WorldWideScience

Sample records for preface nonclassical transport

  1. Preface: Nonclassical Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Pruess, K.

    2008-01-01

    Transport phenomena in highly heterogeneous media can be dramatically different from those in homogeneous media and therefore are of great fundamental and practical interest. Anomalous transport occurs in semiconductor physics, plasma physics, astrophysics, biology, and other areas. It plays an especially important role in hydrogeology because it may govern the rate of migration and degree of dispersion of groundwater contaminants from hazardous waste sites. The series of four articles in this special section of Vadose Zone Journal is devoted to transport phenomena in heterogeneous media in the context of geologic disposal of radioactive waste. It contains the results of joint investigations performed at the Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. The work was supported by the U.S. DOE (under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231). The problems addressed in this research involve a broad range of space and time scales and were approached using modern methods of theoretical and computational physics, such as scaling analysis and diagrammatic techniques used before in critical phenomena theory. Special attention is paid to the asymptotics of concentration behavior (concentration tails). This issue is exceptionally important for the reliability assessments of radioactive waste disposal because, depending on the structure of the tails, concentrations at large distances from the source can differ by many orders of magnitude. In the first paper of this special section, Bolshov et al. (2008b) present an overview of field and laboratory observations that demonstrate nonclassical flow and transport behavior in geologic media. It is recognized that natural fracture networks as a rule have fractal geometry and can be classified as percolation systems. This is one of the main factors giving rise to anomalous transport in geologic media. Another important factor is the presence of contaminant traps provided by

  2. Transport from non-classical orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.

    2001-10-01

    From the guiding centre orbit invariants it is possible to construct a map of different orbit shapes in a phase space of three dimensionless variables: normalised toroidal radius y, particle pitch angle ξ, normalised orbit width ρ [1, 2, 3]. The map describes the link between two points in phase space: point 1 (y 1 , ξ 1 , ρ) and point 2 (y 2 , ξ 2 , ρ) where y 1 , y 2 denote the orbit intersection points 1 and 2 with the y(R) axis. An algorithm permits the rapid calculation of point 2 when point 1 is given. The orbit drift excursion Δy = y 2 - y 1 is calculated and converted to Δx = x 2 - x 1 where x denotes a dimensionless flux surface label for a given equilibrium. The mono-energetic distribution function f 0 (Δx) is calculated at fixed ρ 0 (energy) and with a uniform pitch distribution for three tokamaks PBX, JET, MAST. These have been selected because of their variation of inverse aspect ratio ε. A fourth and hypothetical tokamak labelled 'NEOC' (neoclassical) is introduced to compare the results obtained with those predicted by neoclassical theory. A strong dependence of f 0 upon ε is established. An appropriate thermal distribution f(Δx) is also calculated for the four tokamaks and this distribution depends on the profile shapes of normalised temperature and normalised density as well as on the topology of the equilibrium. The thermal distribution functions are shown to exceed the levels assumed in neoclassical transport theory: the mean values are two to four times larger. It is shown that one reason for this excess is due to orbits which traverse the central region of the tokamak. The implications of the results obtained for estimates of transport can then be studied. The magnitude of the drift excursion Δx from a given flux surface x yields by itself no transport. In the limit vertical bar δ vertical bar yξρ (Δx) and δ = (δy, δξ, δρ). The former vector can be calculated in the thermal case. The latter vector describes collisionless

  3. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Huisman, Marieke; Huisman, M.; van de Pol, J.C.; van de Pol, Jan Cornelis

    This is a preface of the special issue of the 14th international workshop on Automated Verification of Critical Systems. This workshop covers all aspects of automated verification, including model checking, theorem proving, SAT/SMT constraint solving, abstract interpretation, and refinement

  4. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avrachenkov, K.; Donato, D.; Avrachenkov, Konstantin; Donato, Debora; Litvak, Nelly

    2009-01-01

    PrefaceThis volume constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 6th Workshop on Algorithms and Models for the Web Graph, WAW 2009, held in Barcelona in February 2009. The World Wide Web has become part of our everyday life, and information retrieval and data mining on the Web are now of enormous

  5. Non-classical radiation transport in random media with fluctuating densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyuldya, S.V.; Bratchenko, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    The ensemble averaged propagation kernels of the non-classical radiation transport are studied by means of the proposed application of the stochastic differential equation random medium generators. It is shown that the non-classical transport is favored in long-correlated weakly fluctuating media. The developed kernel models have been implemented in GEANT4 and validated against the d ouble Monte Carlo m odeling of absorptions curves of disperse neutron absorbers and γ-albedos from a scatterer/absorber random mix

  6. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and sinks, the meso-scale and synoptic scale dynamics of the atmosphere, and long-range 'trans- boundary' transport at different altitude levels, with specific focus on the Indian mainland and the surrounding oceans is of great importance in assessing the radiative impacts and the conse- quent regional climate implications.

  7. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rune Møller; Pacino, Dario; Voß, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Computational Logistics, ICCL 2013, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in September 2013. The 19 papers presented in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected for inclusion in the book. They are organized in to...... in topical sections named: maritime shipping, road transport, vehicle routing problems, aviation applications, and logistics and supply chain management....

  8. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Yuri; Tassi, Franco; Varekamp, Johan; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Kalacheva, Elena

    2017-10-01

    Many volcanoes at any tectonic settings host hydrothermal systems. Volcano-hydrothermal systems (VHS) are result of interaction of the upper part of plumbing systems of active volcanoes with crust, hydrosphere and atmosphere. They are heated by magma, fed by magmatic fluids and meteoric (sea) water, transport and re-distribute magmatic and crustal material. VHS are sensitive to the activity of a host volcano. VHS may have specific features depending on the regional and local tectonic, geologic and geographic settings. The studies reported in this volume help to illustrate the diversity of the approaches and investigations that are being conducting at different volcano-hydrothermal systems over the world and the results of which will be of important value in furthering our understanding of the complex array of the processes accompanying hydrothermal activity of volcanoes. About 60 papers were submitted to a special session of "Volcano-Hydrothermal Systems" at the 2015 fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union. The papers in this special issue of the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research were originally presented at that session.

  9. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Hostis, Valérie; Foct, François; Féron, Damien

    2006-11-01

    programmes. The sessions of the workshop covered the following areas, from fundamental aspects to technically relevant industrial applications: - Present and Future Expectations on regulations, design codes and R& D programmes; - Experimental Studies mainly focused on corrosion of embedded steels and its mechanical consequences, reactive agents transport and chemical degradation of concrete; - Phenomenological Modelling of the different mechanisms involved in reinforced concrete degradation (corrosion, transport, mechanics, etc.); - Service Life Models focused on the assessment of reinforced concrete structures and life cycle analysis; - Feedback Experience use of field experiences and archaeological artefacts for the phenomenological understanding and modelling; - Monitoring and Repair on-site corrosion evaluation, repairing techniques performance... The organisation and the success of this Workshop have been made possible thanks to CEA (Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique) and EDF (Électricité de France) which co-organised this event. It was co-sponsored by EFC/WP4 (European Federation of Corrosion, Nuclear corrosion working party) and OECD/NEA (Nuclear Energy Agency) which the editors want to warmly thank for their active scientific and practical contributions. The editors would also like to thank the authors who presented papers of outstanding scientific content and who responded enthusiastically to the discussions and questions raised during the Workshop, the programme committee, who had to make the tricky selection of the presented papers, and finally the reviewers of the papers presented in this special issue. This Workshop was a forum to exchange state-of-the-art knowledge on corrosion and long-term performance of concrete in nuclear power plants and waste facilities. The editors hope that the scientific results gathered in these proceedings will be useful to scientists and engineers in the field of reinforced concrete materials for nuclear applications. Valérie L

  10. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei; Balaev, Dmitrii; Val'kov, Valery

    2017-10-01

    This special issue of Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (JMMM) is a collection of selected papers presented at the International Conference Euro-Asian Symposium ;Trends in Magnetism; (EASTMAG-2016), held at the Siberian Federal University and Kirensky Institute of Physics, Federal Research Center, Krasnoyarsk Science Center of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, Russia, during August 15-19,2016. The papers were selected for publication after an intensive peer review, with a minimum of two reviewers for every paper. The editors would like to place on record the unstinted support received from over 130 reviewers which culminated in the selection of 61 manuscripts for publication. We take this opportunity to thank every one for participating in the EASTMAG-2016. As it happened in the previous EASTMAG-conferences of this once in three years scientific event, the EASTMAG-2016 covered a large spectrum of subjects that attract the interest of a wider community devoted to magnetic materials and their applications. The five days conference comprised special sessions for Section 1. Fundamental magnetic properties, 2. Magnetism and Superconductivity, 3. Magnetism of strongly correlated electronic systems, 4. Transport phenomena and spin electronics, 5. Dynamics of spin systems and magnetic resonances, 6 Magnetooptics and X-ray magnetooptics, 7. Ultrafast magnetism, 8. Magnonics, 9. Magnetic nanoparticles and granular systems, 10. Low dimensional magnetism and nanostructured materials, 11. Magnetic memories. With more than 430 registered participants from 19 countries comprising researchers from universities, academia, scientists and engineers from R&D institutions and industry, EASTMAG-2016 provided a perfect platform for an excellent interaction among all participants. Overall, the conference was well received with a keynote, seven plenary, eighty eight invited, one hundred oral and more than two hundred poster presentations. We would like

  11. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovics, A.

    2007-06-01

    had led to the establishment of the chair of Electrodynamics and Continuum Mechanics in 1970, the first head of which was professor Juris Mikelsons. In the early 90's, when all research institutions in our country underwent dramatic changes, not all research directions and institutions managed to adapt successfully to the new conditions. Fortunately, the people who were involved in computer modelling of physical processes were among the most successful. First, the existing and newly established contacts in Western Europe were used actively to reorient the applied researches in the directions actively studied at the universities and companies, which were the partners of the University of Latvia. As a result, research groups involved in these activities successfully joined the international effort related to the application of computer models to industrial processes, and the scientific laboratory for Mathematical Modelling of Environmental and Technological Processes was founded in 1994. The second direction of modelling development was related to the application of computer-based models for the environmental and technological processes (e.g., sediment transport in harbours, heat transfer in building constructions) that were important for the companies and state institutions in Latvia. Currently, the field of engineering physics, the core of which is the computer modelling of technological and environmental processes, is one of the largest and most successfully developing parts of researches and educational programs at the Department of Physics of the University of Latvia with very good perspectives in the future for the development of new technologies and knowledge transfer.

  12. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    MEM03: The Second International Workshop on Mechano-Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors (Kyoto, Japan, 3–5 March 2003) Superconductivity is on course to be widely applied in various advanced technologies including: (1) magnetically levitated vehicles (MAGLEV), international thermonuclear experimental reactors (ITER), electric generators, high energy accelerator and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using metallic composite superconductors; (2) cable, fault-current-limiters (FCL), transformers, flywheels and motors by using oxide composite superconductors; (3) high field NMR and other sophisticated devices by combining both metallic and oxide superconductors. In order to create a real market for these advanced technologies using superconductivity, it is absolutely essential to develop superconducting wires/tapes with better performance. The development of accompanying assessment technologies is therefore indispensable for their R&D. Some important properties are related to the mechanical properties of the conductors. It is well known that degraded superconducting and mechanical properties (during fabrication as well as under operation) can cause serious problems, because the critical current depends sensitively on bending and tensile stresses, electromagnetic force, and mechanical and thermal cycling. Therefore he assessment of mechanical properties and the effect of strain on transport properties is crucial for improving and developing high performance superconducting devices. It is now very timely to have a meeting in order to discuss common scientific problems systematically and comprehensively. The Second International Workshop on Mechano-Electromagnetic Properties of Composite Superconductors, MEM03, was held in Kyoto, Japan, 3–5 March 2003, mainly to discuss the fundamentals of the following topics. • Electromagnetic properties: change of critical current, RRR and ac loss due to external forces like bending, compressive and tensile

  13. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2003-05-01

    This special issue presents a series of papers on biological physics. It emphasizes the fact that Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter welcomes papers in this area and foresees a fruitful cross-fertilization between this and other more conventional condensed matter fields. The work was presented at the conference ÂNanophysics in Life SciencesÂ' held in Copenhagen on 21-22 June 2002. The meeting was arranged by, and marked the start of, the new Division of Physics in Life Sciences (DPL) within the European Physical Society (EPS). It also celebrated the opening of a new Danish research centre on quantum protein physics (QUP), which was co-organizer and co-sponsor. The meeting was organized at short notice and yet attracted some 80 participants from a number of countries (despite the fact that the chosen weekend included the `midsummer night', a feast nobody in the Northern Scandinavian countries would wish to miss - even when offered an event in the beautiful venue of the Carlsberg estate). The audience included many young people and students, demonstrating the great interest in the field of biological physics and in the topics chosen within that field. The selection represented, furthermore, the present scope of the new DPL division. All but one of the board members of DPL were able to attend and present their work, among others. They have subsequently delivered valuable contributions to this special issue. The subjects cover a large area (the full programme can be found on the division's web-page: DPL.risoe.dk). To mention a few: the dynamical and optical properties of biomolecules (proteins), experimental studies of single biomolecules, various theoretical approaches to the protein folding problem and DNA motion, biomolecular motor and transport functions, quantum chemical calculations. Many of these problems are closely related to those studied in conventional condensed matter. To emphasize one topic we have written the Viewpoint article (pages V5-V9) which

  14. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, A.; Lielausis, O.; Chopart, J.-P.

    2003-09-01

    PAMIR 2002 was organized in Ramatuelle, France, on September 16-20, 2002. The conference was attended by scientists working in various fields of magnetohydrodynamics and in this view has played an important role in the exchanges of ideas, promoting new scientific collaborations. The conference has managed about 160 oral and poster presentations regrouped in the form of specific topics. The audience of the conference has extended compared with PAMIR 2000 by considering that about 190 scientists, representing 22 countries, attended the Ramatuelle site. All scientific aspects of the liquid MHD were represented including: 1. Fundamental MHD enclosed all aspects of the MHD flows under various conditions of the magnetic Reynolds number. Problems involving steady, alternating or travelling magnetic field as well as the stability problems were considered. The specific problem of strong magnetic fields was also considered in this session. 2. Mettalurgical application of MHD. The communications have analyzed the possibilities offered by the magnetic fields in metallurgy to increase the quality of the product. The problems of interface stabilities, which control various industrial applications, have been also considered in this session as well as the transport of liquid metals by electromagnetic pumps. Some applications in electromagnetic filtration have been also reported. 3. Magnetoelectrolysis (poorly conducting fluids). The possibility to control the mass transfer phenomena in electrochemical systems by using the action of a magnetic field is one of the most promising and new applications of electromagnetism in Europe. The field of magnetoelectrolysis is extremely wide and provides, only for electrodeposition, the possibility to improve the quality, the structure, and to control the homogeneity and the rate of the deposit. Some particular applications for electrodeposition of magnetic materials have been also presented. 4. Magnetic fluids. This topic was announced for the

  15. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batail, Patrick

    2004-04-01

    with p _π-p_π overlap interactions between frontier orbitals of the precursors is today a very active field of research reaching out in field of molecular magnetic materials. Also, the materials chemistry of single component molecular metals and the development of strategies for the chemical control of band filling in molecular metals are areas of intense research. Considerable progress reported in first principle-based electronic structure calculations for large complex systems and band structure calculations of molecular metals should diffuse promptly in the molecular materials community. On the physics side, recent advances in understanding the localization-delocalization-charge ordering competition in low dimensional systems of strongly correlated electrons, and their formulation at ISCOM'03 in a language and format accessible to experimentalists and materials scientists, carries a great many promises for significant developments in the conception of novel molecular superconductors. The physics of one- and two-dimensional molecular metals and superconductors was a strong component of ISCOM'03 with very diverse complementary experimental approaches including transport, uniaxial and isotropie high pressures and high magnetic fields studies, thermal conductivity, STM. Two dimensional conductors have proved to be prototype materials for the study of interacting electron gases through the phenomenon of Mott localization exhibited in some BEDT-TTF salts. Applications of angle-resolved photo-emission investigations have been reported and emerge as a very promising area for future developments. Coupled to quantum chemistry calculations the latter carry along an enormous potential, as exemplified by the wealth of information delivered on the nature of the chemical bonding and electronic structure of molecular solids. The reports of superconductivity induced by a large magnetic field in RETS salts containing magnetic anions have shown how organic materials have brought the

  16. The generation of arbitrary order, non-classical, Gauss-type quadrature for transport applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented, based upon the Stieltjes method (1884), for the determination of non-classical Gauss-type quadrature rules, and the associated sets of abscissae and weights. The method is then used to generate a number of quadrature sets, to arbitrary order, which are primarily aimed at deterministic transport calculations. The quadrature rules and sets detailed include arbitrary order reproductions of those presented by Abu-Shumays in [4,8] (known as the QR sets, but labelled QRA here), in addition to a number of new rules and associated sets; these are generated in a similar way, and we label them the QRS quadrature sets. The method presented here shifts the inherent difficulty (encountered by Abu-Shumays) associated with solving the non-linear moment equations, particular to the required quadrature rule, to one of the determination of non-classical weight functions and the subsequent calculation of various associated inner products. Once a quadrature rule has been written in a standard form, with an associated weight function having been identified, the calculation of the required inner products is achieved using specific variable transformations, in addition to the use of rapid, highly accurate quadrature suited to this purpose. The associated non-classical Gauss quadrature sets can then be determined, and this can be done to any order very rapidly. In this paper, instead of listing weights and abscissae for the different quadrature sets detailed (of which there are a number), the MATLAB code written to generate them is included as Appendix D. The accuracy and efficacy (in a transport setting) of the quadrature sets presented is not tested in this paper (although the accuracy of the QRA quadrature sets has been studied in [12,13]), but comparisons to tabulated results listed in [8] are made. When comparisons are made with one of the azimuthal QRA sets detailed in [8], the inherent difficulty in the method of generation, used there, becomes apparent

  17. The generation of arbitrary order, non-classical, Gauss-type quadrature for transport applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Peter J., E-mail: peter.spence@awe.co.uk

    2015-09-01

    A method is presented, based upon the Stieltjes method (1884), for the determination of non-classical Gauss-type quadrature rules, and the associated sets of abscissae and weights. The method is then used to generate a number of quadrature sets, to arbitrary order, which are primarily aimed at deterministic transport calculations. The quadrature rules and sets detailed include arbitrary order reproductions of those presented by Abu-Shumays in [4,8] (known as the QR sets, but labelled QRA here), in addition to a number of new rules and associated sets; these are generated in a similar way, and we label them the QRS quadrature sets. The method presented here shifts the inherent difficulty (encountered by Abu-Shumays) associated with solving the non-linear moment equations, particular to the required quadrature rule, to one of the determination of non-classical weight functions and the subsequent calculation of various associated inner products. Once a quadrature rule has been written in a standard form, with an associated weight function having been identified, the calculation of the required inner products is achieved using specific variable transformations, in addition to the use of rapid, highly accurate quadrature suited to this purpose. The associated non-classical Gauss quadrature sets can then be determined, and this can be done to any order very rapidly. In this paper, instead of listing weights and abscissae for the different quadrature sets detailed (of which there are a number), the MATLAB code written to generate them is included as Appendix D. The accuracy and efficacy (in a transport setting) of the quadrature sets presented is not tested in this paper (although the accuracy of the QRA quadrature sets has been studied in [12,13]), but comparisons to tabulated results listed in [8] are made. When comparisons are made with one of the azimuthal QRA sets detailed in [8], the inherent difficulty in the method of generation, used there, becomes apparent

  18. Characterization of SLCO5A1/OATP5A1, a solute carrier transport protein with non-classical function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sebastian

    Full Text Available Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP/SLCO have been identified to mediate the uptake of a broad range of mainly amphipathic molecules. Human OATP5A1 was found to be expressed in the epithelium of many cancerous and non-cancerous tissues throughout the body but protein characterization and functional analysis have not yet been performed. This study focused on the biochemical characterization of OATP5A1 using Xenopus laevis oocytes and Flp-In T-REx-HeLa cells providing evidence regarding a possible OATP5A1 function. SLCO5A1 is highly expressed in mature dendritic cells compared to immature dendritic cells (∼6.5-fold and SLCO5A1 expression correlates with the differentiation status of primary blood cells. A core- and complex- N-glycosylated polypeptide monomer of ∼105 kDa and ∼130 kDa could be localized in intracellular membranes and on the plasma membrane, respectively. Inducible expression of SLCO5A1 in HeLa cells led to an inhibitory effect of ∼20% after 96 h on cell proliferation. Gene expression profiling with these cells identified immunologically relevant genes (e.g. CCL20 and genes implicated in developmental processes (e.g. TGM2. A single nucleotide polymorphism leading to the exchange of amino acid 33 (L→F revealed no differences regarding protein expression and function. In conclusion, we provide evidence that OATP5A1 might be a non-classical OATP family member which is involved in biological processes that require the reorganization of the cell shape, such as differentiation and migration.

  19. Quantification of nonclassicality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mraz, Melanie; Sperling, Jan; Vogel, Werner; Hage, Boris [Universitaet Rostock, Institut fuer Physik, Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century the discussion on physics beyond the classical regime started. This was the hour of birth of quantum physics and, with Einstein's description of the photoelectric effect, of quantum optics. Even the physicists had problems to understand nonclassical quantum phenomena, because of its non-intuitive properties. So, why further struggling? Nonclassical states have an advantage over classical states for various applications. Only one example is the quantum teleportation which would be unthinkable without nonclassical states. Hence, it is of a fundamental interest to study properties of nonclassical quantum states. It is already possible to say if a state is nonclassical or not, but how can we decide how much nonclassicality is in our system? We propose a degree of nonclassicality being a nonclassicality measure. It is determined by the decomposition of a quantum state into superpositions of coherent states. On the one hand, coherent states resembles the behavior of a classical harmonic oscillator most closely. On the other hand, the more quantum superpositions of coherent states are needed, the more quantum interferences arise. A method for such a decomposition of quantum states is presented and the degree of nonclassicality is determined for different states. We apply our method to typical nonclassical states, such as the compass state and the squeezed vacuum state.

  20. A viral, transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-independent, high affinity ligand with alternative interactions endogenously presented by the nonclassical human leukocyte antigen E class I molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; Infantes, Susana; Abia, David; Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; García, Ruth; Lasala, Fátima; Jiménez, Mercedes; Mir, Carmen; Morreale, Antonio; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2012-10-12

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) enables the flow of viral peptides generated in the cytosol by the proteasome and other proteases to the endoplasmic reticulum, where they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. Later, these peptide-HLA class I complexes can be recognized by CD8(+) lymphocytes. Cancerous cells and infected cells in which TAP is blocked, as well as individuals with unusable TAP complexes, are able to present peptides on HLA class I by generating them through TAP-independent processing pathways. Here, we identify a physiologically processed HLA-E ligand derived from the D8L protein in TAP-deficient vaccinia virus-infected cells. This natural high affinity HLA-E class I ligand uses alternative interactions to the anchor motifs previously described to be presented on nonclassical HLA class I molecules. This octameric peptide was also presented on HLA-Cw1 with similar binding affinity on both classical and nonclassical class I molecules. In addition, this viral peptide inhibits HLA-E-mediated cytolysis by natural killer cells. Comparison between the amino acid sequences of the presenting HLA-E and HLA-Cw1 alleles revealed a shared structural motif in both HLA class molecules, which could be related to their observed similar cross-reactivity affinities. This motif consists of several residues located on the floor of the peptide-binding site. These data expand the role of HLA-E as an antigen-presenting molecule.

  1. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Proton transport phenomena are of paramount importance for acid-base chemistry, energy transduction in biological organisms, corrosion processes, and energy conversion in electrochemical systems such as polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The relevance for such a plethora of materials and systems, and the ever-lasting fascination with the highly concerted nature of underlying processes drive research across disciplines in chemistry, biology, physics and chemical engineering. A proton never travels alone. Proton motion is strongly correlated with its environment, usually comprised of an electrolyte and a solid or soft host material. For the transport in nature's most benign proton solvent and shuttle, water that is, insights from ab initio simulations, matured over the last 15 years, have furnished molecular details of the structural diffusion mechanism of protons. Excess proton movement in water consists of sequences of Eigen-Zundel-Eigen transitions, triggered by hydrogen bond breaking and making in the surrounding water network. Nowadays, there is little debate about the validity of this mechanism in water, which bears a stunning resemblance to the basic mechanistic picture put forward by de Grotthuss in 1806. While strong coupling of an excess proton with degrees of freedom of solvent and host materials facilitates proton motion, this coupling also creates negative synergies. In general, proton mobility in biomaterials and electrochemical proton conducting media is highly sensitive to the abundance and structure of the proton solvent. In polymer electrolyte membranes, in which protons are bound to move in nano-sized water-channels, evaporation of water or local membrane dehydration due to electro-osmotic coupling are well-known phenomena that could dramatically diminish proton conductivity. Contributions in this special issue address various vital aspects of the concerted nature of proton motion and they elucidate important structural and dynamic effects of solvent

  2. Quantum measure of nonclassical light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Sik

    2003-01-01

    The nonclassical light and its properties are reviewed in the phase space representation. The quantitative measure of nonclassicality for a single-mode case is introduced and its physical significance is discussed in terms of the environmental effects on nonclassicality. The quantitative measure of nonclassical property is defined and used to classify the different nonclassical properties. The nonclassical measure is also extended to the multi-mode case. One of the distinctive features of multi-mode nonclassical light is entanglement, which is not possessed by a single-mode light, and the multi-mode nonclassical measure may reflect the contents of entanglement. The multi-mode nonclassical measure is calculated for the superposition through a beam spitter and compared with the single-mode nonclassical measure.

  3. Tomography of nonclassical states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazrafkan, MR; Man'ko, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    A review of the symplectic tomography method is presented. Superpositions of different types of photon states are considered within the framework of the tomography approach. Such nonclassical photon states as even and odd coherent states, crystallized Schrodinger cat states, and other superposition

  4. Nonclassic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Feldman Witchel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH due to P450c21 (21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder. This disorder is due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene which is located at chromosome 6p21. The clinical features predominantly reflect androgen excess rather than adrenal insufficiency leading to an ascertainment bias favoring diagnosis in females. Treatment goals include normal linear growth velocity and “on-time” puberty in affected children. For adolescent and adult women, treatment goals include regularization of menses, prevention of progression of hirsutism, and fertility. This paper will review key aspects regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of NCAH.

  5. PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizuka, Tomonori

    2008-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in

  6. Translator's preface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiell, James T

    2013-08-01

    Presents a preface from James T. Lamiell, who translates Wilhelm Wundt's Psychology's Struggle for Existence (Die Psychologie im Kampf ums Dasein), in which Wundt advised against the impending divorce of psychology from philosophy, into English. Lamiell comments that more than a decade into the 21st century, it appears that very few psychologists have any interest at all in work at the interface of psychology and philosophy. He notes that one clear indication of this is that the Society for Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, which is Division 24 of the American Psychological Association (APA), remains one of the smallest of the APA's nearly 60 divisions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Nonlinearity and nonclassicality in a nanomechanical resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teklu, Berihu [Clermont Universite, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS, PHOTON-N2, Institut Pascal, Aubiere Cedex (France); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (Italy); Ferraro, Alessandro; Paternostro, Mauro [Queen' s University, Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Belfast (United Kingdom); Paris, Matteo G.A. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    We address quantitatively the relationship between the nonlinearity of a mechanical resonator and the nonclassicality of its ground state. In particular, we analyze the nonclassical properties of the nonlinear Duffing oscillator (being driven or not) as a paradigmatic example of a nonlinear nanomechanical resonator. We first discuss how to quantify the nonlinearity of this system and then show that the nonclassicality of the ground state, as measured by the volume occupied by the negative part of the Wigner function, monotonically increases with the nonlinearity in all the working regimes addressed in our study. Our results show quantitatively that nonlinearity is a resource to create nonclassical states in mechanical systems. (orig.)

  8. Unification of nonclassicality measures in interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao; Zhou, Hongyi; Gu, Mile; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2018-01-01

    From an operational perspective, nonclassicality characterizes the exotic behavior in a physical process which cannot be explained with Newtonian physics. There are several widely used measures of nonclassicality, including coherence, discord, and entanglement, each proven to be essential resources in particular situations. There exists evidence of fundamental connections among the three measures. However, the sources of nonclassicality are still regarded differently and such connections are yet to be elucidated. Here, we introduce a general framework of defining a unified nonclassicality with an operational motivation founded on the capability of interferometry. Nonclassicality appears differently as coherence, discord, and entanglement in different scenarios with local measurement, weak basis-independent measurement, and strong basis-independent measurement, respectively. Our results elaborate how these three measures are related and how they can be transformed from each other. Experimental schemes are proposed to test the results.

  9. Quantitative characterization of non-classic polarization of cations on clay aggregate stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feinan Hu

    Full Text Available Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+ at concentrations from10-5 to 10-1 mol L-1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation-surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability.

  10. Quantitative Characterization of Non-Classic Polarization of Cations on Clay Aggregate Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10−5 to 10−1 mol L−1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation–surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  11. Nonclassical correlations in superconducting circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliore, Rosanna [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); CNR-INFM, UdR CNISM di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Scala, Matteo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Guccione, Marina; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Messina, Antonino [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    A key step on the road map to solid-state quantum information processing (and to a deeper understanding of many counterintuitive aspects of quantum mechanics) is the generation and manipulation of nonclassical correlations between different quantum systems. Within this framework, we analyze the possibility of generating maximally entangled states in a system of two superconducting flux qubits, as well as the effectof their own environments on the entanglement dynamics. The analysis reported here confirms that the phenomena of sudden birth and sudden death of the entanglement do not depend on the particular measure of the entanglement adopted (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Exponential attractors for a nonclassical diffusion equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaozhen Ma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we prove the existence of exponential attractors for a nonclassical diffusion equation in ${H^{2}(Omega}cap{H}^{1}_{0}(Omega$ when the space dimension is less than 4.

