WorldWideScience

Sample records for pregnancy symptoms contraceptive

  1. Preventing Unintended Pregnancy Among Young Sexually Active Women: Recognizing the Role of Violence, Self-Esteem, and Depressive Symptoms on Use of Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Deborah B; Zhao, Huaqing; Corrado, Rachel; Mastrogiannnis, Dimitrios M; Lepore, Stephen J

    2017-04-01

    Ineffective contraceptive use among young sexually active women is extremely prevalent and poses a significant risk for unintended pregnancy (UP). Ineffective contraception involves the use of the withdrawal method or the inconsistent use of other types of contraception (i.e., condoms and birth control pills). This investigation examined violence exposure and psychological factors related to ineffective contraceptive use among young sexually active women. Young, nonpregnant sexually active women (n = 315) were recruited from an urban family planning clinic in 2013 to participate in a longitudinal study. Tablet-based surveys measured childhood violence, community-level violence, intimate partner violence, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem. Follow-up surveys measured type and consistency of contraception used 9 months later. Multivariate logistic regression models assessed violence and psychological risk factors as main effects and moderators related to ineffective compared with effective use of contraception. The multivariate logistic regression model showed that childhood sexual violence and low self-esteem were significantly related to ineffective use of contraception (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.69, confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.18-6.17, and aOR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.28-0.93; respectively), although self-esteem did not moderate the relationship between childhood sexual violence and ineffective use of contraception (aOR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.08-1.84). Depressive symptoms were not related to ineffective use of contraception in the multivariate model. Interventions to reduce UP should recognize the long-term effects of childhood sexual violence and address the role of low self-esteem on the ability of young sexually active women to effectively and consistently use contraception to prevent UP.

  2. Ambivalence and pregnancy: adolescents' attitudes, contraceptive use and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Hannah; Martin, Anne; Bearman, Peter S

    2004-01-01

    It is often argued that adolescents who become pregnant do not sufficiently appreciate the negative consequences, and that prevention programs should target participants' attitudes toward pregnancy. Data from the first two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were used to examine whether 15-19-year-old females' attitudes toward pregnancy influence their contraceptive consistency and their risk of pregnancy. Characteristics and attitudes associated with pregnancy and contraceptive use were assessed using bivariate and multivariate analysis. Twenty percent of female adolescents were defined as having antipregnancy attitudes, 8% as having propregnancy attitudes and 14% as being ambivalent toward pregnancy; the remainder were considered to have mainstream attitudes. Among sexually experienced adolescents, having an attitude toward pregnancy was not associated with risk of pregnancy. However, those who were ambivalent about pregnancy had reduced odds of using contraceptives consistently and inconsistently rather than not practicing contraception at all (odds ratios, 0.5 and 0.4, respectively). Antipregnancy respondents did not differ from proprepregancy respondents in terms of their contraceptive consistency. However, having a positive attitude toward contraception was associated with increased likelihood of inconsistent and consistent contraceptive use compared with nonuse (1.6 and 2.1, respectively). Programs designed to prevent pregnancy need to give young women information about pregnancy and opportunities to discuss the topic so that they form opinions. Furthermore, programs should emphasize positive attitudes toward contraception, because effective contraceptive use is shaped by such attitudes and is strongly associated with reduction of pregnancy risk.

  3. Study of Contraceptives Used in Unwanted Pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Aghababaei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unintended pregnancy is a worldwide problem that affects women, their families, and society. Unintended pregnancy can result from contraceptive failure, non-use or use mistake of contraceptive Methods: This study examined the Frequency and pattern of contraceptive method use in unintended pregnancy women reffering to health and medical center of Hamadan medical science university in Iran. Design and setting: A descriptive study was conducted at health and medical center of Hamadan medical science in Iran. Data were collected using a questionnaire in 2006 from a convenience sample of 900 unintended pregnancy women . The survey included measures of demographic variables, type and pattern of contraceptive method use. Data were analyzed by Chi square and t-test using SPSS. Results: Of the 900 participants, 93.9% had used contraceptive methods. The most common contraceptive method use in unintended pregnancy women were oral contraceptive pills 38.1% , natural method 31.9%, condom 19.8%, breastfeeding 4.4%, IUD 3.6%, emergency 1.9% and rhythm 0.4%. The most common problem in contraceptive use were irregular and incorrectly use in hormonal methods and condom users, no control in IUD users and mistake in date calculation in rhythmic users. Conclusion: The majority of participants had used contraceptive methods but have unintended pregnancy. More education is needed in this subject.

  4. Psychological Aspects of Contraception, Unintended Pregnancy, and Abortion

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, Julia R.; Rubin, Lisa R.

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of important biopsychosocial factors linking women's reproductive health and mental health is increasing. This review focuses on psychological aspects of contraception, unintended pregnancy, and abortion because these are common reproductive health experiences in U.S. women's lives. This review addresses the mental-health antecedents and consequences of these experiences, mostly focusing on depression and depressive symptoms before and after unintended pregnancy and contraceptio...

  5. Psychological Aspects of Contraception, Unintended Pregnancy, and Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Julia R; Rubin, Lisa R

    2014-10-01

    The knowledge of important biopsychosocial factors linking women's reproductive health and mental health is increasing. This review focuses on psychological aspects of contraception, unintended pregnancy, and abortion because these are common reproductive health experiences in U.S. women's lives. This review addresses the mental-health antecedents and consequences of these experiences, mostly focusing on depression and depressive symptoms before and after unintended pregnancy and contraception. As mental-health antecedents, depressive symptoms predict contraceptive behaviors that lead to unintended pregnancy, and mental-health disorders have been associated with having subsequent abortions. In examining the mental-health consequences, most sound research does not find abortion or contraceptive use to cause mental-health problems. Consequently, evidence does not support policies based on the notion that abortion harms women's mental health. Nevertheless, the abortion-care setting may be a place to integrate mental-health services. In contrast, women who have births resulting from unintended pregnancies may be at higher risk of postpartum depression. Social policies (e.g., paid maternity leave, subsidized child care) may protect women from mental-health problems and stress of unplanned children interrupting employment, education, and pre-existing family care responsibilities.

  6. Contraceptive use and pregnancy decision making among women with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, A K; Goergen, C A; Delaney, J A; Williamson, C; Mundy, L M; Fraser, V J

    1999-12-01

    HIV is a growing epidemic among women in the United States. This study seeks to determine if knowledge of HIV infection and of the benefits of prenatal zidovudine (ZDV) to decrease vertical HIV transmission is related to decisions about pregnancy planning, contraceptive and condom use, and pregnancy termination among noninjection drug using (IDU) women with HIV. Eighty-two HIV-infected women were interviewed about their pregnancy decisions, contraceptive and condom use, and pregnancy outcome. Data was verified by structured chart review where available. Awareness of HIV infection or knowledge of the benefits of prenatal ZDV use did not significantly influence pregnancy planning, contraceptive choice, use of contraception, or consideration of pregnancy termination. Condom use was extremely low (14.6% consistent use), the majority of pregnancies (68.0%) were unplanned, contraceptive use was low (50.9%), and few pregnancies were terminated (6.3%). Women on Medicaid were significantly less likely than women with private or no insurance to terminate their pregnancy (2/20, 10% vs. 3/5, 60%, p = 0.04, two-tailed Fisher's exact test). Most women (70.0%) reported the most important reason for carrying the pregnancy to term was the desire for a child. In conclusion, among women in this non-IDU, Midwestern cohort, knowledge of HIV infection was not associated with decisions to plan a pregnancy, use contraception if not planning pregnancy, or terminate an unplanned pregnancy.

  7. Contraceptive Choices Pre and Post Pregnancy in Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, L; Martins, I; Oliveira, N; Antunes, I; Palma, F; Alves, MJ

    2015-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: The main aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of adolescent pregnancy in the future contraceptive choices. A secondary aim is to verify whether these choices differ from those made after an abortion. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING:Adolescent Unit of a tertiary care center. PARTICIPANTS:212 pregnant teenagers. INTERVENTIONS: Medical records review. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Intended pregnancy rate and contraceptive methods used before and after pregnanc...

  8. Unplanned Pregnancy and Contraceptive Use in Hull and East Yorkshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexhell, Helen; Guthrie, Kate; Cleland, Kelly; Trussell, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study has two aims. The first is to assess the proportion of unplanned pregnancies among women attending antenatal clinics and those undergoing induced abortion (IA). The second is to assess both their previous contraceptive use and contraceptive intention, with particular focus on the use or consideration of any long acting reversible contraceptives in Hull and East Riding in order to inform service redesign. Study Design Consecutive women attending their first antenatal clinic (ANC) appointment and women attending a gynaecology clinic undergoing induced abortion (IA) were asked to complete a 2-page questionnaire that contained a validated pregnancy intendedness questionnaire (the London Measure of Unplanned Pregnancy (LMUP)) and questions to establish contraceptive use and access prior to this index pregnancy. Results The overall response rate was 69%. We received 648 evaluable questionnaires for women undergoing IA. Of these pregnancies, 75.8% (95% CI 72.3%-79.0%) were unplanned (LMUP score 0-3). We received 1001 evaluable questionnaires from women booking at antenatal clinics. Of these pregnancies, 5.5% (95% CI 4.2%-7.0%) were unplanned. Among those with unplanned pregnancies who were not using contraception 31% reported that they were unable to obtain the method they wanted. Among those using a method immediately prior to the index unplanned pregnancy, 33% stated it was not the method they wanted; of these 75% would have preferred sterilization, the implant, injectable, or intrauterine contraceptive. Conclusion Unplanned pregnancies in this population are common among women undergoing IA but are uncommon among women attending an ANC. About a third of women not using contraception reported that they were unable to obtain the method they wanted, and about a third of women using contraception stated that they were not using the method they would have preferred. Implications Opportunities to prevent unplanned pregnancies are missed when staff in

  9. Medicaid spending on contraceptive coverage and pregnancy-related care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objective Up to 50% of pregnancies are unintended in the United States, and the healthcare costs associated with pregnancy are the most expensive among hospitalized conditions. The current study aims to assess Medicaid spending on various methods of contraception and on pregnancy care including unintended pregnancies. Methods We analyzed Medicaid health claims data from 2004 to 2010. Women 14–49 years of age initiating contraceptive methods and pregnant women were included as separate cohorts. Medicaid spending was summarized using mean all-cause and contraceptive healthcare payments per patient per month (PPPM) over a follow-up period of up to 12 months. Medicaid payments were also estimated in 2008 per female member of childbearing age per month (PFCPM) and per member per month (PMPM). Medicaid payments on unintended pregnancies were also evaluated PFCPM and PMPM in 2008. Results For short-acting reversible contraception (SARC) users, all-cause payments and contraceptive payments PPPM were respectively $365 and $18.3 for oral contraceptive (OC) users, $308 and $19.9 for transdermal users, $215 and $21.6 for vaginal ring users, and $410 and $8.8 for injectable users. For long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) users (follow-up of 9–10 months), corresponding payments were $194 and $36.8 for IUD users, and $237 and $29.9 for implant users. Pregnancy cohort all-cause mean healthcare payments PPPM were $610. Payments PFCPM and PMPM for contraceptives were $1.44 and $0.54, while corresponding costs of pregnancies were estimated at $39.91 and $14.81, respectively. Payments PFCPM and PMPM for contraceptives represented a small fraction at 6.56% ($1.44/$21.95) and 6.63% ($0.54/$8.15), respectively of the estimated payments for unintended pregnancy. Conclusions This study of a large sample of Medicaid beneficiaries demonstrated that, over a follow-up period of 12 months, Medicaid payments for pregnancy were considerably higher than payments for either SARC or

  10. Ectopic Pregnancy and Emergency Contraceptive Pills: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Kelly; Raymond, Elizabeth; Trussell, James; Cheng, Linan; Zhu, Haoping

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the existing data to estimate the rate of ectopic pregnancy among emergency contraceptive pill treatment failures. Data Sources Our initial reference list was generated from a 2008 Cochrane review of emergency contraception. In August 2009, we searched Biosys Previews, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, Global Health Database, Health Source: Popline, and Wanfang Data (a Chinese database). Methods of Study Selection This study included data from 136 studies which followed a defined population of women treated one time with emergency contraceptive pills (either mifepristone or levonorgestrel), and in which the number and location of pregnancies were ascertained. Results Data from each article were abstracted independently by two reviewers. In the studies of mifepristone, 3 out of 494 (0.6%) pregnancies were ectopic; in the levonorgestrel studies, 3 out of 307 (1%) were ectopic. Conclusion The rate of ectopic pregnancy when treatment with emergency contraceptive pills fails does not exceed the rate observed in the general population. Since emergency contraceptive pills are effective in lowering the risk of pregnancy, their use should reduce the chance that an act of intercourse will result in ectopic pregnancy. PMID:20502299

  11. Adverse mood symptoms with oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poromaa, Inger Sundström; Segebladh, Birgitta

    2012-04-01

    In spite of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) having been available for more than 50 years, surprisingly little is known about the prevalence of truly COC-related adverse mood symptoms and about the underlying biological mechanisms of proposed changes in mood and affect. Precise estimates of COC-related adverse mood symptoms are not available due to the lack of placebo-controlled trials. In prospective trials the frequency of women who report deteriorated mood or deteriorated emotional well-being varies between 4 and 10%, but it can be assumed that the causal relation in these prevalence rates is overestimated. Adverse mood symptoms and somatic symptoms are most pronounced during the pill-free interval of the treatment cycles, but whether extended COC regimens would be more favorable in this respect is not known. COCs with anti-androgenic progestagens, such as drospirenone and desogestrel, appear more favorable in terms of mood symptoms than progestagens with a more androgenic profile. Available data suggest that lower doses of ethinylestradiol could be beneficial. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. Committee Opinion No 699: Adolescent Pregnancy, Contraception, and Sexual Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    In 2015, the birth rate among U.S. adolescents and young adults (aged 15-19 years) reached a historic low at 22.3 per 1,000 women. Despite positive trends, the United States continues to have the highest adolescent pregnancy rate among industrialized countries with data. Racial and ethnic disparities in adolescent pregnancy rates continue to exist, as do state-based differences in pregnancy, birth, and abortion rates. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports access for adolescents to all contraceptive methods approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. In the absence of contraindications, patient choice should be the principal factor in prescribing one method of contraception over another. Dual method use-the use of condoms in combination with more effective contraceptive methods to protect against sexually transmitted infections and unwanted pregnancy-is the ideal contraceptive practice for adolescents. Just as adolescents should have access to the full range of contraceptives, including long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, they should be able to decline and discontinue any method on their own, without barriers. A reproductive justice framework for contraceptive counseling and access is essential to providing equitable health care, accessing and having coverage for contraceptive methods, and resisting potential coercion by health care providers. Successful programs that resulted in measurable changes in adolescent contraceptive practices and sexual behavior have been described, but not implemented uniformly nor supported by policy improvements. More research is needed to determine which programs are most effective and which programs do not work. Continued efforts are integral to further advance positive trends.

  13. Pregnancy, contraception and emergency contraception: the language of urban adolescent young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollen, C J; Fernando, M; Hayes, K L; Barg, F K

    2012-08-01

    We sought to characterize how a group of urban adolescent females understands the domains of pregnancy, contraception, and emergency contraception (EC). We used the research strategy of freelisting as part of an in-depth interview study. Urban adolescent females presenting to a Pediatric Emergency Department. Participants were enrolled using a purposive sampling strategy if they were black, English-speaking females, 15-19 years old, who resided in 1 of 11 zip codes surrounding the hospital. Smith's saliency score. Freelists were analyzed for the entire sample, as well as for subgroups. Thirty adolescents completed the interview. We found that this group of adolescents uses different words to characterize the domains of pregnancy, contraception, and EC. The only overlapping salient term was "abortion," which appeared in the overall lists for pregnancy and EC and in the younger group's list for contraception. In addition, lack of knowledge was cited as an important factor related to contraception. Adolescent patients may not fully understand the concepts of contraception and EC. Providers should consider the potential need to provide an explanation for terms used, and they should consider explicitly differentiating between routine forms of contraception and EC, as well as between EC and abortion. Copyright © 2012 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ectopic Pregnancy After Plan B Emergency Contraceptive Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Brianne Jo; Layman, Kerri

    2016-04-01

    Pregnancy outcomes after emergency contraceptive use has been debated over time, but review of the literature includes mechanisms by which these medications may increase the chance of an ectopic pregnancy. Such cases are infrequently reported, and many emergency providers may not readily consider this possibility when treating patients. This is a case presentation of ectopic pregnancy in a patient who had recently used Plan B (levonorgestrel) emergency contraceptive. She presented with abdominal pain and vaginal spotting, and was evaluated by serum testing and pelvic ultrasound. She was discovered to have a right adnexal pregnancy. She was treated initially with methotrexate, though she ultimately required surgery for definitive treatment. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: This case report aims to bring a unique clinical case to the attention of emergency providers. The goal is to review research on the topic of levonorgestrel use and the incidence of ectopic pregnancies. The mechanism of action of this emergency contraceptive is addressed, and though no definite causal relationship is known between levonorgestrel and ectopic pregnancies, there is a pharmacologic explanation for how this event may occur after use of this medication. Ultimately, the emergency provider will be reminded of the importance of educating the patient on the possible outcomes after its use, including failure of an emergency contraceptive and the potential of ectopic pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Unintended rapid repeat pregnancy and low education status: any role for depression and contraceptive use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ian M; Culhane, Jennifer F; McCollum, Kelly F; Elo, Irma T

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of depressive symptoms and poor contraceptive use early in the first postpartum year to the risk of unintended repeat pregnancy at the end of that year among adults with low educational status ( or = 19) who enrolled prenatally (14.7 +/- 6.9 weeks gestational age) and were followed twice after delivery (3.3 +/- 1.3 months and 11.0 +/- 1.3 months). Associations were assessed by multivariate logistic regression. Low educational status (odds ratio, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.25-4.33) and less effective contraceptive use (odds ratio, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.05-4.51) were associated with unintended pregnancy. Neither depressive symptoms nor contraceptive use reduced the risk of pregnancy that was associated with low educational status. Low educational status was associated with more than twice the risk of unintended pregnancy 1 year after delivery. We found no evidence that depression or poor contraceptive use mediate this relationship.

  16. Contraceptive practices and pregnancy intendedness among pregnant adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanjakornsiripan W

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wakul Lanjakornsiripan, Siriruthai Amnatbuddee, Kanok Seejorn, Yuthapong Werawatakul, Pilaiwan Kleebkaow, Ratana Komwilaisak, Sanguanchoke Luanratanakorn Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Background: Adolescent pregnancy is a major health problem in many developing countries.Objective: To assess contraceptive practices and pregnancy intendedness in pregnant adolescents.Materials and methods: This study was prospectively conducted from September 2013 to June 2014. All consecutively pregnant women between 15 and 19 years old attending the Antenatal Clinic at Srinagarind Hospital and the Khon Kaen Branch of the Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand were invited for participation. Face-to-face interviews by trained interviewers using standardized questionnaires were carried out. Logistic regression was used to determine an adjusted odds ratio (aOR and 95% confidence interval (CI of independent predictors.Results: Two hundred participants were enrolled. Mean age was 17.2 years. One hundred and eighteen (59.0% were currently in school. Seventy-five (37.5% participants had never used any contraceptive methods. Of the 125 participants who had ever used contraception, regular use of contraceptives was reported in only 21 participants (16.8%. Only two participants (1.0% had ever used an intrauterine device or implant. Participants’ age was a significant independent factor associated with non-use of contraceptives (aOR, 6.42; 95% CI, 2.94–14.04. Of the 200 participants, 132 (66.0% declared that the pregnancy was unintended. Significant independent factors predicting unintended pregnancy were educational status (aOR, 6.17; 95% CI, 3.27–13.75 and participants’ age (aOR, 5.76; 95% CI, 2.42–13.70.Conclusion: Non-use and use of contraceptive methods with high failure rates were major reasons leading to adolescent pregnancies. Participants’ age was an independent factor

  17. Contraceptive medicalisation, fear of infertility and teenage pregnancy in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Helen; Souza, Ana D; Tavares, Patrícia A; Cruz, Suélen H; Béhague, Dominique P

    2011-02-01

    In Brazil, as in many other countries, teenage pregnancy is widely recognised as a public health problem. Buttressed by a public health science of the economics of teenage pregnancy that emphasises the postponement of parenthood as key to poverty reduction, young people's lack of appreciation for medical knowledge of contraceptives is most often credited for failed attempts to reduce teenage pregnancy. Based on a longitudinal ethnographic study conducted in Pelotas, Brazil, with young people over the course of 10 years, our study found that young women who became teenage parents did not lack medical knowledge but were, rather, highly medicalised. Not only were they intensely concerned with the ill-effects of oral contraceptives on possible future fertility, they also engaged in intricate routines of contraceptive-use as a way of testing and safeguarding their fecundity. Our analysis attends to the way these practices are shaped by the problematisation of the economics of teenage pregnancy, as well as by the gendering of cultural norms relating to the transition to adulthood. We theorise the results by considering how contraceptive medicalisation enabled some women to engage with the authority of normative society, while developing a potent off-stage critique of this authority and of what they considered to be discriminatory messages imbedded in scientific discourses on teenage pregnancy.

  18. Documentation of Contraception and Pregnancy Intention In Medicaid Managed Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Thiel de Bocanegra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Clinical guidelines recommend the documentation of pregnancy intention and family planning needs during primary care visits. Prior to the 2014 Medicaid expansion and release of these guidelines, the documentation practices of Medicaid managed care providers are unknown. Methods: We performed a chart review of 1054 Medicaid managed care visits of women aged 13 to 49 to explore client, provider, and visit characteristics associated with documentation of immediate or future plans for having children and contraceptive method use. Five managed care plans used Current Procedural Terminology and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes to identify providers with at least 15 women who had received family planning or well-woman care in 2013. We conducted multilevel logistic regression analyses with documentation of contraceptive method and pregnancy intention as outcome variables and clinic site as the level 2 random effect. Results: Only 12% of charts had documentation of pregnancy intention and 59% documented contraceptive use. Compared to women with a family planning visit reason, women with an annual, reproductive health, or primary care reason for their visit were significantly less likely to have contraception documented (odds ratio [OR] = 11.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.8-17.7. Age was also a significant predictor with women aged 30 to 49 (OR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4-0.9, and women aged 13 to 19 (OR = 0.2; 95% CI = 0.1-0.6 being less likely to have a note about pregnancy intention in their chart. Pregnancy intention was more likely to be documented in multispecialty clinics (OR = 15.5; 95% CI = 2.7-89.2. Conclusions: Interventions to improve routine medical record documentation of contraception and pregnancy intention regardless of patient age and visit characteristics are needed to facilitate the provision of family planning in managed care visits and, ultimately, achieving better maternal infant health outcomes

  19. Contraceptive Use, Unwanted Pregnancies and Abortions among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Mean age was 27.0±8.1 years, 851 (50.4%) were single and 1005 (59.6%) qualified hairdressers. 817 (56.8%) of ... Attainment of secondary school education was a predictor of contraceptive .... On the whole, 1438 (85.2%) had ever had sex and a total of 604 .... advantage of protection from sexually transmitted diseases8.

  20. Determinants of emergency contraception non-use among women in unplanned or ambivalent pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmara Alves dos Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the determinants of emergency contraception non-use among women in unplanned and ambivalent pregnancies. Method Cross-sectional study with a probabilistic sample of 366 pregnant women from 12 primary health care units in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. A multinomial logistic regression was performed, comparing three groups: women who used emergency contraception to prevent ongoing pregnancies (reference; women who made no use of emergency contraception, but used other contraceptive methods; and women who made no use of any contraceptive methods at all. Results Cohabitation with a partner was the common determinant of emergency contraception non-use. No pregnancy risk awareness, ambivalent pregnancies and no previous use of emergency contraception also contributed to emergency contraception non-use. Conclusion Apart from what is pointed out in the literature, knowledge of emergency contraception and the fertile period were not associated to its use.

  1. Contraceptive Use and Unintended Pregnancies Among HIV-Infected Women in Mumbai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Beena; Velhal, Gajanan; Chauhan, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Ragini; Begum, Shahina; Nandanwar, Y. S.; Fonseca, Michelle; Baweja, Sujata; Turbadkar, Dilip; Ramchandran, Anita; Dalal, Asha; Shastri, Jayanti; Agrawal, Sachee; Panhale, Manisha; More, Vasundhara; Sanap, Pravin; Panchal, Renuka; Kanougiya, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Access to reproductive health services in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) programs can greatly enhance program's potential to limit the spread of disease, reduce unintended pregnancies and safeguard the health of infected people. Objectives: To assess (i) knowledge, attitude, and use regarding contraceptives; safe sex and dual protection; (ii) fertility desires and unintended pregnancies post HIV and (iii) symptoms of reproductive tract infection/sexually transmitted infection (RTI/STI) among women infected with HIV. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study among 300 currently married HIV-positive women who had not undergone permanent sterilization with no immediate desire for pregnancy. Study site was Integrated Counseling and Testing Centers (ICTC) in tertiary hospitals of Mumbai and women were interviewed using a semistructured questionnaire. Results: In spite of good awareness about modern methods, 42.7 felt that contraceptives other than condoms were harmful to use due to their HIV status. Knowledge on dual protection was limited to condom (75%). Condom use increased from 5.7% pre-HIV to 71.7% post-HIV, with 89.6% reporting regular use. Future fertility desire was expressed by 8.7% women. Induced abortions post-HIV was reported by16.6% women, as pregnancies were unintended. About 69% wished to use dual contraceptive methods for effective protection if it was not harmful to be used by people living with HIV (PLHIV). Conclusion: Data reveals a need to promote modern contraceptive methods along with regular condom use to prevent unintended pregnancies and improve health-seeking behavior for contraception. Health system models that converge or link HIV services with other reproductive health services need to be tested to provide comprehensive reproductive healthcare to infected women in India. PMID:26170540

  2. Contraceptive use and unintended pregnancies among HIV-infected women in Mumbai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Access to reproductive health services in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV programs can greatly enhance program′s potential to limit the spread of disease, reduce unintended pregnancies and safeguard the health of infected people. Objectives: To assess (i knowledge, attitude, and use regarding contraceptives; safe sex and dual protection; (ii fertility desires and unintended pregnancies post HIV and (iii symptoms of reproductive tract infection/sexually transmitted infection (RTI/STI among women infected with HIV. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study among 300 currently married HIV-positive women who had not undergone permanent sterilization with no immediate desire for pregnancy. Study site was Integrated Counseling and Testing Centers (ICTC in tertiary hospitals of Mumbai and women were interviewed using a semistructured questionnaire. Results: In spite of good awareness about modern methods, 42.7 felt that contraceptives other than condoms were harmful to use due to their HIV status. Knowledge on dual protection was limited to condom (75%. Condom use increased from 5.7% pre-HIV to 71.7% post-HIV, with 89.6% reporting regular use. Future fertility desire was expressed by 8.7% women. Induced abortions post-HIV was reported by16.6% women, as pregnancies were unintended. About 69% wished to use dual contraceptive methods for effective protection if it was not harmful to be used by people living with HIV (PLHIV. Conclusion: Data reveals a need to promote modern contraceptive methods along with regular condom use to prevent unintended pregnancies and improve health-seeking behavior for contraception. Health system models that converge or link HIV services with other reproductive health services need to be tested to provide comprehensive reproductive healthcare to infected women in India.

  3. Contraceptive use and risk of unintended pregnancy in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Diana G; Bley, Julia; Mikanda, John; Induni, Marta; Arons, Abigail; Baumrind, Nikki; Darney, Philip D; Stewart, Felicia

    2004-07-01

    California is home to more than one out of eight American women of reproductive age. Because California has a large, diverse and growing population, national statistics do not necessarily describe the reproductive health of California women. This article presents risk for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections among women in California based on the California Women's Health Survey. Over 8900 women of reproductive age who participated in this survey between 1998 and 2001 provide estimates of access to care and use of family-planning methods in the state. We find that 49% of the female population aged 18-44 in California is at risk of unintended pregnancy. Nine percent (9%) of women at risk of an unintended pregnancy are not using any method of contraception, primarily for method-related reasons, such as a concern about side effects or a dislike of available contraceptive methods. Among women at risk for unintended pregnancy, we find disparities by race/ethnicity and education in use of contraceptive methods.

  4. Pregnancy attitudes, contraceptive service utilization, and other factors associated with Los Angeles homeless youths' use of effective contraception and withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winetrobe, H; Rhoades, H; Barman-Adhikari, A; Cederbaum, J; Rice, E; Milburn, N

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to understand the associations of contraceptive service utilization (ie, accessing condoms or birth control), pregnancy attitudes, and lifetime pregnancy history among male and female homeless youth in relation to use of effective contraception and withdrawal. Between October 2011 and February 2012, homeless youth (14-27 years old) from 2 drop-in centers in Los Angeles (N = 380) were recruited and completed a questionnaire. The data in this paper are restricted to those who reported vaginal sex at last sex (N = 283). Analyses examined history of foster care, sexual abuse, exchange sex, pregnancy, lifetime homelessness duration, current living situation, contraceptive service utilization, and pregnancy attitudes in predicting use of effective contraception and withdrawal at last sex. Over 62% of females and 43% of males report having ever been pregnant or impregnating someone. There are no gender-based differences in pregnancy attitudes; 21% agree they would like to become pregnant within the year. Additionally, there are no gender-based differences in reported contraceptive use at last vaginal sex. In the multivariable model, high school education, contraceptive service utilization (Relative Risk Ratio [RRR]: 4.0), and anti-pregnancy attitudes (RRR: 1.3) are significant positive predictors of using effective contraception; anti-pregnancy attitudes (RRR: 1.2) and gender (RRR: 0.3) are significantly associated with using withdrawal. Health professionals should acknowledge that some homeless youth desire pregnancy; for those that do not, access to effective contraception is important. Programs must continue to promote pregnancy prevention, and include discussions of healthy pregnancy habits for pregnancy-desiring youth. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Venous thromboembolism during pregnancy, postpartum or during contraceptive use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Molina, A; Rota, L L; Di Micco, P; Brenner, B; Trujillo-Santos, J; Ruiz-Gamietea, A; Monreal, M

    2010-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of maternal death during pregnancy or postpartum, and in women using hormonal contraceptives. However, important issues concerning its natural history and therapy remain unsolved, and most of the protocols for treatment of VTE in this patient population are based on data extrapolated from other populations. RIETE is an ongoing registry of consecutive patients with objectively confirmed, symptomatic, acute VTE. We examined the clinical characteristics and three-month outcome of all enrolled women with pregnancy, postpartum or using hormonal contraceptives. As of December 2008, 173 pregnant women, 135 postpartum, and 798 contraceptive users were enrolled. Of these, 438 (40%) presented with pulmonary embolism (PE) and 668 with deep-vein thrombosis (DVT). Most women with acute PE had dyspnea (72%) or chest pain (75%), but only 2.0% had hypoxaemia. During the three-month study period, five women (0.45%; 95% CI: 0.17-1.00) died (3 had fatal PE), 13 (1.18%; 95% CI: 0.66-1.95) had VTE recurrences, and seven (0.63%; 95% CI: 0.28-1.25) major bleeding. Two of the three women with fatal PE died during the first few hours after arriving at the emergency ward, with no time to start any therapy. The outcome of pregnant or postpartum women with VTE is similar to that in contraceptive users, even though the treatment is different. The non-specific nature of PE signs may have caused some delay in PE diagnosis.

  6. Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, G L

    1967-01-01

    Contraception is discussed in this article. Abstinence is the only certain method of contraception. The normal pregnancy rate in the normal unprotected population would be somewhere between 60 to 80 pregnancies per 100 woman-years. Contraceptive methods vary in effectiveness. The failure rate of the safe period method is between 10-50 per 100 woman-years while the failure rate of spermicidal pessaries and creams is somewhere between 20 and 80 per 100 woman-years. Occlusive diaphragms fit over the anterior vaginal wall, such as the Dutch cap, or over the cervix itself, such as the cervical or Dumas cap. The failure rate of the Dumas cap is about 4 per 100 woman-years and the Dutch cap 6 per 100 woman-years. Perhaps the ideal female contraceptive is just around the corner in the alteration of cervical mucus by changing its pH or other constituents so that it becomes a spermicidal barrier or causes either sperm agglutination or a reduction of sperm motility. Between 8% and 15% of plastic IUDs are extruded spontaneously and a further 10% may be removed because of pain, intermenstrual bleeding, or menorrhagia. They are well tolerated in about 80% of patients, in whom the failure rate is about 2 per 100 woman years. The douche and sponge are unacceptable and unreliable methods of contraception. The main advance in contraceptive technique over the past 10 years has been the introduction of the oral contraceptives. The combined type of pill was developed first, followed by the sequential type. It has been estimated that between half a million and 1 million women in this country now take oral contraceptive pills and nothing detrimental has so far been proved about the method in spite of persistent and widely published doubts about its possible dangers. The failure rate of the oral contraceptives is less than 1 per 100 woman years.

  7. One-year contraceptive continuation and pregnancy in adolescent girls and women initiating hormonal contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Tina R; Foster-Rosales, Anne; Upadhyay, Ushma D; Boyer, Cherrie B; Brown, Beth A; Sokoloff, Abby; Harper, Cynthia C

    2011-02-01

    To assess contraceptive discontinuation, switching, factors associated with method discontinuation, and pregnancy among women initiating hormonal contraceptives. This was a 12-month longitudinal cohort study of adolescent girls and women (n=1,387) aged 15 to 24 years attending public family planning clinics who did not desire pregnancy for at least 1 year and selected to initiate the patch, ring, depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, or pills. Participants completed follow-up assessments at 3, 6, and 12 months after baseline. Life table analysis was used to estimate survival rates for contraceptive continuation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate factors associated with method discontinuation. The continuation rate (per 100 person-years) at 12 months was low for all methods; however, it was lowest for patch and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate initiators, 10.9 and 12.1 per 100 person years, respectively (P≤.003); continuation among ring initiators was comparable to pill initiators, 29.4 and 32.7 per 100 person-years, respectively (P=.06). Discontinuation was independently associated with method initiated and younger age. The only factors associated with lower risk of discontinuation were greater intent to use the method and being in school or working. The pregnancy rate (per 100 person-years) was highest for patch and ring initiators (30.1 and 30.5) and comparable for pill and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate initiators (16.5 and 16.1; Pcontraceptive continuation, education about longer-acting methods, and developing new contraceptives that women may be more likely to continue. II.

  8. Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives to reduce the rate of teen pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Ellen

    2015-11-01

    Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) are safe for use in adolescents and do not rely on compliance or adherence for effectiveness. Continuation rates are higher and pregnancy rates are lower for adolescent users of LARCs compared with short-acting methods such as oral contraceptives. Similarly, repeat pregnancy rates are lower when LARCs are used compared with other forms of contraception. Myths and misconceptions about LARCs and other contraceptives remain a barrier to their use. Health care providers are in a unique position to provide confidential care to adolescents, and should provide education to them about the various contraceptive options, especially LARCs. Copyright © 2015 Cleveland Clinic.

  9. Contraception, pregnancy, childbirth--when things go wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, A

    1986-01-01

    This discussion of contraception, pregnancy, and childbirth covers the following: accepting and discharging patients; legal duty of care; contract law; consent; records; time limit; criminal law; sanctions; children under 16; contraception; failed sterilization, vasectomy, and abortion; abortions; pregnancy; delivery; postnatal care; birth at home; and unqualified persons. The relationship of the doctor to the private patient is governed by the law of contract and in a particular case may impose a greater duty on the doctor than that imposed by tort. The doctor must obtain the consent of the patient and must adhere to the proper standards of competent professional practice, either the generally accepted practice or, if there are 2 or more alternative procedures, one which can be professional supported. Where sterilization (tubal occlusion) is proposed, advice and counseling should be offered. On the birth of a child, drugs may not be administered without the mother's consent. The records of the National Health Service patient appear to belong to the Secretary of State for Social Services and the records of the private patient to the patient. The patient may sue within 3 years from the date of the alleged negligence or the discovery of the negligence. The doctor is most unlikely to be prosecuted for a criminal offense but failure to attend the patient, or gross carelessness, could possibly lead to a manslaughter charge. The Family Practitioner Committee may give a warning, a reprimand, and may stop the payment of fees. The doctor may give contraceptive advice and treatment to an adolescent female under age 16, but the doctor must first conform to 5 guidelines, known as the Fraser Guidelines. These guidelines are listed. The doctor must be aware of the possible risks and side effects of the various contraceptive methods and must evaluate each method and each patient accordingly. A doctor may be liable under the law of contract for a failed sterilization, vasectomy

  10. Contraception and Unintended Pregnancy among Unmarried Female University Students: A Cross-sectional Study from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjing; Long, Lu; Cai, Hui; Wu, Yue; Xu, Jing; Shu, Chang; Wang, Peng; Li, Bo; Wei, Qinyu; Shang, Xuejun; Wang, Xueyi; Zhang, Meimei; Xiong, Chengliang; Yin, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to understand the level of contraceptive knowledge and attitudes towards contraception, and then to explore the association between the contraceptive behavior and unintended pregnancy in unmarried female university students in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted of university students in 49 universities across 7 cities in China from September 2007 to January 2008. We distributed 74,800 questionnaires, of which 69,842 were returned. In this paper, the data from 35,383 unmarried female university students were analyzed. The prevalence of sexual intercourse in unmarried female university students was 10.2%. The prevalence of unintended pregnancy in those sexually active female university students, was 31.8%. Among students with pregnancy, 53.5% experienced two or more pregnancies. 28.3% of the students with sexual intercourse reported that they always adopted contraceptive methods, and of those 82.9% chose to use male condoms. The majority (83.9%) of students with unintended pregnancy chose to terminate the latest pregnancy by surgical abortion or medical abortion. The contraceptive knowledge level of students who experienced unintended pregnancy was lower than those who did not. In China, about one third of unmarried female students with sexual intercourse experience unintended pregnancy. A variety of contraceptive methods are adopted, but the frequency of contraceptive use is low. Most of unmarried female students who experienced unintended pregnancy would choose to terminate the pregnancy with surgical or medical abortion. University students, especially the ones who have experienced unintended pregnancy, lack contraceptive and reproductive health knowledge. PMID:26091505

  11. The COX-2 inhibitor meloxicam prevents pregnancy when administered as an emergency contraceptive to nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Nicole C; Lynch, Terrie J; Kim, Soon Ok; Duffy, Diane M

    2013-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors reduce prostaglandin synthesis and disrupt essential reproductive processes. Ultrasound studies in women demonstrated that oral COX-2 inhibitors can delay or prevent follicle collapse associated with ovulation. The goal of this study was to determine if oral administration of a COX-2 inhibitor can inhibit reproductive function with sufficient efficacy to prevent pregnancy in primates. The COX-2 inhibitor meloxicam (or vehicle) was administered orally to proven fertile female cynomolgus macaques using one emergency contraceptive model and three monthly contraceptive models. In the emergency contraceptive model, females were bred with a proven fertile male once 2±1 days before ovulation, returned to the females' home cage, and then received 5 days of meloxicam treatment. In the monthly contraceptive models, females were co-caged for breeding with a proven fertile male for a total of 5 days beginning 2±1 days before ovulation. Animals received meloxicam treatment (1) cycle days 5-22, or (2) every day, or (3) each day of the 5-day breeding period. Female were then assessed for pregnancy. The pregnancy rate with meloxicam administration using the emergency contraception model was 6.5%, significantly lower than the pregnancy rate of 33.3% when vehicle without meloxicam was administered. Pregnancy rates with the three monthly contraceptive models (75%-100%) were not consistent with preventing pregnancy. Oral COX-2 inhibitor administration can prevent pregnancy after a single instance of breeding in primates. While meloxicam may be ineffective for regular contraception, pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 may be an effective method of emergency contraception for women. COX-2 inhibitors can interfere with ovulation, but the contraceptive efficacy of drugs of this class has not been directly tested. This study, conducted in nonhuman primates, is the first to suggest that a COX-2 inhibitor may be effective as an emergency contraceptive.

  12. Unmet need for contraception and its association with unintended pregnancy in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishwajit, Ghose; Tang, Shangfeng; Yaya, Sanni; Feng, Zhanchun

    2017-06-12

    Unmet need for contraception and unintended pregnancy are important public health concerns both in developing and developed countries. Previous researches have attempted to study the factors that influence unintended pregnancy. However, the association between unmet need for contraception and unwanted pregnancy is not studied adequately. The aim of the present study was to measure the prevalence of unmet need for contraception and unwanted pregnancy, and to explore the association between these two in a nationally representative sample in Bangladesh. Data for the present study were collected from Bangladesh demographic and health survey conducted in 2011. Participants were 7338 mothers ageing between 13 and 49 years selected from both rural and urban residencies. Planning status of last pregnancy was the main outcome variable and unmet need for contraception was the explanatory variable of primary interest. Cross tabulation, chi-square tests and logistic regression (Generalised estimating equations) methods were used for data analysis. Mean age of the sample population was 25.6 years (SD 6.4). Prevalence of unmet need for contraception was 13.5%, and about 30% of the women described their last pregnancy as unintended. In the adjusted model, the odds of unintended pregnancy were about 16 fold among women who reported facing unmet need for contraception compared to those who did not (95% CI = 11.63-23.79). National rates of unintended pregnancy and of unmet need for contraception remain considerably high and warrant increased policy attention. Findings suggests that programs targeting to reduce unmet need for contraception could contribute to a lower rate of unintended pregnancy in Bangladesh. More in-depth and qualitative studies on the underlying sociocultural causes of unmet need can help develop context specific solutions to unintended pregnancies.

  13. An exploratory analysis of contraceptive method choice and symptoms of depression in adolescent females initiating prescription contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Jenny; Presser, Liandra; Malbon, Katherine; Braun-Courville, Debra; Linares, Lourdes Oriana

    2015-04-01

    We examine the association between depressive symptoms and contraceptive method choice among adolescents initiating prescription contraception. This cross-sectional study analyzes baseline data of 220 urban, minority adolescent females (ages 15-19 years) presenting for prescription contraceptive initiation at a comprehensive, free-of-cost, adolescent health center in New York City. All participants met with a health care provider who provided standard contraception counseling before initiating contraception. Each participant then selected a short- or long-acting contraceptive: a 3-month supply of the pill, patch, ring or a medroxyprogesterone acetate depot injection (short-acting), or placement/referral for an intrauterine device (IUD; long-acting). We assess the independent association between contraceptive method selection and symptoms of depression [assessed by the Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression (CES-D) scale]. Ten percent (n=21/220) of adolescent females selected an IUD. Bivariate analysis revealed that those with elevated levels of depressive symptoms were more likely to select an IUD as compared to those with minimal symptoms (mean CES-D score 20 vs. 13; t=3.052, p=.003). In multivariate logistic regressions, adolescent females had increased odds of selecting an IUD if they reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms (adjusted odds ratio=4.93; confidence interval, 1.53-15.83; p=.007) after controlling for ethnicity/race, education, number of lifetime partners and gravidity. Inner-city, minority adolescents with elevated symptoms of depression who present for prescription contraceptive initiation may be more likely to select an IUD rather than shorter-acting methods. By recognizing adolescent females with depressive symptoms, providers can strategize their approach to effective contraception counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pregnancy and oral contraceptive use do not significantly influence outcome in long term rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drossaers-Bakker, K. W.; Zwinderman, A. H.; van Zeben, D.; Breedveld, F. C.; Hazes, J. M. W.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral contraceptives (OC) and pregnancy are known to have an influence on the risk of onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Pregnancy itself has beneficial effects on the activity of the disease, with relapses post partum. It is not known, however, whether OC and pregnancies influence the

  15. Contraception usage and timing of pregnancy among pregnant teenagers in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Linda R; van der Spuy, Zephne M

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate knowledge and use of contraception among pregnant teenagers in the Cape Town metropolitan area. A cross-sectional study enrolled women aged 16 to 19 years who were pregnant and attending prenatal clinics, and prenatal and labor wards at regional hospitals and midwife-run obstetric clinics in the Cape Town area between March 1, 2011 and September 30, 2011. Data were collected using an administered questionnaire. The study enrolled 314 participants. Of the participants, 240 (76.4%) felt their pregnancies had occurred at the "wrong time" but only 38 (12.1%) were using contraception at the time of conception. The form of contraception that participants most commonly had knowledge of was injectable hormonal contraception (274 [87.3%]). Contraception use was low, with 126 (40.1%) participants having never used contraception. The forms of contraception used most commonly were the male condom (106 [33.8%]) and injectable contraception (98 [31.2%]). The majority of participants found it easy to get contraception (192 [61.1%]) and felt that information regarding contraception was readily available (233 [74.2%]). Contraception use is suboptimal but this may not simply be a reflection of ineffective family-planning services. Further research is needed to fully explain the lack of contraceptive use in this population. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Contraceptive Use and Pregnancy Incidence Among Women Participating in an HIV Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akello, Carolyne A; Bunge, Katherine E; Nakabiito, Clemensia; Mirembe, Brenda G; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Mishra, Anupam; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Chirenje, Zvavahera M; Celum, Connie; Balkus, Jennifer E

    2017-06-01

    Recent HIV prevention trials required use of effective contraceptive methods to fulfill eligibility for enrollment. We compared pregnancy rates in a subset of participants enrolled in the Microbicide Trials Network protocol (MTN-003), a randomized trial of chemoprophylaxis to prevent HIV acquisition among women aged 18-45 years who initiated depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) or combined oral contraceptives (COCs) at enrollment, relative to those already using DMPA or COCs. Data were analyzed from MTN-003 participants from Uganda. Before enrollment, information on contraceptive type and initiation date was obtained. Urine pregnancy tests were performed at monthly follow-up visits. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare pregnancy incidence among new users (initiated ≤60 days before enrollment) and established users (initiated >60 days before enrollment). Of 322 women enrolled, 296 were COC or DMPA users, 82 (28%) were new users, and 214 (72%) were established users. Pregnancy incidence was higher among new contraceptive users compared to established users (20.70% vs. 10.55%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.66; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.93-2.96). Among DMPA users, pregnancy incidence was 10.20% in new users versus 3.48% in established users (HR = 2.56; 95% CI 0.86-7.65). Among new COC users, pregnancy incidence was 42.67% in new users versus 23.67% in established COC users (adjusted HR = 1.74; 95% CI 0.87-3.48). New contraceptive users, regardless of method, at the Uganda MTN-003 site had an increased pregnancy risk compared to established users, which may be due to contraceptive initiation primarily for trial eligibility. New users may benefit from intensive contraceptive counseling and additional contraceptive options, including longer acting reversible contraceptives.

  17. Contraceptive failure--results from a study conducted among women with accepted and unaccepted pregnancies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    to use of condom and oral contraception than women aged 25-34 years. In addition, contraceptive failure was found to be associated with being single, a student, and having given birth twice or more previously. Regarding pregnancy acceptance, being 25-34 years of age was positively associated, whereas......Most studies focusing on contraceptive failure in relation to pregnancy have focused on contraceptive failure among women having induced abortions, thereby neglecting those women who, despite contraceptive failure, accept the pregnancy and intend to carry the fetus to term. To get a more complete...... picture of the problem of contraceptive failure, this study focuses on contraceptive failure among women with diverse pregnancy outcomes.In all, 3520 pregnant women attending Odense University Hospital were included: 373 had induced abortions, 435 had spontaneous abortions, 97 had ectopic pregnancies...

  18. Pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 prevention does not diminish the pregnancy prevention effectiveness of hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnane, Pamela M; Heffron, Renee; Ronald, Allan; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Donnell, Deborah; Mugo, Nelly R; Were, Edwin; Mujugira, Andrew; Kiarie, James; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2014-07-31

    For women at risk of HIV-1, effective contraception and effective HIV-1 prevention are global priorities. In a clinical trial of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-1 prevention in HIV-1-serodiscordant couples, we estimated the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives (oral contraceptive pills, injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and hormonal implants) for pregnancy prevention relative to no contraception among 1785 HIV-1-uninfected women followed up to 36 months. We compared the effectiveness of each method among women assigned PrEP versus placebo. Contraception was not required for participation, but was offered on-site and was recorded monthly; incident pregnancy was determined by monthly urine testing. For women using no contraception, overall pregnancy incidence was 15.4% per year. Women reporting oral contraceptive use had comparable pregnancy incidence to women using no contraception, and this lack of contraceptive effectiveness was similar for those assigned PrEP and placebo (17.7 and 10.0% incidence per year, respectively; P-value for difference in effect by PrEP use = 0.24). Women reporting injectable contraception had reduced pregnancy incidence compared to those reporting no contraception, which did not differ by arm (PrEP 5.1%, placebo 5.3% per year; P-value for difference = 0.47). Contraceptive effectiveness was highest among women using implants (pregnancy incidence <1% per year in both arms). PrEP had no adverse impact on hormonal contraceptive effectiveness for pregnancy prevention. As seen previously in similar populations, women reporting contraceptive pill use had little protection from pregnancy, possibly due to poor adherence. Injectable or implantable hormonal contraception and PrEP provide effective prevention for pregnancy and HIV-1.

  19. Prevalence of gestrointestinal symptoms in pregnancy | Audu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of gestrointestinal symptoms in pregnancy. BM Audu, SK Mustapha. Abstract. Objectives: This study is aimed at determining the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms among healthy pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital. Methods: Questionnaires were ...

  20. Contraceptive method and pregnancy incidence among women in HIV-1-serodiscordant partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngure, Kenneth; Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly R; Celum, Connie; Cohen, Craig R; Odoyo, Josephine; Rees, Helen; Kiarie, James N; Were, Edwin; Baeten, Jared M

    2012-02-20

    Effective contraception reduces unintended pregnancies and is a central strategy to reduce vertical HIV-1 transmission for HIV-1-infected women. Among 2269 HIV-1-seropositive and 1085-seronegative women from seven African countries who were members of HIV-1-serodiscordant heterosexual partnerships and who were participating in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial, we assessed pregnancy incidence according to contraceptive method using multivariate Andersen-Gill analysis. Compared with women using no contraceptive method, pregnancy incidence was significantly reduced among HIV-1-seropositive and HIV-1-seronegative women using injectable contraception [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.24, P = 0.001 and aHR 0.25, P pregnancy risk only among HIV-1-seropositive women (aHR 0.51, P = 0.004) but not seronegative women (aHR 0.64, P = 0.3), and, for both seropositive and seronegative women, oral contraceptive pill users were more likely to become pregnant than injectable contraceptive users (aHR 2.22, P = 0.01 for HIV-1-seropositive women and aHR 2.65, P = 0.09 for HIV-1-seronegative women). Condoms, when reported as being used as the primary contraceptive method, marginally reduced pregnancy incidence (aHR 0.85, P = 0.1 for seropositive women and aHR 0.67, P = 0.02 for seronegative women). There were no pregnancies among women using intrauterine devices, implantable methods or who had undergone surgical sterilization, although these methods were used relatively infrequently. Family planning programs and HIV-1 prevention trials need innovative ways to motivate uptake and sustained use of longer acting, less user-dependent contraception for women who do not desire pregnancy.

  1. Linking Changes in Contraceptive Use to Declines in Teen Pregnancy Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Manlove

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a unique microsimulation tool, Teen FamilyScape, the present study explores how changes in the mix of contraceptive methods used by teens contributed to the decline in the U.S. teen pregnancy rate between 2002 and 2010. Results indicate that changes in contraceptive use contributed to approximately half of the decline in the teen pregnancy rate during this time period (48% and that a little more than half of this “contraceptive effect” was due to an increase in teen condom use (58%. The remaining share of the contraceptive effect can be attributed to an increase in the use of more effective hormonal (pill, patch, ring and long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC/injectable methods (Intrauterine Devices (IUD, implant and injectable. Results from an additional counterfactual analysis suggest that the contraceptive effect was driven by the fact that the percentage of teens using no birth control fell during the study time period, rather than by the fact that some teens switched from less effective methods (condoms to more effective hormonal and LARC/injectable methods. However, very high typical use failure rates for teen condom users suggest the need for a two-pronged approach for continuing reductions in teen pregnancy for sexually active teens: first, targeting the youth most at risk of not using contraception and helping them choose contraception, and second, increasing the effectiveness of method use among existing contraceptors.

  2. Pregnancy and contraceptive use among women participating in the FEM-PrEP trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Rebecca; Nanda, Kavita; Kapiga, Saidi; Malahleha, Mookho; Mandala, Justin; Ogada, Teresa; Van Damme, Lut; Taylor, Douglas

    2015-02-01

    Pregnancy among study participants remains a challenge for trials of new HIV prevention agents despite promotion and provision of contraception. We evaluated contraceptive use, pregnancy incidence, and study drug adherence by contraceptive method among women enrolled in the FEM-PrEP trial of once-daily oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine (TDF-FTC) for HIV prevention. We required women to be using effective non-barrier contraception at enrollment. At each monthly follow-up visit, women were counseled on contraceptive use and tested for pregnancy. TDF-FTC adherence was determined by measuring plasma drug concentrations at 4-week intervals. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess factors associated with incident pregnancy and multivariate logistic regression to examine the relationship between contraceptive method used at enrollment and TDF-FTC adherence. More than half of women were not using effective contraception before enrollment. Ninety-eight percent of these women adopted either injectable (55%) or oral (43%) contraceptives. The overall pregnancy rate was 9.6 per 100 woman-years. Among injectable users and new users of combined oral contraceptives (COCs), the rates were 1.6 and 35.1, respectively. New users of injectables had significantly greater odds of adhering to TDF-FTC than new COC users [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 4.4 (1.7 to 11.6), P = 0.002], existing COC users [3.1 (1.3 to 7.3), P = 0.01], and existing injectable users [2.4 (1.1 to 5.6), P = 0.04]. Women using COCs during FEM-PrEP, particularly new adopters, were more likely to become pregnant and less likely to adhere to study product than injectable users. HIV prevention trials should consider requiring long-acting methods, including injectables, for study participation.

  3. Contraceptive method and pregnancy incidence among African women in HIV-1 serodiscordant partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    NGURE, Kenneth; HEFFRON, Renee; MUGO, Nelly R.; CELUM, Connie; COHEN, Craig R.; ODOYO, Josephine; REES, Helen; KIARIE, James N.; WERE, Edwin; BAETEN, Jared M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective contraception reduces unintended pregnancies and is a central strategy to reduce vertical HIV-1 transmission for HIV-1 infected women. Methods Among 2269 HIV-1 seropositive and 1085 seronegative women from 7 African countries who were members of HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual partnerships and who were participating in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial, we assessed pregnancy incidence for women using various contraceptive methods using multivariate Andersen-Gill analysis. Results Compared with women using no contraceptive method, pregnancy incidence was significantly reduced among HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative women using injectable contraception (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.24, p=0.001 and aHR 0.25, ppregnancy risk only among HIV-1 seropositive women (aHR 0.51, p=0.004) but not seronegative women (aHR 0.64, p=0.3), and, for both seropositive and seronegative women, oral contraceptive pill users were more likely to become pregnant than injectable contraceptive users (aHR 2.22, p=0.01 for HIV-1 seropositive women and aHR 2.65, p=0.09 for HIV-1 seronegative women). Condoms, when reported as being used as the primary contraceptive method, marginally reduced pregnancy incidence (aHR 0.85, p=0.1 for seropositive women and aHR 0.67, p=0.02 for seronegative women). There were no pregnancies among women using intrauterine devices, implantable methods or who had undergone surgical sterilization, although these methods were used relatively infrequently. Conclusions Family planning programs and HIV-1 prevention trials need innovative ways to motivate uptake and sustained use of longer acting, less user-dependent contraception for women who do not desire pregnancy. PMID:22156966

  4. Contraceptive use and pregnancies in adolescents' romantic relationships: role of relationship activities and parental attitudes and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amialchuk, Aliaksandr; Gerhardinger, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In a unified framework, the authors estimate whether romantic relationship activities and parental attitudes predict contraception use and consistency, and whether contraception use and consistency predict pregnancy risk among male and females adolescents in the United States. Data on 3717 participants of the first 2 waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) who were sexually experienced in their recent romantic relationship were analyzed to examine how presex activities in the romantic relationship and parental attitudes and communication are associated with contraception choices and how contraception choices are associated with pregnancies. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only some relationship activities and parental communication about contraception were significant predictors of contraception, and their influence differed by gender. Going out with the partner increased contraception consistency among males (odds ratio, 2.04). Discussing contraception with the partner before having first sex increased the odds of ever using contraception for both genders (2.61 for females and 1.59 for males) and increased the odds of consistent contraception for females (1.505). Discussing contraception with parent increased the odds of consistent contraception among females (1.383). Merely, using contraception was not a significant predictor of the risk of pregnancy, whereas using contraception consistently significantly reduced the odds of getting partner pregnant for males (0.413) and the odds of pregnancy of females (0.343). Contraception and pregnancy education programs should take into account qualities of romantic relationship and emphasize consistent use of contraception and communication about contraception between partners and with parents.

  5. Awareness and use of contraception by women seeking termination of pregnancy in south eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echendu Dolly Adinma

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the awareness and use of contraception by women seeking for termination of pregnancy in south eastern Nigeria. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional questionnaire based on the study of one hundred consecutive abortion seekers attending a clinic in southeastern Nigeria was utilized. Results: Mean age of the respondents was (23.5暲 4.4 years. The majority were students (55.0% with 64.0% having secondary education and 33.0% possesing tertiary educational qualifications. Seventy five percent were nulliparous while 49% had one or more previous pregnancy termination. The majority of the respondents (73% were aware of contraceptive methods but only 10% had ever used including 6% using male condom. Only 38% of the respondents desired to use contraceptives after the termination of index pregnancy. Conclusions: It is concluded that the majority have the high level of contraceptive awareness but contraceptive usage is shockingly low. Therefore, there is a strong need to conduct further and wide spread research not only into the various factors that influence access to contraception but also factors that promote induced abortion and overall unsafe abortion morbidity and mortality as a basis towards the enrichment of discussion related to family planning and contraception, the magnitude of abortion problems, and abortion laws in Nigeria.

  6. Combined hormonal contraception and risk of venous thromboembolism within the first year following pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jesper Friis; Bergholt, T; Nielsen, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with combined hormonal contraceptives following early terminated pregnancies or birth, a Danish nationwide retrospective cohort observing a one-year follow-up was defined using three unique registries. All Danish women with confirmed...... pregnancies aged 15-49 during the period of 1995-2009 were included. The main outcomes were relative and absolute risks of first time venous thromboembolism in users as well as non-users of combined hormonal contraceptives. In 985,569 person-years, 598 venous thromboembolisms were recorded. After early...... terminated pregnancies and births, respectively, 113 and 485 events occurred in 212,552 and 773,017 person-years. After early terminated pregnancies, the crude VTE incidence ratios were similar, and the numbers needed to harm were equal between groups that did or did not use combined hormonal contraceptives...

  7. Sexual orientation differences in teen pregnancy and hormonal contraceptive use: an examination across 2 generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Brittany M; Corliss, Heather L; Missmer, Stacey A; Rosario, Margaret; Spiegelman, Donna; Austin, S Bryn

    2013-09-01

    To examine whether sexual orientation is associated with disparities in teen pregnancy and hormonal contraception use among adolescent females in 2 intergenerational cohorts. Data were collected from 91,003 women in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII), born between 1947-1964, and 6463 of their children, born between 1982-1987, enrolled in the Growing Up Today Study (GUTS). Log-binomial models were used to estimate risk ratios for teen pregnancy and hormonal contraception use in sexual minorities compared with heterosexuals and metaanalysis techniques were used to compare the 2 cohorts. Overall, teen hormonal contraception use was lower and teen pregnancy was higher in NHSII than GUTS. In both cohorts, lesbians were less likely, whereas the other sexual minorities were more likely, to use hormonal contraception as teenagers compared with their heterosexual peers. All sexual minority groups in both cohorts, except NHSII lesbians, were at significantly increased risk for teen pregnancy, with risk ratios ranging from 1.61 (95% confidence interval, 0.40-6.55) to 5.82 (95% confidence interval, 2.89-11.73). Having an NHSII mother who was pregnant as a teen was not associated with teen pregnancy in GUTS participants. Finally, significant heterogeneity was found between the 2 cohorts. Adolescent sexual minorities have been, and continue to be, at increased risk for pregnancy. Public health and clinical efforts are needed to address teen pregnancy in this population. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sexual orientation differences in teen pregnancy and hormonal contraceptive use: An examination across two generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Brittany M.; Corliss, Heather L.; Missmer, Stacey A.; Rosario, Margaret; Spiegelman, Donna; Austin, S. Bryn

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether sexual orientation is associated with disparities in teen pregnancy and hormonal contraception use among adolescent females in two intergenerational cohorts. Study Design Data were collected from 91,003 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII),born between 1947–1964, and 6,463 of their children, born between 1982–1987, enrolled in the Growing Up Today Study (GUTS). Log-binomial models were used to estimate risk ratios (RR) for teen pregnancy and hormonal contraception use in sexual minorities compared to heterosexuals and meta-analysis techniques were used to compare the two cohorts. Results Overall, teen hormonal contraception use was lower and teen pregnancy was higher in NHSII than GUTS. In both cohorts, lesbians were less likely, whereas the other sexual minorities were more likely, to use hormonal contraception as teenagers compared to their heterosexual peers. All sexual minority groups in both cohorts, except NHSII lesbians, were at significantly increased risk for teen pregnancy, with RRs ranging from 1.61 (95%CI 0.40, 6.55) to 5.82 (95%CI 2.89, 11.73). Having a NHSII mother who was pregnant as a teen was not associated with teen pregnancy in GUTS participants. Finally, significant heterogeneity was found between the two cohorts. Conclusions Adolescent sexual minorities have been, and continue to be, at increased risk for pregnancy. Public health and clinical efforts are needed to address teen pregnancy in this population. PMID:23796650

  9. Contraception and pregnancy then and now: examining the experiences of a cohort of mid-age Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Christine; Bateson, Deborah; Weisberg, Edith; Estoesta, Jane

    2009-08-01

    More than 50% of women who have an unplanned pregnancy report using a contraceptive method. Since the launch of the pill 50 years ago, a number of cross-sectional surveys have examined contraceptive use in the Australian context. There is, however, little data on contraceptive use and efficacy over a woman's reproductive years. To determine the pattern of contraceptive use of Australian women over their reproductive lifespan, with particular emphasis on the relationship between contraceptive use and pregnancy. One thousand women from the mid-age cohort of the Australian Women's Longitudinal Study were invited to participate in the Family Planning survey by completing a questionnaire about their reproductive histories. Completed questionnaires were received for 812 women. The contraceptive pill was the most commonly ever used contraceptive method at 94% and also the most commonly used method prior to all pregnancies. Contraceptive failure increased with increasing gravidity; 11.4% with the first pregnancy to 23.0% with the fourth pregnancy, while 28.8% of the respondents reported an 'accidental' pregnancy due to stopping contraception for reasons such as concern about long-term effects and media stories. While surveys indicate that 66-70% of Australian women use a contraceptive method, more than half of unplanned pregnancies apparently occur in women using contraception. The modern Australian woman, in common with her predecessors, still faces significant challenges in her fertility management. This survey provides a longitudinal perspective on contraceptive use in relation to pregnancy and highlights the issue of efficacy of contraceptives in real-life situations.