  13. Fisher information, nonclassicality and quantum revivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romera, Elvira [Instituto Carlos I de Física Teórica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Santos, Francisco de los, E-mail: dlsantos@onsager.ugr.es [Instituto Carlos I de Física Teórica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Departamento de Electromagnetismo y Física de la Materia, Universidad de Granada, Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-11-08

    Wave packet revivals and fractional revivals are studied by means of a measure of nonclassicality based on the Fisher information. In particular, we show that the spreading and the regeneration of initially Gaussian wave packets in a quantum bouncer and in the infinite square-well correspond, respectively, to high and low nonclassicality values. This result is in accordance with the physical expectations that at a quantum revival wave packets almost recover their initial shape and the classical motion revives temporarily afterward.

  14. Fisher information, nonclassicality and quantum revivals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romera, Elvira; Santos, Francisco de los

    2013-01-01

    Wave packet revivals and fractional revivals are studied by means of a measure of nonclassicality based on the Fisher information. In particular, we show that the spreading and the regeneration of initially Gaussian wave packets in a quantum bouncer and in the infinite square-well correspond, respectively, to high and low nonclassicality values. This result is in accordance with the physical expectations that at a quantum revival wave packets almost recover their initial shape and the classical motion revives temporarily afterward.

  15. Propagation of nonclassical correlations across a quantum spin chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, S. [Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Quantum Systems Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Okinawa (Japan); Apollaro, T. J. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, IT-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Di Franco, C. [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork, Republic of Ireland (Ireland); Banchi, L.; Cuccoli, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, IT-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, via G.Sansone 1, IT-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Vaia, R. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, IT-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Plastina, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, IT-87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy); INFN Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Universita della Calabria, IT-87036, Arcavacata di Rende (Italy); Paternostro, M. [Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    We study the transport of quantum correlations across a chain of interacting spin-1/2 particles. As a quantitative figure of merit, we choose a symmetric version of quantum discord and compare it with the transported entanglement, addressing various operating regimes of the spin medium. Discord turns out to be better transported for a wide range of working points and initial conditions of the system. We relate this behavior to the efficiency of propagation of a single excitation across the spin chain. Moreover, we point out the role played by a magnetic field in the dynamics of discord in the effective channel embodied by the chain. Our analysis can be interestingly extended to transport processes in more complex networks and the study of nonclassical correlations under general quantum channels.

  16. Converting multilevel nonclassicality into genuine multipartite entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regula, Bartosz; Piani, Marco; Cianciaruso, Marco; Bromley, Thomas R.; Streltsov, Alexander; Adesso, Gerardo

    2018-03-01

    Characterizing genuine quantum resources and determining operational rules for their manipulation are crucial steps to appraise possibilities and limitations of quantum technologies. Two such key resources are nonclassicality, manifested as quantum superposition between reference states of a single system, and entanglement, capturing quantum correlations among two or more subsystems. Here we present a general formalism for the conversion of nonclassicality into multipartite entanglement, showing that a faithful reversible transformation between the two resources is always possible within a precise resource-theoretic framework. Specializing to quantum coherence between the levels of a quantum system as an instance of nonclassicality, we introduce explicit protocols for such a mapping. We further show that the conversion relates multilevel coherence and multipartite entanglement not only qualitatively, but also quantitatively, restricting the amount of entanglement achievable in the process and in particular yielding an equality between the two resources when quantified by fidelity-based geometric measures.

  17. Nonclassical Orthogonal Polynomials and Corresponding Quadratures

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuda, H; Alt, E O; Matveenko, A V

    2004-01-01

    We construct nonclassical orthogonal polynomials and calculate abscissas and weights of Gaussian quadrature for arbitrary weight and interval. The program is written by Mathematica and it works if moment integrals are given analytically. The result is a FORTRAN subroutine ready to utilize the quadrature.

  18. Divergence en Route to Nonclassical Annonaceous Acetogenins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Daniel; Norrby, Per-Ola; Rein, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    Syntheses of the nonclassical annonaceous acetogenins, pyranicin, and pyragonicin from common latestage intermediates are presented. The construction of key elements relies on asymmetric HWE reactions, including the desymmetrization of a meso-dialdehyde and a parallel kinetic resolution of a race...

  19. Nonclassicality in phase-number uncertainty relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matia-Hernando, Paloma; Luis, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    We show that there are nonclassical states with lesser joint fluctuations of phase and number than any classical state. This is rather paradoxical since one would expect classical coherent states to be always of minimum uncertainty. The same result is obtained when we replace phase by a phase-dependent field quadrature. Number and phase uncertainties are assessed using variance and Holevo relation.

  20. Nonclassicality in phase-number uncertainty relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matia-Hernando, Paloma; Luis, Alfredo [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    We show that there are nonclassical states with lesser joint fluctuations of phase and number than any classical state. This is rather paradoxical since one would expect classical coherent states to be always of minimum uncertainty. The same result is obtained when we replace phase by a phase-dependent field quadrature. Number and phase uncertainties are assessed using variance and Holevo relation.

  1. Surfactant enhanced non-classical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, J.

    2000-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced non-classical extractions are presented and discussed. They include micellar enhanced ultrafiltration and cloud point extraction. The ideas of the processes are given and the main features are presented. They are compared to the classical solvent extraction. The fundamental of micellar solutions and their solubilisation abilities are also discussed. (author)

  2. Surfactant enhanced non-classical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced non-classical extractions are presented and discussed. They include micellar enhanced ultrafiltration and cloud point extraction. The ideas of the processes are given and the main features are presented. They are compared to the classical solvent extraction. The fundamental of micellar solutions and their solubilization abilities are also discussed. (author)

  3. PREFACE Spectral and transport properties of quantum systems: in memory of Pierre Duclos (1948-2010) Spectral and transport properties of quantum systems: in memory of Pierre Duclos (1948-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    This issue is devoted to our colleague and friend Pierre Duclos who passed away suddenly and prematurely in Prague on 12 January this year. We want to honour his memory in the way he would have liked, by collecting fresh and original work from his area of interest. Pierre Duclos was born on 8 January 1948 in Paris. He started as an engineering student but also attended graduate courses at the Centre de Physique Théorique (CPT) in Marseille, which inspired him to change his path and pursue the professional career of a researcher. He joined the Mathematical Physics team at CPT and obtained a position at the University of Toulon, where he later became a full professor. He was never solitary; always being full of energy and a smart and sociable person, he started and maintained many international collaborations and organized numerous conferences and seminars. In the early eighties he had strong ties with the Free and Technical Universities of Berlin. From the beginning of the nineties, he collaborated with coleagues in Prague, Bucharest, Santiago de Chile, and more recently also in Aalborg and Dublin. His scientific interests were wide, with a focus on mathematical methods of quantum theory. He made important contributions to our understanding of multiple-well Schrödinger operators, geometrically-induced properties of quantum waveguides, spectra of Wannier-Stark systems, dynamics with time-periodic perturbations, and transport in mesoscopic systems, to name his most significant results. We choose for this issue the title `Spectral and transport properties of quantum systems' which cover the subjects of most papers to which his colleagues, and often coauthors, contributed. We have also included a few other papers with topics related to Pierre's work. We are glad we were able to gather a numerous collection of papers which in our view represent interesting new developments. A few of them are works which bear Pierre's signature and have been completed by his

  4. Angular-momentum nonclassicality by breaking classical bounds on statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luis, Alfredo [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rivas, Angel [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    We derive simple practical procedures revealing the quantum behavior of angular momentum variables by the violation of classical upper bounds on the statistics. Data analysis is minimum and definite conclusions are obtained without evaluation of moments, or any other more sophisticated procedures. These nonclassical tests are very general and independent of other typical quantum signatures of nonclassical behavior such as sub-Poissonian statistics, squeezing, or oscillatory statistics, being insensitive to the nonclassical behavior displayed by other variables.

  5. Treatment of Nonclassic 11-Hydroxylase Deficiency with Ashwagandha Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Powell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An elderly woman presented with acne and male pattern alopecia, which upon diagnostic evaluation was found to be due to nonclassic 11-hydroxylase deficiency. We previously reported that Ashwagandha root ameliorates nonclassic 3-β-ol dehydrogenase and aldosterone synthase deficiencies. This is the first report of its use being associated with amelioration of nonclassic 11-hydroxylase deficiency, where its apparent effects appear to be dose-related.

  6. Nonclassical effects in plasmonics: an energy perspective to quantify nonclassical effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    of the nonclassical effects at different microscopic levels by contrasting the numerical results from the semiclassical hydrodynamic Drude model (HDM) and the microscopic random-phase approximation (RPA). The formal relation between the HDM and the RPA is also established for metals by exploring the limit...

  7. Non-classical continuum mechanics a dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Maugin, Gérard A

    2017-01-01

    This dictionary offers clear and reliable explanations of over 100 keywords covering the entire field of non-classical continuum mechanics and generalized mechanics, including the theory of elasticity, heat conduction, thermodynamic and electromagnetic continua, as well as applied mathematics. Every entry includes the historical background and the underlying theory, basic equations and typical applications. The reference list for each entry provides a link to the original articles and the most important in-depth theoretical works. Last but not least, every entry is followed by a cross-reference to other related subject entries in the dictionary.

  8. Nonclassical nucleation pathways in protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fajun

    2017-11-08

    Classical nucleation theory (CNT), which was established about 90 years ago, has been very successful in many research fields, and continues to be the most commonly used theory in describing the nucleation process. For a fluid-to-solid phase transition, CNT states that the solute molecules in a supersaturated solution reversibly form small clusters. Once the cluster size reaches a critical value, it becomes thermodynamically stable and favored for further growth. One of the most important assumptions of CNT is that the nucleation process is described by one reaction coordinate and all order parameters proceed simultaneously. Recent studies in experiments, computer simulations and theory have revealed nonclassical features in the early stage of nucleation. In particular, the decoupling of order parameters involved during a fluid-to-solid transition leads to the so-called two-step nucleation mechanism, in which a metastable intermediate phase (MIP) exists between the initial supersaturated solution and the final crystals. Depending on the exact free energy landscapes, the MIPs can be a high density liquid phase, mesoscopic clusters, or a pre-ordered state. In this review, we focus on the studies of nonclassical pathways in protein crystallization and discuss the applications of the various scenarios of two-step nucleation theory. In particular, we focus on protein solutions in the presence of multivalent salts, which serve as a model protein system to study the nucleation pathways. We wish to point out the unique features of proteins as model systems for further studies.

  9. Classical and nonclassical randomness in quantum measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farenick, Douglas; Plosker, Sarah; Smith, Jerrod

    2011-01-01

    The space POVM H (X) of positive operator-valued probability measures on the Borel sets of a compact (or even locally compact) Hausdorff space X with values in B(H), the algebra of linear operators acting on a d-dimensional Hilbert space H, is studied from the perspectives of classical and nonclassical convexity through a transform Γ that associates any positive operator-valued measure ν with a certain completely positive linear map Γ(ν) of the homogeneous C*-algebra C(X) x B(H) into B(H). This association is achieved by using an operator-valued integral in which nonclassical random variables (that is, operator-valued functions) are integrated with respect to positive operator-valued measures and which has the feature that the integral of a random quantum effect is itself a quantum effect. A left inverse Ω for Γ yields an integral representation, along the lines of the classical Riesz representation theorem for linear functionals on C(X), of certain (but not all) unital completely positive linear maps φ:C(X) x B(H)→B(H). The extremal and C*-extremal points of POVM H (X) are determined.

  10. Nonclassical nucleation pathways in protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fajun

    2017-11-01

    Classical nucleation theory (CNT), which was established about 90 years ago, has been very successful in many research fields, and continues to be the most commonly used theory in describing the nucleation process. For a fluid-to-solid phase transition, CNT states that the solute molecules in a supersaturated solution reversibly form small clusters. Once the cluster size reaches a critical value, it becomes thermodynamically stable and favored for further growth. One of the most important assumptions of CNT is that the nucleation process is described by one reaction coordinate and all order parameters proceed simultaneously. Recent studies in experiments, computer simulations and theory have revealed nonclassical features in the early stage of nucleation. In particular, the decoupling of order parameters involved during a fluid-to-solid transition leads to the so-called two-step nucleation mechanism, in which a metastable intermediate phase (MIP) exists between the initial supersaturated solution and the final crystals. Depending on the exact free energy landscapes, the MIPs can be a high density liquid phase, mesoscopic clusters, or a pre-ordered state. In this review, we focus on the studies of nonclassical pathways in protein crystallization and discuss the applications of the various scenarios of two-step nucleation theory. In particular, we focus on protein solutions in the presence of multivalent salts, which serve as a model protein system to study the nucleation pathways. We wish to point out the unique features of proteins as model systems for further studies.

  11. Nonclassical lightstates in optical communication schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattle, K. U.

    1997-11-01

    The present thesis is a result in theoretical and experimental work on quant information and quant communication. The first part describes a new high intense source for polarization entangled photon pairs. The high quality of the source is clearly demonstrated by violating a Bell-inequality in less than 5 minutes with 100 standard deviations. This new source is a genius tool for new experiments in the field of fundamental physics as well as applied physics. The next chapter shows an experimental implementation of an optical dense quantum coding scheme. The combination of Bell-state generation and analysis of this entangled states leads to a new nonclassical communication scheme, where the channel capacity is enhanced. A single two state photon can be used for coding and decoding 1.58 bit instead of 1 bit for classical two state systems. The following chapter discusses two photon interference effects for two independent light sources. In an experiment two independent fluorescence pulses show this kind of interference effects. The fifth chapter describes 3-photon interference effects. This nonclassical interference effect is the elementary process for the quantum teleportation scheme. In this scheme an unknown particle state is transmitted from A to B without sending the particle itself. (author)

  12. Nonclassical light sources for silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajoni, Daniele; Galli, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Quantum photonics has recently attracted a lot of attention for its disruptive potential in emerging technologies like quantum cryptography, quantum communication and quantum computing. Driven by the impressive development in nanofabrication technologies and nanoscale engineering, silicon photonics has rapidly become the platform of choice for on-chip integration of high performing photonic devices, now extending their functionalities towards quantum-based applications. Focusing on quantum Information Technology (qIT) as a key application area, we review recent progress in integrated silicon-based sources of nonclassical states of light. We assess the state of the art in this growing field and highlight the challenges that need to be overcome to make quantum photonics a reliable and widespread technology.

  13. [Taxonomic theory for non-classical systematics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlinov, I Ia

    2012-01-01

    Outlined briefly are basic principles of construing general taxonomic theory for biological systematics considered in the context of non-classical scientific paradigm. The necessity of such kind of theory is substantiated, and some key points of its elaboration are exposed: its interpretation as a framework concept for the partial taxonomic theories in various schools of systematics; elaboration of idea of cognitive situation including three interrelated components, namely subject, object, and epistemic ones; its construing as a content-wisely interpreted quasi-axiomatics, with strong structuring of its conceptual space including demarcation between axioms and inferring rules; its construing as a "conceptual pyramid" of concepts of various levels of generality; inclusion of a basic model into definition of the taxonomic system (classification) regulating its content. Two problems are indicated as fundamental: definition of taxonomic diversity as a subject domain for the systematics as a whole; definition of onto-epistemological status of taxonomic system (classification) in general and of taxa in particular.

  14. Incomplete Detection of Nonclassical Phase-Space Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohmann, M.; Tiedau, J.; Bartley, T.; Sperling, J.; Silberhorn, C.; Vogel, W.

    2018-02-01

    We implement the direct sampling of negative phase-space functions via unbalanced homodyne measurement using click-counting detectors. The negativities significantly certify nonclassical light in the high-loss regime using a small number of detectors which cannot resolve individual photons. We apply our method to heralded single-photon states and experimentally demonstrate the most significant certification of nonclassicality for only two detection bins. By contrast, the frequently applied Wigner function fails to directly indicate such quantum characteristics for the quantum efficiencies present in our setup without applying additional reconstruction algorithms. Therefore, we realize a robust and reliable approach to characterize nonclassical light in phase space under realistic conditions.

  15. Classical and nonclassical symmetries analysis for initial value problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiyong; Chen Yufu

    2010-01-01

    Classical and nonclassical symmetries are considered to reduce evolution equations with initial conditions in two independent variables. First of all, we rearrange the classical infinitesimal operators such that they leave the initial value problems invariant. Secondly, we give a sufficient condition for the nonclassical symmetry reductions of initial value problems. The generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with dispersive effects is considered to examine the algorithms.

  16. Nonclassical pseudospectral method for the solution of brachistochrone problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alipanah, A.; Razzaghi, M.; Dehghan, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, nonclassical pseudospectral method is proposed for solving the classic brachistochrone problem. The brachistochrone problem is first formulated as a nonlinear optimal control problem. Properties of nonclassical pseudospectral method are presented, these properties are then utilized to reduce the computation of brachistochrone problem to the solution of algebraic equations. Using this method, the solution to the brachistochrone problem is compared with those in the literature

  17. Nonclassical Symmetries for Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations via Compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sabbagh, Mostafa F.; Ahmad, Ali T.

    2011-01-01

    The determining equations for the nonclassical symmetry reductions of nonlinear partial differential equations with arbitrary order can be obtained by requiring the compatibility between the original equations and the invariant surface conditions. The (2+1)-dimensional shallow water wave equation, Boussinesq equation, and the dispersive wave equations in shallow water serve as examples illustrating how compatibility leads quickly and easily to the determining equations for their nonclassical symmetries. (general)

  18. On the origin of nonclassicality in single systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aravinda, S; Srikanth, R; Pathak, Anirban

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of certain general probability theories of single systems, we identify various nonclassical features such as incompatibility, multiple pure-state decomposability, measurement disturbance, no-cloning and the impossibility of certain universal operations, with the non-simpliciality of the state space. This is shown to naturally suggest an underlying simplex as an ontological model. Contextuality turns out to be an independent nonclassical feature, arising from the intransitivity of compatibility. (paper)

  19. A classical view on nonclassical nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Paul J M; Finney, Aaron R; Habraken, Wouter J E M; Nudelman, Fabio; Friedrich, Heiner; Laven, Jozua; De Yoreo, James J; Rodger, P Mark; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2017-09-19

    Understanding and controlling nucleation is important for many crystallization applications. Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) is often used as a model system to investigate nucleation mechanisms. Despite its great importance in geology, biology, and many industrial applications, CaCO 3 nucleation is still a topic of intense discussion, with new pathways for its growth from ions in solution proposed in recent years. These new pathways include the so-called nonclassical nucleation mechanism via the assembly of thermodynamically stable prenucleation clusters, as well as the formation of a dense liquid precursor phase via liquid-liquid phase separation. Here, we present results from a combined experimental and computational investigation on the precipitation of CaCO 3 in dilute aqueous solutions. We propose that a dense liquid phase (containing 4-7 H 2 O per CaCO 3 unit) forms in supersaturated solutions through the association of ions and ion pairs without significant participation of larger ion clusters. This liquid acts as the precursor for the formation of solid CaCO 3 in the form of vaterite, which grows via a net transfer of ions from solution according to z Ca 2+ + z CO 3 2- → z CaCO 3 The results show that all steps in this process can be explained according to classical concepts of crystal nucleation and growth, and that long-standing physical concepts of nucleation can describe multistep, multiphase growth mechanisms.

  20. Nonclassical Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Cuhaci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH is 21-hydroxylase (21-OH deficiency due to mutation of the CYP21A2 gene. Patients with nonclassical CAH (NC-CAH are usually asymptomatic at birth and typically present in late childhood, adolescence, or adulthood with symptoms of excessive androgen secretion. Subfertility is relative in NC-CAH, but the incidence of spontaneous miscarriage is higher. Here, we report a previously undiagnosed female who gave birth to a normal male child and is planning to become pregnant again. Case Report. A 32-year-old female was referred to our clinic for obesity. Her medical history revealed that she had had three pregnancies. She was planning to become pregnant again. Her laboratory results revealed that she had NC-CAH. Since her husband is the son of her aunt and she had miscarriages and intrauterin exitus in her history, their genetic analyses were performed. Conclusion. Since most patients with NC-CAH have a severe mutation, these patients may give birth to a child with the classical CAH (C-CAH if their partner is also carrying a severe mutation. Females with NC-CAH who desire pregnancy must be aware of the risk of having an infant with C-CAH.

  1. Preface: Irgac 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solà Joan

    2007-06-01

    , Joan Camps, Noela Fariña, Javier Grande, Laia Jornet, David López Val, Guillem Pérez and Hrvoje Štefančić. I cannot finish without mentioning Dolors (my wife) and Clara (my daughter) who suffered during the many months I had to devote to the detailed organization of this event, a task that I had to combine of course with the research work and the ordinary duties of any university professor. In fact, although the conference took place during just those five (sunny) days of July 2006 mentioned above, the first preliminary searches for speakers had begun in mid-2004, and now I still find myself writing this preface in May 2007—roughly three years' intermittent work for just a one-week event! No complaints whatsoever, of course. I just feel immensely gratified knowing in my heart that most of the participants, if not all of them, truly enjoyed IRGAC 2006 in Barcelona. The challenge was worth it!

  2. The Emancipation of the Preface in the "Phenomenology of Spirit"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Parcero Oubiña

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In his work Prefaces, Kierkegaard’s pseudonym Nicolaus Notabene refers satirically to the preface of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, claiming the value of a preface beyond its connection with the book, against the hegelian objections to prefaces. The present paper aims to compare both works in order to reconsider the relation between them, proposing and alternative interpretation according to which Kierkegaard’s book, beyond its ironical nature, can be regarded as an explicit statement of the inherent meaning to Hegel’s critique of prefaces carried out in the very preface to the Phenomenology of Spirit. Thus Notabene’s satire will help to identify the hegelian preface as an “emancipated preface”, just as Kierkegaard’s heteronym describes them, as texts whose real meaning would consist in its ability to operate exclusively as a disposition [Stemning / Stimmung] towards the work that they precede.

  3. Nonclassical properties of a contradirectional nonlinear optical coupler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thapliyal, Kishore [Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, A-10, Sector-62, Noida, UP-201307 (India); Pathak, Anirban, E-mail: anirban.pathak@gmail.com [Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, A-10, Sector-62, Noida, UP-201307 (India); RCPTM, Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacky University and Institute of Physics of Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Sen, Biswajit [Department of Physics, Vidyasagar Teachers' Training College, Midnapore 721101 (India); Perřina, Jan [RCPTM, Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacky University and Institute of Physics of Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Optics, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2014-10-24

    We investigate the nonclassical properties of output fields propagated through a contradirectional asymmetric nonlinear optical coupler consisting of a linear waveguide and a nonlinear (quadratic) waveguide operated by second harmonic generation. In contrast to the earlier results, all the initial fields are considered weak and a completely quantum-mechanical model is used here to describe the system. Perturbative solutions of Heisenberg's equations of motion for various field modes are obtained using Sen–Mandal technique. Obtained solutions are subsequently used to show the existence of single-mode and intermodal squeezing, single-mode and intermodal antibunching, two-mode and multi-mode entanglement in the output of contradirectional asymmetric nonlinear optical coupler. Further, existence of higher order nonclassicality is also established by showing the existence of higher order antibunching, higher order squeezing and higher order entanglement. Variation of observed nonclassical characters with different coupling constants and phase mismatch is discussed. - Highlights: • Nonclassicalities in fields propagating through a directional coupler is studied. • Completely quantum-mechanical description of the coupler is provided. • Analytic solutions of Heisenberg equations of motion for various modes are obtained. • Existence of lower order and higher order entanglement is shown. • Variation of nonclassicalities with phase-mismatch and coupling constants is studied.

  4. Nonclassical states of light with a smooth P function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damanet, François; Kübler, Jonas; Martin, John; Braun, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    There is a common understanding in quantum optics that nonclassical states of light are states that do not have a positive semidefinite and sufficiently regular Glauber-Sudarshan P function. Almost all known nonclassical states have P functions that are highly irregular, which makes working with them difficult and direct experimental reconstruction impossible. Here we introduce classes of nonclassical states with regular, non-positive-definite P functions. They are constructed by "puncturing" regular smooth positive P functions with negative Dirac-δ peaks or other sufficiently narrow smooth negative functions. We determine the parameter ranges for which such punctures are possible without losing the positivity of the state, the regimes yielding antibunching of light, and the expressions of the Wigner functions for all investigated punctured states. Finally, we propose some possible experimental realizations of such states.

  5. Atom ionization in a nonclassical intense electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, A.M.; Tikhonova, O.V.

    2002-01-01

    The atoms ionization process in the intense nonclassical electromagnetic field is considered. It is shown that depending on the field quantum state the probability of ionization may essentially change even by one and the same average quantum number in the radiation mode, whereby the difference in the ionization rates is especially significant in the case, when the ionization process is of a multiphoton character. It is demonstrates in particular, that the nonclassical field may be considerably more intensive from the viewpoint of the atoms ionization, than the classical field with the same intensity. The peculiarities of the decay, related to the atomic system state in the strong nonclassical field beyond the perturbation theory frames are studied [ru

  6. Nonclassicality indicator for the real phase-space distribution functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, Parvin; Khademi, Siamak; Nasiri, Sadollah

    2010-01-01

    Benedict et al. and Kenfack et al. advocated nonclassicality indicators based on the measurement of negativity of the Wigner distribution functions. These indicators have some applications in quantum mechanics and quantum optics. In this paper we define a nonclassicality indicator in terms of the interference in phase space, which is applicable to some real distribution functions including those of Wigner. As a special case one may reproduce the previous results using our indicator for the Wigner distribution functions. This indicator is examined for cases of the Schroedinger cat state and the thermal states and the results are compared with those obtained by previous methods. It seems that the physical behavior of nonclassicality indicators originates in the uncertainty principle. This is shown by an onto correspondence between these indicators and the uncertainty principle.

  7. PREFACE: Edison 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varani, Luca; Palermo, Christophe; Bastard, Gérald

    2009-11-01

    Conference logo On behalf of the organizing committee we welcome all participants to the 16th International Conference on Electron Dynamics In Semiconductors, Optoelectronics and Nanostructures (EDISON). Since the first meeting, organized in 1973 in Modena (Italy), this international conference has been regularly organized mostly each two years, and after 28 years EDISON is back to Montpellier for its 16th edition. This conference was previously known as 'Hot Carriers In Semiconductors' (HCIS). For some years the name was changed into 'Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors' (keeping the acronym HCIS). Then, during the last meeting of the international advisory committee in Tokyo, the decision was taken to find a new denomination that should be more adapted to the latest evolutions in the domains covered by the conference. After several discussions and a vote within the committee, the new acronym of EDISON was chosen. Therefore EDISON 16 can be considered as the last of a long series of conferences and, at the same time, the first of a new cycle of conferences. The primary focus of EDISON is to provide an international meeting place to discuss the latest progress in the field of nonequilibrium classical and quantum carrier dynamics, from semiconductor bulk materials up to advanced structures and nanometric devices. This includes: classical incoherent transport, as well as coherent transport, usually analyzed by means of ultrafast electrical and optical excitations. To accompany the newest developments, TeraHertz phenomena, with a special attention to quantum cascade lasers, have been added to the list of topics. More recently new subjects have been included such as spintronics, transport in organic materials, graphene and carbon nanotubes. This list of topics is regularly modified and updated at each edition of the conference to represent but also anticipate the latest scientific evolutions. The distinctive features of EDISON are: A long-lasting history

  8. Equilibration and nonclassicality of a double-well potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Steve; De Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro

    2016-01-29

    A double well loaded with bosonic atoms represents an ideal candidate to simulate some of the most interesting aspects in the phenomenology of thermalisation and equilibration. Here we report an exhaustive analysis of the dynamics and steady state properties of such a system locally in contact with different temperature reservoirs. We show that thermalisation only occurs 'accidentally'. We further examine the nonclassical features and energy fluxes implied by the dynamics of the double-well system, thus exploring its finite-time thermodynamics in relation to the settlement of nonclassical correlations between the wells.

  9. PREFACE: Quantum Dot 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert A.

    2010-09-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at Quantum Dot 2010 (QD2010). The conference was held in Nottingham, UK, on 26-30 April 2010. The conference addressed topics in research on: 1. Epitaxial quantum dots (including self-assembled and interface structures, dots defined by electrostatic gates etc): optical properties and electron transport quantum coherence effects spin phenomena optics of dots in cavities interaction with surface plasmons in metal/semiconductor structures opto-electronics applications 2. Novel QD structures: fabrication and physics of graphene dots, dots in nano-wires etc 3. Colloidal quantum dots: growth (shape control and hybrid nanocrystals such as metal/semiconductor, magnetic/semiconductor) assembly and surface functionalisation optical properties and spin dynamics electrical and magnetic properties applications (light emitting devices and solar cells, biological and medical applications, data storage, assemblers) The Editors Acknowledgements Conference Organising Committee: Maurice Skolnick (Chair) Alexander Tartakovskii (Programme Chair) Pavlos Lagoudakis (Programme Chair) Max Migliorato (Conference Secretary) Paola Borri (Publicity) Robert Taylor (Proceedings) Manus Hayne (Treasurer) Ray Murray (Sponsorship) Mohamed Henini (Local Organiser) International Advisory Committee: Yasuhiko Arakawa (Tokyo University, Japan) Manfred Bayer (Dortmund University, Germany) Sergey Gaponenko (Stepanov Institute of Physics, Minsk, Belarus) Pawel Hawrylak (NRC, Ottawa, Canada) Fritz Henneberger (Institute for Physics, Berlin, Germany) Atac Imamoglu (ETH, Zurich, Switzerland) Paul Koenraad (TU Eindhoven, Nethehrlands) Guglielmo Lanzani (Politecnico di Milano, Italy) Jungil Lee (Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Korea) Henri Mariette (CNRS-CEA, Grenoble, France) Lu Jeu Sham (San Diego, USA) Andrew Shields (Toshiba Research Europe, Cambridge, UK) Yoshihisa Yamamoto (Stanford University, USA) Artur

  10. Preface: Phonons 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Bernard

    2007-06-01

    logo.jpg" ALT="Conference logo"/> The conference PHONONS 2007 was held 15-20 July 2007 in the Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers (CNAM) Paris, France. CNAM is a college of higher technology for training students in the application of science to industry, founded by Henri Grégoire in 1794. This was the 12th International Conference on Phonon Scattering in Condensed Matter. This international conference series, held every 3 years, started in France at Sainte-Maxime in 1972. It was then followed by meetings at Nottingham (1975), Providence (1979), Stuttgart (1983), Urbana-Champaign (1986), Heidelberg (1989), Ithaca (1992), Sapporo (1995), Lancaster (1998), Dartmouth (2001) and St Petersburg (2004). PHONONS 2007 was attended by 346 delegates from 37 different countries as follows: France 120, Japan 45, Germany 25, USA 25, Russia 21, Italy 13, Poland 9, UK 9, Canada 7, The Netherlands 7, Finland 6, Spain 6, Taiwan 6, Greece 4, India 4, Israel 4, Ukraine 4, Serbia 3, South Africa 3, Argentina 2, Belgium 2, China 2, Iran 2, Korea 2, Romania 2, Switzerland 2, and one each from Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Egypt, Estonia, Mexico, Moldova, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Turkey. There were 5 plenary lectures, 14 invited talks and 84 oral contributions; 225 posters were presented during three poster sessions. The first plenary lecture was given by H J Maris who presented fascinating movies featuring the motion of a single electron in liquid helium. Robert Blick gave us a review on the new possibilities afforded by nanotechnology to design nano-electomechanical systems (NEMS) and the way to use them to study elementary and fundamental processes. The growing interest for phonon transport studies in nanostructured materials was demonstrated by Arun Majumdar. Andrey Akimov described how ultrafast acoustic solitons can monitor the optical properties of quantum wells. Finally, Maurice Chapellier told us how phonons can help tracking dark matter. These 328

  11. Contour detection based on nonclassical receptive field inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorescu, Cosmin; Petkov, Nicolai; Westenberg, Michel A.