  10. Use of Dicloxacillin and Risk of Pregnancy among Users of Oral Contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Broe, Anne; Stage, Tore B

    2018-01-01

    The antibiotic dicloxacillin has been shown to induce drug-metabolizing CYP enzymes to a clinically relevant extent. In the present study, we investigated whether use of dicloxacillin confers an increased risk of unwanted pregnancy among oral contraceptive users. The study population comprised...... Danish women falling pregnant (1997-2015) during oral contraceptive use, defined as having filled a prescription for an oral contraceptive within 120 days both before and after the estimated date of conception. Data were analysed using a case-cross-over approach. For each woman, we assessed the use......, yielding an odds ratio (OR) associating use of dicloxacillin to unintended pregnancy of 1.18 (95% CI 0.84-1.65). Supplementary and sensitivity analyses generally returned similar estimates, except for a slightly increased risk among users of progestogen-only oral contraceptives (OR 1.83, 95%CI 0...

  11. Emergency contraception: knowledge and use among Danish women requesting termination of pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perslev, A; Rørbye, C; Boesen, H C

    2002-01-01

    as knowledge about both the correct time limit and where to acquire the EC. We found adequate knowledge in 44.7%. These women were typically younger, better educated and more often singles, nulliparae, and users of contraception. No relation was found to the type of contraception used or to previous......The aim of this study was to describe knowledge about and use of emergency contraception (EC) among Danish women requesting termination of pregnancy. The study included 1514 women (response rate 83.7%) referred during the period August 2000 to May 2001. Sufficient knowledge of EC was defined...

  12. How do levonorgestrel-only emergency contraceptive pills prevent pregnancy? Some considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzanega, Bruno; Cosmi, Erich

    2011-06-01

    Controversial opinions exist about the possible mechanisms throughout emergency contraception prevents pregnancy. Recently, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics and the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception released a Joint Statement declaring that 'inhibition or delay of ovulation should be their primary and possibly only mechanism of action'. They still added that 'Review of the evidence suggests that LNG-ECPs cannot prevent implantation'. Concerning levonorgestrel-only emergency contraceptive pills effects on ovulation, the Statement based on seven reference papers which considered a total of only 142 patients, divided into still different subgroups. Basing on their same references we got quite different conclusions.

  13. Managing Unplanned Pregnancies in Five Countries: Perspectives on Contraception and Abortion Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Why is induced abortion common in environments when modern contraception is readily available? This study analyzes qualitative data collected from focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with women and men from low income areas in five countries -- the U.S., Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru and Mexico -- to better understand how couples manage their pregnancy risk. Across all settings, women and men rarely weigh the advantages and disadvantages of contraception and abortion before beginning a sexual relationship or engaging in sexual intercourse. Contraception is viewed independently of abortion, and the two are linked only when the former is invoked as a preferred means to avoiding repeat abortion. Contraceptive methods are viewed as suspect because of perceived side effects, while abortion experience, often at significant personal risk, raised the specter of social stigma and motivation for better contraceptive practice. In all settings, male partners figure importantly in pregnancy decisions and management. Although there are inherent limitations from small sample sizes, the study narratives reveal psychosocial barriers to effective contraceptive use and identify nodal points in pregnancy decision-making that can inform and structure future investigation. PMID:21756080

  14. Provision of no-cost, long-acting contraception and teenage pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secura, Gina M; Madden, Tessa; McNicholas, Colleen; Mullersman, Jennifer; Buckel, Christina M; Zhao, Qiuhong; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2014-10-02

    The rate of teenage pregnancy in the United States is higher than in other developed nations. Teenage births result in substantial costs, including public assistance, health care costs, and income losses due to lower educational attainment and reduced earning potential. The Contraceptive CHOICE Project was a large prospective cohort study designed to promote the use of long-acting, reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods to reduce unintended pregnancy in the St. Louis region. Participants were educated about reversible contraception, with an emphasis on the benefits of LARC methods, were provided with their choice of reversible contraception at no cost, and were followed for 2 to 3 years. We analyzed pregnancy, birth, and induced-abortion rates among teenage girls and women 15 to 19 years of age in this cohort and compared them with those observed nationally among U.S. teens in the same age group. Of the 1404 teenage girls and women enrolled in CHOICE, 72% chose an intrauterine device or implant (LARC methods); the remaining 28% chose another method. During the 2008-2013 period, the mean annual rates of pregnancy, birth, and abortion among CHOICE participants were 34.0, 19.4, and 9.7 per 1000 teens, respectively. In comparison, rates of pregnancy, birth, and abortion among sexually experienced U.S. teens in 2008 were 158.5, 94.0, and 41.5 per 1000, respectively. Teenage girls and women who were provided contraception at no cost and educated about reversible contraception and the benefits of LARC methods had rates of pregnancy, birth, and abortion that were much lower than the national rates for sexually experienced teens. (Funded by the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation and others.).

  15. Scaling up postabortion contraceptive service--results from a study conducted among women having unwanted pregnancies in urban and rural Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke; Yambesi, Fortunata; Kipingili, Rose

    2005-01-01

    Tanzania and 42% in rural Tanzania stated that their pregnancy was unwanted. Contraceptive acceptance among women with unwanted pregnancies was high; 93% in urban Tanzania and 71% in rural Tanzania left with a contraceptive method. CONCLUSION: The high proportion of women with unwanted pregnancies in urban...... and rural Tanzania underlines the need of scaling up postabortion contraceptive service....

  16. A checklist approach to caring for women seeking pregnancy testing: effects on contraceptive knowledge and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica; Papic, Melissa; Baldauf, Erin; Updike, Glenn; Schwarz, E Bimla

    2015-02-01

    To assess how a checklist reminding clinicians to deliver a bundled intervention affects contraceptive knowledge and use 3 months after women seek walk-in pregnancy testing. Pre-intervention, an inner-city family planning clinic provided unstructured care; during the intervention period, clinic staff used a checklist to ensure women received needed services. Women seeking walk-in pregnancy testing who wished to avoid pregnancy for at least 6 months were asked to complete surveys about their contraceptive knowledge and use immediately after and 3-months after visiting the study clinic. To assess the significance of changes over time, we used logistic regression models. Between January 2011 and May 2013, over 1500 women sought pregnancy testing from the study clinic; 323 completed surveys (95 pre-intervention and 228 during the intervention period). With this checklist intervention, participants were more likely to receive emergency contraception (EC) (22% vs. 5%, [aOR 4.66 (1.76-12.35)], [corrected] have an intrauterine device or implant placed at the time of their clinic visit (5% vs. 0%, p=0.02), or receive a contraceptive prescription (23% vs. 10%, pcontraception and were more likely to report at 3-month follow-up a method of contraception more effective than the method they used prior to seeking pregnancy testing from the study clinic (aOR=2.02, 95% CI=1.03-3.96). The authors would like to apologize for any inconvenience caused. [corrected]. Women seeking walk-in pregnancy testing appear more likely to receive EC and to have switched to a more effective form of birth control in the 3 months following their visit when clinic staff used a 3-item checklist and provided scripted counseling. A checklist reminding clinic staff to assess pregnancy intentions, provide scripted counseling about both emergency and highly-effective reversible contraception, and offer same-day contraceptive initiation to women seeking walk-in pregnancy testing appears to increase use of

  17. Cluster headache in women: relation with menstruation, use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, and menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, J A; Favier, I; Helmerhorst, F M; Haan, J; Ferrari, M D

    2006-01-01

    In contrast with migraine, little is known about the relation between cluster headache and menstrual cycle, oral contraceptives, pregnancy, and menopause. A population based questionnaire study was performed among 224 female cluster headache patients, and the possible effect of hormonal influences on cluster headache attacks studied. For control data, a similar but adjusted questionnaire was sent to healthy volunteers and migraine patients. It was found that menstruation, use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, and menopause had a much smaller influence on cluster headache attacks than in migraine. Cluster headache can, however, have a large impact on individual women, for example to refrain from having children. PMID:16407458

  18. Happiness about unintended pregnancy and its relationship to contraceptive desires among a predominantly Latina cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Abigail R A

    2015-06-01

    Women frequently profess happiness about unintended pregnancies; such incongruence is associated with use of less effective contraceptive methods and inconsistent or incorrect method use. Yet, the methods women use may differ from those they desire. Data on 578 women were drawn from a prospective survey of postpartum women aged 18-44 recruited from three hospitals in Texas between 2012 and 2014. Jonckheere-Terpstra tests were used to compare women's feelings about a future pregnancy with their childbearing intentions. Fisher-Freeman-Halton tests compared distributions of contraceptive methods currently used and desired by women who professed happiness about a future unintended pregnancy, as well as distributions of desired methods by women's reported feelings. The proportion of women who reported happiness about a future pregnancy was 59% among those intending to wait two or three years for another child, 46% among those intending to wait four or more years, and 36% among those intending to have no more children. Among women who professed happiness, a greater proportion desired to use a highly effective contraceptive method than were currently using one (72% vs. 15% among those intending no more children; 55% vs. 23% among those intending to wait at least four years; and 36% vs. 10% among those intending to wait two or three years). Across intention categories, the types of methods desired did not differ by whether women professed happiness or unhappiness. Women who profess happiness about a future unintended pregnancy may nonetheless desire highly effective contraceptive methods. Copyright © 2015 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  19. Socioeconomic Status As a Risk Factor for Unintended Pregnancy in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseyemi, Abigail; Zhao, Qiuhong; McNicholas, Colleen; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the association of low socioeconomic status as an independent risk factor for unintended pregnancy. We performed a secondary analysis of data from the Contraceptive CHOICE project. Between 2007 and 2011, 9,256 participants were recruited and followed for up to 3 years. The primary outcome of interest was unintended pregnancy; the primary exposure variable was low socioeconomic status, defined as self-report of either receiving public assistance or having difficulty paying for basic necessities. Four contraceptive groups were evaluated: 1) long-acting reversible contraceptive method (hormonal or copper intrauterine device or subdermal implant); 2) depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection; 3) oral contraceptive pills, a transdermal patch, or a vaginal ring; or 4) other or no method. Confounders were adjusted for in the multivariable Cox proportional hazard model to estimate the effect of socioeconomic status on risk of unintended pregnancy. Participants with low socioeconomic status experienced 515 unintended pregnancies during 14,001 women-years of follow-up (3.68/100 women-years; 95% CI 3.37-4.01) compared with 200 unintended pregnancies during 10,296 women-years (1.94/100 women-years; 95% CI 1.68-2.23) among participants without low socioeconomic status. Women with low socioeconomic status were more likely to have an unintended pregnancy (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, 95% CI 1.5-2.2). After adjusting for age, education level, insurance status, and history of unintended pregnancy, low socioeconomic status was associated with an increased risk of unintended pregnancy (adjusted HR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7). Despite the removal of cost barriers, low socioeconomic status is associated with a higher incidence of unintended pregnancy.

  20. Contraceptive failure after hysteroscopic sterilization: Analysis of clinical and demographic data from 103 unplanned pregnancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Jones, Christopher A.; Wood, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This investigation examined data on unplanned pregnancies following hysteroscopic sterilization (HS). Methods A confidential questionnaire was used to collect data from women with medically confirmed pregnancy (n=103) registered after undergoing HS. Results Mean (±SD) patient age and body mass index (BMI) were 29.5±4.6 years and 27.7±6.1 kg/m2, respectively. Peak pregnancy incidence was reported at 10 months after HS, although <3% of unplanned pregnancies occurred within the first three months following HS. Mean (±SD) interval between HS and pregnancy was 19.6±14.9 (range, 2 to 84) months. Patients age ≥30 years and BMI <25 reported conception after HS somewhat sooner than younger patients, although the differences in time to pregnancy were not significant (P=0.24 and 0.09, respectively). The recommended post-HS hysterosalpingogram (to confirm proper placement and bilateral tubal occlusion) was obtained by 66% (68/103) of respondents. Conclusion This report is the first to provide patient-derived data on contraceptive failures after HS. While adherence to backup contraception 3 months after HS can be poor, many unintended pregnancies with HS occur long after the interval when alternate contraceptive is required. Many patients who obtain HS appear to ignore the manufacturer's guidance regarding the post-procedure hysterosalpingogram to confirm proper device placement, although limited insurance coverage likely contributes to this problem. The greatest number of unplanned pregnancies occurred 10 months after HS, but some unplanned pregnancies were reported up to 7 years later. Age, BMI, or surgical history are unlikely to predict contraceptive failure with HS. Further follow-up studies are planned to capture additional data on this issue. PMID:26623413

  1. Parent and Peer Influence on Sexual Behavior, Contraceptive Use, and Pregnancy Experience of Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Farida; Zelnik, Melvin

    1981-01-01

    Analyzed data from a national probability sample of 15 through 19-year-old women to determine the influence of parents and peers on premarital sexual behavior, contraceptive use, and premarital pregnancy. Results show women with views resembling those of parents have low levels of premarital experience. (Author)

  2. Unplanned pregnancy-risks and use of emergency contraception: a survey of two Nigerian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Anthony Idowu; Nwokocha, Ezebunwa Ethelbert; Adeniyi, Oladele Vincent; Ter Goon, Daniel; Akpan, Wilson

    2017-06-02

    The vulnerabilities of young women of low socio-economic status and those with little or no formal education tend to dominate the discourse on unplanned pregnancy, unsafe abortion and emergency contraception (EC) in sub-Saharan Africa. This article draws on a survey conducted among female undergraduate students to shed light on sexual behaviour and the dynamics of emergency contraceptive use among this cohort. The survey involved 420 female undergraduate students drawn using a multistage sampling technique, while a self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Univariate and bivariate analyses were applied to examine the factors associated with the use of emergency contraception. Of the 176 female students who reported being sexually active in the year preceding the survey, only 38.6% reported the use of condom during the entire year. Of those who reported unplanned pregnancy anxiety n = 94, about 30.1% used EC, 20.4% used non-EC pills as EC, while others reported having used no EC. A few respondents (n = 3) had terminated a pregnancy under unsafe conditions. Awareness of EC (p contraceptive methods. Poor knowledge of EC methods and timing of use, as well as wrong perception about EC side effects, are barriers to the utilisation of EC for the prevention of unplanned pregnancy among the study participants.

  3. [Unwanted adolescent pregnancy and post-partum utilization of contraceptive methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Urquiza, Rosa María; Hernández-Prado, Bernardo; García-Barrios, Cecilia; González, Dolores; Walker, Dylis

    2003-01-01

    To describe the proportion of unwanted pregnancies among all pregnant adolescents, its association with sociodemographic characteristics, and the use of post-partum contraceptive methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 220 women between 13 and 19 years of age, in two semi-urban municipalities of the State of Morelos, Mexico, interviewed between 1992 and 1994. Women were interviewed at home, six to twelve weeks after their delivery date. Women were asked whether they had wanted their last pregnancy, and about knowledge and use of contraceptive methods after delivery. Adolescent pregnancies accounted for 17% of all births registered in these two municipalities. Among all adolescent mother 22.73% reported that their pregnancy had not been wanted. A positive association was found between the lack of access to health services provided by public medical insurance systems (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social IMSS and Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado ISSSTE) and unwanted pregnancy (adjusted OR = 3.03, 95% CI (1.31, 7.) An association was also found between living in an urban community (adjusted OR = 2.16, 95% CI (1.08, 4.33) and an unwanted pregnancy. Among all adolescent mothers, 91.3% were familiar with "the pill" as a contraceptive method; 84.72% knew about the IUD, and 63.68% knew about the condom. However, only 35% of them were actually using an effective contraceptive method six weeks after delivery. No difference in frequency of contraceptive use was found among the adolescent mothers, according to whether they wanted their last pregnancy. Only 43.39% of mothers who delivered at hospitals or health centers were using an effective contraceptive method. These findings suggest that there is a great potential for family planning programs to target adolescents, and that the use of contraceptive methods after delivery should be promoted among adolescent mothers, especially those lacking access to public medical

  4. Helping Clinicians Prevent Pregnancy among Sexually Active Adolescents: U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use and U.S. Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Emily M

    2015-08-01

    The United States has made substantial progress in reducing teenage birth rates in recent decades, but rates remain high. Teen pregnancy can increase the risk of poor health outcomes and lead to decreased educational attainment, increased poverty, and welfare use, as well as increased cost to taxpayers. One of the most effective ways to prevent teenage pregnancy is through the use of effective birth control methods. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention has made the prevention of teenage pregnancy 1 of its 10 winnable battles. The CDC has released 2 evidence-based clinical guideline documents regarding contraceptive use for adolescents and adults. The first guideline, US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 2010, helps clinicians recognize when a contraceptive method may not be safe to use for a particular adolescent but also when not to withhold a contraceptive method that is safe to use. The second document, US Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, 2013, provides guidance for how to use contraceptive methods safely and effectively once they are deemed safe. Health care providers are encouraged to use these documents to provide safe and effective contraceptive care to patients seeking family planning, including adolescents. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. All rights reserved.

  5. Knowledge and attitudes of Latin American gynecologists regarding unplanned pregnancy and use of combined oral contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahamondes L

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Luis Bahamondes,1 Josefina Lira-Plasencia,2 Ricardo Martin,3 Victor Marin,4 Maria Y Makuch1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP, Campinas, Brazil; 2Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, México, DF, México; 3Hospital Universitario, Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá, Bogotá, Colombia; 4Hospital Central, Petróleos Mexicanos, México, DF, México Background: Unintended pregnancy is a public health problem and unmet medical need worldwide. It is estimated that in the year 2012, almost 213 million pregnancies occurred, and the global pregnancy rate decreased only slightly from 2008 to 2012. It was also estimated that 85 million pregnancies (40% of all pregnancies were unintended and that 38% ended in an unintended birth. Objectives: To assess knowledge and attitudes of Latin American (LA obstetricians and gynecologists (OBGYNs regarding unintended pregnancies and aspects of combined oral contraceptive (COC use. Methods: A survey was conducted during a scientific meeting about contraception in 2014, in which OBGYNs from 12 LA countries who provide attention in contraception were invited to respond to a multiple-choice questionnaire to assess their knowledge and attitudes regarding unplanned pregnancy and some aspects regarding COC use. Results: A total of 210 OBGYNs participated in the study. Their knowledge regarding COC failure was low. The participants reported they believed that their patients habitually forgot to take a pill and that their patients did not know what to do in these situations. They were aware of the benefits of COC use; however, they were less prone to prescribe COCs for the purpose of protecting against ovarian and endometrial cancer, and one-quarter of them had doubts about the association between COC use and cancer risk. Conclusion: The interviewed LA OBGYNs showed some flaws in terms of knowledge of COC failure rates and the non-contraceptive benefits and risks

  6. Pregnancy Outcomes Following Ulipristal Acetate Emergency Contraception Failure: A Report of Five Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Zeynep; Akgul, Emine

    2017-06-01

    The emergency contraceptive ulipristal acetate (UPA) 30 mg is increasingly used by women, but there is no published data on UPA exposure in pregnancy. Here we describe five cases of unintended pregnancies following the use of UPA for emergency contraception. Of five pregnant women exposed to UPA, one decided to terminate the pregnancy for personal reasons. Two of them experienced premature rupture of membranes and the babies were born large for gestational age (LGA). The other two women experienced gestational diabetes, and one of them also delivered a LGA baby. The blood glucose levels of the mothers were normal after delivery and at six weeks postpartum. No birth defects and no growth or developmental abnormalities for the infants were reported during 6 months follow-up. Pregnant women inadvertently exposed to UPA should be monitored carefully, unless further data are available.

  7. Is education the best contraception: the case of teenage pregnancy in England?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Sourafel; Paton, David

    2015-04-01

    This paper examines potential explanations for recent declines in teenage pregnancy in England. We estimate panel data models of teenage conception, birth and abortion rates from regions in England. Although point estimates are consistent with the promotion of long acting reversible contraception (LARC) having a negative impact on teenage pregnancy rates, the effects are generally small and statistically insignificant. In contrast, improvements in educational achievement and, to a lesser extent, increases in the non-white proportion of the population are associated with large and statistically significant reductions in teenage pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Contraceptive failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    Most studies focusing on contraceptive failure in relation to pregnancy have focused on contraceptive failure among women having induced abortions, thereby neglecting those women who, despite contraceptive failure, accept the pregnancy and intend to carry the fetus to term. To get a more complete...... picture of the problem of contraceptive failure, this study focuses on contraceptive failure among women with diverse pregnancy outcomes. In all, 3520 pregnant women attending Odense University Hospital were included: 373 had induced abortions, 435 had spontaneous abortions, 97 had ectopic pregnancies......, and 2614 received antenatal care. The variables studied comprise age, partner relationship, number of births, occupational and economical situation, and contraceptive use.Contraceptive failure, defined as contraceptive use (condom, diaphragm, IUD, oral contraception, or another modern method...

  9. Pregnancy in HIV clinical trials in Sub Saharan Africa: failure of consent or contraception?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Ssali

    Full Text Available Higher than expected pregnancy rates have been observed in HIV related clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa. We designed a qualitative study to explore the factors contributing to high pregnancy rates among participants in two HIV clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa.Female and male participants enrolled in one of two clinical HIV trials in south-west Uganda were approached. The trials were a phase III microbicide efficacy trial among HIV negative women using vaginal gel (MDP; and a trial of primary prevention prophylaxis for invasive cryptococcal disease using fluconazole among HIV infected men and women in Uganda (CRYPTOPRO. 14 focus group discussions and 8 in-depth interviews were conducted with HIV positive and negative women and their male partners over a six month period. Areas explored were their experiences about why and when one should get pregnant, factors affecting use of contraceptives, HIV status disclosure and trial product use.All respondents acknowledged being advised of the importance of avoiding pregnancy during the trial. Factors reported to contribute to pregnancy included; trust that the investigational product (oral capsules/vaginal gel would not harm the baby, need for children, side effects that led to inconsistent contraceptive use, low acceptance of condom use among male partners. Attitudes towards getting pregnant are fluid within couples over time and the trials often last for more than a year. Researchers need to account for high pregnancy rates in their sample size calculations, and consider lesser used female initiated contraceptive options e.g. diaphragm or female condoms. In long clinical trials where there is a high fetal or maternal risk due to investigational product, researchers and ethics committees should consider a review of participants contraceptive needs/pregnancy desire review after a fixed period, as need for children, partners and health status of participants may alter over time.

  10. Reproductive counseling, contraception, and unplanned pregnancy in fertile women treated by gynecologic oncologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Crafton

    2017-02-01

    Members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO were surveyed electronically regarding consistency of counseling patterns of contraception and fertility concerns, most and least common contraceptive methods utilized, referral patterns, and incidence of unplanned pregnancy. Of the 1424 SGO members identified, 261 participated in the questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 18%. Eighty-two percent of respondents agreed unplanned pregnancy is a potential problem, but only 57% believed their patients understood unplanned pregnancy is possible during treatment. Half of respondents report “always” in terms of frequency that contraception is addressed among their high-risk patients. After adjustment for gender, we found that the odds of reporting providing fertility counseling were nearly three times higher among attendings as compared to fellows [AOR = 2.72; 95% CI = (1.44, 5.12, three times higher in women as compared to men [AOR = 2.80; 95% CI = (1.46, 5.38], as well as in individuals 50+ years as compared to those <40 years old [AOR = 4.91; 95% CI = (2.05, 11.74]. Ninety-six percent reported <5 unplanned pregnancies, to their knowledge, in the previous five years of clinical practice. Most providers acknowledge that unplanned pregnancy is a potential risk in fertile gynecologic oncology patients, but only half believe their patients understand an unplanned pregnancy is possible. An opportunity exists to provide more directed counseling regarding fertility during and after cancer therapy, and to educate patients and providers regarding more reliable, long acting contraceptive methods.

  11. Motivational antecedents to contraceptive method change following a pregnancy scare: a couple analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W B; Pasta, D J

    2001-01-01

    In this study we develop and then test a couple model of contraceptive method choice decision-making following a pregnancy scare. The central constructs in our model are satisfaction with one's current method and confidence in the use of it. Downstream in the decision sequence, satisfaction and confidence predict desires and intentions to change methods. Upstream they are predicted by childbearing motivations, contraceptive attitudes, and the residual effects of the couples' previous method decisions. We collected data from 175 mostly unmarried and racially/ethnically diverse couples who were seeking pregnancy tests. We used LISREL and its latent variable capacity to estimate a structural equation model of the couple decision-making sequence leading to a change (or not) in contraceptive method. Results confirm most elements in our model and demonstrate a number of important cross-partner effects. Almost one-half of the sample had positive pregnancy tests and the base model fitted to this subsample indicates less accuracy in partner perception and greater influence of the female partner on method change decision-making. The introduction of some hypothesis-generating exogenous variables to our base couple model, together with some unexpected findings for the contraceptive attitude variables, suggest interesting questions that require further exploration.

  12. First intercourse, contraception and first pregnancy in Flanders: changes during the past 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodewijckx, E

    1987-10-01

    The investigation of women in Flanders born between 1931 and 1962 shows that premarital sexual intercourse has become almost general and that the age at the onset of sexual intercourse is steadily declining. Until the 1970s in spite of the improving contraceptive behavior of youngsters, the number of women experiencing premarital pregnancy increased and 1st conceptions occurred at an increasingly younger age. The 1970s marked a turning point: fewer women became pregnant before marriage or in adolescnece. From that time, the contraceptive revolution kept pace with the sexual revolution.

  13. Contraceptive Use Effectiveness and Pregnancy Prevention Information Preferences Among Heterosexual and Sexual Minority College Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt-Vinti, Heather D; Thompson, Erika L; Griner, Stacey B

    2018-04-14

    Previous research shows that sexual minority women have higher rates of unintended pregnancy than heterosexual women, but has not considered the wide range of contraceptive method effectiveness when exploring this disparity. We examine contraceptive use effectiveness and desire for pregnancy prevention information among college women across sexual orientation identity as a risk factor for unintended pregnancy. Using the National College Health Assessment Fall-2015 dataset, restricted to women who reported engaging in vaginal sex and not wanting to be pregnant (N = 6,486), logistic regression models estimated the odds of contraceptive method effectiveness and desire for pregnancy prevention information by sexual orientation. Most women (57%) reported using a moderately effective contraceptive method (e.g., pill, patch, ring, shot) at last vaginal sex. Compared with heterosexual women, bisexual (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.62), lesbian (aOR, 0.03; 95% CI, 0.02-0.06), pansexual/queer (aOR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.25-.56) and other (aOR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.30-0.81) women were significantly less likely to have used a moderately effective method compared with no method. Only 9% of the sample used a highly effective method; asexual (aOR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.92) and lesbian (aOR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.03-0.20) women were significantly less likely than heterosexual women to have used these methods. Pansexual/queer and bisexual women were more likely than heterosexual women to desire pregnancy prevention information. Several groups of sexual minority women were less likely than heterosexual women to use highly or moderately effective contraceptive methods, putting them at increased risk for unintended pregnancy, but desired pregnancy prevention information. These findings bring attention to the importance of patient-centered sexual and reproductive care to reduce unintended pregnancy. Copyright © 2018 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published

  14. Unwanted pregnancies and Contraception in Chronic Renal Failure: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batuhan Özmen

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a rare condition in patients requiring dialysis with end-stage chronic renal disease (CRD. However successful pregnancies were reported in CRD, patients are encountering with great number of complications and aggressive acceleration\tof CRD by achieving pregnancy. The most crucial topic is unwanted pregnancies of these patients due to high complication rates described in the literature. Thus many authors were discussing safety of contraception in CRD patients requiring dialysis (hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and in patients with renal transplant. In this report medical termination of a twenty-two weeks gestational age unwanted pregnancy that was complicated with aggressive hypertension and severe renal insufficiency under\tdialysis in a 38 years-old end-stage CRD patient was reported.

  15. [Contraception and pregnancy after liver transplantation: an update overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolin, Mônica Beatriz; Coelho, Júlio Cezar Uili; Urbanetz, Almir Antônio; Pampuch, Melina

    2009-01-01

    Successful liver transplantation not only treats the underlying liver disease but also restores libido and fertility in female recipients. Although reports of successful pregnancy after liver transplantation continue to increase, these pregnancies are considered of high-risk because they are associated with increase maternofetal morbidity. A MEDLINE search (1978-2007) was conducted using the terms 'liver transplantation', 'pregnancy', 'immunosuppressive agents', 'sexual function'. Reviews, retrospective series, long-term clinical follow-up of case series and original articles containing basic scientific observations were included. Although no formal guidelines have been established there are some 'golden rules' to improve the probability of favorable maternal and fetal outcome. Most transplant centers recommend to delay pregnancy for at least 1-year after transplantation. The recipient should be on a stable immunosuppression regimen, with good graft function and no evidence of renal dysfunction or uncontrolled arterial hypertension. Considering the increased incidence of prematurity, low birth weight, hypertension and preeclampsia reported during pregnancy post-LT, these high-risk patients should be managed by a multidisciplinary team, including an obstetrician specialized in high-risk pregnancies. Carefully monitoring of immunosuppressive drugs serum level is prudent to avoid graft rejection episodes and drugs with teratogenic potential should be discontinued. Breastfeeding is usually not recommended. Successful pregnancies are the rule after liver transplantation. A carefully monitoring by an experience multidisciplinary team increases the chances of favorable maternofetal outcome.

  16. High Lifetime Pregnancy and Low Contraceptive Usage Among Sex Workers Who Use Drugs- An Unmet Reproductive Health Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexson Debbie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to describe levels of pregnancy and contraceptive usage among a cohort of street-based female sex workers (FSWs in Vancouver. Methods The study sample was obtained from a community-based prospective cohort study (2006-2008 of 211 women in street-based sex work who use drugs, 176 of whom had reported at least one prior pregnancy. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate lifetime pregnancy prevalence, pregnancy outcomes (miscarriage, abortion, adoption, child apprehension, child custody, and contraceptive usage. In secondary analyses, associations between contraceptive usage, individual and interpersonal risk factors and high number of lifetime pregnancies (defined as greater than the sample mean of 4 were examined. Results Among our sample, 84% reported a prior pregnancy, with a mean of 4 lifetime pregnancies (median = 3; IQR: 2-5. The median age of women reporting 5+ pregnancies was 38 years old [interquartile range (IQR: 25.0-39.0] compared to 34 years [IQR: 25.0-39.0] among women reporting 4 or fewer prior pregnancies. 45% were Caucasian and 47% were of Aboriginal ancestry. We observed high rates of previous abortion (median = 1;IQR:1-3, apprehension (median = 2; IQR:1-4 and adoption (median = 1; IQR:1-2 among FSWs who reported prior pregnancy. The use of hormonal and insertive contraceptives was limited. In bivariate analysis, tubal ligation (OR = 2.49; [95%CI = 1.14-5.45], and permanent contraceptives (e.g., tubal ligation and hysterectomy (OR = 2.76; [95%CI = 1.36-5.59] were both significantly associated with having five or more pregnancies. Conclusion These findings demonstrate high levels of unwanted pregnancy in the context of low utilization of effective contraceptives and suggest a need to improve the accessibility and utilization of reproductive health services, including family planning, which are appropriately targeted and tailored for FSWs in Vancouver.

  17. Nonuse of contraception among women at risk of unintended pregnancy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, William; Jones, Jo; Abma, Joyce

    2015-08-01

    This paper seeks to determine factors associated with nonuse of contraception by women at risk of unintended pregnancy in the United States. This nonuse may be associated with about 900,000 unintended births in the US each year. The 2002 and 2006-2010 National Surveys of Family Growth were combined to yield a nationally representative sample of 9,445 women at risk of unintended pregnancy. Logistic regression analyses identified factors associated with nonuse of contraception. This analysis reveals previously undocumented patterns of nonuse: controlling for confounding variables, cohabiting women [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.45-3.52] had higher odds of nonuse than married women; women who reported a difficulty getting pregnant (AOR=2.5, 95% CI=2.01-3.01) had higher odds of nonuse than those who did not. Nonuse was also more common among women with a master's degree or more (AOR=1.5, 95% CI=1.11-2.08) compared with those with some college or bachelor's degree, and it was more common among women in their first year after first intercourse than after the first year (AOR 1.6, 95% CI=1.12-2.22). Among women who had a recent unintended birth, the most common reason for not using contraception prior to conception was that she did not think she could get pregnant. This study establishes national estimates of reasons for nonuse of contraception and identifies some new subgroups at risk of nonuse. These results may help better understand factors affecting nonuse of contraception and develop strategies for preventing unintended pregnancy in the United States. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Prevention of unintended pregnancies in Nigeria; the effect of socio-demographic characteristic on the knowledge and use of emergency contraceptives among female university students

    OpenAIRE

    Olumide A. Abiodun; John Sotunsa; Olusoji Jagun; Bukola Faturoti; Franklin Ani; Imaralu John; Agboola Taiwo; Ogechukwu Taiwo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The proportion of unintended pregnancy remains high in developing regions due to unmet need for contraception and inconsistent use of modern contraceptives. Practice of emergency contraception is particularly important because of the high rates of unintended pregnancy. The aim was to assess the practice of emergency contraception among female students. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 5,233 female university students in Nigeria. Results: About 25.4% of th...

  19. Unintended pregnancy and subsequent use of modern contraceptive among slum and non-slum women in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotso, Jean Christophe; Izugbara, Chimaraoke; Saliku, Teresa; Ochako, Rhoune

    2014-07-10

    In spite of major gains in contraceptive prevalence over the last few decades, many women in most parts of the developing world who would like to delay or avoid pregnancy do not use any method of contraception. This paper seeks to: a) examine whether experiencing an unintended pregnancy is associated with future use of contraception controlling for a number factors including poverty at the household and community levels; and b) investigate the mechanisms through which experiencing an unintended pregnancy leads to uptake of contraception. Quantitative and qualitative data from a cross-sectional research project conducted in 2009/10 in two slum settlements and two non-slum settings of Nairobi, Kenya are used. The quantitative component of the project was based on a random sample of 1,259 women aged 15-49 years. Logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of unintended pregnancy on future contraceptive use. The qualitative component of the project successfully interviewed a total of 80 women randomly selected from survey participants who had reported having at least one unintended pregnancy. Women whose last pregnancy was unintended were more likely to be using a modern method of contraception, compared to their peers whose last pregnancy was intended, especially among the wealthier group as shown in the interaction model. Among poor women, unintended pregnancy was not associated with subsequent use of contraception. The qualitative investigation with women who had an unplanned pregnancy reveals that experiencing an unintended pregnancy seems to have served as a "wake-up call", resulting in greater attention to personal risks, including increased interest in pregnancy prevention. For some women, unintended pregnancy was a consequence of strong opposition by their partners to family planning, while others reported they started using contraceptives following their unintended pregnancy, but discontinued after experiencing side effects. This study provides

  20. Is pregnancy fatalism normal? An attitudinal assessment among women trying to get pregnant and those not using contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel K

    2018-05-21

    To assess factors associated with pregnancy fatalism among U.S. adult women. I used data from the Change and Consistency in Contraceptive Use study, which collected information from a national sample of 4634U.S. women aged 18-39 at baseline (59% response rate). I assessed pregnancy fatalism based on agreement with the statement: "It doesn't matter whether I use birth control, when it is my time to get pregnant, it will happen." I compare fatalism among all respondents to fatalism among respondents who were trying to get pregnant and those who did not want to get pregnant but were not using contraception. I used logistic regression to assess associations between nonuse of contraception and pregnancy fatalism at baseline and whether respondents were trying to get pregnant six months later. Overall, 36% of the sample expressed some degree of pregnancy fatalism, and proportions were higher for respondents trying to get pregnant (55%) and those not using contraception (57%). The association between pregnancy fatalism and trying to get pregnant was maintained after controlling for other characteristics (OR 1.4, p=.01), as was the association for nonuse of contraception (OR 2.08, p<.001). Contraceptive nonusers at baseline were more likely than users to be trying to get pregnant six months later, especially if they expressed a fatalistic outlook at baseline. Pregnancy fatalism may be a common outlook among women who are trying to get pregnant. Associations between fatalism and nonuse of contraception may be more complex than previously recognized. Gaining a better understanding of the dynamics of pregnancy planning might inform our understanding of why some women do not use contraception. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Using Behavioral Economic Theory to Increase Use of Effective Contraceptives among Opioid-maintained Women at Risk of Unintended Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Sarah H.; Hand, Dennis J.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Badger, Gary J.; Meyer, Marjorie C.; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective An unsettling aspect of the US opioid epidemic is the high rate of in utero exposure, especially since most of these pregnancies are unintended, due in part to low rates of effective contraceptive use among opioid-using women. This study tested an intervention informed by behavioral economic theory and aimed at promoting effective contraceptive use among opioid-maintained women at risk of unintended pregnancy in the Burlington, VT area between 2011–2013. Methods Thirty-one women were assigned (initial 5 consecutively, subsequent 26 randomly) to either usual care or an experimental intervention. Participants in usual care received condoms, a dose of emergency contraception, and referral to local providers. Participants in the experimental condition received usual care plus the World Health Organization’s contraception initiation protocol, including free prescription contraceptives, and financial incentives for attending 13 follow-up visits over 6 months to help manage side effects and other issues. Results Significantly more women in the experimental vs. usual care control conditions initiated prescription contraceptive use (100% vs. 29%) and reported prescription contraceptive use at 1-month (63% vs. 13%), 3-month (88% vs. 20%), and 6-month (94% vs. 13%) assessments. None of the experimental condition participants became pregnant during the 6-month protocol vs. three women (20%) in the control condition. Conclusions These results provide the first experimental evidence supporting the efficacy of an intervention for increasing prescription contraceptive use among opioid-maintained women at risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:27346756

  2. Contraceptive Use and the Risk of Ectopic Pregnancy: A Multi-Center Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Zhao, Wei-Hong; Meng, Chun-Xia; Ping, Hua; Qin, Guo-Juan; Cao, Shu-Jun; Xi, Xiaowei; Zhu, Qian; Li, Xiao-Cui; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the association between the risk of ectopic pregnancy (EP) and the use of common contraceptives during the previous and current conception/menstrual cycle. A multi-center case-control study was conducted in Shanghai. Women diagnosed with EP were recruited as the case group (n = 2,411). Women with intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) (n = 2,416) and non-pregnant women (n = 2,419) were matched as controls at a ratio of 1∶1. Information regarding the previous and current use of contraceptives was collected. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidential intervals (CIs). Previous use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) was associated with a slight risk of ectopic pregnancy (AOR1 = 1.87 [95% CI: 1.48-2.37]; AOR2 = 1.84 [1.49-2.27]), and the risk increased with the duration of previous use (P1 for trend contraceptives reduced the risk of both unwanted IUP (condom: AOR = 0.04 [0.03-0.05]; withdrawal method: AOR = 0.10 [0.07-0.13]; calendar rhythm method: AOR = 0.54 [0.40-0.73]; oral contraceptive pills [OCPs]: AOR = 0.03 [0.02-0.08]; levonorgestrel emergency contraception [LNG-EC]: AOR = 0.22 [0.16-0.30]; IUDs: AOR = 0.01 [0.005-0.012]; tubal sterilization: AOR = 0.01 [0.001-0.022]) and unwanted EP (condom: AOR1 = 0.05 [0.04-0.06]; withdrawal method: AOR1 = 0.13 [0.09-0.19]; calendar rhythm method: AOR1 = 0.66 [0.48-0.91]; OCPs: AOR1 = 0.14 [0.07-0.26]; IUDs: AOR1 = 0.17 [0.13-0.22]; tubal sterilization: AOR1 = 0.04 [0.02-0.08]). However, when contraception failed and pregnancy occurred, current use of OCPs (AOR2 = 4.06 [1.64-10.07]), LNG-EC (AOR2 = 4.87 [3.88-6.10]), IUDs (AOR2 = 21.08 [13.44-33.07]), and tubal sterilization (AOR2 = 7.68 [1.69-34.80]) increased the risk of EP compared with the non-use of contraceptives. Current use of most contraceptives reduce the risk of both IUP and EP. However, if the

  3. Contraceptive Use and the Risk of Ectopic Pregnancy: A Multi-Center Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Li

    Full Text Available To evaluate the association between the risk of ectopic pregnancy (EP and the use of common contraceptives during the previous and current conception/menstrual cycle.A multi-center case-control study was conducted in Shanghai. Women diagnosed with EP were recruited as the case group (n = 2,411. Women with intrauterine pregnancy (IUP (n = 2,416 and non-pregnant women (n = 2,419 were matched as controls at a ratio of 1∶1. Information regarding the previous and current use of contraceptives was collected. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs and the corresponding 95% confidential intervals (CIs.Previous use of intrauterine devices (IUDs was associated with a slight risk of ectopic pregnancy (AOR1 = 1.87 [95% CI: 1.48-2.37]; AOR2 = 1.84 [1.49-2.27], and the risk increased with the duration of previous use (P1 for trend <10-4, P2 for trend <10-4. The current use of most contraceptives reduced the risk of both unwanted IUP (condom: AOR = 0.04 [0.03-0.05]; withdrawal method: AOR = 0.10 [0.07-0.13]; calendar rhythm method: AOR = 0.54 [0.40-0.73]; oral contraceptive pills [OCPs]: AOR = 0.03 [0.02-0.08]; levonorgestrel emergency contraception [LNG-EC]: AOR = 0.22 [0.16-0.30]; IUDs: AOR = 0.01 [0.005-0.012]; tubal sterilization: AOR = 0.01 [0.001-0.022] and unwanted EP (condom: AOR1 = 0.05 [0.04-0.06]; withdrawal method: AOR1 = 0.13 [0.09-0.19]; calendar rhythm method: AOR1 = 0.66 [0.48-0.91]; OCPs: AOR1 = 0.14 [0.07-0.26]; IUDs: AOR1 = 0.17 [0.13-0.22]; tubal sterilization: AOR1 = 0.04 [0.02-0.08]. However, when contraception failed and pregnancy occurred, current use of OCPs (AOR2 = 4.06 [1.64-10.07], LNG-EC (AOR2 = 4.87 [3.88-6.10], IUDs (AOR2 = 21.08 [13.44-33.07], and tubal sterilization (AOR2 = 7.68 [1.69-34.80] increased the risk of EP compared with the non-use of contraceptives.Current use of most

  4. Characteristics of Women with Unwanted Pregnancies and Reasons for Contraceptive Methods Discontination: Sample of Rural Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Ay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence and characteristics of women with unwanted pregnancy in rural area and to examine pregnant women’s contraceptive method preferences, satisfaction with the methods and reason the methods discontinuation. METHOD: This study was carried out in Manisa city rural area between the dates of January and June 2011 in women who agreed to participate in the study. The sample of the research is composed of 239 pregnant women. The research was a descriptive, cross-sectional and field study and the data was collected by using questionnaire which was prepared by researcher. Data was gathered through the face to face interview with the women at their home. Statistical analyses were undertaken using SPSS version 11.5. Descriptive analysis, Pearson’s Chi-square (χ² test, fisher exact test, and t-test were used statistical evaluation. RESULTS: Of the 239 pregnancies, 64 (26.8% were unwanted pregnancies. The mean age of women was respectively 25.0±5.0, and 29.0±5.4 years, for wanted, and unwanted pregnancies. Women with unwanted pregnancies were older, less educated, they had less educated husbands, had low income level, had more pregnancies, deliveries, had less than two years interval between their births. Unwanted pregnancies were observed in women using the coitus interrupts method (%53.1, effective contraceptive methods (%54.3 and not using any method (%16.3 (p<0.05. The most reasons for discontinuation were reported pregnant women as follows: side effects of methods, disapproval for husband, pregnancy occurs using the method, believe for ineffective contraceptive methods. CONCLUSION: In order to reduce the number of unwanted pregnancies and wanted abortions which reversely affect the women healthy; an appropriate contraception method must be employed. Health care providers should identify women with unwanted pregnancy to understand women's concerns and experiences using contraception. This

  5. Contraception use and unplanned pregnancies among injection drug-using women in St Petersburg, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Nadia; Kershaw, Trace; Krasnoselskikh, Tatiana V; Kozlov, Andrei P

    2011-07-01

    This cross-sectional study estimated the prevalence of contraceptive methods and investigated whether abortion rates influence contraceptive behaviour among injection drug-using (IDU) women in St Petersburg, Russia. A self-administered questionnaire of behaviour in the last 3 months was applied to a convenient sample of IDU women. Of 80 sexually active participants, 67% had had an abortion. No participant reported using hormonal contraceptives or intrauterine devices (IUDs). The only valid method of contraception used was condoms, which was reported by half of the participants. Consistent condom use was reported by 22% of participants and was no more likely among those who had an abortion. Condom use was significantly associated with having multiple or casual sex partners [prevalence ratio (PR) 1.75, 95% (confidence interval) CI 1.11-2.78, p = 0.01], having an IDU sex partner (PR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36-0.85, p = 0.029) and with a negative attitude toward condoms (PR 0.53, 95% CI 0.33-0.84, p = 0.01). Abortions were less likely among those who had multiple or casual sex partners (PR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.97, p = 0.03). Despite the high prevalence of abortions among IDU women, none reported the use of hormonal contraception or IUDs. Having had an abortion was not associated with greater likelihood of using condoms. Participants mostly used condoms with casual or multiple sex partners, suggesting that condoms were used mainly to prevent HIV/sexually transmitted infection transmission and not to prevent pregnancy. Programmes to prevent unwanted pregnancies and reduce abortion-related health risks among this understudied vulnerable group are needed.

  6. Hormonal Contraception, Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, and Risk of HIV Disease Progression Among Zambian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kristin M; Kilembe, William; Haddad, Lisa; Vwalika, Bellington; Lakhi, Shabir; Khu, Naw Htee; Brill, Ilene; Chomba, Elwyn; Mulenga, Joseph; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan

    2016-03-01

    Some studies suggest that hormonal contraception, pregnancy, and/or breastfeeding may influence rates of HIV disease progression. From 1994 to 2012, HIV discordant couples recruited at couples' voluntary HIV counseling and testing centers in Lusaka were followed 3-monthly. Multivariate survival analyses explored associations between time-varying contraception, pregnancy, and breastfeeding and 2 outcomes among HIV-positive women: (1) time to death and (2) time to antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation. Among 1656 female seropositive, male seronegative couples followed for 3359 person-years (PY), 224 women died [6.7/100 PY; 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.8 to 7.6]. After 2003, 290 women initiated ART (14.5/100 PY; 95% CI: 12.9 to 16.2). In a multivariate model of time to death, hormonal implant [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.98] and injectable (aHR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.97) were significantly protective relative to nonhormonal method use, whereas oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use was not (aHR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.74 to 1.57) controlling for baseline HIV disease stage, time-varying pregnancy, time-varying breastfeeding, and year of enrollment. In a multivariate model of time-to-ART initiation, implant was significantly protective (aHR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.31 to 0.95), whereas OCP (aHR = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.44 to 1.10) and injectable (aHR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.55 to 1.32) were not relative to nonhormonal method use controlling for variables above, woman's age, and literacy. Pregnancy was not significantly associated with death (aHR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.66) or ART initiation (aHR = 1.24; 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.86), whereas breastfeeding was protective for death (aHR = 0.34; 95% CI: 0.19 to 0.62) and ART initiation (aHR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.29 to 0.85). Hormonal implants and injectables significantly predicted lower mortality; implants were protective for ART initiation. OCPs and pregnancy were not associated with death or ART initiation, whereas

  7. Contraceptive use and risk of unintended pregnancy in California

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Diana; Bley, Julia; Mikanda, John; Induni, Marta; Arons, Abigail; Baumrind, Nikki; Darney, Philip D.; Stewart, Felicia

    2004-01-01

    Abstract California is home to more than one out of eight American women of reproductive age. Because California has a large, diverse and growing population, national statistics do not necessarily describe the reproductive health of California women. This article presents risk for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections among women in California based on the California Women’s Health Survey. Over 8900 women of reproductive age who participated in this survey between 1998 and 2001 pr...

  8. Sexually transmitted diseases, human immunodeficiency virus, and pregnancy prevention. Combined contraceptive practices among urban African-American early adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, B F; Li, X; Galbraith, J; Feigelman, S; Kaljee, L

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the success of efforts to educate youth not only to use prescription contraceptives to avoid pregnancy, but also to use condoms to avoid sexually transmitted diseases, including infection with the human immunodeficiency virus. Longitudinal study of 383 African-American youth aged 9 to 15 years enrolled in a randomized, controlled trial of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) risk reduction intervention. Data about contraceptive practices were obtained at baseline and 6, 12, and 18 months later using a culturally and developmentally appropriate risk assessment tool administered with "talking" computers (Macintosh, Apple Computer Inc, Cupertino, Calif). Approximately three fourths of sexually active youth used some form of contraception in each 6-month round, with almost half of the youth using combinations of contraceptives. Among all youth at baseline and among control youth throughout the study, more than half used condoms and more than two thirds who used oral contraceptives also used condoms. Receipt of an AIDS education intervention was associated with use of more effective contraceptive practices (eg, condoms and another prescription or nonprescription method of birth control). After receiving the intervention, more than 80% of the youth who used oral contraceptives also used condoms. Contraceptive practices showed considerable stability. Knowledge about AIDS was positively associated with use of more effective contraceptive methods. Many youth are using condoms and prescription birth control simultaneously, and these use rates can be increased through AIDS education interventions.

  9. Contraceptive use before first pregnancy by women in India (2005-2006): determinants and differentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anjali; Singh, K K

    2015-12-29

    There exist ample of research literature investigating the various facet of contraceptive use behaviors in India but the use of contraception by married Indian women, prior to having their first pregnancy has been neglected so far. This study attempts to identify the socio demographic determinants and differentials of contraceptive use or non use by a woman in India, before she proceeds to have her first child. The analysis was done using data from the third National Family Health Survey (2005-2006), India. This study utilized information from 54,918 women who ever have been married and whose current age at the time of NFHS-3 survey was 15-34 years. To identify the crucial socio-demographic determinants governing this pioneering behavior, logistic regression technique has been used. Hosmer Lemeshow test and ROC curve analysis was also performed in order to check the fitting of logistic regression model to the data under consideration. Of all the considered explanatory variables religion, caste, education, current age, age at marriage, media exposure and zonal classifications were found to be significantly affecting the study behavior. Place of residence i.e. urban--rural locality came to be insignificant in multivariable logistic regression. In the light of sufficient evidences confirming the presence of early marriages and child bearing practices in India, conjunct efforts are required to address the socio demographic differentials in contraceptive use by the young married women prior to their first pregnancy. Encouraging women to opt for higher education, ensuring marriages only after legal minimum age at marriage and promoting the family planning programs via print and electronic media may address the existing socio economic barriers. Also, the family planning programs should be oriented to take care of the geographical variations in the study behavior.

  10. Pregnancy-related anxiety and depressive symptoms are associated with visuospatial working memory errors during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataja, E-L; Karlsson, L; Huizink, A C; Tolvanen, M; Parsons, C; Nolvi, S; Karlsson, H

    2017-08-15

    Cognitive deficits, especially in memory and concentration, are often reported during pregnancy. Similar cognitive dysfunctions can also occur in depression and anxiety. To date, few studies have investigated the associations between cognitive deficits and psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy. This field is of interest because maternal cognitive functioning, and particularly its higher-order aspects are related to maternal well-being and caregiving behavior, as well as later child development. Pregnant women (N =230), reporting low (n =87), moderate (n =97), or high (n =46) levels of depressive, general anxiety and/or pregnancy-related anxiety symptoms (assessed repeatedly with EPDS, SCL-90/anxiety subscale, PRAQ-R2, respectively) were tested in mid-pregnancy for their cognitive functions. A computerized neuropsychological test battery was used. Pregnant women with high or moderate level of psychiatric symptoms had significantly more errors in visuospatial working memory/executive functioning task than mothers with low symptom level. Depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy and concurrent pregnancy-related anxiety symptoms were significant predictors of the performance in the task. General anxiety symptoms were not related to visuospatial working memory. Cognitive functions were evaluated only at one time-point during pregnancy precluding causal conclusions. Maternal depressive symptoms and pregnancy-related anxiety symptoms were both associated with decrements in visuospatial working memory/executive functioning. Depressive symptoms seem to present more stable relationship with cognitive deficits, while pregnancy-related anxiety was associated only concurrently. Future studies could investigate, how stable these cognitive differences are, and whether they affect maternal ability to deal with demands of pregnancy and later parenting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pregnancy intention and use of contraception among Hispanic women in the United States: data from the National Survey of Family Growth, 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masinter, Lisa M; Feinglass, Joe; Simon, Melissa A

    2013-10-01

    Both unintended and adolescent childbearing disproportionately impact the Hispanic population of the United States. We used the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) to provide the most recent, nationally representative description of pregnancy, childbearing, and contraception for Hispanic females aged 15-44. We determined baseline fertility data for self-identified Hispanic female respondents. Among those reporting a pregnancy history, we calculated the proportion of pregnancies identified as unintended and their association with sociodemographic variables. We also assessed outcomes and estimates of relative risk for unintended pregnancy. Finally, we examined contraceptive use prior to self-reported unintended pregnancies. Approximately 70% of Hispanic women reported ever being pregnant, including 18% of teenagers. Over half (51%) of those pregnancies were unintended, including 81% among teenagers. The adjusted risk of unintended pregnancy was highest in women 15 to 19 years old and those with three or more pregnancies (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.64, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.44-1.88 and IRR 1.77, 95% CI: 1.53-2.06, respectively). Half of unintended pregnancies were preceded by no contraception. The most common reason for unintended pregnancy preceded by contraception was "improper use" (45%) and among pregnancies without use, the most common response (37%) was "I did not think I could get pregnant." There is a high frequency of unintended pregnancy and lack of contraceptive use among Hispanic women. These findings highlight the need for improved reproductive education and contraceptive counseling in this population.

  12. Emergency contraception in a country with restricted access to contraceptives and termination of pregnancy, a prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Medard M; Ostrowska, Lucyna; Swiątek, Ewa

    2013-10-01

    Poland has a restrictive abortion law. Emergency contraception (EC) is expensive and available only on prescription, which is not easily obtainable in public health care. We aimed to identify the main reasons for EC requests, observed failure rates and the type and incidence of adverse effects. Prospective single-center observational study. A cohort of women living in Warsaw, who requested EC. Data were collected via a questionnaire completed by healthcare providers prescribing EC, and included age, date of the request, previous EC use, time from intercourse to clinic visit and day of menstrual cycle on which intercourse took place. Reason for EC request, time lapse between unprotected intercourse and EC use, age of women requesting EC, reported cases of pregnancy. A total of 4655 women requested EC. Of these 62.9% (n = 2928) were ≤25 years old. During follow up, 0.75% (31 individuals) became pregnant. Adverse effects of hormonal EC were rare and mild. The main reason for requesting EC was problems associated with condoms (63.2%, n = 2609). The mean interval between unprotected intercourse and EC use was 21.2 h, but 26.7 h when EC failed (n.s.). Considering intake within and after 24 h, the difference was significant (p < 0.05). Women living in Warsaw seeking EC used the EC product very soon after unprotected intercourse, and this was probably one of the most important reasons for the low pregnancy rates in the studied population. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. Recruiting online: lessons from a longitudinal survey of contraception and pregnancy intentions of young Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Melissa L; Loxton, Deborah; Wigginton, Britta; Lucke, Jayne C

    2015-05-15

    Recruitment of young people for epidemiologic research remains challenging, with marked decreases in the effectiveness of face-to-face, mail, and telephone recruitment methods. We report on the implementation and feasibility of an innovative and flexible approach used to recruit participants for a longitudinal cohort study about contraceptive use and pregnancy (the Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention, and Decisions (CUPID) Study). Australian women aged 18-23 years were recruited using a range of online, networking, and offline methods, including social media (primarily Facebook (Facebook Inc., Menlo Park, California; http://www.facebook.com)), face-to-face events, distribution of promotional material, and media releases. Over the course of the 1-year recruitment period (beginning in September 2012), a total of 3,795 eligible women were recruited to complete the online survey, at a cost of approximately A$11 per participant. This sample was found to be broadly representative of the Australian population of women aged 18-23 years in terms of demographic characteristics, with the exception of an overrepresentation of tertiary-educated women (88.7% compared with 72.6%). This study demonstrated that although current recruitment strategies are required to be innovative and flexible in order to engage young people in epidemiologic research, representative samples can be achieved online at reasonable cost. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Pregnancy, contraceptive use, and HIV acquisition in HPTN 039: relevance for HIV prevention trials among African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Stewart E; Dai, James Y; Wang, Jing; Sichalwe, Bupe N; Akpomiemie, Godspower; Cowan, Frances M; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Baeten, Jared M; Hughes, James P; Wald, Anna; Celum, Connie

    2010-04-01

    Biomedical HIV prevention trials enroll sexually active women at risk of HIV and often discontinue study product during pregnancy. We assessed risk factors for pregnancy and HIV acquisition, and the effect of pregnancy on time off study drug in HIV Prevention Trials Network 039. A total of 1358 HIV negative, herpes simplex virus type 2-seropositive women from South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe were enrolled and followed for up to 18 months. A total of 228 pregnancies occurred; time off study drug due to pregnancy accounted for 4% of woman-years of follow-up among women. Being pregnant was not associated with increased HIV risk (hazard ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.23-1.80, P = 0.40). However, younger age was associated with increased risk for both pregnancy and HIV. There was no association between condom use as a sole contraceptive and reduced pregnancy incidence; hormonal contraception was not associated with increased HIV risk. Bacterial vaginosis at study entry was associated with increased HIV risk (hazard ratio 2.03, P = 0.02). Pregnancy resulted in only a small amount of woman-time off study drug. Young women are at high risk for HIV and are an appropriate population for HIV prevention trials but also have higher risk of pregnancy. Condom use was not associated with reduced incidence of pregnancy.

  15. [The efficiency of oral contraception containing drospirenone in treating symptoms of premenstrual syndrome or premenstrual dysphoric disorder in gyneacology practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svojanovská, K

    2010-10-01

    The efficiency of oral contraception containing drospirenone in treating symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) was demonstrated in a number of studies. The objective of this observation was to use the "Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool" (PSST) to identify women who suffer from severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or PMDD and evaluate the benefits of their treatment through using the oral contraceptive containing drospirenone in regime 24/4 in gyneacology practice. The retrospective study was conducted from September 2008 to August 2009. Fifty-one women met by the PSST (Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool, Steiner et. al., 2003) the criteria of severe PMS/PMDD. Twenty-eight women took no contraception at the start of the evaluation and twenty-three already took oral contraceptives before changing to the oral contraceptive with drospirenone. The women completed the PSST and in the case of severe PMS/PMDD started treatment with the oral contraceptive containing 20 microg ethinylestradiol /EE/ + 3 mg drospirenone /drsp/ in regime 24/4. The next evaluation was conducted by the same PSST after 3 or 4 months of treatment with this oral contraceptive. The study involved 51 women between the ages of 15 and 44 years (average 25.7 years), who completed the PSST before and after 3 or 4 months of treatment with the oral contraceptive containing drospirenone. The summary score of all subjects significantly decreased from 24.6 before they started using the oral contraceptive with drospirenone to 7,2 after 3 or 4 months of treatment with this oral contraceptive. Significant declines in summary scores have been shown in both groups (in the group without oral contraception from 24.9 at the start of the observation to 8.2 after 3 or 4 months of using this oral contraceptive with drospirenone; and from 24.3 to 6.0 in the group with the change from using various oral contraceptives to using the contraceptive containing drospirenone). The application of PSST for detection

  16. Identification of risk factors and perspectives of adolescents regarding pregnancy, sexuality and contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette Carrillo Soto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Describe the risk factors and perspectives of adolescents regarding pregnancy, sexuality and contraception at the Hospital General de Jerez, Zacatecas. Material and methods. Transversal, observational and descriptive study. The population consisted of 137 teenagers or young mothers with a history of pregnancy who attended a consultation in the General Hospital of Jerez and who were between 14 and 22 years old. Results. The average age of the 137 adolescents surveyed was 19.8 ± 1.9 years. 56.2% were single, 68.5% have primary and/or secondary, 75.9% of them depended economically on their father before getting pregnant and currently only 34.3% of them Conclusion. The information regarding the risks of pregnancy in adolescents presented in this document is insufficient. It is necessary to reinforce in schools, community health centers, hospitals, neighborhoods and homes, preventive education to avoid pregnancy at an early age and that this brings consequences for the adolescent mother, the child and her family.

  17. Association between long-acting reversible contraceptive use, teenage pregnancy, and abortion rates in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connolly A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Anne Connolly,1 Guilhem Pietri,2 Jingbo Yu,3 Samantha Humphreys4 1The Ridge Medical Practice, Cousen Road, Bradford, UK; 2HERON – A PAREXEL® Company, London, UK; 3Merck & Co, Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA; 4Merck Sharp & Dohme Limited, Hertfordshire, UK Background: Since the late 1990s, the British government has launched major strategies to address high teenage pregnancy and abortion rates in England. These have focused in part on improving access to contraception through national campaigns. This study assessed teenage pregnancy and abortion rate trends since 1998 and possible associations with usage of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs. Methods: Teenage conception rates and age-specific abortion rates were obtained from the Office for National Statistics and the Department of Health. LARC usage data was obtained for Depo-Provera, Implanon/Nexplanon, intrauterine devices, Mirena, and Noristerat from the IMS British Pharmaceutical Index, IMS Hospital Pharmacy Audit, IMS Disease Analyzer, and KT-31 reports. Through linear regression methods, changes in conception and abortion-related outcomes during 1998–2011 and the associations with LARC usage were assessed. Results: Conception rates for girls younger than 18 years of age decreased significantly between 1998–2011, from 46.6 to 30.7 per 1,000 girls. A statistically significant association was observed between this decrease and increased LARC usage (P=0.0024 in this population. Abortion rates among females aged <18 years or aged 18–19 years decreased between 1998–2011, and their associations with increased LARC usage were statistically significant (P=0.0029 and P=0.0479, respectively. The pattern in older women was complex; abortion rates in women aged 20–24 years or 25–34 years increased slightly from 1998 to 2011, with stabilization during 2007–2011. Conclusion: Increased LARC usage in England was significantly associated with decreased teenage pregnancy rates

  18. Long-acting reversible contraceptive acceptability and unintended pregnancy among women presenting for short-acting methods: a randomized patient preference trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubacher, David; Spector, Hannah; Monteith, Charles; Chen, Pai-Lien; Hart, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    Measures of contraceptive effectiveness combine technology and user-related factors. Observational studies show higher effectiveness of long-acting reversible contraception compared with short-acting reversible contraception. Women who choose long-acting reversible contraception may differ in key ways from women who choose short-acting reversible contraception, and it may be these differences that are responsible for the high effectiveness of long-acting reversible contraception. Wider use of long-acting reversible contraception is recommended, but scientific evidence of acceptability and successful use is lacking in a population that typically opts for short-acting methods. The objective of the study was to reduce bias in measuring contraceptive effectiveness and better isolate the independent role that long-acting reversible contraception has in preventing unintended pregnancy relative to short-acting reversible contraception. We conducted a partially randomized patient preference trial and recruited women aged 18-29 years who were seeking a short-acting method (pills or injectable). Participants who agreed to randomization were assigned to 1 of 2 categories: long-acting reversible contraception or short-acting reversible contraception. Women who declined randomization but agreed to follow-up in the observational cohort chose their preferred method. Under randomization, participants chose a specific method in the category and received it for free, whereas participants in the preference cohort paid for the contraception in their usual fashion. Participants were followed up prospectively to measure primary outcomes of method continuation and unintended pregnancy at 12 months. Kaplan-Meier techniques were used to estimate method continuation probabilities. Intent-to-treat principles were applied after method initiation for comparing incidence of unintended pregnancy. We also measured acceptability in terms of level of happiness with the products. Of the 916

  19. Role of young women's depression and stress symptoms in their weekly use and nonuse of contraceptive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kelli Stidham; Moreau, Caroline; Trussell, James; Barber, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    We prospectively examined the influence of young women's depression and psychological stress symptoms on their weekly contraceptive method use. We examined data from 689 women ages 18-20 years participating in a longitudinal cohort study. Women completed 8,877 weekly journals over the first year, which assessed reproductive, relationship, and health information. We focused on baseline depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale) and stress (Perceived Stress Scale) symptoms and weekly contraceptive method use. Analyses used multivariate random effects and multinomial logistic regression. Approximately one quarter of women exhibited moderate/severe depression (27%) and stress (25%) symptoms at baseline. Contraception was not used in 10% of weekly journals, whereas coital and noncoital methods were used in 42% and 48% of weeks, respectively. In adjusted models, women with moderate/severe stress symptoms had more than twice the odds of contraception nonuse than women without stress (odds ratio [OR] 2.23, confidence interval [CI] 1.02-4.89, p = .04). Additionally, women with moderate/severe depression (RR .52, CI .40-.68, p contraceptives (OCs; reference category). Women with stress symptoms also had higher relative risks of using condoms (RR 1.17, CI 1.00-1.34, p = .02) and withdrawal (RR 1.29, CI 1.10-1.51, p = .001) than OCs. The relative risk of dual versus single method use was also lower for women with stress symptoms. Women's psychological symptoms predicted their weekly contraceptive nonuse and use of less effective methods. Further research can determine the influence of dynamic psychological symptoms on contraceptive choices and failures over time. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Unintended pregnancy and use of emergency contraception among a large cohort of women attending for antenatal care or abortion in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakha, Fatim; Glasier, Anna

    2006-11-18

    Unintended pregnancy is common. Although many unintended pregnancies end in induced abortion, up to a third of those proceeding to birth might be unplanned. Some of these pregnancies could be prevented by emergency contraception. We have sought to establish how many pregnancies ending in either childbirth or abortion are unintended, and what proportion of women use emergency contraception to try to prevent pregnancy. 2908 women who attended an Edinburgh hospital for antenatal care and 907 attending for abortion fully completed a self-administered questionnaire including a validated measure of pregnancy intention and questions about emergency contraceptive use. 814 (89.7%) of 907 pregnancies among women requesting abortion were unintended compared with only 250 (8.6%) among 2908 women who planned to continue pregnancy. However, only 1909 (65.6%) of continuing pregnancies were intended. The rest of the women were ambivalent about pregnancy intention. In women who continued with their pregnancies intendedness was related to age, with unintended pregnancy most probable in young women (pconceiving, and is thus unlikely to reduce unintended pregnancy rates. Rather, we need to find ways to improve the use of regular contraception.

  1. The Relationship between Contraceptive Use and Unintended Pregnancies among Married Women in Thatta District, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumera Ali

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: The rate of unintended pregnancy has decreased from 24% to 16% in the last four to five years in Pakistan. However, this rate stills varies among the women living in the rural and urban areas of Pakistan. The females residing in the rural areas are less likely to have many contraceptive choices and receive no/low-quality family planning services; as a result, they end up with birth control failure and unintended pregnancy. Regarding this, more studies are needed to investigate the association between the unintended pregnancy and contraceptive use, particularly in the rural areas of Pakistan.Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy among the women at reproductive age living in Thatta district, Sindh, Pakistan. Methods:This nested case-control study was conducted on the women living in Thatta district during June 2011-July 2012. The pregnant women who did not want more children were considered as cases, and those who intended to have more children were considered as controls. The categorical and continuous variables were analyzed using the Chi-square test and independent t-tests, respectively. Results: According o the results of the present study, the use of contraceptive methods was significantly associated with increased risk of unintended pregnancy among the women living in Thatta district [OR: 2.77 (1.46-5.25]. Moreover, there was 14% increased risk of unintended pregnancy with one year increase in the age of the women [OR: 1.14 (1.10-1.19]. The age at marriage showed negative association with unintended pregnancy [OR: 0.92 (0.87-0.97]. The women having at least one son (alive were almost three times more likely to report their recent pregnancies as unintended, compared to those with no living son [OR: 2.97 (1.82-4.84]. In addition, the husband’s education and their opposition with the use of family planning methods [OR 2.16 (1.06-4.39] were

  2. Bothersome lower urinary symptoms during pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Results: Storage phase symptoms (nocturia, urgency, daytime frequency and painful bladder) were common ... (hesitancy, straining to pass urine and interrupted stream) were also found. ..... mixed sample and found that more white women.

  3. Influence of gender, anxiety and depression symptoms, and use of oral contraceptive in color perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria Aparecida da; Anfe, Taciana Emília de Almeida; Matos, Adriana Bona; Vieira, Glauco Fioranelli

    2015-01-01

    The color is a psychophysical phenomenon, and much has been studied about its physical components. However, the psychological part is poorly investigated, except for the difference between genders in the literature shows that more men are color deficient than women. Dental students are trained to better understand the differences in color, so we became interested in studying whether psychological variables such as anxiety and depression and use of hormonal contraceptives may interfere with this ability. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate if factors, such as, hormonal contraceptive use, depressive symptoms, anxiety and quality of life, influence on the ability of color discrimination of dental school students. Sixty-one subjects participated and the following instruments apply: (1) test that consists in the observation of a set of 25 labels (Pantones) with values of known colors, (2) scales of depression, anxiety, and quality of life assessments, and (3) Ishihara test. No difference was observed between genders as color perception (p = 0.868). Symptoms of anxiety and depression were significantly more frequent in the female population that showed worse quality of life (p color perception. Women using hormonal contraceptives had lower color perception than men (p = 0.04). No difference between the genders in the perception of colors was observed, contrary to common sense that women discriminate more colors than men, but women using hormonal contraceptives showed more difficulty in color perception. The ability to understand and distinguish color differences is extremely important in clinical dentistry. There could be differences in color perception between men and women that would influence clinical performance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Oral contraceptives, pregnancy and the risk of cerebral thromboembolism: the influence of diabetes, hypertension, migraine and previous thrombotic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, O

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of developing cerebral thromboembolism among pregnant women and among fertile women with hypertension, migraine, diabetes, and previous thrombotic disease, and to investigate the interaction of these risk factors with the use of oral contraceptives. DESIGN...... multivariate analysis, pregnancy implied an odds ratio (OR) for a cerebral thromboembolic attack of 1.3 (nonsignificant), diabetes an OR of 5.4 (P hypertension an OR of 3.1 (P ... thromboembolism whereas diabetes, hypertension, migraine and past thromboembolic events increased the risk of cerebral thromboembolism significantly. Women with these increased thrombotic risks should use oestrogen-containing oral contraceptives only after careful considerations of the risks, if at all....

  5. Male contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, John K

    2016-11-01

    Although female contraceptives are very effective at preventing unintended pregnancy, some women can not use them because of health conditions or side-effects, leaving some couples without effective contraceptive options. In addition, many men wish to take active responsibility for family planning. Thus, there is a great need for male contraceptives to prevent unintended pregnancies, of which 80-90 million occur annually. At present, effective male contraceptive options are condoms and vasectomy, which are not ideal for all men. Therefore, efforts are under way to develop novel male contraceptives. This paper briefly reviews the advantages and disadvantages of condoms and vasectomies and then discusses the research directed toward development of novel methods of male contraception. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Different patterns of depressive symptoms during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truijens, S.E.M.; Spek, V.R.M.; van Son, M.J.M.; Oei, S.G.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the US Preventive Services Task Force has advocated to screen pregnant and postpartum women for depression. However, we questioned the meaning of a single elevated depression score: does it represent just one episode of depression or do these symptoms persist throughout the entire

  7. The influence of psychosocial factors on pregnancy related pelvic symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, G. van de

    2006-01-01

    This thesis encloses studies which are separate analyses of the PRIMIS Study. In the PRIMIS Study a cohort of healthy women who expected their first child was followed up from early pregnancy to one year after delivery. Self-report questionnaires regarding psychosocial factors, urogenital symptoms

  8. Stability of the pregnancy obsessive compulsive personality disorder symptoms checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Broekhoven, K.E.M.; Karreman, A.; Hartman, E.E.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Because stability over time is central to the definition of personality disorder, aim of the current study was to determine the stability of the Pregnancy Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD) Symptoms Checklist (N = 199 women). Strong positive correlations between assessments at 32 weeks

  9. Unintended pregnancy, contraceptive use, and childbearing desires among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women in Botswana: across-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayondi, Gloria K; Wirth, Kathleen; Morroni, Chelsea; Moyo, Sikhulile; Ajibola, Gbolahan; Diseko, Modiegi; Sakoi, Maureen; Magetse, Jane Dipuo; Moabi, Kebaiphe; Leidner, Jean; Makhema, Joseph; Kammerer, Betsy; Lockman, Shahin

    2016-01-16

    Little is known about the impact of knowledge of HIV serostatus on pregnancy intention and contraceptive use in high-HIV-burden southern African settings in the era of widespread antiretroviral treatment availability. We analyzed interview data collected among 473 HIV-uninfected and 468 HIV-infected pregnant and recently postpartum women at two sites in southern Botswana. Participants were interviewed about their knowledge of their HIV status prior to pregnancy, intendedness of the pregnancy, contraceptive use, and future childbearing desires. The median age of the 941 women was 27 years, median lifetime pregnancies was 2, and 416 (44%) of pregnancies were unintended. Among women reporting unintended pregnancy, 36% were not using a contraceptive method prior to conception. Among contraception users, 81% used condoms, 13% oral contraceptives and 5% an injectable contraceptive. In univariable analysis, women with unintended pregnancy had a higher number of previous pregnancies (P = HIV-infected, 48% reported knowing they were HIV-uninfected, and 22% reported not knowing their HIV status prior to conception. In multivariable analysis, women who did not know their HIV status pre-conception were more likely to report their pregnancy as unintended compared to women who knew that they were HIV-uninfected (aOR = 1.7; 95%CI: 1.2-2.5). After controlling for other factors, unintended pregnancy was not associated with knowing one's HIV positive status prior to conception (compared with knowing one's negative HIV status prior to conception). Among women with unintended pregnancy, there was no association between knowing their HIV status and contraceptive use prior to pregnancy in adjusted analyses. Sixty-one percent of women reported not wanting any more children after this pregnancy, with HIV-infected women significantly more likely to report not wanting any more children compared to HIV-uninfected women (aOR = 3.9; 95%CI: 2.6-5.8). The high rates of reported unintended

  10. Clinical trial considerations on male contraception and collection of pregnancy information from female partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banholzer Maria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little guidance regarding the risk of exposure of pregnant women/ women of childbearing potential to genotoxic or teratogenic compounds via vaginal dose delivered through seminal fluid during sexual intercourse. Method We summarize current thinking and provide clinical trial considerations for a consistent approach to contraception for males exposed to genotoxic and/or teratogenic compounds or to compounds of unknown teratogenicity, and for collection of pregnancy data from their female partners. Results Where toxicity testing demonstrates genotoxic potential, condom use is required during exposure and for 5 terminal plasma half-lives plus 74 days (one human spermatogenesis cycle to avoid conception. For non-genotoxic small molecules and immunoglobulins with unknown teratogenic potential or without a no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL from embryo-fetal development (EFD studies and no minimal anticipated biological effect level (MABEL, condom use is recommended for males with pregnant partner/female partner of childbearing potential. For teratogenic small molecules with estimated seminal fluid concentration and a margin between projected maternal area under the curve (AUC and NOAEL AUC from EFD studies of ≥300 (≥100 for immunoglobulins or in the absence of a NOAEL with a margin between MABEL plasma concentration and maternal Cmax of ≥300 (≥10 for immunoglobulins, condom use is not required. However, condom use is required for margins below the thresholds previously indicated. For small molecules with available seminal fluid concentrations, condom use is required if margins are Pregnancy data should be proactively collected if pregnancy occurs during the condom use period required for males exposed to first-in-class molecules or to molecules with a target/class shown to be teratogenic, embryotoxic or fetotoxic in human or preclinical experiments. Conclusion These recommendations, based on a precaution

  11. Effect of BMI and body weight on pregnancy rates with LNG as emergency contraception: analysis of four WHO HRP studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festin, Mario Philip R; Peregoudov, Alexandre; Seuc, Armando; Kiarie, James; Temmerman, Marleen

    2017-01-01

    To estimate the effect of increased body weight and body mass index (BMI) on pregnancy rates with levonorgestrel (LNG) 1.5mg used as emergency contraception (EC). The study reviewed data from 6873 women in four WHO-HRP randomized trials on EC conducted between 1993 and 2010. Participants took either 1.5mg of LNG as a single dose or in two doses 12h apart, up to 120h of unprotected intercourse. Contraceptive efficacy (pregnancy rates) at different weight and BMI categories was evaluated. Overall pregnancy rate was low at 1.2%. Pregnancy rates were also low in women weighing over 80kg (0.7%) and who were obese (BMI over 30kg/m 2 ) (2.0%). The pooled analyses for pregnancy demonstrated that BMI over 30kg/m 2 decreased efficacy significantly (odds ratio 8.27, 95% confidence interval = 2.70-25.37) when compared to women in lower BMI categories, mainly influenced by pregnancies in obese women from one study site. Sensitivity analyses excluding that site showed that obesity was no longer a risk factor; however, the other studies included too few obese women in the sample to exclude a substantial decrease in efficacy. Pregnancy rates with use of LNG 1.5mg for EC were low at less than 3% across different weight and BMI categories. Pooled analyses showed an increase in pregnancy rates among obese women (BMI more than 30kg/m 2 ) compared to women with normal BMI levels, influenced by pregnancies all coming from one study site. Access to LNG as EC should still be promoted to women who need them, and not be restricted in any weight or BMI category, with additional attention for counselling and advice for obese women. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Emergency Contraception ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Emergency contraception refers to methods that women can use to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse, method failure or incorrect use. Unwanted pregnancy followed by unsafe abortion can be avoided by using different contraceptive methods including emergency contraceptives.

  13. Is there an association between depressive and urinary symptoms during and after pregnancy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, G. van de; Brummen, H.J. van; Bruinse, H.W.; Heintz, A.P.M.; Vaart, C.H. van der

    2007-01-01

    Depressive symptoms and urinary symptoms are both highly prevalent in pregnancy. In the general population, an association is reported between urinary symptoms and depressive symptoms. The association of depressive and urinary symptoms has not yet been assessed in pregnancy. In this study, we

  14. Association between knowledge about levonorgestrel emergency contraception and the risk of ectopic pregnancy following levonorgestrel emergency contraception failure: a comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duo; Yan, Ming-Xing; Ma, Jue; Xia, Wei; Xue, Rui-Hong; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    To study the association between knowledge about levonorgestrel emergency contraception (LNG-EC) and the risk of ectopic pregnancy (EP) following LNG-EC failure. This study included 600 women who had visited the hospital with LNG-EC failure. Of these, 300 with EP and 300 with intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) were recruited to the EP group and IUP group respectively. The participants were interviewed face-to-face using a standardized questionnaire. Pearson's chi-square tests and t-test were used to compare the sociodemographic characteristics, reproductive and gynecological history, surgical history, previous contraceptive experience, and answers to 10 questions concerning the knowledge about LNG-EC. Those who gave incorrect answers to the question regarding the basic mechanism and specific method of levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive pills (LNG-ECPs) were at a higher risk of EP after LNG-EC failure. Women who did not strictly follow instructions or advice from healthcare professionals were more likely to subsequently experience EP (p < 10(-4) ). Women with LNG-EC failure reported friends/peers, TV, and Internet as the main sources of information. No difference was observed with regard to the sources of knowledge on LNG-EC (p = 0.07). The results illustrate the importance of strictly following the doctor's guidance or drug instructions when using LNG-ECPs. The media should be used to disseminate information about responsible EC, and pharmacy staff should receive regular educational training sessions in this regard. © 2016 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Contraception and hormonal management in the perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Margaret E; Faubion, Stephanie S; MacLaughlin, Kathy L; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M

    2015-01-01

    This literature review focuses on contraception in perimenopausal women. As women age, their fecundity decreases but does not disappear until menopause. After age 40, 75% of pregnancies are unplanned and may result in profound physical and emotional impact. Clinical evaluation must be relied on to diagnose menopause, since hormonal levels fluctuate widely. Until menopause is confirmed, some potential for pregnancy remains; at age 45, women's sterility rate is 55%. Older gravidas experience higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, and death. Many safe and effective contraceptive options are available to perimenopausal women. In addition to preventing an unplanned and higher-risk pregnancy, perimenopausal contraception may improve abnormal uterine bleeding, hot flashes, and menstrual migraines. Long-acting reversible contraceptives, including the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), the etonogestrel subdermal implant (ESI), and the copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD), provide high efficacy without estrogen. LNG-IUS markedly decreases menorrhagia commonly seen in perimenopause. Both ESI and LNG-IUS provide endometrial protection for women using estrogen for vasomotor symptoms. Women without cardiovascular risk factors can safely use combined hormonal contraception. The CDC's Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use informs choices for women with comorbidities. No medical contraindications exist for levonorgestrel emergency-contraceptive pills, though obesity does decrease efficacy. In contrast, the Cu-IUD provides reliable emergency and ongoing contraception regardless of body mass index (BMI).

  16. The Contraceptive Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Picavet, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are relatively few unwanted pregnancies in the Netherlands, as evidenced by low abortion and teenage pregnancy rates. However, even in the Netherlands, one in eight pregnancies end in an induced abortion. Many unwanted pregnancies could have been prevented by better use of reliable contraceptive methods. In this thesis, contraceptive behaviour is studied with an emphasis on where the use of contraception goes wrong and the demographic profile of the women who have difficulty...

  17. Menstrual cycle, pregnancy and oral contraceptive use alter attraction to apparent health in faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B C; Perrett, D I; Little, A C; Boothroyd, L; Cornwell, R E; Feinberg, D R; Tiddeman, B P; Whiten, S; Pitman, R M; Hillier, S G; Burt, D M; Stirrat, M R; Law Smith, M J; Moore, F R

    2005-02-22

    Previous studies demonstrating changes in women's face preferences have emphasized increased attraction to cues to possible indirect benefits (e.g. heritable immunity to infection) that coincides with periods of high fertility (e.g. the late follicular phase of the menstrual cycle). By contrast, here we show that when choosing between composite faces with raised or lowered apparent health, women's preferences for faces that are perceived as healthy are (i) stronger during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle than during the late follicular, fertile phase, (ii) stronger in pregnant women than in non-pregnant women and (iii) stronger in women using oral contraceptives than in women with natural menstrual cycles. Change in preference for male faces was greater for short- than long-term relationships. These findings indicate raised progesterone level is associated with increased attraction to facial cues associated with possible direct benefits (e.g. low risk of infection) and suggest that women's face preferences are influenced by adaptations that compensate for weakened immune system responses during pregnancy and reduce the risk of infection disrupting foetal development.

  18. Unmet Need for Family Planning, Contraceptive Failure, and Unintended Pregnancy among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Sandra I.; Buzdugan, Raluca; Ralph, Lauren J.; Mushavi, Angela; Mahomva, Agnes; Hakobyan, Anna; Watadzaushe, Constancia; Dirawo, Jeffrey; Cowan, Frances M.; Padian, Nancy S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevention of unintended pregnancies among women living with HIV infection is a strategy recommended by the World Health Organization for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). We assessed pregnancy intentions and contraceptive use among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women with a recent pregnancy in Zimbabwe. Methods We analyzed baseline data from the evaluation of Zimbabwe’s Accelerated National PMTCT Program. Eligible women were randomly sampled from the catchment areas of 157 health facilities offering PMTCT services in five provinces. Eligible women were ≥16 years old and mothers of infants (alive or deceased) born 9 to 18 months prior to the interview. Participants were interviewed about their HIV status, intendedness of the birth, and contraceptive use. Results Of 8,797 women, the mean age was 26.7 years, 92.8% were married or had a regular sexual partner, and they had an average of 2.7 lifetime births. Overall, 3,090 (35.1%) reported that their births were unintended; of these women, 1,477 (47.8%) and 1,613 (52.2%) were and were not using a contraceptive method prior to learning that they were pregnant, respectively. Twelve percent of women reported that they were HIV-positive at the time of the survey; women who reported that they were HIV-infected were significantly more likely to report that their pregnancy was unintended compared to women who reported that they were HIV-uninfected (44.9% vs. 33.8%, pHIV status and lack of contraception use prior to pregnancy. Conclusions Unmet need for family planning and contraceptive failure contribute to unintended pregnancies among women in Zimbabwe. Both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women reported unintended pregnancies despite intending to avoid or delay pregnancy, highlighting the need for effective contraceptive methods that align with pregnancy intentions. PMID:25144229

  19. Emergency contraception: Knowledge and practice among women and the spouses seeking termination of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, S K

    2016-04-01

    India was one of the first countries to launch a formal family planning program. Initially, the main thrust of the program was on sterilization but subsequently it has got evolved and now the stress is to bring about awareness of contraception and make informed choices. Emergency contraception has been included in its armamentarium. This study was conducted to find out about the awareness among the cases who report for induced abortion. A total of 784 willing cases were enrolled in the study; there were no exclusion criteria except unwillingness. A parallel group was also included consisting of their spouses. Information that was being sought about Emergency Contraception (EC) included its knowledge, details of administration, and availability. Of the 784 cases, a large number, 742 (94.6%), underwent first trimester abortion and only 42 (5.3%) underwent second trimester abortion. 286 (36.4%) patients had not used any contraceptive. A large number had used natural methods (35.3%), like lactation, abstinence, or coitus interruptus, and 25.7% had used barrier contraception inconsistently. A very small percentage in both the groups knew about EC; more number of men knew about EC than women. Awareness about emergency contraception is low, as reported in many other studies, though it is available for many years. Awareness about contraceptives needs to be improved and emergency contraceptive should be advocated as a backup method. More efforts are required to generate awareness about regular use of effective contraception and emergency contraception if required.

  20. Restless Legs Symptoms and Pregnancy and Neonatal Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyieng'o, D Onentia; Kirwa, Kipruto; Tong, Iris; Martin, Susan; Antonio Rojas-Suarez, José; Bourjeily, Ghada

    2016-02-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a commonly occurring neurologic disorder that affects up to one third of women during pregnancy. RLS has been associated with increased sympathetic tone in the nonpregnant population. We examined whether a RLS surrogate is associated with a higher prevalence of pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Data were analyzed from a cross-sectional survey of 1000 women interviewed soon after delivery by using an RLS surrogate question. Women were asked how frequently (0 = none, 1 = rarely [pregnancy. Clinical charts were reviewed to obtain relevant demographic and clinical data, including the presence of gestational hypertensive disorders and neonatal outcomes at birth. Subjects who "always" experienced RLS were compared with subjects experiencing symptoms less frequently or not at all with respect to prevalence of gestational hypertensive disorder. The mean ([SD]) age, prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), and BMI at delivery were 29.0 (6.1) years, 26.1 (6.2) kg/m(2), and 32.0 (6.3) kg/m(2), respectively. The overall prevalence of the RLS surrogate (jumpy or jerky leg movements) was 35.5% with the following distribution on a Likert scale: score 1 = 6.4%; score 2 = 10.2%; score 3 = 8.1%; and score 4 = 10.8%. Chronic hypertension was present in 2.1%, pregnancy-induced hypertension in 9.5%, and preeclampsia in 4.5% of respondents. Subjects who reported "always" having sensations of jumpy or jerky legs were more likely to have gestational hypertensive disorders compared with those who reported less frequent occurrence of the symptoms. Adjusted odds ratios were 3.74 (95% CI, 1.31-10.72; P = 0.014) for chronic hypertension; 1.26 (95% CI, 0.65-2.46; P = 0.487) for pregnancy-induced hypertension; and 2.15 (95% CI, 0.97-4.75; P = 0.060) for preeclampsia. There was a significant association between leg movement score and neonatal birth weight (coefficient, -149.5 g [95% CI, -276.9 to -22.5]; P = 0.005) and gestational age at birth (-0.7 week [95% CI, -1.1 to

  1. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Urinary Incontinence During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, Gülşah; Güven, Emine Seda G; Tekin, Yeşim B; Şentürk, Şenol; Kağitci, Mehmet; Üstüner, Işık; Mete Ural, Ülkü; Şahin, Figen K

    2016-05-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) can frequently be seen in pregnant women. Pregnancy and delivery have been considered as risk factors in the occurrence of pelvic floor dysfunction and determinants of LUTS. The main associated risk factor is parity. In the present study, we aim to determine the frequency of LUTS and urinary incontinence (UI) during pregnancy and the associated risk factors. This prospective study was carried out in a total of 250 women during their 28- and 40-gestational week checks. The Urinary Distress Inventory-6, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7, and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form were used to determine LUTS and its effect on quality of life. The mean age and gestational age of the participants were 29.41 ± 5.70 year (range 18-44) and 35.45 ± 2.98 weeks (range 28-40), respectively. The prevalence of LUTS was 81.6%. The prevalence of UI during pregnancy was 37.2%. Stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were diagnosed as 15.6, 4.8 and 16.8%, respectively. We found that advanced age, smoking and multiparity were risk factors associated with incontinence. Incontinence reduced pregnant women's quality of life. Lower urinary tract symptoms are commonly seen among pregnant women and these symptoms negatively affect the quality of life of pregnant women. Advanced age, smoking and multiparity were risk factors associated with urinary incontinence and LUTS. Obstetricians should be on the lookout for individual urological problems in pregnancy. Resolving any urological issues and cessation of smoking for the affected individuals will help alleviate the problem. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Falling short of universal access to reproductive health: unintended pregnancy and contraceptive use among Mexican women with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Tamil

    2013-01-01

    A favourable context for women with HIV to prevent unintended pregnancy is a cornerstone of reproductive rights and will contribute to achieving universal access to reproductive health, a Millennium Development Goal target. This analysis explores the reproductive trajectories of Mexican women with HIV post-diagnosis and their access to reproductive counselling and use of contraceptives. In-depth interviews and short surveys were conducted with women of reproductive age living with HIV. Results indicate that sexual and reproductive health counselling in HIV care focuses on the male condom and does not routinely address reproductive desires or provide information about or access to other contraceptive methods. Unintended pregnancies result from inconsistent condom use and condom breakage. Women experienced discriminatory denial of and pressure to accept particular contraceptive methods because of their HIV status. Mexican women with HIV are not enjoying their constitutionally guaranteed right to freely choose the number and spacing of their children. Mexico's commitment to reproductive rights and the Popular Health Insurance offer policy and financial frameworks for providing family planning services in public HIV clinics. To ensure respectful implementation, rights-based training for HIV healthcare providers and careful monitoring and evaluation will be needed.

  3. Concordance between intention to use and current use of contraceptives among six-month postpartum women in Brazil: The role of unplanned pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Dos Santos, Osmara Alves; Fujimori, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    to examine the effect of pregnancy planning status in the concordance between intention to use and current use of contraceptives among postpartum women. a prospective study was conducted in 12 primary health care facilities in São Paulo, Brazil, from November 2013 to September 2014. A total of 264 woman aged 15-44 years old completed a face-to-face interview when they were pregnant (baseline), and were interviewed by phone at 6 months postpartum. At baseline, participants were questioned about the contraceptive method they would prefer to be using at 6 months postpartum. At 6 months postpartum, they answered about the contraceptive method they were currently using. Pregnancy planning status was measured using the Brazilian Portuguese London Measure of Unplanned Pregnancy. We conducted logistic regression, considering contraceptive preference-use concordance as the dependent variable and the main covariate as pregnancy planning status. Only 28.9% of postpartum women were using the method they preferred to use when they were pregnant. The agreement between preference and contraceptive use was higher for injectables (60.9%) and lowest for IUD, as nobody who preferred it was actually using it. Women who were not sure about what method they intended to use after childbirth more frequently reported no use at six months postpartum. Multivariate logistic regression showed that postpartum women whose pregnancy was unplanned were less likely to use the contraceptive methods that they intended to use when they were pregnant [aOR=0.36; 95%CI=0.14-0.97]. Brazilian women were able to access contraceptives in the postpartum period. However, there is a considerable discordance between their contraceptive intention to use and use at the sixth postpartum month. A higher unmet demand for IUD and sterilization should be highlighted. The pregnancy planning status is associated to postpartum contraceptive preference-use concordance, so interventions before pregnancy may affect

  4. Relationship between Maternal General and Specific-Pregnancy Stress, Anxiety, and Depression Symptoms and Pregnancy Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanjanzadeh, Parvin; Faramarzi, Mahbobeh

    2017-04-01

    Despite scientific advances in the field of physical problems during pregnancy, the effect of mental problems on the health of pregnant women is still an important issue that needs further research. To determine the association of symptoms of stress, anxiety and depression during pregnancy and there effect on the pregnancy outcome. This was a descriptive correlational study. The population included 200 pregnant women of the urban and rural health centers affiliated with Babol University of Medical Sciences. There were 100 each in second and third trimester. Convenience multi stage cluster sampling was performed. Data collection was received through the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), Pregnancy Distress Questionnaire (PDQ), and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14) questionnaires. The correlation results showed a significant difference between variables of depression, stress, and anxiety with birth weight, birth height and head circumference and infants' APGAR score (prelationships on prediction of infant weight (B=-0.324), anxiety on prediction of infant height (B=-0.197), stress on prediction of head circumference (B=-0.350) and depression on prediction of APGAR score (B=-0.323) are effective (pdepression, anxiety and stress in pregnancy, and scheduling to avoid adverse consequences of the pregnancy outcome.

  5. Prevalence of pregnancy experiences and contraceptive knowledge among single adults in a low socio-economic suburban community in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Li Ping; Atefi, Narges; Majid, Hazreen Abd; Su, Tin Tin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of pregnancy experience and its association with contraceptive knowledge among single adults in a low socio-economic suburban community in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2012 among the Kerinchi suburban community. Of the total 3,716 individuals surveyed, young single adults between 18 and 35 years old were questioned with regard to their experience with unplanned pregnancy before marriage. Contraceptive knowledge was assessed by a series of questions on identification of method types and the affectivity of condoms for the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. A total of 226 female and 257 male participants completed the survey. In total, eight female (3.5%) participants reported experience with an unplanned pregnancy before marriage, and five male (1.9 %) participants had the experience of impregnating their partners. The participants had a mean total score of 3.15 (SD = 1.55) for contraceptive knowledge out of a possible maximum score of five. Female participants who had experienced an unplanned pregnancy had a significantly lower contraceptive knowledge score (2.10 ± 1.48) than who had never experienced pregnancy (3.30 ± 1.35), p<0.05. Likewise, male participants who had experienced impregnating their partners had a significantly lower contraceptive knowledge score (1.60 ± 1.50) than those who did not have such experience (3.02 ± 1.59), p<0.05. The results showed evidence of premarital unplanned pregnancy among this suburban community. The low level of contraceptive knowledge found in this study indicates the need for educational strategies designed to improve contraceptive knowledge.

  6. Motivational interviews to improve contraceptive use in populations at high risk of unintended pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Amie; Nirantharakumar, Krishnarajah; Truchanowicz, Ewa G; Surenthirakumaran, Rajendra; MacArthur, Christine; Coomarasamy, Arri

    2015-08-01

    Effective contraceptive use has the potential to prevent around 230 million births each year. An estimated 222 million women want to delay pregnancy or cease childbearing, but are not actively using contraception. Lack of education is a known barrier for effective contraceptive use. Motivational interviews are presumed to improve effective contraceptive use, but studies to date report varied findings. Some studies demonstrate an improvement and others report no effect. A systematic review of evidence on the impact of motivational interviews on contraceptive use in women of childbearing age was carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE, BNI, Cochrane library, CINHAL, African Index Medicus, Web of Science, the Reproductive Health Library, and the Science Citation Index (inception-January 2013) without language restriction. Search terms included 'motivational interview* AND contraception OR family planning OR maternal OR pregnancy'. Randomised controlled trials comparing the effect of motivational interviews with standard practice on effective contraception use in women of reproductive age were included. The outcome measures were use of effective contraception or use of high-level contraception, and subsequent births or pregnancies. The random effects model was used to pool the risk ratios from individual studies. Eight randomised controlled trials were included in the review with a total of 3424 women at high risk of pregnancy. Meta-analysis showed an increase in effective contraceptive use with motivational interviews when compared with control (RR 1.32 95%CI 1.11, 1.56: P=0.002) in the period of zero to four months post intervention. No difference in effective contraceptive use was shown at four to eight months (RR 1.10, 95%CI 0.93, 1.32: P=0.27), and between eight to twelve months (RR 1.18 95%CI 0.96, 1.46: P=0.12). No evidence of effect in the reduction of subsequent pregnancies or births at twelve to twenty-four months was seen with motivational interviews (RR 0.80 95

  7. Bulimia symptoms and other risk behaviors during pregnancy in women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Scott J; Keel, Pamela K; Thuras, Paul; Mitchell, James E

    2004-09-01

    The current study examined the change in bulimic symptoms as well as alcohol, drug, and tobacco use during pregnancy in subjects with bulimia nervosa. A self-report questionnaire was used to collect retrospective data on eating disorder symptoms and substance use during pregnancy from 129 participants in a long-term study of bulimia nervosa. Follow-up data were collected for a total of 322 pregnancies occurring over a 10-15-year period. Overall, subjects reported that body dissatisfaction worsened, but binge eating and purging improved during pregnancy. However, the number of women completely abstinent from bulimic symptoms did not change significantly with pregnancy. Body esteem often worsened with pregnancy, particularly for women with active bulimia symptoms. Self-reported alcohol use significantly declined with pregnancy. In general, bulimia nervosa symptoms decreased during pregnancy, although the number of women completely abstinent did not change significantly.

  8. Prevalence of pregnancy experiences and contraceptive knowledge among single adults in a low socio-economic suburban community in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of pregnancy experience and its association with contraceptive knowledge among single adults in a low socio-economic suburban community in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2012 among the Kerinchi suburban community. Of the total 3,716 individuals surveyed, young single adults between 18 and 35 years old were questioned with regard to their experience with unplanned pregnancy before marriage. Contraceptive knowledge was assessed by a series of questions on identification of method types and the affectivity of condoms for the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. Results A total of 226 female and 257 male participants completed the survey. In total, eight female (3.5%) participants reported experience with an unplanned pregnancy before marriage, and five male (1.9 %) participants had the experience of impregnating their partners. The participants had a mean total score of 3.15 (SD = 1.55) for contraceptive knowledge out of a possible maximum score of five. Female participants who had experienced an unplanned pregnancy had a significantly lower contraceptive knowledge score (2.10 ± 1.48) than who had never experienced pregnancy (3.30 ± 1.35), pknowledge score (1.60 ± 1.50) than those who did not have such experience (3.02 ± 1.59), pknowledge found in this study indicates the need for educational strategies designed to improve contraceptive knowledge. PMID:25438066

  9. A retrospective cohort analysis comparing pregnancy rates among HIV-positive women using contraceptives and efavirenz- or nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    PATEL, Rena C.; ONONO, Maricianah; GANDHI, Monica; BLAT, Cinthia; HAGEY, Jill; SHADE, Starley B.; VITTINGHOFF, Eric; BUKUSI, Elizabeth A.; NEWMANN, Sara J.; COHEN, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Given recent concerns of efavirenz reducing the efficacy of contraceptive implants, we sought to determine if pregnancy rates differ among HIV-positive women using various contraceptive methods and efavirenz- or nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of HIV-positive women aged 15–45 years enrolled in HIV care facilities in western Kenya from January 2011 to December 2013. Pregnancy was diagnosed clinically and the primary exposure was a combination of contraceptive method and ART regimen. We used Poisson models, adjusting for repeated measures, as well as demographic, behavioral and clinical factors, to compare pregnancy rates among women on different contraceptive/ART combinations. Findings 24,560 women contributed 37,635 years of follow-up with 3,337 incident pregnancies. Among women using implants, adjusted pregnancy incidence for nevirapine- and efavirenz-based ART users were 1·1 (95% CI 0·72–1·5) and 3·3 (95% CI 1·8–4·8) per 100 women-years (w-y), respectively (adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) 3·0, 95% CI 1·3–4·6). Among women using depomedroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), adjusted pregnancy incidence for nevirapine- and efavirenz-based ART users were 4·5 (95% CI 3·7–5·2) and 5·4 (95% CI 4·0–6·8) per 100 w-y, respectively (aIRR 1·2, 95% CI 0·91–1·5). Women using other contraceptive methods, except for intrauterine devices and permanent methods, experienced 3·1–4·1 higher rates of pregnancy than women using implants, with 1·6–2·8 higher rates specifically among women using efavirenz-based ART. Interpretation While HIV-positive women using implants on efavirenz-based ART faced three times higher risk of contraceptive failure than those on nevirapine-based ART, these women still experienced lower contraceptive failure rates than women on all other contraceptive methods, except for intrauterine devices and permanent methods

  10. Pregnancy rates in HIV-positive women using contraceptives and efavirenz-based or nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy in Kenya: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rena C; Onono, Maricianah; Gandhi, Monica; Blat, Cinthia; Hagey, Jill; Shade, Starley B; Vittinghoff, Eric; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Newmann, Sara J; Cohen, Craig R

    2015-11-01

    Concerns have been raised about efavirenz reducing the effectiveness of contraceptive implants. We aimed to establish whether pregnancy rates differ between HIV-positive women who use various contraceptive methods and either efavirenz-based or nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens. We did this retrospective cohort study of HIV-positive women aged 15-45 years enrolled in 19 HIV care facilities supported by Family AIDS Care and Education Services in western Kenya between Jan 1, 2011, and Dec 31, 2013. Our primary outcome was incident pregnancy diagnosed clinically. The primary exposure was a combination of contraceptive method and efavirenz-based or nevirapine-based ART regimen. We used Poisson models, adjusting for repeated measures, and demographic, behavioural, and clinical factors, to compare pregnancy rates among women receiving different contraceptive and ART combinations. 24,560 women contributed 37,635 years of follow-up with 3337 incident pregnancies. In women using implants, adjusted pregnancy incidence was 1.1 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0.72-1.5) for nevirapine-based ART users and 3.3 per 100 person-years (1.8-4.8) for efavirenz-based ART users (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR] 3.0, 95% CI 1.3-4.6). In women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, adjusted pregnancy incidence was 4.5 per 100 person-years (95% CI 3.7-5.2) for nevirapine-based ART users and 5.4 per 100 person-years (4.0-6.8) for efavirenz-based ART users (adjusted IRR 1.2, 95% CI 0.91-1.5). Women using other contraceptive methods, except for intrauterine devices and permanent methods, had 3.1-4.1 higher rates of pregnancy than did those using implants, with 1.6-2.8 higher rates in women using efavirenz-based ART. Although HIV-positive women using implants and efavirenz-based ART had a three-times higher risk of contraceptive failure than did those using nevirapine-based ART, these women still had lower contraceptive failure rates than did those receiving all other

  11. Associations of life events during pregnancy with longitudinal change in symptoms of antenatal anxiety and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J. L.; Bockting, C. L. H.; Stolk, R. P.; Kotov, R.; Ormel, J.; Burger, H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to investigate the association of life events during pregnancy with change in antenatal anxiety and depression symptoms. We distinguished pregnancy related and non-pregnancy related events and assessed specificity of these associations for depressive or anxious symptoms. In addition, we

  12. Maternal adiposity prior to pregnancy is associated with ADHD symptoms in offspring: evidence from three prospective pregnancy cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, A; Miettunen, J.; Henriksen, Tine Brink

    2007-01-01

    Objectives:We examine whether pregnancy weight (pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and/or weight gain) is related to core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in school-age offspring.Design:Follow-up of prospective pregnancy cohorts from Sweden, Denmark and Finland within...... in this range). Logistic regression and latent class analyses were used to examine maternal pregnancy weight in relation to children's ADHD core symptoms.Results:Teacher rated 12 556 school-aged children. Gestational weight gain outside of the Institute of Medicine guidelines was not related to ADHD symptoms...... the Nordic Network on ADHD.Methods:Maternal pregnancy and delivery data were collected prospectively. Teachers rated inattention and hyperactivity symptoms in offspring. High scores were defined as at least one core symptom rated as 'severe' and two as 'present' (approximately 10% of children scored...

  13. Impact of emergency contraception status on unintended pregnancy: observational data from a women’s health practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payakachat N

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine if non-prescription emergency contraception (EC availability impacted self-reported unintended pregnancy rates and to assess women’s knowledge and awareness of EC prior to and after non-prescription availability.Methods: A survey regarding contraception use and knowledge was verbally administered to a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 272 pregnant women receiving prenatal care at a large urban community women’s clinic between August 2003 and October 2008. Statistical analyses determined the differences between two groups (before [BA] and after, [AA] non-prescription EC availability in the U.S. drug market in terms of self-reported unintended pregnancy rates, knowledge and awareness of EC.Results: The AA group reported higher incidence of unintended pregnancy when compared to the BA group (90.7% vs. 72.7%, P = 0.0172. The majority of both groups reported that they were not using any contraception at the time of conception (BA-84.4%; AA-83.3%. There was no significant difference in the participants’ awareness of EC between the two groups (BA-46.8% vs. AA-43.0% nor was there a significant difference between the two groups in the self-reported willingness to use EC in the future (BA-53.1% vs. AA-63.4%. However, among participants who were unaware of EC, 61% reported they would consider using it in the future after receiving brief EC counseling from a pharmacist or student pharmacist. Neither age nor pregnancy intention was associated with self-reported EC awareness but there was an association with income (P = 0.0410 and education (P = 0.0021.Conclusion: The change from prescription-only to non-prescription status of EC in the U.S. drug market did not impact the unintended pregnancy rate in this patient population. Lack of knowledge and awareness is still a major barrier to widespread EC use.

  14. A randomized trial of motivational interviewing and facilitated contraceptive access to prevent rapid repeat pregnancy among adolescent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jack; Lutz, Robyn; Osuagwu, Ngozi; Rotz, Dana; Goesling, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Most interventions designed to reduce teen pregnancy rates have not focused on pregnant and/or parenting adolescents. Therefore, a large randomized controlled trial was conducted regarding a motivational interviewing program entitled Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy in a low-income sample of adolescent mothers. This program recommended monthly sessions between a participant and a registered nurse over 18 months. This program also featured facilitated birth control access through transportation assistance and a part-time contraceptive clinic. The impact of this program on rapid repeat pregnancies at 18 months after enrollment was evaluated. Five hundred ninety-eight adolescent females were enrolled from 7 obstetrics-gynecology clinics and 5 postpartum units of a large hospital system in a Midwestern city. Each participant was enrolled at least 28 weeks pregnant or less than 9 weeks postpartum. Each participant was randomized to either the Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy intervention or a usual-care control condition. Intervention participants averaged 4.5 hours of assistance. Participants were contacted by blinded research staff at 6 and 18 months to complete self-report surveys. Differences in outcomes between the intervention and control groups were assessed using ordinary least-squares regression. There was an 18.1% absolute reduction in self-reported repeat pregnancy in the intervention group relative to the control group (20.5% vs 38.6%%; P Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy program represents one of the few evidence-based interventions to reduce rapid repeat teen pregnancy. This relatively brief intervention may be a viable alternative to more time-intensive programs that adolescent mothers may be unable or unwilling to receive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Pantić

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception refers to any device or drug that is used as an emergency procedure to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse.The first method of emergency contraception was high dose of estrogen. Concern about side effects led to subsequent development of the so-called Yuzpe regimen which combined ethinil estradiol with levonorgestrel and levonorgestrel alone. Less convenient to use is the copper intauterine contraceptive device.It is known that in some women sexual steroids may inhibit or delay ovulation and may interfere with ovum and sperm transport and implantation. Copper intrauterine device causes a foreign-body effect on the endometrium and a direct toxic effect to sperm and blastocyst.The Yuzpe regimen reduces the risk of pregnancy after a single act of sexual intercourse by about 75% and the levonorgestrel alone by about 85%. The copper intrauterine device is an extremely effective method for selected patients.Nausea and vomiting are common among women using the Yuzpe regimen and considerably less common among women using levonorgestrel alone regimen.Emergency contraception is relatively safe with no contraindications except pregnancy. It is ineffective if a woman is pregnant. There is no need for a medical hystory or a phisical examination before providing emergency contraceptive pills. They are taken long before organogenesis starts, so they should not have a teratogenic effect.Counseling should include information about correct use of the method, possible side effects and her preferences for regular contraception.Unintended pregnancy is a great problem. Several safe, effective and inexpensive methods of emergency contraception are available including Yuzpe regimen, levonorges-trel-only regimen and copper intrauterine device.

  16. Current Developments In Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Yaşar Sanhal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Contraception (birth control prevents pregnancy by interfering with the normal process of ovulation, fertilization, and implantation. There are different kinds of birth control that act at different points in the process. The rapid increase in the world population makes it mandatory to develop new contraceptive methods. According to WHO data, every year 200 billion new pregnancies occur and more than 50 billion of them are classified as unintended. To avoid complications of these unintended pregnancies and abortions, the contraception and kinds of contraceptive methods should be well known and understood. Recently, new hormonal contraceptive choices and regimen were adminestered and studies about male contraception and immunocontraception were performed. In this review, we discussed about the new development and progress on contraception.

  17. Impact of Hypnosis Intervention in Alleviating Psychological and Physical Symptoms During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevi, Zuhrah; Low, Wah Yun; Hassan, Jamiyah

    2016-04-01

    Physical symptoms (e.g., vomiting) and psychological symptoms (stress, anxiety, and depression) during pregnancy are common. Various strategies such as hypnosis are available to reduce these symptoms. The objective of the authors in this study is to investigate the impact of a hypnosis intervention in reducing physical and psychological symptoms during pregnancy. A pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental design was employed in this study. The hypnosis intervention was given to the experimental group participants at weeks 16 (baseline), 20 (time point 1), 28 (time point 2), and 36 (time point 3) of their pregnancy. Participants in the control group received only the traditional antenatal care. Participants from both groups completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) and a Pregnancy Symptoms Checklist at weeks 16, 20, 28 and 36 of pregnancy. Results indicated that stress and anxiety symptoms were significantly reduced for the experimental group, but not for the control group. Although mean differences for the depressive symptoms were not significant, the experimental group had lower symptoms at time point 3. The physical symptoms' results showed significant group differences at time point 3, indicating a reduction in the experience of physical symptoms for the experimental group participants. Our study showed that hypnosis intervention during pregnancy aided in reducing physical and psychological symptoms during pregnancy.

  18. Non-contraceptive oestrogen-containing preparations for controlling symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naheed, Bushra; Kuiper, Jan Herman; Uthman, Olalekan A; O'Mahony, Fidelma; O'Brien, Patrick Michael Shaughn

    2017-03-03

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a psychological and somatic disorder of unknown aetiology, with symptoms typically including irritability, depression, mood swings, bloating, breast tenderness and sleep disturbances. About 3% to 10% of women who experience these symptoms may also meet criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). PMS symptoms recur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and reduce by the end of menstruation. PMS results from ovulation and may be due to ovarian steroid interactions relating to neurotransmitter dysfunction. Premenstrual disorders have a devastating effect on women, their families and their work.Several treatment options have been suggested for PMS, including pharmacological and surgical interventions. The treatments thought to be most effective tend to fall into one of two categories: suppressing ovulation or correcting a speculated neuroendocrine anomaly.Transdermal oestradiol by patch, gel or implant effectively stops ovulation and the cyclical hormonal changes which produce the cyclical symptoms. These preparations are normally used for hormone therapy and contain lower doses of oestrogen than found in oral contraceptive pills. A shortened seven-day course of a progestogen is required each month for endometrial protection but can reproduce premenstrual syndrome-type symptoms in these women. To determine the effectiveness and safety of non-contraceptive oestrogen-containing preparations in the management of PMS. On 14 March 2016, we searched the following databases: the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group (CGF) Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Studies (CRSO); MEDLINE; Embase; PsycINFO; CINAHL; ClinicalTrials.gov; metaRegister of Controlled trials (mRCT); and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) Search Portal. In addition, we checked the reference lists of articles retrieved. We included published and unpublished randomized placebo or active

  19. Non-contraceptive benefits of hormonal and intrauterine reversible contraceptive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamondes, Luis; Valeria Bahamondes, M; Shulman, Lee P

    2015-01-01

    Most contraceptive methods present benefits beyond contraception; however, despite a large body of evidence, many healthcare professionals (HCPs), users and potential users are unaware of those benefits. This review evaluates the evidence for non-contraceptive benefits of hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive methods. We searched the medical publications in PubMed, POPLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE and LILACS for relevant articles, on non-contraceptive benefits of the use of hormonal and intrauterine reversible contraceptive methods, which were published in English between 1980 and July 2014. Articles were identified using the following search terms: 'contraceptive methods', 'benefits', 'cancer', 'anaemia', 'heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB)', 'endometrial hyperplasia', 'endometriosis' and 'leiomyoma'. We identified, through the literature search, evidence that some combined oral contraceptives have benefits in controlling HMB and anaemia, reducing the rate of endometrial, ovarian and colorectal cancer and ectopic pregnancy as well as alleviating symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Furthermore, the use of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system also controls HMB and anaemia and endometrial hyperplasia and cancer, reduces rates of endometrial polyps in users of tamoxifen and alleviates pain associated with endometriosis and adenomyosis. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate controls crises of pain associated with sickle cell disease and endometriosis. Users of the etonogestrel-releasing contraceptive implant have the benefits of a reduction of pain associated with endometriosis, and users of the copper intrauterine device have reduced rates of endometrial and cervical cancer. Despite the high contraceptive effectiveness of many hormonal and intrauterine reversible contraceptive methods, many HCPs, users and potential users are concerned mainly about side effects and safety of both hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive methods, and there is scarce information

  20. [The difficulties of contraception: conflicts and paradoxes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribier, F

    1988-06-01

    This work uses clinical examples to explore sources of conflict and denial of patients and physicians during contraception consultations. The discovery of oral contraceptives (OCs) and improvements in mechanical contraception raised hopes that couples could achieve total control of their fertility. But continued high abortion rates and the persistence of sexual problems and maladjustments have demonstrated that contraception alone is not a panacea. Conflicts about contraception may be conscious and quickly expressed during a consultation, even if a medical pretext is given. The resentment when 1 partner desires a child and the other does not for example can translate into a conflict about contraception. Some women are fully aware of their own ambivalence about pregnancy and contraception and able to express it openly, but very often the woman's concerns are expressed by questions, fears, and verbal slips. The fear that pills are unnatural or will cause congenital defects can be interpreted as an expression of guilt over the pleasure that pills permit. Sterility is the ultimate fear caused by this unlimited possibility for pleasure. In the majority of cases, physical complaints are the means by which contraception clients address their physicians. In some cases, intolerance to OCs may actually be a hysterical manifestation that is not understood. Such symptoms as nausea, breast swelling, dizziness, vomiting, nervousness, and insomnia may be signs of early pregnancy as well as of intolerance for pills. Intolerance to pills may be caused by intolerance of a sexuality in which all things seem possible but in which the individual feels unrecognized by the partner. The resulting aggression may be turned inward in the form of a morbid symptom or of forgetting or stopping pill use, recourse to abortion, and demand for recognition. Acting out, especially by adolescents, is common in the area of contraception. In some cases the psychological or emotional needs of the patient

  1. Unmet need for family planning, contraceptive failure, and unintended pregnancy among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra I McCoy

    Full Text Available Prevention of unintended pregnancies among women living with HIV infection is a strategy recommended by the World Health Organization for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT. We assessed pregnancy intentions and contraceptive use among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women with a recent pregnancy in Zimbabwe.We analyzed baseline data from the evaluation of Zimbabwe's Accelerated National PMTCT Program. Eligible women were randomly sampled from the catchment areas of 157 health facilities offering PMTCT services in five provinces. Eligible women were ≥16 years old and mothers of infants (alive or deceased born 9 to 18 months prior to the interview. Participants were interviewed about their HIV status, intendedness of the birth, and contraceptive use.Of 8,797 women, the mean age was 26.7 years, 92.8% were married or had a regular sexual partner, and they had an average of 2.7 lifetime births. Overall, 3,090 (35.1% reported that their births were unintended; of these women, 1,477 (47.8% and 1,613 (52.2% were and were not using a contraceptive method prior to learning that they were pregnant, respectively. Twelve percent of women reported that they were HIV-positive at the time of the survey; women who reported that they were HIV-infected were significantly more likely to report that their pregnancy was unintended compared to women who reported that they were HIV-uninfected (44.9% vs. 33.8%, p<0.01. After adjustment for covariates, among women with unintended births, there was no association between self-reported HIV status and lack of contraception use prior to pregnancy.Unmet need for family planning and contraceptive failure contribute to unintended pregnancies among women in Zimbabwe. Both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women reported unintended pregnancies despite intending to avoid or delay pregnancy, highlighting the need for effective contraceptive methods that align with pregnancy intentions.

  2. Common symptoms during pregnancy to predict depression and health status 14 years post partum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Mohsina; Clavarino, Alexandra M; Callaway, Leonie; Alati, Rosa; Najman, Jake M; Williams, Gail; Al Mamun, Abdullah

    2009-03-01

    To examine the prospective association between symptoms commonly experienced during pregnancy and the mental and general health status of women 14 years post partum. Data used were from the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy, a community-based prospective birth cohort study begun in Brisbane, Australia, in 1981. Logistic regression analyses were conducted. Data were available for 5118 women. Women who experienced a higher burden of symptoms during pregnancy were at greater risk of becoming depressed and reporting poorer health status 14 years post partum. Women who experienced major problems during pregnancy were 4 times more likely to be depressed and nearly 8 times more likely to report poorer health status 14 years after the index pregnancy compared with women who experienced few problems. Findings suggest that pregnant women who experience common symptoms during pregnancy are likely to experience poorer mental and self-reported general health 14 years after the pregnancy.

  3. Documentation of Pregnancy Status, Gynaecological History, Date of Last Menstrual Period and Contraception Use in Emergency Surgical Admissions: Time for a Change in Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Bowns, M; Wilson, M S J; Mustafa, A

    2015-12-01

    To determine whether pregnancy status, gynaecological history, date of last menstrual period and contraceptive use are documented in emergency female admissions of reproductive age admitted to general surgery. This is a retrospective study. This study was conducted in the United Kingdom. Females of reproductive age (12-50 years) admitted as an emergency to general surgery with abdominal pain were considered in this study. Retrospective analysis of medical notes of emergency female admissions with abdominal pain between January and September 2012. We recorded whether a pregnancy test result was documented (cycle 1). Results were analysed and a prompt added to the medical clerk-in document. We re-audited (cycle 2) between January and June 2013 looking for improvement. Documented pregnancy status within 24 h of admission and prior to any surgical intervention. 100 case notes were reviewed in stage 1. 30 patients (30 %) had a documented pregnancy status. 32 (32 %), 25 (25 %) and 29 (29 %) had a documented gynaecology history, contraceptive use and date of last menstrual period (LMP), respectively. 24 patients underwent emergency surgery, 6 (25 %) had a documented pregnancy status prior to surgery. Of 50 patients reviewed in stage 2, 37 (75.0 %) had a documented pregnancy status (p contraceptive use (p < 0.0001) documented. 40 patients (80 % had a documented LMP (p < 0.0001). 7 patients required surgery, of whom 6 (85.7 %) had a documented pregnancy test prior to surgery (p = 0.001). All pregnancy tests were negative. A simple prompt in the surgical admission document has significantly improved the documentation of pregnancy status and gynaecological history in our female patients, particularly in those who require surgical intervention. A number of patient safety concerns were addressed locally, but require a coordinated, interdisciplinary discussion and a national guideline. A minimum standard of care, in females of reproductive age, should include mandatory objective

  4. Contraceptive challenges experienced by women who requested ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of contraceptives over weekends and during lunch breaks could enable more women to prevent unwanted pregnancies, reducing the number of requests for TOP services. Keywords: abortions; accessibility of contraceptives; contraceptive challenges; contraceptives' side-effects; emergency contraceptives; termination of ...

  5. University Students Seeking Hormonal Emergency Contraception: Why Do They Not Want Pregnancy Now? When is it Suitable to Have Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aira Virtala

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available University students who sought hormonal emergency contraception (EC in the Tampere Student Health Station during the period 1.9.2000-31.12.2001 received a questionnaire on their use of it. Of the total, 114 responded (67%. The aim of this study was to ascertain why the respondents did not want to get pregnant now and when it would be suitable for them to get children. Free answers to these questions were analysed using a collective consensus method. The main reasons for not wanting pregnancy now were un? nished studies and the non-steady character of the relationship. Almost all planned to become pregnant some day in the future when their life situation was appropriate, usually at the age of about 30 years.

  6. Swedish teenager perceptions of teenage pregnancy, abortion, sexual behavior, and contraceptive habits--a focus group study among 17-year-old female high-school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Maria; Larsson, Margareta; Von Essen, Louise; Tydén, Tanja

    2005-10-01

    Sweden has the highest abortion numbers among the Nordic countries. Since 1995, the abortion rate among teenagers has increased by nearly 50%. We therefore undertook a study where the overall aim was to gain a deeper understanding on which factors female teenagers believe may explain the increasing numbers of teenage abortions. Teenagers' perceptions of teenage pregnancy, abortion, sexual behavior, and contraceptive habits were investigated. Six focus group interviews with 17-year-old Swedish girls were conducted. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by manifest content analysis. Negative attitudes toward teenage pregnancy and supportive attitudes toward abortion were expressed. Risk-taking behaviors such as negligence in contraceptive use and intercourse under the influence of alcohol were suggested as main reasons behind the increasing numbers of abortions among Swedish teenagers. The contemporary, sexualized, media picture was believed to influence adolescents' sexual behavior, and liberal attitudes toward casual sex were expressed. Girls were perceived as more obliged than boys in taking responsibility for contraceptive compliance and avoidance of pregnancy. The apprehension that hormonal contraceptives cause negative side-effects was widely spread, and the participants were found to have a somewhat limited knowledge of abortion. The majority were unsatisfied with the quality of sexual education provided by the schools. Possible reasons for increased abortion numbers among teenagers in Sweden could be liberal attitudes toward casual sex in combination with negligence in contraceptive use, use of alcohol followed by sexual risk-taking, fear of hormonal contraceptives, and a deterioration of sexual education in the schools.

  7. Prevention of unintended pregnancy and use of contraception?important factors for preconception care

    OpenAIRE

    Kallner, Helena Kopp; Danielsson, Kristina Gemzell

    2016-01-01

    Preservation of fertility and optimizing health before pregnancy is becoming increasingly important in societies where childbirth often is postponed. Research shows that as women postpone childbirth they achieve higher levels of education and higher incomes. This leads to advantages for their children and for society. However, as women postpone childbearing they are at risk for contracting conditions which may affect fertility and/or pregnancies, pregnancy outcome, and the newborn child. Prec...