    We propose a biologically motivated computational step, called nonclassical receptive field (non-CRF) inhibition, more generally surround inhibition or suppression, to improve contour detection in machine vision. Non-CRF inhibition is exhibited by 80% of the orientation-selective neurons in the

  12. Correspondence and canonicity in non-classical logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sourabh, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we study correspondence and canonicity for non-classical logic using algebraic and order-topological methods. Correspondence theory is aimed at answering the question of how precisely modal, first-order, second-order languages interact and overlap in their shared semantic environment.

  13. 32 CFR 644.1 - Preface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Project Planning § 644.1 Preface. Subpart A sets out basic procedures to be followed in planning and scheduling for the acquisition of lands in connection with Military and Civil Works projects. It is not... the acquisition phase. Civil Works ...

  14. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Briedis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Šis Santalkos numeris yra skirtas religijos ir etikos sambūviui apmąstyti. Iškeltas tikslas nėra naujas ir pratęsia ilgaamžę istorinę ir teorinę šių žmoniškosios būties sričių koegzistavimą (kartais įgydavusį simbiozės, o kartais ir griežtos opozicijos pavidalą refleksijos tradiciją. Nuo garsiosios Eutifrono dilemos iki šių laikų taikomosios etikos problemos skleidžiasi sudėtingas etikos ir religijos sąveikų bei kontroversijų laukas. Nepaisant to, kad gyvename sekuliarioje ir vartotojiškoje epochoje, religiniai ir etiniai klausimai tebėra aktualūs. Kita vertus, į juos nebus atsakyta, kol tyrinėjimus kreips ir „karūnuos“ ištisomis tradicijomis tapę diskursyvūs modeliai. Todėl reikalinga nuolatinė fundamentalių religinių ir etinių sąvokų revizija bei konstruktyvi reinterpretacija, atsižvelgiant į intelektualinius ir kultūrinius šiandienos pokyčius. Toks hermeneutinės prieigos reikalaujantis požiūris, be kita ko, rodo tradicinius autoritetus naujoje šviesoje.

  15. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena Rodriguez, V.A.; Bravo Cebrejos, Jorge

    1997-01-01

    The Fifth Latin American Conference on Applications of the Moessbauer Effect, LACAME '96, held in Cusco, Peru, September 9-14, 1996,was co-hosted by the Physics Sciences Faculty of the San Marcos Major University of Lima and the San Antonio Abad National University of Cusco. Contributions related to the traditional scientific subjects connected with applications of the Moessbauer Effect were presented in sixteen plenary talks, twenty-one selected contributions for oral presentation, and eighty-eight posters. The conference was attended by some eighty-five scientists from fourteen countries.The Proceedings of LACAME '96 consist of two parts. The first includes invited papers and selected contributed papers for oral presentations, which are published in a special issue of the journal Hyperfine Interactions. The second includes forty-eight selected papers for poster presentation, which are published in a special volume of Hyperfine Interactions C (Conferences).The Editor is grateful to the authors and to the referees for their joint effort, contributing to the scientific quality of both these proceedings.We remember that, since 1988, several Latin American research groups which work with Moessbauer spectroscopy have met at Latin American Conferences in Rio de Janeiro (1988), Havana (1990),Buenos Aires (1992), and Santiago de Chile (1994). LACAME '96 was the fifth of its kind in this series. The attendance at these meetings has been about one hundred physicists from Europe and North America. Presently, in the Latin American scientific community there are about twenty groups working with Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the last six years, the interactions among these different groups have increased due to these meetings. They have allowed the integration of this scientific community. However, we expect to strengthen these relations even more through future new collaborations.The Latin American scientists attending the Cusco meeting agreed that these conferences are extremely useful in the area and are committed to organizing the sixth LACAME '98 Conference in Columbia

  16. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Romão, Teresa; Reidsma, Dennis; Nijholt, Antinus; Romão, Teresa; Reidsma, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment ACE 2012). ACE has become the leading scientific forum for dissemination of cutting-edge research results in the area of entertainment computing. Interactive entertainment is one of the most vibrant

  17. Preface

    OpenAIRE

    Mjølsnes, Stig Frode

    2015-01-01

    Hackers, in the wide positive sense, are often enthusiastic presenters of their practical experience and exploits, but quite indifferent to writing papers. By contrast, scientists are good at writing papers, but often oblivious to the actual details of practice. At times, this difference in approach incites antagonistic attitudes between these communities. We wanted to mingle the two, shall we say, the explorers and the explanators, for mutual inspiration and communication to the benefit of t...

  18. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ystad, S.; Kronland-Martinet, R.; Jensen, K.

    2009-01-01

    . The field of computer music embraces a large number of research areas that span from information retrieval, programming, artificial intelligence to acous- tics, signal processing and sound modeling. In the last CMMR gatherings an increased emphasis was placed on the role of human interaction at all levels...

  19. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Geschiere, P.L.; Binsbergen, van W.M.J.; Geschiere, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Revised version of a book first published in 1982 in Dutch entitled "Oude produktiewijzen en binnendringend kapitalisme" by the Free University, Amsterdam, in association with the African Studies Centre, Leiden. The modern history of Africa can be seen in Marxist terms as a process by which the

  20. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorse, D.; Boutard, J.-L.

    2002-09-01

    The Symposium on “Structural materials for Hybrid systems: A challenge in metallurgy" was held during the “Journées d'Automne 2001" of the “Société Française de Métallurgie et de Matériaux", Paris from October 29 through 31, 2001. The editors of this volume, D. Gorse and J.-L. Boutard, would like to acknowledge GDR GEDEON, CEA - Direction de l'énergie Nucléaire, CNRS - Département des Sciences Chimiques, et Centre d'études de Chimie Métallurgique for sponsoring this symposium. This symposium was divided into three sessions dealing with i) thermodynamics, intergranular penetration and liquid metal embrittlement, ii) irradiation effects in structural materials and iii) compatibility of structural materials with lead alloys in relation with R& D studies for MEGAPIE. The intent of this symposium was to provide a forum for discussing the most recent results obtained in the frame of the materials research program of the “Groupement De Recherche (GDR) GEDEON". Special emphasis was given to all factors susceptible to affect the durability of structural materials for spallation targets, like irradiation effects under proton and neutron mixed spectrum, Liquid Metal Corrosion (LMC) and Embrittlement (LME). The material research program of GEDEON is a joint CEA-CNRS venture. In 1997, the GDR GEDEON gave opportunity to metallurgists and nuclear physicists of both organizations to collaborate for validating the concept of Pb-Bi spallation targets as a key component for Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS). Historically, since 1995, GDR GEDEON has promoted ADS, also called Hybrid System, as an option for waste management. The starting point of the material program was the 1st GEDEON Workshop on “Materials For Hybrid Systems" held in Paris in 1997, where reference materials of the 9-12 Cr martensitic steels series were selected: EM10 (9Cr-1Mo) and the modified 9Cr-1Mo, T91 (9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb). However, besides their specific concern for ADS, our studies are also of interest for the next generation of LM spallation targets in EU, U.S.A. and Japan. These proceedings contain manuscripts from 90% of the presented papers. The organizers would like to thank all their Colleagues who presented papers, contributed with manuscripts and attended the sessions at the symposium. For sake of clarity, this volume is divided into five sections: 1) general R& D for spallation targets, 2) irradiation effects in liquid metal spallation targets, 3) oxygen control: thermodynamics and monitoring, 4) resistance to liquid metal corrosion and embrittlement of structural materials for spallation targets and 5) basic studies of intergranular penetration and liquid metal embrittlement. Section 1 begins with a description of the spallation neutron source facility SINQ and of ongoing R& D programs at PSI (Switzerland), including MEGAPIE, the joint initiative by six European research institutions and JAERI (Japan), DOE (USA) and KAERI (Korea) to design, build, operate and assess the performance of a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target for 1MW of beam power (G. Bauer et al.). The materials aspects related to the MEGAPIE target and to the LiSoR (Liquid Solid Reactions under irradiation) experiment are reviewed by T. Auger et al. The advantages and drawbacks of solid tungsten spallation targets, compared to liquid Pb-Bi eutectic spallation targets are examined by R. Enderlé et al., presenting the CEA point of view. Section 2 is dedicated to irradiation effects in Liquid Metal (LM) spallation targets structure, a crucial problem for the feasibility of ADS. P. Jung is pointing out the specificity of the irradiation conditions in LM targets by comparison with fast neutron fission and fusion reactors, and the metallurgical consequences like irradiation and helium-induced embrittlement. The author emphasizes the importance of spallation residues whose deleterious effects on in-service properties of target container and window are largely unknown. Until recently, say 1997, only predictions of spallation residues production were available. This motivated the GEDEON workshop on “Nuclear Data for materials studies in the frame of hybrid systems" held in 1999 in Vichy (France). The paper presented by C. Villagrasa et al. highlights the progress achieved during the past five years, promoted by GDR GEDEON. The reverse kinematics experiments performed during that period allowed to obtaining reliable values for production cross sections of residual nuclei produced by spallation reactions. The authors also mention improvements on the computation codes. The case of the target window, thin target simply made of iron from the nuclear physics point of view, is thoroughly investigated. The authors also treat the production of residues in heavy metals, like lead. The experimental data reported below results from the cooperation of CEA, CNRS and Forschungszentrum Jülich within the program SPIRE of the 5th European Framework Program. From the metallurgists point of view, O. Danylova et al. reported an interesting attempt to simulate by doping production of three spallation residues, namely phosphorus, sulfur and titanium, certainly detrimental regarding the mechanical properties (fracture toughness...) of the 9% Cr martensitic steels pre-selected for the target window and container. The authors describe the inherent difficulties encountered for obtaining the microstructure and modified steel composition expected under irradiation. In all cases, production of hydrogen and helium is expected very high, ~90 000 appm/year for hydrogen and ~5000 appm/year for helium, corresponding to a damage level of ~100 dpa/year in the target window. These estimated values are just mentioned to show the importance of the metallurgical problem to be faced. These data motivated studies of helium implantation effects by J. Henry et al. in two 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) and modified 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb (T91) pre-selected martensitic steels. Homogeneous implantation of 5000 appm He in T91 and EM10 thin foils followed by TEM examination and tensile testing revealed an important hardening and embrittlement at 250 °C. At 500 °C both materials exhibit far less hardening and retain significant ductility. In the latter case, those findings were correlated with the appearance of helium bubbles detected in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) examination. At 250 °C, no He bubble is detected by TEM. Conversely, Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) allows to identify a high density of objects ~1-2 nm, most probably tiny He bubbles. The low temperature He embrittlement is most probably due to the conjunction of grain hardening and decrease of the cohesive energy of prior austenitic grain boundaries due to He segregation. Besides hydrogen and helium, significant quantities of other spallation residues will be also accumulated in the target window during one year of operation. About 1000 appm of calcium form after one year of irradiation with 1 GeV protons. This exemplary insoluble spallation residue could also contribute to embrittle the window. G. Amiri et al. studied the implantation of both calcium and sulfur (up to 1-2 at% corresponding to a 20 dpa damage level) at 500 °C, assumed to be the highest temperature of the target window in service conditions. P. Pareige et al. detected the formation of Ca nanoclusters using the 3D atomic probe. Neither calcium sulfides nor carbides were detectable whatever the temperature (300 °C or 500 °C) and damage levels. E. Cadel, P. Pareige and M.O. Ruault showed how powerful is the 3D atom probe to characterize both chemical and structural evolution of irradiated steel specimens, at a nanometric scale allowing for interpretation of radiation damages “from first principles". Section 3 is dedicated to oxygen control, including thermodynamic aspects and monitoring. The GDR GEDEON material program promoted the development of oxygen sensors in liquid metals. V. Ghetta et al. studied carefully the possibilities, limitations of existing sensors and proposed new developments allowing to interpret e.m.f measurements at temperatures well below 450 °C. Intercomparisons between oxygen sensors, using various static facilities (BIP, JACOMEX and COLIMESTA) were carried out by J.-L. Courouau et al. This study is now going on including our EU partners in the closely related TECLA program granted by the 5th framework program. C. Lesueur et al. developed original methods for measuring wettability, permitting to determine the stability of native oxides (on Al, Fe, Ni and also T91 steel) in contact with molten lead. A. Maitre et al. presented a preliminary thermodynamic study of the quinary Bi-Fe-Hg-O-Pb system, beginning with the Bi-Hg-Pb system. No solid ternary phase was found in Pb-Bi eutectic in the temperature range expected for the spallation target. Then the authors focused on the possible formation of oxygenated compounds of low melting point either at the T91 steel/Pb or at the T91 steel/Pb-Bi eutectic interface. Section 4 concerns the resistance to LMC and LME of structural materials pre-selected for the spallation target of ADS, with special emphasis on the liquid Pb-Bi eutectic target concept. The compatibility of 9% Cr martensitic steels (like EM10 or T91...) with liquid Pb and Pb-Bi eutectic was examined. Qualification of the T91 steel/LBE system is required to build the liquid Pb-Bi target in PSI in 2005 and for further applications. A comparative study of the long-term corrosion behaviour of various martensitic and austenitic steels in forced circulation loop was carried out by F. Balbaud-Celerier et al. allowing to vary the temperature and oxygen content in LBE covering the range 10-8wt% -10-6wt.% . This work results from a fruitful collaboration with IPPE (Obninsk, Russia). The two following papers of Section 4 deal with the tensile behaviour of T91 steel in contact with lead and its alloys. The most severe metallurgical (J.-B. Vogt et al.) and environmental (J.-L. Pastol et al.) conditions are considered in order to estimate the risk of LME for the target window in service. J.-B. Vogt et al. observed a transgranular (TG) brittle fracture after hardening heat treatment of T91 steel after tensile testing of notched specimens at 350 °C in oxygen-saturated lead. Note that cases of TG-LME are rather scarcely observed. On the other hand, J.-L. Pastol et al. obtained an embrittling effect on notched specimens by optimizing the environmental parameters (in LBE at 350 °C under He-4% H2 cover gas...) and tensile testing conditions. F. Gamaoun et al. showed that a few days exposure of T91 steel in lead under either reducing or oxidizing conditions gives rise to a significant porosity in the steel. This could justify the increased stress relaxation kinetics of specimens submitted to 4-point bending tests under the same conditions. Besides the R& D research related to the spallation target for ADS, a non-negligible part of the GEDEON material research program was dedicated to intergranular penetration and LME. Some exemplary LME studies are reported in Section 5 of this volume, illustrating various aspects of this very old, tricky and exotic problem in metallurgy. One can find in this volume studies involving various Solid Metal/Liquid Metal (SM/LM) couples, going from high purity metal couples (Ni/Pb, Ni/Bi...) to industrial metallic alloys put in contact with liquid metals or alloys of varying purity. LME is a multi scale phenomenon that cannot be explained on the sole basis of either thermodynamics, metallurgical or kinetics criteria. In this section, the role of the stress-strain state is emphasized. The importance of the microstructure of the grains boundaries (facetting...) on LM penetration is also pointed out. This aspect of the problem can now be dealt with thanks to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) techniques. Crack propagation kinetics can now be followed at ESRF (Grenoble) using synchrotron radiation imaging techniques. It is now possible to follow the propagation, structure and chemistry of the embrittling phase in the crack, at microscopic and at nanometric scale. It is also possible, in principle, to take into account the role of defects in grain-boundaries (GB) on the penetration of the embrittling species and conversely to investigate the role of the defects produced by wetting on the GB microstructure. We do hope that these techniques open a new and attractive field of research to improve the understanding of LME. The HRTEM study carried out by A. Charai et al. enlightens the importance of crystallography on wetting. Two exemplary couples are thoroughly investigated: the Mo/Ni couple giving rise to an interfacial nanometer thick interface for one type of Mo bicrystal wetted by nickel and the Ni/Pb couple pointing out the role of the GB plane on wetting. Y. Brechet et al. investigated not only the microstructure effects on “LM" penetration into cracks (cracks kinetics and morphologies), but also the plasticity effects ahead of the crack tip, studying a variant of the mythic Al/Ga couple, say the 7010 Aluminum alloy in contact with Gallium, allowing for modifications of the precipitation state at the GBs by applying various heat treatments. Y. Brechet et al. conclude in favour of a step by step penetration process, quasi at atomic scale and give an estimate of crack propagation velocity, of the order of a few micrometers per second, in good agreement with experimental observations. The author stresses the importance of defects in the GBs (precipitates...) at different scales which can explain discrepancies between the experimental crack velocity and the one calculated using a continuum elastic model. The paper presented by W. Ludwig et al. concentrates on two synchrotron radiation imaging techniques (X-ray micro-radiography and micro-fluorescence) available at ESRF (Grenoble) in order to characterize the penetration kinetics of embrittling species in the crack. Beside the Al/Ga couple, it is shown that those techniques are suitable to follow intergranular propagation of cracks in the Ni/Bi system, even when the embrittling layer becomes nanometric. Structuration of liquid Al in contact with Cu(100) and Cu(111) surfaces of a bulk Cu crystal was studied by P. Geysermans et al. using Molecular Dynamics simulations. The authors showed an epitaxial relationship, whatever the density of the solid and contacting liquid phases. This feature is of importance to understand the structure of the wetting layers in GBs. J. Bernardini et al. emphasize the role of macroscopic defects like facets in GBs on “LM" penetration and propose a model allowing to describe the real shape of the cracks they observed with Ni annealed in contact with pure lead, inconsistent with Mullins grooving theory. Cu/Bi, Cu/LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Ni/LBE systems were studied by K. Wolski et al. using AES semi-quantitative analysis of fractured specimens under vacuum within an Auger Electron spectrometer, enlightening the embrittling role of the nanometer-thick wetting layer in the crack tip area. In summary, during the past five years close cooperation between researchers within the material research program of GEDEON co-sponsored by the 5th EU Framework program allowed to make significant progress. Research dedicated to radiation damage in structural materials for ADS and spallation targets was very active and a number of impressive results were obtained. The low temperature He embrittlement is certainly a matter of concern. The controlling mechanisms and their dependence with temperature, He and dpa production rate has to be clarified. Likewise, compatibility studies of structural materials with lead and lead alloys, particularly LBE, gave rise to a number of remarkable results. One can mention here specifically the progress made with oxygen sensors. Significant is also the renewal of interest for LME during the past five years. Promising results on LME and intergranular penetration are already obtained and should be obtained in this attractive field of research. Of course, a great deal of work remains to be done in order to validate the concept of Pb-Bi spallation target for ADS. Especially, the effect of spallation elements production in structural materials and in LBE has to be assessed as well as LMC and LME under irradiation.

  1. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.; Mamatov, E.D.; Safiev, Kh.S.

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the results of research works conducted in V.I. Nikitin Institute of Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tajikistan and Nuclear and Radiation Safety Agency of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tajikistan. Present book describes the specifics of chloric decomposition process of boron-silicate and aluminium containing ores of the Republic of Tajikistan. One of the main purpose of research is elaboration of methods of boron- and aluminium containing compounds obtaining from ores by chloric methods.

  2. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCrescenzi, Maurizio; Bellucci, Stefano

    2003-09-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains some of the invited papers presented at the School and Workshop on Nanotubes and Nanostructureswhich was held in Frascati, Italy in October 2001 (http://wwwsis.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2001/). The motivation and aim of this initiative was to promote the growth and development of science at the interface between different fields, where methods in one field are used to solve problems in others, bearing in mind the need to strengthen areas of research which are between fields. The School and Workshop covered an area - that of nanotubes and nanostructures - of overlap between field theory and statistical mechanics. This area has important consequences for the study of condensed matter physics and chemistry and also has impressive potential for applications in many fields. We focussed on nanotubes because they appeared to be ideal model systems for studying the physics in one-dimensional solids and have significant potential as building blocks for various practical nanoscale devices. Nanotubes, in fact, have proved to be useful for miniaturized electronic, mechanical, electrochemical and chemical devices. Similar efforts have been devoted to growing artificially nanostructured magnetic materials. The new structural and magnetic properties of these materials are discussed with an emphasis on the correlation between structure and magnetism, which also serves as guidance for improving their magnetic properties.

  3. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benage, J. F.; Dufty, J. W.; Murillo, M. S.

    2003-06-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) which was held during the week of 2--6 September 2002 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. It was the ninth in a series of conferences starting in 1977 in Orléans-la-Source, France as a summer institute. The second in the series was a workshop held in Les Houches in 1982. The conferences were then held in the following order: Santa Cruz, California in 1986, Tokyo, Japan in 1989, Rochester, USA in 1992, Binz, Germany in 1995, Boston, USA in 1997 and St Malo, France in 1999. The planned frequency for the future is every three years. The purpose of these conferences is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of research accomplishments and ideas relating to plasma, liquid and condensed systems dominated by strong Coulomb interactions between their constituents. Strongly coupled Coulomb systems encompass diverse many-body systems and physical conditions. Each meeting has seen an evolution of topics and emphasis as new discoveries and new methods appear. This year, sessions were organized for invited presentations and posters on dense plasmas, colloids, condensed matter, two-dimensional systems, astrophysics, dense hydrogen, ultra-cold plasmas, traps and beams, dusty plasmas, clusters, kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. Within each area new results from theory, simulation and experiment were presented. In addition, a special panel discussion was held one evening to explore the questions which continue to be posed by the experiments on and modelling of dense hydrogen. As this special issue illustrates, the field remains vibrant and challenging, being driven to a great extent by new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions. This is illustrated by the inclusion of developments in the area of beams, traps, plasma crystals and ultra-cold plasmas. In total, 105 participants from 13 countries attended the conference, including 34 invited speakers. Unfortunately, some international speakers could not attend due to problems with obtaining visas, and we deeply regret the difficulties and lost opportunities. These individuals and all others giving presentations at the conference, including invited plenary and topical talks and posters, were asked to contribute to this special issue and most have done so. We trust that this special issue will accurately record the contents of the conference, and provide a valuable resource for researchers in this rapidly evolving field. We would like to thank all members of the International Advisory Board for their contributions to the conference. In particular, we thank Chairman Jean-Pierre Hansen for his diligent work at coordinating the International Advisory Board, the Programme Committee and the Local Organizing Committee. Of course, nothing would have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the Local Organizing Committee. We wish to thank the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Theoretical, Physics, Applied Physics, Materials Science and Technology divisions) and Sandia National Laboratory (Pulsed Power Sciences) for sponsoring this conference. We also gratefully acknowledge the administrative support we received from Marianna Martinez, Marion Hutton and Ellie Vigil of Los Alamos National Laboratory, all of whom were major contributors to the success of the conference. John F Benage, James W Dufty and Michael S Murillo Guest Editors Please see PDF for photograph of conference participants. Local Organizing Committee J F Benage Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA M Desjarlais Sandia National Laboratory, USA G J Kalman Boston College, USA J Kress Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA M S Murillo Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA G Ortiz Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA J Weisheit Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA SCCS International Advisory Board A Alastuey Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, France D Andelman Tel Aviv University, Israel N W Ashcroft Cornell University, USA J Bollinger NIST, Boulder, USA J-M Caillol Université Paris XI, France D M Ceperley University of Illinois, USA G Chabrier Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, France J Clerouin CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, France S das Sarma University of Maryland, USA A DeSilva University of Maryland, USA H DeWitt Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA D Dubin University of California, USA J Dufty University of Florida, USA W Ebeling Humboldt University, Germany V Filinov Institute of High Temperature Physics, Russia M Fisher University of Maryland, USA V E Fortov Institute of High Temperature Physics, Russia K Golden University of Vermont, USA J-P Hansen Cambridge University, UK F Hensel Philipps-Universität, Germany G Kalman Boston College, USA W Kohn University of California, USA H Lowen University of Dusseldorf, Germany G Morfill Max Planck Institute of Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany D Neilson University of New South Wales, Australia G Patey University of British Columbia, Canada F Peeters University of Antwerp, Germany D Pines Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA G Roepke University of Rostock, Germany M Rosenberg University of California, USA Y Rosenfeld Negev Nuclear Research Center, Israel M Schlanges University of Greifswald, Germany G Senatore University of Trieste, France H Totsuji Okayama University, Japan J Weisheit Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA Obituary Forty years of plasma line broadening---in memory of Professor Charles Hooper Jr Our friend and colleague, Charles Hooper Jr, died on 5 May 2002 after a long illness and a valiant battle against it. This presentation is a brief look back at the issues in plasma line broadening over the past forty years, and the contributions to them by Chuck and his students. Chuck graduated from Dartmouth College in 1954. He served in the US Navy for two years before receiving a PhD from Johns Hopkins University in 1963. He then joined the faculty at the University of Florida where his first two papers were written on `Electric microfield distributions in plasmas' and `Relaxation theory of spectral line broadening in plasma'. These two topics were the focus of his research for the next four decades. A personal perspective on the primary problems in this field for each decade is presented here to highlight the many contributions from his research programme. Chuck was particularly proud of the seventeen PhD students who graduated during this time, most of whom are still active in line broadening and related areas. During the early 1970s he recognized the importance of laser fusion and was a strong protagonist for US investment in this area at the national laboratories. He became a leader in this field through his continuing work on spectroscopy as the primary diagnostic tool for laser-produced plasmas. As such Chuck served on several advisory panels at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. He was also co-organizer of a series of conferences on radiative and atomic processes in dense plasmas for the past twenty years. His most recent research has been in collaboration with the University of Rochester Laser Laboratory where he designed and analysed experiments on laser-produced plasmas. The Department of Energy has continuously supported his research since 1974. Less well-known to the plasma community are Chuck's successes as Chairman of the Physics Department at the University of Florida from 1979--86. He initiated a new phase of growth in many science departments at both the University of Florida and Florida State University through his statewide cross-disciplinary Microfabritec programme, bringing significant new funds and faculty lines to physics and materials sciences. He was recognized with The Distinguished Service Award from the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in 2000 as founder and former director of that programme. The field of plasma line broadening has lost one of its most dedicated and enthusiastic spokesmen. His colleagues will miss a cheerful and personable friend, and will remember well his irrefutable response to disagreement, `I am not convinced...'. James W Dufty Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 Obituary In Memorium: Dr Yaakov (Yasha) Rosenfeld Dr Yaakov Rosenfeld (16 February 1948-21 July 2002) In his research life, all too brief, Yasha Rosenfeld notably enriched and significantly advanced an area of physics which is still one of the more challenging fields in the expanding pantheon of the condensed matter sciences: the statistical physics of the liquid state. The ambit of physics associated with this highly correlated state of matter is itself extraordinarily broad, and Yasha's work has had notable impact over an impressively wide front, including charged and neutral liquids, uniform and non-uniform liquids, classical and quantal liquids, single component and multicomponent liquids, liquids close to and far from criticality, liquids both disturbed and in equilibrium. He also greatly elucidated the universal and scaling properties of liquids, and many at this conference will have encountered and admired his remarkable fundamental measures functional, originating in the latter stages of his life. Yasha was an undergraduate at the Technion, and a graduate student (for both masters and doctoral degrees) at the Weizmann Institute. He was a Weizmann Fellow at Cornell University in 1977--78, and it was both a great pleasure and a considerable stimulation to work with him during this period. Subsequently he held several visiting appointments at distinguished intitutions in the US and in Europe, while holding (since 1973) a permanent position at the Nuclear Research Center of the Negev. His first two papers (in 1974 and 75, and joint with Thieberger) dealt with the square well fluid and solid; at the end of his life he had again taken up the pressure dissociation of dense hydrogen a topic he also worked on in 1976. In the intervening years there are more than 100 papers prolifically covering all the areas mentioned above. Because of his originality and eclectic interests, and particularly his ability to link to so many areas in the physics of liquids, he was always much in demand as a speaker at conferences (such as ours). We can but speculate on what more he might have contributed, for he was surely one of the most productive of physicists in our field and also surely in full flight with respect to his creative powers. Yasha's passing has therefore robbed us of one who has given `...a purpose in liquidity...' and for many of us we have also lost a deeply admired friend and colleague, one who was unfailingly generous with insights and ideas, and one whose cheerful scepticism was invariably a constant creative and innovative force on the road to the deeper understanding of the liquid state. Neil Ashcroft

  4. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalu, Dan; Muller, Alexandru

    2003-07-01

    It is a great pleasure for us to introduce this special issue featuring selected papers from the 13th European Micromechanics Workshop, MME'02, organized by the National Institute for R&D in Microtechnologies (IMT Bucharest). The conference was held in the beautiful mountain resort Sinaia, a former Romanian royal residence, 120 km north of Bucharest. In 1989 the first MME workshop was held in Twente, since then it has traveled from one Western European country to another. MME'02 is the first workshop to have been held in Eastern Europe. MEMS consolidated as an exciting field for research and development over the past decade and the MEMS industry is now a substantial presence. Commercial applications of MEMS technology now include pressure, chemical, acceleration, rotation rate sensors, microphones, microdevices in microfluidic systems for bio-engineering, RF switches and fiber optic networks (optical switches), etc. Microtechnology is one of the major growth markets of the 21st century. Microsystems are now key products in information and communication technology, automotive engineering and are also increasing in the fields of chemistry and life sciences. The 6th Framework Programme, already underway, promotes long-term initiatives in this area of research. After reviewing 72 high-quality abstracts submitted for the conference, the programme organizers selected 68 for presentation during the one and half days of the workshop. There were 62 papers from Europe and six papers from outside Europe (USA, Canada and Singapore). The papers covered materials, processing, modeling and applications of micromachining and micromachined devices. Following the tradition of the MME workshops, non-invited papers were discussed at poster sessions after a short oral presentation. This formula was again highly appreciated and stimulated much discussion between scientists. Five invited papers were also presented orally. These invited talks reviewed the latest technological developments in MEMS topics. This year special attention was devoted to the emerging RF MEMS technology. In addition, a presentation of `Microsystems in FP6' was held as a special invited talk at the end of the conference. The selection of papers for inclusion in this issue was difficult, due to the high quality of the papers of the workshop. The final content is a result of the collaboration of the programme committee and Institute of Physics Publishing staff. We wish to thank our colleagues from the MME'02 programme committee: A G R Evans (Southampton University), M Hill (Cork Institute of Technology) and R Wolffenbuttel (Delft University of Technology). We are grateful to all participants for making the workshop a very stimulating meeting place for the MEMS community in Europe.

  5. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    scientists and engineers, astronomers, business people and ... Earth/Moon system and its current environment, but also ... the space environment, together with the products ... Ivashkin, V V, M V Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Russia.

  6. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Bonin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available « Avec ténacité, ce qu’il veut (l’homme, c’est arracher aux Alpes la seule richesse qu’elles recèlent, asservir la force de leurs eaux. » (Documentaire du 17 octobre 1960, La Grande Dixence, 3’50’’, TSR, http://www.ideesuisse.ch/250.0.html?&L=1, consulté le 15 décembre 2007 Hydroelectricity has been officially classified as a renewable resource by the Beijing Declaration on Renewable Energy for Sustainable Development – obviously, it was not by chance that this declaration was made in China...

  7. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, L.; Chaparro, A. M.

    The CONAPPICE congress series is dedicated to forstering fuel cell technology activities and related processes, like the hydrogen production, storage and use. Latest advances are shown by groups from universities, research centres, technology centres, companies and administration. CONAPPICE is organised every two years by the Spanish Fuel Cells Association (APPICE) as one of the main activities within its education and dissemination program. The third edition, CONAPPICE 2008, took place in the Spanish city of Zaragoza, from 24 to 26 September. Zaragoza was, during 2008, a reference for renewable energies, sustainable development and environment protection, and hosted an international exposition dedicated to these concepts. Fuel cells, with their demonstrated clean and secure behaviour, are one of the central concepts to bring the desired energy paradigm based on hydrogen conversion, so the presence of CONAPPICE 2008 in Zaragoza this year was more than justified.

  8. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    This book is addressed to scholars and students of linguistics and compu- tational linguistics as well as others. Constraints are fundamental notions in the characterisation and processing of language. A model of language may consist of a generative and a constraining part, independently of wheth...... not claim to provide a unified view of constraints, but aims at creating a mutual inspiration and transfer of results between the different fields and directions covered in this book. . . ....

  9. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    1998-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 1997. The reports consist of two sections: ''Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure'' and ''Experimental Methods and Instrumentation''. The research program includes investigations of the giant dipole resonance, studies of nuclear dissipation, Coulomb excitations and spectroscopy of nuclei around A=130. The study of the GDR decay of 76 Se * has been completed using the beam from the Warsaw Cyclotron. The deformation of this nucleus at E x =45 MeV has been found. These studies were extended to higher excitation energies at the University of Washington Superconducting Linear Accelerator. We continued our participation in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMISE collaborations. The FOPI group carried out its experiment on strangeness production in HI collisions, using the SIS accelerator at GSI Darmstadt where evidence of the formation of Δ(1232 MeV) resonance at a beam energy per nucleon below the pion production threshold has been found. The nuclear spectroscopy group continues its interest in the properties of nuclei in the vicinity of doubly closed shells. High spin states in nuclei near 208 Pb were populated in strongly damped HI collisions. New states were found in 209,210 Pb and 207 Tl. Spins and parities were assigned based on the shell-model. In the region of A≅100, new data on the of high spin states in 104 Sn have been reported. Lifetimes of these states were measured. In studies of nuclear superdeformation the search for transitions linking the yrast superdeformed bands in 144 Gd and 143 Eu to normal deformed states has been carried out. The candidate for such linking transition (E=3361 keV) in 143 Eu has been confirmed. Motivated by nuclear structure and astrophysical considerations studies on 180 Ta have been continued to find its intermediate states connecting the isomer to its ground state. Referring to the section on Experimental Methods and Instrumentation, one should to mention the PPCO method. It can be used to assign spin, parity and multipolarity of oriented nuclei

  10. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    1999-01-01

    This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 1998. The scientific reports are grouped in two sections: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure; Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The current research program of our Division includes activities using the beams from the Warsaw cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as involvement in research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year substantial progress has been made in completing the ISOL/IGISOL isotope separator which was connected to the heavy ion beam line, the ion source chamber was mounted and equipped with the target and the ion guide chambers. To study, control and improve the ion optics system, a special corona ion source was designed, mounted and installed in the ion guide chamber. We continued our study of high-energy γ-ray emission in heavy-ion collisions in the projectile energy range of 4-11 MeV/u. The analysis of experimental data obtained in collaboration with the NPL in Seattle shows the importance of the bremsstrahlung emission in the γ-ray spectra at photon energies above 20 MeV. An improved theoretical description, including complete and incomplete fusion, preequilibrium emission and bremsstrahlung process, indicates that the bremsstrahlung cross-section at high γ-ray energies is smaller than predicted by the simple model using exponential formula. The extracted GDR parameters and their dependence on average temperature and spin are strongly influenced by the inclusion of incomplete fusion and preequilibrium processes. We continued our participation and active involvement in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMISE international collaborations. Data from experiments of the FOPI collaboration were analysed in terms of event-by-event fluctuations. A novel method of studying equilibration processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions was applied to the data from the Ru + Ru reaction at 1.69 A·GeV. By an appropriate choice of the fluctuating variables, chemical and thermal equilibration could be studied independently. Preliminary results show that equilibration of the system changes with centrality of the collision. The data from Au + Au collisions at 0.8 A·GeV were analysed for the presence of the intermittency signal. Our participation in the TAPS collaboration included studies of particle production in reactions induced by 190 MeV protons on nuclei. Analysis of particles which are in coincidence with neutral pions (produced below the NN threshold) revealed existence of two distinct production mechanisms: the first one being the emission from a hot equilibrated compound nucleus and the second one the quasi-direct, forward-directed process with the single proton carrying most of the energy remaining after pion production. The nuclear spectroscopy group concentrated their interest on studying properties the nuclei in the region of Z>50 and N 119 In were determined from lifetime measurements of 31 negative parity states. This unique experimental information about four negative parity bands in 119 I made it possible to determine the shape of this nucleus as being quadrupole close to maximal nonaxiality. The description of these negative parity bands by a γ-soft core is better than by a γ-rigid core. Our spectroscopy group also continued their involvement in studies of nuclear superdeformation. High spin states in neutron-deficient nuclei around A∼140 were studied with the γ detector array EUROBALL 3. Dipole bands representing the rotation of a magnetic dipole were found in the 142 Gd nucleus

  11. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The main goal of the joint Slovak-Hungarian monitoring is to mutually record and evaluate the impacts of the water supply by the underwater weir. The evaluation includes the changes in the hydrological regimes of the surface and ground water, the changes in the surface and ground water quality, the changes in soil moisture and changes in forestry and biota. The goal of the mutual data exchange is to provide information on monitoring results characterising the environmental changes on the influenced area of the respective Parties. The basic condition of data exchange is use of equal or compatible methods of measurements and analysis and the application of agreed interpretation methods. The final goal of the Joint Annual Report is to submit the joint evaluation of the monitoring results and the joint recommendations for monitoring improvement and environment protection activities to the respective governments

  12. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Light is absorbed by promoting electrons between quantum states. Our control of this key optoelectronic interaction has improved radically in recent years as we become smarter about finding ways to affect this fundamental process. For decades, researchers concentrated on improving optical properties through changing the properties of the electronic states, by choosing appropriate atoms, molecules or solids, and by growing crystals of a perfection not found in nature. Huge developments in material science saw the introduction of many optically special materials, such as compound semiconductors and their nanostructures. Recently we have found new ways to manipulate the light-matter interaction by modifying the photonic components, for instance by enhancing the optical field with feedback in cavities. This second `knob' on the light-matter interaction manipulates the optical density of states. Besides simply enhancing the interaction by locally amplifying the electromagnetic fields, the modified optical density of states produced by photonic structuring allows emission and absorption rates to be enhanced or suppressed, now known as the Purcell effect. Atom-filled optical cavities exhibit many of these interesting phenomena. But it was not until the advent of high-quality semiconductor epitaxy that transitions with sufficient oscillator strength and a narrow-enough linewidth could be produced to uncover a third approach to modifying the light-matter interaction. A simple offshoot of the technology development of vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers, the combination of high-reflectivity semiconductor mirrors and narrow strong absorption lines of semiconductor quantum wells, opens a new regime. This `strong-coupling' regime emerges when the time it takes a photon to be emitted and pass once around the cavity to be then reabsorbed (known as the inverse `Rabi' frequency) becomes less than the time for the photon to leak out of the cavity or for the electronic transition to lose its phase coherence. In 1991 the first such semiconductor structure showed the resulting Rabi splitting, with electron and photon states being mixed together by the optical interaction into polaritons (Weisbuch et al 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 3314). Why do polaritons in semiconductors give us so many new properties, many of which are explored in this special issue? They are the third knob to tweak on the light-matter box because the mixing revises the underlying quantum states; polaritons then have different properties to electron-hole pairs. Instead of merely working on reshaping the wavefunctions of the electrons, we use the electric-dipole coupling to mix in some photon component and alter the way that optical energy couples in and out of the material. Polaritons have one of the biggest spatial wavefunctions that we know how to make, they possess boson symmetry, and weigh very little compared to electrons. But it is not really their individual properties that make them of such importance, it is their interactions. It took another decade after the first polaritons were seen in semiconductor microcavities before it was found that the interaction between polaritons was orders of magnitude stronger than between electron-hole pairs (Baumberg 2001 Physics World 15 (3) 37 and Savvidis et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 1547). The key revelation in understanding polaritons has been their dispersion relation, which is completely distorted compared to that of the electron-hole pairs (Houdre et al 1994 Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 2043). Of course polaritons exist in bulk materials (Hopfield 1958 Phys. Rev. 112 155) but the shape of the dispersion there is again different and not favourable for many of the polariton interactions that are reported throughout this issue. In semiconductor microcavities, the new dispersion relations take the form of an energy `trap' in momentum space. As in golf, polaritons tend to collect either at the bottom of the trap or around its edges. Through an intense concentration of research, both theoretical and experimental, over the past three years much has become clearer about how polaritons behave, including suggestions about how they can be made to work for us in producing hitherto inaccessible physical phenomena of technological interest. Thus, it is timely to collect many of the excellent contributions together into a special issue in which much of this science can be treated in the depth it deserves. We can divide the contributions into those that promise new sorts of strongly-coupled microcavity devices; those which explore how polaritons are formed, how they scatter, and how they decay; and those which identify more of the unusual polariton particularly at the bottom of the dispersion relation). This latter topic reopens the question of whether Bose-Einstein (or in this case, polariton) condensation is possible or has been seen in these unusual structures. This field then crosses a number of important research areas including micro-lasers, lasing without inversion, condensation and superfluidity, new spin properties, ultrafast optical nonlinearities and quantum optics. We have included a review article by Quatropanni and co-workers, which discusses theoretical aspects of the nonlinear optical properties of semiconductor microcavities in the strong exciton-photon coupling regime, which was planned to appear as a separate paper in Semiconductor Science and Technology, but which was considered more appropriate to be incorporated in this issue. A theoretical description of coherent nonlinearities in semiconductor microcavities is given by Savasta et al, who show that the strong energy dependence of the two exciton states damping is crucial to explain the dependence of the experimentally reported results on Rabi splitting and detuning. Stimulated polariton scattering, arising from the bosonic character of polaritons, is described by Skolnick's group, who also emphasize the role of the unusual dispersion of the lower polariton branch to allow much of the new physics in semiconductor microcavities. Non-linear effects in semiconductor microcavities, which include stimulated polariton scattering, parametric oscillation, spin dynamics, and the possibilities of a polariton condensate, are discussed by Baumberg et al. The suppression of the relaxation bottleneck on the lower polariton branch and the stimulation of the emission in II-VI based microcavities is demonstrated by Dang and collaborators, who also probe the coherent dynamics along the lower polariton branch by means of angle-resolved four wave mixing experiments. The possibility to observe parametric polariton amplification at room temperature is discussed by Deveaud's team, who demonstrate that this could be achieved in cavities, in which quantum wells with a large exciton binding energy are embedded, such as in GaN-based cavities. The effects induced by a two-dimensional electron gas on the interaction between the electromagnetic field and the excitons in a semiconductor microcavity are discussed by Cohen et al, who show that the presence of the electron gas is responsible for an efficient interaction between electrons and polaritons. The modification of the optical mode spectrum in microcavities, by introducing lateral photon confinement, is demonstrated by Bayer and collaborators, who show the possibility of tailoring elastic polariton pair-scattering and a suppression of the spontaneous emission for quantum dots embedded in such cavities. The optical properties of biexcitons in microcavities are reviewed by Langbein et al, who perform a detailed investigation of the polariton-biexciton transition and study the biexciton binding energy and dephasing in a microcavity at low temperature. A detailed experimental study of linear and circular polarization dynamics in secondary emission of microcavities in the strong coupling regime is presented by Amand's group, who show that it is possible to manipulate the polariton spin and alignment within the optical dephasing time. The spin dynamics under non-resonant excitation is presented by Viña's co-workers, who demonstrate that the polarization of the emission is controlled by the detuning of the cavity and the exciton modes, leading to crossed-polarized emission after circularly-polarized excitation at negative detunings. The enhancement of the resonant Raman scattering using semiconductor planar microcavities is described by Fainstein and Jusserand, who also propose a novel phonon microcavity structure and demonstrate the existence of acoustical phonon confined modes in these structures. Exciton-polariton lasing and its relation with the formation of a macroscopic coherence, associated with a Bose-Einstein phase transition, is reviewed by Yamamoto et al. A calculation of the phase diagram of a weakly interacting polariton gas in a microcavity is given by Kavokin and collaborators, who also describe the possible condensation of polaritons using a quantum kinetic formalism. The quantum mechanical nature of the light field in semiconductor microcavities is revealed by the teams of Gibbs and Koch, who describe entanglement effects in the probe reflectivity of a microcavity system and squeezing in the incoherent emission. Normal-mode coupling in photonic crystals is demonstrated by Ishihara's group, who present experimental evidence of the strong coupling regime, detuning schemes, and anticrossing behaviour in absorption and photoluminescence investigations. Characteristic features of organic semiconductor microcavities, the similarities and differences between inorganic and organic cavities operating within the strong coupling regime and the identification of novel features of the organic systems that can be exploited in new structures are discussed by Bradley et al, who also present prospects for inorganic/organic hybrid materials that may form the seed of a new paradigm in optoelectronic devices. A theoretical analysis of resonant acousto-optic Stark effects for microcavity polaritons is presented by Ivanov and Littlewood, who also discuss possible applications of this effect for optical modulation and switching. Hopefully, as well as providing a new resource, this issue will stimulate imaginative exploitation of this emerging field. Guest Editors J J Baumberg Departments of Physics & Astronomy, Electronics & Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK L Viña Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049, Madrid, Spain

  13. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    lems arising, for example, after discretization of optimal control problems. Lucien developed a general framework for quantifying near-optimality...Polak, E., Da Cunha, N.O.: Constrainedminimization under vector valued-criteria in finite dimensional spaces. J. Math . Anal. Appl. 19(1), 103–124...1969) 12. Pironneau, O., Polak, E.: On the rate of convergence of certain methods of centers. Math . Program. 2(2), 230–258 (1972) 13. Polak, E., Sargent

  14. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auret, Danie; Swart, Hendrik; Venter, André

    2014-04-01

    The 5th South African Conference on Photonic Materials (SACPM) was again hosted very successfully at the beautiful Kariega private game reserve situated in the Eastern Cape, the second largest of South Africa's nine provinces. It is the traditional home of the Xhosa people and the birth place of many prominent South Africans including Nelson Mandela and Thabo Mbeki. This movingly beautiful region is a remarkably diverse biosphere - ranging from lush evergreen forests to rugged mountains - incorporating the sunshine coast, with miles of sun-drenched coastline, pristine beaches and the warm sparkling Indian Ocean dotted with rivers, lagoons and coastal villages.

  15. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Valeria V.; Kurlyandskaya, Galina V.

    2016-10-01

    This special issue of Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials contains selected peer-reviewed papers from the International Baltic Conference on Magnetism: focus on biomedical aspects (IBCM-2015) held in Svetlogorsk, Kaliningrad region, Russia on the base of Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (IKBFU, Kaliningrad, Russia) during August 30-September 03, 2015. Ural Federal University named after the first President of Russia B.N. Yeltsin (UrFU, Yekaterinburg, Russia) acted as a co-organizer of the IBCM-2015. IKBFU and UrFU vice-rectors for science - Prof. Artyom V. Yurov and Prof. Vladimir V. Kruzhaev - took a special care for the IBCM-2015.

  16. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droste, Ch.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific contributions are classified into three sections: 1) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure, 2) Experimental Methods and Instrumentation, 3) Other Research. In the section 1 the information about an experimental setup for studing high energy gamma rays produced in heavy ion collisions is given. Other research described in this section is the study of the mechanism of fusion-fission reactions where complete set of data on precission neutron multiplicities was analysed. The very long fusion-fission time scale is reported that may suggest some unexpected properties of hot nuclear matter. Our permanent interest in gamma rays accompanying heavy ion reactions is represented by a contribution in which extremely energetic photons, above the kinematics limit set by the beam and Fermi motion velocities, has been observed. Reactions at higher energies are represented by two works, an experimental one in which η meson production cross section were measured and a theoretical one that deals with the properties of hot nuclear matter produced in 200 AGeV nucleus-nucleus collision. The nucler spectroscopy group reports some new information concerning shell structure of the spherical nuclei. The decay of the I = 8 + isomer in strongly neutron deficient 100,102 Cd was studied and the results were analysed in the framework of a shell model. The wave functions for many excited states in 208 Pb were derived from the large set of experimental data and interesting information about residual interactions was obtained. The electromagnetic properties of some deformed nuclei were investigated. The 125,127 La nuclei were studied using RDM lifetime measurements and 129 Xe and 156 Gd - using Coulomb excitation. The superdeformed states were studied in 145 Gd where the SD bands have been discovered. One of them shows two band crossing. In the second section a new experimental method for determination of gamma ray polarization is proposed and in the last one the results of experimental test of Bell's inequalities are presented

  17. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Mee; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2018-05-01

    This special issue of the Spectrochimica Acta A is dedicated to the retirement of Professor Yukihiro Ozaki of Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan as an internationally well recognized scientist in molecular spectroscopy studies including vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.

  18. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldev Arora

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Earth is a complex dynamic system and study of the geomagnetic field can provide
    insight to the dynamic processes operative in the outer core where the main field is
    produced by a geo-dynamo mechanism. By contrast the study of transient geomagnetic
    variations is an important tool for studying the complex solar wind-magnetosphere-
    ionosphere coupling. In addition the currents induced by the time varying external
    current system allow us to image the crust and the upper mantle in terms of
    electric conductivity. Lack of measurements and collection of geomagnetic data from
    certain strategic locations restricts the development of high quality models of main
    geomagnetic field as well as the current systems responsible for transient geomagnetic
    variations. Division V of the International Association of Geomagnetic Aeronomy
    (IAGA jointly with the Interdivisional Commission for Developing Countries organized
    a special symposium «Geomagnetic Measurements in Remote Regions» at General
    Assembly of IUGG held at Perugia (Italy during July 2-12, 2007. Papers were
    presented on data base numerical simulations identifying strategic gaps in the existing
    observatory network where new measurements of geomagnetic field could improve
    upon existing geomagnetic reference models. Special focus was on describing the
    novel design of equipment, modes of data collection and dissemination from remote
    regions. During the symposium, 21 presentations were presented and this issue of
    Annals of Geophysics compiles a selection of papers.
    It is significant that each paper in this special issue is multi-authored by several
    institutions and countries. This emphasizes the importance of worldwide collaboration
    when obtaining and analyzing data from geophysical observations in remote regions.
    With current technology magnetic observatories still require people to take measurements
    at least once per week to enable baselines to be established and must be
    away from power sources and transmission lines. This restricts the location of magnetic
    observatories used for deep Earth investigations. However, presented here are
    papers describing ways to overcome harsh conditions and obtain magnetic data in
    remote locations. The need for long term ground based geomagnetic observatories
    for reference models is well established and discussed. Also discussed, is the study
    of magnetic field variations for determining transient phenomena. The measuring
    stations can exist unmanned as highlighted during the session by the Japanese group (not included in this volume and Chambodut et al.
    Five papers (Cafarella et al., Chambodut et al., De Lauretis et al., Maksymchuk
    et al., and Torta et al. describe magnetic observations in Antarctica. Most of this
    continent is covered by ice so it is almost impossible to sample the continental surface
    directly: magnetic exploration allows us to overcome much of this problem, providing
    important information on the geological and tectonic settings of this continent.
    Antarctica is also an interesting magnetic region because it is in darkness for
    half of the year, so production of the ionospheric plasma that creates the daily Solar
    quiet variation is reduced for this period in this region (Chambodut et al.. In addition,
    it contains the southern polar cap current system – a window to the solar wind
    and the magnetospheric-ionospheric energy transfer processes (De Lauretis et al..
    Torta et al. and Chambodut et al. describe the exceptional means necessary for a
    magnetic observatory in Antarctica attempting to attain INTERMAGNET status. Torta et
    al. use Livingston Island (LIV, in the South Shetland Islands archipelago (in operation
    for ten years, and Chambodut et al. describe Concordia Base (in operation for
    just over 3 years. Both have not yet achieved INTERMAGNET status.
    De Lauretis et al. use two stations Concordia at Dome C and Mario Zucchelli at
    Terra Nova Bay to show that the geomagnetic signals, measured by the two stations,
    have very different signatures that depend upon the position of the stations with respect
    to the sources.
    The paper by Cafarella et al., describes long-term trends in geomagnetic measurements
    which have non-absolute baselines for six months of the year at Mario
    Zucchelli station (TNB. These authors compare TNB data with the models from
    satellite measurements and find them to be in good agreement. They exhibit the different
    long-term trend in source currents for example, daily variation, pulsations
    and internal Earth sources such as jerks.
    Maksymchuk et al. also describe the results of long-term (1998-2005 yrs. magnetic
    investigations but use tectonomagnetic techniques in the Western Antarctic
    near the location of Ukrainian Antarctic Station «Academic Vernadsky». This new
    type of research is described.
    A novel approach to remote data acquisition is given in Torta et al. They describe
    the development of data transmission facilities for real time access between Antarctica
    and Spain using METEOSAT and GOES satellites and recently the move to a
    high frequency (HF digital radio-link, using ionospheric propagation.
    Geomagnetic measurements from the deep sea are discussed in Vitale et al. From
    2000 to 2005 two exploring geophysical missions were undertaken in the Tyrrhenian
    deep seafloor at depths between around -2000 and -3000 m in the framework of the European-funded GEOSTAR Projects. During the two GEOSTAR deep seafloor
    missions, scalar and vector magnetometer measurements were used to improve
    global and regional geomagnetic reference models and to infer specific geoelectric
    information about the two sites.
    Three papers (Korte et al., Macmillan et al., Matzka et al. describe magnetic observations
    in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly. This is the region between
    Africa and South America where Earth’s main magnetic field is depressed causing
    localized space weather hazards (some described in Macmillan et al., especially
    satellite outages. Korte et al. describes the installation of new magnetic observatories
    in Bolivia, Namibia and St Helena, and Macmillan et al. describe two older
    magnetic observatories located on Ascension Island and Port Stanely.
    Repeat station surveys are a way of measuring the secular variation of main field.
    Matzka et al. contains a detailed report of a repeat station survey in this region at
    Tristan da Cunha Island. They also describe the drawbacks of repeat station surveys
    and prefer a magnetic observatory in the region which will be established for the
    SWARM satellite mission. However, Korte et al. show that when nothing else exists
    repeat stations are still a good way of obtaining secular variation data. They describe
    the addition of several repeat stations in the South Atlantic anomaly area in
    Africa.
    Torta et al. and Korte et al. also describe efforts being made to create an unmanned
    magnetic observatory, which would have INTERMAGNET standards.
    The Guest Editors wish to thank Enkelejda Qamili for her assistance during the
    session in Perugia, the numerous referees who reviewed the papers and the Editorial
    office of Annals of Geophysics for their continued support and encouragement in
    bring out this special issue of the Journal.

  19. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, V.; Iacomi, F.; Dubourdieu, C.; Sánchez Barrera, F.; Kompitsas, M.

    2015-10-01

    The present issue contains a collection of representative papers presented at the 10th International Conference on Physics of Advanced Materials, ICPAM-10 (https://www.icpam.ro/), held in Iasi, Romania, September 22-28, 2014. ICPAM-10 was organized under the auspices of the Romanian Ministry of Education and Research and had as co-organizers 22 prestigious institutions from Romania, France, U.K, Russia, Japan, Portugal, Ukraine, Netherlands, Switzerland, Hungary, Turkey, Greece and USA and benefited of the support of 20 sponsors and exhibitors. The financial support offered by NanoAndMore, ExpressCredit, American Elements, ArcelorMittal Tubular Products Iasi, Agilrom Scientific, Schaefer SouthEast Europe, Iasi City Hall, PIM Copy, Histeresis, ApelLaser, Nitech, Technosteel LBR, THORLABS GmbH, MaTecK, Sartorom, Antalis, EMFUTUR and Romanian Physical Society helped to support the attendance of many young researchers and PhD students, as well as several prizes that were awarded.

  20. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, D.

    Sixteen years ago, the first international conference on lead-acid batteries LABAT'89 laid the foundations of a world community of scientists, technologists and experts working in the field of lead-acid batteries, who gather together every 3 years to discuss the latest achievements, problems and challenges facing the development of this most widely used electrochemical power source. These conferences of ours have become traditional and have withstood the fierce competition of numerous other meetings on power sources, which abound in the calendar of events lately. This year, the lack of international coordination resulted in a clash of three international conferences on electrochemical power sources held within the same week. The Organizing Committee of LABAT'2005 announces with great satisfaction that this year's conference was attended by nearly 200 battery experts from 30 countries. Sixty-two papers were submitted for presentation at the conference by speakers from all six continents. Twenty-one companies chose to exhibit their products and services at LABAT'2005.

  1. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorandi, Daniele; Maltese, Vincenzo; Rovatsos, Michael; Stewart, James; Miorandi, Daniele; Maltese, Vincenzo; Rovatsos, Michael; Nijholt, Antinus; Stewart, James

    2014-01-01

    Social collective intelligence is an emerging area at the intersection of collective intelligence and social informatics, where social processes between humans are being leveraged and enhanced, by means of advanced Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), to solve challenging problems using

  2. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Ulf; Goobar, Ariel; Nilsson, Bengt E. W.

    2005-01-01

    The idea of organizing a Nobel Symposium focusing on the recent exciting developments in the overlap between string theory and cosmology was born about two years prior to the meeting. The progress, both observational and theoretical, was sparked off by the spectacular new measurements of the geometry and content of the universe. These included ever more accurate observations of the cosmological background radiation testing our ideas of the very early universe, as well as observations of distant supernovae indicating that the universe is in a phase of accelerated expansion. This development was a fertile ground for cosmologists as well as for the string community where people were looking for contacts with observations by applying string theory at the cosmological scale. We are now witnessing the impact of improved observational data coming in regularly, and on the theory side, the appearence of large amounts of collaborative work between cosmologists and string theorists. In view of these facts, we believe that the timing of the Symposium was close to optimal. As organizers, we felt very pleased with the Symposium, and were very happy to see so many prominent scientists being enthusiastic about the meeting. We direct our most profound thanks for the success of the Symposium to all the participants. A special thanks goes to the speakers and chairmen. With half of the time allocated for discussions in the sessions, each one devoted to a particular issue, it was of paramount importance that the chairmen could get both cosmologists and string theorists to contribute with their views and expertice to penetrate the questions to the limit. The resulting debates in several sessions will linger in the memories of those present for many years to come. The Symposium ended with a question and answer session with the whole audience acting as panel. The participants had been asked to formulate what they thought were the key questions in the field. Although consensus was not always reached, it was clear to everyone that the issues discussed at the Symposium (and documented in this book) are among the most fascinating topics in contemporary Physics. Our most sincere thanks go to professors Lars Brink, David Gross, and Michael Turner for organizing this grand final. The outcome of a Symposium like this depends to a very large extent on the place where it was held and its surroundings. The choice fell on the small historic town of Sigtuna and the Sigtuna Stiftelsen (Sigtuna Foundation), a Mediterranean inspired building complex and conference center from the beginning of the last century, with a rich tradition of hosting the most famous individuals in the cultural life of Sweden. The building itself, the proximity to the lake Mälaren, and the picturesque town made the stay a wonderful experience. Our deep gratitude is also directed to the personnel in Sigtuna who with a smile made everything possible and the stay a very pleasant one. Important help was also provided by the scientific secretaries of the Symposium, Martin Olsson and Henric Larsson. We also want to emphasize the crucial role played by the international advisory committee consisting of L Bergström, L Brink, P Di Vecchia, D Gross, R Kallosh, M Rees, H Rubinstein, and M Turner. We are deeply grateful for their work, especially during the preliminary planning of the meeting. The Klein lecture committee and the Swedish Academy of Sciences are acknowledged for organizing an impressive end to the Symposium in Stockholm. The public lectures by David Gross and Andrei Linde followed by the Klein lecture by Stephen Hawking were attended by an audience of over 1200 people, while several other hundred were unable to enter the already full lecture room. This event was certainly among the scientific highlights of the year in Sweden. Finally, we would like to extend our gratitude to the Nobel foundation for providing the financial support.