  8. Emergency contraception with a copper IUD or oral levonorgestrel: an observational study of 1-year pregnancy rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turok, David K; Jacobson, Janet C; Dermish, Amna I; Simonsen, Sara E; Gurtcheff, Shawn; McFadden, Molly; Murphy, Patricia A

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the 1-year pregnancy rates for emergency contraception (EC) users who selected the copper T380 intrauterine device (IUD) or oral levonorgestrel (LNG) for EC. This prospective study followed women for 1 year after choosing either the copper T380 IUD or oral LNG for EC. The study was powered to detect a 6% difference in pregnancy rates within the year after presenting for EC. Of the 542 women who presented for EC, agreed to participate in the trial and met the inclusion criteria, 215 (40%) chose the copper IUD and 327 (60%) chose oral LNG. In the IUD group, 127 (59%) were nulligravid. IUD insertion failed in 42 women (19%). The 1-year follow-up rate was 443/542 (82%); 64% of IUD users contacted at 1 year still had their IUDs in place. The 1-year cumulative pregnancy rate in women choosing the IUD was 6.5% vs. 12.2% in those choosing oral LNG [hazard ratio (HR) 0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.29-0.97, p=.041]. By type of EC method actually received, corresponding values were 5.2% for copper IUD users vs. 12.3% for oral LNG users (HR 0.42, 95% CI: 0.20-0.85, p=.017). A multivariable logistic regression model controlling for demographic variables demonstrates that women who chose the IUD for EC had fewer pregnancies in the following year than those who chose oral LNG (HR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.26-0.96, p=.037). One year after presenting for EC, women choosing the copper IUD for EC were half as likely to have a pregnancy compared to those choosing oral LNG. Compared to EC users who choose oral levonorgestrel, those who select the copper IUD have lower rates of pregnancy in the next year. Greater use of the copper IUD for EC may lower rates of unintended pregnancy in high-risk women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sleep disturbances and binge eating disorder symptoms during and after pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulman, T Frances; Von Holle, Ann; Torgersen, Leila; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2012-10-01

    We compared sleep problems during pregnancy and sleep dissatisfaction 18 months after pregnancy in pregnant women with binge eating disorder (BED) symptoms and pregnant women without an eating disorder. Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Data were gathered from 72,435 women. A total of 1,495 (2.1%) women reported having BED symptoms both before and during pregnancy; 921 (1.3%) reported pre-pregnancy BED symptoms that remitted during pregnancy; 1,235 (1.7%) reported incident BED symptoms during pregnancy; and 68,784 (95.0%) reported no eating disorder symptoms before or during pregnancy (referent). Questionnaires were collected at 3 time points, with a median completion time of 17.1 weeks gestation, 30.1 weeks gestation, and 18.7 months after childbirth. We collected information on demographics, eating disorder status before and during pregnancy, sleep problems during the first 18 weeks of pregnancy, hours of sleep during the third trimester, and sleep satisfaction 18 months after childbirth. All BED symptom groups were significantly more likely to report sleep problems during the first 18 weeks of pregnancy than the referent (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.26-1.42, false discovery rate [FDR] P sleep than the referent (adjusted OR = 1.49, FDR P sleep 18 months after childbirth (adjusted ORs = 1.28-1.47, FDR P sleeping problems during pregnancy and dissatisfaction with sleep 18 months after childbirth. Health care professionals should inquire about BED during pregnancy as it may be associated with sleep disturbances, in addition to the hallmark eating concerns.

  10. Update on emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Wing Kay; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2016-12-01

    Emergency contraception provides a critical and time-sensitive opportunity for women to prevent undesired pregnancy after intercourse. Both access and available options for emergency contraception have changed over the last several years. Emergency contraceptive pills can be less effective in obese women. The maximum achieved serum concentration of levonorgestrel (LNG) is lower in obese women than women of normal BMI, and doubling the dose of LNG (3 mg) increases its concentration maximum, approximating the level in normal BMI women receiving one dose of LNG. Repeated use of both LNG and ulipristal acetate (UPA) is well tolerated. Hormonal contraception can be immediately started following LNG use, but should be delayed for 5 days after UPA use to avoid dampening the efficacy of UPA. The copper intrauterine device (IUD) is the only IUD approved for emergency contraception (and the most effective method of emergency contraception), but use of LNG IUD as emergency contraception is currently being investigated. Accurate knowledge about emergency contraception remains low both for patients and healthcare providers. Emergency contraception is an important yet underutilized tool available to women to prevent pregnancy. Current options including copper IUD and emergency contraceptive pills are safe and well tolerated. Significant gaps in knowledge of emergency contraception on both the provider and user level exist, as do barriers to expedient access of emergency contraception.

  11. Symptoms associated with the DSM IV diagnosis of depression in pregnancy and post partum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Martin; Marks, Maureen N; Pinard, Claudia; Taylor, Alyx; von Castelberg, Brida; Künzli, Hansjörg; Glover, Vivette

    2009-06-01

    Pregnancy and the postpartum may affect symptoms of depression. However it has not yet been tested how the symptoms used for the DSM IV diagnosis of depression discriminate depressed from non depressed women perinatally. A modified version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV (SCID interview) was used that allowed assessment of all associated DSM IV symptoms of depression with depressed and non depressed women in pregnancy and the postpartum period. Loss of appetite was not associated with depression either ante or postnatally. The antenatal symptom pattern was different from the postnatal. The sensitivity of the symptoms ranged from 0.7% to 51.6%, and specificity from 61.3% to 99.1%. The best discriminating symptoms were motor retardation/agitation and concentration antenatally, and motor retardation/agitation, concentration and fatigue postnatally. Depression in pregnancy and postpartum depression show significantly different symptom profiles. Appetite is not suitable for the diagnosis of depression in the perinatal period.

  12. Stability of the Pregnancy Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Symptoms Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Broekhoven, Kiki E M; Karreman, Annemiek; Hartman, Esther E; Pop, Victor J M

    2018-02-01

    Because stability over time is central to the definition of personality disorder, aim of the current study was to determine the stability of the Pregnancy Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD) Symptoms Checklist (N = 199 women). Strong positive correlations between assessments at 32 weeks of pregnancy and 2 and 3-3.5 years after childbirth were found (r between .62-.72), and the group mean score did not change over time. The Pregnancy OCPD Symptoms Checklist assesses stable, trait-like symptoms of OCPD.

  13. Factors associated with unintended pregnancy, poor birth outcomes and post-partum contraceptive use among HIV-positive female adolescents in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obare Francis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the experiences of unintended pregnancies and poor birth outcomes among adolescents aged 15–19 years in the general population are well documented, there is limited understanding of the same among those who are living with HIV. This paper examines the factors associated with experiencing unintended pregnancies, poor birth outcomes, and post-partum contraceptive use among HIV-positive female adolescents in Kenya. Methods Data are from a cross-sectional study that captured information on pregnancy histories of HIV-positive female adolescents in four regions of Kenya: Coast, Nairobi, Nyanza and Rift Valley provinces. Study participants were identified through HIV and AIDS programs in the four regions. Out of a total of 797 female participants, 394 had ever been pregnant with 24% of them experiencing multiple pregnancies. Analysis entails the estimation of random-effects logit models. Results Higher order pregnancies were just as likely to be unintended as lower order ones (odds ratios [OR]: 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.8–2.0 while pregnancies occurring within marital unions were significantly less likely to be unintended compared to those occurring outside such unions (OR: 0.1; 95% CI: 0.1–0.2. Higher order pregnancies were significantly more likely to result in poor outcomes compared to lower order ones (OR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.6–4.0. In addition, pregnancies occurring within marital unions were significantly less likely to result in poor outcomes compared to those occurring outside such unions (OR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1–0.9. However, experiencing unintended pregnancy was not significantly associated with adverse birth outcomes (OR: 1.3; 95% CI: 0.5–3.3. There was also no significant difference in the likelihood of post-partum contraceptive use by whether the pregnancy was unintended (OR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.5–1.5. Conclusions The experience of repeat unintended pregnancies among HIV-positive female adolescents

  14. Factors associated with unintended pregnancy, poor birth outcomes and post-partum contraceptive use among HIV-positive female adolescents in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obare, Francis; van der Kwaak, Anke; Birungi, Harriet

    2012-10-06

    Although the experiences of unintended pregnancies and poor birth outcomes among adolescents aged 15-19 years in the general population are well documented, there is limited understanding of the same among those who are living with HIV. This paper examines the factors associated with experiencing unintended pregnancies, poor birth outcomes, and post-partum contraceptive use among HIV-positive female adolescents in Kenya. Data are from a cross-sectional study that captured information on pregnancy histories of HIV-positive female adolescents in four regions of Kenya: Coast, Nairobi, Nyanza and Rift Valley provinces. Study participants were identified through HIV and AIDS programs in the four regions. Out of a total of 797 female participants, 394 had ever been pregnant with 24% of them experiencing multiple pregnancies. Analysis entails the estimation of random-effects logit models. Higher order pregnancies were just as likely to be unintended as lower order ones (odds ratios [OR]: 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.8-2.0) while pregnancies occurring within marital unions were significantly less likely to be unintended compared to those occurring outside such unions (OR: 0.1; 95% CI: 0.1-0.2). Higher order pregnancies were significantly more likely to result in poor outcomes compared to lower order ones (OR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.6-4.0). In addition, pregnancies occurring within marital unions were significantly less likely to result in poor outcomes compared to those occurring outside such unions (OR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-0.9). However, experiencing unintended pregnancy was not significantly associated with adverse birth outcomes (OR: 1.3; 95% CI: 0.5-3.3). There was also no significant difference in the likelihood of post-partum contraceptive use by whether the pregnancy was unintended (OR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.5-1.5). The experience of repeat unintended pregnancies among HIV-positive female adolescents in the sample is partly due to inconsistent use of contraception to prevent

  15. Informative content of clinical symptoms of acute appendicitis in different terms of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutovoy A.B.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to evaluate diagnostic efficacy of some clinical symptoms of acute appendicitis 75 women in different terms of pregnancy were examined. Informative content of such symptoms as Kocher- Volkovich, Rovsing, Bartomje - Michelson, Sitkovsky, Gabay, Brendo, Michelson, Ivanov was studied. Pain syndrome was fixed in all examined women. Pain localization was various and depended on the pregnancy term. During the I trimester of pregnancy the most often pain was manifestated in epigastrium and right lower quadrant, rarely in other abdomen regions. In the II trimester in majority of cases pain occurred in right lower quadrant. During III trimester pain prevailed in right upper quadrant of abdomen. Analyzing informative component of researching symptoms there was noted significant decrease (р<0,05; р<0,01; р<0,001 of their diagnostic value with growth of pregnancy term. Therefore Kocher – Volkovich and Rovsing symptoms were the most informative in the I trimester of pregnancy. Diagnostic efficacy of Brendo(67,3%, Michelson(55,7%, Ivanov(59,6% symptoms was higher than that of Kocher – Volkovich (36,5%, Rovsing (28,8%, Sitkovsky (51,9%, Bartomje – Michelson (55,7% symptoms, their value was diminishing together with increase of pregnancy terms.

  16. Oral contraceptives induced hepatotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Akshaya Srikanth; V. Manisree

    2013-01-01

    Oral Contraceptives are the pharmacological agents used to prevent pregnancy. These are divided as the combined and progestogen methods and are administered orally, transdermally, systemically and via vaginal route. All these methods contain both oestrogen and progestogen. Vigorous usage of oral contraceptives and anabolic steroids as associated with cholestasis, vascular lesions and hepatic neoplasm. Benign hepatic neoplasms are clearly associated with oral contraceptives. In this article we...

  17. Conduct Disorder Symptoms and Subsequent Pregnancy, Child-Birth and Abortion: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Willy; Mastekaasa, Arne

    2011-01-01

    Research on teenage pregnancy and abortion has primarily focused on socio-economic disadvantage. However, a few studies suggest that risk of unwanted pregnancy is related to conduct disorder symptoms. We examined the relationship between level of conduct disorder symptoms at age 15 and subsequent pregnancy, child-birth and abortion. A…

  18. Contraception and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos-Hesselink, JolienW.; Cornette, Jerome; Sliwa, Karen; Pieper, Petronella G.; Veldtman, Gruschen R.; Johnson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Contraceptive counselling should begin early in females with heart disease, preferably directly after the start of menstruation. In coming to a decision about the method of contraception, the following issues should be considered: (i) the risk of pregnancy for the mother and the consequences of an

  19. Risk factors and the choice of long-acting reversible contraception following medical abortion: effect on subsequent induced abortion and unwanted pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korjamo, Riina; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Mentula, Maarit

    2018-04-01

    To analyse the post-abortion effect of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) plans and initiation on the risk of subsequent unwanted pregnancy and abortion. retrospective cohort study of 666 women who underwent medical abortion between January-May 2013 at Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. Altogether 159 (23.8%) women planning post-abortion use of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) participated in a randomized study and had an opportunity to receive the LNG-IUS free-of-charge from the hospital. The other 507 (76.2%) women planned and obtained their contraception according to clinical routine. Demographics, planned contraception, and LARC initiation at the time of the index abortion were collected. Data on subsequent abortions were retrieved from the Finnish Abortion Register and electronic patient files until the end of 2014. During the 21 months ([median], IQR 20-22) follow-up, 54(8.1%) women requested subsequent abortions. When adjusted for age, previous pregnancies, deliveries, induced abortions and gestational-age, planning LARC for post-abortion contraception failed to prevent subsequent abortion (33 abortions/360 women, 9.2%) compared to other contraceptive plans (21/306, 6.9%) (HR 1.22, 95% CI 0.68-2.17). However, verified LARC initiation decreased the abortion rate (4 abortions/177 women, 2.3%) compared to women with uncertain LARC initiation status (50/489, 10.2%) (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06-0.48). When adjusted for LARC initiation status, age abortion (27 abortions/283 women, 9.5%) compared to women ≥25 years (27/383, 7.0%, HR1.95, 95% CI 1.04-3.67). Initiation of LARC as part of abortion service at the time of medical abortion is an important means to prevent subsequent abortion, especially among young women.

  20. A prospective longitudinal cohort study: evolution of GERD symptoms during the course of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fill Malfertheiner Sara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD in pregnancy are reported with a prevalence of 30–80%. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and severity of GERD symptoms during the course of pregnancy. Furthermore current practice in medical care for GERD during pregnancy was assessed. Methods We performed a prospective longitudinal cohort study on 510 pregnant women (mean age 28.12, SD 5.3. Investigations for reflux symptoms where based on the use of validated reflux-disease questionnaire (RDQ. Additional information was collected about the therapy. A group of non-pregnant women (mean age 24.56, SD 5.7 was included as controls. Frequency and severity of reflux symptoms were recorded in each trimester of pregnancy. Results The prevalence of GERD symptoms in pregnant women increased from the first trimester with 26.1 to 36.1% in the second trimester and to 51.2% in the third trimester of pregnancy. The prevalence of GERD symptoms in the control group was 9.3%. Pregnant women received medication for their GERD symptoms in 12.8% during the first, 9.1% during the second and 15.7% during the third trimester. Medications used >90% antacids, 0% PPI. Conclusion GERD symptoms occur more often in pregnant women than in non-pregnant and the frequency rises in the course of pregnancy. Medical therapy is used in a minority of cases and often with no adequate symptom relief.

  1. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy.

  2. Maternal depressive symptoms during and after pregnancy are associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in their 3- to 6-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, Elina; Lahti, Marius; Tuovinen, Soile; Lahti, Jari; Lipsanen, Jari; Savolainen, Katri; Heinonen, Kati; Hämäläinen, Esa; Kajantie, Eero; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Villa, Pia M; Laivuori, Hannele; Reynolds, Rebecca M; Räikkönen, Katri

    2017-01-01

    Maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy have been associated with child behavioural symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in early childhood. However, it remains unclear if depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy are more harmful to the child than depressive symptoms only during certain times, and if maternal depressive symptoms after pregnancy add to or mediate any prenatal effects. 1,779 mother-child dyads participated in the Prediction and Prevention of Pre-eclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction (PREDO) study. Mothers filled in the Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale biweekly from 12+0-13+6 to 38+0-39+6 weeks+days of gestation or delivery, and the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Conners' Hyperactivity Index at the child's age of 3 to 6 years (mean 3.8 years, standard deviation [SD] 0.5). Maternal depressive symptoms were highly stable throughout pregnancy, and children of mothers with consistently high depressive symptoms showed higher average levels (mean difference = 0.46 SD units, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.36, 0.56, p maternal depressive symptoms after pregnancy, which both added to and partially mediated the prenatal effects. Maternal depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy are associated with increased ADHD symptomatology in young children. Maternal depressive symptoms after pregnancy add to, but only partially mediate, the prenatal effects. Preventive interventions suited for the pregnancy period may benefit both maternal and offspring mental health.

  3. Parental depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy and attention problems in children: a cross-cohort consistency study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Batenburg, T.; Brion, M.J.; Henrichs, J.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Hofman, A.; Verhulst, F.C.; Lawlor, D.A.; Davey Smith, G.; Tiemeier, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy have been associated with offspring-attention deficit problems. Aim: We explored possible intrauterine effects by comparing maternal and paternal symptoms during pregnancy, by investigating cross-cohort consistency, and by investigating

  4. Parental depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy and attention problems in children: A cross-cohort consistency study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van Batenburg-Eddes (Tamara); M.-J. Brion (Maria); J. Henrichs (Jens); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); A. Hofman (Albert); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); G. Davey-Smith (George); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy have been associated with offspring-attention deficit problems. Aim: We explored possible intrauterine effects by comparing maternal and paternal symptoms during pregnancy, by investigating cross-cohort consistency, and by

  5. Contraceptive availability during an emergency response in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Sascha R; Kourtis, Athena P; Curtis, Kathryn M; Tepper, Naomi; Gorman, Susan; Jamieson, Denise J; Zotti, Marianne; Barfield, Wanda

    2013-03-01

    This article provides the evidence for contraceptive need to prevent unintended pregnancy during an emergency response, discusses the most appropriate types of contraceptives for disaster situations, and details the current provisions in place to provide contraceptives during an emergency response.

  6. Teen Pregnancy and Childbearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy has sub items, Reproductive Health & Teen Pregnancy Contraceptive Use STDs Teen Pregnancy & Childbearing Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Trends Negative Impacts Strategies & Approaches for Prevention Engaging Adolescent Males in Prevention Tips for Parents of Teens ...

  7. Noncontraceptive use of contraceptive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickles, Monique Collier; Alderman, Elizabeth

    2014-06-01

    • On the basis of strong research evidence, there are many noncontraceptive advantages to use of hormonal contraceptive agents in adolescent girls. (3) (4)(5)(7)(10)(11)(12)(13)(14). • On the basis of research evidence and consensus, most of these agents are safe with minor adverse effects. (2)(3)(4)(5)(7)(10)(11)(12)(13)(14). • On the basis of research evidence and consensus, through application of evidence-based approaches and proper counseling, pediatricians can use various contraceptive agents to treat several medical conditions and to help alleviate many of the undesired symptoms and complications associated with menstrual periods. (2)(3)(4)(5)(7)(10)(11)(12)(13) (14). • On the basis of research evidence and consensus, these agents may be used in sexually active adolescents to simultaneously help prevent unintended adolescent pregnancies. (2)(3)(4)(5)(7)(10)(11)(12)(13)(14).

  8. The Pregnancy Obsession-Compulsion-Personality Disorder Symptom Checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Broekhoven, K.; Hartman, E.; Spek, V.; Bergink, V.; van Son, M.J.M.; Karreman, A.; Pop, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Up until now, very little research has been undertaken on the possible role of personality traits, such as perfectionism and obsessive compulsive personality disorder (OCPD), on pregnancy distress. This is possibly due to the fact that no appropriate instruments are available for use

  9. The pregnancy obsession-compulsion-personality disorder symptom checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Broekhoven, K.; Hartman, E.E.; Spek, V.R.M.; Bergink, V.; van Son, M.; Karreman, A.; Pop, V.J.M.

    Background: Up until now, very little research has been undertaken on the possible role of personality traits, such as perfectionism and obsessive compulsive personality disorder (OCPD), on pregnancy distress. This is possibly due to the fact that no appropriate instruments are available for use

  10. Pregnancy Intention and Contraceptive Use among Women by Class of Obesity: Results from the 2006-2010 and 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Brian T; Elia, Jennifer L; Ha, Cathrine Y; Kaneshiro, Bliss E

    Conflicting research findings on the association of obesity and pregnancy intention may be due to their collective definition of obesity at a body mass index of 30 kg/m 2 or greater. However, obese women with a BMI of 40 kg/m 2 or greater may be both behaviorally and clinically different from obese women with a lower BMI. This study reexamines this relationship, stratifying by class of obesity; the study also explores variations in contraceptive use by class of obesity given their potential contribution to the incidence of unintended or unwanted pregnancy. This study combined data from the 2006 through 2010 and 2011 through 2013 US National Survey of Family Growth. Pregnancy intention (intended, mistimed, unwanted) and current contraceptive use (no method, barrier, pill/patch/ring/injection, long-acting reversible contraceptive, sterilization) were compared across body mass index categories: normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m kg/m 2 ), overweight (25.0-29.9), obese class 1 (30.0-34.9 kg/m 2 ), class 2 (35.0-39.9 kg/m 2 ), and class 3 (≥40 kg/m 2 , severe obesity). Weighted multinomial logistic regressions were refined to determine independent associations of body mass index class and pregnancy intention, as well as contraceptive method, controlling for demographic, socioeconomic, and reproductive factors. Body mass index data were available for 9,848 nonpregnant, sexually active women who reported not wanting to become pregnant. Women with class 3 obesity had significantly greater odds of mistimed (adjusted odd ratio [aOR], 1.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-2.75) or unwanted (aOR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.15-3.32) pregnancy compared with normal weight women. Women with class 2 or 3 obesity were more likely to not be using contraception (aOR, 1.53-1.62; 95% CI, 1.04-2.29). Although women with class 2 obesity were more likely to be using long-acting reversible contraceptive methods and sterilization over short-acting hormonal methods (aOR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.08-2.57; aOR, 2

  11. High pregnancy incidence and low contraceptive use among a prospective cohort of female entertainment and sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Putu; Evans, Jennifer L; Stein, Ellen S; Page, Kimberly; Maher, Lisa

    2018-05-03

    While HIV and unintended pregnancies are both occupational risks faced by female sex workers, the epidemiology of pregnancy and its drivers in this population remains understudied. This includes Cambodia, where the drivers of pregnancy among female entertainment and sex workers (FESW) remain unknown. The current study aimed to examine factors associated with incident pregnancy, as well as describe contraceptive use among FESW in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. This analysis drew from the Young Women's Health Study (YWHS)-2, a 12-month observational cohort of 220 FESW aged 15-29 years, conducted between August 2009 and August 2010. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were conducted at baseline and quarterly thereafter, alongside HIV and pregnancy testing. Bivariate and multivariable extended Cox regression analysis was used to examine correlates of incident pregnancy. At baseline, 6.8% of participants were pregnant, and only 10.8% reported using hormonal contraceptives, with 11.3% reporting an abortion in the past 3 months. Pregnancy incidence was high, at 22/100 person-years (95% CI: 16.3-30.1). In multivariable analysis, younger age (19-24 years versus 25-29 years) (Adjusted Hazards Ratio (AHR): 2.28; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.22-4.27), lower income (400,000-600,000 Riel (≤150$USD) versus > 600,000 Riel (> 150$USD)) (AHR 2.63; 95% CI 1.02-6.77) positively predicted pregnancy, while higher self-reported condom self-efficacy were associated with reduced pregnancy incidence (AHR 0.89; 95% CI 0.81-0.98). Results document high incidence of pregnancy and unmet reproductive health needs among FESWs in Cambodia. Findings point to an urgent need for multi-level interventions, including venue-based HIV/STI and violence prevention interventions, in the context of legal and policy reform. High pregnancy incidence in this population may also undermine recruitment and retention into HIV prevention intervention trials. The exploration of innovative and comprehensive sex

  12. Can the delivery method influence lower urinary tract symptoms triggered by the first pregnancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Botelho

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The increase of the intensity of urinary symptoms in late pregnancy and postpartum has been well documented by several authors, but their causes remain uncertain, partly because of its probable multifactor origin. There are also controversies whether the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms during pregnancy is the same as postpartum and whether the method of delivery could influence the risk of onset of urinary symptoms. This study aimed to evaluate the urinary symptoms triggered during pregnancy and its evolution in the late puerperium, correlating them with the delivery method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A longitudinal study was conducted, which included 75 primigravidae women, classified according to method of delivery as: (VD vaginal delivery with right mediolateral episiotomy (n = 28; (CS elective caesarean section (n = 26; and (EC emergency caesarean section (n = 21. Urinary symptoms were assessed in the last trimester of pregnancy and at 45 days (± 10 of puerperium with validated versions for Portuguese language of the following questionnaires: International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Overactive Bladder (ICIQ-OAB. RESULTS: It was observed that frequency, urgency, nocturia and urge incontinence, triggered during pregnancy, decreased significantly in the postpartum period, regardless of the delivery method (p = 0.0001. However, symptoms related to urinary loss due to stress persisted after vaginal delivery (p = 0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Urgency, frequency and nocturia triggered during pregnancy tend to disappear in the late postpartum period, regardless of the delivery method, but the symptoms related to urinary loss due to stress tend to persist in late postpartum period after vaginal delivery.

  13. Pipeline for Contraceptive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blithe, Diana L.

    2016-01-01

    The high rates of unplanned pregnancy reflect unmet need for effective contraceptive methods for women, especially for individuals with health risks such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and other conditions that may contraindicate use of an estrogen-containing product. Improvements in safety, user convenience, acceptability and availability of products remain important goals of the contraceptive development program. Another important goal is to minimize the impact of the products on the environment. Development of new methods for male contraception has the potential to address many of these issues with regard to safety for women who have contraindications to effective contraceptive methods but want to protect against pregnancy. It also will address a huge unmet need for men who want to control their fertility. Products under development for men would not introduce eco-toxic hormones in the waste water. Investment in contraceptive research to identify new products for women has been limited in the pharmaceutical industry relative to investment in drug development for other indications. Pharmaceutical R&D for male contraception was active in the 1990’s but was abandoned over a decade ago. The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) has supported a contraceptive development program since 1969. Through a variety of programs including research grants and contracts, NICHD has developed a pipeline of new targets/products for male and female contraception. A number of lead candidates are under evaluation in the NICHD Contraceptive Clinical Trials Network (CCTN) (1–3). PMID:27523300

  14. Symptoms of Allergic Rhinitis in Women during Early Pregnancy Are Associated with Higher Prevalence of Allergic Rhinitis in Their Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa Shinohara

    2007-01-01

    Results: Offspring whose mothers had any AR symptoms during early pregnancy showed a significantly higher adjusted odds ratio for the onset of AR in offspring than those whose mothers had no symptoms during pregnancy (adjusted Odds Ratio: 6.26, p=0.036. However, the symptoms of AR during late pregnancy showed no effects on the odds ratio. In contrast, the presence or absence of AR symptoms during early or late pregnancy showed no association with the prevalence of food allergy, atopic dermatitis or asthma in offspring. Conclusions: Our results suggest the presence of possible epigenetic mechanisms regulating the onset of AR in humans presumably through increased organ-specific hypersensitivity.

  15. Contraceptive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, M; Atkinson, L

    1984-06-01

    A question of the 1980s is how will contraceptive technology contribute to improving family planning services to meet the goal of making available a simple, safe, effective, and widely acceptable contraceptive method. Significant changes in existing technology in the 1970s resulted in safer and more effective contraceptive methods. Voluntary sterilization emerged as the primary method in developed and developing countries, as important modifications simplified the procedure for women. The tolerance and effectiveness of the IUD were improved by reducing its size, adding copper to its surface, or encapsulating progesterone within it. The steroid content of the birth control pill was reduced 10-fold, leading to fewer side effects, and the pill was found to be an effective postcoital contraceptive when taken at specific intervals. Vacuum aspiration for the termination of 1st trimester pregnancy proved to be 1 of the safest surgical techniques practiced. Belated attention is now being focused on adapting existing contraceptive methods for use during the postpartum period and breast feeding. The insertion of an IUD immediately following childbirth is a particularly useful option in the developing world as an increasing number of women have their babies in urban hospitals. A method of enhancing the contraceptive effect of breast feeding should neither change milk production nor transfer the drug to the nursing infant. Fortunately, progestin-only pills have been found to have no effect on breast milk and an attempt is being made to expand the use of this approved method. More simplification of female sterilization is needed. Current techniques require back-up facilities in case of complications and are unlikely to meet the developing world's enormous demand. 2 methods not widely used -- spermicides and periodic abstinence -- are coming under new scrutiny. In mid-1983 the US Food and Drug Administration approved a spermicide-impregnanated disposable sponge for over

  16. Association of pregnancy and Candida vaginal colonization in women with or without symptoms of vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leli, C; Mencacci, A; Meucci, M; Bietolini, C; Vitali, M; Farinelli, S; D' Alò, F; Bombaci, J C; Perito, S; Bistoni, F

    2013-06-01

    Candida infection is one of the main causes of vulvovaginitis. The experience of symptoms of vulvovaginitis during pregnancy changes in relation to clinical, behavioral, and demographic factors. Candidiasis is associated with an increased risk of delivery complications. In some studies pregnant women are found more symptomatic than non-pregnant women, but in others a higher prevalence of asymptomatic infections is described during pregnancy. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of Candida vaginal colonization in pregnant women, and investigate if the occurrence of symptoms is influenced by pregnancy, in a population of Italian native and immigrant women. A total of 344 outpatients, who visited the laboratory for routine genital examination, independently of pregnancy or presence or absence of symptoms of vulvovaginitis, were evaluated. Colonization by Candida spp. was significantly higher in pregnant than non-pregnant patients (31.4% vs. 19.9%; χ2=5.59; P=0.018), nevertheless pregnant women were significantly more often asymptomatic compared to non-pregnant (46.5% vs. 16%; χ2=42.31; Pvulvovaginitis (respectively: P<0.0001 and P=0.008). Pregnancy seems to be independently associated to Candida spp. asymptomatic vaginal infection. Given that candidiasis has been associated with possible delivery complications, these results suggest to screen for Candida spp. vaginal colonization asymptomatic women during pregnancy.

  17. [Immigrant women at the health center. Monitoring of pregnancy and contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austveg, B

    1987-01-23

    Over the past decade, Norwegian cities have experienced an influx of immigrants, many from third world countries. Women from these societies have brought with them cultural traditions and mores regarding birth, prevention and their own bodies which can present many problems and challenges to public health personnel. This study specifically deals with the experiences of midwives and clinicians working with immigrant women in Oslo, and offers some recommendations to health care staffs in their counseling and treating such women. Many things which seem obvious to Western-trained clinicians may not seem so to their patients, and when staff are not understood or are questioned they may interpret this as a challenge of their authority and competence. For example, Norwegian health workers, having been reared in a society concerned about the "population explosion" and often having been trained to readily equate large families with poverty and/or ignorance of birth control, must attempt to try and understand that this is not necessarily true, and that such attitudes can limit the effectiveness of counseling in sensitive areas. Most Asian and African societies see children as an economic resource. The author accordingly urges health care workers to approach their patients in this area, as in others, with empathy and to try and be aware of their assumptions. Cultural traditions should also be taken into account when recommending a particular form of birth control to a woman or couple requesting such advice. Some methods will be more or less acceptable to different nationalities. For instance, many Asian cultures view menstruation as a necessary part of nature's plan to maintain balance between the "hot" and "cold" forces of the body, and since oral contraceptives often reduce flow, they might be considered as harmful. Condoms, on the other hand, may be more readily acceptable since they do not affect body rhythms. Coitus interruptus is the most widely practices form of birth

  18. Emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... IUD placed inside the uterus CHOICES FOR EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION Two emergency contraceptive pills may be bought without a prescription. ...

  19. Acculturative stress is associated with trajectory of anxiety symptoms during pregnancy in Mexican-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, Andrea; D'Anna-Hernandez, Kimberly

    2017-05-01

    Over half of pregnant women report anxiety symptoms and these symptoms may be precipitated by stressful experiences. Anxiety rates may be higher in Mexican-American women who experience sociocultural stressors, such as acculturation, acculturative stress and discrimination. However, the role of such stressors on the trajectory of anxiety symptoms across pregnancy is not yet known. Mexican-American women (n=151) completed surveys across pregnancy about acculturation, acculturative stress, perceived discrimination, and state anxiety. Multilevel modeling found that acculturation (Anglo orientation, b=0.050, SE=0.379, t (137.561)=0.134, p=0.894; Mexican orientation, b=0.775, SE=0.692, t (133.424)=1.121, p=0.264) and perceived discrimination (b=-1.259, SE=0.921, t (137.489)=-1.367, p=0.174) were not associated with the trajectory of anxiety symptoms. However, acculturative stress, even while controlling for perceived stress, was associated with high levels of anxiety symptoms that were elevated early in pregnancy (b=-0.045, SE=0.022, t (135.749)=-2, p=0.047). This work highlights the unique role of acculturative stress in risk for prenatal anxiety in early pregnancy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Contraception for the older woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasier, A; Gebbie, A

    1996-04-01

    Contraception presents particular problems for women over the age of 40. Although fertility is declining and the risk of pregnancy may be small, the consequences of an unplanned pregnancy may be socially devastating and medically ill-advised. Menstrual dysfunction and psychosexual difficulties increase with age and may exacerbate the side-effects of some methods of contraception. The long-term risks of combined hormonal contraception, particularly cardiovascular disease, become more pertinent to women whose natural risk of disease increases with age. Patterns of sexual activity and contraceptive use change with age. The advantages and disadvantages of currently available methods of contraception are difficult to quantify, and the choice of method is very much a matter for individual concern. The increasing prevalence of HRT may complicate matters for some women who are unsure for how long to continue using contraception. Contraceptives of the future may be designed to improve the reproductive health of all women, particularly those approaching the menopause.

  1. The underutilization of emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Kit S

    2012-04-01

    Despite the availability of effective contraceptive methods, unintended pregnancy continues to be a significant health problem for women throughout the world. The reasons for unplanned pregnancy include failure to use contraception, incorrect use of contraception, unplanned consensual intercourse, and rape. Emergency contraception was once heralded as a means of reducing the rates of unintended pregnancy, elective abortion, and unwanted childbirth. But more than three decades after the first oral form was introduced, the use of emergency contraception remains suboptimal-even in the United States, where it is available to most women of childbearing age without a prescription. Nurses can help narrow this clinical gap in women's health care by increasing awareness of emergency contraception, correcting common misconceptions about its mechanism of action and potential adverse effects, and facilitating patient access.

  2. Associations between acetaminophen use during pregnancy and ADHD symptoms measured at ages 7 and 11 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M D Thompson

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to replicate and extend the recently found association between acetaminophen use during pregnancy and ADHD symptoms in school-age children. METHODS: Participants were members of the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative Study, a longitudinal study of 871 infants of European descent sampled disproportionately for small for gestational age. Drug use during pregnancy (acetaminophen, aspirin, antacids, and antibiotics were analysed in relation to behavioural difficulties and ADHD symptoms measured by parent report at age 7 and both parent- and child-report at 11 years of age. The analyses included multiple covariates including birthweight, socioeconomic status and antenatal maternal perceived stress. RESULTS: Acetaminophen was used by 49.8% of the study mothers during pregnancy. We found significantly higher total difficulty scores (Strengths and Difficulty Questionnaire parent report at age 7 and child report at age 11 if acetaminophen was used during pregnancy, but there were no significant differences associated with any of the other drugs. Children of mothers who used acetaminophen during pregnancy were also at increased risk of ADHD at 7 and 11 years of age (Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised. CONCLUSIONS: These findings strengthen the contention that acetaminophen exposure in pregnancy increases the risk of ADHD-like behaviours. Our study also supports earlier claims that findings are specific to acetaminophen.

  3. Associations between Acetaminophen Use during Pregnancy and ADHD Symptoms Measured at Ages 7 and 11 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John M. D.; Waldie, Karen E.; Wall, Clare R.; Murphy, Rinky; Mitchell, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to replicate and extend the recently found association between acetaminophen use during pregnancy and ADHD symptoms in school-age children. Methods Participants were members of the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative Study, a longitudinal study of 871 infants of European descent sampled disproportionately for small for gestational age. Drug use during pregnancy (acetaminophen, aspirin, antacids, and antibiotics) were analysed in relation to behavioural difficulties and ADHD symptoms measured by parent report at age 7 and both parent- and child-report at 11 years of age. The analyses included multiple covariates including birthweight, socioeconomic status and antenatal maternal perceived stress. Results Acetaminophen was used by 49.8% of the study mothers during pregnancy. We found significantly higher total difficulty scores (Strengths and Difficulty Questionnaire parent report at age 7 and child report at age 11) if acetaminophen was used during pregnancy, but there were no significant differences associated with any of the other drugs. Children of mothers who used acetaminophen during pregnancy were also at increased risk of ADHD at 7 and 11 years of age (Conners’ Parent Rating Scale-Revised). Conclusions These findings strengthen the contention that acetaminophen exposure in pregnancy increases the risk of ADHD-like behaviours. Our study also supports earlier claims that findings are specific to acetaminophen. PMID:25251831

  4. Prenatal Pregnancy Complications and Psychiatric Symptoms: Children with ASD versus Clinic Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Megan E.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the association between prenatal pregnancy complications (PPC) and childhood psychiatric symptoms in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and non-ASD children who were referred to a psychiatric clinic (Controls). Parents completed a "DSM-IV"-referenced rating scale and developmental history questionnaire.…

  5. Prevalence, course and determinants of carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms during pregnancy : A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meems, M.; Truijens, S. E. M.; Spek, V.; Visser, L. H.; Pop, V. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence, severity and relation to fluid retention of self-reported pregnancy-related carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms in a large sample of pregnant women. Design A prospective longitudinal cohort study. Setting Dutch women who became pregnant between January 2013

  6. Prepartum autobiographical memory specificity predicts post-traumatic stress symptoms following complicated pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, Beatrijs J. A.; Wessel, Ineke; Engelhard, Iris M.; Peeters, Louis L.; Dalgleish, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Prior research has shown that reduced autobiographical memory specificity predicts an increase in post-traumatic stress severity in traumatised individuals. Studies have also demonstrated that reduced memory specificity predicts later symptoms of depression after pregnancy-related life stress. So

  7. Symptoms of an Intrauterine Hematoma Associated with Pregnancy Complications: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Lan; Wei, Zhaolian; Cao, Yunxia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the predictive value of the symptoms of an intrauterine hematoma (IUH) for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods A literature review was performed with the search terms, including intrauterine/subchorionic/retroplacental/subplacental hematoma/hemorrhage/bleeding/collection/fluid, covering the period from January, 1981 to January, 2014. We just focused on the pregnancy outcomes associated with different symptoms of an IUH. Results It is generally agreed that a retroplacental, posterior or subchorionic in the fundus of uterus, and/or persistent IUH is associated with adverse outcomes in the ongoing pregnancy. However, the prognosis value of both volume and gestational age at diagnosis of IUH still remains controversial. Some researchers argue that a large IUH is associated with an increased risk of adverse events during pregnancy while others refuted. It is believed by some that the earlier an IUH was detected, the higher the risk for adverse outcomes would be, while no or weak association were reported by other studies. The prognostic value of the simultaneous presence of vaginal bleeding on pregnancy outcome is also controversial. Conclusions Both the position relative to the placenta or uterus and duration of IUH have strong predictive value on the prognosis in the ongoing pregnancy. However, the prognostic values of the IUH volume, gestational age at diagnosis and the simultaneous presence of vaginal bleeding remain controversial up to now. Moreover, most of previous reports are small, uncontrolled studies with incomplete information. Prospective, large sample, cohorts studies which take all detailed symptoms of an IUH into consideration are needed when we evaluate its clinical significance in the prognosis of pregnancy. PMID:25369062

  8. Maternal depressive symptoms during and after pregnancy are associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in their 3- to 6-year-old children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Wolford

    Full Text Available Maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy have been associated with child behavioural symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in early childhood. However, it remains unclear if depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy are more harmful to the child than depressive symptoms only during certain times, and if maternal depressive symptoms after pregnancy add to or mediate any prenatal effects. 1,779 mother-child dyads participated in the Prediction and Prevention of Pre-eclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction (PREDO study. Mothers filled in the Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale biweekly from 12+0-13+6 to 38+0-39+6 weeks+days of gestation or delivery, and the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Conners' Hyperactivity Index at the child's age of 3 to 6 years (mean 3.8 years, standard deviation [SD] 0.5. Maternal depressive symptoms were highly stable throughout pregnancy, and children of mothers with consistently high depressive symptoms showed higher average levels (mean difference = 0.46 SD units, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.36, 0.56, p < 0.001 compared to the low group, and proportion (32.1% vs. 14.7% and odds (odds ratio = 2.80, 95% CI 2.20, 3.57, p < 0.001 of clinically significant ADHD symptoms. These associations were not explained by the effects of maternal depressive symptoms after pregnancy, which both added to and partially mediated the prenatal effects. Maternal depressive symptoms throughout pregnancy are associated with increased ADHD symptomatology in young children. Maternal depressive symptoms after pregnancy add to, but only partially mediate, the prenatal effects. Preventive interventions suited for the pregnancy period may benefit both maternal and offspring mental health.

  9. An update on emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, Michele C; Olusola, Patti L; Low, Sarah B

    2014-04-01

    Emergency contraception decreases the risk of unintended pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse or after suspected failure of routine contraception (e.g., a condom breaking). Oral methods include combined contraceptive pills (i.e., Yuzpe method), single- or split-dose levonorgestrel, and ulipristal. The Yuzpe method and levonorgestrel are U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved for use 72 hours postcoitus, whereas the newest method, ulipristal, is approved for up to 120 hours postcoitus. The copper intrauterine device may be used as emergency contraception up to seven days after unprotected intercourse. It is nonhormonal and has the added benefit of long-term contraception. Advanced provision of emergency contraception may be useful for all patients, and for persons using ulipristal because it is available only by prescription. Physicians should counsel patients on the use and effectiveness of emergency contraception, the methods available, and the benefits of routine and consistent contraception use.

  10. Changes in blood levels of proteinase inhibitors, pregnancy zone protein, steroid carriers and complement factors induced by oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Poulsen, Henning Kvist; Teisner, Børge

    1993-01-01

    Three low-dose oral contraceptives Trinordiol, Gynatrol, and Marvelon, containing ethinylestradiol (EE) in combination with triphasic levonorgestrel (LNg), monophasic levonorgestrel, and monophasic desogestrel (DGS), respectively, were given to 65 healthy women, n = 21-22 in each group. Blood...

  11. Exercise in obese pregnant women: The role of social factors, lifestyle and pregnancy symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIntyre H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity may reduce the risk of adverse maternal outcomes, yet there are very few studies that have examined the correlates of exercise amongst obese women during pregnancy. We examined which relevant sociodemographic, obstetric, and health behaviour variables and pregnancy symptoms were associated with exercise in a small sample of obese pregnant women. Methods This was a secondary analysis using data from an exercise intervention for the prevention of gestational diabetes in obese pregnant women. Using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ, 50 obese pregnant women were classified as "Exercisers" if they achieved ≥900 kcal/wk of exercise and "Non-Exercisers" if they did not meet this criterion. Analyses examined which relevant variables were associated with exercise status at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks gestation. Results Obese pregnant women with a history of miscarriage; who had children living at home; who had a lower pre-pregnancy weight; reported no nausea and vomiting; and who had no lower back pain, were those women who were most likely to have exercised in early pregnancy. Exercise in late pregnancy was most common among tertiary educated women. Conclusions Offering greater support to women from disadvantaged backgrounds and closely monitoring women who report persistent nausea and vomiting or lower back pain in early pregnancy may be important. The findings may be particularly useful for other interventions aimed at reducing or controlling weight gain in obese pregnant women.

  12. Path model of antenatal stress and depressive symptoms among Chinese primipara in late pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingtao; Zeng, Yingchun; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Ying; Li, Jie

    2016-07-21

    Antenatal maternal mental health problems have numerous consequences for the well-being of both mother and child. This study aimed to test and construct a pertinent model of antenatal depressive symptoms within the conceptual framework of a stress process model. This study utilized a cross-sectional study design. participants were adult women (18 years or older) having a healthy pregnancy, in their third trimester (the mean weeks gestation was 34.71). depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured by Zung's Self-rating Depressive and Anxiety Scale, stress was measured by Pregnancy-related Pressure Scale, social support and coping strategies were measured by Social Support Rating Scale and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire, respectively. path analysis was applied to examine the hypothesized causal paths between study variables. A total of 292 subjects were enrolled. The final testing model showed good fit, with normed χ (2) = 32.317, p = 0.061, CFI = 0.961, TLI = 0.917, IFI = 0.964, NFI = 0.900, RMSEA = 0.042. This path model supported the proposed model within the theoretical framework of the stress process model. Pregnancy-related stress, financial strain and active coping have both direct and indirect effects on depressive symptoms. Psychological preparedness for delivery, social support and anxiety levels have direct effects on antenatal depressive symptoms. Good preparedness for delivery could reduce depressive symptoms, while higher levels of anxiety could significantly increase depressive symptoms. Additionally, there were indirect effects of miscarriage history, irregular menstruation, partner relationship and passive coping with depressive symptoms. The empirical support from this study has enriched theories on the determinants of depressive symptoms among Chinese primipara, and could facilitate the formulation of appropriate interventions for reducing antenatal depressive symptoms, and enhancing the mental health of

  13. Emergency contraception: clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasier, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) is widely used to prevent unwanted pregnancy. This review considers the safety and efficacy of three commonly used methods -- levonorgestrel (LNG-EC), ulipristal acetate (UPA) and the copper intrauterine device. All are extremely safe, and side effects are minimal. Concerns about increased risks of ectopic pregnancy after EC use have proved unfounded, and possible teratogenic effects seem unlikely. Although the true effectiveness of EC is impossible to estimate, recent research suggests that LNG-EC prevents around 50% of expected pregnancies in women using the method within 72 h of intercourse, whereas UPA appeared to prevent almost two thirds of pregnancies. Emergency intrauterine device insertion probably prevents over 95% of pregnancies. However, although improved accessibility of EC has clearly led to increased use, it does not appear to have had any public health benefit in reducing unintended pregnancy rates. Most of the data on sexual behavior following improved access to EC do not show any detrimental effect on subsequent use of other more effective methods of contraception or on the incidence of unintended pregnancy or sexually transmitted infection. However, unless these other methods of contraception are also made easily available from pharmacies, improved access to EC risks unlinking its use with use of subsequent ongoing contraception. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Teen motherhood and pregnancy prototypes: the role of social context in changing young African American mothers' risk images and contraceptive expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ashley B; Simons, Ronald L; Simons, Leslie Gordon; Gibbons, Frederick X; Gerrard, Meg

    2013-12-01

    Despite the declining rate of teen pregnancies in the United States, academic and public health experts have expressed concern over the still relatively high rate of rapid repeat pregnancies among adolescents, particularly among minority youth. Using a sample of over 300 African American female adolescents, the current study used insights from the prototype/willingness model of adolescent risk behavior to explore this risk. More specifically, it assessed the relationship between entry into unwed motherhood during mid-to-late adolescence and changes in prototypes of unmarried pregnant teens. Further, it explored the extent to which these changing prototypes accounted for young mothers' later contraceptive expectations. We tested the possibility that social images were affected not only by personal experience (the birth of a child) but also by the family and community context in which this experience took place. The findings show that the early entrance into teen motherhood was associated with a shift toward more favorable prototypes of unwed pregnant teens, but that this was only the case for young mothers in disadvantaged contexts. Given this, prototype changes helped to explain the link between teen motherhood and contraceptive expectations only for those in disadvantaged contexts. We discuss these findings in terms of their practical and theoretical implications.

  15. Protective Factors, Risk Indicators, and Contraceptive Consistency Among College Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Leslie F; Sieving, Renee E; Pettingell, Sandra L; Hellerstedt, Wendy L; McMorris, Barbara J; Bearinger, Linda H

    2016-01-01

    To explore risk and protective factors associated with consistent contraceptive use among emerging adult female college students and whether effects of risk indicators were moderated by protective factors. Secondary analysis of National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health Wave III data. Data collected through in-home interviews in 2001 and 2002. National sample of 18- to 25-year-old women (N = 842) attending 4-year colleges. We examined relationships between protective factors, risk indicators, and consistent contraceptive use. Consistent contraceptive use was defined as use all of the time during intercourse in the past 12 months. Protective factors included external supports of parental closeness and relationship with caring nonparental adult and internal assets of self-esteem, confidence, independence, and life satisfaction. Risk indicators included heavy episodic drinking, marijuana use, and depression symptoms. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate relationships between protective factors and consistent contraceptive use and between risk indicators and contraceptive use. Self-esteem, confidence, independence, and life satisfaction were significantly associated with more consistent contraceptive use. In a final model including all internal assets, life satisfaction was significantly related to consistent contraceptive use. Marijuana use and depression symptoms were significantly associated with less consistent use. With one exception, protective factors did not moderate relationships between risk indicators and consistent use. Based on our findings, we suggest that risk and protective factors may have largely independent influences on consistent contraceptive use among college women. A focus on risk and protective factors may improve contraceptive use rates and thereby reduce unintended pregnancy among college students. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published

  16. The Symptoms Get Worse after Pregnancy in Sheehan's Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Hao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sheehan’s syndrome, which is pituitary necrosis after severe postpartum hemorrhage and hypovolemia, may cause hypopituitarism immediately or several years later, depending on the degree of tissue destruction. We report an unusual case, in which a 55-year-old woman with Sheehan's syndrome got worse symptoms after spontaneous labor. In 1998, she had severe postpartum hemorrhage and pituitary necrosis during the third delivery, thus it was diagnosed as Sheehan’s syndrome by clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, and magnetic resonance imaging. She was treated by replacement therapy including hydrocortisone and levothyroxine sodium. However, she had the fourth spontaneous pregnancy in 2000 and got worse symptoms after delivery. We carefully concluded that pregnancy provided no evidence against the diagnosis of Sheehan’s syndrome because pregnancy might improve hypopituitarism by stimulating the pituitary remnant to undergo hyperplasia and irritating the placenta to secrete hormone. However, pregnancy might aggravate the symptoms by inducing autoimmunity as well. All in all, early diagnosis and adequate medical treatment are important to provide a good prognosis of Sheehan’s syndrome.

  17. [Intrauterine contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, P F

    1984-09-01

    Approximately 60 million women worldwide use IUDs. Despite worldwide distribution, the total number of IUD carriers has barely increased since 1970. Due to its risks and side effects there is a retrograding tendency both in West Germany and the US. To generate positive development, 3 basic trends have emerged: 1) Restrictive usage of the pharmacologically inactive, 1st generation IUDs such as the Lippes Loop or the Saf-T-Coil, 2) the increasing usage of small plastic IUDs with bioactive alloys to decrease failure rates such as the copper (2nd generation) or hormone-releasing IUDs, and 3) improvements made by changing its design to reduce side effects without loss of contraceptive effectiveness. Almost all IUDs increase monthly blood loss by 50-100%. The risk of illness for women with IUDs is 2-3 times higher than for a woman without or with other contraceptive methods. About 20% of all expulsions occur unnoticed. There are 2 kinds of perforations: primary (iatrogenic), at time of insertion, and secondary, some time after insertion. The IUD failure rate is about 1-3 pregnancies/100 woman years. In case of pregnancy, the IUD must be removed immediately. IUD insertion requires consent of the woman and can be made to women from 16 years on, presupposing moral maturity. IUD insertion after a miscarriage or abortion does not lead to risks or complications. Due to its corrosive quality, the copper IUD can only remain inside the uterus for a limited time. IUDs could become an excellent contraceptive method if it were possible to decrease bleeding, design easily-removeable IUDs, and prolong their potential for duration in the body.

  18. Social support and pregnancy: II. Its relationship with depressive symptoms among Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, T; Toda, M A; Shima, S; Sugawara, K; Sugawara, M

    1998-02-01

    In a questionnaire survey among 1329 first-trimester pregnant women, both the husband support measures and unwanted pregnancy ('stressor' agent in pregnancy) showed significant effects on an elevated score of the cognitive disturbance subscale of the Zung's self-rating depression scale (SDS), while only unwanted pregnancies showed an effect on an elevated score of the dysphoric mood subscale of the SDS. However, no interaction was observed between the husband support measures and unwanted pregnancy, therefore the effect of the husband's social support on the cognitive disturbance score was not that of a buffer, but rather a main effector. Finally, multiple regression analyses showed that the dysphoric mood score was preceded by unwanted pregnancy, premenstrual irritability, public self-consciousness, and maternal overprotection; while the cognitive disturbance score was preceded by unwanted pregnancy, husband reduced 'given' and 'giving' support, maternal reduced care and overprotection, paternal reduced care, low annual income, low private self-consciousness, and smoking. These findings suggest that the husband's support for a pregnant woman is effective only in reducing cognitive symptoms, and that different symptomatic constellations have different sets of psychosocial correlates.

  19. Depressive Symptoms Prior to Pregnancy and Infant Low Birth Weight in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Andrew; Labys, Charlotte A; Burns, Jonathan K

    2015-10-01

    Despite improvements in service delivery and patient management, low birth weight among infants has been a persistent challenge in South Africa. The study aimed to explore the relationship between depression before pregnancy and the low birth weight (LBW) of infants in post-apartheid South Africa. This study utilized data from Waves 1 and 2 of the South African National Income Dynamics Study, the main outcome being a dichotomous measure of child LBW (<2500 g) drawn from the Wave 2 child questionnaire. Depressive symptoms of non-pregnant women was the main predictor drawn from the Wave 1 adult questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were screened using the 10-item four-point Likert version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) instrument. A total score of 10 or greater on the CES-D indicates a positive screen for depressive symptoms. An adjusted logistic regression model was used to examine the relationship between women's depression before pregnancy and infant LBW. A sample size of 651 women in Wave 1 was linked to 672 newborns in Wave 2. The results of the adjusted logistic regression model indicated depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 10) prior to pregnancy were associated with infant LBW (adjusted OR 2.84, 95 % CI 1.08-7.46). Another significant covariate in the model was multiple childbirths. Our finding indicates that women's depressive symptoms prior to pregnancy are associated with the low birth weight of newborns and suggests that this association may not be limited to depression present during the ante-natal phase.

  20. Embarazo no deseado en adolescentes, y utilización de métodos anticonceptivos posparto Unwanted adolescent pregnancy and post-partum utilization of contraceptive methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Núñez-Urquiza

    2003-01-01

    potencial de cobertura aún no alcanzado entre el grupo de adolescentes, especialmente entre las que viven en áreas suburbanas y entre las no derechohabientes de la seguridad social. Asimismo, sugiere la necesidad de insistir en la promoción de la utilización de métodos anticonceptivos posparto en este grupo considerado de alto riesgo reproductivo. Además, se evidencia la necesidad de investigar sobre métodos de educación sexual y reproductiva que puedan introducirse en el sistema escolar desde el nivel primario.OBJECTIVE: To describe the proportion of unwanted pregnancies among all pregnant adolescents, its association with sociodemographic characteristics, and the use of post-partum contraceptive methods. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 220 women between 13 and 19 years of age, in two semi-urban municipalities of the State of Morelos, Mexico, interviewed between 1992 and 1994. Women were interviewed at home, six to twelve weeks after their delivery date. Women were asked whether they had wanted their last pregnancy, and about knowledge and use of contraceptive methods after delivery. RESULTS: Adolescent pregnancies accounted for 17% of all births registered in these two municipalities. Among all adolescent mother 22.73% reported that their pregnancy had not been wanted. A positive association was found between the lack of access to health services provided by public medical insurance systems (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social IMSS and Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado ISSSTE and unwanted pregnancy (adjusted OR=3.03, 95% CI (1.31, 7. An association was also found between living in an urban community (adjusted OR=2.16, 95% CI (1.08, 4.33 and an unwanted pregnancy. Among all adolescent mothers, 91.3% were familiar with "the pill" as a contraceptive method; 84.72% knew about the IUD, and 63.68% knew about the condom. However, only 35% of them were actually using an effective contraceptive

  1. ACOG Committee Opinion Number 542: Access to emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Emergency contraception includes contraceptive methods used to prevent pregnancy in the first few days after unprotected intercourse, sexual assault, or contraceptive failure. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998, numerous barriers to access to emergency contraception remain. The purpose of this Committee Opinion is to examine the barriers to the use of oral emergency contraception methods and to highlight the importance of increasing access.

  2. Oxytocin course over pregnancy and postpartum period and the association with postpartum depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Andrea; Krause, Daniela; Maiwald, Carina; Härtl, Kristin; Myint, Aye-Mu; Kästner, Ralph; Obermeier, Michael; Padberg, Frank; Brücklmeier, Benedikt; Weidinger, Elif; Kieper, Susann; Schwarz, Markus; Zill, Peter; Müller, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    During the postpartum period, women are at higher risk of developing a mental disorder such as postpartum depression (PPD), a disorder that associates with mother-infant bonding and child development. Oxytocin is considered to play a key role in mother-infant bonding and social interactions and altered oxytocin plasma concentrations were found to be associated with PPD. In the present study, we evaluated oxytocin plasma levels and depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the postpartum period in healthy women. We evaluated 100 women twice during pregnancy (weeks 35 and 38) and three times in the postpartum period (within 2 days and 7 weeks and 6 months after delivery) by measuring oxytocin plasma levels with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and assessing depressive symptoms with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Oxytocin plasma levels significantly increased from the 35th week of gestation to 6 months postpartum in all women. However, levels decreased from the 38th week of gestation to 2 days after delivery in participants with postpartum depressive symptoms, whereas they continuously increased in the group without postpartum depressive symptoms; the difference between the course of oxytocin levels in the two groups was significant (Δt2-t3: t = 2.14; p = 0.036*). Previous depressive episodes and breastfeeding problems predicted postpartum depressive symptoms. Our results indicate that alterations in the oxytocin system during pregnancy might be specific for women who develop postpartum depressive symptoms. Future studies should investigate whether oxytocin plasma levels might have predictive value in women at high risk for PPD.

  3. Personality, depressive symptoms during pregnancy and their influence on postnatal depression in Spanish pregnant Spanish women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Marín-Morales

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of personality factors and antenatal depressive symptomatology in postnatal depression. A prospective ex post facto design was carried out. The sample consisted of 116 women, recruited in their first trimester of pregnancy and followed up until four months postpartum. The measurement instruments used were the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS to assess postpartum depression, the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI to analyse personality traits and the depression subscale of the Symptoms Check List 90 (SCL-90-R to assess depressive symptomatology in the first half of pregnancy. Socio-demographic variables (age, parity, educational level, employment status, and planned pregnancy and clinical variables (neonatal Apgar score and mode of delivery were also taken into account. A positive correlation was found between postpartum depression and depressive symptomatology in the first trimester; however after the regression analysis neuroticism was the only factor that predicted postpartum depressive symptoms, explaining 24.8% of the variance. Neuroticism significantly influences psychological health during life events such as motherhood. Due to its stable condition, personality could be assessed from the beginning of pregnancy, contributing to the care of pregnant women with high scores in neuroticism, to prevent, detect and treat early postnatal depression.

  4. Fewer self-reported depressive symptoms in young adults exposed to maternal depressed mood during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohsel, Katrin; Holz, Nathalie E; Hohm, Erika; Schmidt, Martin H; Esser, Günter; Brandeis, Daniel; Banaschewski, Tobias; Laucht, Manfred

    2017-02-01

    Depressed mood is prevalent during pregnancy, with accumulating evidence suggesting an impact on developmental outcome in the offspring. However, the long-term effects of prenatal maternal depression regarding internalizing psychopathology in the offspring are as yet unclear. As part of an ongoing epidemiological cohort study, prenatal maternal depressed mood was assessed at the child's age of 3 months. In a sample of n=307 offspring, depressive symptoms were obtained via questionnaire at the ages of 19, 22, 23 and 25 years. At age 25 years, diagnoses of depressive disorder were obtained using a diagnostic interview. In a subsample of currently healthy participants, voxel-based morphometry was conducted and amygdala volume was assessed. In n=85 young adults exposed to prenatal maternal depressed mood, no significantly higher risk for a diagnosis of depressive disorder was observed. However, they reported significantly lower levels of depressive symptoms. This association was especially pronounced when prenatal maternal depressed mood was present during the first trimester of pregnancy and when maternal mood was depressed pre- as well as postnatally. At an uncorrected level only, prenatal maternal depressed mood was associated with decreased amygdala volume. Prenatal maternal depressed mood was not assessed during pregnancy, but shortly after childbirth. No diagnoses of maternal clinical depression during pregnancy were available. Self-reported depressive symptoms do not imply increased, but rather decreased symptom levels in young adults who were exposed to prenatal maternal depressed mood. A long-term perspective may be important when considering consequences of prenatal risk factors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Female contraception over 40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of women 40-49 years of age need an effective method of contraception because the decline in fertility with age is an insufficient protection against unwanted pregnancy. Although pregnancy is less likely after the age of 40 years, the clinical and social consequences...... is insufficient for contraceptive purposes. Thus a family planning method is needed. Sterilization is by far the most common method in several countries. Copper intrauterine devices and hormone intrauterine systems have similar effectiveness, with fewer than 1% failures in the first year of typical use. Special...

  6. Missed Opportunities: Emergency Contraception Utilisation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although contraceptives, including emergency contraceptives, are widely available free at public health facilities in South Africa, rates of teenage and unintended pregnancy are high. This paper analyses awareness and utilisation of emergency contraception amongst 193 young women (aged 15-24 years) attending public ...

  7. Knowledge, attitude, and practice on emergency contraceptives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Unwanted pregnancy followed by unsafe abortion can be avoided by using different contraceptive methods, including emergency contraceptives. Information on knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptives among women is particularly important because of high rates of teenage and ...

  8. Sexual Attitudes and Contraceptive Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Donn

    1978-01-01

    Discusses barriers to effective contraception, such as informational, emotional, and imaginative factors, and what might be done to avoid unwanted pregnancies by using these factors in positive programs and behaviors. (Author/RK)

  9. Attitudes towards and knowledge about intrauterine contraceptive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of attitudes, 40.0% (n=60) expressed concern about the pain during insertion, 33.3% (n=50) believed the IUCD can ... women are at risk of unintended pregnancy. ... pregnancies requires long periods of effective contraceptive use.

  10. Relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy and the early postpartum period: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, William; Steiner, Meir; Coote, Marg; Frey, Benicio N

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal depressive symptoms often co-occur with other inflammatory morbidities of pregnancy. The goals of our study were 1) to examine whether changes in inflammatory markers from the third trimester of pregnancy to 12 weeks postpartum were associated with changes in depressive symptoms; 2) to examine whether third trimester inflammatory markers alone were predictive of postpartum depressive symptoms; and 3) to examine the relationship between inflammatory markers and depressive symptoms during the third trimester of pregnancy and at 12 weeks postpartum. Thirty-three healthy pregnant women were recruited from the Women's Health Concerns Clinic at St. Joseph's Healthcare in Hamilton, Canada. The impact of depressive symptoms on the levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and C-reactive protein (CRP) at the third trimester of pregnancy, at 12 weeks postpartum, and across time was assessed using linear and mixed-model regression. Regression analysis revealed no significant association between depressive symptoms and any of the candidate biomarkers during pregnancy, at 12 weeks postpartum, or over time. Pregnancy depressive symptoms (p > 0.001), IL-6 (p = 0.025), and IL-10 (p = 0.006) were significant predictors of postpartum Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score. Our study supports previous reports from the literature showing no relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy, early postpartum, or across time. Our study is the first to observe an association between late pregnancy levels of IL-6 and IL-10 and postpartum depressive symptoms. Further studies with larger samples are required to confirm these findings.

  11. Relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy and the early postpartum period: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Simpson

    Full Text Available Objective: Perinatal depressive symptoms often co-occur with other inflammatory morbidities of pregnancy. The goals of our study were 1 to examine whether changes in inflammatory markers from the third trimester of pregnancy to 12 weeks postpartum were associated with changes in depressive symptoms; 2 to examine whether third trimester inflammatory markers alone were predictive of postpartum depressive symptoms; and 3 to examine the relationship between inflammatory markers and depressive symptoms during the third trimester of pregnancy and at 12 weeks postpartum. Methods: Thirty-three healthy pregnant women were recruited from the Women’s Health Concerns Clinic at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in Hamilton, Canada. The impact of depressive symptoms on the levels of interleukin (IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and C-reactive protein (CRP at the third trimester of pregnancy, at 12 weeks postpartum, and across time was assessed using linear and mixed-model regression. Results: Regression analysis revealed no significant association between depressive symptoms and any of the candidate biomarkers during pregnancy, at 12 weeks postpartum, or over time. Pregnancy depressive symptoms (p > 0.001, IL-6 (p = 0.025, and IL-10 (p = 0.006 were significant predictors of postpartum Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale (EPDS score. Conclusions: Our study supports previous reports from the literature showing no relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy, early postpartum, or across time. Our study is the first to observe an association between late pregnancy levels of IL-6 and IL-10 and postpartum depressive symptoms. Further studies with larger samples are required to confirm these findings.

  12. Depressive Symptoms in Pregnancy: The Influence of Social, Psychological and Obstetric Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Eleomar Vilela de; Campos, Rodolfo Nunes; Avelino, Mariza Martins

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms and their association with social, psychological, behavioral and obstetric characteristics in pregnant women. Methods This is a cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of 375 pregnant women who attended prenatal clinics in two public maternity hospitals located in the city of Goiania, Brazil. To testify the depressive symptoms, we used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). A descriptive statistical analysis was performed using programs such as CDC EPI-INFO™, version 7.1.5, and Statistical Package for Social Sciences (IBM SPSS), version 21.0. Results the patients had probable depressive symptoms (15.47%) and possible depressive symptoms (25.33%). The bivariate analysis showed a significant association among "depressive symptoms" and the following variables: "single or divorced" (prevalence ratio, PR = 2.08; 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.26 to 3.44); "physical activity during pregnancy" (PR = 3.96; 95%CI = 1.28 to 12.31); exposure to "psychological/emotional" violence (PR = 4.74; 95%CI = 2.94 to 7.64); "prior mental problem" (PR = 2.66; 95%CI =1.49 to 4.73) and "obstetric complications during pregnancy" (PR = 2.53; 95%CI = 1.55 to 4.13). The multivariate analysis confirmed the association of these depressive symptoms with the variables "suffered psychological/emotional violence" (odds ratio, OR = 5.821; 95%CI = 2.939 to 11.528); "physical activity during pregnancy" (OR = 3.885; 95%CI = 1.060 to 14.231); "obstetric complications during pregnancy" (OR = 2.442; 95%CI = 1.233 to 4.834) and "single or divorced" (OR = 2.943; 95%CI = 1.326 to 6.533). Conclusions the prevalence of depressive symptoms among pregnant women is of 15.47%, and emotional violence is the main factor associated with gestational depression. Thieme Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  13. Forgettable contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, David A

    2009-12-01

    The term "forgettable contraception" has received less attention in family planning than has "long-acting reversible contraception." Defined here as a method requiring attention no more often than every 3 years, forgettable contraception includes sterilization (female or male), intrauterine devices, and implants. Five principal factors determine contraceptive effectiveness: efficacy, compliance, continuation, fecundity, and the timing of coitus. Of these, compliance and continuation dominate; the key determinants of contraceptive effectiveness are human, not pharmacological. Human nature undermines methods with high theoretical efficacy, such as oral contraceptives and injectable contraceptives. By obviating the need to think about contraception for long intervals, forgettable contraception can help overcome our human fallibility. As a result, all forgettable contraception methods provide first-tier effectiveness (contraceptives today with exclusively first-tier effectiveness is the one that can be started -- and then forgotten for years.

  14. Parental depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy and attention problems in children : A cross-cohort consistency study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Batenburg-Eddes, T.; Brion, M.J.; Henrichs, J.; Jaddoe, V.W.; Hofman, A.; Verhulst, F.C.; Lawlor, D.A.; Davey Smith, G.; Tiemeier, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    Background:  Maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy have been associated with offspring-attention deficit problems. Aim:  We explored possible intrauterine effects by comparing maternal and paternal symptoms during pregnancy, by investigating cross-cohort consistency, and by investigating

  15. Social adversity in pregnancy and trajectories of women's depressive symptoms: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Ann M; Plotnikova, Maria; Clavarino, Alexandra; Mamun, Abullah; Najman, Jake M

    2018-02-01

    Sound evidence has linked the experience of adversity with depression. Less is known about this association over time. The aim of this study is to determine whether or not social adversity experienced by pregnant women is associated with their patterns of depressive symptoms over their reproductive life course. Data were obtained from a cohort of women collected at their first obstetrical clinic visit of an index pregnancy (time-point 1) and at a further six time-points to 27 years following the birth. Latent Class Growth Modelling was used to estimate trajectories of women's depressive symptoms over this time period. Logistic regression modelling determined the prospective association between measures of adversity in pregnancy and 27-year postpartum depression trajectories, controlling for potential confounders. Experiencing financial problems, housing problems, serious disagreements with partners and with others, and experiencing serious health problems in pregnancy were associated with membership of high and middle depression trajectories over the 27 years. Having someone close die or have a serious illness was associated with the high depression trajectory only. Younger maternal age and low family-income at first clinic visit were also associated with an increased risk of women's membership of both high and middle depression trajectories. Experiencing adversity during pregnancy predicts subsequent patterns of maternal depression over an extended period of women's reproductive life course. It is not clear whether women's experiences of adversity during pregnancy were causally associated with subsequent depression or whether there are other explanations of the observed association. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The emotional-behavioural functioning of children exposed to maternal depressive symptoms across pregnancy and early childhood: a prospective Australian pregnancy cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallo, Rebecca; Woolhouse, Hannah; Gartland, Deirdre; Hiscock, Harriet; Brown, Stephanie

    2015-10-01

    Children exposed to maternal depression during pregnancy and in the postnatal period are at increased risk of a range of health, wellbeing and development problems. However, few studies have examined the course of maternal depressive symptoms in the perinatal period and beyond on children's wellbeing. The present study aimed to explore the relationship between both the severity and chronicity of maternal depressive symptoms across the early childhood period and children's emotional-behavioural difficulties at 4 years of age. Data from over 1,085 mothers and children participating in a large Australian prospective pregnancy cohort were used. Latent class analysis identified three distinct trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms from pregnancy to 4 years postpartum: (1) no or few symptoms (61%), (2) persistent subclinical symptoms (30%), and (3) increasing and persistently high symptoms (9%). Regression analyses revealed that children of mothers experiencing subclinical and increasing and persistently high symptoms were at least two times more likely to have emotional-behavioural difficulties than children of mothers reporting minimal symptoms, even after accounting for known risk factors for poor outcomes for children. These findings challenge policy makers and health professionals to consider how they can tailor care and support to mothers experiencing a broader spectrum of depressive symptoms across the early childhood period, to maximize opportunities to improve both short-and long-term maternal and child health outcomes.

  17. Postcoital contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, H C

    1977-02-05

    My colleague Dr. C.L. Brewer (January 15, p. 169) is within his rights to ask for a precise definition of abortion and contraception. I define abortion as the deliberate destruction of the embryo once it is embedded in the uterus. The absolutist on the abortion issue, until he is sure that an IUD never works by destroying an embedded embryo, must logically eschew this technique, advising his patient as to his ethical objections. She may then seek other advice once she has the facts. However, to insist that those who advise an IUD with the motive of contraception cannot herefore object to, say, intrauterine saline aimed at the destruction of a moving 27-week fetus is, in my view, stretching his argument. With further stretching it could be carried to absurdity in the rubella-early pregnancy dilemma: why not deliver the child, examine it carefully, and then if imperfect kill it with a silver hammer? Unthinkable, even if logical. Still, Dr. Brewer has a point and (with me) no doubt he will sympathize with Pope John and his advisers in their support for family spacing only by the avoidance of the fertile days - esthetically admirable but, alas, not always effective. How absurd the Catholic Church would now look if 10 years ago it had blessed the IUD only to find that it may operate not only by preventing the embedding of the zygot but by destroying it in situ - by definition an abortion. The future may settle the debate with hormones which convert the endometrium to a nonreceptive state so that a fetus is never embedded in the womb. Even better, we may develop a male hormone which prevents sperm from penetrating the ovum. Meantime, motive is important: contraception is not abortion and our abortionists should not dress up as delayed contraceptors. (Editor's note: This correspondence is now closed.)

  18. Parental depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy and attention problems in children: A cross-cohort consistency study

    OpenAIRE

    Batenburg-Eddes, Tamara; Brion, Maria; Henrichs, Jens; Jaddoe, Vincent; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank; Lawlor, Debbie; Davey-Smith, George; Tiemeier, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Background: Maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy have been associated with offspring-attention deficit problems. Aim: We explored possible intrauterine effects by comparing maternal and paternal symptoms during pregnancy, by investigating cross-cohort consistency, and by investigating whether parental symptoms in early childhood may explain any observed intrauterine effect. Methods: This study was conducted in two cohorts (Generation R, n = 2,280 and ALSPAC, n = 3,442). Pregnant w...

  19. [Low urinary tract symptoms after Thierry's spatula delivery at first pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provansal, M; Bretelle, F; Bannier, M; Gamerre, M; Mazouni, C

    2007-11-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate prevalence of low urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) after Thierry's spatula delivery at first pregnancy. A retrospective study of 236 primiparous with instrumental delivery or spontaneous delivery who had delivered from January 2001 to December 2002. Low urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were evaluated one year after delivery with a questionnaire. Incidence of LUTS was compared depending on mode of delivery. Of the 236 patients included, 88.1% replied to the questionnaire, 106 who delivered spontaneously and 102 who underwent Thierry's spatula delivery. The incidence of urinary incontinence was similar after instrumental deliveries and after spontaneous vaginal deliveries (34.9 versus 24.5%, p=0.10). In univariate analysis, symptoms of urinary urgency and urinary frequency were higher after instrumental delivery than after spontaneous delivery, respectively, 34.9 versus 22.5%, p=0.049 and 19.8 versus 8.8%, p=0.03. After controlling for confounding factors, no difference in LUTS was observed between the two groups; the respective adjusted odds-ratios (95% IC) were 1,5 (0.8-3) for urinary incontinence, 1.7 (0.9-3.5) for urgency and 2.5 (0.9-6.3) for urinary frequency. One year after delivery, one third of patients will present urinary incontinence and more than 50% will complain of bladder instability symptoms. Compared to spontaneous vaginal delivery, the use of Thierry's spatulas at first pregnancy does not induce higher risk of LUTS.

  20. Contraceptive practices of women in Northern Tshwane, Gauteng ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although most participants knew about legalised termination of pregnancy services in the RSA, they didnot know how to access these services. The recommendations address ways in which contraceptive services could be improved. Keywords: adolescents\\' contraceptive use; emergency contraception; contraception; ...

  1. Intra-uterine contraceptive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, J

    1985-05-01

    Among the advantages of IUDs are the device's high continuation rate, the lack of systemic side effects, and the absence of a need for continual motivation to practice contraception. The effectiveness of plastic IUDs is directly proportional to their surface area, but the degree of excessive bleeding experienced is inversely related to device size. Thus, devices represent a compromise between large size for effectiveness and small size for acceptability. The optimum time to fit an IUD is during the 1st hald of the menstrual cycle. Absolute contraindications to IUD use include the presence of active pelvic inflammatory disease, undiagnosed irregular bleeding, a history of ectopic pregnancy or tubal surgery, and a distorted uteine cavity. Failure rates associated with IUD use range from 2-3% in the 1st year and then decrease. Since the main mechanism of action appears to be production of a sterile inflammatory reaction in the uterine cavity, the IUD prevents intrauterine pregnancy more effectively than ectopic pregnancy. Nonetheless, there is little evidence to suggest that IUD use actually increases the incidence of ectopic pregnancy. Resumption of fertility after IUD removal is not delayed. There is not need to change inert plastic IUDs in women who remain symptom free. The copper devices should be changed every 3-4 years. A search is under way for antifertility agents that can be incorporated into the device to reduce side effects. In general, the IUD is most suitable for older, parous women.

  2. Ulipristal acetate in emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstajn, Marina Sprem; Baldani, Dinka Pavicić; Skrgatić, Lana; Radaković, Branko; Vrbić, Hrvoje; Canić, Tomislav

    2014-03-01

    Despite the widespread availability of highly effective methods of contraception, unintended pregnancy is common. Unplanned pregnancies have been linked to a range of health, social and economic consequences. Emergency contraception reduces risk of pregnancy after unprotected intercourse, and represents an opportunity to decrease number of unplanned pregnancies and abortions. Emergency contraception pills (ECP) prevent pregnancy by delaying or inhibiting ovulation, without interfering with post fertilization events. If pregnancy has already occurred, ECPs will not be effective, therefore ECPs are not abortificants. Ulipristal acetate (17alpha-acetoxy-11beta-(4N-N,N-dymethilaminophenyl)-19-norpregna--4,9-diene-3,20-dione) is the first drug that was specifically developed and licensed for use as an emergency contraceptive. It is an orally active, synthetic, selective progesterone modulator that acts by binding with high affinity to the human progesterone receptor where it has both antagonist and partial agonist effects. It is a new molecular entity and the first compound in a new pharmacological class defined by the pristal stem. Up on the superior clinical efficacy evidence, UPA has been quickly recognized as the most effective emergency contraceptive pill, and recently recommended as the first prescription choice for all women regardless of the age and timing after intercourse. This article provides literature review of UPA and its role in emergency contraception.

  3. Anxiety and depression symptoms in women and men from early pregnancy to 3-months postpartum: parity differences and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Bárbara; Conde, Ana

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate both anxiety and depression symptoms from early pregnancy to 3-months postpartum, comparing women and men and first and second-time parents. A sample of 260 Portuguese couples (N=520), first or second-time parents, recruited in an Obstetrics Out-patients Unit, filled in the State-Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and the Edinburgh Post-Natal Depression Scale (EPDS) at the 1st, 2nd and 3rd pregnancy trimesters, childbirth, and 3-months postpartum. A decrease in anxiety and depression symptoms from early pregnancy to 3-months postpartum was found in both women and men, as well as in first and second-time parents. Men presented less anxiety and depression symptoms than women, but the same pattern of symptoms over time. Second-time parents showed more anxiety and depression symptoms than first-time parents and a different pattern of symptoms over time: an increase in anxiety and depression symptoms from the 3rd trimester to childbirth was observed in first-time parents versus a decrease in second-time parents. The voluntary nature of the participation may have lead to a selection bias; women and men who agreed to participate could be those who presented fewer anxiety and depression symptoms. Moreover, the use of self-report symptom measures does not give us the level of possible disorder in participants. Anxiety and depression symptoms diminish from pregnancy to the postpartum period in all parents. Patterns of anxiety and depression symptoms from early pregnancy to 3-months postpartum are similar in women and men, but somewhat different in first and second-time parents. Second-time parents should also be considered while studying and intervening during pregnancy and the postpartum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of emergency contraception ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The contraceptive prevalence in our environment is very low with attendant increase in unwanted pregnancy and unsafe abortion. The use of emergency contraception (EC) in women with unprotected intercourse could be the only option that can avoid the unwanted pregnancy and unsafe abortion. Objective: ...

  5. Advance Provision of Emergency Contraception for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamji, Jehan-Marie; Swartwout, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Emergency contraception is most effective at preventing unintended pregnancy when taken as early as possible following unprotected sexual intercourse. Advance provision of this medication supports more timely and effective use. In the midst of rising teen pregnancy rates, current policies often limit access to emergency contraception for…

  6. The emergency contraceptive drug, levonorgestrel: a review of post-coital oral and peri-coital vaginal administration for prevention of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, N N

    2011-11-01

    The objective of our study was the evaluation and elucidation of levonorgestrel (LNG) as emergency contraception (EC) administered through oral and vaginal routes. Data regarding post-coital oral and peri-coital vaginal application of LNG were extracted from the literature through MEDLINE database service for years 2001-2010. It was found that a single dose of 1.5 mg LNG or two doses of 0.75 mg LNG 12 h apart were used for EC. Currently, LNG is also on trial for vaginal application as EC in Carraguard gel for 'dual protection'. The oral or vaginal dose of 1.5 mg LNG resulted in peak plasma concentration, C(max) 19.2 or 3.21 ng/ml, with shorter time, T(max) 1.4 or 6.6 h, and greater AUC, 152.7 or 52.5 ng.h/ml, with shorter half-life, 25 or 32 h, respectively. LNG EC inhibited mid-cycle LH surge and delayed or prevented ovulation when administered before ovulation. Mechanism of action of LNG EC appeared to inhibit or delay ovulation. The risk of pregnancy was 4.12%. A single dose of 1.5 mg LNG could reduce the pregnancy rate to 0.7%. Occurrence of ectopic pregnancy following failure of LNG EC was reported. This EC caused no serious adverse effects but was associated with menstrual disturbance. Although widely acceptable, the cost and short-supply to rural areas pose a barrier to access EC for the poor and rural-dwellers, respectively. It was concluded that unlike post-coital oral administration, peri-coital vaginal application of 1.5 mg LNG needs further study to be an alternative option for women to use it for prevention of pregnancy.

  7. Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and child ADHD symptoms, executive function and cortical thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Buss

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rationale/statement of the problem : Increasing evidence suggests exposure to adverse conditions in intrauterine life may increase the risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in childhood. High maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI has been shown to predict child ADHD symptoms; however, the neurocognitive processes underlying this relationship are not known. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that this association is mediated by alterations in child executive function and cortical development. Methods : A population-based cohort of 174 children (mean age = 7.3±0.9 (SD years, 55% girls was evaluated for ADHD symptoms, using the Child Behavior Checklist, and for neurocognitive function, using the Go/No-go Task. This cohort had been followed prospectively from early gestation and birth through infancy and childhood with serial measures of maternal and child prenatal and postnatal factors. In 108 children, a structural MRI scan was acquired and the association between maternal obesity and child cortical thickness was investigated using Freesurfer software. Results : Maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was a significant predictor of child ADHD symptoms (F (1,158=4.80, p = 0.03 and of child performance on the Go/No-go Task (F (1,157=8.37, p=0.004 after controlling for key potential confounding variables. A test of the mediation model revealed that the association between higher maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and child ADHD symptoms was mediated by impaired executive function (inefficient/less attentive processing; Sobel test: t=2.39 (±0.002, SEM; p=0.02. Interestingly, after controlling for key potential confounding variables pre-pregnancy obesity was furthermore associated with region-specific thinner cortices, including regions previously reported to be thinner in children with ADHD, like the prefrontal cortex. Conclusion : To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report the

  8. Childhood Sexual Violence and Consistent, Effective Contraception Use among Young, Sexually Active Urban Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Deborah B; Lepore, Stephen J; Mastrogiannis, Dimitrios S

    2015-05-22

    Unintended pregnancy (UP) is a significant public health problem. The consistent use of effective contraception is the primary method to prevent UP. We examined the role of childhood sexual and physical violence and current interpersonal violence on the risk of unintended pregnancy among young, urban, sexually active women. In particular, we were interested in examining the role of childhood violence and interpersonal violence while recognizing the psychological correlates of experiencing violence (i.e., high depressive symptoms and low self-esteem) and consistent use of contraception. For this assessment, 315 sexually active women living in Philadelphia PA were recruited from family planning clinics in 2013. A self-administered, computer-assisted interview was used to collect data on method of contraception use in the past month, consistency of use, experiences with violence, levels of depressive symptoms, self-esteem and sexual self-efficacy, substance use and health services utilization. Fifty percent of young sexually active women reported inconsistent or no contraception use in the past month. Inconsistent users were significantly more likely to report at least one prior episode of childhood sexual violence and were significantly less likely to have received a prescription for contraception from a health care provider. Inconsistent contraception users also reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms and significantly lower levels of self-esteem. The relation between childhood sexual violence and UP remained unchanged in the multivariate models adjusting for self-esteem or depressive symptoms. These findings highlight the long-term consequences of childhood sexual violence, independent of current depressive symptoms and low self-esteem, on consistent use of contraception.

  9. Childhood Sexual Violence and Consistent, Effective Contraception Use among Young, Sexually Active Urban Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah B. Nelson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Unintended pregnancy (UP is a significant public health problem. The consistent use of effective contraception is the primary method to prevent UP. We examined the role of childhood sexual and physical violence and current interpersonal violence on the risk of unintended pregnancy among young, urban, sexually active women. In particular, we were interested in examining the role of childhood violence and interpersonal violence while recognizing the psychological correlates of experiencing violence (i.e., high depressive symptoms and low self-esteem and consistent use of contraception. For this assessment, 315 sexually active women living in Philadelphia PA were recruited from family planning clinics in 2013. A self-administered, computer-assisted interview was used to collect data on method of contraception use in the past month, consistency of use, experiences with violence, levels of depressive symptoms, self-esteem and sexual self-efficacy, substance use and health services utilization. Fifty percent of young sexually active women reported inconsistent or no contraception use in the past month. Inconsistent users were significantly more likely to report at least one prior episode of childhood sexual violence and were significantly less likely to have received a prescription for contraception from a health care provider. Inconsistent contraception users also reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms and significantly lower levels of self-esteem. The relation between childhood sexual violence and UP remained unchanged in the multivariate models adjusting for self-esteem or depressive symptoms. These findings highlight the long-term consequences of childhood sexual violence, independent of current depressive symptoms and low self-esteem, on consistent use of contraception.

  10. Pregnancy planning, timing, happiness and depressive symptoms among low-income women living with and without HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polansky, Marcia; Singh, Hardeep; Gao, Yang; Aaron, Erika

    2018-03-21

    This study assessed associations of sociodemographic factors and pregnancy intent and wantedness with pregnancy happiness and prenatal depressive symptoms and the relationship between prenatal depressive symptoms and pregnancy happiness. Depression is the leading cause of disability world-wide and more so for women. Women are most likely to experience depression in their child bearing years, including during pregnancy. Untreated prenatal depression, associated with unwanted pregnancies endangers the health and wellbeing of the mother and her child. Research on the association of prenatal depression with pregnancy happiness among women with low incomes in the U.S.A. is limited. For women living with HIV, associations among family planning factors, pregnancy feelings and prenatal depression have been understudied. Sixty-four women living with HIV and 194 HIV-negative low-income pregnant women receiving care in a public university-based ob-gyn clinic with integrated HIV-care in Philadelphia between 2009 and 2012 participated in the study. The women completed a questionnaire on sociodemographic and pregnancy factors and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The independent associations of sociodemographic and pregnancy factors with pregnancy happiness and associations of these factors and pregnancy happiness with the CES-D were assessed using multivariable linear regressions. Women who felt the pregnancy was too soon were less happy being pregnant (p < 0.01). Prenatal depressive symptoms were inversely associated with happiness with being pregnant and completing high school (p < 0.001 for both). Health care professionals need to provide reproductive counselling and mental health for prenatal depression should explore feelings about being pregnant and being a mother.

  11. Emergency contraception - potential for women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Suneeta

    2014-11-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) is a safe and effective method which is used to prevent unwanted pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Many of the unwanted pregnancies end in unsafe abortions. The search for an ideal contraceptive, which does not interfere with spontaneity or pleasure of the sexual act, yet effectively controls the fertility, is still continuing. Numerous contraceptive techniques are available, yet contraceptive coverage continues to be poor in India. Thus, even when not planning for a pregnancy, exposure to unprotected sex takes place often, necessitating the use of emergency contraception. This need may also arise due to failure of contraceptive method being used (condom rupture, diaphragm slippage, forgotten oral pills) or following sexual assault. Emergency contraception is an intervention that can prevent a large number of unwanted pregnancies resulting from failure of regular contraception or unplanned sexual activity, which in turn helps in reducing the maternal mortality and morbidity due to unsafe abortions. However, a concern has been expressed regarding repeated and indiscriminate usage of e-pill, currently the rational use of emergency contraception is being promoted as it is expected to make a significant dent in reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions. In fact, since the introduction of emergency contraception, the contribution of unsafe abortion towards maternal mortality has declined from 13 to 8 per cent.

  12. Male contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Vivek; Bantwal, Ganapathi

    2012-01-01

    Contraception is an accepted route for the control of population explosion in the world. Traditionally hormonal contraceptive methods have focused on women. Male contraception by means of hormonal and non hormonal methods is an attractive alternative. Hormonal methods of contraception using testosterone have shown good results. Non hormonal reversible methods of male contraception like reversible inhibition of sperm under guidanceare very promising. In this article we have reviewed the curren...

  13. Employment, income, and education and prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy: the Kyushu Okinawa Maternal and Child Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Keiko; Arakawa, Masashi

    2012-08-19

    Epidemiological evidence for the association of socioeconomic status with prenatal depression has been inconsistent. The current cross-sectional study examined the association between employment, job type, household income, and educational level and the prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Subjects were 1741 Japanese women. Depressive symptoms were defined as present when subjects had a Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score of 16 or higher. Adjustment was made for age, gestation, region of residence, family structure, personal and family history of depression, smoking, secondhand smoke exposure at home and at work, employment, household income, and education. The prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy was 19.3%. Compared with unemployment, employment, part-time employment, and full-time employment were significantly associated with a lower prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy: the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50 - 0.86), 0.66 (95% CI: 0.46 - 0.95), and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.48 - 0.90), respectively. Regarding the job type held, women with a professional or technical job and those with a clerical or related occupation had a significantly lower prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy: the adjusted ORs were 0.67 (95% CI: 0.47 - 0.96) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.43 - 0.90), respectively. Sales, service, production, and other occupations were not significantly related to the prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy. There were no relationships between household income or education and the prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Employment, whether full-time or part-time, and holding a professional or technical job or a clerical or related occupation may be inversely associated with the prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy.

  14. Employment, income, and education and prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy: the Kyushu Okinawa Maternal and Child Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyake Yoshihiro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological evidence for the association of socioeconomic status with prenatal depression has been inconsistent. The current cross-sectional study examined the association between employment, job type, household income, and educational level and the prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Methods Subjects were 1741 Japanese women. Depressive symptoms were defined as present when subjects had a Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score of 16 or higher. Adjustment was made for age, gestation, region of residence, family structure, personal and family history of depression, smoking, secondhand smoke exposure at home and at work, employment, household income, and education. Results The prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy was 19.3%. Compared with unemployment, employment, part-time employment, and full-time employment were significantly associated with a lower prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy: the adjusted odds ratios (ORs were 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50 − 0.86, 0.66 (95% CI: 0.46 − 0.95, and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.48 − 0.90, respectively. Regarding the job type held, women with a professional or technical job and those with a clerical or related occupation had a significantly lower prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy: the adjusted ORs were 0.67 (95% CI: 0.47 − 0.96 and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.43 − 0.90, respectively. Sales, service, production, and other occupations were not significantly related to the prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy. There were no relationships between household income or education and the prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Conclusions Employment, whether full-time or part-time, and holding a professional or technical job or a clerical or related occupation may be inversely associated with the prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy.

  15. Antenatal dietary patterns and depressive symptoms during pregnancy and early post-partum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Rachel; Hill, Briony; Jacka, Felice N; O'Neil, Adrienne; Skouteris, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Perinatal depression is a debilitating disorder experienced during pregnancy and/or the first year post-partum. Recently, maternal dietary intake during pregnancy has emerged as a possible area of intervention for the prevention of mental disorders in women and their offspring. However, the relationship between antenatal diet quality and perinatal depressive symptoms remains poorly understood. The current study explored the predictive role of antenatal diet quality for antenatal and post-natal depressive symptoms. Pregnant women (n = 167) were recruited between February 2010 and December 2011. Women completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at time 1 [T1, mean weeks gestation = 16.70, standard deviation (SD) = 0.91], time 2 (T2, mean weeks gestation = 32.89, SD = 0.89) and time 3 (T3, mean weeks post-partum = 13.51, SD = 1.97) and a food frequency questionnaire at T1 and T2. Diet quality was determined by extracting dietary patterns via principal components analysis. Two dietary patterns were identified: 'healthy' (including fruit, vegetables, fish and whole grains) and 'unhealthy' (including sweets, refined grains, high-energy drinks and fast foods). Associations between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms were investigated by path analyses. While both 'healthy' and 'unhealthy' path models showed good fit, only one significant association consistent with study hypotheses was found, an 'unhealthy' diet was associated with increased depressive symptoms at 32 weeks gestation. Given that this association was cross-sectional, it was not possible to make any firm conclusions about the predictive nature of either dietary patterns or depressive symptoms. Dietary intervention studies or larger prospective studies are therefore recommended. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Plasma adiponectin and depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the postpartum period: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Fernanda; Farias, Dayana R; Struchiner, Claudio J; Kac, Gilberto

    2016-04-01

    Some authors have described an inverse association between adiponectin and depression, but this association has not yet been investigated during the perinatal period. To evaluate the association between the plasma adiponectin levels and symptoms of depression in women from early pregnancy to 30-45 days postpartum. A prospective cohort of 235 women was analyzed, with four waves of follow-up: 5-13th, 22-26th, and 30-36th gestational weeks and 30-45 days postpartum. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; cutoff ≥ 11). The plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The statistical analyses included linear mixed effects regressions to model the association between these time-dependent variables. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 35.5%, 22.8%, 21.8%, and 16.9% and the median (µg/mL) adiponectin levels were 4.8, 4.7, 4.4, and 7.5 in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimesters and the postpartum period, respectively. Women who remained non-depressed throughout the study tended to have higher values of adiponectin throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period compared to those who had depressive symptoms at least once, but this difference was not statistically significant (β=-0.14; p=0.071). There was no statistically significant association between the plasma adiponectin levels and the EPDS scores in the multiple model (β=-0.07; p=0.320). Losses to follow-up, different procedures for the blood draws at the prenatal and postpartum visits, and the presence of a nested clinical trial with omega-3 supplementation. The plasma adiponectin levels were not associated with depressive symptoms during the perinatal period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Acculturative stress negatively impacts maternal depressive symptoms in Mexican-American women during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Anna-Hernandez, Kimberly L.; Aleman, Brenda; Flores, Ana-Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Background Mexican-American women exhibit high rates of prenatal maternal depressive symptoms relative to the general population. Though pregnant acculturated Mexican-American women experience cultural stressors such as acculturation, acculturative stress and discrimination that may contribute to elevated depressive symptoms, the contribution of these socio-cultural correlates to depressive symptomology is unknown. Method Ninety-eight pregnant women of Mexican descent were recruited from a community hospital clinic during their first trimester. Women completed surveys about acculturation, acculturative stress, perceived discrimination, general perceived stress, and maternal depressive symptoms as well as the potential protective factor of Mexican cultural values. Results Women who experienced greater acculturative and perceived stress, but not perceived discrimination or acculturation, reported significantly elevated depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Also, women who experienced greater acculturative stress identified with a mixture of Mexican and American cultural values. However, only the Mexican cultural value of respect was protective against maternal depressive symptoms while adhering to the Anglo value of independence and self-reliance was a risk factor. Limitations A limitation in the study is the cross-sectional and descriptive self-report nature of the work, underscoring the need for additional research. Moreover, physiological measures of stress were not analyzed in the current study. Conclusions Results point to acculturative stress, above other cultural stressors, as a potential intervention target in culturally competent obstetric care. These findings have implications for maternal mental health treatment during pregnancy, which likely affects maternal-fetal programming and may favorably affect perinatal outcomes in the vulnerable Mexican-American population. PMID:25699668

  18. Perceived Financial Satisfaction, Health Related Quality of Life and depressive Symptoms in Early Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahrakorpi, Niina; Koivusalo, Saila B; Eriksson, Johan G; Kautiainen, Hannu; Stach-Lempinen, Beata; Roine, Risto P

    2017-07-01

    Objectives To assess the associations of perceived financial satisfaction and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and depressive symptoms in an unselected pregnant population in early pregnancy. Methods 750 consecutive pregnant women attending the first communal ultrasound examination before gestational week 14 were invited to participate. Questionnaires assessing HRQoL (15D), depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Depression Scale, EPDS), medical, obstetric, and socioeconomic status were handed out. The participants were divided into three groups according to their satisfaction with their financial status, (unsatisfied, somewhat satisfied, and satisfied). Main outcome measures were 15D and EPDS-scores and dimensions of HRQoL. Results 325 (43,3%) questionnaires were returned. The mean 15D-score for HRQoL was 0,926 (SD 0,056). The financially unsatisfied women had lower HRQoL than women in more satisfied groups (0.906, 0.923 and 0.931, p = 0.012). The result remained significant, even after adjusting for age and education(p = 0.032). The unsatisfied women had a higher mean body mass index (BMI) (25.4, 24.4 and 23.2 kg/m 2 , p for linearity = 0.002), were more often smokers, (13 vs. 4 and 3%, p = 0.029), and had experienced at least one abortion (18, 14 and 7%, p = 0.017). Dimensions of depression, distress and sleep explained the differences between the groups. 27% of unsatisfied women scored EPDS ≥10 points suggesting increased risk of depression. Conclusions Financial satisfaction in early pregnancy associates with HRQoL and risk of perinatal depressive symptoms. Unsatisfied women more often have risk factors for unfavourable pregnancy outcomes which may influence the later health and wellbeing of the mother and child.

  19. [Contraception in the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, R; Boukhris, M

    1994-02-01

    In the last decade, global use of contraceptive methods has increased. About 50% of couples of childbearing age use a modern contraceptive method. This evolution and a positive change in attitude towards male contraception has encouraged research in fertility regulation to enlarge and to improve acceptance of the contraceptive mix. Current injectable contraceptives interfere with the menstrual cycle. Research is exploring ways to minimize such secondary effects by reducing the total hormone dose and by changing the way the active product is delivered (e.g., microspheres). An injectable prototype is an analogue of levonorgestrel (HRP 002). A new IUD is made of leather suspended by a nylon suture which has been inserted into the uterine muscle. RU-486, often used to interrupt early pregnancy, is being tested as an oral contraceptive (OC). It inhibits secretion of gonadotropins and ovulation. It holds promise as an OC with no estrogen component. Since it also inhibits endometrial development and thus prevents implantation, it may someday be used for emergency contraception (i.e., postcoital contraception). New contraceptive implants under study include Norplant RII (2 rods of levonorgestrel lasting for 3 years), Implanon (desogestrel), and Capranor (biodegradable implant lasting 2 years). The female condom consists of a flexible polyurethane sheath with a flexible ring at each end. It has the potential to protect against sexually transmitted diseases since it covers the labial lips and is impermeable to HIV. France and Switzerland have both approved its use. It will enter the UK market at the end of the year. Approval for marketing has been sought in the US.

  20. Missed hormonal contraceptives: new recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Edith; Black, Amanda; Dunn, Sheila; Senikas, Vyta

    2008-11-01

    To provide evidence-based guidance for women and their health care providers on the management of missed or delayed hormonal contraceptive doses in order to prevent unintended pregnancy. Medline, PubMed, and the Cochrane Database were searched for articles published in English, from 1974 to 2007, about hormonal contraceptive methods that are available in Canada and that may be missed or delayed. Relevant publications and position papers from appropriate reproductive health and family planning organizations were also reviewed. The quality of evidence is rated using the criteria developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. This committee opinion will help health care providers offer clear information to women who have not been adherent in using hormonal contraception with the purpose of preventing unintended pregnancy. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. Instructions for what women should do when they miss hormonal contraception have been complex and women do not understand them correctly. (I) 2. The highest risk of ovulation occurs when the hormone-free interval is prolonged for more than seven days, either by delaying the start of combined hormonal contraceptives or by missing active hormone doses during the first or third weeks of combined oral contraceptives. (II) Ovulation rarely occurs after seven consecutive days of combined oral contraceptive use. (II) RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. Health care providers should give clear, simple instructions, both written and oral, on missed hormonal contraceptive pills as part of contraceptive counselling. (III-A) 2. Health care providers should provide women with telephone/electronic resources for reference in the event of missed or delayed hormonal contraceptives. (III-A) 3. In order to avoid an increased risk of unintended pregnancy, the hormone-free interval should not exceed seven days in combined hormonal contraceptive users. (II-A) 4. Back-up contraception should

  1. Risk factors for depressive symptoms in adolescent pregnancy in a late-teen subsample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Hristina; Stuart, Scott

    2014-04-01

    Depression in adolescent pregnancy is common but underrecognized and can be associated with negative medical outcomes. This brief report examines the relationship between depressive symptoms and various demographic and obstetrical risk factors, as well as the use of antidepressants in pregnant adolescents of late teenage years. Data were derived from a relatively large sample (506 women) recruited from university-based and community mental health centers in Iowa. A cross-sectional analysis did not reveal significant statistical associations between the risk factors and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory). Antidepressant use was very low (3.7 %), and adolescents with higher depression scores were more likely to take medications. In conclusion, screening for depression in pregnant adolescents should be universal, regardless of demographic and obstetrical risk factors, and promptly addressed.

  2. [Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrom during pregnancy: prevalence of main symptoms and relationship with Pregnancy Induced-Hypertension and Intra-Uterine Growth Retardation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaora-Tournadre, D; Ragot, S; Meurice, J C; Pourrat, O; D'Halluin, G; Magnin, G; Pierre, F

    2006-04-01

    To investigate the frequency of main symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrom (OSAS) and their relationship with Pregnancy Induced-Hypertension (PIH) as well as Intrauterine Growth Retardation (IGR) as suggested by recent studies. Four hundred (and) thirty-eight enquiry forms completed during post-partum period were analysed, after exclusion of multiple pregnancies. Collected data were demographic characteristics, obstetrical events, sleep disorders during last trimester, screening of snoring and vigilance troubles with an Epworth score. Forty-five percentages of the patients reported to have habitual snoring during pregnancy. Among these, 85% were non-snorers before pregnancy. Daytime somnolence concerned 84,5% of the population with an Epworth score significatively increased (P<0,0001). The prevalence of PIH was found to be 4,5%, with two apparently independent risk factors: the body mass index (OR=1,1) and an association between snoring and increased vigilance trouble (OR=2,6). No statistical difference was found concerning IGR. SAS symptoms are frequent during pregnancy and snoring appears to be linked with PIH. However, polysomnographic data are not yet sufficient to explain pathophysiological mechanisms and find relevant diagnostic markers during pregnancy.

  3. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder symptom cluster improvement by cycle with the combined oral contraceptive ethinylestradiol 20 mcg plus drospirenone 3 mg administered in a 24/4 regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Joachim; Niknian, Minoo; Shulman, Lee P; Lynen, Richard

    2011-07-01

    A combined oral contraceptive comprising ethinylestradiol (EE) 20 mcg/drospirenone 3 mg in a 24/4 regimen has been clinically shown to alleviate the symptoms associated with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). However, previous studies did not report data according to cycle-by-cycle improvement. This was a subanalysis of a Phase III, double-blind, multicenter, United States-based study. Women with confirmed PMDD were randomized to EE 20 mcg/drospirenone 3 mg 24/4 or placebo for three treatment cycles. Ten of the 21 emotional and physical items on the Daily Record of Severity of Problems scale were grouped to define three symptom clusters: (a) negative emotions, (b) food cravings and (c) water retention-related symptoms. The change from baseline at each treatment cycle was compared between groups using a weighted analysis of covariance model. The full analysis set comprised 449 women. Daily Record of Severity of Problems scores for each symptom cluster were significantly reduced from baseline with both EE 20 mcg/drospirenone 3 mg 24/4 and placebo (pemotions, food cravings and water retention-related symptoms to a significantly greater extent than placebo during all three cycles of treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Benefits and risks of hormonal contraception for women

    OpenAIRE

    Gorenoi, Vitali; Schönermark, Matthias P.; Hagen, Anja

    2007-01-01

    Scientific background: A large proportion of women of reproductive age in Germany use various methods of pregnancy prevention (contraception), among them various hormone-based methods. Hormonal contraceptives may be divided into combined estrogen-progestogen contraceptives (pills, skin patches, vaginal rings), progestogen-only contraceptives (pills, injections, implants, hormone spirals) and emergency contraceptives. Research questions: The evaluation addressed the question of benefits and ri...

  5. Contraceptive implants: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowlands S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sam Rowlands,1,2 Stephen Searle3 1Centre of Postgraduate Medical Research and Education, School of Health and Social Care, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; 2Dorset HealthCare, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; 3Sexual Health Services, Chesterfield, United KingdomAbstract: Progestin-only contraceptive implants are a highly cost-effective form of long-acting reversible contraception. They are the most effective reversible contraceptives and are of a similar effectiveness to sterilization. Pregnancies are rare in women using this method of contraception, and those that do occur must be fully investigated, with an ultrasound scan of the arm and serum etonogestrel level if the implant cannot be located. There are very few contraindications to use of implants, and they have an excellent safety profile. Both acceptability and continuation with the method are high. Noncontraceptive benefits include improvements in dysmenorrhea, ovulatory pain, and endometriosis. Problematic bleeding is a relatively common adverse effect that must be covered in preinsertion information-giving and supported adequately if it occurs. Recognized training for both insertion and removal should be undertaken. Care needs to be taken at both insertion and removal to avoid neurovascular injury. Implants should always be palpable; if they are not, noninsertion should be assumed until disproven. Etonogestrel implants are now radiopaque, which aids localization. Anticipated difficult removals should be performed by specially trained experts. Keywords: contraceptive, subdermal implant, etonogestrel, levonorgestrel, progestin-only, long-acting reversible contraception

  6. Post-coital contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, J R; Chambers, J; Hall, D J

    1984-03-01

    137,000 British women chose to have an abortion in 1981 and about 25% were teenagers. A recent estimate noted that 10% of unintended pregnancies could have been avoided if postcoital contraception had been obtainable. The availability of postcoital contraception is limited and few doctors have much knowledge of or interest in this contraceptive method. 2 questions that arise are why have doctors been so slow to adopt this effective method of birth control and what are the chances of its availability in the National Health Service (NHS) improving. Postcoital contraception is a comparatively new and until recently unpublicized fertility control method, and there was little knowledge of it among the general population or the medical profession. Doctors' ignorance and reluctance to provide the method may have been due in part to the fact that the pharmaceutical firms have been hesitant to recommend oral contraceptive (OC) pills for this use. There is no specially packaged product, and it is necessary for a patient to be given 4 pills from a 21-pill pack. This has meant that the method has not been advertized, as most new methods would be, in the medical magazines. Hopefully, this lack of knowledge has been rectified by the Family Planning Association. As part of its campaign to launch the method, it has sent details to all general practitioners. Attitudes to postcoital contraception are important, and clearly there are strong parallels with the abortion issues and legal and moral undercurrents as well. Many doctors might have been put off providing postcoital contraception by the experience of the 2 clinics (BPAS in Sheffield and the Caithorpe Nursing Home in Birmingham) which had been reported by Life, an antiabortion pressure group, to the Director of Public Prosecutions under the Offences Against the Persons Act 1863. But on May 10, 1983 the Attorney General announced that the provisionof postcoital contraception is not a criminal offense. This statement may not be

  7. Changes in blood levels of proteinase inhibitors, pregnancy zone protein, steroid carriers and complement factors induced by oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Poulsen, H K; Teisner, B

    1993-01-01

    levels of antithrombin III (AT III), alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1at), complement factors (factor B, C3, C4), pregnancy zone protein (PZP), corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and albumin were measured before treatment and during...

  8. Contraceptive Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troen, Philip; And Others

    This report provides an overview of research activities and needs in the area of contraceptive development. In a review of the present state, discussions are offered on the effectiveness and drawbacks of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, barrier methods, natural family planning, and sterilization. Methods of contraception that are in the…

  9. Contraceptive Coverage and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschann, Mary; Soon, Reni

    2015-12-01

    A major goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is reducing healthcare spending by shifting the focus of healthcare toward preventive care. Preventive services, including all FDA-approved contraception, must be provided to patients without cost-sharing under the ACA. No-cost contraception has been shown to increase uptake of highly effective birth control methods and reduce unintended pregnancy and abortion; however, some institutions and corporations argue that providing contraceptive coverage infringes on their religious beliefs. The contraceptive coverage mandate is evolving due to legal challenges, but it has already demonstrated success in reducing costs and improving access to contraception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Conception by means of in vitro fertilization is not associated with maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy or postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambadauro, Pietro; Iliadis, Stavros; Bränn, Emma; Skalkidou, Alkistis

    2017-08-01

    To study whether conception by means of in vitro fertilization (IVF) is associated with maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy or postpartum. Longitudinal observational study. University hospital. A total of 3,283 women with singleton pregnancies receiving antenatal care and delivering in Uppsala from 2010 to 2015. A web-based self-administered structured questionnaire including sociodemographic, clinical and pregnancy-related items, and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was delivered at 17 and 32 gestational weeks and at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Prevalence of significant depressive symptoms (EPDS ≥12) and EPDS scores. A total of 167 women (5%) had conceived via IVF and 3,116 (95%) had a spontaneous pregnancy. IVF mothers were more frequently ≥35 years of age (46.1% vs. 22.6%) and primiparous (71.7% vs. 49.9%) and had a higher cesarean delivery rate (22.4% vs. 14.2%). Demographic and clinical characteristics were otherwise similar between the two groups. Significant depressive symptoms were reported by 12.8%, 12.4%, 13.8%, and 11.9% of women at 17 and 32 gestational weeks and 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum, respectively. The prevalence of depressive symptoms and the EPDS scores during pregnancy and postpartum were similar between women conceiving spontaneously or through IVF. The mode of conception was not associated with significant depressive symptoms at any time point, even when adjusting for several possible confounders in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Despite the psychologic distress characterizing subfertility and its treatment, conception by means of IVF is not associated with maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy or postpartum. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Teenage Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Mary C.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the problems of teenage pregnancy, including the costs to society, the challenge to educators, and the types of preventive programs developing across the country. Programs dealing strictly with reproduction and contraception are the least effective deterrents to teenage pregnancy. (MD)

  12. Dietary patterns and depressive symptoms during pregnancy in Japan: Baseline data from the Kyushu Okinawa Maternal and Child Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Keiko; Okubo, Hitomi; Sasaki, Satoshi; Furukawa, Shinya; Arakawa, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    Only one Brazilian study has examined the association between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms during pregnancy. The current cross-sectional study examined this issue in Japan. Study subjects were 1744 pregnant women. Between April 2007 and March 2008, information under study was obtained. Dietary patterns were derived from a factor analysis of 33 predefined food groups based on a self-administered diet history questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were defined as a Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score ≥ 16. Adjustment was made for age, gestation, region of residence, number of children, family structure, history of depression, family history of depression, smoking, secondhand smoke exposure, employment, household income, education, and body mass index. Three dietary patterns were identified: 'healthy', characterized by high intake of green and yellow vegetables, other vegetables, mushrooms, pulses, seaweed, potatoes, fish, sea products, miso soup, sugar, and shellfish; 'Japanese', characterized by high intake of rice and miso soup; and 'Western', characterized by high intake of beef and pork, processed meat, vegetable oil, chicken, eggs, shellfish, and salt-containing seasonings. The healthy and Japanese patterns were independently inversely associated with depressive symptoms during pregnancy: the adjusted prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals, P for trend) between extreme quartiles were 0.56 (0.43-0.73, pregnancy. Information was obtained between the 5th and 39th week of pregnancy. The healthy and Japanese dietary patterns may be inversely associated with depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Committee Opinion No 707: Access to Emergency Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Emergency contraception refers to contraceptive methods used to prevent pregnancy in the first few days after unprotected intercourse, sexual assault, or contraceptive failure. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998, numerous barriers to emergency contraception remain. The purpose of this Committee Opinion is to examine barriers to the use of emergency contraception, emphasize the importance of increasing access, and review new methods of emergency contraception and limitations in efficacy in special populations.

  14. Committee Opinion No. 707 Summary: Access to Emergency Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Emergency contraception refers to contraceptive methods used to prevent pregnancy in the first few days after unprotected intercourse, sexual assault, or contraceptive failure. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998, numerous barriers to emergency contraception remain. The purpose of this Committee Opinion is to examine barriers to the use of emergency contraception, emphasize the importance of increasing access, and review new methods of emergency contraception and limitations in efficacy in special populations.

  15. The impact of combined oral contraceptives on ocular tissues: a review of ocular effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilita M. Moschos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this manuscript is to review the action and adverse effects of combined oral contraceptives (COCs on ocular tissues. The percentage of unwanted pregnancies and the subsequent abortions make contraception crucial worldwide. Over 100 million women around the world use common contraceptive methods, including intrauterine devices, combined estrogen and progestin oral contraceptives, as well as progestin only preparations (oral contraceptives, implants or injections. COCs are widely used for contraception, but they are also indicated in menorrhagia, endometriosis, acne and hirsutism, fibroid uterus and premenstrual syndrome. However, they have been associated with high rates of cardiovascular events, venous thromboembolic disease, ischemic strokes and breast cancer. The incidence of COCs-related ocular complications is estimated to be 1 in 230 000, including dry eye symptoms, corneal edema, lens opacities and retinal neuro-ophthalmologic or vascular complications. We may infer that the serious ocular complications of COCs can be prevented by eliminating the estrogen dosage and choosing third-generation progestins. In any case, doctors should take into consideration the systemic and ocular history of the patients before selecting any method of contraception.

  16. Symptoms associated with pregnancy complications along the Thai-Burma border: the role of conflict violence and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falb, Kathryn L; McCormick, Marie C; Hemenway, David; Anfinson, Katherine; Silverman, Jay G

    2014-01-01

    To assess the association between lifetime violence victimization and self-reported symptoms associated with pregnancy complications among women living in refugee camps along the Thai-Burma border. Cross-sectional survey of partnered women aged 15-49 years living in three refugee camps who reported a pregnancy that resulted in a live birth within the past 2 years with complete data (n = 337). Variables included the lifetime prevalence of any violence victimization, conflict victimization, intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization, self-reported symptoms of pregnancy complications, and demographic covariates. Logistic generalized estimating equations, accounting for camp-level clustering, were used to assess the relationships of interest. Approximately one in six women (16.0 %) reported symptoms related to pregnancy complications for their most recent birth within the last 2 years and 15 % experienced violence victimization. In multivariable analyses, any form of lifetime violence victimization was associated with 3.1 times heightened odds of reporting symptoms (95 % CI 1.8-5.2). In the final adjusted model, conflict victimization was associated with a 3.0 increase in odds of symptoms (95 % CI 2.4-3.7). However, lifetime IPV victimization was not associated with symptoms, after accounting for conflict victimization (aOR: 1.8; 95 % CI 0.4-9.0). Conflict victimization was strongly linked with heightened risk of self-reported symptoms associated with pregnancy complications among women in refugee camps along the Thai-Burma border. Future research and programs should consider the long-term impacts of conflict victimization in relation to maternal health to better meet the needs of refugee women.

  17. Emergency contraception: different bioethical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraceptives, in this case post-morning pills, are contraceptive methods used to avoid an unwanted pregnancy after an unprotected sexual intercourse. Their use is feeding a strong ethical debate between subjects for and against their prescription and leading some health professionals to conscientious objection. Among people contrary to prescription some oppose to it because of a general refuse of all contraceptive methods, others considering post-morning pills as abortive. Among people supporting prescription, some consider emergency contraception necessary to assure fundamental women’s rights, in particular the right to sexual auto-determination, while others prescribe emergency contraception only to avoid a greater demand for abortion. It is up to the Italian National Health Service warranting a correct balance between the two opposite positions, that can protect women’s right of access to health services.

  18. Nutritional factors associated with antenatal depressive symptoms in the early stage of pregnancy among urban South Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukose, Ammu; Ramthal, Asha; Thomas, Tinku; Bosch, Ronald; Kurpad, Anura V; Duggan, Christopher; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2014-01-01

    Many women of reproductive age from developing countries have poor nutritional status, and the prevalence of depression during pregnancy is high. The objective of the present study was to assess the prevalence of antenatal depressive symptoms in early pregnancy, and to identify the demographic and nutritional factors associated with these symptoms in a sample of urban South Indian pregnant women. This cross-sectional study was the baseline assessment of a prospective randomized controlled trial of vitamin B12 supplementation in urban pregnant south Indian women between the ages of 18 and 40 years ( www.clinicaltrials.gov : NCT00641862). 365 women in their first trimester of pregnancy were screened for depressive symptoms at an urban clinic in Karnataka, South India, using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K-10). Nutritional, clinical and biochemical factors were also assessed. Mean (SD) age of the cohort was 22.6 (3.7) years and mean (SD) BMI was 20.4 (3.3) kg/m(2). 121 (33 %) of the women in the 1st trimester had symptoms consistent with depression (K-10 score >6). In multivariate log binomial regression analysis, presence of antenatal depressive symptoms in the first trimester were positively associated with vomiting, prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.54 (95 % CI 1.10, 2.16) and negatively with anemia, PR = 0.67 (95 % CI 0.47, 0.96). Nutrient intakes, serum vitamin B12, methylmalonic acid, homocysteine and red cell folate levels were not associated with measures of depression. Antenatal depressive symptoms in early pregnancy are highly prevalent in urban Indian women and are more common in women with vomiting and without anemia. In this cross-sectional data, blood concentrations of vitamin B12 and folate were not associated with depressive symptoms. The relationship between nutritional status and depressive symptoms may require larger and longitudinal studies.

  19. Gravidez ectópica após uso de contracepção de emergência: relato de caso Ectopic pregnancy after use of hormonal emergency contraception: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Monteiro Zucchi

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Gravidez ectópica é a implantação e o desenvolvimento do ovo fora da cavidade uterina; impõe diagnóstico precoce e assistência de urgência. Gravidez ectópica com corpo lúteo contralateral presume ocorrência de transmigração do zigoto para a tuba uterina do lado oposto, o que pode ser responsável pela sua ocorrência. Em 1994, o levonorgestrel teve sua eficácia comprovada como superior à dos outros métodos para contracepção de emergência. É relatado caso de paciente de 27 anos que apresentou gravidez ectópica, de localização tubária, com corpo lúteo contralateral, após uso de contracepção de emergência por falha do método anticoncepcional de escolha (preservativo masculino. Foi realizado tratamento cirúrgico conservador por videolaparoscopia, com boa evolução após a cirurgia.Ectopic pregnancy is the implantation and development of the ovum outside the uterine cavity; it needs a quick diagnosis and an urgent treatment. The presence of the corpus luteum in the ovary that is contralateral to the ectopic pregnancy is presumptive evidence for ovum transmigration, which may be the cause of ectopic pregnancy. In 1994, a multinational clinical trial proved the superiority of levonorgestrel over the existing emergency contraceptive products. In the present study, we describe the case of a 27-year-old woman with ectopic pregnancy and a contralateral corpus luteum after use of hormonal emergency contraception (levonorgestrel, because of failure of the used contraception method (condom. The patient was treated with laparoscopic surgery that was successful.

  20. Childhood sexual abuse, intimate partner violence during pregnancy, and posttraumatic stress symptoms following childbirth: a path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Aline Gaudard E Silva de; Reichenheim, Michael Eduardo; Moraes, Claudia Leite; Howard, Louise Michele; Lobato, Gustavo

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the pathways by which childhood sexual abuse (CSA), psychological and physical intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy, and other covariates relate to each other and to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in the postpartum period. The sample comprised 456 women who gave birth at a maternity service for high-risk pregnancies in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, interviewed at 6-8 weeks after birth. A path analysis was carried out to explore the postulated pathways between exposures and outcome. Trauma History Questionnaire, Conflict Tactics Scales and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist were used to assess information about exposures of main interest and outcome. The link between CSA and PTSD symptoms was mediated by history of trauma, psychiatric history, psychological IPV, and fear of childbirth during pregnancy. Physical IPV was directly associated with postnatal PTSD symptoms, whereas psychological IPV connection seemed to be partially mediated by physical abuse and fear of childbirth during pregnancy. The role of CSA, IPV, and other psychosocial characteristics on the occurrence of PTSD symptoms following childbirth as well as the intricate network of these events should be acknowledged in clinic and intervention approaches.

  1. Perinatal stress, fatigue, depressive symptoms, and immune modulation in late pregnancy and one month postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C Y; Pickler, R H

    2014-01-01

    Stress and fatigue are common complaints of pregnant and postpartum women as is depression. These symptoms may be related to immunomodulation. However, few studies have examined these relationships. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among stress, fatigue, depression, and cytokines as markers of immune modulation in prenatal and postpartum women. Women completed questionnaires and gave blood samples during late pregnancy and again at 4-6 weeks postpartum. Blood was analyzed for cytokines as measures of immune modulation. Stress, fatigue, and depression were experienced at moderately high levels, with higher levels of fatigue and depression in the postpartum but higher stress in the prenatal period. Levels of several cytokines were increased in the postpartum over the prenatal period. Stress and depression were related in the prenatal period and stress, depression, and fatigue were related in the postpartum. While various cytokines were related to each other in both periods, only stress was related to MIP-1β, a cytokine that may be important for childbirth processes. More studies, especially longitudinal and interventional studies, are needed to increase our knowledge about etiology, patterns, symptoms, factors, and management of maternal distress. The search for reliable biomarkers for at-risk mothers remains a priority.

  2. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) across pregnancy and postpartum: Associations with race, depressive symptoms, and low birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Lisa M; Mitchell, Amanda M; Gillespie, Shannon L; Palettas, Marilly

    2016-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated as a causal factor in major depression and is critical to placental development during pregnancy. Longitudinal data on BDNF across the perinatal period are lacking. These data are of interest given the potential implications for maternal mood and fetal growth, particularly among Black women who show ∼2-fold greater risk for delivering low birth weight infants. Serum BDNF, serum cortisol, and depressive symptoms (per CES-D) were assessed during each trimester and 4-11 weeks postpartum among 139 women (77 Black, 62 White). Low birth weight (BDNF declined considerably from 1st through 3rd trimesters (ps≤0.008) and subsequently increased at postpartum (pBDNF during the 1st trimester, 2nd trimester, and postpartum (ps≤0.032) as well as lower serum cortisol during the 2nd and 3rd trimester (ps≤0.01). Higher serum cortisol was concurrently associated with lower serum BDNF in the 2nd trimester only (pBDNF at both the 2nd and 3rd trimester was negatively associated with 3rd trimester depressive symptoms (ps≤0.02). In addition, women delivering low versus healthy weight infants showed significantly lower serum BDNF in the 3rd trimester (p=0.004). Women delivering low versus healthy weight infants did not differ in depressive symptoms at any time point during pregnancy (ps≥0.34). Serum BDNF declines considerably across pregnancy in Black and White women, with overall higher levels in Blacks. Lower serum BDNF in late pregnancy corresponds with higher depressive symptoms and risk for low birth weight in Black and White women. However, the predictive value of serum BDNF in pregnancy is specific to within-race comparisons. Potential links between racial differences in serum BDNF and differential pregnancy-related cortisol adaptation require further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adolescent contraception: review and guidance for pediatric clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, J; Santelli, J S

    2015-02-01

    The majority of adolescents initiate sexual activity during their teenage years, making contraception an important aspect of routine adolescent health care. Despite common misperceptions, all available methods of reversible contraception are appropriate for adolescent use. Contraceptive side effects profiles and barriers to use of certain methods should be considered when providing contraceptives to adolescents. In particular, ease of use, confidentiality, and menstrual effects are main concerns of adolescents. Contraceptive counseling with adolescents should describe method efficacy, discuss user preferences, explore barriers to use, counsel regarding sexually transmitted infection prevention, and consider what to do if contraception fails. Emergency contraception should be widely discussed with adolescents, as it is appropriate for use during gaps in other contraceptive use, method failure, and adolescents who are not using another form of contraception. Dual method use (condom plus a highly effective method of contraception) is the gold standard for prevention of both pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.

  4. The influence of nurse home visits, including provision of 3 months of contraceptives and contraceptive counseling, on perceived barriers to contraceptive use and contraceptive use self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Alan L; Rdesinski, Rebecca E; Creach, E Dawn; Choi, Dongseok; Harvey, S Marie

    2008-01-01

    To identify the influence of a community health nurse (CHN) home visit on perceived barriers to contraceptive access and contraceptive use self-efficacy. We enrolled 103 women into two groups in a randomized trial evaluating the influence of contraceptive dispensing and family planning counseling during home visits on perceived barriers to accessing contraceptives and contraceptive use self-efficacy. Both groups received counseling by a CHN about sexually transmitted disease and pregnancy prevention, and a resource card listing phone numbers of family planning clinics. After randomization, the CHN dispensed three months of hormonal contraception to the intensive intervention group and advised the minimal intervention group to schedule an appointment at a family planning clinic. Data collection at baseline and 12 months included demographic, reproductive and other health-related information as well as quantitative assessments of information on perceived barriers to contraceptive access and contraceptive use self-efficacy. The mean age of participants was 24.7 years. Three-fourths had household incomes under $25,000. We found significant reductions in three perceived barriers to contraceptive access for both groups, as well as significant increases in two measures of contraceptive use self-efficacy at twelve months compared to baseline. Nurse home visits involving family planning counseling might be effective in reducing perceived barriers to contraceptive access and increasing contraceptive use self-efficacy.