  3. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwerdtner Máñez, Kathleen; Poulsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    as long term catch rates has been investigated through the use of past paper documents, including photographs. Equally important, and more frequently, historians are answering anthropogenic questions evolving around individual fishermen, fishing fleets, consumers, managers and marine scientists. Listing......This chapter shows how historians’ methodologies and approaches are being used to reconstruct marine ecological phenomena of the past. In terms of the use of history in historical marine ecology, a number of examples are presented of how past species abundance and spatial aggregation as well...... all relevant historical scholarship, which can be termed marine environmental history are beyond the scope of this chapter. What is mainly in focus here, is historical research, where the methodologies have been used to infer knowledge on past marine resource use. The final parts of this chapter...

  4. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... Computational methods are essential for analysing biological data because ... Many problems in the above areas are closely related to different tasks .... roles in the maintenance of cell's functional responses by regulating the.

  5. Preface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan; Ding; Hervé; Stolowy

    2013-01-01

    <正>Since the seminal JFE paper published by Jensen and Meckling in 1976(Jensen and Meckling,1976)the agency theory has been widely applied in numerous studies in the fields of corporate finance and accounting.Meanwhile,many researchers also notice that the conflicts between the principal(shareholder)and the agent(manager)may not be the predominant issue in most of the firms around the world,since the dispersed shareholding and separation between ownership and management are relatively uncommon phenomenon,limited to certain type of firms(listed firms)and to certain countries(like the USA).

  6. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A young research scientist who had only joined the staff at Texas a year before I ... wide range of close collaboration with the rest of the Indian institutions as ... to have continuous coverage of the observations without gaps because of the day–.

  7. Preface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huijun

    2009-01-01

    @@ Climate change is one of the most challenging issues faced by human beings.Although many remarkable achievements have been made in climate change research,there is still a tremendous amount of uncertainty in the field.Comprehensive and rational understanding of climate change processes and mechanisms,assessment of future climate change,and formulating proper mitigation policy are all still a long way from realization.These uncertainties make the climate change problem extremely complicated,requiring interdisciplinary exploration.

  8. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, R. B.

    2003-03-01

    It is not an exaggeration to say that over the past forty years solid-state electronic devices have revolutionized working practices and the way leisure time is spent. The semiconductor at the heart of the vast majority of these electronic devices is silicon. Predictions that new semiconductors will be required to enable the pace of the electronics revolution to be kept at its present level are regularly made, but silicon device engineers just keep coming up with ways to make silicon devices better and better. It is the year 1990, and reliable chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques for the formation of large area films of diamond have been demonstrated in a number of research laboratories around the world. The first major international conferences on the growth, properties and potential applications for diamond, now available in a form useful to device engineers for the first time, have taken place. A survey of the basic properties of diamond suggests that it is an ideal material for electronics. It has a wide bandgap (5.5 eV, indirect), high saturated carrier velocities and carrier mobilities (and electrons and holes have similar values), a high electric field breakdown strength, low dielectric constant, high thermal conductivity and high visible-infrared radiation transparency. Many potential applications can, and have been proposed, including high power and high frequency electronic devices. When the resilience of diamond to high levels of radiation or heat, and the prospect of a negative electron affinity surface are also considered, many more applications come to mind such as high temperature or radiation hard electronics, radiation detectors, optoelectronic devices and cold cathodes. At this time, diamond films grown on non-diamond substrates are polycrystalline, and highly defective, but high purity single crystal material is considered `just around the corner'. There is even a naturally occurring dopant, boron, to enable p-type diamond to be produced and surely it is only a matter of months before n-type material is realized. Researchers can be found talking to the media about future computers that will have within them semiconducting chips made of diamond early in the new century. Let us now move to the present, the year 2003. Diamond films grown on non-diamond substrates are still polycrystalline, although far less defective. Single crystal material is available, but not in large areas since it is produced through the homoepitaxial growth of a high purity layer on a (relatively) cheap, but small, substrate. The only dopant that all laboratories can master is still boron, but at least three labs have reliably generated n-type conductivity through the incorporation of phosphorus, although the donor level formed is deep at around 0.6 eV (nor is boron shallow, forming an acceptor level at 0.37 eV). There are no mass market active diamond electronic devices for sale, and certainly no computers with diamond-based chips at their heart. Why? Well perhaps the early predictions were simply too ambitious. Ten or so years is not a long time in terms of the development of a new semiconductor. Also the predictors were far too ready to dismiss silicon. This article is being written on a Macintosh laptop computer, whose base can get too hot for the lap after prolonged use! Silicon for high temperature electronics? Well yes, if you introduce silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology as Motorola have done. The level of investment required for even the most basic semiconductor fabrication facility is measured in billions of US dollars. New semiconductors will not be used within mass production environments unless they offer not just incremental improvements, but major steps forward, and do so reliably. It can be argued that it was the need for microwave devices that emerged with modern communications that gave III-V semiconductors their breakthrough, not the prospect of an improved computer. In this new century those working in the field of diamond electronics have become more realistic in their ambitions, and with this realism have come many successes, even though they are on a smaller scale than originally predicted. You can buy active electronic devices based upon CVD diamond, but they are aimed at niche markets. For this reason, many of the multi-national companies no longer support programmes in diamond electronics, but in their place are plenty of medium and small enterprises for whom niche markets are just fine. Optoelectronic devices and radiation detectors, in particular, have been produced with performance levels that are commercially useful. For example, aspects of my own work at UCL have led to the commercial introduction of deep UV diamond-based photodetectors, and CEA in Paris have introduced a range of radiation detectors that are being purchased for use within the nuclear industry. This is not to say that mass market applications for diamond will not emerge, it is simply that if they do they are likely to be where diamond enables a new technology, not an incremental improvement to an existing one. Perhaps the exciting new topic of quantum computing could be just such a technology in 10-20 years time. Equally exciting is the integration of electronics with biological materials, and nano-biotechnology could perhaps be a major application area for diamond-based devices in the future. All future developments of diamond electronics will be underpinned by fundamental insight into the way that the diamond grows, its properties and the physics controlling the operation of device structures. Whilst many CVD methods have been used to grow diamond, micowave plasma enhanced CVD has proved to be the most effective for the growth of high purity material. Until recently growth rates were limited to around 1 µm h-1, making the material fairly costly to produce. This can now be increased to beyond 50 µm h-1 making even the highest quality diamond substrates commercially accessible for many applications. The electronic properties of the material have also been improving dramatically over the last few months, such that it is possible to produce CVD material with carrier mobilities that surpass the best natural diamonds (see for example, Science (2002) 297 1670). This special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology is dedicated to surveying recent developments in diamond electronics that are being enabled by these improvements in growth. Most of this special issue addresses crystalline diamond. However, two articles have been included on diamond-like carbon (DLC), to give the reader some insight into the properties and applications of this related, but different, material. In fact DLC is not a single material, but is a fully constrained network of sp2 and sp3 carbon (sometimes with hydrogen), where the sp2 and sp3 ratio, and hence the materials properties, can be varied. The issue begins with an article on the electronic properties of diamond; doping diamond is then considered. The fascinating observation that hydrogen terminated diamond surfaces display p-type conductivity is then discussed, followed by some diamond processing issues and electronic device fabrication. Papers on properties and applications follow. At the end of the issue are two largely theoretical papers submitted by Johann Prins. These papers are thought provoking, but make some very controversial claims. They are included here so that the reader can consider the approach developed within these two associated papers, perhaps thinking how this impacts upon their own work, even if the end conclusions remain open to debate. Indeed, it is hoped that this debate will be opened up through their publication, enabling this area of thought to be more widely explored and critically examined. Optical picture of a homoepitaxial film Figure 1. Optical picture of a homoepitaxial film grown at a rate of more than 50 µm h-1. Figure 1 is an optical picture of a homoepitaxial film grown in my laboratories at UCL at a rate of more than 50 µm h-1. It is included for no scientific or technical reason, nor is it our best layer. It is simply included as a beautiful picture, and to remind us that not all good things have to be for a commercial application! It has been a pleasure working with the authors and IOPP in bringing together this special issue. I hope you, the reader, find it useful.

  9. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Jackie M., , Dr; Swart, Hendrik C., , Prof; Reinhardt Botha, J., , Prof

    2016-01-01

    The 6th South African Conference on Photonic Materials took place at Mabula Game Lodge, South Africa, from 4 to 8 May 2015. The conference venue, Mabula Game Lodge, is located in the Waterberg Mountains outside Bela-Bela in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. This part of our beautiful country is home to some of the most impressive bushveld and is particularly renowned for its exceptional private game lodges, Mabula Game Lodge being no exception. It is located a mere two hours' drive from O.R. Tambo International Airport in Gauteng and offers an unforgettable "Big Five" game experience on the malaria free reserve.

  10. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Magdalena; Błaszczak, Zdzislaw

    2017-11-01

    It is with great pleasure that we are presenting the subsequent volume of the International Poznan Workshop proceedings. The conferences of this cycle have been since the beginning devoted to laser light interaction with atomic nuclei and since more recently also to the applications of ion-storage devices. The first edition entitled "Laser Spectroscopy of Atomic Nuclei" took place in Dubna in December 1990, and since then the subsequent conferences have been held every two to three years in Poznan, where they have been jointly organized by the Faculty of Physics at the Adam Mickiewicz University (Poznan) and the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna). The conferences have enjoyed increasing popularity and have attracted increasing numbers of specialists from a number of research institutions engaged in laser spectroscopy of radioactive and other exotic (e.g. anti-) atomic nuclei and related instruments. Over the years the workshops have gained a reputation of presenting research of a high scientific level and having impact on the directions of future studies. The 2016 workshop on the Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research has been already the 10th edition and it was a pleasure to see that the event was thriving and the participants were enjoying it in all fronts. Around 100 scientists met on May 16 -19 in Poznan for the 4-day event. They were even more international than in the previous edition, representing institutes in Europe, North America, Japan, and even Australia. Many have returned to Poznan, but there were also new faces, especially among the younger participants. It was great to see the leaders in their topics discussing physics, but not only, with PhD students and starting post-docs. More than sixty talks were delivered, reflecting well the state-of-the art in the covered fields which were all related to the techniques, experimental results and theory connected to lasers and storage devices applied to exotic nuclei. The presentations were supplemented with many posters covering even more results. We hope that the participants also enjoyed the concert of renaissance music. In this warm atmosphere (much warmer than the temperatures outside the lecture hall), we are looking forward to the 11 th edition, which has been already announced to take place again in Poznan. In the next 3 years many new results will be certainly collected, so that without doubt we will participate in another interesting workshop.

  11. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siirola, Jeffrey; Gani, Rafiqul

    2017-01-01

    include economics (raw material consumption, energy requirement, labor requirement, other operating costs, equipment capital, working capital, etc.), environmental impacts, physical plant size, employment, flexibility, controllability, robustness, reliability, safety, etc. Topics covering synthesis issues...... Engineering has collected papers from invited authors covering a wide range of topics within PI. We include the idea of any process design feature that retains the primary process objectives (production rate and fitness-for-use criteria) while also improving one or more performance parameters which could...

  12. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franks, Stewart; Boegh, Eva; Blyth, Eleanor

    2011-01-01

    The hydro-climatological approach of this volume illustrates the scientific and practical value of considering hydrological phenomena and processes in a climate context to improve understanding of controls, process interaction, and past and future variability/change. Contributions deal with under......The hydro-climatological approach of this volume illustrates the scientific and practical value of considering hydrological phenomena and processes in a climate context to improve understanding of controls, process interaction, and past and future variability/change. Contributions deal...... considered. The interdisciplinary approach reveals information and perspective that go beyond the study of cli ate and hydro gy alone...

  13. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The PLASMA-2001- International Symposium on Research and Applications of Plasmas - was held in Warsaw, Poland on September 19-22, 2001. It was the fifth general symposium organized (every two years since 1993) under auspices of the Plasma Physics Section, Committee of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences. The scientific program of PLASMA-2001 was relatively wide in order to cover all the directions of plasma studies carried out in Poland. All the invited and contributed papers were divided into 9 topical groups: 1. Elementary processes and general theory of plasma phenomena. 2. Plasmas in tokamaks and stellarators, including related experiments. 3. Plasmas produced by Z-Pinch and Plasma-Focus discharges. 4. Plasmas generated by intense laser beams. 5. Plasmas of microwave and glow discharges. 6. Plasmas produced by spark- and arc-discharges. 7. Plasmas in space (ionospheric, interplanetary, and heliospheric). 8. Diagnostic methods and experimental facilities for plasma studies. 9. Applications of quasi-stationary and pulsed plasmas. The responsibility for the selection of contributed papers and appointments of invited speakers was taken by an International Scientific Program Committee (ISPC) chaired by Prof. M. Sadowski from the Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk by Warsaw, Poland. The organization activities were coordinated by a Local Organizing Committee (LOC), acting at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw, Poland, and chaired by Dr. Z. Skladanowski. There were 141 registered participants (including 14 invited speakers), who represented 22 different countries. Honorary guests represented the Polish Committee for UNESCO, Polish Atomic Agency, and scientific councils of several Polish research centers. About half of the participants constituted plasma researchers from Polish institutes and universities. Also represented were different foreign research centers and universities, and particularly those involved in the scientific collaboration with the Polish research teams. The most numerous groups of the foreign participants arrived from the Czech Republic (18 persons), Germany (14 persons), Russia (14 persons), and Ukraine (5 persons). Other countries (some very distant from Poland, as Argentina, Japan, USA, etc.) were represented by individuals. During three working days of the Symposium there were run 8 plenary sessions, at which the participants listened and discussed 14 invited talks and 20 selected oral presentations. About 170 contributed papers, which were accepted by the ISPC, were presented during 3 poster sessions. The most important scientific results of the Symposium can be summarized as follows: In the field of theory - there were presented new results on numerical modeling of plasmas in tokamaks, analysis of behavior of dusty plasmas, the description of collisional absorption within dense laser-produced plasma, and theoretical interpretations of various plasma experiments. In the field of experiments - there were reported results of recent studies with stellarators Wendelstein-7AS and Uragan-3M as well as research with tokamak TEXTOR-94, the development of diagnostic methods adopted for magnetic confinement experiments as well as for inertial confinement of laser- and pinch-produced plasmas. Also reported were some new results of wave measurements in ionosphere, and results of the recent Plasma-Focus (PF) experiments (including those obtained with the PF-1000 facility operated at a 1-MJ level). In the field of applications - there were presented characteristics of high-Z heavy ions produced by means of laser pulses, and applications of X-ray pulses from PF discharges for material studies. Also reported were the uses of pulsed plasma-ion streams for the modification of different materials, and the applications of plasma discharges for the neutralization of injurious chemical compounds. Abstracts of all the invited and accepted papers were collected in the Book of Abstracts, which was distributed among the guests and participants of the Symposium. The full versions of the invited and contributed papers, which were delivered to the LOC in proper time and form, have been presented in Internet (http://www.ifpilm.waw.pl) and in this compact disk. The most interesting papers have also been submitted by their authors to different scientific journals (e.g. Nukleonika, Acta Phys. Polon., J. Tech. Phys., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., etc.). Since the editorial activity was very limited, the presented papers represent opinions of the authors, and their publication means neither an endorsement by ISPC nor opinions of editors. Taking into consideration that the invited and contributed papers covered a wide scope of plasma research and applications, these proceedings may be of interest not only for the participants of PLASMA-2001, but also for many physicists and engineers. Persons interested in some scientific problems or details of the presentations are kindly asked to contact responsible authors directly. This compact disk is delivered to all the registered participants free of charge, but some additional copies are available from the LOC upon a special order. (author)

  14. Preface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droste, Ch. [Warsaw Univ., Inst. of Experimental Physics, Nuclear Physics Division, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    The scientific reports are grouped in two sections: 1. Reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure; 2. Experimental methods and instrumentation. In the first section we present the newly developed technique of identification of hydrogen isotopes in the electromagnetic calorimeter TAPS. It allowed for an exclusive study that evidenced the decay {Delta}{sup +}{yields}p{pi}{sup 0} in nuclear matter at pion subthreshold beam energy. Our program of studying nuclear dissipation has been continued and extended to include the analysis of pre-scission neutron multiplicities in fusion-fission reactions in term of the Kramers-Grange-Weidenmueller formalism. I would like to emphasize also one of the first scientific results obtained using the Warsaw Cyclotron, where high-energy {gamma}-ray spectra from the {sup 12}C + {sup 58}Ni reaction at 47.5 MeV were measured and the giant dipole resonance parameters of the {sup 70}Se were extracted. In the mass A{approx}100 region ({sup 98}Cd, {sup 102}Sn) new isomeric states were identified. For nuclei around {sup 208}Pb many excited states were found which can be interpreted as octupole vibrations coupled to the high spin one-particle one-hole orbitals. The structure of the {sup 125,127}La and {sup 127}Pr nuclei was investigated. The interesting questions whether the shape transition between highly deformed and superdeformed nuclei is sharp or whether a coexistence of the both shapes occurs have been studied in the {sup 143}Gd nucleus. Reports on experimental methods and instrumentation are presented in the second section. Here, I would like to mention that after two years of preparation, the experimental setup for high energy {gamma}-ray studies (JANOSIK) installed at the Warsaw Cyclotron was accomplished during 1996. The report gives the present status of this apparatus that began to bring first scientific results (see contribution in the Report). During 1996 a remarkable progress was achieved in installation of the isotope separator on line of the Warsaw Cyclotron. The first ion beam (off line) was extracted for Xe isotopes and the resolving power of about 560 was obtained.

  15. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den M.G.J.; Gasevic, D.; Gray, J.; Brand, van den M.G.J.; Gasevic, D.; Gray, J.

    2010-01-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings of the Second International Conference on Software Language Engineering (SLE 2009). The conference was held in Denver, Colorado (USA) during October 5–6, 2009 and was co-located with the 12th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Model-Driven Engineering

  16. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   The First National Conference on Advances in Superconductivity was the first of a series of conferences in the field of superconductivity planned to be held biannually in one of the universities or scientific research centers in the country. The goal of these meetings is to bring together groups of researchers in the field of experimental and theoretical superconductivity, to discuss their latest research results. Also, to educate and exert the superconductivity phenomenon among the researchers, scholars, and graduate students in the country as well as to introduce the vast applications of superconductivity in the country’s different industries. We hope that these conferences would lead to more collaboration and convergence among the country’s researchers in solving the important challenges remained in the field of superconductivity, and in particular, high temperature superconductivity. It is only through these sharing of experiences that we can fully benefit from our human resources and facilities, and expect a breakthrough in the superconductivity research and its application in the country.   This conference was organized by the National Centre of Excellence in Complex Systems and Condensed Matter, Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology in collaboration with the Iran Physics Society, and took place in the Department of Physics of Sharif University of Technology in Tehran during June 30-31, 2008. Besides many sessions for scientific presentations, the poster section attracted the attention of many. At the end of the conference, a panel discussion was organized by the members of the Scientific Committee and Dr. E. Arzi, Head of the Physics Society of Iran, and the importance of the following points was emphasized:   1- Supporting interdisciplinary research.   2- Proposing group research and joint projects in superconductivity.   3- Proposing application oriented projects in superconductivity.   4- Requesting the authorities to support and equip the superconductivity research laboratories.   5- Requesting authorities of the Ministry of Science, Research, and Technology to place the field of superconductivity among the country’s scientific research priorities.   6- Considering the research in the interdisciplinary field of nano-superconductivity.   7- Organizing a superconductivity committee formed in the Iran Physics Society.   8- Organizing group scientific activities such as schools and workshops in superconductivity, and inviting eminent international scientists and Nobel laureates in this field.   9- Presenting undergraduate superconductivity course including the standard BCS theory on a yearly basis.   10- Giving special consideration to research in the field of unconventional superconductivity, with proper investment allocation.   One important event in the conference was the recognition given to young scientists (under 40 years and the poster presentation. The Scientific Committee gave the Young Researcher Award and Prize in superconductivity to Dr. A. Jafari from Isfahan University of Technology and Dr. M.R. Mohammadizadeh from University of Tehran for their extended scientific activities in the country and research achievement with the international standards. Also, the best poster award was given to Dr. V. Daadmehr, S. Falahati, and S. Saeb from Alzahra University.   The Science Book Exhibition, especially in the field of superconductivity, was another activity of the conference. The Sharif University of Technology Publishing, Iran Atomic Agency Publishing, Sharif Extended Electronic Teaching, Jahan Adib, Kokab Gheshm, Ammeh International, and University Publishing Centre Companies had extensive participation in the exhibition. This exhibition was well received by the conference participants.   The response of the condensed matter physics community to this conference has been excellent. 74 researchers from various universities and research centers presented their contributions as the following: University of Isfahan (10, Sharif University of Technology (6, Alzahra University (6, Islamic Azad University (5, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz (4, Basic Sciences Research Institution (3, University of Isfahan (3, University of Urmia (2, Institution for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (2, and Kashan University (2 shared contributions, and Ardebili University, Payam Noor University, University of Tabriz, Sabzevar Tarbiat Moallem University, University of Tehran, Khajeh Nasireddin Toosi University of Technology, Ferdousi University, University of Kordestan, University of Kentuky (USA, Communication Research Centre, University of Australia, and University of Yazd, each shared in one contribution. Overall, 24 papers were accepted for the oral and 14 papers for the poster presentations. Finally, in accordance with the standard of the Iranian Physics Research Journal, 25 full papers, of which, 14 in the experiment and 11 in the theory of superconductivity were accepted for publication in the Proceedings. In order to choose each paper, at least two favorable reports were received from the referees.   The organization of this conference was made possible through the financial support of the National Centre of Excellence in Complex Systems and Condensed Matter (Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Magnet Research Laboratory (MRL (Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Alzahra University, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, University of Kordestan, Abasic Industrial Group, and Payvand Adab Cultural and Educational Institution. Also, its success should be credited to the tireless efforts extended by the Organizing Committee, active students staff, and specially, Dr. M. Bahmanabadi. Here, it is necessary to extend our special thanks to each of them.   The successful organization of this conference can be attributed to the active participation of the researchers, scholars, students, and cooperation and support of many colleagues. This has brought about closer understanding and collaboration among the scientists and also between the active laboratories in this field. We hope that the participants carried with them good experience and memories of their presence in the conference. Many will find themselves in the conference photographs taken during the conference, which are shown in the Proceedings. Surely, this successful experience will be carried out to the future conferences, and we will witness successful organization of the future conferences. The Second National Conference on Advances in Superconductivity (NCAS2 will be organized by Dr. M. Zargar Shoushtari and his colleagues in Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz during 3-4 Feb., 2010 with the website addresses: www.psi.ir/?ncas2 and www.ncas2.com or email addresses: ncas2@scu.ac.ir and ncas2@psi.ir. We look forward to seeing you all in Ahvaz.       M. Akhavan   N. Nafari   H. Salamati   M. A. Shahzamanian   M. Zargar Shoushtari     Fall 2008

  17. Preface

    OpenAIRE

    Itioka, Takao; Pungga, Runi Anak Sylvester; Meleng, Paulus; Sakai, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    This proceeding is a compilation of findings and progress activities of research collaboration between the Forest Department Sarawak (FDS) and the Japan Research Consortium for Tropical Forests in Sarawak (JRCTS). To highlight the research findings, An International Symposium entitled "Frontier in Tropical Forest Research: Progress in Joint Projects between the Forest Department Sarawak and the Japan Research Consortium for Tropical Forests in Sarawak" was ii held in Kuching, Sarawak on 21-22...

  18. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Briedis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The contributors to this volume, who practice phenomenology in six countries in Europe and North America, all agree that these questions are to be answered with a clear and resounding No. The readers of this volume are bound to find out that this common critique of phenomenology is more of a caricature than its accurate description.

  19. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Korhola

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a general increase in the awareness of political, business and financial institutions for the necessity of concrete action to allow sustainable development in mountain regions. This increased interest in mountain regions is documented by the resolution of the UN General Assembly that declared 2002 the International Year of Mountains. The world’s mountains clearly do not lend themselves to a simple definition because of their complexity. For each region, specific characterisation is necessary. The Arctic and Alpine regions of Europe often represent the most remote and least disturbed natural environments; yet they are threatened by acid deposition, toxic air pollutants and by climate change. These environments are fragile, being subject to adverse and harsh climatic conditions (high levels of precipitation, low temperatures, aridity, high solar radiation, natural disasters (avalanches, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and poor, shallow soils prone to erosion because of steep slopes. However, the fragility of mountain ecosystems means that they are not only vulnerable to environmental change, but that they are also excellent sensors of change. Their sensitivity and the presence of high quality environmental records preserved in lake sediments can be used to infer the speed, direction and biological impact of changing air quality and climate.

  20. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieška Juzefovič

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This issue is dedicated to phenomenon of creativity which becomes particularly popular among the humanities and social sciences. Essays are divided into two problematic parts - in the first part the topic of creativity is connected with theoretical-philosophical approach and the field of aesthetics, while in the second one it is connected precisely with the social and economic area.

  1. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja; Poel, Mannes; Hondorp, Hendri; Hondorp, G.H.W.

    2008-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the 20th edition of the Belgian-Netherlands Conference on Artificial Intelligence. The conference was organized by the Human Media Interaction group of the University of Twente. As usual, the conference was under the auspices of the Belgian-Dutch Association for

  2. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Duvenhage

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this trans-disciplinary special issue, diverse themes are dealt with that can be reduced to sustainable development (and that which is related to it in a distinctive manner. Matters which are discussed include: the conceptualisation of power, political transformation as an ideology, ethical political communication, white-collar crime; ministry in a post-literary communication context; development cooperation in Africa; and the problem of liaison between academics, students and practitioners regarding public management in the North West Province.

  3. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Distante, Cosimo; Hua, Gang

    2017-01-01

    World Videos. The workshops were run on December 4, 2016, in Cancun in Mexico. The two workshops together received 13 papers. Each paper was then reviewed by at least two expert reviewers in the field. In all, 11 papers were accepted to be presented at the workshops. The topics covered in the papers....... The organizers of the two workshops would like to express their sincere thanks to the authors of the contributed papers, the reviewers who made sure of the good quality of the papers, and the attendees of the workshops....

  4. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Dijk, Nico; van Dijk, Nico M.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of queueing theory and its application traces back to Erlang’s historical work for telephony networks as recently celebrated by the Erlang Centennial, 100 Years of Queueing, Copenhagen, recalling his first paper in 1909. Ever since, the simplicity and fundamental flavour of Erlang’s

  5. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Robert Villehad Wikman

    1970-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Plutarch Lachesis was the third of the Sisters of Fate. She joined Generation and Destruction in the sublunar world. Nemesis, on the contrary, was a daughter of Tyche. Mythical thought in late Hellenic times saw in these goddesses an expression of Natural and Divine necessity dominating human life. Carl Linnæus conceives Lachesis and Nemesis as symbols behind realities included in his views about human life and conduct. How he regarded Lachesis naturalis and Nemesis Divina is the subject of the present study.

  6. Preface

    OpenAIRE

    ل Rahighi

    2017-01-01

    Particle accelerators are engines of discovery and innovation. Design, construction and use of particle accelerators have made numerous scientific and technological achievements in recent decades, having an undeniable influence on society. In medicine and pharmacy, particle accelerators provide in more efficient treatment with fewer side effects. Disease diagnostics are how much straightforward with the help of radio isotopes, accelerators have made it possible to develop new antibiotics with...

  7. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ل Rahighi

    2017-08-01

    The availability of educated individuals at the present scale in Iran is indeed exceptional. This is a unique opportunity which should not be missed by science policy makers at the political levels.  