  5. Sexual and Contraceptive Behaviors among Adolescents Requesting Emergency Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwiak, Carrie; Howard, Brandon; Hsieh, Jennifer; Ricciotti, Nancy; Sucato, Gina S

    2016-12-01

    Unintended pregnancy rates in the United States remain high among adolescents. Emergency contraception (EC) provides the only option for pregnancy prevention after unprotected sex. To better define the population of adolescents who request and use EC pills, we performed a post hoc analysis of an over-the-counter simulation study of EC pills. Teen reproductive health clinics in 5 cities. Adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17 years who requested EC. Single-tablet levonorgestrel 1.5 mg. We calculated the correlations between age and baseline sexual and contraceptive behaviors. χ 2 Tests were used to compare behaviors of first-time and repeat EC users. Overall, the most commonly reported contraceptive methods ever used were condoms, oral contraceptives, none, and withdrawal; the most common method ever used in each age group was no method for 13- to 14-year-olds and condom for 15-, 16-, and 17-year-olds. The percentage of participants who had never used contraception before requesting EC decreased with age (53% [20/28] of 13- to 14-year-olds vs 15% [10/65] of 17-year-olds). First-time EC users were more likely to report no previous contraceptive use compared with repeat EC users (42% [88/208] vs 10% [13/135]; P contraceptive method (ie, "unprotected sex"). Adolescents who requested EC most commonly reported ever-use of contraceptive methods that rely on user adherence or no method at all, with younger adolescents more likely than older adolescents to have used no previous method. The provision of EC presents an opportunity to provide education and access to highly effective, long-term contraceptive methods. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Keith T; Bonzini, Matteo; Bonde, Jens Peter Ellekilde

    2013-01-01

    Most pregnant women are exposed to some physical activity at work. This Concise Guidance is aimed at doctors advising healthy women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies about the risks arising from five common workplace exposures (prolonged working hours, shift work, lifting, standing and hea...... on pregnancy. Moreover, moderate physical exercise is thought to be healthy in pregnancy and most pregnant women undertake some physical work at home. The guidelines provide risk estimates and advice on counselling....

  7. Adolescent mothers' knowledge and perceptions of contraceptives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This descriptive quantitative survey attempted to identify reasons why adolescent mothers (aged 19 or younger at the birth of their babies) failed to utilise contraceptive, emergency contraceptive and / or termination of pregnancy (TOP) services. The research population comprised all adolescent mothers in the region, the ...

  8. Emergency Contraception: A Global Overview of Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Recent concerns over teenage pregnancy, abortion and sexuality have pushed emergency contraceptive methods to the fore once again. The studies on knowledge and attitudes of providers are of particular importance, as they will have direct effects on potential users of emergency contraception. Aim/Method: ...

  9. Long acting reversible contraception | Kluge | Obstetrics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Long acting reversible contraception (LARC) has great potential in reducing these pregnancies as they are highly effective and do not rely a great deal on compliance and correct use. They have better continuation rates than short term hormonal contraception and as per definition require administration less than once per ...

  10. Progestogen-only injectable contraceptive: Experience of women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Progestogen-only injectable contraceptive is a long-acting contraceptive given intramuscularly to give protection against unwanted pregnancy for a period of 2 or 3 months, depending on the type. Alterations in menstrual pattern are a well known side effect of this effective contraceptive method. Objectives: To ...

  11. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  12. Pregnancy Prevention at Her Fingertips: A Text- and Mobile Video-Based Pilot Intervention to Promote Contraceptive Methods among College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh-Buhi, Eric R.; Helmy, Hannah; Harsch, Kristin; Rella, Natalie; Godcharles, Cheryl; Ogunrunde, Adejoke; Lopez Castillo, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This paper reports on a pilot study evaluating the feasibility and acceptability of a text- and mobile video-based intervention to educate women and men attending college about non-daily contraception, with a particular focus on long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). A secondary objective is to describe the process of intervention…

  13. Perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms, smoking, and recent alcohol use in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ian M; Culhane, Jennifer F; Webb, David A; Coyne, James C; Hogan, Vijaya; Mathew, Leny; Elo, Irma T

    2010-06-01

    Perceived discrimination is associated with poor mental health and health-compromising behaviors in a range of vulnerable populations, but this link has not been assessed among pregnant women. We aimed to determine whether perceived discrimination was associated with these important targets of maternal health care among low-income pregnant women. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in English or Spanish with 4,454 multiethnic, low-income, inner-city women at their first prenatal visit at public health centers in Philadelphia, Penn, USA, from 1999 to 2004. Perceived chronic everyday discrimination (moderate and high levels) in addition to experiences of major discrimination, depressive symptomatology (CES-D >or= 23), smoking in pregnancy (current), and recent alcohol use (12 months before pregnancy) were assessed by patients' self-report. Moderate everyday discrimination was reported by 873 (20%) women, high everyday discrimination by 238 (5%) women, and an experience of major discrimination by 789 (18%) women. Everyday discrimination was independently associated with depressive symptomatology (moderate = prevalence ratio [PR] of 1.58, 95% CI: 1.38-1.79; high = PR of 1.82, 95% CI: 1.49-2.21); smoking (moderate = PR of 1.19, 95% CI: 1.05-1.36; high = PR of 1.41, 95% CI: 1.15-1.74); and recent alcohol use (moderate = PR of 1.23, 95% CI: 1.12-1.36). However, major discrimination was not independently associated with these outcomes. This study demonstrated that perceived chronic everyday discrimination, but not major discrimination, was associated with depressive symptoms and health-compromising behaviors independent of potential confounders, including race and ethnicity, among pregnant low-income women.

  14. Analysis of tubal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, N.; Iqbal, F.; Tayyeb, R.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: This study was carried out to determine the frequency, etiological factors, modes of presentation, accuracy of diagnostic modalities, operative findings and surgical treatment of tubal pregnancies. Design: Observational study. Place and duration of study: This study was conducted in gynae unit iii, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, Lahore from January 1995 to December 1996. Subject and Methods: All the patients diagnosed as a case of tubal pregnancy in two years period were included in the study. Detailed history regarding the symptoms and risk factors of tubal pregnancy was taken followed by clinical examination. The diagnostic and treatment modality used and operative findings were also recorded. All the data was recorded on a proforma and finally the results were analysed. Results: Incidence of tubal pregnancy was found out to be 1:305 deliveries. Out of these, 70% of the cases occurred in the age group of 21-30 years and in patients with low parity (in para 0-2) 65% of the patients had high risk factor e.g previous abdominopelvic surgery PID or history of infertility. Pain was the commonest symptom (90% of cases) followed by vaginal bleeding (80%) adnexal masses (70%) and amenorrhea (65%). Acute tubal pregnancy was found in 85% of the cases while 15% of cases had chronic tubal pregnancy. Tubal pregnancy in the ampullary region was detected in 65% patients. Conclusion: Previous abdominopelvic surgery, PID or history of infertility and use of intra-uterine contraceptive device are the main etiologic factors. Most of the patients present at a very late stage with ruptured tubal pregnancy followed by salpingostomy in 95% of cases. Only 5% of cases had conservative surgical treatment i.e salpingostomy. Culdocentesis ultrasonography and laparoscopy were good diagnostic modalities. (author)

  15. Contraceptive Sponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause: Vaginal irritation or dryness Urinary tract or vaginal infection An increased risk of contracting STIs Toxic shock ... 24 hours to reduce the risk of an infection. Remove the contraceptive ... If your vaginal muscles are still holding the contraceptive sponge tightly, ...

  16. Contraceptive Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulka, Barbara S.; And Others

    The objective of research in contraceptive evaluation is to improve the ability of individuals to choose contraceptive methods best suited to their needs and circumstances and to provide information that will lead to the development of safer and more effective methods. There are usually three considerations in judging the importance of a method of…

  17. Advances in Male Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephanie T.; Amory, John K.; Bremner, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant advances in contraceptive options for women over the last 50 yr, world population continues to grow rapidly. Scientists and activists alike point to the devastating environmental impacts that population pressures have caused, including global warming from the developed world and hunger and disease in less developed areas. Moreover, almost half of all pregnancies are still unwanted or unplanned. Clearly, there is a need for expanded, reversible, contraceptive options. Multicultural surveys demonstrate the willingness of men to participate in contraception and their female partners to trust them to do so. Notwithstanding their paucity of options, male methods including vasectomy and condoms account for almost one third of contraceptive use in the United States and other countries. Recent international clinical research efforts have demonstrated high efficacy rates (90–95%) for hormonally based male contraceptives. Current barriers to expanded use include limited delivery methods and perceived regulatory obstacles, which stymie introduction to the marketplace. However, advances in oral and injectable androgen delivery are cause for optimism that these hurdles may be overcome. Nonhormonal methods, such as compounds that target sperm motility, are attractive in their theoretical promise of specificity for the reproductive tract. Gene and protein array technologies continue to identify potential targets for this approach. Such nonhormonal agents will likely reach clinical trials in the near future. Great strides have been made in understanding male reproductive physiology; the combined efforts of scientists, clinicians, industry and governmental funding agencies could make an effective, reversible, male contraceptive an option for family planning over the next decade. PMID:18436704

  18. Mechanisms of action of hormonal emergency contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Vivian W Y; Levine, Marc; Soon, Judith A

    2010-02-01

    Hormonal emergency contraceptives have been used to prevent unwanted pregnancy for more than 3 decades. The mechanisms of action of the regimen containing a combination of estrogen and progestin, known as the Yuzpe regimen, and those of the levonorgestrel regimen continue to be controversial, especially over the possibility that these regimens might act by interfering with implantation of the fertilized ovum. We performed a search of the PubMed (1949-July 2009) and EMBASE (1980-July 2009) databases to identify literature on the mechanisms of action of these contraceptive regimens, and data were extracted from pertinent English-language studies. We classified studies according to the approach taken by the investigators to study the actions of emergency contraceptives on pregnancy: an indirect method that uses statistical models to determine whether emergency contraceptives would be as effective as reported if they act only by disrupting ovulation; direct observation of the effects of emergency contraceptives on surrogate outcomes, including ovulation, sperm activity, hormonal levels, and endometrial receptivity to implantation; and analysis of directly observed pregnancy outcomes against statistical data. Acceptability of emergency contraceptives by women and clinicians may depend on personal opinions about when life or pregnancy begins. The evidence strongly supports disruption of ovulation as a mechanism of action. The data suggest that emergency contraceptives are unlikely to act by interfering with implantation, although the possibility has not been completely excluded. The data also suggest that emergency contraceptives are ineffective after ovulation. Women and clinicians who consider implantation or later events to be the beginning of pregnancy should be aware that emergency contraceptives are likely nonabortive by this definition of pregnancy.

  19. Male Hormonal Contraception: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Mara Y.; Page, Stephanie T.; Bremner, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous contraceptive options available to women, approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States and worldwide are unplanned. Women and men support the development of reversible male contraception strategies, but none have been brought to market. Herein we review the physiologic basis for male hormonal contraception, the history of male hormonal contraception development, currents agents in development, as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contrace...

  20. Supplying emergency contraception to adolescents: the nurse's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Craig

    2014-12-02

    This article explores issues surrounding the supply of emergency contraception to adolescents to reduce the risk of unintended pregnancy. It explains the female reproductive cycle, and describes the types of emergency contraception that may be supplied following unprotected sexual intercourse or contraception failure. The aftercare that should be offered to adolescents following the supply of emergency contraception is discussed, alongside issues surrounding the safeguarding of children and vulnerable adults.

  1. Practice Bulletin Summary No. 152: Emergency Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Emergency contraception, also known as postcoital contraception, is therapy used to prevent pregnancy after an unprotected or inadequately protected act of sexual intercourse. Common indications for emergency contraception include contraceptive failure (eg, condom breakage or missed doses of oral contraceptives) and failure to use any form of contraception (1-3). Although oral emergency contraception was first described in the medical literature in the 1960s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998. Since then, several new products have been introduced. Methods of emergency contraception include oral administration of combined estrogen-progestin, progestin only, or selective progesterone receptor modulators and insertion of a copper intrauterine device (IUD). Many women are unaware of the existence of emergency contraception, misunderstand its use and safety, or do not use it when a need arises (4-6). The purpose of this Practice Bulletin is to review the evidence for the efficacy and safety of available methods of emergency contraception and to increase awareness of these methods among obstetrician-gynecologists and other gynecologic providers.

  2. Practice Bulletin No. 152: Emergency Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Emergency contraception, also known as postcoital contraception, is therapy used to prevent pregnancy after an unprotected or inadequately protected act of sexual intercourse. Common indications for emergency contraception include contraceptive failure (eg, condom breakage or missed doses of oral contraceptives) and failure to use any form of contraception (). Although oral emergency contraception was first described in the medical literature in the 1960s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998. Since then, several new products have been introduced. Methods of emergency contraception include oral administration of combined estrogen-progestin, progestin only, or selective progesterone receptor modulators and insertion of a copper intrauterine device (IUD). Many women are unaware of the existence of emergency contraception, misunderstand its use and safety, or do not use it when a need arises (). The purpose of this Practice Bulletin is to review the evidence for the efficacy and safety of available methods of emergency contraception and to increase awareness of these methods among obstetrician-gynecologists and other gynecologic providers.

  3. Temperament, Character, and Depressive Symptoms during Pregnancy: A Study of a Japanese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Minatani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To examine the effects of temperament and character domains on depression during pregnancy. Methods. We examined 601 pregnant women using a questionnaire that included the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS, the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI, and demographic variables. Results. In a hierarchical regression analysis, severity of depression during pregnancy was predicted by the women’s negative response towards the current pregnancy, low self-directedness, and high harm avoidance, persistence, and self-transcendence. Conclusion. Depression during pregnancy is predicted by personality traits as well as women’s negative attitudes towards the current pregnancy.

  4. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  5. Post-ovulatory contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasier, A; Baird, D T

    1990-06-01

    It is possible to prevent pregnancy after unprotected intercourse by suppressing ovulation, inhibiting fertilization or interfering with tubal transport and/or implantation of the early embryo. IUCDs probably prevent implantation by stimulating the release of prostaglandins from the endometrium but are not acceptable to many women. Post-coital contraceptive steroids, e.g. high-dose oestrogens, are associated with a relatively high incidence of side-effects and must be taken within 72 hours of coitus. As these agents are effective by creating a uterine environment unfavourable for implantation, it may be possible to use antigestagens or antioestrogens in this way. It is already known that an antigestagen in combination with a prostaglandin is a highly effective method of inducing abortion in very early pregnancy. The corpus luteum is essential for the maintenance of pregnancy and its destruction by a luteolytic agent should dislodge the implanting embryo. If an effective method of preventing implantation could be developed which was relatively free from side-effects, it should be possible to use it as a regular form of contraception to be taken only when the risk of pregnancy had occurred.

  6. Contraception with combined oral contraceptive pills in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mass media was the commonest source of information, and one accidental pregnancy occurred (Pearl index 0.03 per 100 woman years). Conclusion: This study shows that combined oral contraceptives pills appear to be acceptable, safe and effective in Port Harcourt. This compares to world wide experience. Concerted ...

  7. Contraception with Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (IUCD) in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One accidental pregnancy occurred (pearl index of 0.007 per 100 woman years). IUCD is an effective method of contraception in Port Harcourt ; comparable to worldwide experience. The low uptake rate calls for concerted effort to create more awareness about it especially in the rural areas/ non literate population.

  8. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Koyama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency post-coital contraception (EC is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method, and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference.

  9. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Atsuko; Hagopian, Laura; Linden, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference. PMID:24453516

  10. Quality of life, anxiety and depression symptoms in early and late pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Nicoline C; Secher, Anna L; Cramon, Per

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to explore changes in health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression symptoms during pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An observational cohort study including 137 pregnant women with pregestational diabetes (110...... with type 1 and 27 with type 2). To evaluate changes from early to late pregnancy, the internationally validated questionnaires 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were completed at 8 and 33 gestational weeks. RESULTS: From early to late pregnancy....... The HADS anxiety score improved slightly from 5.0 (3.3) to 4.5 (3.4) (p = 0.04) whereas the HADS depression score remained unchanged. The prevalence of women with HADS anxiety or depression score ≥8 did not change. CONCLUSIONS: Physical quality of life deteriorated whereas mental quality of life improved...

  11. Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... current.html ACOG Committee on Obstetric Practice and Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. (2013; Reaffirmed 2015). Committee Opinion No. 579. Definition of term pregnancy. Retrieved May 20, 2016, from ...

  12. Emergency contraception - Potential for women′s health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneeta Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception (EC is a safe and effective method which is used to prevent unwanted pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Many of the unwanted pregnancies end in unsafe abortions. The search for an ideal contraceptive, which does not interfere with spontaneity or pleasure of the sexual act, yet effectively controls the fertility, is still continuing. Numerous contraceptive techniques are available, yet contraceptive coverage continues to be poor in India. Thus, even when not planning for a pregnancy, exposure to unprotected sex takes place often, necessitating the use of emergency contraception. This need may also arise due to failure of contraceptive method being used (condom rupture, diaphragm slippage, forgotten oral pills or following sexual assault. Emergency contraception is an intervention that can prevent a large number of unwanted pregnancies resulting from failure of regular contraception or unplanned sexual activity, which in turn helps in reducing the maternal mortality and morbidity due to unsafe abortions. However, a concern has been expressed regarding repeated and indiscriminate usage of e-pill, currently the rational use of emergency contraception is being promoted as it is expected to make a significant dent in reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions. In fact, since the introduction of emergency contraception, the contribution of unsafe abortion towards maternal mortality has declined from 13 to 8 per cent.

  13. Parents' anxiety and depression symptoms after successful infertility treatment and spontaneous conception: does singleton/twin pregnancy matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendais, I; Figueiredo, B

    2016-10-01

    Does mode of conception [spontaneous/after infertility treatment (IT)], type of pregnancy (singleton/twin) and parent gender have an effect on anxiety and depression levels and trajectories during pregnancy and the post-partum period? Conception after IT was associated with a transitory increase in anxiety during the perinatal period for parents of singletons, while for IT parents of twins higher levels of psychopathological symptoms tended to persist during pregnancy and the post-partum period. Most previous studies have shown that successful IT is not associated with poor psychological well-being during pregnancy and the post-partum period, but there is also some evidence for heightened pregnancy-related anxiety, lower self-esteem and lower self-efficacy. Parents of twins experience increased postnatal anxiety and depression. This prospective longitudinal study assessed 267 couples (N = 534) at each trimester of pregnancy, after childbirth and at 3 months post-partum. The sample comprised 36 couples who had conceived after IT (19 twin pairs and 17 singletons) and 231 couples who had conceived spontaneously (SC; 28 twin pairs and 203 singletons). Couples were recruited at four public hospitals in Portugal, and self-report measures of anxiety and depression symptoms were administered. IT parents reported higher anxiety after childbirth than parents who SC, regardless of pregnancy type. IT parents of twins showed higher anxiety at mid-pregnancy, as well as higher anxiety and depression at 3 months post-partum than IT parents of singletons. Among IT mothers, those who had twins exhibited higher depression after childbirth than those who had singletons. Differences according to mode of conception, pregnancy type and parents gender over time were also noted. During pregnancy, IT parents of twins showed no significant change in depression scores, while the other groups depression scores statistically significantly decreased over time. From pregnancy to the post

  14. Maternal anxiety, depression and sleep disorders before and during pregnancy, and preschool ADHD symptoms in the NINFEA birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzini, L; Popovic, M; Zugna, D; Vitiello, B; Trevisan, M; Pizzi, C; Rusconi, F; Gagliardi, L; Merletti, F; Richiardi, L

    2018-04-18

    Maternal mental disorders have been associated with the risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. Within the context of a mother-child cohort, we examined whether maternal anxiety, depression and sleep disorders are associated with pre-school ADHD symptoms. The study included 3634 singletons from the Italian NINFEA (Nascita e INFanzia: gli Effetti dell'Ambiente') cohort. Maternal doctor-diagnosed anxiety, depression and sleep disorders before and during pregnancy were assessed from the questionnaires completed during pregnancy and 6 months after delivery. Mothers rated child ADHD symptoms at 4 years of age, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Hyperactive-impulsive (ADHD-H), inattentive (ADHD-I) and total ADHD scores were analysed in the models adjusted for child's gender, first-born status, maternal age, education, alcohol consumption and smoking during pregnancy. The total ADHD score at age 4 was associated with maternal lifetime anxiety (17.1% percentage difference in score compared with never; 95% CI 7.3-27.9%), sleep disorders (35.7%; 95% CI 10.7-66.5%) and depression (17.5%; 95% CI 3.2-33.8%). Similar positive associations were observed also for ADHD-H and ADHD-I traits, with slightly attenuated associations between maternal sleep disorders and child ADHD-I score, and maternal depression and both ADHD scores. All the estimates were enhanced when the disorders were active during pregnancy and attenuated for disorders active only during the pre-pregnancy period. Maternal anxiety, depression and sleep disorders are associated with a relative increase in the number of ADHD-H, ADHD-I and total ADHD symptoms in preschoolers.

  15. Preconception counseling and contraception after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølsted-Pedersen, L; Skouby, S O; Damm, P

    1991-01-01

    -contraceptive compounds appear to be safe for women with previous GDM when administered for limited periods. At the follow-up examination, we found no increased risk of developing diabetes in women with previous GDM who used oral contraception. We consider the intrauterine contraceptives (IUD) a safe and effective......Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) diagnosed in the period 1978-1984 were followed for on average 6 yr after the index pregnancy. Thirty percent had diabetes mellitus at the follow-up examination, and preliminary results indicate that at least another third will develop diabetes during...... a subsequent pregnancy. Therefore, family planning and contraceptive guidance should follow the lines for women with pregestational diabetes. When low-dose hormonal contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel were given to women with previous GDM, glucose tolerance and lipoprotein levels...

  16. Maternal use of oral contraceptives and risk of fetal death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, R.; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Jørgensen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    Intrauterine exposure to artificial sex hormones such as oral contraceptives may be associated with an increased risk of fetal death. Between 1996 and 2002, a total of 92 719 women were recruited to The Danish National Birth Cohort and interviewed about exposures during pregnancy. Outcome.......2%) women took oral contraceptives during pregnancy. Use of combined oestrogen and progesterone oral contraceptives (COC) or progesterone-only oral contraceptives (POC) during pregnancy was not associated with increased hazard ratios of fetal death compared with non-users, HR 1.01 [95% CI 0.71, 1.45] and HR...... 1.37 [95% CI 0.65, 2.89] respectively. Neither use of COC nor POC prior to pregnancy was associated with fetal death. Stratification by maternal age and smoking showed elevated risks of fetal death for women contraception during pregnancy, but the interactions were...

  17. Association between contraceptive discontinuation and pregnancy intentions in Guatemala Asociación entre la suspensión en el uso de anticonceptivos y las intenciones de embarazo en Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine L. Barden-O’Fallon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine whether contraceptive discontinuation is associated with pregnancies that are conceived earlier than desired (mistimed or are not wanted at the time of conception (unwanted. METHODS: Data were obtained from the 2002 Guatemala National Maternal and Child Health Survey. Pregnancies within the three years prior to and at the time of the survey (April 1999-November 2002 were classified as either "intended," "mistimed," or "unwanted." The key independent variable was whether the woman had used contraception within 12 months of the pregnancy and, for those who had used it, the reason for discontinuation (either to get pregnant or for another reason. A multinomial logistic analysis was used to determine the degree of association of discontinuation with pregnancy intentions. RESULTS: One of every five mistimed pregnancies and one of every six unwanted pregnancies followed discontinuations that were for reasons other than to become pregnant (e.g., contraceptive failure, side effects, and health concerns. Discontinuations for reasons other than to become pregnant were shown to be positively and significantly associated with a reported mistimed pregnancy (coefficient = 2.15; standard error = 0.27 or unwanted pregnancy (2.68; 0.37 compared to an intended pregnancy. Pregnancies preceded by discontinuations for reasons other than to become pregnant were also more likely to be reported as mistimed or unwanted than pregnancies of women who were not using contraception during the year prior to pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to increase contraceptive continuation. Any program should include an increased effort to reduce contraceptive failure and better address the side effects and the health concerns that women have that can lead to discontinuation. Non-users who want to delay or limit births should also be identified and targeted for outreach in order to reduce unintended pregnancies.OBJETIVOS: Determinar si la suspensión del

  18. "Pregnancy and labour cause more deaths than oral contraceptives": The debate on the pill in the Spanish press in the 1960s and 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gómez, Teresa; Ignaciuk, Agata

    2015-08-01

    From 1941 to 1978, Franco's regime in Spain banned all contraceptive methods. The pill started circulating in Spain from the 1960s, officially as a drug used in gynaecological therapy. However, in the following decade it was also increasingly used and prescribed as a contraceptive. This paper analyses debates about the contraceptive pill in the Spanish daily newspaper ABC and in two magazines, Blanco y Negro and Triunfo, in the 1960s and 1970s. It concludes that the debate on this contraceptive method was much more heterogeneous than might be expected given the Catholic-conservative character of the dictatorship. The daily press focused on the adverse effects of the drug and magazines concentrated on the ethical and religious aspects of the pill and discussed it in a generally positive light. Male doctors and Catholic authors dominated the debate. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Students' perceptions of contraceptives in university of ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Nimo Appiah-Agyekum

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to explore University of Ghana Business School diploma student's knowledge of contraceptives, types of contraceptives, attitudes towards contraceptive users, preference for contraceptives, benefits, and side-effects of contraceptives.Data was conducted with three sets of focus group discussions. Participants were systematically sampled from accounting and public administration departments.Findings showed that students had little knowledge of contraceptives. The male and female condoms were the main contraceptive types reported out of the many modern and traditional methods of contraceptives. The main benefits of contraceptives were; ability to protect against STIs, abortions, unwanted pregnancy and psychological trauma. Whilst most respondents preferred future use of pills, side-effects of contraceptives were mostly reported for condoms than other contraceptive methods. Results showed that participants had bad attitudes towards unmarried contraceptive users.Generally, our findings show that detailed knowledge about contraceptives is low. There is a little gap of information on contraception knowledge, timing, and contraceptive types among university diploma students. Reproductive and maternal services should be available and accessible for tertiary students.

  20. Contraceptive options for women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sharon; Steyn, Petrus; Temmerman, Marleen

    2014-08-01

    Women living with HIV are often of reproductive age, and many desire effective contraceptive options to delay or prevent pregnancy. We review the safety of various hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive methods for women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Additionally, we discuss drug interactions between contraceptive methods and antiretrovirals and the safety of methods with respect to onward transmission to HIV-negative partners for women in sero-discordant partnerships. In general, most methods are safe for most women living with HIV. An understanding of the reproductive goals of each individual patient, as well as her medical condition and medication, should be taken into account when counselling women on their contraceptive options. Further research is needed to understand drug interactions between contraceptives and antiretrovirals better and how to fulfil the contraceptive needs of HIV-positive women. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contraception include: your primary care doctor’s office college/university and women’s health centers public health departments hospital ... Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality Birth Control Family Health Infants and Toddlers Kids ...

  2. The association between pregnancy intendedness and experiencing symptoms of postpartum depression among new mothers in the United States, 2009 to 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Gauthreaux, Christina; Negron, Jenesis; Castellanos, Daniel; Ward-Peterson, Melissa; Castro, Grettel; Rodr?guez de la Vega, Pura; Acu?a, Juan Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Postpartum depression (PPD) is a form of major depressive disorder affecting approximately 13% of women worldwide. Unintended pregnancies, reaching close to 50% of the pregnancies in the United States, have become a major health concern. While many physiologic and psychosocial causes have been analyzed, few studies have examined the relationship between unintended pregnancy and symptoms of PPD. A cross-sectional study was conducted using surveillance data from the Centers for Disease...

  3. Would male hormonal contraceptives affect cardiovascular risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zitzmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of hormonal male contraception is to prevent unintended pregnancies by suppressing spermatogenesis. Hormonal male contraception is based on the principle that exogenous administration of androgens and other hormones such as progestins suppress circulating gonadotropin concentrations, decreasing testicular Leydig cell and Sertoli cell activity and spermatogenesis. In order to achieve more complete suppression of circulating gonadotropins and spermatogenesis, a progestin has been added testosterone to the most recent efficacy trials of hormonal male contraceptives. This review focusses on the potential effects of male hormonal contraceptives on cardiovascular risk factors, lipids and body composition, mainly in the target group of younger to middle-aged men. Present data suggest that hormonal male contraception can be reasonably regarded as safe in terms of cardiovascular risk. However, as all trials have been relatively short (< 3 years, a final statement regarding the cardiovascular safety of hormonal male contraception, especially in long-term use, cannot be made. Older men with at high risk of cardiovascular event might not be good candidates for hormonal male contraception. The potential adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives on cardiovascular risk appear to depend greatly on the choice of the progestin in regimens for hormonal male contraceptives. In the development of prospective hormonal male contraception, data on longer-term cardiovascular safety will be essential.

  4. Ulipristal acetate for emergency contraception: postmarketing experience after use by more than 1 million women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Delphine P; Jager, Martine; Kapp, Nathalie; Abitbol, Jean-Louis

    2014-05-01

    To describe the safety of ulipristal acetate in emergency contraception. Postmarketing pharmacovigilance data collection. A total of 553 women experienced 1049 adverse drug reactions. The most frequent (n,%) were pregnancies (282, 6.8%); nausea, abdominal pain and vomiting (139, 13.3%); headache, dizziness (67, 6.4%); and metrorrhagia, menses delay and breast symptoms (84, 8.0%). Including data from clinical trials, 376 pregnancies have been reported in total, 232 (62%) with a known outcome: 28 live births (29 newborns), 34 miscarriages, 151 induced abortions, 4 ectopics and 15 which are ongoing. No safety concern emerges from a sizable database of reported adverse reactions following ulipristal acetate exposure among varying ethnicities and regions. Postapproval data confirm the safety profile described during the clinical trials. Use of ulipristal acetate for emergency contraception in a variety of settings and among diverse populations indicate that it is safe and without unexpected or serious adverse events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Comparative Efficacy of Low-Dose Combined Oral Contraceptives Containing Desogestrel and Drospirenone in Premenstrual Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirath Wichianpitaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the efficacy of low-dose COC containing desogestrel (DSG with drospirenone (DRSP in the changes of premenstrual symptoms. Methods. In an open-label randomized controlled trial, 90 women with premenstrual syndrome who required COC were randomly recruited and allocated equally to receive either 6 cycles of 20 micrograms ethinyl estradiol (EE/150 micrograms DSG (DSG group or 20 micrograms EE/3 mg DRSP (DRSP group in 24/4 extended regimen. Analysis of covariance and repeated analysis of variance were used to determine the difference of mean Women's Health Assessment Questionnaire (WHAQ scores changes between groups, within group, and in premenstrual, menstrual, and postmenstrual phases. Results. Baseline characteristics and WHAQ scores were comparable. At the ends of the 3rd and the 6th cycles, mean WHAQ scores of all the 3 phases in DRSP group showed significant reduction and were significantly lower than those in DSG group. DSG group showed significant reduction in both premenstrual and menstrual phases after the 6th cycle. Adverse effects were comparable in both groups. In conclusion, low-dose COC containing either DSG or DRSP reduced premenstrual symptoms, but the latter showed greater efficacy and earlier reduction.

  6. Young women's contraceptive microbicide preferences: associations with contraceptive behavior and sexual relationship characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Candace; Tanner, Amanda E; Hensel, Devon J; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Zimet, Gregory D

    2014-03-01

    In time, microbicides may provide women with dual prevention against pregnancy and STDs. Although several microbicide dimensions have been evaluated, little is known about women's preferences for contraceptive microbicides and correlates of these preferences. Acceptability of a hypothetical contraceptive microbicide cream or jelly was examined among a -clinic-based sample of 266 women in Indianapolis from 2004 (when participants were aged 14-22) to 2008. Group conjoint analyses and individual conjoint analyses were used to compare preferences with respect to four microbicide -dimensions: contraceptive ability, efficacy in relation to condoms, timing of use and texture. Pearson's product moment correlations were used to examine the relationship between preferences for a contraceptive microbicide and selected characteristics of the women. Overall, the top-rated microbicide dimensions were efficacy in relation to that of condoms and contraceptive ability (importance scores, 40.0 and 35.4 out of 100.0, respectively). When all dimension levels were compared, contraceptive ability was the most strongly preferred (part-worth utility score, 8.9), and lower efficacy than that of -condoms was the least strongly preferred (-11.9). Preference for contraceptive microbicides was positively -associated with current contraceptive use, sexual agency, partner communication, commitment to avoiding pregnancy and -perceived partner agreement about avoiding pregnancy (coefficients, 0.07-0.18). It was negatively associated with current or past nonuse of contraceptives, seeking pregnancy and perceived partner agreement about seeking -pregnancy (-0.08 to -0.14). Microbicides with dual prevention properties may be attractive to young women. Microbicide development and subsequent clinical trials should incorporate contraceptive microbicides. Copyright © 2013 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  7. Strategies for communicating contraceptive effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Laureen M; Steiner, Markus; Grimes, David A; Hilgenberg, Deborah; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2013-04-30

    Knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness is crucial to making an informed choice. The consumer has to comprehend the pros and cons of the contraceptive methods being considered. Choice may be influenced by understanding the likelihood of pregnancy with each method and factors that influence effectiveness. To review all randomized controlled trials comparing strategies for communicating to consumers the effectiveness of contraceptives in preventing pregnancy. Through February 2013, we searched the computerized databases of MEDLINE, POPLINE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO and CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP. Previous searches also included EMBASE. We also examined references lists of relevant articles. For the initial review, we wrote to known investigators for information about other published or unpublished trials. We included randomized controlled trials that compared methods for communicating contraceptive effectiveness to consumers. The comparison could be usual practice or an alternative to the experimental intervention.Outcome measures were knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness, attitude about contraception or toward any particular contraceptive, and choice or use of contraceptive method. For the initial review, two authors independently extracted the data. One author entered the data into RevMan, and a second author verified accuracy. For the update, an author and a research associate extracted, entered, and checked the data.For dichotomous variables, we calculated the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For continuous variables, we computed the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. Seven trials met the inclusion criteria and had a total of 4526 women. Five were multi-site studies. Four trials were conducted in the USA, while Nigeria and Zambia were represented by one study each, and one trial was done in both Jamaica and India.Two trials provided multiple sessions for participants. In one study that examined contraceptive choice, women in

  8. CUP: contraceptive users pamphlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    This pamphlet, edited by an ad hoc committee of several consultants, scientists, theologians, public health and family planning directors, and an international attorney, covers the following topics: contra-conception; choices of contraceptives; contraceptive package information; copper IUDs; pelvic inflammatory disease (PID); sexually transmitted diseases; and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It includes a questionnaire for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Professor Joseph Goldzieher describes the "Contra-Conception" database as "a synthesis of up-to-date literature and contemporary guidelines, designed to provide ready access for practicing physicians and medical students." It contains data on several types of hormonal contraception. "Contra-Conceptions" is designed to allow the physician to set his or her own pace when working with the computer, and no previous computer experience is required. 1 of the program's many innovative features is the patient-profiling/decisionmaking section which can be used in the doctor's office to help decide what type of hormonal contraceptive is appropriate for a particular patient. The program permits the doctor to evaluate the significance of patient variables such as parity, smoking, menstrual difficulties and helps the doctor to identify the risks and benefits of the various methods and, ultimately, to make a balanced decision in the context of the most recent data. Contraceptive drugs and devices should include detailed information on the following: description of formula or device; indication, usage, and contraindications, clinical pharmacology and toxicology; dose-related risk; pregnancies per 100 women year; and detailed warning. The sequence of major pathophysiological reactions associated with copper IUDs is identified as are special problems of pelvic infections in users of copper IUDs. Those women who use oral contraceptives (OCs) or a barrier method of contraception or whose partners use a condom have a lower

  9. Hormonal emergency contraception: a clinical primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebarth, Angela; Hansen, Keith A

    2007-03-01

    Unintended and teenage pregnancies are major public health concerns in the United States. Emergency contraception is used to prevent pregnancy after failure of a contraceptive method or after unprotected intercourse. Expanded use of emergency contraception has the potential to reduce unintended pregnancy and induced abortions, while reducing state and federal healthcare expenditures. The recent approval of Plan B as an over-the-counter medication for individuals over 18 years of age should improve access to this medication. However, there are still widespread misconceptions about the mechanisms and implications of emergency contraception. Expanded access to emergency contraception is associated with increased use, but not associated with decreased efficacy, increased sexual risk-taking behavior, or less consistent use of traditional birth control methods. This review is designed to provide clinicians with information regarding the use of emergency contraception for reproductive age patients. It includes a brief description of methods of use, mechanisms of action, and side effect profiles of the most commonly used methods of emergency contraception, levonorgestrel and the Yuzpe method.

  10. The copper intrauterine device for emergency contraception: an opportunity to provide the optimal emergency contraception method and transition to highly effective contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermish, Amna I; Turok, David K

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide, 40% of all pregnancies are unintended. Widespread, over-the-counter availability of oral emergency contraception (EC) has not reduced unintended pregnancy rates. The EC visit presents an opportunity to initiate a highly effective method of contraception in a population at high risk of unintended pregnancy who are actively seeking to avoid pregnancy. The copper intrauterine device (IUD), the most effective method of EC, continues to provide contraception as effective as sterilization for up to 12 years, and it should be offered as the first-line method of EC wherever possible. Increased demand for and supply of the copper IUD for EC may have an important role in reducing rates of unintended pregnancy. The EC visit should include access to the copper IUD as optimal care but should ideally include access to all highly effective methods of contraception.

  11. Utilization of fetal fibronectin testing and pregnancy outcomes among women with symptoms of preterm labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackwell SC

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sean C Blackwell,1 Erin M Sullivan,2 Allison A Petrilla,2 Xian Shen,2 Kathleen A Troeger,3 James D Byrne4 1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston, TX, USA; 2Avalere Health, LLC, Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Washington, DC, USA; 3Hologic, Inc., Outcomes Research, Marlborough, MA, USA; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, CA, USA Objectives: To identify pregnant health plan members triaged through the emergency department (ED, including labor and delivery (ELD units, with symptoms of preterm labor (PTL, and evaluate the use of fetal fibronectin (fFN testing; and to calculate the rate of hospitalization and timing of delivery in relation to the ED visit. Methods: Retrospective cohort study using Medical Outcomes Research for Effectiveness and Economics Registry®, a national multipayer claims database. A cohort of pregnant women evaluated in an ELD with a diagnosis of PTL from June 2012 through November 2015 was identified. The proportion of women with PTL who received fFN testing was calculated.Results: A total of 23,062 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The rate of fFN testing prior to delivery was 12.0%. Of the 23,062 patients included in the analysis, 75.9% were discharged home. Of those who were discharged from the emergency room, one in five went on to deliver within 3 days and almost 96% of this group was not screened for the presence of fFN. Of the remaining 24.1% of patients admitted to the hospital, 91.3% delivered during their stay. In a sensitivity analysis, the percentage of women who delivered within 3 days of the ELD encounter was lower for women who received fFN testing only (6.6% versus those who had a history of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS only (21.6%. Furthermore, the rate of delivery within 3 days was lowest among patients who had both fFN testing and TVUS (4

  12. Women's perceptions of contraceptive efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaiya, Roshni; Lopez, Lia L; Nelson, Anita L

    2017-01-01

    Adoption of contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices has been less than might be expected given their superior efficacy and convenience. The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge and beliefs held by women, which may influence their contraceptive choices and theirongoing utilization of contraceptive methods. English speaking, nonpregnant, reproductive-age women, who were not surgically sterilized, were individually interviewed to obtain limited demographic characteristics and to assess their knowledge about the efficacy of various contraceptive methods in typical use and about the relative safety of oral contraceptives. A convenience sample of 500 women aged 18-45 years, with education levels that ranged from middle school to postdoctoral level was interviewed. The efficacy in typical use of both combined oral contraceptives and male condoms was correctly estimated by 2.2%; over two-thirds of women significantly over estimated the efficacy of each of those methods in typical use. Oral contraceptives were thought to be at least as hazardous to a woman's health as pregnancy by 56% of women. The majority of reproductive aged women surveyed substantially overestimated the efficacy of the two most popular contraceptive methods, often saying that they were 99% effective. Women with higher education levels were most likely to overestimate efficacy of oral contraceptives. Women of all ages and education levels significantly overestimated the health hazards of oral contraceptives compared to pregnancy. Overestimation of effectiveness of these methods of contraception, may contribute to lower adoption of implants and intrauterine devices. When individualizing patient counselling, misperceptions must be identified and addressed with women of all educational backgrounds. Not applicable.

  13. Oral contraceptives and neuroactive steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, Andrea J; Biggio, Giovanni; Concas, Alessandra

    2006-08-01

    A deregulation in the peripheral and brain concentrations of neuroactive steroids has been found in certain pathological conditions characterized by emotional or affective disturbances, including major depression and anxiety disorders. In this article we summarize data pertaining to the modulatory effects of oral contraceptive treatment on neuroactive steroids in women and rats. Given that the neuroactive steroids concentrations are reduced by oral contraceptives, together with the evidence that a subset of women taking oral contraceptives experience negative mood symptoms, we propose the use of this pharmacological treatment as a putative model to study the role of neuroactive steroids in the etiopathology of mood disorders. Moreover, since neuroactive steroids are potent modulators of GABA(A) receptor function and plasticity, the treatment with oral contraceptives might also represent a useful experimental model to further investigate the physiological role of these steroids in the modulation of GABAergic transmission.

  14. Male hormonal contraception: looking back and moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M Y; Page, S T; Bremner, W J

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous contraceptive options available to women, approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States and worldwide are unplanned. Women and men support the development of reversible male contraception strategies, but none have been brought to market. Herein we review the physiologic basis for male hormonal contraception, the history of male hormonal contraception development, currents agents in development as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception for men. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  15. A clinical study of transdermal contraceptive patch in Thai adolescence women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyasirisilp, Rachatapon; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2008-02-01

    To study cycle control, compliance and safety of a transdermal contraceptive patch in adolescent Thai women. Fifty-eight healthy women were assigned to receive 3 cycles of contraceptive patch (ethinyl estradiol 20 microg and norelgestromin 150 microg/day). All participants aged 16-20 years were invited to participate from the family planning clinic at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. Data were collected on adverse effects, perceived advantages and disadvantages, body weight, blood pressure, patch detachments and compliance. Data were analyzed using mean, percentage and student's t-test. The participants' average age was 19.4 years, height 158.8 cm, weight 51.8 kg, BMI 20.8 Kg/m2. The most location of patch application was the abdomen and the most adverse event was breast tenderness (31.0%) followed by application site reaction, nausea vomiting and headache respectively. The breast symptom was mild in severity. The participants reported decrease in dysmenorrhea and shorter duration of bleeding. There were no significant changes in body weight and blood pressure. The improvement of their facial acne was reported. There were no pregnancies during use and the adhesion of the contraceptive patch is excellent. Partial patch detachment was reported in only 6.9%. No completed patch detachment was found. The present study found an overall positive impression of a new transdermal contraceptive patch. The good compliance and few side effects were demonstrated. The adhesive patch contraceptive was excellent.

  16. Beyond the Condom: Frontiers in Male Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Mara Y; Amory, John K

    2016-05-01

    Nearly half of all pregnancies worldwide are unplanned, despite numerous contraceptive options available. No new contraceptive method has been developed for men since the invention of condom. Nevertheless, more than 25% of contraception worldwide relies on male methods. Therefore, novel effective methods of male contraception are of interest. Herein we review the physiologic basis for both male hormonal and nonhormonal methods of contraception. We review the history of male hormonal contraception development, current hormonal agents in development, as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception options for men. Nonhormonal methods reviewed will include both pharmacological and mechanical approaches in development, with specific focus on methods which inhibit the testicular retinoic acid synthesis and action. Multiple hormonal and nonhormonal methods of male contraception are in the drug development pathway, with the hope that a reversible, reliable, safe method of male contraception will be available to couples in the not too distant future. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Prevalence and associated factors of depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy: A population based study in rural Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Zarina N

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined the associated factors of antepartum depressive and anxiety symptoms (ADS and AAS in low-income countries, yet the World Health Organization identifies depressive disorders as the second leading cause of global disease burden by 2020. There is a paucity of research on mental disorders and their predictors among pregnant women in Bangladesh. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms and explore the associated factors in a cross-section of rural Bangladeshi pregnant women. Methods The study used cross-sectional data originating from a rural community-based prospective cohort study of 720 randomly selected women in their third trimester of pregnancy from a district of Bangladesh. The validated Bangla version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used to measure ADS, and a trait anxiety inventory to assess general anxiety symptoms. Background information was collected using a structured questionnaire at the respondents' homes. Results Prevalence of ADS was 18% and AAS 29%. Women's literacy (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.37-0.95, poor partner relationship (OR 2.23, 95% CI 3.37-3.62, forced sex (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.01-3.75, physical violence by spouse (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.02-2.80, and previous depression (OR 4.62 95% CI 2.72-7.85 were found to be associated with ADS. The associated factors of AAS were illiteracy, poor household economy, lack of practical support, physical partner violence, violence during pregnancy, and interaction between poor household economy and poor partner relationship. Conclusion Depressive and anxiety symptoms are found to occur commonly during pregnancy in Bangladesh, drawing attention to a need to screen for depression and anxiety during antenatal care. Policies aimed at encouraging practical support during pregnancy, reducing gender-based violence, supporting women with poor partner relationships, and identifying previous depression may ameliorate

  18. Teen pregnancy: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Katherine A; Loveless, Meredith

    2014-10-01

    To provide clinicians with a review of recent research and clinically applicable tools regarding teen pregnancy. Teen pregnancy rates have declined but still remain a significant problem in the USA. Teen pregnancy prevention was identified by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as one of its top six priorities, which is increasing research and intervention data. Long-acting contraceptive methods are acceptable to teens and have been shown to reduce teen birth rates. Pregnant teens need special attention to counseling on pregnancy options and reducing risk during pregnancy with regular prenatal care. Postpartum teens should be encouraged and supported to breastfeed, monitored for depression, and have access to reliable contraception to avoid repeat undesired pregnancy. This review highlights important issues for all providers caring for female adolescents and those who may encounter teen pregnancy. Foremost prevention of teen pregnancy by comprehensive sexual education and access to contraception is the priority. Educating patients and healthcare providers about safety and efficacy of long-acting reversible contraception is a good step to reducing undesired teen pregnancies. Rates of postpartum depression are greater in adolescents than in adults, and adolescent mothers need to be screened and monitored for depression. Strategies to avoid another undesired pregnancy shortly after delivery should be implemented.

  19. Emergency contraception – a neglected option for birth control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka R. Gunardi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception (EC is any method of contraception which is used after intercourse and before the potential time of implantation, in order to prevent pregnancy after an unprotected or inadequately protected sexual intercourse, or cases of rape. Use of emergency contraception could halve the number of unintended pregnancies and the consequent need for abortion, but unfortunately many medical professionals and the public are not aware of it. Two methods are available for emergency contraception, namely emergency contraception pills (ECPs and copper-bearing intrauterine devices (Cu-IUDs. There are two regimens of ECP, the levonorgestrel regimen and combined regimen. The levonorgestrel regimen is preferred as it is more effective and causes less side effects. ECPs should be administered as soon as possible after unprotected or inadequately protected sex, being most effective if initiated within 24 hours. Cu-IUDs can be inserted up to 5 days after unprotected sexual intercourse. Emergency contraception mainly works by preventing fertilization, and does not interrupt and established pregnancy. Emergency contraception is very safe, therefore can be offered to women who have had unprotected intercourse and wish to prevent pregnancy. It must only be used as a backup method of birth control. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:248-52. doi: 10.13181/mji.v22i4.609Keywords: Birth control, copper-IUD, emergency contraception, emergency contraceptive pills, levonorgestrel

  20. title: fertility intentions, contraceptive awareness and contraceptive

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. SOLOMON AVIDIME

    2010 (Special Issue); 14(3): 65. ORIGINAL ... Abstract. This study measured contraceptive knowledge, contraceptive use and fertility intentions among 1408 women of .... the topic of contraception must be approached in a .... Frequencies were run based on respon- ..... clinical characteristics of modern contraceptive users.

  1. [Unconscious resistance to contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloor, P A

    1978-12-01

    The Swiss penal code of 1942 requires the presence of a psychiatrist in all decisions about termination of pregnancy and of sterilization. The so called sexual revolution of the last 20 years has brought about a dissociation of the traditional psychosexual behavior, where eroticism, affection, and desire of a child do not integrate as harmoniously as before. Narcissistic libido, inherent in all of us, can make an individual want a baby for reasons other than normal, but as a reflection of a parent, as a toy for an infantile mother, as a termination to free, sexual life, felt as sin, for a young couple, as a hope for the future, as the rival of one of the parents, as a remedy for something lost. These are just some of the reasons why contraception, completely accepted on a conscious level, can be rejected on an unconscious one, leading to unwanted pregnancies. Family planning, through a better and deeper psychological preparation of its personnel, should better identify patients more at risk of contraceptive failure, and the unconscious resistances of individuals and couples. This very important task can be started in schools with sex education, and in family planning centers with sexual therapy for the couple. This new approach would imply an increased interest for psychology on the part of doctors assisting young couples.

  2. Contraception matters: indicators of poor usage of contraception in sexually active women attending family planning clinics in Victoria, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Jason

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unintended pregnancy (mistimed or unwanted remains an important health issue for women. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with risk of unintended pregnancy in a sample of Victorian women attending family planning clinics. Methods This cross-sectional survey of three Family Planning Victoria Clinics from April to July 2011 recruited women aged 16-50 years with a male sexual partner in the last 3 months, and not intending to conceive. The questionnaire asked about contraceptive behaviours and important factors that influence contraception use (identified from a systematic literature review. Univariate analysis was calculated for the variables of interest for associations with contraceptive use. An overall multivariate model for being at risk for unintended pregnancy (due to inconsistent or ineffective contraceptive use or non-use was calculated through backward elimination with statistical significance set at Results 1006 surveys were analyzed with 96% of women reporting contraception use in the last 3 months. 37% of women were at risk for unintended pregnancy due to imperfect use (61% inconsistent users; 31% ineffective methods or never using contraception (8%. On multivariate analysis, women at risk for unintended pregnancy compared with women not at risk were 1 partner in the last 3 months (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.3-4.6. These women were dissatisfied with current contraception (OR 2.5, 95% 1.8-3.5; felt “vulnerable” to pregnancy (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.6-3.0; were not confident in contraceptive knowledge (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.5-4.8; were unable to stop to use contraception when aroused (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.5-2.9 but were comfortable in speaking to a doctor about contraception (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.1. Conclusion Despite reported high contraceptive usage, nearly 40% of women were at risk for unintended pregnancy primarily due to inconsistent contraceptive use and use of ineffective

  3. Contraception for Women with Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P.; Mathiesen, E.; Clausen, T.D.

    2005-01-01

    Planned pregnancy is mandatory in women with diabetes, and their need for contraception is essential. Basically, the same methods can be used as in women without diabetes, but a number of specific conditions have to be considered when guiding these women, as we discuss in this review. Unfortunately......, the field is limited in studies in certain areas, especially considering contraception for women with type 1 diabetes and late diabetic complications and women with type 2 diabetes. Thus, in the real clinical world, the choice of contraceptive often will be a kind of compromise, balancing pro and cons...

  4. Contraception for women with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth; Clausen, Tine Dalsgaard

    2005-01-01

    Planned pregnancy is mandatory in women with diabetes, and their need for contraception is essential. Basically, the same methods can be used as in women without diabetes, but a number of specific conditions have to be considered when guiding these women, as we discuss in this review. Unfortunately......, the field is limited in studies in certain areas, especially considering contraception for women with type 1 diabetes and late diabetic complications and women with type 2 diabetes. Thus, in the real clinical world, the choice of contraceptive often will be a kind of compromise, balancing pro and cons...

  5. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 1 of 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-10-01

    To provide guidelines for health care providers on the use of contraceptive methods to prevent pregnancy and on the promotion of healthy sexuality. Guidance for Canadian practitioners on overall effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, non-contraceptive benefits, side effects and risks, and initiation of cited contraceptive methods; family planning in the context of sexual health and general well-being; contraceptive counselling methods; and access to, and availability of, cited contraceptive methods in Canada. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Database from January 1994 to January 2015 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., contraception, sexuality, sexual health) and key words (e.g., contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English from January 1994 to January 2015. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to June 2015. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of the evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Chapter 1: Contraception in Canada Summary Statements 1. Canadian women spend a significant portion of their lives at risk of an unintended pregnancy. (II-2) 2. Effective contraceptive methods are underutilized in Canada, particularly among vulnerable populations. (II-2) 3. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, including contraceptive implants and intrauterine contraception (copper-releasing and levonorgestrel

  6. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 2 of 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    To provide guidelines for health care providers on the use of contraceptive methods to prevent pregnancy and on the promotion of healthy sexuality. Guidance for Canadian practitioners on overall effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, non-contraceptive benefits, side effects and risks, and initiation of cited contraceptive methods; family planning in the context of sexual health and general well-being; contraceptive counselling methods; and access to, and availability of, cited contraceptive methods in Canada. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Database from January 1994 to January 2015 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., contraception, sexuality, sexual health) and key words (e.g., contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English from January 1994 to January 2015. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to June 2015. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of the evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Chapter 1: Contraception in Canada Summary Statements  1. Canadian women spend a significant portion of their lives at risk of an unintended pregnancy. (II-2)  2. Effective contraceptive methods are underutilized in Canada, particularly among vulnerable populations. (II-2)  3. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, including contraceptive implants and intrauterine contraception (copper-releasing and levonorgestrel

  7. New technologies in contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Rowlands, Sam

    2009-01-01

    New technologies in both reversible contraception and sterilisation are described. The review includes recent advances in the development of oral contraception, emergency contraception, injectable contraception, vaginal rings, subdermal implants, transdermal contraception, intrauterine devices, spermicides and barrier methods. It also covers methods of transcervical female sterilisation and more easily reversible male sterilisation. The emphasis is on the technology and its safety and effecti...

  8. Depressive symptoms and gestational length among pregnant adolescents: Cluster randomized control trial of CenteringPregnancy® plus group prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Jennifer N; Epel, Elissa; Lewis, Jessica B; Cunningham, Shayna D; Tobin, Jonathan N; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Thomas, Melanie; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2017-06-01

    Depressive symptoms are associated with preterm birth among adults. Pregnant adolescents have high rates of depressive symptoms and low rates of treatment; however, few interventions have targeted this vulnerable group. Objectives are to: (a) examine impact of CenteringPregnancy® Plus group prenatal care on perinatal depressive symptoms compared to individual prenatal care; and (b) determine effects of depressive symptoms on gestational age and preterm birth among pregnant adolescents. This cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 14 community health centers and hospitals in New York City. Clinical sites were randomized to receive standard individual prenatal care (n = 7) or CenteringPregnancy® Plus group prenatal care (n = 7). Pregnant adolescents (ages 14-21, N = 1,135) completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale during pregnancy (second and third trimesters) and postpartum (6 and 12 months). Gestational age was obtained from medical records, based on ultrasound dating. Intention to treat analyses were used to examine objectives. Adolescents at clinical sites randomized to CenteringPregnancy® Plus experienced greater reductions in perinatal depressive symptoms compared to those at clinical sites randomized to individual care (p = .003). Increased depressive symptoms from second to third pregnancy trimester were associated with shorter gestational age at delivery and preterm birth (<37 weeks gestation). Third trimester depressive symptoms were also associated with shorter gestational age and preterm birth. All p < .05. Pregnant adolescents should be screened for depressive symptoms prior to third trimester. Group prenatal care may be an effective nonpharmacological option for reducing depressive symptoms among perinatal adolescents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Heterotopic Pregnancy in a Natural Conception Following Failed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-23

    Feb 23, 2011 ... patient underwent emergency laparotomy and evacuation of products of intrauterine pregnancy. A high index of suspicion is necessary to ensure early diagnosis and management. KEY WORDS: Contraceptive, emergency, heterotrophic, laparotomy, pregnancy. INTRODUCTION. Heterotopic pregnancy ...

  10. Maternal symptoms of anxiety during pregnancy affect infant neuromotor development: the generation R study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Batenburg-Eddes, T.; de Groot, L.; Huizink, A.C.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Hofman, A.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Verhulst, F.C.; Tiemeier, H.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies found that maternal symptoms of anxiety or depression are related to functioning and development of the offspring. Within a population-based study of 2,724 children, we investigated the effect of maternal anxiety or depression on infant neuromotor development. Symptoms of anxiety and

  11. KNOWLEDGE OF EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVES AMONG WOMEN OF REPRODUCTIVE AGE GROUP

    OpenAIRE

    Singh; Himabindu; Shrivastava

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND As per data from WHO, 21.6 million unsafe abortions occurred globally in 2008, out of which 47,000 women died from abortionrelated complications, contributing to 13% of global maternal mortality. (1) Emergency contraceptive can be used after intercourse to prevent pregnancy in case of unprotected intercourse, contraceptive failure or sexual assault. A considerable proportion of these abortions can be prevented by the timely use of emergency contraception. OBJECTIVE...

  12. [Place of persistence trouble during oral contraception and subsequent use of emergency contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, C; Lachowsky, M

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the understanding of hormonal contraceptive failures, this study evaluates the persistence of oral contraception and the use of emergency contraception (EC) during persistence incidents. We made the hypothesis of the existence of a strong link between the risk of unplanned pregnancies and these two parameters. In this study, we also evaluated women's perception of EC in order to elucidate the reasons of EC insufficient use. One survey was carried out on Internet on a representative sample of women, aged 16-45. In this survey, 3775 French women were interviewed (source-population). We defined a target population of 2415 fertile women who had heterosexual intercourse during the last 12 months, and a population of 760 women at risk of unintended pregnancy who had unprotected sexual intercourse during the last 12 months(risk-population). A little more than 30% of the target population, meaning 20% of the source-population (n=745) stopped their contraceptive method temporarily for an average time of two months. Almost 60% of women had a risk of unwanted pregnancy during this period without contraception, which is 59% of the risk-population. Only 20% of women among the population at risk used EC. The main reasons given for EC insufficient use were the misperception of the risk of pregnancy, the lack of knowledge about EC and its way of use. For the first time, this survey shows that 13% of women (of the source population) decide to stop temporarily their contraceptive method for an average time of two months per year. Fifty-nine percent of unplanned pregnancy situations are due to this poor contraception persistence. Although there is a need to reduce the risk of women being at risk, it seems also highly desirable to overcome the consequences of this poor persistence. Giving information about EC and a systematic prescription during contraception consultations would lead to an increased use of EC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  13. Contraception in women with medical problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanjal, Mandish K

    2008-01-01

    Women with medical disease have a higher incidence of maternal mortality compared with healthy women, with cardiac disease now being the most common cause of maternal death in the UK. A handful of medical conditions exist where pregnancy is not recommended due to mortality rates approaching 50%. It is imperative that such women have the most reliable methods of contraception available. Contraceptive agents may themselves affect medical disease, or may interact with medications used by such women. There may be a range of contraceptive agents suitable for each medical condition. The contraceptive selected should be tailored to suit the individual. The following points should be considered when deciding on the most appropriate contraceptive agent: efficacy, thrombotic risk (oestrogen containing contraceptives), arterial risks (oestrogen containing contraceptives), infective risk (e.g. insertion of intrauterine device [IUD]), vagal stimulation (e.g. insertion of IUD, ESSURE®), bleeding risks with patients on anticoagulants, interaction with concomitant drugs, effects of anaesthesia and ease of use. This review aims to cover the different contraceptive agents available and the best ones to use for certain medical illnesses. PMID:27582790

  14. POSTPARTUM CONTRACEPTIVE USE IN RURAL BAREILLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Esam Mahmood

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contraception is an important intervention to reduce burden of unwanted pregnancy and promote healthy living among women. Objectives: To find out the postpartum contraceptive usage and identify the different variables which affect the postpartum contraception among the rural females of Bareilly district. Methods: The cross sectional study was carried out in randomly selected villages of Bhojipura Block of Bareilly district, Uttar Pradesh. All women who had delivered within last one year were interviewed by house to house survey to collect data regarding socio-demographic characteristics and contraceptive use by structured questionnaire. A total of 123 women participated in the study. Chi- square test was used to analyze data. Results: Only 13.8% mothers adopted postpartum contraception. Lack of knowledge (32.5% and young infant being breastfed (28.5% were the common reasons of not using any contraceptive method. Contraceptive use was higher amongst females aged less than 30 years and those belonging to middle socioeconomic class and nuclear families. The significant influence of the women’ educational status on utilization of family planning methods was observed (p<0.05. Conclusions: Low percent of postpartum contraceptive use indicates the need for improving awareness among the study population.

  15. Contraception: Everyone's responsibility

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of modern methods of contraception in married women or women in union ... Contraception and Fertility Planning Policy and Service Delivery. Guidelines and .... methods. Injectable contraceptives have for a long time been offered.

  16. Emergency Contraception Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Text Only Full media Version Get Emergency Contraception NOW INFO about Emergency Contraception Q&A about Emergency Contraception Español | Arabic Find a Morning After Pill Provider Near You This website ...

  17. Psychosocial Correlates of Contraceptive Practices during Late Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagana, Luciana

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the literature on psychosocial correlates of contraceptive practices among sexually active late adolescents. Helps identify subgroups of adolescents who either do not use or misuse contraceptive means, putting them at risk for unwanted pregnancy, AIDS, and other sexually transmitted diseases. Promotes further research on those variables…

  18. Knowledge and use of emergency contraception among educated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: One of the effective ways to reduce unwanted pregnancy and its consequences is the knowledge and effective use of emergency contraception among the population. Aim: To evaluate the knowledge of emergency contraception among educated men and women and how often they use it. Methodology: ...

  19. Uptake of post‑abortion contraception among women who had ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Unexpected or unplanned pregnancy poses a major public health ... therefore, reinforcing the importance of contraception from time to time among this age ... or inconsistent use of contraception contributed to most ... and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new.

  20. HIV/ AIDS and Contraception | Steyn | Obstetrics and Gynaecology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevention of unintended pregnancies in HIV infected women is a high priority. With the exception of male and female condoms contraceptive options provide no protection for STI and HIV transmission. Consistent and correct condom use needs to be encouraged in addition to the use of an effective contraceptive method.

  1. Contraception and Induced Abortion in the West Indies: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A.A.; de Bruijn, J.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Most islands in the West Indies do not have liberal laws on abortion, nor laws on pregnancy prevention programmes (contraception). We present results of a literature review about the attitude of healthcare providers and women toward (emergency) contraception and induced

  2. Contraceptive Promotion And Utilization: Solution To Problem Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the contraceptive utilisation among patients treated in a University Teaching Hospital for complications of illegal abortion aimed at utilizing such information to proffer solution to the problems of unwanted pregnancy and induced abortion. In this study, 93.3% of patients had never used contraceptive and ...