  8. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 2001. The scientific reports are grouped in two sections: - Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure; - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The current research program of our Division includes ''in-house'' activities using the beams from the Warsaw Cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as involvement in research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year we continue our participation in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMICE international collaborations. We are strongly involved in the FOPI upgrade project, especially in the construction of the modified TOF detector. The upgrade of scintillation sub-detector BARREL has been completed and TOF resolution of 110-140 ps for minimum ionizing particles was achieved. The analysis of ''event-by-event'' fluctuations in nuclear collisions has been the subject of interest for quite some time. Some new results concerning the possible effect of unphysical fluctuations generated by the response function of the FOPI detector as well as by mixing of events of different centrality are presented in this report. A new approach in studying of chemical equilibrium in dense, hot nuclear matter was tested. For this purpose, fluctuations of rare particles (K + , K - ) produced in 58 Ni + 58 Ni and 96 Ru + 96 Ru nuclear collisions were used. Unfortunately, the number of double-kaon events from these experiments was too small to obtain conclusive results. The question of mass dependence of sub-threshold neutral pion production in heavy-ion collisions was studied with the TAPS spectrometer. The analysis of experimental data obtained with the Ar beam at 95 AMeV on several targets was completed and neutral pions have been identified through invariant mass analysis. A new approach to the analysis of fusion excitation functions and fusion-barrier distributions was proposed. About 50 precisely measured fusion excitation functions were perfectly reproduced within the phenomenological model and the systematics of the parameters were obtained allowing to predict not yet measured fusion- or capture excitation functions. This result is important for better planning of future experiments on synthesis of superheavy elements. During the last year, we continued our study of high-energy γ-ray emission in heavy-ion reactions in an energy range of 5-11 MeV/u. The purpose of this work is to investigate the properties of hot, fast rotating compound nuclei and to extract information on GDR built on excited states - as a function of the nuclear temperature. In our resent experiments with the modified JANOSIK set-up, measurement of high energy γ-rays have been combined with detection of light charged particles. In such a way a more accurate information on the excitation energy and the mass and charge of the decaying nucleus could be obtained. Using the beam of the Warsaw Cyclotron and the OSIRIS experimental set-up, lifetimes of high spin rotational levels in 131 La were measured. The mean lifetimes were extracted with DSA method and were obtained for six high-spin rotational levels of the yrast band built on the h 11/2 proton orbital. The extracted values range from 0.3 ps for the 43/2 - state to 1.3 ps for 23/2 - state. Some interesting results have been obtained for nuclei in the atomic mass region around A∼170. For example , 174 Yb was produced in the 170 Eu( 7 Li, pxn) reaction and identified with the GASP spectrometer and the charge particle-telescope system ISIS. A set of four identical γ bands originating from orbitals of different shells was found. Among contributions concerning experimental methods and instrumentation, I would like to mention the interesting proposal of using EUROBALL CLUSTER sub-detectors as in-beam polarimeters. Properties of CLUSTER detectors have been studied and compared with the results obtained for CLOVER detectors. As was already mentioned, most of the work presented in this Annual Report results from close collaboration with our colleagues from many foreign as well as Polish institutes an universities. In this place, I would like to express our deep gratitude to all our friends and collaborators around the world. I would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author)

  9. Preface

    OpenAIRE

    Dorożyński, Tomasz; Kuna-Marszałek, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    Considering environmental protection requirements in business operations may, in the long run, determine if a lasting comparative advantage can be achieved. That is why our textbook, rich in case studies, identifies not only the threats a business may pose to the environment but stresses the ways of reducing its negative impact. It discusses, among other things, the concept of corporate social responsibility, environmental management systems, methods and the importance of eco-labelling goods ...

  10. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Døvling; Rodger, C.

    2009-01-01

    This issue is a collection of papers dedicated to Anthony Hilton on the occasion of his retirement. The variety of topics bears testimony to the broad scope of Anthony's research, and the quality of the contributions witnesses to the impact his work has had on high class mathematicians in many...

  11. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandras Velička

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors’ publications are a valuable contribution to linguistics and methodical science of foreign language teaching. They will help to improve language teaching methods in higher schools, and the obtained results of linguistic researches will motivate language teaching methods more theoretically.

  12. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Suvaryan, Yu. M.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Cultural Astronomy is the reflection of sky events in various fields of nations' culture. In foreign literature, this field is also called "Astronomy in Culture" or "Astronomy and Culture". Cultural astronomy is the set of interdisciplinary fields studying the astronomical systems of current or ancient societies and cultures. It is manifested in Religion, Mythology, Folklore, Poetry, Art, Linguistics and other fields. During the past few decades interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary sciences have become the main incentive for the development of science. While studying astronomical topics in various areas of culture interesting discoveries have been occurred; such topics are widely used in folklore and other genres of literature, painting, architecture and music. Ancient astronomy, chronologies and calendars created on the basis of astronomical knowledge, Astrolinguistics and other fields play an important role in culture and national heritage. There are a number of organizations related to "Astronomy in Culture", appropriate specialists are being prepared, in this area conferences are being organized and papers are being published in professional and scientific-popular journals. Astronomy has also a leading role in scientific tourism, scientific journalism and in general science pularization and popular science dissemination, as well as social awareness and world perception. All these led to the idea of holding a Young Researchers conference with the subject on "Cultural Astronomy in Armenian Highland". Conference was held on June 20-23, 2016 in Armenian National Academy of Sciences. Among the participants there were astronomers, philosophers, historians, archeologists, specialists of literature, linguists, culturologists, experts in tourism and other fields. The opening session of the conference was attended by the president of NAS RA acad. Radik Martirosyan, NAS RA Academician-secretary of the Department of Armenology and Social Sciences acad. Yuri Suvaryan, ambassadors of foreign countries in Armenia, Presidents of RA Creative Unions, scientists, young researchers and journalists. The last sessions of the conference were held in the "Metsamor" Historical-Archeological Museum-Reserve, Art academy of Byurakan and Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory. The meeting is focused on Armenian archaeoastronomy and cultural astronomy, including many creations related to astronomical knowledge; calendars, rock art, mythology, etc. On the other hand, this subject is rather poorly developed in Armenia; there are only individual studies on various related issues (especially many studies related to Anania Shirakatsi) but not coordinated actions to manage this important field of investigation. The meeting is aimed at the development of problems of interdisciplinary sciences in Armenia and preparation of a basis for further possible collaborations by means of presentations of available modern knowledge in various areas of culture by experts from different professions and by joint discussions. A number of thematic sessions were held: Cultural Astronomy, Archaeoastronomy, Scientific Tourism & Scientific Journalism, Astronomical Education & Amauter Astronomy, Invited and contributed talks were presented by reknown and young researchers. The present Proceedings includes most of the talks. We hope that the Proceedings will be an interesting and valuable resource for many professionals and broad mass of readers.

  13. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stręk, Wiesław; Zych, Eugeniusz; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-12-01

    We are pleased and proud to present this Special Issue of the Optical Materials with papers presented at the Sixth Excited States of Transition Elements Conference - ESTE2016 organized by Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research Polish Academy of Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry University of Wrocław, and Intech Transfer Technology Centre. The conference was held under the honorary auspices of the Minister of Science and Higher Education of Republic of Poland, dr. Jarosław Gowin. The event had also patronage of Polish Academy of Sciences and Patent Office of Republic of Poland. ESTE2016 was held in Hotel Polanica Resort & Spa in Polanica - Zdrój, Poland in August 21-26, 2016. About 130 scientists from Europe, Asia and both Americas participated in the conference. As usually, in ESTE both experienced, world-wide recognized scientists and young researchers presented their new groundbreaking research achievements which were discussed during the lectures, poster sessions and evening informal discussions. A part of the ESTE2016 conference was devoted to presentations of the participants of LUMINET project - European Network on Luminescent Materials supported by Marie Curie Actions - Initial Training Networks. The scientific level of these presentations proved that through a rigorous, well-executed trainings, and a multidisciplinary research programme, LUMINET strategically positioned the EU with respect to new and improved possibilities and young scientists educated for that purpose.

  14. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 1999. The scientific reports are grouped in two sections: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure; Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The current research program of our Division includes ''in house'' activities using the beams from the Warsaw cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as involvement in research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year, the first on-line test experiments with the IGISOL separator were performed. The first radioactivity measurements of short lived isotopes were made with the helium chamber. This work is being carried out in close collaboration with the Nuclear Spectroscopy Division and the Heavy Ion Laboratory. We continued our study of high-energy γ-ray emission in heavy-ion reactions in an energy range of 4-11 MeV/u. The measured γ-ray spectra and angular distributions from 12 C+ 58,64 Ni reactions have been consistently analyzed by taking into account complete and incomplete fusion processes as well as Bremsstrahlung emission. It has been shown that the contribution of incomplete fusion and processes increases with increasing relative energy and strongly distorts the derived GDR parameters. We also continued our participation and active involvement in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMISE international collaborations. We are strongly involved in the FOPI upgrade project especially in the construction of the modified TOF scintillation subdetector BARREL. The problem of the mass dependence of subthreshold pion production in heavy ion collisions was studied with the TAPS spectrometer. The analysis of the experimental data obtained with the Ar-beam on several targets, from carbon to gold, is in progress. A new method of reconstructing neutral pion momenta from measurements of two decay photons has been developed. Careful analysis of the measurements errors revealed that the γγ invariant mass window for events selected for the reconstruction should be much narrowed than commonly used. The nuclear spectroscopy group continued their study of the properties nuclei in the region of Z>50 and N 119 I were identified. Altogether, lifetimes for 60 levels in 9 bands were measured. This allowed the group to determine about 100 B(E2) and B(M1) transition probabilities. Mean lifetimes have also been measured for superdeformed bands of the 145 Gd nucleus with the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The extracted quadrupole moments made it possible to make a more conclusive assesment of which orbitals are active in the configurations od SD bands. In another study, the nuclear structure of 142 Gd was investigated with the EUROBALL spectrometer. The identified rotational bands with strong magnetic dipole transitions show characteristic features of magnetic rotation. The expected M1 multipolarity of the in-band transitions has been confirmed by an analysis of the linear polarization. The results are well reproduced within the framework of the tilted axis cranking model. As was already mentioned, most of the work presented in this Annual Report results from close collaboration with our colleagues from many foreign and Polish institutes and universities. In this place I would like to express our deep gratitude to all our friends and collaborators around the world. I would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the Polish Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author)

  15. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in years 2002 and 2003. As in previous years the scientific reports are grouped in two sections: - Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure; - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The present research program of our Division includes ''in-house'' activities concentrated on experiments with beams from the Warsaw Cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as involvement in research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last two years we continued our participation in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMICE international collaborations. We are strongly involved in the FOPI project. The analysis of ''event-by-event'' fluctuations in nuclear collisions has been the subject of our interest for quite some time. Recently results of an analysis of Au + Au collisions were compared with predictions of the IQMD model. The dependence of the model simulation on various values of the nucleon-nucleon interaction cross sections is presented in this report. Two-photon interferometry experiment for the Ta + Au system at 40 A MeV was repeated by the Taps collaboration with the aim to significantly improve the statistics. The obtained two-photon correlation function shows no evidence of any fluctuating structure, suggested by results of the previous experiment. This result rules out the possibility of a simple double-source scenario of photon emission. The neutral pion angular distribution in 95 A MeV Ar induced reactions on several targets were reanalyzed. Namely, it was found that the presence of mixed electromagnetic and hadronic clusters has to be properly taken into account in order to obtain final angular distributions of subthreshold neutral pions. A new type of an analysis of fusion excitation functions and fusion-barrier distributions was proposed. About 50 precisely measured fusion excitation functions were perfectly reproduced within a phenomenological model, and systematics of the model parameters were obtained allowing to predict not yet measured fusion- or capture excitation functions. This result is important for better planning future experiments on synthesis of superheavy elements. During the last year, we continued our study of high-energy γ-ray emission in heavy-ion reactions in the energy range of 5-11 MeV/u. The purpose of this work was to investigate properties of hot, fast rotating compound nuclei. In our resent experiments using the beam of the Warsaw Cyclotron and the modified JANOSIK set-up, isospin mixing in 32 S at high excitation energies was studied. The degree of the isospin mixing was extracted from the statistical decay of the giant dipole resonance. It was shown that at 58.3 MeV excitation energy, the isospin mixing is small, in agreement with previously published data. Recent theoretical and experimental works have attracted attention to the problem of chirality in atomic nuclei with odd number of protons and neutrons. These investigations are in a very preliminary stage and up to now there was no information concerning the lifetimes in chiral bands. Using the beam of the Warsaw Cyclotron and the OSIRIS experimental set-up, lifetimes of supposedly chiral bands in 132 La were measured for the first time. These interesting results, compared with theoretical calculations, are presented in this Report. High spin states in deformed nuclei in the region of atomic mass number around A ≅ 170 have also been studied.The band crossing related to the alignment of the pair of neutrons in the i 13/2 orbital has been observed in the yrast band of 173 Yb. Among contributions concerning experimental methods and instrumentation, I would like to call attention to an interesting proposal to use the beam of of the Warsaw Cyclotron for radiobiological studies. As was already mentioned, most of the work presented in this Annual Report results from close collaboration with our colleagues from many foreign as well as Polish research institutes and universities. In this place, I would like to express our deep gratitude to all our friends and collaborators around the world. I would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the Polish State Committee for Scientific Research. (author)

  16. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 2000. The scientific reports are grouped in two sections: - Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure; - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The current research program of our Division includes ''in-house'' activities using the beams from the Warsaw Cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as involvement in research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year, the first on-line test experiments with the IGISOL separator were performed, which allowed to estimate the overall efficiency of the device as well as the evacuation time of the radioactive ions from the ion guide source. The first radioactivity measurements of short lived isotopes were made with the helium chamber. This work is being carried out in close collaboration with the Nuclear Spectroscopy Division and the Heavy Ion Laboratory. We continued our study of high-energy γ-ray emission in heavy-ion reactions in an energy range of 4-11 MeV/u. The measured gamma-ray spectra and angular distributions have been consistently analyzed by taking into account complete and incomplete fusion processes as well as Bremsstrahlung emission. It has been shown that the role of incomplete fusion and Bremsstrahlung processes increases with increasing relative energy and strongly influences the derived GDR parameters. Existing data on precisely measured fusion excitation functions were used to investigate dynamical properties of very heavy nuclear systems, in particular the fusion energy thresholds. This information is important for predictions of close-contact energy thresholds in reactions considered for future experiments on synthesis of superheavy elements. We also continued our participation in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMISE international collaborations. We are strongly involved in the FOPI upgrade project, especially in the construction of the modified TOF scintillation sub-detector BARREL that has been recently completed. TOF resolution of 110-140 ps for minimum ionising particles has been achieved. The analysis of ''event-by-event'' fluctuations in nuclear collisions has been a subject of our interest for quite some time. Some new results concerning the possible effect of unphysical fluctuations generated by the response function of the FOPI detector as well as by mixing of events with different centrality are presented in this report. The question of mass dependence of subthreshold pion production in heavy-ion collisions was studied with the TAPS spectrometer. The analysis of experimental data obtained with the Ar-beam on several targets, was used to study the effect of pion absorption in nuclear matter. The experimental data are well described within a geometrical model, where pion absorption takes into account the momentum dependence of pion absorption length. The nuclear spectroscopy group continued their study of the properties of nuclei in the region of Z>50 and N 132m Ce, 134m Nd) were investigated using the beam from the Warsaw Cyclotron. New results concerning the decay paths and hindrance factors have been obtained. For this interesting region of soft gamma deformation, the experimental results were compared with predictions of a recent theoretical model based on the band mixing mechanism. Mean lifetimes in the range of picoseconds have been determined for 10 levels of the 118 Te nuclei. This gives the unique opportunity to study transition probabilities in the ground state band above the band crossing. To explain the experimental data, an extended version of the IBFM has been proposed. A new type of rotation, interpreted as the rotation of a large magnetic dipole around the nuclear spin was recently identified in nuclei in the mass region A∼140. In this report the structure of 141 Eu was investigated with the EUROBALL III spectrometer, rotational bands with strong magnetic dipole transitions showing characteristic features of magnetic rotation were observed. As was already mentioned, most of the work presented in this Annual Report results from close collaboration with our colleagues from many foreign and Polish institutes and universities. In this place, I would like to express our deep gratitude to all our friends and collaborators around the world. I would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author)

  17. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first time that our Annual Report is distributed in electronic version. You can also find it on our web page: http://zfjavs.fuw.edu.pl/npd/raporta/. We hope that you will appreciate this change. This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 2005. Contributions are grouped in two sections: - Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure; - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. As in previous years the research program of our Division combines ''in-house'' activities including experiments with beams from the Warsaw Cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as participation in the research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this Report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year we continued our participation in the FOPI and CBM international collaborations. In this Report we present preliminary results of an analysis of K 0 meson production in pion induced reactions at 1.15 GeV/c momentum. Products of these reactions were registered using the FOPI detector setup. The aim of these experiments is to study the influence of the dense nuclear matter on the elementary production cross sections of strange mesons and baryons. Recently, essential changes of the pion-induced processes, such as π - p → K 0 , were suggested as a result of the in-medium modifications of hadron properties. Results of the measurements of the neutral pion angular distributions for argon induced reactions on four targets at 95 A MeV are presented. To describe the observed asymmetry in these angular distributions, and also other data available in the literature, a simple phenomenological model is proposed. It is assumed in this model that mesons produced in elementary nucleon-nucleon collisions are absorbed in the surrounding nuclear matter. Results are in good agreement with experimental data. In this Report we give first results of an analysis of the experiment carried out at LNS INFN in Catania, aimed to study the basic features of the mechanism of energy dissipation in nucleus-nucleus collisions. A very heavy system, 197 Au + 197 Au, was studied at a bombarding energy of 15 MeV/nucleon by using the CHIMERA multidetector array. Preliminary results indicate that the observed processes already at such relatively low energy show presence of the two-body dissipation mechanism. In order to verify methods of calculating the fusion-evaporation cross sections in reactions leading to the production of new super-heavy elements in '' cold '' and '' hot '' fusion reactions, we analyzed experimental data on the evaporation residue cross sections for two systems 12 C+ 236 U and 16 O + 208 Pb. The agreement between data and results of calculations verifies the proposed method of calculating the '' survival probability ''. This method can be then applied for heavier systems and help to plan future experiments aimed at the synthesis of new superheavy elements. New experiments with the beam of the Warsaw Cyclotron and the modified JANOSIK set-up were carried out recently. Information on the isospin mixing at an excitation energy of 49 MeV in 36 Ar, 44 Ti and 60 Zn was obtained from the analysis of statistical decay of the Giant Dipole Resonance. Comparisons with values of the isospin mixing coefficient obtained for lighter nuclei ( 28 Si, 32 S) at the same excitation energy suggest that the isospin mixing increases with the increasing mass and charge of the nucleus. Some recent theoretical and experimental works have drawn attention to the question of the chirality in atomic nuclei with odd numbers of protons and neutrons. These studies are still in a very preliminary stage and the information on the lifetimes in chiral bands is rather scarce. Using the beam of the Warsaw Cyclotron and the OSIRIS experimental set-up, lifetimes of the supposedly chiral bands in 128 Cs were measured. For precise determination of the lifetimes in 128 Cs, the dE/dx values for the Cs recoils moving in the target material (Sn) were measured. A substantial difference between the electronic stopping power obtained in our experiment and that in Ziegler's predictions was found. Some new data on the half-life of the isomeric states in neutron reach nuclei( 97 Sr, 97 Y and 131 Sb) are presented. Neutron reach nuclei were produced by thermal-neutron induced fission of the actinium elements at the high-flux reactor at the ILL (Grenoble). Among contributions concerning experimental methods and instrumentation, I would like to mention the report on a new radiobiological facility operating at the Heavy Ion Laboratory in Warsaw. The facility allows to vary the energy from 2 MeV/nucleon to 10 MeV/nucleon. As already mentioned, most of the work presented in this Annual Report results from close collaboration with our colleagues from many foreign as well as Polish institutes and universities. In this place, I would like to express our deep gratitude to all our friends and collaborators around the world. I would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the Ministry of Education and Science (MEiN). (author)

  18. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M.; Vaclavikova, M.

    2007-12-01

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held on July 23-27, 2007 in Kosice, Slovakia. The attendance was high and motivated, in line with previous ten conferences within the ICMF series organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guaruja. The conference in Slovakia reflected the enthusiasm of the scientific community from all around the world, with 256 participants from 30 countries. The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote the progress and the knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As the research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to extend the frontiers of knowledge in the field and to present the new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by the members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in the Book of Abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in 2 poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations helped to expand the frontiers of the area and to establish new bridges between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Outcomes of this conference are presented by 115 scientific papers, which are published partly in the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JoPCM) and partly in Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of P.J. Safarik and Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from the Ferrotec, Cryosoft, Mikrochem, Liquids research, Askony, U.S. Steel Kosice, is also gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Ali, Nasar; Fierro, Giuseppe; Aliofkhazraei, Mahmood; Chipara, Mircea

    2017-11-01

    The ;International Conference on Surfaces, Coatings and Nano-Structured Materials; (NANOSMAT) has rapidly emerged as the premier conference in the field of materials science, engineering, technology and all aspects of ;nano;. Since 2005, it has been very successfully organised in several European countries, including Portugal, Spain, Italy, France, Poland, Czech Republic, Ireland, United Kingdom and also in USA, and in Asia, including Turkey and China.

  20. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this book is to elucidate the role of forests as part of a landscape in the life of people. Most landscapes today are cultural landscapes that are influenced by human activity and that in turn have a profound effect on our understanding of and identification with a place. The book...

  1. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues François

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Even as we venture into this new millennium, climate change has become emblematic of the “mal du siècle” foreboding a veritable cataclysm for human societies and their organisation by the year 2100. However, beyond the overtones of catastrophism, the upheavals that climate change can bring about in our land management practices are a reality. Rather than giving in to the allures of an alarmist discourse, it becomes imperative to better understand the mechanisms of these changes and to assess ...

  2. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geiger, M.; Kals, H.J.J.; Shirvani, B; Singh, U.P.

    2001-01-01

    The multiple facets of modern sheet metal manufacturing techniques are applied throughout a wide spectrum of economy, ranging from the automotive industry and machine manufacturing to electrical engineering and electronics. This wide range of applications means that sheet metal manufacturers produce

  3. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspect, Alain

    2002-06-01

    COLOQ est une conférence regroupant, tous les deux ans, la communauté scientifique et industrielle nationale travaillant dans les domaines des lasers, de l'optique non-linéaire et de l'optique quantique. Elle s'est tenue pour sa septième édition à Rennes, du 5 au 7 septembre 2001, sur le campus de Beaulieu de l'Université de Rennes I. Cette réunion a pour but de favoriser les rencontres entre les membres des différents laboratoires nationaux publics ou privés travaillant sur ces sujets. C'est donc un moyen privilégié de resserrer les liens de cette communauté et d'y intégrer les jeunes chercheurs. Une dimension importante de COLOQ est de permettre aux jeunes chercheurs de se connaître, de se faire connaître, de découvrir la communauté à laquelle ils appartiennent et d'élargir leurs connaissances des thèmes qui la structurent. La participation de 200 chercheurs et de 18 exposants de matériels spécialisés dans les lasers et l'optoélectronique témoigne de la vitalité de COLOQ. Le programme de COLOQ 7 a comporté des conférences générales données par des chercheurs de renom international et des séances de communications par voie d'affiches. Les exposés ont porté sur des sujets d'optique particulièrement actifs au niveau national et international : les télécoms, thème cher à la région Bretagne en particulier, les phénomènes fondamentaux, les nouvelles percées de l'optique en métrologie et mesures ultra-sensibles, sujets privilégiés du laboratoire organisateur, les sources de l'extrême (incluant X et V-UV). Parallèlement à 20 conférences invitées, 130 communications par affiches ont présenté, tout au long du colloque, les plus récents résultats concernant les atomes froids et la métrologie, les télécoms optiques, l'optique non-linéaire et les nouveaux matériaux, les nanostructures et l'optique de champ proche, la physique des lasers, etc. Ce volume spécial du Journal de Physique IV regroupe la presque totalité des conférences invitées et des communications par affiches. Pour la première fois, un forum pour l'emploi a été mis en place afin de permettre aux doctorants et post-doctorants de nouer des premiers contacts avec leurs futurs employeurs. Enfin, COLOQ 7 a été clôturé par une conférence de Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, ouverte au public, qui a enthousiasmé non seulement les participants du colloque, mais aussi les étudiants et les lycéens de Rennes, qui avaient été conviés avec leurs enseignants. La réussite de cette manifestation est due, avant tout, à la qualité scientifique des présentations, mais elle repose aussi sur l'action conjuguée des comités d'organisation national et local, au généreux soutien des diverses instances publiques nationales, régionales, locales, et à la forte participation des sociétés industrielles du secteur optoélectronique et laser qui nous ont permis de maintenir les frais d'inscription à un niveau particulièrement raisonnable ; en particulier pour les jeunes. Que tous soient ici remerciés, en particulier le comité local qui a su, au delà d'une organisation impeccable, nous faire apprécier la chaleur de l'accueil breton !

  4. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, M.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Hydrobiologia brings together a series of papers resulting from an intensified effort to describe the current status of the physical and biological conditions present at California's Salton Sea. Most of the studies were contract investigations that were part of a project initiated in January 1998 to pursue the improvement of environmental conditions at the Salton Sea. The remainder are independent investigations resulting in information of importance for the Salton Sea Restoration Project. The information provided by those investigations resulting in information of importance for the Salton Sea Restoration Project. The information provided by those investigations is the most holistic assembly of scientific knowledge about the Salton Sea ever brought together in a single publication. The resulting findings provide an important foundation of knowledge for what has been stated to be '. . . one of the worlds' most dynamic salt lakes . . .' (Hart et al., 1998). We hope this publication will serve as a catalyst to stimulate additional scientific investigations that will further enhance understanding of the dynamics of this unique ecosystem. The purpose for these introductory comments is to place the scientific investigations reported on and the Salton Sea Restoration Project in context and entities, and to one another.

  5. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Grabbe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available On September 30, 2015, the American Studies Journal published its Occasional Paper No. 10, entitled “Rape as Spectator Sport and Creepshot Entertainment: Social Media and the Valorization of Lack of Consent.” The author, Kelly Oliver, is the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. Drawing attention to recent cases of rape on American college campuses, she shows how cell phones and social media have been used to prolong the humiliation of the victims, giving rise to a culture of voyeurism that no longer hides its contempt for women.

  6. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biefeld, Robert M.

    2017-04-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Crystal Growth collects some of the papers presented either orally or as posters at the 18th International Conference on Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (ICMOVPE-XVIII) held at the Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina in San Diego, California, USA, from July 10 through July 15, 2016. This conference series was initiated in 1981 by the French in Ajaccio and is now held semi-annually with rotation between the USA, Asia, and Europe. The conference is pre-eminent in the field and the papers presented as well as those published in this volume represent the leading edge research in MOVPE done worldwide. This particular conference followed the earlier tradition in emphasizing semiconductor materials. The very successful program, which was organized by Andrew Allerman and Christine Wang, contained 219 papers which included 5 plenary speakers, the Harold M. Manasevit Young Investigator Award speech, 113 oral presentations, 6 rump session talks on future trends in industry, and 94 posters. The conference presentations were led off by Nobel Prize Winner Professor Shuji Nakamura talking about the invention of blue LEDs and the future of solid state lighting. There were ten session on III-nitride growth and devices, four sessions on nanostructures and their characterization, as well as sessions on photovoltaics, growth fundamentals, the growth of III-V's on Si and other materials. The conference brought together 255 participants from 26 countries including Australia, 1, Belgium, 3, Brazil, 1, Canada, 3, China, 11, Czech Republic, 5, Denmark, 2, France, 11, Germany, 41, Hong Kong, 3, India, 2, Ireland, 3, Italy, 1, Japan, 31, Netherlands, 1, Norway, 1, Poland, 2, Republic of Korea, 11, Russian Federation, 2, Saudi Arabia, 3, Spain, 3, Sweden, 2, Switzerland, 3, Taiwan, 12, the United Kingdom, 7, and the USA, 90. It is my pleasure to personally thank the Conference Organizing Committee, the MRS and the exhibitors and sponsors who helped to create an especially successful conference in terms of both technical content with formal talks and informal communications as well as the social elements that enable the atmosphere necessary for a productive and enjoyable conference.

  7. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Briedis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present issue of Santalka is named Intersubjectivity: Phenomenological and Hermeneutical Perspectives continues and broadens the topics of the previous issue named Phenomenological ethics (Santalka (Coactivity vol. 17, no 3. It is dedicated to phenomenological and hermeneutic approaches to subjectivity and intersubjectivity. The following questions still constitute the core of phenomenology and philosophical hermeneutics, though for the time being they are also actively discussed in analytic tradition. On the other hand, the problem of intersubjectivity enables to link together philosophy and ethics, psychology, psychotherapy, sociology, philosophy of religion and other humanitarian and social disciplines.

  8. Preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Nijholt, Antinus; Nijholt, A.

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the latest advances in playful user interfaces – interfaces that invite social and physical interaction. These new developments include the use of audio, visual, tactile and physiological sensors to monitor, provide feedback and anticipate the behavior of human users. The decreasing

  9. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this part of book author give the explanation and purposes of necessity of new elaborations inculcation to industry, in particular to the process of wastes complex reprocessing of aluminium plant in Tajikistan

  10. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowell, Robert J.; Alpers, Charles N.; Jamieson, Heather E.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Majzlan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is perhaps history’s favorite poison, often termed the “King of Poisons” and the “Poison of Kings” and thought to be the demise of fiction’s most famous ill-fated lovers. The toxic nature of arsenic has been known for millennia with the mineral realgar (AsS), originally named “arsenikon” by Theophrastus in 300 B.C.E. meaning literally “potent.” For centuries it has been used as rat poison and as an important component of bactericides and wood preservatives. Arsenic is believed to be the cause of death to Napoleon Bonaparte who was exposed to wallpaper colored green from aceto-arsenite of copper (Aldersey-Williams 2011). The use of arsenic as a poison has been featured widely in literature, film, theatre, and television. Its use as a pesticide made it well known in the nineteenth century and it was exploited by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the Sherlock Holmes novel The Golden Pince-Nez (Conan-Doyle 1903). The dark comedy Arsenic and Old Lace is a prime example of arsenic in popular culture, being first a play but becoming famous as a movie.

  11. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bianco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mt. Vesuvius is one of the most hazardous volcanoes in the world, due to the highly populated surrounding area, where more than 800,000 people live. It experienced various regimes of eruptive activity, from effusive to Plinian. Its last eruption, a mild effusive event, occurred on March 1944. After that the volcano started a period of quiescence, characterized by low seismicity, low deformation pattern, widespread fumaroles emissions accompanied by diffuse CO2 degassing in the crater area and CO2-rich groundwater along the southern flank and in the adjacent plain. Despite the low level of activity, Vesuvius is one of the best-monitored volcanoes in the world. During the last decades many researchers have been involved in the volcano monitoring, covering a wide range of topics, in order to discover any signals that could contribute to understand the volcano dynamics. However, in spite of so much effort, an exhaustive comprehension of the volcano system, aimed at a reliable prediction of the future activity, is far from having been reached. On the other hand, the fast technological evolution makes new instruments and methodologies available for a more sensitive monitoring in the future. [...

  12. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlocha, J.

    1996-01-01

    Ministry of the environment of the Slovak Republic looks back about United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 where the document Agenda for 21 century, famous as AGENDA 21 (Declaration from Rio de Janeiro about environment and development) was accepted. From 132 indicators of sustainable development (which were proposed on Forty sitting of the Commission of the United Nations for Sustainable Development (CSD) 18 April - 3 May 1996 in New York) 76 indicators on the social, economic and institutional questions, and only 56 indicators on the environmental problematic are aimed. In the next part minister deals with the environmental politic after UNCED in the Slovak republic up to 1996. After UNCED the Slovak Republic as first state the document Strategy, principles and priority of state environmental politic has developed in 1993. The National environmental action program approved in 1996. Other activities and documents which were approved in the Slovak Republic are described

  13. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinwen; Xiao, Guoqing; Wang, Zhiguang; Gao, Xing

    2017-09-01

    This issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B contains selected papers presented at the 27th International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids (ICACS-27) that was held from 24 to 29 July 2016 at the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Lanzhou, China. ICACS is a series of biannual conferences, those most recently ones were held in Debrecen, Hungary (2014), Kyoto, Japan (2012), Kraków, Poland (2010), Phalaborwa, South Africa (2008), Berlin, Germany (2006) and Genova, Italy (2004).

  14. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Quintana, Jacqueline

    2002-03-01

    Complex systems represent one of the richest and more fascinating fields of current scientific research. The reason behind this is the important role that the properties of complex systems and materials play in a variety of different but overlapping areas in physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, and social sciences, like medicine and economy. Such unusually broad research field is, therefore, of primary interest nowadays in pure science and technology. The role of statistical physics in this new field of complex systems has been present since its onset and it has been accelerating recently. Methods developed for studying ordering phenomena in simple systems have been generalized for application to more complex forms of matter (polymers, biological macromolecules, glasses, etc) and complex processes (e.g. chaos, turbulence, economy, jamming, biological processes). In particular, many different phenomena (considered in the past to belong to separate research fields) have now a common description. Pillars of such a description are the concepts of scaling and universality. The International Conference on `Scaling Concepts and Complex Systems' (a satellite meeting of STATPHYS21) was devoted to give an overview on recent developments around these two concepts. The Conference took place in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, in July 9-14 2001. The meeting was held in the Gordon Conference style and was attended by about 100 scientists, it covered a large variety of theoretical and experimental research topics of current interest in complex systems and materials. The meeting consisted of a total number of about 40 invited and contributed talks and a poster session. The topics covered included: scaling behaviour, supra-molecular systems, aggregation, aggregation kinetics, growth mechanisms, disordered systems, soft condensed matter (polymers, biological polymers, bio-colloids, gels, colloids, membranes and interfacial phenomena), granular matter, phase separation and out-of-equilibrium dynamics, non-linear dynamics, chaos, turbulence and chaotic dynamics. The present issue contains a substantial number of the invited and contributed talks presented at the meeting. We made an effort to arrange these papers with an order similar to that of presentation during the meeting. It is our pleasure to thank the scientific committee, all the speakers, the session chairs and all participants who contributed to the success of the conference. We are grateful to the Bonino-Pulejo Foundation (Messina-Italy), and to the President On. Nino Calarco, for the Patronage and the enthusiastic support. Our thanks goes also for the Messina University, the INFM (Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Italy), the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT, Mexico) and the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM). The Conference was sponsored by the INFM-Sec.C, CONACyT, UNAM, the Bonino-Pulejo Foundation which contributed financial support to participants and to the publication of the present issue. We are grateful to them for the support. Last, but not the least, we express our warmest gratitude to all the members of the local organizing committee for their assistance and for the work spent in organizing this meeting and especially to Professor~Alberto Robledo for his valuable advice.

  15. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    rate has not shown any notable decline, but there has been a decline in the ... attempted to provide 'state of the art' information on fertility control methods and a ... the world and provide glimpses of how these populations may have evolved.

  16. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Qunbi; Chen, Xi

    2018-02-01

    Global IP traffic is predicted to increase nearly threefold over the next 5 years, driven by emerging high-bandwidth-demanding applications, such as cloud computing, 5G wireless, high-definition video streaming, and virtual reality. This results in a continuously increasing demand on the capacity of backbone optical networks. During the past decade, advanced digital signal processing (DSP), modulation formats, and forward error correction (FEC) were commercially realized to exploit the capacity potential of long-haul fiber channels, and have increased per channel data rate from 10 Gb/s to 400 Gb/s. DSP has played a crucial role in coherent transceivers to accommodate channel impairments including chromatic dispersion (CD), polarization mode dispersion (PMD), laser phase noise, fiber nonlinearities, clock jitter, and so forth. The advance of DSP has also enabled innovations in modulation formats to increase spectral efficiency, improve linear/nonlinear noise tolerance, and realize flexible bandwidth. Moving forward to next generation 1 Tb/s systems on conventional single mode fiber (SMF) platform, more innovations in DSP techniques are needed to further reduce cost per bit, increase network efficiency, and close the gap to the Shannon limit. To further increase capacity per fiber, spatial-division multiplexing (SDM) systems can be used. DSP techniques such as advanced channel equalization methods and distortion compensation can help SDM systems to achieve higher system capacity. In the area of short-reach transmission, the rapid increase of data center network traffic has driven the development of optical technologies for both intra- and inter-data center interconnects (DCI). In particular, DSP has been exploited in intensity-modulation direct detection (IM/DD) systems to realize 400 Gb/s pluggable optical transceivers. In addition, multi-dimensional direct detection modulation schemes are being investigated to increase the data rate per wavelength targeting 1 Tb/s interface.

  17. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Stan; Basu, Asish

    Publication of this monograph will coincide, to a precision of a few per mil, with the centenary of Henri Becquerel's discovery of "radiations actives" (C. R. Acad. Sci., Feb. 24, 1896). In 1896 the Earth was only 40 million years old according to Lord Kelvin. Eleven years later, Boltwood had pushed the Earth's age past 2000 million years, based on the first U/Pb chemical dating results. In exciting progression came discovery of isotopes by J. J. Thomson in 1912, invention of the mass spectrometer by Dempster (1918) and Aston (1919), the first measurement of the isotopic composition of Pb (Aston, 1927) and the final approach, using Pb-Pb isotopic dating, to the correct age of the Earth: close—2.9 Ga (Gerling, 1942), closer—3.0 Ga (Holmes, 1949) and closest—4.50 Ga (Patterson, Tilton and Inghram, 1953).

  18. Preface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Axelsson, Owe (ed.); Kincaid, D. R. (ed.)

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2010), s. 141-142 ISSN 1070-5325 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : David M. Young * iterative methods * partial differential equations of elliptic type Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.163, year: 2010 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/nla.752/pdf

  19. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Robin E.; Nel, Jackie M.; Botha, J. Reinhardt

    2018-04-01

    The 7th South African Conference on Photonic Materials took place at the secluded Amanzi Game Reserve, South Africa, from 27 to 31 March 2017. The conference venue is about 70 km north of Bloemfontein in beautiful 'Bushveld' surroundings, as well as being located in the Free State's Maize Triangle which forms an integral part of South Africa's staple crop production. It is about 200 km east of Kimberley, where the discovery of diamonds around 1870 sparked a mining rush - and about a decade later brought the first electric street lights to Africa and the Southern Hemisphere.

  20. Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster-Swendsen, Mia; Vogt, Helle

    2006-01-01

    and legal schooling that the 'creators' of the laws received at major centres of learning throughout Europe. Moreover the authors address a number of important questions concerning the creation and development of legal professions and the dynamics between legal practice and theoretical, learned approaches...

  1. PREFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandras Velička

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The edition of scientific articles that you are holding in your hands is both new and old. Its history dates back to 1993, when research workers of the Department of Foreign Languages and Department of the Lithuanian Language of Vilnius Gediminas Technical University put in a great deal of effort on the initial publication of “Filologija”, an annual collection of scientific works. 13 volumes of this collection have been published.

  2. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzanowski, A.

    2000-01-01

    The research activities of the H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) results in publication of 600 scientific papers, reports and conference contributions. Among the most important results one can consider: In the elementary particle physics, the DELPHI Collaboration in which INP participate, determined the mass and width of the W boson with an accuracy comparable to that obtained by D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron. New results on the parton structure of the photon were obtained by the H1 detector and the properties of the hadronic final state were further studied by the ZEUS Collaboration. Studies of the electron pairs in cosmic ray cascades by the JACEE experiment indicate the possibility of the existence of a new neutral particle with mass around 9 MeV/c 2 decaying into an electron-positron pair. A new technique of coherent inclusive exponentiation was used in the analysis of the LEP data. It allowed an analysis of the quantum interference between the incoming and outgoing photons as well as art evaluation of the higher order QED corrections to the of Z + γ process. The COSY 11 Collaboration found that the cross section for the p+p→K + Λ 0 +p reaction is 28 times higher than that for the p+p→K + Σ 0 +p reaction. It was suggested that the final state interaction was responsible for this phenomenon. Studies of the nonpartonic components in the nucleon structure function led to a better understanding of the higher order twist effects. A review paper summarizing the results on the role of leading baryons in high energy reactions appeared in Progress on Nuclear and Particle Physics. A theory of the interaction of very high energy neutrinos with nucleons was developed and applied to calculate the change in flux of the neutrinos traversing the Earth. Multichannel analysis of the properties of the scalar mesons f 0 (500), f 0 (980) and f 0 (1400) was completed. New results on the condensation of kaons inside the neutron star matter were obtained. In the nuclear spectroscopy studies, a 10 + isomeric state was identified in the 206 Hg nucleus. For the nuclei around A = 150, e.g. 149 Gd, discrete transitions joining SD bands with normal deformed states were unambiguously observed. Owing to the use of the Recoil Filter Detector with EUROBALL, and consequently significant reduction of the Doppler line broadening, new data on 45 Sc and nuclei near-by were obtained. The muon catalysed fusion studies led to a remarkable success in explanation of the resonance formation of the ddμ molecule in solid deuterium. A series of experiments on the elasticity and adhesion properties of the biological cell measured in vivo were completed with the atomic force microscope. Complementary studies of the properties of the isopentylcyanobiphenyl by dielectric relaxation, adiabatic calorimetry, infrared absorption, neutron scattering and polarization microscopy methods Ied to the conclusion of the existence of an universal character of the relaxation process in a broad range of temperatures and thermodynamic phases. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectra, both static and Magic Angle Spinning, of 51 V nuclei deposited on various substrates were measured. It was then possible to determine coordination, local symmetry and association of vanadium complexes. New effects like the tunneling of NH 2 D 2 and confirmation of the existence of the dipole moment of the NH 3 D ions were found. Many ab inito studies of lattice dynamics of various crystal, some of them for the first time (TiC, CuInSe 2 ), were performed. In the applied physics, we should mention the extreme sensitivity in measurements of the concentration of SF 6 at the level 10 -19 mol/cm 3 in water. The method of artificial intelligence was elaborated to find differences between two methods of measurements of neutron total absorption cross section on separated data samples. In the NMR imaging the water diffusion tensor components in vivo and in vitro both for spinal cord tissues were obtained and the influence of formaline fixture on its absolute value was found. Conditions were determined for selective separation of Hf and Nb in the solutions of sulphuric and muriatic acids using inorganic sorbents, such as hexacyanoferrate(II) of nickel and cobalt. Ratios of 137 Cs components from resuspension and stratosphere in both the average global fall-out and the Chernobyl fall-out were determined. The INP participated also in the first experiments to apply radioactive 32 P to intra-arterial brachytherapy. Results of comparative studies showed that SCGE method when applied for measuring DNA damage induced by a challenging dose of X-rays and an efficiency of cellular repair capacity, can be used in clinical studies as a predictive assay. Results suggest also that this method can be used in environmental studies for testing an individual susceptibility to the induction of the DNA damage. One can noted also some success in the development of new experimental equipment. The upgraded design of the luminosity monitor for the ZEUS detector was constructed and commissioned. A new mechanical structure and cooling system for the PHOBOS detector at the BNL were completed. The Institute was involved in the preparation of the ATLAS and ALICE experiments at the future LHC collider at CERN. The conversion of the heating plant from coal to gas have been completed which radically reduced the pollution level in the area of our Institute and Krakow in winter. The Institute hosted 10 conferences and collaboration meetings and also participates in the EU Socrates-Erasmus educational programme

  3. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    earthquake of 26 January 2001, held at New Delhi during October 3–5, ... the stresses and modes of failure of this mid-plate region. ... effects of flexure in imposing a stress system ... masonry structures to intense ground shaking of the area ...

  4. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Harris

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The papers in this volume explore the history and the enigmatic, elusive identity of Britain’s Liberal Party. Clearly, the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition formed in May 2010 provides an excellent opportunity and context in which to do so.It is a question which has, in various ways and at various times, risen to the agitated surface of British political life, to remind us that beneath the near century-old Conservative-Labour hegemony there still lurks, in the quieter depths below, what...

  5. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Beth Adams; Dale W. Cole; Charles B. Davey; Scott H. Chang

    2009-01-01

    This volume represents the proceedings from the 11th North American Forest Soils Conference, held June 22?26, 2008 in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. The theme for the conference "Forest Soil Science: Celebrating 50 Years of Research on Properties, Processes and Management of Forest Soils" captures the celebratory, but thoughtful, nature of the conference. Forest...

  6. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjun Zheng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The 1 st and 2 nd International Conferences on Modern Economic Technology and Management have been successfully held in 2014 and 2015 and the contributions have aroused more attention from the academic researching field. Since the success of the previous conferences, the 3 rd International Conference on Modern Economic Technology and Management (ICMETM 2016 will be held as scheduled on April 28-29, 2016 in Kyoto, Japan so as to further search the new problems and underlying reasons existing in economic technology and management under globalization and marketization. The proceedings in the conference mainly focus on the topics including analysis of economic policy, international finance and trade, theory of consumer behavior, evaluation and management of public project, economic development strategy and planning of new region, administrative management, business management and management of public affairs and policy and so on.

  7. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Vladimir S.; Miranda, Eva; Rubtsov, Vladimir; Przybylska, Maria; Tabachnikov, Sergei

    2017-05-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Geometry and Physics gathers several contributions to the conference FDIS 2015 3-rd Conference on Finite Dimensional Integrable Systems in Geometry and Mathematical Physics which took place in Będlewo in July 12 to 17, 2015. It also contains other contributions by specialists in the field of integrable systems and related subjects. This is the second special issue which corresponds to the third installment of a series of Workshops called FDIS, which take place every other year.

  8. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Eric T.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    Readers of this book will generally fit into two groups. One group is geologists and geochemists, who have studied the global carbon cycle for many decades. These readers will find that the papers in this book present a new view of familiar themes. Whereas much previous work on the carbon cycle, and other geochemical cycles, has emphasized the nature of the steady state maintained by complex networks of feedbacks, recent attention has shifted to the changes implied by the way these feedbacks respond to perturbations. The other group of readers is the community of scientists who are concerned with anticipating the effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Like the geologists and geochemists, these readers have a long tradition of carbon cycle research within their own disciplines. They, also, have raised subtle but profound questions about the role of the steady state assumption in their studies. As the evidence for preanthropogenic CO2 variations grows, they are no longer satisfied with predictive models that assume ipso facto that the carbon cycle was at a steady state before man's intervention. And as they discover more about the complexities of carbon cycle processes, they seek to know how these processes have behaved in the geologic past.

  9. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BULLETIN OF CHEMICAL REACTION ENGINEERING & CATALYSIS (ISSN 1978-2993, Volume 7, Number 2, Year 2012 is an electronic international journal. The journal is a media for communicating all research activities in chemical reaction engineering and catalysis fields, and disseminating the novel technology and news related to chemical reaction engineering, catalyst engineering and science, bioreactor engineering, membrane reactor, and catalytic reactor engineering.In this issue, effect of calcination temperature on the physic-chemical properties was presented with respect to some characterizations of the catalyst. In addition, synthesis and characterization as well as their relationship was studied. Effect of some preparation methods of catalyst and their relationship with catalyst performance and characterization was reported. The review on biodiesel-based heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production using homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis was highlighted. In addition, the synthesized zinc oxide based acid catalyst was explored to be used in the heterogeneous biodiesel production by using the vegetable oils and methanol. Original research articles focusing on enzymatic hydrolysis was also highlighted targeted for production of glucose from cellulosic material. Beside that, development of an alternative process to obtain the industrially important benzyl aromatics by benzylation of aromatics using benzyl chloride was focused which catalysed by mesoporous solid acid catalysts including their characterization and analysis. Finally, the study on cationic copolymerization in one step takes place between carbon–carbon double-bond monomer styrene with cyclic monomer tetrahydrofuran. The reaction was initiated with maghnite-H+ an acid exchanged montmorillonite as acid solid eco-catalyst. The oxonium ion of tetrahydrofuran and carbonium ion of styrene propagated the reaction of copolymerization.Currently, the BCREC journal is an open access electronic international journal. Readers can read and download any full-text articles for free of charge. However, Authors may pay some processing fees once their articles has been accepted, i.e. for subscription of Original Reprint Articles. Authors may also pay some fees for Original Reprint Articles with some eligible rates. The research articles submitted to the BCREC journal will be peer-reviewed by at least two reviewers. Accepted research articles will be available online following the journal peer-reviewing process as well as assigned to DOI number from CrossRef. Official language used in this journal is English.Official website address of BCREC journal is: http://bcrec.undip.ac.id.Editor would like to appreciate all researchers, academicians, industrial practitioners focused on chemical reaction engineering and catalysis to contribute to this online journal.---------------------------------------------Assoc. Prof. Dr. I. Istadi (Editor-in-Chief Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis Group, Department of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University E-mail: bcrec@undip.ac.id http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.2.4368.iv 

  10. Preface

    OpenAIRE

    Młodawska-Bronowska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    This monograph covers the output of the conference titled “2014 − New Opportunities for Japan and V-4 Cooperation” and contains Japanese and Polish contributions. It offers reflections on the statu nascendi of economic and cultural relations between the two nations. Viewpoints and research results mirror the various interests and arguments of the scholars (mainly economists, sociologists, and japanlogists), businessmen, and representatives of administrative bodies (central and local governme...

  11. Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haugan Are

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The 6th International Conference on Tracers and Tracing Methods (TRACER 6 was arranged in Oslo, 6–8 June 2011. The conference was organized by Institute for Energy Technology (IFE, located at Kjeller in Norway. The internet sites for TRACER 6 and IFE can be found at www.tracer6.com and www.ife.no, respectively.

  12. Preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybler, P.

    2004-01-01

    Scientific conference deals with problems in environmental sciences and radio-environmental sciences. The conference proceeded in two sections: (A) Environmental engineering; (B) Nuclear technologies. Sixty registered people and fifty guests participated on this conference. Twenty-seven presentations and eleven posters were presented. This number of the journal contains twenty-one papers from which eighteen papers deals with the scope of INIS

  13. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, P. L.; Pugh, D. T.; De Ronde, J. G.; Warrick, R. G.; Hannah, J.

    The measurement of sea level is of fundamental importance to a wide range of research in climatology, oceanography, geology and geodesy. This volume attempts to cover many aspects of the field. The volume opens with a description by Bolduc and Murty of one of the products stemming from the development of tide gauge networks in the northern and tropical Atlantic. This work is relevant to the growth of the Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS), the main goal of which is to provide the world with an efficient, coherent sea level monitoring system for oceanographic and climatological research. The subsequent four papers present results from the analysis of existing tide gauge data, including those datasets available from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level and the TOGA Sea Level Center. Two of the four, by Wróblewski and by Pasarić and Orlić, are concerned with European sea level changes, while Yu Jiye et al. discuss inter-annual changes in the Pacific, and Wang Baocan et al. describe variability in the Changjiang estuary in China. The papers by El-Abd and A wad, on Red Sea levels, are the only contributions to the volume from the large research community of geologists concerned with sea level changes.

  14. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Alok

    2015-03-01

    Facing the French Alps from the northern shore of Lac Léman, the campus of EPFL - Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - hosted the 17th International Conference on Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (ICMOVPE XVII). As a written memory of this event, this special issue of Journal of Crystal Growth offers an insight into the research presented in Lausanne between July 13 and 18, 2014.

  15. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, Valentin; Iacomi, Felicia; Tetean, Romulus

    2017-12-01

    The 11th International Conference on Physics of Advanced Materials, ICPAM-11 (https://www.icpam.ro/) was organized under the auspices of the Romanian Ministry of Education and Research by Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Romania in collaboration with Babes-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca, Romania, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Romania and other 22 prestigious institutions from Romania, France, U.K, Russia, Japan, Portugal, Ukraine, Netherlands, Switzerland, Hungary, Turkey, Greece and USA. During September 8-14, 2016, ICPAM 11, together with the other three events, 2nd Autumn School on Physics of Advanced Materials, PAMS-2, 4th International Festival of NanoArt and 2nd Art and Science Photography Exhibition and Workshop, attracted in Cluj-Napoca 290 participants, of which an important number were young researchers, postdocs, artists and PhD and Master students. The financial support offered by important sponsors and exhibitors such as Al Fateh@Sons Traders, Emerson, ArcelorMittal, THORLABS, Histeresis, Specs, Blade Solutions, had a major contribution to provide gratuities and to award many prices to young researchers and PhD students.

  16. Preface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A decade back, the word 'wireless' generally meant a 'mobile phone' in which talk when you walk. However, the modern mobile communication systems are shifting their focus from solely voice communication to Internet. ... It's all about data, we need to protect it and thus the term 'secured wireless networks'.

  17. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourbesville, Philippe; Mujumdar, Pradeep P.; Kojiri, Toshiharu

    It is obvious that water resources management has become an important issue in this century under the specified situation of climate change, regional development and population increase. Moreover, the modern life has become vulnerable to water environments affected with climate evolution and with growing urbanisation. New water-related technologies may create the additional water consumption or drastic water saving. Freshwater withdrawals by human activities have increased dramatically over the years. Already, at the beginning of the 21st century, one-sixth of the world's population is without access to clean water supply while two-fifths lacked access to sanitation. Problems of water resources have also become much discussed in the international conferences and multi-national organizations.

  18. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Martin; Brodd, Ralph J.; Qiu, Xinping; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    The 2007 meeting of the International Battery Material Association (IBA) was held in the Kylin Villa Hotel and Resort in Shenzhen (China) from November 16-20, 2007. The local meeting was organized by Tsinghua University (China). This was the first meeting of the IBA in China and a most successful one with more than 210 attendees. The meeting benefited from prestigious scientific sponsorship by the International Society of Electrochemistry (ISE), Gold Peak Batteries (Hong Kong), Amperex Technology Limited (ATL, China), PEC (Belgium), Ametek Inc. (USA), Evonik Degussa (Germany), Suedchemie (Germany), TIMCAL AG (Switzerland), Hong-Sen Materials Company (China), Hydro-Quebec (Canada), Pulead Technology Industry Co. (China), and Neware Technology Limited (China).

  19. The Essence of Nonclassicality: Non-Vanishing Signal Deficit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravinda, S.; Srikanth, R.

    2015-12-01

    Nonclassical properties of correlations- like unpredictability, no-cloning and uncertainty- are known to follow from two assumptions: nonlocality and no-signaling. For two-input-two-output correlations, we derive these properties from a single, unified assumption: namely, the excess of the communication cost over the signaling in the correlation. This is relevant to quantum temporal correlations, resources to simulate quantum correlations and extensions of quantum mechanics. We generalize in the context of such correlations the nonclassicality result for nonlocal-nonsignaling correlations (Masanes et al., Phys. Rev. A 73, 012112 (2006)) and the uncertainty bound on nonlocality (Oppenheim and Wehner, Science 330(6007), 1072 (2010)), when the no-signaling condition is relaxed.

  20. Nonclassical Problem for Ultraparabolic Equation in Abstract Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gia Avalishvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonclassical problem for ultraparabolic equation with nonlocal initial condition with respect to one time variable is studied in abstract Hilbert spaces. We define the space of square integrable vector-functions with values in Hilbert spaces corresponding to the variational formulation of the nonlocal problem for ultraparabolic equation and prove trace theorem, which allows one to interpret initial conditions of the nonlocal problem. We obtain suitable a priori estimates and prove the existence and uniqueness of solution of the nonclassical problem and continuous dependence upon the data of the solution to the nonlocal problem. We consider an application of the obtained abstract results to nonlocal problem for ultraparabolic partial differential equation with second-order elliptic operator and obtain well-posedness result in Sobolev spaces.

  1. Preface: Multiscale feedbacks in ecogeomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Joseph M.; Gibbins, Chris; Wainwright, John; Larsen, Laurel G.; McElroy, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Geomorphic systems are known to exhibit nonlinear responses to physical–biological feedbacks (Thornes, 1985; Baas, 2002; Reinhardt et al., 2010). These responses make understanding and/or predicting system response to change highly challenging. With growing concerns over ecosystem health, a pressing need exists for research that tries to elucidate these feedbacks (Jerolmack, 2008; Darby, 2010; National Research Council, 2010). A session was convened at the Fall 2008 meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) to provide an outlet for some of this truly interdisciplinary and original research, which is central to understanding geomorphic and ecological dynamics. The session attracted over 39 contributions, which were divided into two well-attended oral sessions and a very busy poster session. This special issue presents new research from the AGU session, which highlights clear physical–biological feedbacks. The aim is to bring together contrasting perspectives on biological and geomorphic feedbacks in a diversity of physiographic settings, ranging from wetlands and estuaries, through rivers, to uplands. These papers highlight biological and physical feedbacks which involve the modulation or amplification of geomorphic processes. These papers will be of interest to a core geomorphology audience, and should also draw attention from the fields of ecohydraulics, hydroecology, ecohydrology, ecomorphology, biogeochemistry and biogeography, and biogeomorphology as well as the more traditional fields of hydrology, ecology and biology. In this preface to the special issue, we a) review past contributions to the emerging field of ecogeomorphology and related disciplines, b) provide some context for how this topical special issue came to fruition, and c) summarize the contributions to this special issue.

  2. Nonlinear coherent loss for generating non-classical states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalychev, A; Mogilevtsev, D; Kilin, S

    2011-01-01

    Here, we discuss a generation of non-classical states of bosonic mode with the help of artificially designed loss, namely the nonlinear coherent loss. We show how to generate superpositions of Fock states, and how it is possible to 'comb' the initial states leaving only states with certain properties in the resulting superposition (for example, a generation of a superposition of Fock states with odd number of particles). We discuss purity of generated states and estimate maximal achievable generation fidelity.

  3. Symplectic tomography of nonclassical states of trapped ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man'ko, O.

    1996-03-01

    The marginal distribution for two types of nonclassical states of trapped ion - for squeezed and correlated states and for squeezed even and odd coherent states (squeezed Schroedinger cat states) is studied. The obtained marginal distribution for the two types of states is shown to satisfy classical dynamical equation equivalent to standard quantum evolution equation for density matrix (wave function) derived in symplectic tomography scheme. (author). 20 refs

  4. Non-classical Correlations and Quantum Coherence in Mixed Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng-Da; Wei, Mei-Song; Wang, Jicheng; Zhang, Yixin; He, Qi-Liang

    2018-05-01

    We investigate non-classical correlations (entanglement and quantum discord) and quantum coherence for an open two-qubit system each independently coupled to a bosonic environment and a spin environment, respectively. The modulating effects of spin environment and bosonic environment are respectively explored. A relation among the quantum coherence, quantum discord and classical correlation is found during the sudden transition phenomenon. We also compare the case of mixed environments with that of the same environments, showing that the dynamics is dramatically changed.

  5. Construction of classical and non-classical coherent photon states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honegger, Reinhard; Rieckers, Alfred

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that the diagonal matrix elements of all-order coherent states for the quantized electromagnetic field have to constitute a Poisson distribution with respect to the photon number. The present work gives first the summary of a constructive scheme, developed previously, which determines in terms of an auxiliary Hilbert space all possible off-diagonal elements for the all-order coherent density operators in Fock space and which identifies all extremal coherent states. In terms of this formalism it is then demonstrated that each pure classical coherent state is a uniformly phase locked (quantum) coherent superposition of number states. In a mixed classical coherent state the exponential of the locked phase is shown to be replaced by a rather arbitrary unitary operator in the auxiliary Hilbert space. On the other hand classes for density operators--and for their normally ordered characteristic functions--of non-classical coherent states are obtained, especially by rather weak perturbations of classical coherent states. These illustrate various forms of breaking the classical uniform phase locking and exhibit rather peculiar properties, such as asymmetric fluctuations for the quadrature phase operators. Several criteria for non-classicality are put forward and applied to the elaborated non-classical coherent states, providing counterexamples against too simple arguments for classicality. It is concluded that classicality is only a stable concept for coherent states with macroscopic intensity

  6. Transcriptional regulation by nonclassical action of thyroid hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moeller Lars C

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thyroid hormone (TH is essential for normal development, growth and metabolism. Its effects were thought to be principally mediated through triiodothyronine (T3, acting as a ligand for the nuclear TH receptors (TRs α and β residing on thyroid hormone response elements (TREs in the promoter of TH target genes. In this classical model of TH action, T3 binding to TRs leads to recruitment of basal transcription factors and increased transcription of TH responsive genes. Recently, the concept of TH action on gene expression has become more diverse and now includes nonclassical actions of T3 and T4: T3 has been shown to activate PI3K via the TRs, which ultimately increases transcription of certain genes, e.g. HIF-1α. Additionally, both T3 and thyroxine (T4 can bind to a membrane integrin, αvβ3, which leads to activation of the PI3K and MAPK signal transduction pathways and finally also increases gene transcription, e.g. of the FGF2 gene. Therefore, these initially nongenomic, nonclassical actions seem to serve as additional interfaces for transcriptional regulation by TH. Aim of this perspective is to summarize the genes that are currently known to be induced by nonclassical TH action and the mechanisms involved.