  3. Pharmacy Access to Emergency Contraception in Rural and Frontier Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigbee, Jeri L.; Abood, Richard; Landau, Sharon Cohen; Maderas, Nicole Monastersky; Foster, Diana Greene; Ravnan, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Context: Timely access to emergency contraception (EC) has emerged as a major public health effort in the prevention of unintended pregnancies. The recent FDA decision to allow over-the-counter availability of emergency contraception for adult women presents important rural health implications. American women, especially those living in rural and…

  4. Obesity and contraception: metabolic changes, risk of thromboembolism, use of emergency contraceptives, and role of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, E P; Murthy, A S

    2013-06-01

    Rates of obesity are increasing worldwide. Due to the medical consequences of obesity, routine health care like family planning becomes complicated. Conflicting data exists regarding efficacy of hormonal contraceptives in obese women, while little data on efficacy of emergency contraception in obese women exists. Much of what is available suggests lower serum hormonal levels in obese women with little effect on ovulation inhibition. Contraceptive steroids can cause a number of deteriorating metabolic changes, particularly in obese women; whether these changes are clinically significant is unknown. Venous thromboembolic risk is increased with both obesity and use of hormonal contraceptives; however the question remains if the risk is additive or multiplicative. Bariatric surgery can lead to digestive changes which may affect absorption of contraceptive hormones. While long acting reversible contraceptives may be the best option in the post operative obese patient, little data, beyond a simple recommendation to avoid pregnancy for at least one year, exists to help guide appropriate contraceptive choice.

  5. When can a woman resume or initiate contraception after taking emergency contraceptive pills? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, Jennifer; Rodriguez, Maria I; Curtis, Kathryn M; Kapp, Nathalie

    2013-05-01

    Hormonal emergency contraception can postpone ovulation, making a woman vulnerable to pregnancy later in the same cycle. However, concern exists as to whether concurrently administered emergency contraception pills (ECP) and other hormonal methods of contraception may affect the effectiveness of both medications. A systematic review of the literature using PubMed and the Cochrane databases was performed to identify articles concerning the resumption or initiation of regular contraception within the same cycle as ECP use. We searched for articles in any language, published between 1980 and April 2012 and included all methods of emergency contraception pills available in the USA. The search strategy identified 184 articles in the PubMed and Cochrane databases, of which none met inclusion criteria. The drug manufacturer advises continuation or initiation of routine contraception as soon as possible after use of ulipristal acetate, with concomitant use of a reliable barrier method until next menses. However, a theoretical concern exists that given ulipristal acetate's function as a selective progesterone receptor modulator, coadministration of a progestin could decrease its effectiveness as an emergency contraceptive. Initiation of hormonal contraception following levonorgestrel or the Yuzpe regimen for emergency contraception carries no similar concern for decreased method effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Current and future contraceptive options for women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rena C; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Baeten, Jared M

    2018-01-01

    Among women living with HIV, half of the pregnancies are unintended. Effective contraception can prevent unintended pregnancies and consequently reduce maternal mortality and perinatal transmission of HIV. While contraceptive options available for all women also apply to women living with HIV, specific considerations exist to the use of contraception by women living with HIV. Areas covered: First, general principles guiding the use of contraception among women living with HIV are discussed, such as choice, method mix, relative effectiveness, and drug-drug interactions. Second, a detailed discussion of each contraceptive method and issues surrounding the use of that method, such as drug-drug interactions, follows. Third, future contraceptive options in advanced development for use by women or men are briefly discussed. Expert opinion: Contraceptive methods available to all women should also be accessible to women living with HIV. When the relative effectiveness of a contraceptive method is reduced, for example due to drug-drug interactions with antiretrovirals, the method should still be made available to women living with HIV with the appropriate information sharing and counseling. Greater research on various aspects of contraceptive use by women living with HIV and more comprehensive testing of co-administration of hormonal contraceptives and common medications used by these women are warranted.

  7. Non-palpable and difficult contraceptive implant removals: The New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-03

    Dec 3, 2017 ... clients appreciate the benefits of long-term reversible contraceptive methods, while ... for requesting early removals were side-effects,[9-11] changing to another method, planning to ..... fertility, and outcome of pregnancies.

  8. Postpartum education for contraception: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Laureen M; Hiller, Janet E; Grimes, David A

    2010-05-01

    Contraceptive education is generally considered a standard component of postpartum care, but the effectiveness is seldom examined. Two-thirds of postpartum women may have unmet needs for contraception, and many adolescents become pregnant again within a year of giving birth. Women may prefer to discuss contraception prenatally or after hospital discharge. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effects of educational interventions for postpartum mothers about contraceptive use. We searched computerized databases for randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness of postpartum contraceptive education. The intervention must have started within 1 month after delivery. The Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio was calculated with 95% confidence interval for the dichotomous outcomes. Eight trials met the inclusion criteria. Of 4 short-term interventions, 1 did not have sufficient data and 1 was statistically underpowered. The remaining 2 showed a positive effect on contraceptive use. Of 4 multifaceted programs, 2 showed fewer pregnancies or births among adolescents in the experimental group that had enhanced services, and 1 structured home-visiting program showed more contraceptive use. The effective interventions were conducted in Australia, Nepal, Pakistan, and the United States. Postpartum education about contraception led to more contraception use and fewer unplanned pregnancies. Short-term interventions were limited by self-reported outcomes or showing no effect for many comparisons. The longer-term programs were promising and not necessarily more costly than usual care. Health care providers can determine if 1 of these interventions suits their setting and level of resources. Obstetricians & Gynecologist, Family Physicians. After completing this educational activity, the participant should be better able to assess the importance of assessing delivery methods when examining intervention quality, evaluate the evidence from randomized trials on

  9. Trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the first 12 months postpartum and child externalizing and internalizing behavior at three years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehler, Heather; Austin, Marie-Paule; Mughal, Muhammad Kashif; Wajid, Abdul; Vermeyden, Lydia; Benzies, Karen; Brown, Stephanie; Stuart, Scott; Giallo, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    Background Most evidence of the association between maternal depression and children’s development is limited by being cross-sectional. To date, few studies have modelled trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms from pregnancy through the early postpartum years and examined their association with social emotional and behavior functioning in preschool children. The objectives of this study were to: 1) identify distinct groups of women defined by their trajectories of depressive symptoms across four time points from mid-pregnancy to one year postpartum; and 2) examine the associations between these trajectories and child internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Methods We analyzed data from the All Our Families (AOF) study, a large, population based pregnancy cohort of mother-child dyads in Alberta, Canada. The AOF study is an ongoing pregnancy cohort study designed to investigate relationships between the prenatal and early life period and outcomes for children and mothers. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Children’s behavioral functioning at age 3 was assessed using the Behavior Scales developed for the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. Longitudinal latent class analysis was conducted to identify trajectories of women’s depressive symptoms across four time points from pregnancy to 1 year postpartum. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess the relationship between trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms and children’s behavior, while adjusting for other significant maternal, child and psychosocial factors. Results 1983 participants met eligibility criteria. We identified four distinct trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms: low level (64.7%); early postpartum (10.9%); subclinical (18.8%); and persistent high (5.6%). In multivariable models, the proportion of children with elevated behavior symptoms was highest for children whose mothers had

  10. Preventing Teenage Pregnancy: A Team Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Cheryl

    1986-01-01

    By age 16 one in three adolescents have experienced sexual intercourse. Because one-third of these sexually active teens never use contraception, they have a five-times greater risk of pregnancy than teenagers who take contraceptive measures. In 1982, one in 23 Canadian teenage girls became pregnant. Teenagers' reasons for not using contraceptives include fear of parents learning about their sexual activity, lack of knowledge about contraception, and lack of self-esteem. Parents, educators an...

  11. Usage patterns and attitudes towards emergency contraception: the International Emergency Contraception Research Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassovics, Miklós; Virágh, Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the survey was to gain understanding of women's usage patterns and attitudes towards emergency contraception (i.e., the 'morning after pill') and to gain insight into the role and attitudes of pharmacists as providers of emergency contraception. As part of the International Emergency Contraception Research Initiative, approximately 6500 women (15-49 years) and nearly 500 pharmacists from 14 countries in Western, Central and Eastern Europe, and Central Asia completed questionnaires via web-based interrogation or computer-assisted/paper-assisted personal interviews. Common to almost all countries and cultures was that, while awareness of emergency contraception was high (≥84% of respondents, except in Kazakhstan), usage was generally low (4-18%). In Austria, the Czech Republic, Spain, and the UK, better underlying protection with hormonal contraceptives or male condoms would have meant less need for emergency contraception. In Bulgaria, Lithuania, Romania, and Russia, greater dependence on less reliable contraceptive methods such as calendar + withdrawal was associated with higher use of the emergency contraceptive pill (11-18%) but also with higher abortion rates (19-21%). Overt rejection of emergency contraception in the event of an accident was low, except in countries (e.g., Austria, Poland) where the misperception that it acts as an abortifacient was common. Except for Bulgaria, pharmacists elsewhere tended to have limited knowledge and moralistic attitudes towards emergency contraception. Improved educational efforts, probably country-specific, are required to increase the use of highly effective methods of regular contraception and overcome barriers to acceptance of emergency contraception as a suitable postcoital solution to avoid unwanted pregnancy or abortion.

  12. [Contraception and sexology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J S

    1991-01-01

    This work argues that contraceptive education urgently requires a new approach that will take into account the client's sexuality at the time the choice of method is made. Emotional factors such as a conscious or unconscious desire for pregnancy or motherhood, family pressures to produce a grandchild, or shame and distrust of contraception may contribute to contraceptive failure. Methods applied at the time of coitus such as condoms or spermicides may not be appropriate for clients for who contraception is a source of anxiety or guilt. The more effective, noncoital-dependent methods including oral contraceptives (OCs), IUDs, and sterilization may generate anxiety over infertility. Their efficacy may lack appeal for clients who enjoy an element of risk. The practitioner's attitude and knowledge may be further influences on the counseling over method choice. Among reversible methods, OCs are ideal for most women as long as they individually prescribed. OCs may be particularly important to the sexual expression of specific groups such as those over 35 with no risk factors other than age. Low-dose progestin-only OCs may be prescribed for this group, although about 10% of users change methods because of menstrual problems. IUDs are usually successfully used by women who have been carefully selected to exclude contraindications. In some cases the partner may be annoyed by the string, which can be rolled up and pushed out of the way or shortened by the practitioner. IUDs are often the best alternative for women with contraindications to OCs or who tolerate their side effects poorly. Spermicides may cause dermatoses or allergies that cause the woman to avoid intercourse. Some women dislike using spermicides because they must be applied prior to each use. Their bad taste is a disadvantage for some couples. Involving the male partner in application of the spermicide may remove some objections. The Billings or cervical mucus method should be avoided by women with irregular

  13. Effects of maternal pregnancy intention, depressive symptoms and social support on risk of low birth weight: a prospective study from southwestern Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Dibaba Wado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low birth weight (LBW is the principal risk factor for neonatal and infant mortality in developing countries. This study examines the effects of unwanted pregnancy, prenatal depression and social support on the risk of low birth weight in rural southwestern Ethiopia. We hypothesized that unwanted pregnancy and prenatal depression increase the risk of low birth weight, while social support mediates this association. METHODS: Data for the study comes from a prospective study in which women were followed from pregnancy through to delivery. Six hundred twenty two women were followed and 537 birth weights were measured within 72 hours. Multivariable log binomial regression was used to model the risk of low birth weight. RESULTS: The mean birth weight was 2989 grams (SD ± 504 grams, and the incidence of LBW was 17.88%. The mean birth weight of babies after unwanted pregnancy was 114 g lower compared to births from intended pregnancy. Similarly, mean birth weight for babies among women with symptoms of antenatal depression was 116 grams lower. Results of unadjusted log-binomial regression showed that unwanted pregnancy, prenatal depression and social support were associated with LBW. The relationship between antenatal depressive symptoms and LBW was mediated by the presence of social support, while the association between LBW and unwanted pregnancy remained after multivariable adjustment. CONCLUSION: The incidence of low birth weight is high in the study area. Poverty, nonuse of antenatal care, low social support and unwanted pregnancy contribute to this high incidence of low birth weight. Hence, identifying women's pregnancy intention during antenatal care visits, and providing appropriate counseling and social support will help improve birth outcomes.

  14. Trazodone (Desyrel) and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... birth defects. Can taking trazodone during my pregnancy cause pregnancy complications? One small study found no greater chance ... I need to take trazodone throughout my entire pregnancy. Will it cause withdrawal symptoms in my baby? Antidepressant use late ...

  15. [Rehabilitation following interruption of pregnancy since the legalization of abortion. I. Structure of patients, duration of disability, menstruation and effects of contraceptive counseling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwahr, C; Knorre, P; Kunz, L

    1974-01-04

    Rehabilitation after abortion is an important consideration for fertile women and is defined here as recovery of the physical, psychic, and social condition that had been present prior to abortion. 206 women were studied 6-12 months after induced abortion (before 12 weeks by the vacuum suction apparatus method). 9.2% of the women attributed worsening of their physical condition to recent abortion. Duration of work incapacity was 8-21 days, with an average of 19 days; younger women and women with fewer children recuperated more quickly. In most cases menstruation returned late, an average of 35 days after the last period. 33% of the menstruations were unusually heavy. Duration of menstruation decreased from an average of 6.5 days for the 1st period to an average of 5.4 days by the 6th, women over 30 became regular more quickly than younger women. The study revealed that 33% of the women did not use contraceptives even after abortion. After intensive counseling, a disappointing 22.9% still resisted using contraceptives.

  16. Emergency contraception: an overview among users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.; Hafiz, H.; Akbar, R.

    2015-01-01

    Emergency contraception Pills (ECP) provides a safe and effective means of post coital treatment and prevents at least 75% of expected pregnancies resulting from unprotected intercourse. The purpose of the study was to assess the awareness regarding emergency contraception and to see the knowledge attitude and preference about emergency contraception. Methods: This was a descriptive cross sectional study carried out at Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Khuzdar. A total of 200 married women of reproductive age group who agreed to participate in the study were interviewed using a self-reported comprehensive, structured closed ended questionnaire. Results: 77% of the women were practicing some contraceptive method at the time of study. Most were using condoms for contraception. 16% of all respondents have never used any contraceptive in their life. 70% believe that religion of Islam is not a barrier in family planning. Only 7.5% of the women were aware about ECP. Conclusion: Knowledge about ECP is poor among the women of child bearing age. There is a room for improvement regarding the awareness and use of ECP which can contribute to prevention of unwanted pregnancies. (author)

  17. EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION: AN OVERVIEW AMONG USERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shazia Amir; Hafeez, Humaira; Akbar, Rabiya

    2015-01-01

    Emergency contraception Pills (ECP) provides a safe and effective means of post coital treatment and prevents at least 75% of expected pregnancies resulting from unprotected intercourse. The purpose of the study was to assess the awareness regarding emergency contraception and to see the knowledge attitude and preference about emergency contraception. This was a descriptive cross sectional study carried out at Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Khuzdar. A total of 200 married women of reproductive age group who agreed to participate in the study were interviewed using a self-reported comprehensive, structured closed ended questionnaire. 77% of the women were practicing some contraceptive method at the time of study. Most were using condoms for contraception. 16% of all respondents have never used any contraceptive in their life. 70% believe that religion of Islam is not a barrier in family planning. Only 7.5% of the women were aware about ECP. Knowledge about ECP is poor among the women of child bearing age. There is a room for improvement regarding the awareness and use of ECP which can contribute to prevention of unwanted pregnancies.

  18. Seaweed consumption and prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy in Japan: Baseline data from the Kyushu Okinawa Maternal and Child Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Keiko; Okubo, Hitomi; Sasaki, Satoshi; Arakawa, Masashi

    2014-09-03

    Seaweed is a popular traditional food in Japan and is a rich source of bioactive metabolites. The neuroprotective properties of seaweed have attracted attention; to date, however, there has been no epidemiological evidence regarding the relationship between seaweed consumption and depression. The current cross-sectional study investigated the association between seaweed consumption and depressive symptoms during pregnancy in Japan. Study subjects were 1745 pregnant women. Depressive symptoms were defined as present when subjects had a Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score of 16 or higher. Dietary consumption during the preceding month was assessed using a self-administered diet history questionnaire. Adjustment was made for age; gestation; region of residence; number of children; family structure; history of depression; family history of depression; smoking; secondhand smoke exposure at home and at work; job type; household income; education; body mass index; and intake of fish and yogurt. The prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy was 19.3%. After adjustment for possible dietary and non-dietary confounding factors, higher seaweed consumption was independently associated with a lower prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy: the adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for depressive symptoms during pregnancy in the first, second, third, and fourth quartiles of seaweed consumption were 1 (reference), 0.72 (0.51 - 1.004), 0.71 (0.50 - 1.01), and 0.68 (0.47 - 0.96), respectively (P for trend = 0.03). The present results suggest that seaweed consumption may be inversely associated with the prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy in Japanese women.

  19. Routine counseling about intrauterine contraception for women seeking emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, E Bimla; Papic, Melissa; Parisi, Sara M; Baldauf, Erin; Rapkin, Rachel; Updike, Glenn

    2014-07-01

    To compare contraceptive knowledge and use among women seeking emergency contraception (EC) before and after an inner-city clinic began providing structured counseling and offering same-day intrauterine device (IUD) or implant placement to all women seeking EC. For 8 months before and 21 months after this change in clinic policy, women aged 15-45 who wanted to avoid pregnancy for at least 6 months were asked to complete surveys immediately, 3 and 12 months after their clinic visit. In addition, we abstracted electronic medical record (EMR) data on all women who sought EC (n=328) during this period. We used chi-squared tests to assess pre/post differences in survey and EMR data. Surveys were completed by 186 women. After the clinic began offering structured counseling, more women had accurate knowledge of the effectiveness of IUDs, immediately and 3 months after their clinic visit. In addition, more women initiated IUD or implant use (survey: 40% vs. 17% preintervention, p=0.04; EMR: 22% vs. 10% preintervention, p=0.01), and fewer had no contraceptive use (survey: 3% vs. 17% preintervention, pcontraceptives with the option of same-day contraceptive placement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparisons of Contraceptive Use between Rural and Urban Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Savannah; Quevillon, Randal; Struckman-Johnson, Cindy; Hansen, Keith

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if barriers in rural areas might decrease an adolescent's likelihood of obtaining effective contraception. Previous studies have reported mixed results in comparisons of rural and urban contraception use. Electronic survey. Midwestern Public University. Undergraduate and graduate women. Questionnaire. Participants retrospectively recalled their contraceptive use and barriers to contraceptive use between the 9th and 12th grades. A Barriers to Contraception Use Scale was created using exploratory factor analysis and yielded 31 questions with 1 underlying factor: barriers. Participants were identified as rural or urban using the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) definition and the participant's self-identification. Overall, rural participants endorsed more barriers to accessing contraceptives than urban participants using the OMB definition (χ(2) (2; n = 388) = 2.04; P .05. The Barriers to Contraception Use Scale total score predicted whether an individual would have a prescription for contraceptives 70.5% of the time compared to the base rate of 54.1%. Although no rural-urban differences in actual contraception use were found, rural participants reported more barriers to accessing contraception, and those who endorsed more barriers were less likely to obtain contraceptives while in high school. Pregnancy prevention programs should thus take these barriers into account when developing future interventions. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Emergency contraceptive use in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Challenging common assumptions about young people's contraceptive practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Rosalijn

    2015-05-01

    Drawing on an ethnographic case study of young people's (aged 18-29) use of emergency contraceptives (ECs) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, this article highlights areas of disconnect between how reproductive health experts envision EC use and local meanings ascribed to ECs by young people. ECs - designed by reproductive health experts to be used only in case of emergency - were preferred by study participants over other contraceptive methods because of their ease of use, discreetness, perceived minimal side effects on beauty and future fertility, and usefulness in navigating reproductive intentions. The findings point to features that young people find desirable when it comes to contraceptive methods and suggest that common assumptions of reproductive health experts about young people's contraceptive practices need to be reconsidered, namely: 1) that young people can plan for prevention of unwanted pregnancy by buying a contraceptive method in advance; 2) that existing contraceptive technologies are appropriate for young people; 3) that young people prefer to use modern contraceptive methods; and 4) that young people in premarital relationships aim to prevent unplanned pregnancy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Narcolepsy and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurovich-Horvat, Eszter; Kemlink, David; Högl, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    In a retrospective cohort study undertaken in 12 European countries, 249 female narcoleptic patients with cataplexy (n = 216) and without cataplexy (n = 33) completed a self-administrated questionnaire regarding pregnancy and childbirth. The cohort was divided further into patients whose symptoms...... of narcolepsy started before or during pregnancy (308 pregnancies) and those in whom the first symptoms of narcolepsy appeared after delivery (106 pregnancies). Patients with narcolepsy during pregnancy were older during their first pregnancy (P ...

  3. The association between pregnancy intendedness and experiencing symptoms of postpartum depression among new mothers in the United States, 2009 to 2011: A secondary analysis of PRAMS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthreaux, Christina; Negron, Jenesis; Castellanos, Daniel; Ward-Peterson, Melissa; Castro, Grettel; Rodríguez de la Vega, Pura; Acuña, Juan Manuel

    2017-02-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a form of major depressive disorder affecting approximately 13% of women worldwide. Unintended pregnancies, reaching close to 50% of the pregnancies in the United States, have become a major health concern. While many physiologic and psychosocial causes have been analyzed, few studies have examined the relationship between unintended pregnancy and symptoms of PPD.A cross-sectional study was conducted using surveillance data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) from 2009 to 2011. The PRAMS population-based random sample included women who have had recent live births and is representative of 78% of the United States population. The chi-squared test was used to examine bivariate associations. Binary logistic regression was utilized to study unadjusted and adjusted associations between PPD and pregnancy intendedness, as well as other demographic and clinical characteristics of mothers in the sample. Multicollinearity in the adjusted model was evaluated using variance inflation factors. Sampling weights were used to account for PRAMS' complex sampling design.Of the 110,231 mothers included in the sample, only 32.3% reported desiring the pregnancy at the time of conception. Women with pregnancies categorized as mistimed: desired sooner, mistimed: desired later, or unwanted were 20% (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-1.3), 30% (AOR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.2-1.4), and 50% (AOR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.3-1.7) more likely to experience symptoms of PPD, respectively, compared to women with desired pregnancies. Other factors found to be associated with experiencing symptoms of PPD were a gestational age of pregnancy (AOR = 1.6; 95% CI: 1.4-2.0).We found that women with mistimed or unwanted pregnancies were more likely to experience symptoms of PPD. Our findings support the current US Preventive Services Task Force and American Academy of

  4. Emergency contraception: which is the best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Suneeta

    2016-12-01

    Emergency contraception is a safe and effective method to prevent an unwanted pregnancy after an unprotected or inadequately protected sexual intercourse. Several methods for emergency contraception (EC) are currently registered in many countries for use in an emergency to prevent a pregnancy following an unprotected, possibly fertile intercourse or after a contraceptive accident like condom rupture. Different methods have varying modes of action, time frame of efficacy, dosage schedule and unwanted effects. Since several methods are available it is important to decide the best method. In this article the available literature on emergency contraception has been reviewed and an attempt has been made to discuss the need for emergency contraception and compare different options for emergency contraception in terms of their efficacy in pregnancy prevention, their safety profile and unwanted side effects. EC repeated use and initiating a regular method after EC use are also discussed. Emergency contraceptive methods include copper Intra-uterine devices (IUD) and different types of pills like estrogen progestin combination pill (Yuzpe Regimen), Progestin only pill (LNG), antiprogestin pill (Mifepristone), and progesterone modulator Uripristal Acetate (UPA). There is a marginal difference in the mechanism of action, efficacy including time frame and ability to protect from pregnancy with regular doses in obese women, drug interactions and side effects. These are discussed in detail. Copper IUD is the most effective emergency contraceptive with advantage of providing continued contraception. However, it cannot be used universally due to lack of infrastructure and a trained provider as well as not being suitable option for women at risk of sexually transmitted infections. Amongst different pills LNG is more effective with fewer side effects than Yuzpe regimen. LNG and UPA are comparable with similar efficacy and side effect profile. UPA has a wider window of efficacy, in

  5. A retrospective analysis of the symptoms and course of dengue infection during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Kavita; Malik, Sunita; Mittal, Pratima

    2017-10-01

    To assess outcomes among pregnant women diagnosed with dengue infection. In a retrospective study, the medical records of all pregnant women with dengue infection admitted to Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India, from July to December 2015 were reviewed. Maternal and fetal outcomes were compared by pregnancy length and stage of disease at diagnosis. Overall, 62 pregnant women with dengue infection were identified. Of these, 56 (90%) tested negative for nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen, indicating a later stage of disease. Maternal near miss and mortality were significantly more common among women with DHF or DSS than among those with dengue fever (Pdengue fever had far better outcomes than did those with DHF or DSS. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of emergency contraception options over 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Brandon K; Tak, Casey R; Sanders, Jessica N; Turok, David K; Schwarz, Eleanor B

    2018-05-01

    The copper intrauterine device is the most effective form of emergency contraception and can also provide long-term contraception. The levonorgestrel intrauterine device has also been studied in combination with oral levonorgestrel for women seeking emergency contraception. However, intrauterine devices have higher up-front costs than oral methods, such as ulipristal acetate and levonorgestrel. Health care payers and decision makers (eg, health care insurers, government programs) with financial constraints must determine if the increased effectiveness of intrauterine device emergency contraception methods are worth the additional costs. We sought to compare the cost-effectiveness of 4 emergency contraception strategies-ulipristal acetate, oral levonorgestrel, copper intrauterine device, and oral levonorgestrel plus same-day levonorgestrel intrauterine device-over 1 year from a US payer perspective. Costs (2017 US dollars) and pregnancies were estimated over 1 year using a Markov model of 1000 women seeking emergency contraception. Every 28-day cycle, the model estimated the predicted number of pregnancy outcomes (ie, live birth, ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, or induced abortion) resulting from emergency contraception failure and subsequent contraception use. Model inputs were derived from published literature and national sources. An emergency contraception strategy was considered cost-effective if the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ie, the cost to prevent 1 additional pregnancy) was less than the weighted average cost of pregnancy outcomes in the United States ($5167). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and probability of being the most cost-effective emergency contraception strategy were calculated from 1000 probabilistic model iterations. One-way sensitivity analyses were used to examine uncertainty in the cost of emergency contraception, subsequent contraception, and pregnancy outcomes as well as the model probabilities. In 1000 women

  7. Contraceptive counseling for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Julia; Santelli, John S

    2015-11-01

    The majority of adolescents become sexually active during their teenage years, making contraceptive counseling an important aspect of routine adolescent healthcare. However, many healthcare providers express discomfort when it comes to counseling adolescents about contraceptive options. This Special Report highlights the evidence supporting age-appropriate contraceptive counseling for adolescents and focuses on best practices for addressing adolescents' questions and concerns about contraceptive methods.

  8. Vaginal contraception--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, D A; Thompson, S

    1982-04-01

    A number of new and innovative methods of vaginal contraceptive have been developed in recent years and are currently being evaluated. Some of these methods are described briefly and the available data on their safety and efficacy are presented. 3 types of contraceptive sponges have been developed--collagen sponge, intravaginal insert, and Secure sponge--and are now being evaluated. The collagen sponge, a cylindrical-shaped disk, exerts its contraceptive effect by acting as a physical barrier to the sperm and through its ability to absorb semen much in excess of its own weight. Preliminary data confirm the effectiveness of the sponge obtained from post-coital tests. The intravaginal insert (IVI) is made of a polyester material incorporating the spermicide nonoxynol-9. In a small clinical evaluation of the IVI, 49 women were followed up for 1 month. No pregnancies or unexpected adverse reactions were reported. The Secure sponge is made of polyurethane and incorporates 1 g of the spermicide nonoxynol-9. Its primary mode of action in preventing pregnancy is through the release of nonoxynol-9. In a multiclinic phase 2 evaluation of the Secure, which included 382 women, the 6-month gross life-table pregnancy rate was 3.8 +or- 1.3/100 women; the 6-month gross discontinuation rate for all reasons was 26.2 +or- 3.4/100 women. Sufficient data from the comparative trials of the Secure and Neo Sampoon foaming suppository studies conducted in Yugoslavia, Taiwan, and Bangladesh have been reported to the International Fertility Research Program (IFRP). The 12-month life-table rates for reasons leading to discontinuation of the contraceptive methods were not significantly different except for the category of "other personal reasons." The advantages Secure provides over other vaginal contraceptives are identified. Foaming vaginal suppositories similar to Neo Sampoon but containing 100 mg nonoxynol-9 are being developed and evaluated in the U.S. Clinical data on these products are

  9. Ulipristal acetate as an emergency contraceptive agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alan M; Thomas, Michael A

    2012-09-01

    Emergency contraceptive agents play a crucial role in preventing unplanned pregnancy. These agents and devices have been studied since the 1960s and have had varied results in terms of side effects and efficacy. A new oral tablet for emergency contraception (EC), ulipristal acetate (UPA) , is a selective progesterone receptor modulator and can be used up to 120 h following unprotected intercourse, without an increase in adverse effects or a decrease in efficacy. This article reviews studies that evaluate the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, and safety profile of UPA as an emergency contraceptive agent. UPA, a selective progesterone receptor modulator, is administered as a single 30 mg dose for EC. This agent provides a comparable, if not better, efficacy and side effect profile than seen with levonorgestrel or mifepristone. Because it has both agonistic and antagonistic effects on the progesterone receptor, ongoing clinical trials are documenting UPA's use for patients with endometriosis and as an extended use contraceptive.

  10. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev V Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent. Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE.

  11. Combined oral contraceptives versus levonorgestrel for emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, S M; Couchenour, R L

    1998-12-01

    A study supported by the World Health Organization's Task Force on Postovulatory Methods of Fertility Control compared the efficacy of the Yuzpe and levonorgestrel-only methods of emergency contraception (EC). Enrolled in this double-blind, randomized trial were 1998 women from 21 centers around the world who requested EC within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse. The pregnancy rate was 1.1% for levonorgestrel alone and 3.2% for the combined ethinyl estradiol-levonorgestrel regimen. The crude relative risk of pregnancy was 0.36 (95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.70) for levonorgestrel compared with the Yuzpe regimen. The former method prevented 85% of expected pregnancies, while the latter prevented only 57%. Finally, side effects such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and fatigue were significantly less common in the levonorgestrel group. Although these findings document the superiority of the levonorgestrel regimen for EC, the 0.75 mg tablets are not currently manufactured in the US.

  12. Adolescents: Contraceptive Knowledge and Use, a Brazilian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Divanise S.; Pontes, Ana C. P.; Cavalcante, Jairo C.; Egito, E. Sócrates T.; Maia, Eulália M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the knowledge and use of contraceptive methods by female adolescent students. The study was cross-sectional and quantitative, using a semi-structured questionnaire that was administered to 12- to 19-year-old female students in Maceió, Brazil. A representative and randomized sample was calculated, taking into account the number of hospital admissions for curettage. This study was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee, and Epi InfoTM software was used for data and result evaluation using the mean and chi-square statistical test. Our results show that the majority of students know of some contraceptive methods (95.5%), with the barrier/hormonal methods being the most mentioned (72.4%). Abortion and aborting drugs were inaccurately described as contraceptives, and 37.9% of the sexually active girls did not make use of any method. The barrier methods were the most used (35.85%). A significant association was found in the total sample (2,592) between pregnancy and the use of any contraceptive method. This association was not found, however, in the group having an active sexual life (559). The study points to a knowledge of contraceptive methods, especially by teenagers who have already been pregnant, but contraceptives were not adequately used. The low use of chemical methods of contraception brings the risk of pregnancy. Since abortion and aborting drugs were incorrectly cited as contraceptive methods, this implies a nonpreventive attitude towards pregnancy. PMID:19151897

  13. Interventions for emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Che, Yan; Showell, Emily; Chen, Ke; Cheng, Linan

    2017-08-02

    Emergency contraception (EC) is using a drug or copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) to prevent pregnancy shortly after unprotected intercourse. Several interventions are available for EC. Information on the comparative effectiveness, safety and convenience of these methods is crucial for reproductive healthcare providers and the women they serve. This is an update of a review previously published in 2009 and 2012. To determine which EC method following unprotected intercourse is the most effective, safe and convenient to prevent pregnancy. In February 2017 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Popline and PubMed, The Chinese biomedical databases and UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme on Human Reproduction (HRP) emergency contraception database. We also searched ICTRP and ClinicalTrials.gov as well as contacting content experts and pharmaceutical companies, and searching reference lists of appropriate papers. Randomised controlled trials including women attending services for EC following a single act of unprotected intercourse were eligible. We used standard methodological procedures recommended by Cochrane. The primary review outcome was observed number of pregnancies. Side effects and changes of menses were secondary outcomes. We included 115 trials with 60,479 women in this review. The quality of the evidence for the primary outcome ranged from moderate to high, and for other outcomes ranged from very low to high. The main limitations were risk of bias (associated with poor reporting of methods), imprecision and inconsistency. Comparative effectiveness of different emergency contraceptive pills (ECP)Levonorgestrel was associated with fewer pregnancies than Yuzpe (estradiol-levonorgestrel combination) (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.84, 6 RCTs, n = 4750, I 2 = 23%, high-quality evidence). This suggests that if the chance of pregnancy using Yuzpe is assumed to be 29 women per 1000, the chance of pregnancy using levonorgestrel would be between

  14. Correlates of oral contraception continuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewer, P A; Gibbs, J O

    1971-05-01

    A sample of 139 predominantly black, young, low-income patients who had accepted oral contraception at a publicly supported family planning clinic has been analyzed for correlates of oral contraception continuation. Interviews were conducted 10-12 months after the clinic visit; at this time 38% of the patients continued taking oral contraceptives. It was found that patients with the highest continuation rates were 18-24 years old, in the 2-3 parity group, living with their husbands, had low-parity mothers, and were able to fill prescriptions in less time with more convenient methods of transportation. Discontinuers tended to have high-parity mothers, live with parents or head their own households, and to be in the 13-17 or 25-45 year old age groups. Fear of long-term use of oral contraceptives and perceived side effects appeared to be implicated in discontinuation. The rate of discontinuation may be associated with irregular coital experience and less consistent exposure to pregnancy.

  15. Use of non-emergency contraceptive pills and concoctions as emergency contraception among Nigerian University students: results of a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Anthony Idowu; Nwokocha, Ezebunwa Ethelbert; Akpan, Wilson; Adeniyi, Oladele Vincent

    2016-10-04

    Emergency contraception (EC) can significantly reduce the rate of unintended pregnancies and unsafe abortions especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the increasing awareness of EC among educated young women in Nigeria, the rate of utilisation remains low. This study therefore explores the main barriers to the use of EC among female university students by analysing their knowledge of emergency contraception, methods ever used, perceived efficacy, and its acceptability. This paper brings together the findings from several focus groups (N = 5) and in-depth interviews (N = 20) conducted amongst unmarried female undergraduate students in two Nigerian universities. Participants considered the use of condom and abstinence as the most effective methods of preventing unplanned pregnancy. However, many participants were misinformed about emergency contraception. Generally, participants relied on unconventional and unproven ECs; Ampiclox, "Alabukun", salt water solution, and lime and potash and perceived them to be effective in preventing unplanned pregnancies. Furthermore, respondents' narratives about methods of preventing unwanted pregnancies revealed that inadequate information on emergency contraception, reliance on unproven crude contraceptive methods, and misconception about modern contraception constitute barriers to the use of emergency contraception. The findings suggested that female university students are misinformed about emergency contraception and their reliance on unproven ECs constitutes a barrier to the use of approved EC methods. These barriers have serious implications for prevention of unplanned pregnancies in the cohort. Behavioural interventions targeting the use of unproven emergency contraceptive methods and misperceptions about ECs would be crucial for this cohort in Nigeria.

  16. Influence of women health care adoption on contraceptive use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, S.U.R.S.; Zafar, M.I.; Batool, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of woman heath seeking behaviour during pregnancy and post delivery period on contraceptive use and family size are important dimensions of female fertility. These determinants of female fertility have rarely been explored, particularly in developing countries confronting problems of rising population growth. A study was conducted in district Faisalabad, Pakistan to explore the influence of pre and postnatal care on contraceptive use. A random sample of 1051 married women was studied from the urban and rural areas of the district through formal survey. It was found that contraceptive use is associated with pre. and postnatal care. Minimum of 5-7 prenatal and at least 2 postnatal visits have been identified as effective to promote contraceptive use. Involvement of health professionals, motivation through mass media and improved access to health care services during the period of pregnancy and after childbirth are the measures suggested to enhance contraceptive use in the society to curtail family size. (author)

  17. Use of IUDs for emergency contraception: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKay R

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca McKay,1 Lynne Gilbert2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Peterborough City Hospital, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom; 2Department of Contraception and Sexual Health, Cambridgeshire Community Services NHS Trust, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom Abstract: Emergency contraception is an essential intervention for the prevention of unplanned pregnancy worldwide. The copper intrauterine device (IUD is highly effective at preventing pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure. Unfortunately, its usage in this context is low and far exceeded by hormonal forms of emergency contraception. These have higher failure rates and, unlike the IUD, are not effective post-fertilization. This review aims to summarize the literature surrounding IUD use as emergency contraception, contrast it with the hormonal options, and provide suggestions for increased usage. Keywords: levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, copper intrauterine device

  18. Long-acting reversible contraceptives: intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve; Ogburn, Tony

    2011-03-01

    The provision of effective contraception is fundamental to the practice of women's health care. The most effective methods of reversible contraception are the so-called long-acting reversible contraceptives, intrauterine devices and implants. These methods have multiple advantages over other reversible methods. Most importantly, once in place, they do not require maintenance and their duration of action is long, ranging from 3 to 10 years. Despite the advantages of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, they are infrequently used in the United States. Short-acting methods, specifically oral contraceptives and condoms, are by far the most commonly used reversible methods. A shift from the use of short-acting methods to long-acting reversible contraceptive methods could help reduce the high rate of unintended pregnancy in the United States. In this review of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, we discuss the intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant available in the United States, and we describe candidates for each method, noncontraceptive benefits, and management of complications.

  19. Knowledge, attitudes and practice of emergency contraception ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Emergency contraceptives (EC) play a very important role in the prevention of unwanted pregnancies when there are user failures with the regular devices. It is an integral part of the treatment of cases of sexual assaults and other unprotected sexual intercourse in susceptible subjects. Aims & Objectives: This ...

  20. Emergency Contraceptive Knowledge And Practice Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With a high incidence of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortion especially among unmarriedwomen in developing countries, there is need to promote emergency contraception (EC). To assess the unmarriedwomen\\'s knowledge, attitude and practice ofEC. A random sample of a cross-section of 594 unmarried women ...

  1. Awareness and practice of emergency contraception among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unprotected sexual exposure leading to unwanted pregnancy and unsafe abortion contributes significantly to reproductive ill health, especially in developing countries. Promotion of emergency contraception (EC) has been advocated as a way of reducing these problems. Our youth, the most vulnerable group, should ...

  2. Emergency contraception: awareness, perception and practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Limited knowledge and practice of contraception is a global public health problem. Unintended pregnancies are the primary cause of induced abortion. When safe abortions are not available, as in Nigeria with restricted abortion laws, abortion can contribute significantly to maternal mortality and morbidity.

  3. Contraception for the perimenopausal woman | Snyman | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contraception in the perimenopausal transition years is a very important aspect of women's health, and it is the responsibility of all health care workers to discuss and render adequate counselling in this regard. Failure to do so can have serious health and mental consequences caused by unplanned pregnancies. There are ...

  4. Contraceptive update Y2K: need for contraception and new contraceptive options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A

    2000-01-01

    Despite the major strides made in birth control, which have produced a decline in unintended pregnancies over the past decade and the lowest rates of teen pregnancies seen since 1974 (1,2), significant problems still remain. Almost half (48%) of US pregnancies in 1995 were unintended (1) and many more that were "intended" were not planned or prepared for (3). To optimize maternal and fetal outcomes, it is incumbent that physicians both emphasize the need for women to be physically, emotionally, and socially prepared for pregnancy before they conceive as well as ensure the availability of effective methods to allow them to do so. Today, contraceptives are available that permit couples to choose if and when to have children. Although only 5% of women who are sexually active and say they do not want to become pregnant are using no method of birth control (4), that group accounts for nearly 40% of the unintended pregnancies. More than half of all unintended pregnancies occur in women who had used a method in the month of conception (1). The strategy with these women should be to find ways to make the method they select work better for them or to switch them to more effective methods. Unfortunately, the most effective reversible methods are among the least utilized--in part because they have the highest initial costs. Some states, such as California and Maryland, have passed Contraceptive Equity Acts, which require insurance companies that provide any prescriptive drug coverage to cover all forms of prescription contraception. Many other states, as well as the federal government, are now considering similar legislation. It is important, therefore, both from the perspective of quality patient care and also from a fiscal standpoint, that all who care for reproductive-aged women become familiar with the full array of contraceptive options. This article will review the methods of reversible birth control now available in the United States, including the most recent efficacy

  5. Emergency Contraception: Do Your Patients Have a Plan B?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Holly; Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Emergency contraception is used after unprotected sex, inadequately protected sex, or sexual assault to reduce the risk of pregnancy. Of emergency contraceptive methods available in the United States, the copper intrauterine device has the highest efficacy, followed by ulipristal acetate, levonorgestrel-containing emergency contraceptive pills, and the Yuzpe method. However, access to the most effective methods is limited. Although advanced prescription of emergency contraceptive pills and counseling on emergency contraception to all reproductive-aged women is recommended, women should be advised to contact their health care providers after taking emergency contraceptive pills to discuss possible copper intrauterine device placement and other follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Role of Patient Activation in Contraceptive Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Jennifer K; Lapin, Brittany; Poston, Lindsay; Hirshfeld, Meredith; Hosack, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Many unintended pregnancies occur due to to contraceptive misuse and nonuse, which is partly due to to lack of knowledge and low self-efficacy related to contraception. We conducted an exploratory, cross-sectional study among low-income women to examine the relationship between knowledge, skills, and confidence in managing one's health, measured using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) and factors that influence contraceptive use. A survey and chart review were conducted among 18- to 45-year-old women from a community health center in Chicago, Illinois, to measure the relationship between activation, self-confidence in avoiding pregnancy, contraception use, and contraceptive counseling. Associations between PAM and outcomes were evaluated using the χ(2) test and adjusted logistic regression models. Among 112 participants (61% Latina, 15% Black, 14% White), we found no differences in PAM by age, race/ethnicity, or parity. Women with higher PAM were more likely to be confident they could avoid pregnancy compared with women with lower PAM (50% vs. 7%; p = .02). Higher PAM remained a significant predictor for self-confidence after risk adjustment (odds ratio, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.11-8.78; p = .031). Greater confidence in avoiding pregnancy was associated with using a moderately or highly effective contraceptive method (43% vs. 14%; p = .047). Women with lower PAM were less likely to receive contraceptive counseling in the prior month (0% vs. 57%; p influence women's contraceptive use, including self-confidence in avoiding pregnancy until it is desired and receiving contraceptive services in primary care. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Are symptom features of depression during pregnancy, the postpartum period and outside the peripartum period distinct? Results from a nationally representative sample using item response theory (IRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoertel, Nicolas; López, Saioa; Peyre, Hugo; Wall, Melanie M; González-Pinto, Ana; Limosin, Frédéric; Blanco, Carlos

    2015-02-01

    Whether there are systematic differences in depression symptom expression during pregnancy, the postpartum period and outside these periods (i.e., outside the peripartum period) remains debated. The aim of this study was to use methods based on item response theory (IRT) to examine, after equating for depression severity, differences in the likelihood of reporting DSM-IV symptoms of major depressive episode (MDE) in women of childbearing age (i.e., aged 18-50) during pregnancy, the postpartum period and outside the peripartum period. We conducted these analyses using a large, nationally representative sample of women of childbearing age from the United States (n = 11,256) who participated in the second wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). The overall 12-month prevalence of all depressive criteria (except for worthlessness/guilt) was significantly lower in pregnant women than in women of childbearing age outside the peripartum period, whereas the prevalence of all symptoms (except for "psychomotor symptoms") was not significantly different between the postpartum and the nonperipartum group. There were no clinically significant differences in the endorsement rates of symptoms of MDE by pregnancy status when equating for levels of depression severity. This study suggests that the clinical presentation of depressive symptoms in women of childbearing age does not differ during pregnancy, the postpartum period and outside the peripartum period. These findings do not provide psychometric support for the inclusion of the peripartum onset specifier for major depressive disorder in the DSM-5. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Low birth weight in offspring of women with depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy: results from a population based study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasreen Hashima E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a high prevalence of antepartum depression and low birth weight (LBW in Bangladesh. In high- and low-income countries, prior evidence linking maternal depressive and anxiety symptoms with infant LBW is conflicting. There is no research on the association between maternal mental disorders and LBW in Bangladesh. This study aims to investigate the independent effect of maternal antepartum depressive and anxiety symptoms on infant LBW among women in a rural district of Bangladesh. Methods A population-based sample of 720 pregnant women from two rural subdistricts was assessed for symptoms of antepartum depression, using the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS, and antepartum anxiety, using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and followed for 6-8 months postpartum. Infant birth weight of 583 (81% singleton live babies born at term (≥37 weeks of pregnancy was measured within 48 hours of delivery. Baseline data provided socioeconomic, anthropometric, reproductive, obstetric, and social support information. Trained female interviewers carried out structured interviews. Chi-square, Fisher's exact, and independent-sample t tests were done as descriptive statistics, and a multiple logistic regression model was used to identify predictors of LBW. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, depressive (OR = 2.24; 95% CI 1.37-3.68 and anxiety (OR = 2.08; 95% CI 1.30-3.25 symptoms were significantly associated with LBW (≤2.5 kg. Poverty, maternal malnutrition, and support during pregnancy were also associated with LBW. Conclusions This study provides evidence that maternal depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy predict the LBW of newborns and replicates results found in other South Asian countries. Policies aimed at the detection and effective management of depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy may reduce the burden on mothers and also act as an important measure in the prevention of LBW

  9. Postpartum Teenagers' Views on Providing Contraception in School-Based Health Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pooja R; Huynh, Michaela T; Alvarez, Crystal A; Jones, DaJonitta; Jennings, Kristofer; Snyder, Russell R

    2016-01-01

    To determine characteristics of teen pregnancies in southeast Texas and the opinions of postpartum teenagers with regard to having contraceptive services available in high school clinics. A cross-sectional study of postpartum teenagers interviewed during their hospital stay. Of 404 postpartum teenagers interviewed, 86% had unplanned pregnancies. Approximately 53% of respondents first had intercourse at less than 16 years of age. Of the 130 teenagers who had used contraception prior to pregnancy, 85% became pregnant because they were unable to visit the clinic to obtain a contraceptive refill or replacement. In multivariate modeling, factors associated with using contraceptives prior to pregnancy included black race (p teenagers surveyed, 223 (82%) were in favor of having contraceptive services offered in high school clinics. Contraceptive education is not sufficient to prevent teenage pregnancy. Increase in access is critical as teenagers with previous pregnancies were more likely to use contraception, likely due to their interaction with the medical community during the antecedent pregnancy. One possible solution is to bring contraceptive services to the teenagers, by offering them at school based health systems. A majority of teenagers surveyed in this study supported this proposal.

  10. Pregnancy risk factors in relation to oppositional-defiant and conduct disorder symptoms in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisch, I Hyun; Buitelaar, Jan K; Glennon, Jeffrey C; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Dietrich, Andrea

    2018-06-01

    Pregnancy factors have been implicated in offspring oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms. Literature still holds notable limitations, such as studying only a restricted set of pregnancy factors, use of screening questionnaires which assess broadly defined outcome measures, and lack of control for disruptive behavior comorbidity and genetic confounds. We aimed to address these gaps by prospectively studying a broad range of pregnancy factors in relation to both offspring ODD and CD symptomatology in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parent and Children. Outcomes were ODD and CD symptom scores at age 7;9 years using the Development and Well-Being Assessment interview. We analyzed maternal (N ≈ 6300) and teacher ratings (N ≈ 4400) of ODD and CD scores separately using negative binomial regression in multivariable models. Control variables included comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, ODD or CD symptoms as appropriate, and genetic risk scores based on an independent CD genome-wide association study. Higher ODD symptom scores were linked to paracetamol use (IRR = 1.24 [98.3% confidence interval 1.05-1.47], P = 0.002, teacher ratings) and life events stress (IRR = 1.22 [1.07-1.39], P = 0.002, maternal ratings) during pregnancy. Higher CD symptom scores were linked to maternal smoking (IRR = 1.33 [1.18-1.51], P < 0.001, maternal ratings), life events stress (IRR = 1.24 [1.11-1.38], P < 0.001, maternal ratings) and depressive symptoms (IRR = 1.14 [1.01-1.30], P = 0.006, maternal ratings) during pregnancy. Common and potentially preventable pregnancy risk factors were independently related to both offspring ODD and CD symptomatology in children from the general population. Future studies should further address genetic confounds and confounding by environmental factors later in life. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Benefits and risks of hormonal contraception for women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: A large proportion of women of reproductive age in Germany use various methods of pregnancy prevention (contraception, among them various hormone-based methods. Hormonal contraceptives may be divided into combined estrogen-progestogen contraceptives (pills, skin patches, vaginal rings, progestogen-only contraceptives (pills, injections, implants, hormone spirals and emergency contraceptives. Research questions: The evaluation addressed the question of benefits and risks of hormonal contraceptives, their economic effects as well as their ethical-social and legal implications.MethodsA systematic literature search was conducted in April 2006 starting from 2000. The evaluation is primarily based on systematic reviews. Results: In perfect use, all hormonal contraceptives excluding emergency contraceptives proved to be the most effective reversible contraceptive methods (rate of unintended pregnancies 0.05% to 0.3%. However, the typical use of oral contraceptives, injections, skin patches, and vaginal rings, which also considers possible application errors, showed a lower contraceptive efficacy (rate of unintended pregnancies 3% to 8%. It was lower than that of copper spirals. The risk of venous thromboembolism increased three to six times in users of hormonal contraceptives, the risks of stroke and myocardial infarction two to three times. The risk declined after discontinuation of use. The effects were estrogen-dose and progestogen-type dependent. The use of hormonal contraceptives showed a relative risk of ovarian and endometrial carcinomas of approximately 0.5 or 0.7, of breast and cervical cancer of approximately 1.2 or 1.6. The effect remained several years after discontinuation of use. The results concerning hepatocellular carcinoma suggested a carcinogenic effect. In women with acne, an improvement due to use of hormonal contraceptives was proven. Cervical chlamydial infections were more frequent in users of hormonal

  12. Oral contraception following abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P abortion (P abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. PMID:27399060

  13. Attitude toward contraception and abortion among Curaçao women. Ineffective contraception due to limited sexual education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyboom-de Jong Betty

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Curaçao is a high incidence of unintended pregnancies and induced abortions. Most of the induced abortions in Curaçao are on request of the woman and performed by general practitioners. In Curaçao, induced abortion is strictly prohibited, but since 1999 there has been a policy of connivance. We present data on the relevance of economic and socio-cultural factors for the high abortion-rates and the ineffective use of contraception. Methods Structured interviews to investigate knowledge and attitudes toward sexuality, contraception and abortion and reasons for ineffective use of contraceptives among women, visiting general practitioners. Results Of 158 women, 146 (92% participated and 82% reported that their education on sexuality and about contraception was of good quality. However 'knowledge of reliable contraceptive methods' appeared to be - in almost 50% of the cases - false information, misjudgements or erroneous views on the chance of getting pregnant using coitus interruptus and about the reliability and health effects of oral contraceptive pills. Almost half of the interviewed women had incorrect or no knowledge about reliability of condom use and IUD. 42% of the respondents risked by their behavior an unplanned pregnancy. Most respondents considered abortion as an emergency procedure, not as contraception. Almost two third experienced emotional, physical or social problems after the abortion. Conclusions Respondents had a negative attitude toward reliable contraceptives due to socio-cultural determined ideas about health consequences and limited sexual education. Main economic factors were costs of contraceptive methods, because most health insurances in Curaçao do not cover contraceptives. To improve the effective use of reliable contraceptives, more adequate information should be given, targeting the wrong beliefs and false information. The government should encourage health insurance companies to reimburse

  14. Sexual Behavior and Contraceptive Use at Brown University: 1975-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peipert, Benjamin J; Scott, Dana Marie; Matteson, Kristen A; Clark, Melissa A; Zhao, Qiuhong; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2016-01-01

    To assess sexual behaviors and contraceptive use in a sample of Brown University students. A total of 255 undergraduate students responded to an anonymous online survey in May 2011. The survey addressed level of sexual activity, behaviors, and contraceptive use. Female responders were compared to results from surveys conducted in 1975, 1986, 1989, and 1995. Of the surveyed undergraduates 62% were sexually active. Sexual activity among women was similar to that of previous survey years. Contraceptive pills were the most common primary contraceptive method, reported by 59% of students, and 32% used dual method contraceptive use for sexually transmitted disease (STD) and pregnancy prevention. We observed a plateau in condom use among women in 2011 after an increase from 1975-1995. Use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) was uncommon (3%). Educational efforts should emphasize the effectiveness of LARC and dual method contraceptive use to reduce the risk of STDs and unintended pregnancies.

  15. Knowledge and use of emergency contraception among students of public secondary schools in Ilorin, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babatunde, Oluwole Adeyemi; Ibirongbe, Demilade Olusola; Omede, Owen; Babatunde, Olubukola Oluwakemi; Durowade, Kabir Adekunle; Salaudeen, Adekunle Ganiyu; Akande, Tanimola Makanjuola

    2016-01-01

    Unintended pregnancy and unsafe abortion pose a major reproductive health challenge to adolescents. Emergency contraception is safe and effective in preventing unplanned pregnancy. The objective of this study was to assess the student's knowledge and use of emergency contraception. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Ilorin, Nigeria, using multi-stage sampling method. Data was collected using pre-tested semi-structured self-administered questionnaire. Knowledge was scored and analysed. SPSS version 21.0 was used for data analysis. A p-value emergency contraception. Majority of respondents (87.2%) had never used emergency contraception. Majority of those who had ever used emergency contraception (85.7%) used it incorrectly, using it more than 72 hours after sexual intercourse (p=0.928). Knowledge about Emergency contraception and prevalence of use were low. Contraceptive education should be introduced early in the school curriculum for adolescents.

  16. Dietary patterns, n-3 fatty acids intake from seafood and high levels of anxiety symptoms during pregnancy: findings from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana dos Santos Vaz

    Full Text Available Little is known about relationships between dietary patterns, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA intake and excessive anxiety during pregnancy.To examine whether dietary patterns and n-3 PUFA intake from seafood are associated with high levels of anxiety during pregnancy.Pregnant women enrolled from 1991-1992 in ALSPAC (n 9,530. Dietary patterns were established from a food frequency questionnaire using principal component analysis. Total intake of n-3 PUFA (grams/week from seafood was also examined. Symptoms of anxiety were measured at 32 weeks of gestation with the Crown-Crisp Experiential Index; scores ≥ 9 corresponding to the 85(th percentile was defined as high anxiety symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the OR and 95% CI, adjusted by socioeconomic and lifestyle variables.Multivariate results showed that women in the highest tertile of the health-conscious (OR 0.77; 0.65-0.93 and the traditional (OR 0.84; 0.73-0.97 pattern scores were less likely to report high levels of anxiety symptoms. Women in the highest tertile of the vegetarian pattern score (OR 1.25; 1.08-1.44 were more likely to have high levels of anxiety, as well as those with no n-3 PUFA intake from seafood (OR 1.53; 1.25-1.87 when compared with those with intake of >1.5 grams/week.The present study provides evidence of a relationship between dietary patterns, fish intake or n-3 PUFA intake from seafood and symptoms of anxiety in pregnancy, and suggests that dietary interventions could be used to reduce high anxiety symptoms during pregnancy.

  17. Community pharmacists providing emergency contraception give little advice about future contraceptive use: a mystery shopper study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasier, Anna; Manners, Rachel; Loudon, Joanna C; Muir, Aileen

    2010-12-01

    UK women increasingly prefer to attend a pharmacy for emergency contraception (EC) rather than a doctor. Most women who use EC do not conceive and remain at risk of pregnancy unless they start regular contraception. We undertook a study to evaluate the quality of service provision in community pharmacies in Lothian, Scotland, and to determine what advice is given about contraception after EC use. Mystery shopper study. EC was unobtainable from 5/40 pharmacies (12.5%), refused because of "contraindications" in 7 (17.5%) and offered in 28 (70%). Most pharmacists appeared nonjudgemental, over 75% asked appropriate questions about eligibility, and over 90% gave appropriate advice about use. EC was universally refused beyond 72 h after sex but universally provided when the date of the last menstrual period was uncertain. Ongoing contraception after EC use was discussed in only 32.5% of all pharmacies and only 43% of those issuing EC. The quality of consultations for EC in pharmacies is generally good but only a minority discuss ongoing contraception after EC use. The implications for contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy rates are worrying. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 'Failed' contraception in a rural South African population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although access (preferably free) to termination of pregnancy. (TOP) is an integral component of women's reproductive health and rights, it is surely more desirable to avoid unwanted pregnancies. According to Benagiano and Pera/ the best ways to reduce the need for abortion are education and contraception. Putting ...

  19. Reproductive knowledge and use of contraception among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prevent maternal deaths is to prevent pregnancy'.[5] One of its recommendations was to promote contraceptive use through education and service provision. This also promotes reproductive health. Women with unplanned pregnancies, especially those with an underlying medical condition such as pregestational diabetes, ...

  20. Contraceptive Uptake among Women of Reproductive Age in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND. Family planning reduces the number of unintended and unwanted pregnancies and thereby saving women from high risk pregnancies and unsafe abortions. Despite the persistent advocacy urging the use of modern contraceptive methods for family planning, the fertility rates in most sub-.

  1. Pregnancy care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have few or mild symptoms during pregnancy. Many women work their full term and travel while they are pregnant. Others may have to cut back on their hours or stop working. Some women require bed rest ...

  2. Potential Factors Associated with Contraceptive Intention Among Adolescent Males in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Hsia Wang

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the predictors of contraceptive intention in adolescent males in Taiwan. It used a cross-sectional design and a sample of 1,000 vocational high school male students to determine the potential factors associated with contraceptive intention. Data were collected on an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire, including personal background variables, prior sexual experience, contraceptive knowledge, contraceptive attitude, contraceptive self-efficacy, perception of peers' contraceptive behavior, perception of support from significant others, and parental-adolescent communication about contraception. A total of 230 participants (23% had prior sexual experience, 13% (30 of whom reported being involved in their girlfriends' pregnancies. Of the participants, 45% recognized the use of condoms as the most favorable contraceptive method for future sexual intercourse. Second to condom use, the combination of the calendar method and condom use was also popular (13.1%. Multiple stepwise regression indicated that better contraceptive attitudes, higher contraceptive self-efficacy, no prior sexual experience, more perception of peers' contraceptive behavior, and higher perception of support from significant others were predictors of higher contraceptive intention. The above predicting factors explained 31.9% of the total variance for contraceptive intention among adolescents. These results provide health professionals with important information to understand the reality adolescents encounter and to design effective contraceptive programs for male adolescents.

  3. Multiple Method Contraception Use among African American Adolescents in Four US Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Brown

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on African American adolescents' (N=850; M age = 15.4 contraceptive practices and type of contraception utilized during their last sexual encounter. Respondents completed measures of demographics, contraceptive use, sexual partner type, and ability to select “safe” sexual partners. 40% endorsed use of dual or multiple contraceptive methods; a total of 35 different contraceptive combinations were reported. Perceived ability to select “safe” partners was associated with not using contraception (OR = 1.25, using less effective contraceptive methods (OR = 1.23, or hormonal birth control (OR = 1.50. Female gender predicted hormonal birth control use (OR = 2.33, use of less effective contraceptive methods (e.g., withdrawal; OR = 2.47, and using no contraception (OR = 2.37. Respondents' age and partner type did not predict contraception use. Adolescents used contraceptive methods with limited ability to prevent both unintended pregnancies and STD/HIV. Adolescents who believed their partners posed low risk were more likely to use contraceptive practices other than condoms or no contraception. Reproductive health practitioners are encouraged to help youth negotiate contraceptive use with partners, regardless of the partner's perceived riskiness.

  4. What makes a contraceptive acceptable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berer, M

    1995-01-01

    The women's health movement is developing an increasing number of negative campaigns against various contraceptive methods based on three assumptions: 1) user-controlled methods are better for women than provider-controlled methods, 2) long-acting methods are undesirable because of their susceptibility to abuse, and 3) systemic methods carry unacceptable health risks to women. While these objections have sparked helpful debate, criticizing an overreliance on such methods is one thing and calling for bans on the provision of injectables and implants and on the development of vaccine contraceptives is another. Examination of the terms "provider-controlled," "user-controlled," and "long-acting" reveals that their definitions are not as clear-cut as opponents would have us believe. Some women's health advocates find the methods that are long-acting and provider-controlled to be the most problematic. They also criticize the near 100% contraceptive effectiveness of the long-acting methods despite the fact that the goal of contraception is to prevent pregnancy. It is wrong to condemn these methods because of their link to population control policies of the 1960s, and it is important to understand that long-acting, effective methods are often beneficial to women who require contraception for 20-22 years of their lives. Arguments against systemic methods (including RU-486 for early abortion and contraceptive vaccines) rebound around issues of safety. Feminists have gone so far as to create an intolerable situation by publishing books that criticize these methods based on erroneous conclusions and faulty scientific analysis. While women's health advocates have always rightly called for bans on abuse of various methods, they have not extended this ban to the methods themselves. In settings where other methods are not available, bans can lead to harm or maternal deaths. Another perspective can be used to consider methods in terms of their relationship with the user (repeated

  5. Contraception in HIV-positive female adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananworanich Jintanat

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sexual behavior of HIV-positive youths, whether infected perinatally, through risky behavior or other ways, is not substantially different from that of HIV-uninfected peers. Because of highly active antiretroviral therapy, increasing number of children, infected perinatally, are surviving into adolescence and are becoming sexually active and need reproductive health services. The objective of this article is to review the methods of contraception appropriate for HIV-positive adolescents with a special focus on hormonal contraceptives. Delaying the start of sexual life and the use of two methods thereafter, one of which is the male condom and the other a highly effective contraceptive method such as hormonal contraception or an intrauterine device, is currently the most effective option for those who desire simultaneous protection from both pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Health care providers should be aware of the possible pharmacokinetic interactions between hormonal contraception and antiretrovirals. There is an urgent need for more information regarding metabolic outcomes of hormonal contraceptives, especially the effect of injectable progestins on bone metabolism, in HIV-positive adolescent girls.

  6. Ectopic pregnancy after two times tubal ligation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Keypour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tubal sterilization is the permanent and effective contraception method. This can be performed at any time, but at least half are performed in conjunction with cesarean or vaginal delivery and are termed puerperal. The most complication after tubal ligation is ectopic pregnancy. Ectopic pregnancy is the leading cause of maternal death in first trimester.Case presentation: We present a 33 years old woman gravida5, para4, all normal vaginal delivery, presented with complaints of delayed menstrual period, pelvic pain and spotting. She underwent tubal ligation for two times. For the first time she had puerperal Pomeroy tubal sterilization after third child delivery. Intra uterine pregnancy occurred three years later. One day after vaginal delivery of fourth child, she underwent post partum tubal ligation with the Parkland method. Tubal pregnancy occurred nine months later. Physical examination identified acute abdomen. Pelvic ultrasound showed no gestational sac in uterine cavity. The sac with fetal pole was in right adnexa. Beta-HCG was 2840mIU/ml. She underwent laparotomy. Surgical management included salpingectomy with cornual resection in both sides. The surgery identified Ectopic pregnancy.Conclusion: Any symptoms of pregnancy in a woman after tubal ligation must be investigated; an ectopic pregnancy should be excluded. Ectopic pregnancy must be considered, in any woman with lower abdominal pain, missed period and vaginal bleed-ing. Conception after tubal sterilization can be explained by fistula formation and re-canalization of fallopian tube.

  7. Emergency contraceptives bring a little peace of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, V

    1999-04-01

    Although emergency contraceptive pills have been prescribed to US women since the discovery of the birth control pill, this regimen has been termed "America's best-kept secret." For fear of legal liability, many providers have been unwilling to prescribe oral contraceptive pills for a purpose other than that for which they are labeled on the packaging. There are indications, however, that access to emergency contraception in the US is improving. PREVEN, the first product to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration specifically for emergency contraception, was released in 1998. The kit includes a step-by-step information booklet, a pregnancy test, and four birth control pills. In Washington State, collaborative drug agreements between volunteer pharmacists and licensed prescribers enable pharmacists to prescribe emergency contraception pills directly--a move that is estimated to have prevented 207 unintended pregnancies and 103 abortions in less than one year. Planned Parenthood has developed two programs to increase the use of emergency contraception. The first allows clinicians to discuss emergency contraception over the phone with clients (even new ones) and to call in prescriptions to local pharmacies; the second provides women with emergency contraceptive kits to keep on hand in advance of a need for the regimen.

  8. Contraception coverage and methods used among women in South Africa: A national household survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M F Chersich

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Globally, family planning services are being strengthened and the range of contraceptive choices expanded. Data on contraceptive coverage and service gaps could help to shape these initiatives. Objective. To assess contraception coverage in South Africa (SA and identify underserved populations and aspects of programming that require strengthening. Methods. Data from a 2012 SA household survey assessed contraception coverage among 6 296 women aged 15 - 49 years and identified underserved populations. Results. Two-thirds had an unintended pregnancy in the past 5 years, a quarter of which were contraceptive failures. Most knew of injectable (92.0% and oral contraception (89.9%, but fewer of intrauterine devices (56.1% and emergency contraception (47.3%. Contraceptive prevalence was 49.1%, and 41.8% women used modern non-barrier methods. About half had ever used injectable contraception. Contraception was lower in black Africans and younger women, who used a limited range of methods. Conclusion. Contraception coverage is higher than many previous estimates. Rates of unintended pregnancy, contraceptive failure and knowledge gaps, however, demonstrate high levels of unmet need, especially among black Africans and young women.

  9. Interactions between hormonal contraception and antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Arne; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Sabers, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and hormonal contraceptives may affect each other's metabolism and clinical efficacy. Loss of seizure control and unplanned pregnancy may occur when these compounds are used concomitantly. Although a large number of available preparations yield a plethora of possible drug...... combinations, most of these drug interactions are predictable and, thus, avoidable. Unfortunately, there is a substantial lack of data regarding the newer AEDs. Detailed understanding of these issues is necessary for those who prescribe AEDs and/or hormonal contraception to women with epilepsy, as well...

  10. Factors Associated with Contraceptive Use among Women of Reproductive Age in Rural Districts of Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulifan, Joseph K; Mazalale, Jacob; Jahn, Albrecht; Hien, Hervé; Ilboudo, Patrick Christian; Meda, Nicolas; Robyn, Paul Jacob; Hamadou, Saidou; Haidara, Ousmane; De Allegri, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Given the current low contraceptive use and corresponding high levels of unwanted pregnancies leading to induced abortions and poor maternal health outcomes among rural populations, a detailed understanding of the factors that limit contraceptive use is essential. Our study investigated household and health facility factors that influence contraceptive use decisions among rural women in rural Burkina Faso. We collected data on fertile non-pregnant women in 24 rural districts in 2014. Of 8,657 women, 1,098 used a modern contraceptive. Women having a living son, a child younger than one year, and household wealth were more likely to use modern contraceptives. Women in polygamous marriages and women living at least 5 kilometers from a health facility were less likely to use contraception. We conclude that modern contraceptive use remains weak, hence, programs aiming to encourage contraceptive use must address barriers at both the health facility and the household level.

  11. Adolescent males' orientation toward paternity and contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsiglio, W

    1993-01-01

    Data from a nationally representative sample of 1,880 young men aged 15-19 reveal that neighborhood quality, parental education, race or ethnicity, and attitudes about male gender roles are related to young men's attitudes toward an unplanned pregnancy and to their contraceptive experiences. Young men who live in poor neighborhoods are more likely to be pleased about an unplanned pregnancy than those who have better living conditions (12% vs. 2%) and are also more likely to view impregnating a woman as enhancing their masculinity (8% vs. 3%). Among men with average living conditions, 12% of black adolescents view fathering a child as enhancing their masculinity, compared with 6% of white adolescents; among those with very good living conditions, these proportions were 10% and 2%, respectively. Young men whose parents had less education and those who held traditional male gender role attitudes were also more likely than their counterparts to view fathering a child as enhancing their masculinity. Regarding contraceptive behavior, sexually active black men and Hispanic men were more likely than white men to have discussed contraception with their last partner; black men were more likely to have used an effective contraceptive method the last time they had intercourse; and black men were more likely to have used a condom at last intercourse. However, young men who were aware that they had been responsible for a previous pregnancy were less likely than those who reported no pregnancies to have used an effective contraceptive the last time they had intercourse. These same young men were also more likely to report that fathering a child would please them and enhance their masculinity.

  12. Safety and Efficacy of Contraceptive Methods for Obese and Overweight Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotke, Pamela S; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Increasing rates of obesity have become a major public health challenge. Given the added health risks that obese women have during pregnancy, preventing unwanted pregnancy is imperative. Clinicians who provide contraception must understand the efficacy, risks, and the weight changes associated with various contraceptive methods. Despite differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of hormonal contraceptives in overweight and obese women, efficacy does not appear to be severely impacted. Both estrogen-containing contraceptives and obesity increase the risk of venous thromboembolism, but the absolute risk remains acceptably low in reproductive age women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Differences between users and non-users of emergency contraception after a recognized unprotected intercourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Pedersen, B L; Nyrnberg, L E

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of emergency contraception is crucial but might not transform into use. Factors influencing decision-making related to use of emergency contraception after an unprotected intercourse and the characteristics of users of emergency contraception (EC) were assessed. In an abortion clinic...... setting, 217 women referred for termination of pregnancy were asked to fill in a questionnaire. Of the 217 women, 139 (64%) were aware of pregnancy risk but only 9 (4%) had used EC after the unprotected intercourse. 42% were estimated to have sufficient knowledge to use hormonal emergency contraception...

  14. Keep Calm and Contracept! Addressing Young Women's Pleasure in Sexual Health and Contraception Consultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanbury, Ali; Eastham, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Clinical sexual health consultations with young women often focus on avoiding "risks;" namely pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection transmission. They also typically fail to explore how contraception use can impact on the capacity to enjoy sexual relationships. In contrast, this paper argues that sexual pleasure should be a…

  15. Knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptive among women who seek abortion care at Jimma University specialized hospital, southwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye Tatek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Ethiopia maternal mortality rate is very high more than one in five women die from pregnancy or pregnancy related causes. The use of contraceptives to prevent unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortion is an important strategy to minimize maternal mortality rate. Among various forms of contraception, emergency contraceptives are the only one that can be used after sexual intercourse offering chance to prevent unwanted pregnancy. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptive among women who seek abortion care at Jimma University specialized hospital (JUSH. Methods Institution base cross-sectional study on knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptive was conducted at JUSH from April to June, 2011Data was collected using structured questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 17.0. Results In this study 89 women were interviewed. More than half of them (48 were from urban area and 41 were from rural area.46 (51.7% of them were single. Of all the respondents only nine women had awareness about emergency contraceptive. Seven of the women mentioned pills as emergency contraception and only two of them mentioned both pills and injectable as emergency contraception. All of them have positive attitude towards emergency contraception but none of them have ever used emergency contraceptives. Conclusion and recommendation The finding revealed pregnancy among women of 15-19 years was very common. The knowledge and practice of emergency contraception is very low. But there is high positive attitude towards emergency contraceptives. Since there is much deficit on knowledge of women on emergency contraceptives, in addition to making them accessible; programs targeted at promotion and education of emergency contraceptives is helpful to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

  16. Pregnancy and melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Marcia S; Martires, Kathryn; Bieber, Amy Kalowitz; Pomeranz, Miriam Keltz; Grant-Kels, Jane M; Stein, Jennifer A

    2016-10-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most common malignancy during pregnancy, and is diagnosed during childbearing age in approximately one-third of women diagnosed with melanoma. The impact of hormonal changes during pregnancy and from iatrogenic hormones on melanoma is controversial. Women undergo immunologic changes during pregnancy that may decrease tumor surveillance. In addition, hormone receptors are found on some melanomas. In spite of these observations, the preponderance of evidence does not support a poorer prognosis for pregnancy-associated melanomas. There is also a lack of evidence that oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy worsens melanoma prognosis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Budget impact analysis of 8 hormonal contraceptive options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Simone; Kerrigan, Matthew; Sood, Vipan

    2013-07-01

    To develop a model comparing costs of 8 hormonal contraceptives and determine whether acquisition costs for implants and intrauterine devices (IUDs) were offset by decreased pregnancy-related costs over a 3-year time horizon from a managed care perspective. A model was developed to assess the budget impact of branded or generic oral contraceptives (OCs), quarterly intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone, etonogestrel/ethinyl estradiol vaginal ring, etonogestrel implant, levonorgestrel IUD, norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol transdermal contraceptive, and ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel extended-cycle OC. Major variables included drug costs, typical use failure rates, discontinuation rates, and pregnancy costs. The base case assessed costs for 1000 women initiating each of the hormonal contraceptives. The etonogestrel implant and levonorgestrel IUD resulted in the fewest pregnancies, 63 and 85, respectively, and the least cost, $1.75 million and $2.0 million, respectively. In comparison, generic OC users accounted for a total of 243 pregnancies and $3.4 million in costs. At the end of year 1, costs for the etonogestrel implant ($800,471) and levonorgestrel IUD ($949,721) were already lower than those for generic OCs ($1,146,890). Sensitivity analysis showed that the cost of pregnancies, not product acquisition cost, was the primary cost driver. Higher initial acquisition costs for the etonogestrel implant and levonorgestrel IUD were offset within 1 year by lower contraceptive failure rates and consequent pregnancy costs. Thus, after accounting for typical use failure rates of contraceptive products, the etonogestrel implant and levonorgestrel IUD emerged as the least expensive hormonal contraceptives.

  18. Contraceptive revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, S J

    1994-06-01

    Global population will increase by almost 1 billion people in the 1990s, the largest 10-year increase ever recorded. In 1994 alone, population will surpass 5.7 billion. The prospect of double-digit billions of people is worrisome, especially since these numbers may affect global warming, supplies of fresh water, destruction of rain forests, industrial pollution, and sustainable development. Yet, many indicators of quality of life show that people enjoy a better quality of life today than they did 100 years ago. Between India's independence and now, life expectancy increased by 20 years, infant mortality decreased 2-fold, literacy increased, and the food supply stabilized. Even though India's population has almost tripled since 1947, its economy increased rapidly and is 1 of the world's top 10 economies. University enrollment stands at 4.5 million. Agricultural production has exceeded demand. India represents the potential for human achievement through technological advancement and social organization. If the world's first national family planning program had been more successful when it began in 1952 in an India of 350 million people, India's population would be around 500 million instead of the expected 1 billion in 2000. All countries need to achieve a sustainable balance between human numbers and needs and natural resources. Family planning is an essential, cost-effective part of any development strategy. Family planning use has reduced fertility from 6 to 3.6 in developing countries. In 1965, only 8% used contraception, while more than 50% use it now. The most remarkable family planning/fertility reduction successes are Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Mexico, and Thailand. Sufficient investment in family planning is needed if significant declines in fertility are to occur. More than 90% of the developing world's people are in countries with official family planning programs. Cost-effective assistance by donors and developing countries implementing

  19. Self-reported perinatal depressive symptoms and postnatal symptom severity after treatment with antidepressants in pregnancy: a cross-sectional study across 12 European countries using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lupattelli A

    2018-06-01

    postnatal depressive symptoms by severity across multiple countries and the association between antidepressant treatment in pregnancy and postnatal symptom severity. Materials and methods: This was a multinational web-based study conducted across 12 European countries (n=8069. Uniform data collection was ensured via an electronic questionnaire. Pregnant women at any gestational week and mothers of children with <1 year of age could participate. We used the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS to measure the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms according to severity, which were corrected by survey weight adjustment (descriptive analysis. Within mothers with a psychiatric disorder (n=173, we estimated the association between antidepressant treatment in pregnancy and postnatal depressive symptom severity, as standardized EPDS mean scores, via the inverse probability of treatment weight (association analysis. Results: In the descriptive analysis (n=8069, the period prevalence of moderate-to-very severe depressive symptoms was higher in the western and eastern regions relative to the northern region, both in the antenatal period (6.8%–7.5% vs 4.3% and in the postnatal period (7.6% vs 4.7%. One in two mothers with psychiatric disorders used an antidepressant in pregnancy (86 of 173. In the association analysis, women medicated at any time during pregnancy (adjusted β=−0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] =−0.66, −0.02 had a significant postnatal symptom severity reduction compared with the nonmedicated counterpart. This effect was larger (β=−0.74, 95% CI =−1.24, −0.24 when the analysis was restricted to mothers within 6 months after childbirth. Conclusion: The prevalence of self-reported antenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms differs across European countries. Among women with psychiatric disorders, those who had been on treatment with antidepressants during pregnancy were less likely to report postnatal depressive symptoms

  20. Cost Savings From the Provision of Specific Methods of Contraception in a Publicly Funded Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostovtseva, Daria P.; Brindis, Claire D.; Biggs, M. Antonia; Hulett, Denis; Darney, Philip D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the cost-effectiveness of contraceptive methods dispensed in 2003 to 955 000 women in Family PACT (Planning, Access, Care and Treatment), California's publicly funded family planning program. Methods. We estimated the number of pregnancies averted by each contraceptive method and compared the cost of providing each method with the savings from averted pregnancies. Results. More than half of the 178 000 averted pregnancies were attributable to oral contraceptives, one fifth to injectable methods, and one tenth each to the patch and barrier methods. The implant and intrauterine contraceptives were the most cost-effective, with cost savings of more than $7.00 for every $1.00 spent in services and supplies. Per $1.00 spent, injectable contraceptives yielded savings of $5.60; oral contraceptives, $4.07; the patch, $2.99; the vaginal ring, $2.55; barrier methods, $1.34; and emergency contraceptives, $1.43. Conclusions. All contraceptive methods were cost-effective—they saved more in public expenditures for unintended pregnancies than they cost to provide. Because no single method is clinically recommended to every woman, it is medically and fiscally advisable for public health programs to offer all contraceptive methods. PMID:18703437

  1. Contraceptive development: why the snail's pace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, L

    1990-01-01

    Current contraceptive methods are not well-suited to many Americans. More safe and effective methods would be desirable. A report, "Developing New Contraceptives: Obstacles and Opportunities" was released in January 1990. It summarized 2 years of data collection by the Committee on Contraceptive Development which includes pharmaceutical company executives, physicians, reproductive biologists, public health, legal, and public policy experts, demographers, and economists. Barrier facing the development of new methods in the US were analyzed and ways to speed up research suggested. Particularly ill served are teenagers, young mothers, and comparatively older couples. The health risks of pregnancy, delivery, and labor "may be underrated." The pill is now the most common form of contraception in the US, followed by female sterilization, condoms, and vasectomy. 95% of women, aged 15-44, who have ever had intercourse, have used 1 or more contraceptive methods. Contraceptive discontinuation and failure rates are high, too. No fundamentally new contraceptives have been approved for use since the IUD and the pill in the 60s. Modifications of existing methods are in clinical trials. Obstacles cited were attitudes of the public, federal regulations and product liability, and the organization of and resources available for research. Public attitudes are very conservative. There is no great demand for more products. Since the 1960s, only 1 large pharmaceutical company (Ortho Pharmaceutical Corp.) is still involved in contraceptive research. Activity by small firms, nonprofit organizations, and universities has increased. Federal research funding in reproductive biology has only increased modestly since the mid 1970s. Private foundation support has dramatically declined. The time involved in the great costs of data required for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval have reduced research incentives. The average time it takes to get FDA approval has increased in the past 20

  2. Contraceptive use and the role of contraceptive counseling in reproductive-aged women with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Bat-Sheva L; Morse, Christopher B; Schanne, Allison; Loren, Alison; Domchek, Susan M; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2014-07-01

    Few data on contraceptive choices in women with cancer exist. Contraception is challenging for women with cancer, particularly those with breast cancer, who are limited to nonhormonal methods. This study characterized contraceptive use during cancer treatment in a group of reproductive-aged women with a recent cancer diagnosis and assessed the impact of contraceptive counseling on the methods they selected. Cross-sectional, survey study of reproductive-aged women at a large tertiary care health system with a recent cancer diagnosis. A total of 107 women completed the survey. Eighty-two women reported 101 contraceptive choices. Twenty-seven percent (27/101) of all methods selected were Tier I/II, and 35% (35/101) were Tier III/IV. Only 4 used an intrauterine device (IUD). Among women reporting sexual activity after diagnosis, 19 (27%) of 71 reported using Tier I/II methods, 21 (30%) of 71 reported using Tier III/IV methods, 16 (23%) of 71 reported abstinence and 10 (14%) of 71 reported using no method. Factors significantly associated with Tier I/II use in the multivariable model included not having a college degree [odds ratio (OR) 0.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05-0.92, p=.038], intercourse during treatment (OR 5.92, 95% CI 1.48-23.66, p=.012) and non-breast cancer (OR 3.60, 95% CI 1.03-12.64, p=.046). Report of contraceptive counseling was positively associated with Tier I/II contraceptive use during cancer treatment (OR 6.92, 95% CI 1.14-42.11, p=.036). Reproductive-aged women diagnosed with cancer underutilized Tier I/II contraceptive agents, especially IUDs. Contraceptive counseling by physicians increases contraceptive use, particularly methods most effective at preventing pregnancy. The study uniquely described the contraceptive practices of over 100 women with cancer. The study sample commonly reported abstinence and use of contraceptive methods with high failure rates. Our data suggest that contraceptive counseling from a health care provider may

  3. [Forgetting hormonal contraceptive methods: expert opinion about their daily management in clinical routine practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, C; André, G; Audebert, A; Christin-Maître, S; Elia, D; Harvey, T; Letombe, B; Lopes, P; Moreau, C; Nisand, I; Pélissier, C

    2011-11-01

    Many guidelines regarding the daily management of regular oral hormonal contraceptive methods have been proposed worldwide. Some of them may even appear to be conflicting. The search for the maximal contraceptive protection leads to a low acceptance of these guidelines, probably because of their complexity and their apparent discrepancy. We are deeply convinced that simplicity and pragmatism of guidelines should pave the way to both their better acceptance and compliance and, consequently, to their improved real-life effectiveness. We have considered physiology and pharmacodynamics before proposing the following rules for an effective management of hormonal contraceptive failures. We conclude that the risk of unwanted pregnancy is higher in case of a unique contraception misuse/a delayed start during the first week of the contraceptive cycle (or in case of multiple days of contraceptive misuses during the following weeks) for a combined contraception or at every cycle day for a non anti-ovulatory progestin only contraception. In such risky situations, we firmly recommend the restart of the regular contraceptive method and the use of condoms for the following 72 hours, provided no sexual intercourse has occurred during the past 5 days before the contraceptive failure. If sexual intercourse has occurred during the past 5 days before the contraceptive failure, we firmly recommend the intake of an emergency contraception, ulipristal acetate, the restart the regular contraceptive method and in this case, the use of condoms for, at least, the following 7 days. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [Hormonal (levonorgestrel) emergency contraception--effectiveness and mechanism of action].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medard, Lech M; Ostrowska, Lucyna

    2010-07-01

    Periodic abstinence and coitus interruptus are the most popular methods of contraception in Poland. Recent studies have provided us with evidence that the so-called "menstrual calendar" may be much less effective than it was believed. In these circumstances, promotion and use of safe and truly effective contraceptives is very important for Polish women. Emergency contraception (EC) is a method which could be used even in cases when other contraception methods have failed. Mechanism of action of levonorgestrel used for EC and possible disturbances in the process of implantation of the blastocyst in the endometrium, remain the source of heated discussion among medical professionals. The latest publications provide us with evidence that the use of levonorgestrel in EC neither alters endometrial receptivity nor impedes implantation. Hormonal EC effectiveness is another hot topic of gynecological endocrinology and statistics. There is, however, no better, safer, and more ethically accepted method of preventing unwanted pregnancy for patients in need of postcoital contraception.

  5. Exposure to violence among women with unwanted pregnancies and the association with post-traumatic stress disorder, symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinglöf, Soile; Högberg, Ulf; Lundell, Inger Wallin; Svanberg, Agneta Skoog

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to examine lifetime exposure to violence, physical and sexual, among women seeking termination of pregnancy (TOP) and its association with socio-demographic factors, PTSD, symptoms of anxiety and depression. The design of the study was a Swedish multi-centre study targeting women requesting TOP. All women requesting TOP with a gestational length less than 12 pregnancy weeks were approached for participation in the study. The questionnaire comprised the following research instruments: Screen Questionnaire-Post traumatic Stress Disorder (SQ-PTSD) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The response rate was 57% and the final sample was 1514 women. Descriptive and analytic statistics were applied. Lifetime exposure to violence was common among women seeking abortion. Exposure to violence was associated with low education, single marital status, smoking and high alcohol consumption. Exposure to violence was associated with the occurrence of signs of PTSD and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Among those having PTSD, all had been exposed to sexual violence and almost all had been exposed to physical violence, while for those with symptoms of anxiety and depression almost half had been exposed to either physical or sexual violence. Exposure to physical and sexual abuse was common among women requesting TOP, and was strongly associated with the occurrence of PTSD, symptoms of anxiety and depression. This underscores the importance for health professionals to recognize and offer support to those women exposed to violence. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Contraception for adolescents in low and middle income countries: needs, barriers, and access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; McCarraher, Donna R; Phillips, Sharon J; Williamson, Nancy E; Hainsworth, Gwyn

    2014-01-02

    Substantial numbers of adolescents experience the negative health consequences of early, unprotected sexual activity - unintended pregnancy, unsafe abortions, pregnancy-related mortality and morbidity and Sexually Transmitted Infections including Human Immunodeficiency Virus; as well as its social and economic costs. Improving access to and use of contraceptives - including condoms - needs to be a key component of an overall strategy to preventing these problems. This paper contains a review of research evidence and programmatic experiences on needs, barriers, and approaches to access and use of contraception by adolescents in low and middle income countries (LMIC). Although the sexual activity of adolescents (ages 10-19) varies markedly for boys versus girls and by region, a significant number of adolescents are sexually active; and this increases steadily from mid-to-late adolescence. Sexually active adolescents - both married and unmarried - need contraception. All adolescents in LMIC - especially unmarried ones - face a number of barriers in obtaining contraception and in using them correctly and consistently. Effective interventions to improve access and use of contraception include enacting and implementing laws and policies requiring the provision of sexuality education and contraceptive services for adolescents; building community support for the provision of contraception to adolescents, providing sexuality education within and outside school settings, and increasing the access to and use of contraception by making health services adolescent-friendly, integrating contraceptive services with other health services, and providing contraception through a variety of outlets. Emerging data suggest mobile phones and social media are promising means of increasing contraceptive use among adolescents.

  7. Contraceptive choice and acceptability: the future for STI risk in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiely, Frances; Saifuddin, Mohammed Syafiek

    2014-03-01

    More than 150 million women become pregnant in developing countries annually and an estimated 287,000 die from pregnancy-related causes. Contraception is vital to prevent unnecessary maternal deaths, as well as sexually transmitted infections. The objective of this study was to investigate preferred contraceptive methods and the factors that influence contraceptive choice among women in Kelantan, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study using interview-based questionnaires was conducted, during July and August 2009, in local family planning clinics in Kelantan. The questionnaire was administered to adult women (age 20-50). Prevalence of unplanned pregnancies was high (48%). Contraceptive preference was Depo contraceptive injection (32%), oral contraceptive pills (27%), intrauterine devices (15%) and contraceptive implants (12%); 9% used condoms. Only 2% used contraception to protect against sexually transmitted infections or HIV/AIDS. Younger women (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.807-0.993) were more likely to use contraception. In conclusion, non-interrupted contraceptive methods were preferred. More than 60% would stop using contraception if it interrupted intercourse. From both a public health and infectious disease perspective, this is extremely worrying.

  8. Common symptoms during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep your gums healthy Swelling, Varicose Veins, and Hemorrhoids Swelling in your legs is common. You may ... In your rectum, veins that swell are called hemorrhoids. To reduce swelling: Raise your legs and rest ...

  9. Hormonal contraception and female pain, orgasm and sexual pleasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicole K; Jozkowski, Kristen N; Sanders, Stephanie A

    2014-02-01

    Almost half of all pregnancies in the United States are unintentional, unplanned, or mistimed. Most unplanned pregnancies result from inconsistent, incorrect, or nonuse of a contraceptive method. Diminished sexual function and pleasure may be a barrier to using hormonal contraception. This study explores sexual function and behaviors of women in relation to the use of hormonal vs. nonhormonal methods of contraception. Data were collected as part of an online health and sexuality study of women. Main outcomes variables assess frequencies in two domains: (i) sexual function (proportion of sexual events with experiences of pain or discomfort, arousal, contentment and satisfaction, pleasure and enjoyment, lubrication difficulty, and orgasm) and (ii) sexual behavior (number of times engaged in sexual activity, proportion of sexual events initiated by the woman, and proportion of sexual events for which a lubricant was used). Sociodemographic variables and contraceptive use were used as sample descriptors and correlates. The recall period was the past 4 weeks. The sample included 1,101 women with approximately half (n = 535) using a hormonal contraceptive method exclusively or a combination of a hormonal and nonhormonal method, and about half (n = 566) using a nonhormonal method of contraception exclusively. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to examine the relation of hormonal contraceptive use to each of the dependent variables. Women using a hormonal contraceptive method experienced less frequent sexual activity, arousal, pleasure, and orgasm and more difficulty with lubrication even when controlling for sociodemographic variables. This study adds to the literature on the potential negative sexual side effects experienced by many women using hormonal contraception. Prospective research with diverse women is needed to enhance the understanding of potential negative sexual side effects of hormonal contraceptives, their prevalence, and possible mechanisms

  10. Adherence to oral contraception in women on Category X medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, Amy; Chen, William; Denison, Shannon E

    2010-10-01

    Over 6% of women become pregnant when taking teratogenic medications, and contraceptive counseling appears to occur at suboptimal rates. Adherence to contraception is an important component in preventing unwanted pregnancy and has not been evaluated in this population. We undertook a pharmacy claims-based analysis to evaluate the degree to which women of childbearing age who receive Category X medications adhere to their oral contraception. We evaluated the prescription medication claims for over 6 million women, age 18-44 years, with prescription benefits administered by a pharmacy benefits manager. Women with 2 or more claims for a Category X medication and 2 or more claims for oral contraception were evaluated in further detail. Adherence to oral contraception was measured by analyzing pharmacy claims. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with adherence. There were 146,758 women of childbearing age who received Category X medications, of which 26,136 also took oral contraceptive medication. Women who received Category X medications were prescribed oral contraception (18%) at rates similar to others of childbearing age (17%). Women prescribed both Category X and oral contraception demonstrated adherence similar to the overall population. Age, class of Category X medication, number of medications, prescriber's specialty, and ethnicity correlated with lower adherence rates. Despite added risk associated with unintended pregnancy, many women who receive Category X medications have refill patterns suggesting nonadherence to oral contraception. Compared with all women age 18-44 years, women receiving teratogenic medications do not have better adherence to oral contraception. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [A new contraceptive method: breast feeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, S

    1993-08-01

    Even though women have known for centuries that breast feeding has a contraceptive effect, family planning agents have only recently promoted it. Family planning specialists at a meeting in Bellagio, Italy, on breast feeding developed directives referred to as the Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM). Adherence to these directives assure effective protection against pregnancy until resumption of menstruation, expansion of infant feeding to foods other than breast milk, or until 6 months postpartum. Nipple stimulation during suckling is sufficient to suppress ovulation. Frequent suckling or more intense suckling maintains the contraceptive effect, so the directives insist that mothers exclusively or almost exclusively breast feed their infants. LAM provides 98% effective protection against pregnancy for 6 months if women observe it as directed. After 6 months, they should use another family planning method. Scientists are trying to see whether they can make the directives more simple. They will discuss this possibility at their next international meeting in 1993 or 1994. Research indicates that the most crucial rule is amenorrhea and use of this rule will make LAM more easy to learn and use, thereby increasing its use. It is difficult to motivate hospital and family planning clinic staff to promote LAM. Information and education are needed to support LAM. for example, a project in Honduras is using peer counseling to promote LAM. Family Health International is following 1000 women for 1 year postpartum in Pakistan and the Philippines. This study's 6-month LAM efficacy rate was around 95%. Little research has looked at the cost effectiveness of LAM. Optimally, LAM is a temporary contraceptive method which must be followed immediately by another contraceptive method. Indeed, LAM counseling should often pregnancy. LAM supporters do not intend for LAM to be a substitute for family planning, but want LAM to be another method in the contraceptive method mix.

  12. Contraception and fertility awareness among women with solid organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Valerie A; Davis, John S; Sayles, Harlan S; Wu, Serena S

    2013-10-01

    To assess the contraception and fertility counseling provided to women with solid organ transplants. A telephone survey of 309 women aged 19-49 years who had received a solid organ transplant at the University of Nebraska Medical Center was performed. Of the 309 eligible women, 183 responded. Patients were asked 19 questions regarding pretransplant and posttransplant fertility awareness and contraception counseling. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Patients had undergone a variety of solid organ transplantations: 40% kidney (n=73); 32% liver (n=59); 6% pancreas (n=11); 5% heart (n=9); 3% intestine (n=5); and 14% multiple organs (n=26). Before their transplantations, 79 women (44%) reported they were not aware that a woman could become pregnant after transplantation. Only 66 women aged 13 and older at the time of transplantation reported that a health care provider discussed contraception before transplantation. Approximately half of women surveyed were using a method of contraception. Oral contraceptive pills were the most commonly recommended method. Twenty-two of the 31 pregnancies after organ transplantation were planned, which is higher than that of the general population. Few women with transplants are educated regarding the effect of organ transplantation on fertility and are not routinely counseled about contraception or the potential for posttransplant pregnancy. Health care providers should incorporate contraceptive and fertility counseling as part of routine care for women with solid organ transplants. : II.

  13. Unmarried Mother's Knowledge and Attitudes toward Emergency Contraceptive Pills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyeong Mi Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThis study was conducted to identify relationships among knowledge and attitudes of unmarried mothers toward emergency contraceptive pills.MethodsData were collected through structured questionnaires from 135 unmarried mothers enrolled in 7 single mothers' facilities nationwide. Data were analyzed using the SPSS/WIN 17.0 program for descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, Scheffe-test, and Pearson correlation coefficients.ResultsFor knowledge about emergency contraceptive pills, there were significant differences among who live with her before pregnancy, experience of past pregnancies, state of present pregnancy and preparation in using contraceptives. For attitude toward emergency contraceptive pills, there were significant differences according to age, education level and religion. There were significant positive relationships between knowledge and attitudes toward emergency contraceptive pills.ConclusionThe results of this study suggest that unmarried women should be better informed about emergency contraceptive pills, and reassured about their safety. Efforts are needed to disseminate up-to-date information to experts in sex education including nurses.

  14. [Combined hormonal contraception in cycles artificially extended].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustillos-Alamilla, Edgardo; Zepeda-Zaragoza, J; Hernández-Ruiz, M A; Briones-Landa, Carlos Humberto

    2010-01-01

    To compare the bleeding patterns, satisfaction and tolerability of 3 different contraceptive in an extended regimens in the service of Family Planning of the North Central Hospital of PEMEX. Healthy, adult women with desire of contraception for one year (N 120) were randomly assigned to receive oral contraceptive drospirenone/ethinyl E2 (group1), the norelgestromin/ethinyl E2 transdermal patch (group 2) and vaginal ring etonogestrel/ ethinyl E2 (group 3) in an extended regimen (42 consecutive days, 1 hormone-free week). Study assessments were conducted at scheduled visits at the time of initial screening, at baseline after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Subjects recorded menstrual associated symptoms bleeding data and completed satisfaction questionnaires. Subjects and investigators provided overall assessments of the regimens. Extended use of 3 different contraceptive resulted in fewer bleeding days in every group (66.6%, 55% and 58.3% P 0.0024), and less mastalgia and menstrual pain. Subjects were highly satisfied with three regimens (93.3%, 96.6% and 91.6% P 0.00421). Although not mayor adverse events were reported with this regimen, there was an increase in spotting days; it decreased with each successive cycle of therapy. Efficacy and safety were similar to those reported for traditional cycle. Extended-contraceptive regimen delays menses and reduces bleeding, a profile that may be preferred by women who seek flexibility with their contraceptive method.

  15. The conscientious objection: debate on emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari Vergallo, G; Zaami, S; Di Luca, N M; Marinelli, E

    2017-01-01

    The authors discuss the emergency contraception (EC) topic, assessing scientific and ethical aspects. The almost totality of the studies carried out tends to report on the use of drugs as an emergency measure to prevent pregnancy. However, it is not yet completely excluded that emergency contraceptives can induce medical abortion. The debate on side effects of EC continues to be a highly emotional and controversial issue both for advocates who believe they will lower considerably the number of unintended pregnancies and abortions, and for opponents who believe that using emergency contraception amounts to an abortion. This latter hypothesis highlights the conflicting aspect of the conscientious objection to abortion of physicians and pharmacists. This research work is aimed at investigating the emergency contraception issue, paying particular attention to the medico-legal and regulatory aspects of this subject. Particularly, the authors focus on the conscientious objection in order to assess, if any, legal protection for physicians and pharmacists who claim a right to conscientious objection. Inappropriate use of EC could be resolved through a registry of user. This registry, of course, would not have the intention of persecution, but would only serve to detect possible cases of subjugation, exploitation and harassment.

  16. [Teenage pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Cancino, María; Hernández-Valencia, Varcelino

    2015-05-01

    In Mexico, 20% of the annual births are presented in women younger than 20 years old. Pregnancy in adolescents puts at risk mother and child health. This risk is major while the woman is younger, especially when the social and economic conditions are not favorable, which is decisive in later psychosocial development. It has been pointed out that the youths with low education, with minor academic and laboral expectations, with low self-esteem and assertiveness, tend to begin early their active sexual life, to use less frequently contraceptives, and in the case of younger women, to be pregnant, with the risk of abortion because they cannot to make the best decision. It is important to take into account the social context and the special characteristics of the family to understand situation of adolescent at risk of pregnancy.

  17. Emergency contraception: update and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Aileen

    2010-03-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) is the postcoital method of pregnancy prevention. Three methods of EC are used in the United States: (1) levonorgestrel-only pills, Plan B (Barr Pharmaceuticals, LLC, New Jersey) (2) combined estrogen and progestin pills, and (3) the copper intrauterine device. Used within 120 hours after unprotected sexual intercourse, EC reduces the risk of pregnancy by 60 to 94%. EC is a critical component of medical care for sexual assault survivors, and several states have laws mandating this standard of care. Levonorgestrel-only EC is available to women >or=17 years of age without a prescription. Women who were counseled by their clinician about EC were 11 times more likely to use EC in the following 12 months. Advance provision of EC to women has not been found to decrease rates of unintended pregnancy compared with routine pharmacy access; however, women routinely prefer advance provision. The newly approved by the Food and Drug Administration single-dose EC, Plan B One-Step (Barr Pharmaceuticals, LLC), may affect unintended pregnancy rates among EC users by simplifying use. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  18. [Male hormonal contraception: past, present, future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, Norbert; Hegyi, Borbála Eszter; Badó, Attila; Németh, Gábor

    2017-11-01

    In certain regions of the world the enormous rate of population growth raises economic and public health concerns and widely accessible contraceptive methods would be desired. In contrast, in other countries the use of effective contraception is a question of individual preferences. Today, most of the reliable contraceptive methods are applied by women, while the options for male methods are quite limited. It is well known that significant portion of pregnancies are still unplanned and several data revealed men's willingness to take part in family planning. Based on these needs, remarkable efforts have been made to develop a suitable hormonal contraceptive agent for men. With the exogenous suppression of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion, the inhibition of the testicular testosterone production and the spermatogenesis can be achieved. In the beginning, testosterone-derivatives, or testosterone-progestin combinations were administered, later synthetic androgen agents were developed. Despite of these efforts, unfortunately, there is no safe, widely feasible male hormonal contraception to date, but in the future this goal can be achieved by solving the key hurdles. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(46): 1819-1830.

  19. Fertility and contraception in the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, S J; Taylor, R; Higgins, I L; Grafton-Wasserman, D A

    1988-01-01

    Data on fertility and contraception in Micronesian women in the Marshall Islands were collected during a women's health survey in 1985. High total fertility rates were found. The reproductive pattern of many Marshallese women is one that has been associated with adverse health consequences: pregnancies in teenagers and in women over 39 years, high parities of four or more births, and short birth intervals. The practice of breastfeeding is declining in younger women. The prevalence of contraceptive use is low, and the availability of reversible methods is limited. Most contraceptive nonusers would like to practice contraception, but are inhibited by the lack of information about family planning. It is suggested that more attention needs to be given to family planning services in the Marshall Islands, in particular to improving the availability of reversible methods of contraception and of information about family planning. Further research is also needed on how family planning services might best be organized to maximize participation by women and their partners who wish to use such services.

  20. Emergency contraception. Widely available and effective but disappointing as a public health intervention: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) prevents pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure. Use of EC has increased markedly in countries where a product is available over the counter, yet barriers to availability and use remain. Although effective in clinical trials, it has not yet been possible to show a public health benefit of EC in terms of reduction of unintended pregnancy rates. Selective progesterone receptor modulators developed as emergency contraceptives offer better effectiveness than levonorgestrel, but still EC is less effective than use of ongoing regular contraception. Methods which inhibit ovulation whenever they are taken or which act after ovulation to prevent implantation and strategies to increase the uptake of effective ongoing contraception after EC use would prevent more pregnancies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Immediate postpartum use of long-acting reversible contraceptives in low- and middle-income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Margo S.; Goldenberg, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Globally, data show that many women of reproductive age desire to use modern family planning methods. Many of these women do not have access to modern contraceptives, which is termed their ‘unmet need’ for contraception. In low- and middle-income countries where total fertility rates can be high and many women have undesired fertility, or wish to increase their inter-pregnancy intervals, access to modern contraceptives is often inadequate. The puerperium is a unique time for interventions to ...

  2. Use of contraceptives among adolescents in Kintampo, Ghana: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boamah EA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ellen Abrafi Boamah, Kwaku Poku Asante, Emmanuel Mahama, Grace Manu, Emmanuel Kwesi Ayipah, Elisha Adeniji, Seth Owusu-Agyei Kintampo Health Research Center, Ghana Health Service, Kintampo, Ghana Introduction: The use of contraceptives is essential in preventing unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions, and abortion-related complications that expose adolescents to health-related risks such as infertility and sometimes death. Objective: To assess contraceptive use among adolescents as evidence to develop appropriate interventions for adolescent sexual health programs. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using both quantitative and qualitative methods was conducted among 793 male and female adolescents (aged 15–19 years in the Kintampo area of Ghana from October 2010–May 2011. Results: Knowledge of at least one contraceptive method was high (88.9% among adolescents of both sexes (males 92.1% and females 86.6%. Knowledge of male condoms was highest (84.0%, and it was the most common contraceptive method used (82.0%. The use of other methods such as pills (7.9%, injection (0.9%, and foam (0.3%, amongst others, was low. About 22.9% of adolescents used contraceptives consistently. Among adolescents, consistent contraceptive use was significantly associated with discussions of contraceptive use between partners (P<0.01. Adolescents who discussed contraceptive use before their first sexual encounter were more likely to use contraceptives consistently when compared to those who had never discussed contraceptive use (odds ratio =0.06; 95% confidence interval: 0.02–0.17; P<0.01. Among sexually active adolescents, 30.0% had experienced pregnancy, with 34.0% of pregnancies resulting in abortions. Pregnancy was high among adolescents who did not use contraceptives consistently, as compared to those who did (6.4% versus 93.6%; P<0.01. The most common source of contraceptives was the chemical seller's/pharmacy shop (62.1%. Conclusion: Though a high number of

  3. Adolescent Pregnancy Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Nathalie; O'Driscoll, Teresa; Becker, Gisela; Spitzer, Rachel F

    2015-08-01

    and postpartum, and more frequently if deemed necessary, is one option for such screening. (II-2A) 10. Pregnant adolescents should have a nutritional assessment, vitamins and food supplementation if needed, and access to a strategy to reduce anemia and low birth weight and to optimize weight gain in pregnancy. (II-2A) 11. Conflicting evidence supports and refutes differences in gestational hypertension in the adolescent population; therefore, the care usual for adult populations is supported for pregnant adolescents at this time. (II-2A) 12. Practitioners should consult gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) guidelines. In theory, testing all patients is appropriate, although rates of GDM are generally lower in adolescent populations. Practitioners should be aware, however, that certain ethnic groups including Aboriginal populations are at high risk of GDM. (II-2A) 13. An ultrasound anatomical assessment at 16 to 20 weeks is recommended because of increased rates of congenital anomalies in this population. (II-2A) 14. As in other populations at risk of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and low birth weight, an ultrasound to assess fetal well-being and estimated fetal weight at 32 to 34 weeks gestational age is suggested to screen for IUGR. (III-A) 15. Visits in the second or third trimester should be more frequent to address the increased risk of preterm labour and preterm birth and to assess fetal well-being. All caregivers should be aware of the signs and symptoms of preterm labour and should educate their patients to recognize them. (III-A) 16. It should be recognized that adolescents have improved vaginal delivery rates and a concomitantly lower Caesarean section rate than their adult counterparts. (II-2A) As with antenatal care, peripartum care in hospital should be multidisciplinary, involving social care, support for breastfeeding and lactation, and the involvement of children's aid services when warranted. (III-B) 17. Postpartum care should include a focus

  4. Contraception among bankers in an urban community in Lagos State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meka, Ijeoma Angela; Okwara, Emmanuel Chidiebere; Meka, Anthony Obiamaka

    2013-01-01

    Contraception means procedures employed to interfere at one stage or the other with the normal sequence of events in the process of reproduction leading to a failure in conception. It means voluntary techniques adopted to achieve birth control. Its use remains sensitive worldwide. Within the same society, contraception varies amongst people of different socio-cultural, educational, religious, or occupational affiliations. It also varies between urban and rural settlements. Some contraceptive techniques also prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The prevalence of STIs also varies with these same factors. There is very limited literature on contraception exclusively amongst bankers. We sought to investigate the level of awareness and practice of contraception amongst bankers in an urban society in Lagos State, Nigeria. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 200 self-administered structured questionnaires were retrieved from bankers from 5 banks selected by simple random sampling in Surulere Local Government Area of Lagos State, Nigeria. Data was subsequently statistically analyzed using SPSS. The age range was 21-45 years, mean 28.8±1.4 years, 51.7% were males (72% single, 27% married, 1% separated) and 48.3% were females (52.4% single, 47.6% married). All (100%) respondents were aware of contraception, 93.3% males and 91.7% females were sexually active, 88.9% males and 84.5% females believe contraception is useful. Most (71.4%) respondents practice contraception, males (81%) being more than females (61.1%), p males believe that contraception prevents pregnancy but not STIs, 28.6% of females and 46.6% of males believe it prevents both pregnancy and STIs, whereas 14% of males and no female believe contraception prevents STIs but not pregnancy. The awareness of and practice of contraception was very high among the bankers but more male bankers practice contraception whereas more female bankers perceive contraceptives to be for the married only.

  5. Efficacy of a combined contraceptive regimen consisting of condoms and emergency contraception pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui; Wu, Jun-Qing; Li, Yu-Yan; Zhou, Ying; Ji, Hong-Lei; Li, Yi-Ran

    2014-04-14

    To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of the combined regimen (consisting of condoms and emergency contraception pills (ECP)) and using condoms only for the purpose of preventing pregnancy. One-thousand-five-hundred-and-sixty-two (1,562) couples as volunteers enrolled at nine centers in Shanghai. Eight-hundred-and-twelve (812) were randomized to use male condoms and ECP (i.e., Levonorgestrel) as a back-up to condoms (the intervention group) and 750 to use male condoms only(the control group), according to their working unit. Participants were visited at admission and at the end of 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The cumulative life table rates were calculated for pregnancy and other reasons for discontinuation. The gross cumulative life table rates showed that the cumulative discontinuation rates for all reasons during the year of follow-up in the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 7.76 ± 0.94 and 6.61 ± 0.91, respectively, per 100 women (χ2 = 0.41, p = 0.5227). The cumulative gross pregnancy rate of the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 2.17 ± 0.52 and 1.25 ± 0.41, respectively, per 100 women (χ2 = 1.93, p = 0.1645). The Pearl Index in the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 2.21% and 1.26%, respectively. Male condoms remain a highly effective contraceptive method for a period of one year while consistently and correctly used. In addition, the lowest pregnancy rate followed from perfect use condom.

  6. Contraceptives with novel benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ying; Lian, Qing-Quan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) agonists (progestins) and antagonists are developed for female contraceptives. However, non-contraceptive applications of newer progestins and PR modulators are being given more attention. The newer PR agonists including drospirenone, nomegestrol, trimegestone, dienogest and nestorone are being evaluated as contraceptives with health benefits because of their unique pharmacological properties. The selective PR modulators (SPRM; PR antagonists with PR agonistic properties) are under development not only for emergency contraception but also for other health benefits such as the treatment of endometritis and leiomyoma. After searching the literature from PubMed, clinicaltrials.gov and patent database, this review focuses on the effects and mechanisms of these progestins, and SPRMs as contraceptives with other health benefits. PR agonists and antagonists that have novel properties may generate better contraceptive effects with other health benefits.

  7. Contraception and Adolescent Males: An Opportunity for Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Molly J; Peters, Marissa; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Kaul, Paritosh

    2016-03-01

    To examine young men's awareness of emergency contraception (EC) and its association with their contraceptive decision-making contributions within a relationship. A convenience sample of English-speaking male patients aged 13-24 years were surveyed regarding their childbearing intentions, contraceptive awareness (including EC), perceived contraceptive knowledge, and communication about birth control with providers and within a relationship. An ethnically diverse sample of adolescent males was recruited with a mean age of 18.9 years. Most had previously been sexually active (75%) and felt it was important to avoid pregnancy (84%) and 61% reported ever having spoken to a health care provider about birth control (other than condoms), but only 42% had heard of EC. Participants who had heard of EC were more likely to have spoken to a health care provider about contraception in the past (51.5% vs. 29.8%; p = .050), to feel they should participate in contraceptive decisions in a relationship (97.4% vs. 76.5%; p = .006), and to have discussed contraception with a partner (76.9% vs. 29.2%; p contraceptive decisions within a relationship if they do not desire fatherhood. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Premarital sexual relationships: Contraceptive knowledge and practice among iranian youths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Taleghani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The youths' sexual behaviors are counted as the main priorities of the public health due to the high prevalence of unwanted pregnancies, illegal abortions, and sexually transmitted infections. This research was carried out to explain the youths' contraceptive knowledge and practice in premarital sexual relationships. Methods: This qualitative research was carried out on 30 single boys and girls aged 18–24, living in Isfahan, Iran, who had already started sexual activities. Data collection was done with semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed by using conventional content analysis. Results: Two main categories were extracted including inadequate awareness regarding contraception (with subcategories “unreliable information sources” and “gender inequality in familiarity with contraceptive methods” and inappropriate contraceptive practice (with sub-categories “use of unreliable contraceptive methods” and “gender inequality in applying contraceptive methods”. Conclusion: Sexual health education programs should equip the youths with adequate knowledge on contraception and use of reliable contraceptive methods. Furthermore, attempts should be made along with tackling gender inequality is very significant for youths' sexual and reproductive health security.

  9. How Effective Is Male Contraception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Pinterest Email Print How effective is male contraception? Not all contraceptive methods are appropriate for all ... is best for them. For men, methods of contraception include male condoms and sterilization (vasectomy). Male condoms. ...

  10. Perceptions of female teenagers in the Tshwane District on the use of contraceptives in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabane, Ntswaleng S; Peu, Mmapheko D

    2015-10-22

    Perceptions of female teenagers in the Tshwane District contribute to the nonuseand or discontinued use of contraceptives as evidenced by increased levels of unplanned pregnancies. The objective of this study was to explore and describe the perceptions of female teenagers in the Tshwane District on the use of contraceptives. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive approach was followed in this study. The population comprised of pregnant female teenagers who were purposively selected. Data were collected using unstructured individual interviews on a face-to-face encounter in a natural setting. Data were analysed using the discourse method of data analysis. The following perceptions on the use of contraceptives emerged: Perceptions on the use of contraceptives, emotions, contraceptive effects, social pressure and education on contraceptives. Teenagers' perceptions were predominantly negative with unfounded fears. Though the teenagers were aware of the importance of the use of contraceptives, motivation to pursue contraception was lacking. Teenagers verbalised to be uncommitted as well. Various perceptions of female teenagers in the Tshwane District on the use of contraceptives were explored and described. It was noted that all the teenagers interviewed had great remorse and feelings of guilt regarding their behaviour of not using contraceptives.Their need for re-education was cited and seen as motivational enough to encourage the use of contraceptives at primary health care settings. Therefore, the study recommended that health education programmes should be restructured to effectively influence the female teenagers'perceptions positively and to promote the use of contraceptives.

  11. Nomegestrol acetate-17b-estradiol for oral contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anne Burke Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Oral contraceptives remain a popular method of contraception over 50 years after their introduction. While safe and effective for many women, the failure rate of oral contraception is about 8%. Concerns about the risk of venous thromboembolism continue to drive the search for the safest oral contraceptive formulations. The oral contraceptive NOMAC-E2 contains nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC 2.5 mg + 17b-estradiol (E2 1.5 mg. The approved dosing regimen is 24 days of active hormone, followed by a 4-day hormone-free interval. NOMAC is a progestin derived from testosterone, which has high bioavailability, rapid absorption, and a long half-life. Estradiol, though it has a lower bioavailability, has been successfully combined with NOMAC in a monophasic oral contraceptive. Two recently published randomized controlled trials demonstrate that NOMAC-E2 is an effective contraceptive, with a Pearl Index less than one pregnancy per 100 woman-years. The bleeding pattern on NOMAC-E2 is characterized by fewer bleeding/spotting days, shorter withdrawal bleeds, and a higher incidence of amenorrhea than the comparator oral contraceptive containing drospirenone and ethinyl estradiol. The adverse event profile appears to be acceptable. Few severe adverse events were reported in the randomized controlled trials. The most common adverse events were irregular bleeding, acne, and weight gain. Preliminary studies suggest that NOMAC-E2 does not seem to have negative effects on hemostatic and metabolic parameters. While no one oral contraceptive formulation is likely to be the optimum choice for all women, NOMAC-E2 is a formulation with effectiveness comparable with that of other oral contraceptives, and a reassuring safety profile.Keywords: oral contraception, nomegestrol acetate, estradiol

  12. [Contraception and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amate, P; Luton, D; Davitian, C

    2013-06-01

    The mean age of first sexual intercourse is still around 17 in France, but a lot of teenagers are concerned by contraception before, with approximately 25% of sexually active 15-year-old girls. The contraceptive method must take into consideration some typical features of this population, as sporadic and non-planned sexual activity, with several sexual partners in a short period of time. In 2004, the "Haute Autorité de santé" has recommended, as first-line method, combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills, in association with male condoms. Copper-containing intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and etonogestrel-containing subcutaneous implant have been suggested but not recommended. However, oral contraceptive pill, as a user-based method, carries an important typical-use failure rate, because remembering taking a daily pill, and dealing with stop periods, may be challenging. Some easier-to-use method should be kept in mind, as 28-day COC packs, transdermal contraceptive patches, and vaginal contraceptive rings. Moreover, American studies have shown that long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), i.e. IUCD and implant, have many advantages for teenagers: very effective, safe, invisible. They seem well-fitted for this population, with high satisfaction and continuation rates, as long as side effects are well explained. Thus, LARC methods should be proposed more widely to teenagers. Anyway, before prescribing a contraceptive method, it is important to determine the specific situation of every teenager, to let them choose the method that they consider as appropriate in their own case, and to think about the availability of the chosen method. It is necessary to explain how to handle mistakes or misses with user-based contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception can be anticipated and prescribed in advanced provision. The use of male condoms should be encouraged for adolescents, with another effective contraceptive method, in order to reduce the high risk

  13. Use of various contraceptive methods and time of conception in a community-based population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Boris; Nahum, Ravit; Yairi, Yael; Hirsch, Michael; Pardo, Josef; Yogev, Yariv; Orvieto, Raoul

    2005-11-01

    To investigate the association between method of contraception and time to conception in a normal community-based population. Prospective, cross-sectional, survey. Large comprehensive ambulatory women's health center. One thousand pregnant women at their first prenatal obstetrics visit were asked to complete a self-report questionnaire. The return to fertility was analyzed by type of contraceptive method, duration of use, and other sociodemographic variables. Response rate was 80% (n=798). Mean age of the patients was 29.9+/-5 years. Seventy-five percent had used a contraceptive before trying to conceive: 80% oral contraceptives, 8% intrauterine device, and 7% barrier methods. Eighty-six percent conceived spontaneously. Contraceptive users had a significantly higher conception rate than nonusers in the first 3 months from their first attempt at pregnancy. Type of contraception was significantly correlated with time to conception. Pregnancy rates within 6 months of the first attempt was 60% for oral contraceptive users compared to 70 and 81% for the intrauterine device and barrier method groups, respectively. There was no correlation between time to conception and parity or duration of contraceptive use. Other factors found to be significantly related to time to conception were older age of both partners and higher body mass index. Contraception use before a planned pregnancy does not appear to affect ease of conception. Type of method used, although not duration of use, may influence the time required to conceive.

  14. Knowledge, attitudes and practice of secondary school girls towards contraception in Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorah U. Ramathuba

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Unplanned teenage pregnancy constitutes an important health problem, whilst contraceptive services are free throughout South Africa and the number of Termination of Pregnancy (TOP services is increasing. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of secondary school girls towards contraception in Thulamela Municipality of Limpopo Province, South Africa. A quantitative descriptive study design was used and respondents were selected by convenience sampling from a population of secondary school girls, the sample consisting of 273 girls in Grades 10–12. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data and analysed by computing frequencies and percentages using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Findings showed that respondents were aware of different contraceptive methods that can prevent pregnancy. However, most did not have knowledge of the emergency contraceptive, intra-uterine device and female condom. Pressure from male partners, fear of parental reaction to the use of contraceptives, reluctance to use contraceptives, poor contraceptive education and lack of counselling were seen as the main causes of ineffective contraceptive use and non-utilisation. Possible modalities of intervention deal with providing contraceptive counselling and care to empower these school girls to make informed choices on reproductive health.

  15. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dispenser may provide the insert to the parent or legal guardian of a legally incompetent patient (or to the... the effectiveness of oral contraceptives in preventing pregnancy, the contraindications to the drug's... concerning the increased risks associated with cigarette smoking and oral contraceptive use. (5) A discussion...

  16. Contraceptive Use Patterns across Teens' Sexual Relationships. Fact Sheet. Publication #2008-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Emily; Carrier, David; Manlove, Jennifer; Ryan, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Teens typically fail to use contraceptives consistently, which contributes to high rates of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among this age group. Existing research has focused primarily on how teens' own characteristics are related to contraceptive use, but has paid less attention to how the characteristics of…

  17. Effective factors contraceptive use by logistic regression model in Tehran, 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramezani F

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite unwillingness to fertility, about 30% of couples do not use any kind of contraception and this will lead to unwanted pregnancy. In this clinical trial study, 4177 subjects who had at least one alive child, and delivered in one of the 12 university hospitals in Tehran were recruited. This study was conducted in 1996. The questionnaire included some questions about contraceptive use, their attitudes about unwantedness or wantedness of their current pregnancies. Data were analysed using a Logistic Regrassion Model. Results showed that 20.3% of those who had no fertility intention, did not use any kind of contraception methods, 41.1% of the subjects who were using a contraception method before pregnancy, had got pregnant unwantedly. Based on Logistic Regression Model; age, education, previous familiarity of women with contraception methods and husband's education were the most significant factors in contraceptive use. Subjects who were 20 years old and less or 35 years old and more and illeterate subjects were at higher risk for unuse of contraception methods. This risk was not related to the gender of their children that suggests a positive change in their perspectives towards sex and the number of children. It is suggested that health politicians choose an appropriate model to enhance the literacy, education and counseling for the correct usage of contraceptives and prevention of unwanted pregnancy.

  18. The Varied Circumstances Prompting Requests for Emergency Contraception at School-Based Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebottom, Abbey; Harrison, Patricia A.; Amidon, Donna; Finnegan, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the circumstances that prompt teenagers to request emergency contraception (EC). This evaluation was designed to refine the EC clinical protocol and improve pregnancy prevention efforts in high school-based clinics by analyzing information on EC use and subsequent contraception use of EC patients. Methods: Sites…

  19. Brief Report: Dapivirine Vaginal Ring Use Does Not Diminish the Effectiveness of Hormonal Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkus, Jennifer E; Palanee-Phillips, Thesla; Reddy, Krishnaveni; Siva, Samantha; Harkoo, Ishana; Nakabiito, Clemensia; Kintu, Kenneth; Nair, Gonasangrie; Chappell, Catherine; Kiweewa, Flavia Matovu; Kabwigu, Samuel; Naidoo, Logashvari; Jeenarain, Nitesha; Marzinke, Mark; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Brown, Elizabeth R; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the potential for a clinically relevant drug-drug interaction with concomitant use of a dapivirine vaginal ring, a novel antiretroviral-based HIV-1 prevention strategy, and hormonal contraception by examining contraceptive efficacies with and without dapivirine ring use. A secondary analysis of women participating in MTN-020/ASPIRE, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the dapivirine vaginal ring for HIV-1 prevention. Use of a highly effective method of contraception was an eligibility criterion for study participation. Urine pregnancy tests were performed monthly. Pregnancy incidence by arm was calculated separately for each hormonal contraceptive method and compared using an Andersen-Gill proportional hazards model stratified by site and censored at HIV-1 infection. Of 2629 women enrolled, 2310 women returned for follow-up and reported using a hormonal contraceptive method at any point during study participation (1139 in the dapivirine arm and 1171 in the placebo arm). Pregnancy incidence in the dapivirine arm versus placebo among women using injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate was 0.43% vs. 0.54%, among women using injectable norethisterone enanthate was 1.15% vs. 0%, among women using hormonal implants was 0.22% vs. 0.69%, and among women using oral contraceptive pills was 32.26% vs. 28.01%. Pregnancy incidence did not differ by study arm for any of the hormonal contraceptive methods. Use of the dapivirine ring does not reduce the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives for pregnancy prevention. Oral contraceptive pill use was associated with high pregnancy incidence, potentially because of poor pill adherence. Injectable and implantable methods were highly effective in preventing pregnancy.

  20. Factors that influence contraceptive use amongst women in Vanga health district, Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangale Izale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contraception is often necessary in order to plan for children and without it there is a risk of unplanned pregnancies. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, this often results in abortions by untrained persons with resultant morbidity and mortality. Aim: To investigate the factors that influence contraceptive use amongst women of childbearing age in the Vanga health zone. Methods: Cross-sectional survey using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Results: Of the 384 women recruited, a majority (46.1% were in the 31–40 year age group;52% had reached primary school and 88% did not have formal employment. One hundredand forty of the participants reported current use of contraception, with 60% of them using modern methods of contraception; 36.1% of them had begun using contraception before the age of 20; and the most common methods were oral contraceptive pills and injection, each accounting for 22.9%. There was variation in the duration of contraceptive use and the main reason for using contraception was to space children. Of the participants, 20.7% had been using contraception for more than two years. Seventy-seven (31.5% of the women reported they did not use contraception because of a fear of side effects. Forty-four (18% reported that they are unable to afford contraception, 38 (15.6% had husbands who disapproved of contraceptive usage, 26 (10.6% had a fear of infertility, 18 (7.4% practised a religion that did not allow them to use contraception and 12 of the women (4.9% did not use contraception because it was unavailable to them. Conclusion: Barriers to contraception in our study were fears of side effects and infertility, cost, male partner’s objection, unavailability of contraception and religious beliefs.