  7. Optical nonclassicality test based on third-order intensity correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigovacca, L.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Di Franco, C.; Kim, M. S.

    2018-03-01

    We develop a nonclassicality criterion for the interference of three delayed, but otherwise identical, light fields in a three-mode Bell interferometer. We do so by comparing the prediction of quantum mechanics with those of a classical framework in which independent sources emit electric fields with random phases. In particular, we evaluate third-order correlations among output intensities as a function of the delays, and show how the presence of a correlation revival for small delays cannot be explained by the classical model of light. The observation of a revival is thus a nonclassicality signature, which can be achieved only by sources with a photon-number statistics that is highly sub-Poissonian. Our analysis provides strong evidence for the nonclassicality of the experiment discussed by Menssen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 153603 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.153603], and shows how a collective "triad" phase affects the interference of any three or more light fields, irrespective of their quantum or classical character.

  8. Nonclassical measurements errors in nonlinear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Edith; Mulalic, Ismir

    Discrete choice models and in particular logit type models play an important role in understanding and quantifying individual or household behavior in relation to transport demand. An example is the choice of travel mode for a given trip under the budget and time restrictions that the individuals...... estimates of the income effect it is of interest to investigate the magnitude of the estimation bias and if possible use estimation techniques that take the measurement error problem into account. We use data from the Danish National Travel Survey (NTS) and merge it with administrative register data...... that contains very detailed information about incomes. This gives a unique opportunity to learn about the magnitude and nature of the measurement error in income reported by the respondents in the Danish NTS compared to income from the administrative register (correct measure). We find that the classical...

  9. CLASSICAL AND NON-CLASSICAL PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Kozlova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The goals and values of human life, the search for the meaning of human existence contain the potential for a meaningful, progressive development of philosophical and anthropological ideas at any time in history. One of the tasks of philosophical anthropology is the formation of the image of man, the choice of ways to achieve the ideal, the methods of comprehension and resolution of universal problems. The increasing processes of differentiation in science led to the formation of different views on the nature of man, to the distinction between classical and non-classical philosophical anthropology. А comparative analysis of these trends is given in this article.Materials and methods: The dialectical method is preferred in the question of research methodology, the hermeneutic and phenomenological approaches are used.Results: The development of philosophical anthropology correlates with the challenges of modernity. By tracking the trends of human change, philosophical anthropology changes the approach to the consideration of its main subject of research. The whole array of disciplines that study man comes to new discoveries, new theories, and philosophical anthropology changes its view of the vision, challenging the principles of classical philosophical anthropology.Classical philosophical anthropology elevates the biological nature of man to a pedestal, non-classical philosophical anthropology actualizes questions of language, culture, thinking, understanding, actualizes the hermeneutic and phenomenological approaches. The desire to understand a person in classical philosophical anthropology is based on the desire to fully reveal the biological mechanisms in a person. The perspective of treating a person in nonclassical philosophical anthropology is polyformen: man as a text, as a dreaming self, as an eternal transition. Non-classical philosophical anthropology, goes from the idea of identity to the idea of variability, from

  10. Quantum teleportation of nonclassical wave packets: An effective multimode theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benichi, Hugo; Takeda, Shuntaro; Lee, Noriyuki; Furusawa, Akira [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    We develop a simple and efficient theoretical model to understand the quantum properties of broadband continuous variable quantum teleportation. We show that, if stated properly, the problem of multimode teleportation can be simplified to teleportation of a single effective mode that describes the input state temporal characteristic. Using that model, we show how the finite bandwidth of squeezing and external noise in the classical channel affect the output teleported quantum field. We choose an approach that is especially relevant for the case of non-Gaussian nonclassical quantum states and we finally back-test our model with recent experimental results.

  11. Nonclassical photon streams using rephased amplified spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, Patrick M.; Naylor, William R.; Longdell, Jevon J.; Beavan, Sarah E.; Sellars, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a fully quantum mechanical treatment of optically rephased photon echoes. These echoes exhibit noise due to amplified spontaneous emission; however, this noise can be seen as a consequence of the entanglement between the atoms and the output light. With a rephasing pulse one can get an 'echo' of the amplified spontaneous emission, leading to light with nonclassical correlations at points separated in time, which is of interest in the context of building wide bandwith quantum repeaters. We also suggest a wideband version of DLCZ protocol based on the same ideas.

  12. Quantum nondemolition measurement with a nonclassical meter input and an electro-optic enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Buchler, B.C.; Bachor, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Optical quantum nondemolition measurements are performed using a beamsplitter with a nonclassical meter input and a electro-optic feedforward loop. The nonclassical meter input is provided by a stable 4.5 dB amplitude squeezed source generated by an optical parametric amplifier. We show...

  13. Preface: Remote Sensing in Coastal Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak R. Mishra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Special Issue (SI on “Remote Sensing in Coastal Environments” presents a wide range of articles focusing on a variety of remote sensing models and techniques to address coastal issues and processes ranging for wetlands and water quality to coral reefs and kelp habitats. The SI is comprised of twenty-one papers, covering a broad range of research topics that employ remote sensing imagery, models, and techniques to monitor water quality, vegetation, habitat suitability, and geomorphology in the coastal zone. This preface provides a brief summary of each article published in the SI.

  14. Prefreshman and Cooperative Education Program. [PREFACE training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Of the 93 students enrolled in the PREFACE program over its four-year history, 70 are still in engineering school. Tables show profiles of student placement and participation from 1973 to 1977 (first semester completed). During the 1977 summer, 10 students were placed at NASA Goddard, 8 at DOE-Brookhaven, and 2 at American Can. Eleven students with less high school math preparation remained on campus for formal precalculus classes. Majors of the students in the program include civil, chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering. Student satisfaction with their training experiences is summarized.

  15. Cauchy–Schwarz inequality-based criteria for the non-classicality of sub-Poisson and antibunched light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volovich, Igor V., E-mail: volovich@mi.ras.ru

    2016-01-08

    We discuss non-classicality of photon antibunching and sub-Poisson photon statistics. The difference K between the variance and the mean of the particle number operator as a measure of non-classicality of a state is discussed. The non-classicality of quantum states, discussed here, is different from another non-classicality, related with Bell's inequalities and entanglement though both can be traced to the violation of an inequality implied by an assumption of classicality that utilized the Cauchy–Schwarz inequality in the derivation. - Highlights: • Non-classicality of photon antibunching and sub-Poisson statistics are discussed. • The Cauchy–Schwarz inequality provides criteria for the non-classicality. • The vacuum contribution makes the superposition of quantum states more classical. • Experiments to generate non-classical superpositions of the Fock states are suggested.

  16. Highly Nonclassical Quantum States and Environment Induced Decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldi, Peter

    2004-06-01

    In this thesis concrete quantum systems are investigated in the framework of the environment induced decoherence. The focus is on the dynamics of highly nonclassical quantum states, the Wigner function of which are negative over some regions of their domains. One of the chosen physical systems is a diatomic molecule, where the potential energy of the nuclei is an anharmonic function of their distance. A system of two-level atoms, which can be important from the viewpoint of quantum information technology, is also investigated. A method is described that is valid in both systems and can determine the characteristic time of the decoherence in a dynamical way. The direction of the decoherence and its relation to energy dissipation is also studied. Finally, a scheme is proposed that can prepare decoherence-free states using the experimental techniques presently available.

  17. Nonclassical polarization effects in fluorescence emission spectra from microdroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S.; Goddard, N. L.; Hill, S. C.

    1999-12-01

    We report a pronounced nonclassical polarization effect on the shape of fluorescence emission spectra from isolated microdroplets containing a dilute solution of soluble fluors or a dilute layer of surfactant fluors. We see different spectral shapes for 90° scattering when comparing between IVV, IVH, IHH, IHV. However, we measure the largest difference in spectral shape in the surfactant case, with the incident polarization directed toward the detector (IHV vs IHH). Imaging reveals that the emission in this case principally arises from two distinct regions near the surface of the droplet, which are diametrically opposed and along the axis of the incident laser beam. The effect appears to be the direct result of coupling between molecular emission moments and electromagnetic modes of the droplet. It is not the molecule which radiates but the molecule microvessel. Directional emission is sensitive to the polarization of the electromagnetic mode which is stimulated by the coupling.

  18. Nonclassicality by Local Gaussian Unitary Operations for Gaussian States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A measure of nonclassicality N in terms of local Gaussian unitary operations for bipartite Gaussian states is introduced. N is a faithful quantum correlation measure for Gaussian states as product states have no such correlation and every non product Gaussian state contains it. For any bipartite Gaussian state ρ A B , we always have 0 ≤ N ( ρ A B < 1 , where the upper bound 1 is sharp. An explicit formula of N for ( 1 + 1 -mode Gaussian states and an estimate of N for ( n + m -mode Gaussian states are presented. A criterion of entanglement is established in terms of this correlation. The quantum correlation N is also compared with entanglement, Gaussian discord and Gaussian geometric discord.

  19. Non-classical structures of organic compounds: unusual stereochemistry and hypercoordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, Vladimir I; Minyaev, Ruslan M; Hoffmann, Roald

    2002-01-01

    Non-classical structures of organic compounds are defined as molecules containing non-tetrahedral tetracoordinate and/or hypercoordinate carbon atoms. The evolution of the views on this subject is considered and the accumulated theoretical and experimental data on the structures and dynamic transformations of non-classical organic compounds are systematised. It is shown that computational analysis using the methods and the software potential of modern quantum chemistry has now acquired high predictive capacity and is the most important source of data on the structures of non-classical compounds. The bibliography includes 227 references.

  20. Non-classical nonlinear feature extraction from standard resonance vibration data for damage detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiras, J N; Monzó, J; Payá, J; Kundu, T; Popovics, J S

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic non-classical nonlinear analyses show promise for improved damage diagnostics in materials that exhibit such structure at the mesoscale, such as concrete. In this study, nonlinear non-classical dynamic material behavior from standard vibration test data, using pristine and frost damaged cement mortar bar samples, is extracted and quantified. The procedure is robust and easy to apply. The results demonstrate that the extracted nonlinear non-classical parameters show expected sensitivity to internal damage and are more sensitive to changes owing to internal damage levels than standard linear vibration parameters.

  1. Materials with complex behaviour II properties, non-classical materials and new technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Oechsner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This book reviews developments and trends in advanced materials and their properties; modeling and simulation of non-classical materials and new technologies for joining materials. Offers tools for characterizing and predicting properties and behavior.

  2. PREFACE: Soil Change Matters 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The opinions expressed and arguments employed in this publication are the sole responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its Member countries. The Workshop was sponsored by the OECD Co-operative Research Programme on Biological Resource Management for Sustainable Agricultural Systems, whose financial support made it possible for eight of the invited speakers to participate in the Workshop. We would like to thank the Organising Committee, the Scientific Committee and the financial support from the conference sponsors and funding from the Government of Victoria that allowed the success of the Soil Change Matters Workshop. Organising Committee (Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources unless otherwise noted): • Richard MacEwan (Convenor) • Jennifer Alexander • Helaina Black (James Hutton Institute, UK) • Doug Crawford • Phil Dyson (North Central CMA) • Jane Fisher • Gemma Heemskerk • Jonathan Hopley • Pauline Mele • Rebecca Mitchell • David Rees • Dugal Wallace • Dale Webster Scientific Committee (Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources unless otherwise noted): • Mr Richard MacEwan • Dr Dominique Arrouays (National Institute of Agronomic Research, France) • Helaina Black (James Hutton Institute, UK) • Mr Doug Crawford • Dr Ben Marchant (Geoscience, UK) • Dr Pauline Mele • Dr Budiman Minasny (University of Sydney, NSW) • Professor Dan Richter (Duke University, USA) • Mr Nathan Robinson Thanks are given to the authors and to the anonymous referees for the papers included here.

  3. Testing nonclassicality in multimode fields: A unified derivation of classical inequalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranowicz, Adam; Bartkowiak, Monika; Wang Xiaoguang; Liu Yuxi; Nori, Franco

    2010-01-01

    We consider a way to generate operational inequalities to test nonclassicality (or quantumness) of multimode bosonic fields (or multiparty bosonic systems) that unifies the derivation of many known inequalities and allows to propose new ones. The nonclassicality criteria are based on Vogel's criterion corresponding to analyzing the positivity of multimode P functions or, equivalently, the positivity of matrices of expectation values of, e.g., creation and annihilation operators. We analyze not only monomials but also polynomial functions of such moments, which can sometimes enable simpler derivations of physically relevant inequalities. As an example, we derive various classical inequalities which can be violated only by nonclassical fields. In particular, we show how the criteria introduced here easily reduce to the well-known inequalities describing (a) multimode quadrature squeezing and its generalizations, including sum, difference, and principal squeezing; (b) two-mode one-time photon-number correlations, including sub-Poisson photon-number correlations and effects corresponding to violations of the Cauchy-Schwarz and Muirhead inequalities; (c) two-time single-mode photon-number correlations, including photon antibunching and hyperbunching; and (d) two- and three-mode quantum entanglement. Other simple inequalities for testing nonclassicality are also proposed. We have found some general relations between the nonclassicality and entanglement criteria, in particular those resulting from the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. It is shown that some known entanglement inequalities can be derived as nonclassicality inequalities within our formalism, while some other known entanglement inequalities can be seen as sums of more than one inequality derived from the nonclassicality criterion. This approach enables a deeper analysis of the entanglement for a given nonclassicality.

  4. About the nonclassicality of states defined by nonpositivity of the P-quasiprobability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuensche, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    The definition of nonclassical states in quantum optics by the nonpositivity of their Glauber-Sudarshan quasiprobability P(α,α * )-P(q,p) is investigated and it is shown that it hides some serious problems. It leads to a subdivision of squeezed thermal states into classical and nonclassical states which is difficult to interpret physically by some qualitatively different behaviour of the states. Nonclassical states are found in arbitrarily small neighbourhoods of every classical state that is illustrated by a very artificial modified thermal state. The observability of the criterion in comparison to that for nonclassicality of states determined by the nearest Hilbert-Schmidt distance to a class of reference states is discussed. The behaviour of the nonclassicality of states in models of phase-insensitive processes of damping and amplification is investigated and it is found that every nonclassical state eventually makes a transition to a classical state. However, this is not specific for the negativities or singularities of the Glauber-Sudarshan quasiprobability and is found in similar form for other quasiprobabilities, for example, for the Wigner quasiprobability. We discuss in quite general form some defects of the Glauber-Sudarshan quasiprobability if compared with classical distribution functions over the phase space, in particular the failure of an earlier advertised superposition formula

  5. Non-classical state engineering for quantum networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, Christina E.

    2014-01-01

    The wide field of quantum information processing and quantum networks has developed very fast in the last two decades. Besides the regime of discrete variables, which was developed first, the regime of continuous variables represents an alternative approach to realize many quantum applications. Non-classical states of light, like squeezed or entangled states, are a fundamental resource for quantum applications like quantum repeaters, quantum memories, quantum key distribution, quantum spectroscopy, and quantum metrology. These states can be generated successfully in the infrared wavelength regime. However, for some tasks other wavelengths, especially in the visible wavelength regime, are desirable. To generate non-classical states of light in this wavelength regime frequency up-conversion can be used, since all quantum properties are maintained in this process. The first part of this thesis deals with the experimental frequency up-conversion of quantum states. Squeezed vacuum states of light at 1550 nm were up-converted to 532 nm and a noise reduction of -1.5 dB at 532 nm was achieved. These states can be used for increasing the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors or spectroscopic measurements. Furthermore, one part of an entangled state at 1550 nm was up-converted to 532 nm and, thus, entanglement between these two wavelengths was generated and characterized to -1.4 dB following Duan et al. With such a quantum link it is possible to establish a quantum network, which takes advantage of the low optical loss at 1550 nm for information transmission and of atomic transitions around 532 nm for a quantum memory in a quantum repeater. For quantum networks the distribution of entanglement and especially of a quantum key is essential. In the second part of this thesis the experimental distribution of entanglement by separable states is demonstrated. The underlying protocol requires a special three-mode state, which is separable in two of the three splittings. With

  6. Non-classical state engineering for quantum networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, Christina E.

    2014-01-24

    The wide field of quantum information processing and quantum networks has developed very fast in the last two decades. Besides the regime of discrete variables, which was developed first, the regime of continuous variables represents an alternative approach to realize many quantum applications. Non-classical states of light, like squeezed or entangled states, are a fundamental resource for quantum applications like quantum repeaters, quantum memories, quantum key distribution, quantum spectroscopy, and quantum metrology. These states can be generated successfully in the infrared wavelength regime. However, for some tasks other wavelengths, especially in the visible wavelength regime, are desirable. To generate non-classical states of light in this wavelength regime frequency up-conversion can be used, since all quantum properties are maintained in this process. The first part of this thesis deals with the experimental frequency up-conversion of quantum states. Squeezed vacuum states of light at 1550 nm were up-converted to 532 nm and a noise reduction of -1.5 dB at 532 nm was achieved. These states can be used for increasing the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors or spectroscopic measurements. Furthermore, one part of an entangled state at 1550 nm was up-converted to 532 nm and, thus, entanglement between these two wavelengths was generated and characterized to -1.4 dB following Duan et al. With such a quantum link it is possible to establish a quantum network, which takes advantage of the low optical loss at 1550 nm for information transmission and of atomic transitions around 532 nm for a quantum memory in a quantum repeater. For quantum networks the distribution of entanglement and especially of a quantum key is essential. In the second part of this thesis the experimental distribution of entanglement by separable states is demonstrated. The underlying protocol requires a special three-mode state, which is separable in two of the three splittings. With

  7. Nuclear translocation of glutathione S-transferase {pi} is mediated by a non-classical localization signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakatsu, Miho [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Goto, Shinji, E-mail: sgoto@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Yoshida, Takako; Urata, Yoshishige; Li, Tao-Sheng [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is abrogated by the deletion of the last 16 amino acid residues in the carboxy-terminal region, indicating that residues 195-208 of GST{pi} are required for nuclear translocation. {yields} The lack of a contiguous stretch of positively charged amino acid residues within the carboxy-terminal region of GST{pi}, suggests that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is mediated by a non-classical nuclear localization signal. {yields} An in vitro transport assay shows that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is dependent on cytosolic factors and ATP. -- Abstract: Glutathione S-transferase {pi} (GST{pi}), a member of the GST family of multifunctional enzymes, is highly expressed in human placenta and involved in the protection of cellular components against electrophilic compounds or oxidative stress. We have recently found that GST{pi} is expressed in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus in some cancer cells, and that the nuclear expression of GST{pi} appears to correlate with resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Although the mitochondrial targeting signal of GST{pi} was previously identified in the amino-terminal region, the mechanism of nuclear translocation remains completely unknown. In this study, we find that the region of GST{pi}195-208 is critical for nuclear translocation, which is mediated by a novel and non-classical nuclear localization signal. In addition, using an in vitro transport assay, we demonstrate that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} depends on the cytosolic extract and ATP. Although further experiments are needed to understand in depth the precise mechanism of nuclear translocation of GST{pi}, our results may help to establish more efficient anti-cancer therapy, especially with respect to resistance to anti-cancer drugs.

  8. Nonlinear Quantum Optical Springs and Their Nonclassical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, M.J.; Tavassoly, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    The original idea of quantum optical spring arises from the requirement of quantization of the frequency of oscillations in the Hamiltonian of harmonic oscillator. This purpose is achieved by considering a spring whose constant (and so its frequency) depends on the quantum states of another system. Recently, it is realized that by the assumption of frequency modulation of ω to ω√1+μa † a the mentioned idea can be established. In the present paper, we generalize the approach of quantum optical spring with particular attention to the dependence of frequency to the intensity of radiation field that naturally observes in the nonlinear coherent states, from which we arrive at a physical system has been called by us as nonlinear quantum optical spring. Then, after the introduction of the generalized Hamiltonian of nonlinear quantum optical spring and it's solution, we will investigate the nonclassical properties of the obtained states. Specially, typical collapse and revival in the distribution functions and squeezing parameters, as particular quantum features, will be revealed. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  9. Rodent Models of Non-classical Progesterone Action Regulating Ovulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Mittelman-Smith

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming clear that steroid hormones act not only by binding to nuclear receptors that associate with specific response elements in the nucleus but also by binding to receptors on the cell membrane. In this newly discovered manner, steroid hormones can initiate intracellular signaling cascades which elicit rapid effects such as release of internal calcium stores and activation of kinases. We have learned much about the translocation and signaling of steroid hormone receptors from investigations into estrogen receptor α, which can be trafficked to, and signal from, the cell membrane. It is now clear that progesterone (P4 can also elicit effects that cannot be exclusively explained by transcriptional changes. Similar to E2 and its receptors, P4 can initiate signaling at the cell membrane, both through progesterone receptor and via a host of newly discovered membrane receptors (e.g., membrane progesterone receptors, progesterone receptor membrane components. This review discusses the parallels between neurotransmitter-like E2 action and the more recently investigated non-classical P4 signaling, in the context of reproductive behaviors in the rodent.

  10. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia misdiagnosed as Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet V Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH misdiagnosed as mosaic Turner syndrome. She presented with complaints of primary infertility. Short stature, the presence of facial hair and hoarse voice was also noted. She had primary amenorrhea and was advised for karyotype at 16 years of age, which was reported as 45, X[20]/46, XX[80], stating her as a case of mosaic Turner syndrome. Clitoroplasty was done at 21 years of age for clitoromegaly, which was noticed during puberty. The diagnosis of mosaic Turner could not explain the virilization. Therefore, we repeated the karyotype, which revealed 46, XX in more than 100 metaphases and was sufficient to exclude mosaicism. Furthermore, the endocrinological evaluation revealed high testosterone level with a normal 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP. The presence of pubertal onset virilization with a karyotype of 46, XX and raised testosterone level with normal 17-OHP level, raised the suspicion of NCAH for which adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was done which confirmed the diagnosis of NCAH.

  11. Multi-crack imaging using nonclassical nonlinear acoustic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lue; Zhang Ying; Liu Xiao-Zhou; Gong Xiu-Fen

    2014-01-01

    Solid materials with cracks exhibit the nonclassical nonlinear acoustical behavior. The micro-defects in solid materials can be detected by nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) method with a time-reversal (TR) mirror. While defects lie in viscoelastic solid material with different distances from one another, the nonlinear and hysteretic stress—strain relation is established with Preisach—Mayergoyz (PM) model in crack zone. Pulse inversion (PI) and TR methods are used in numerical simulation and defect locations can be determined from images obtained by the maximum value. Since false-positive defects might appear and degrade the imaging when the defects are located quite closely, the maximum value imaging with a time window is introduced to analyze how defects affect each other and how the fake one occurs. Furthermore, NEWS-TR-NEWS method is put forward to improve NEWS-TR scheme, with another forward propagation (NEWS) added to the existing phases (NEWS and TR). In the added phase, scanner locations are determined by locations of all defects imaged in previous phases, so that whether an imaged defect is real can be deduced. NEWS-TR-NEWS method is proved to be effective to distinguish real defects from the false-positive ones. Moreover, it is also helpful to detect the crack that is weaker than others during imaging procedure. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. Multi-crack imaging using nonclassical nonlinear acoustic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lue; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Solid materials with cracks exhibit the nonclassical nonlinear acoustical behavior. The micro-defects in solid materials can be detected by nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) method with a time-reversal (TR) mirror. While defects lie in viscoelastic solid material with different distances from one another, the nonlinear and hysteretic stress—strain relation is established with Preisach—Mayergoyz (PM) model in crack zone. Pulse inversion (PI) and TR methods are used in numerical simulation and defect locations can be determined from images obtained by the maximum value. Since false-positive defects might appear and degrade the imaging when the defects are located quite closely, the maximum value imaging with a time window is introduced to analyze how defects affect each other and how the fake one occurs. Furthermore, NEWS-TR-NEWS method is put forward to improve NEWS-TR scheme, with another forward propagation (NEWS) added to the existing phases (NEWS and TR). In the added phase, scanner locations are determined by locations of all defects imaged in previous phases, so that whether an imaged defect is real can be deduced. NEWS-TR-NEWS method is proved to be effective to distinguish real defects from the false-positive ones. Moreover, it is also helpful to detect the crack that is weaker than others during imaging procedure.

  13. PREFACE: Nanospintronics design and realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Hisazumi; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kasai, Hideaki

    2004-12-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains selected papers from the 1st International Conference on Nanospintronics Design and Realization (ICNDR 2004), which was held in Kyoto, Japan, 24--28 May 2004. This conference was organized by the Nanospintronics Design and Realization project members: Hideaki Kasai, Osaka (Chair of the Conference) Hisazumi Akai, Osaka Hajime Asahi, Osaka Wilson Agerico Diño, Osaka Hiroshi Harima, Kyoto Tomoyuki Kakeshita, Osaka Junjiro Kanamori, Kyoto Hiroshi Katayama-Yoshida, Osaka Koichi Kusakabe, Osaka Hiroshi Nakanishi, Osaka (Secretary) Tamio Oguchi, Hiroshima Teruo Ono, Osaka Naoshi Suzuki, Osaka Hitoshi Tabata, Osaka under the auspices of the Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) Special Coordination Funds for Promoting Science and Technology, and the sponsorship of Osaka University and the International Institute for Advanced Studies (IIAS). The conference is intended to provide an international forum for experimental and theoretical researchers, in the rapidly developing field of nanospintronics. It aims to: provide an overview of our current understanding of the physics of spin transport in (magnetic) semiconductors and hybrid magnetic/semiconductor structures; provide a venue to present and discuss the latest developments in using spin-dependent phenomena in nano-(opto-) electronics and computing applications; provide a venue for discussion and assessment of other possible means of exploiting the spin-dependent phenomena in future nano-(opto-) electronic and computing applications; address current (and foreseeable future) problems, of fundamental and applied nature, in an effort to bridge the physics and technology gap between semiconducting and magnetic materials. All of these being geared towards bringing about the realization of a functioning nanospintronics. A total of 127 delegates from 15 countries took part in ICNDR 2004, which was comprised of 62 invited

  14. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    their help in producing this special section. We hope that it conveys some of the excitement and significance of the field. Semiconducting oxides contents Chemical bonding in copper-based transparent conducting oxides: CuMO2 (M = In, Ga, Sc) K G Godinho, B J Morgan, J P Allen, D O Scanlon and G W Watson Electrical properties of (Ba, Sr)TiO3 thin films with Pt and ITO electrodes: dielectric and rectifying behaviourShunyi Li, Cosmina Ghinea, Thorsten J M Bayer, Markus Motzko, Robert Schafranek and Andreas Klein Orientation dependent ionization potential of In2O3: a natural source for inhomogeneous barrier formation at electrode interfaces in organic electronicsMareike V Hohmann, Péter Ágoston, André Wachau, Thorsten J M Bayer, Joachim Brötz, Karsten Albe and Andreas Klein Cathodoluminescence studies of electron irradiation effects in n-type ZnOCasey Schwarz, Yuqing Lin, Max Shathkin, Elena Flitsiyan and Leonid Chernyak Resonant Raman scattering in ZnO:Mn and ZnO:Mn:Al thin films grown by RF sputteringM F Cerqueira, M I Vasilevskiy, F Oliveira, A G Rolo, T Viseu, J Ayres de Campos, E Alves and R Correia Structure and electrical properties of nanoparticulate tungsten oxide prepared by microwave plasma synthesisM Sagmeister, M Postl, U Brossmann, E J W List, A Klug, I Letofsky-Papst, D V Szabó and R Würschum Charge compensation in trivalent cation doped bulk rutile TiO2Anna Iwaszuk and Michael Nolan Deep level transient spectroscopy studies of n-type ZnO single crystals grown by different techniquesL Scheffler, Vl Kolkovsky, E V Lavrov and J Weber Microstructural and conductivity changes induced by annealing of ZnO:B thin films deposited by chemical vapour depositionC David, T Girardeau, F Paumier, D Eyidi, B Lacroix, N Papathanasiou, B P Tinkham, P Guérin and M Marteau Multi-component transparent conducting oxides: progress in materials modellingAron Walsh, Juarez L F Da Silva and Su-Huai Wei Thickness dependence of the strain, band gap and transport properties of

  15. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    compared with the as-produced nanotubes. The second day was dedicated to three more sessions: Characterization and excitations in nanostructures. Superconductivity at the nanoscale. Transport in low-dimensional electron systems and spin effects. The first session of this second day was opened by G Stefani with a lecture on Auger spectroscopies. Then E Perfetto showed the results of a study on electron correlations in carbon nanotubes and graphite from Auger spectroscopy. He determined the screened on-site Coulomb repulsion in graphite and single wall carbon nanotubes by measuring their Auger spectra and performing a new theoretical analysis based on an extended Cini-Sawatzky approach where only one fit parameter is employed. The experimental lineshape is very well reproduced by the theory and this allows the value of the screened on-site repulsion between 2p states to be determined, which is found to be 2.1 eV in graphite and 4.6 eV in nanotubes. The latter is robust by varying the nanotube radius from 1 to 2 nm. S Ugenti gave a presentation setting up a model aimed for the calculation of three-hole features like the ones due to core-valence-valence Auger decays following Coster-Kronig transitions. While several experiments made in the 1970s and in the 1990s on the Auger LMM spectra of transition metals showed the existence of these structures, a theory able to explain and predict them is still missing today. The described model is grounded on the one-step approach, but the use of a valence band fully below the Fermi level allowed the authors to treat their calculations in a three-step approach, so keeping in this exploratory work complications to a minimum. The Hamiltonian of the system is placed in an Anderson-like picture and the spectra are computed evaluating a three-body Green's function. Within this model one arrives to a simple and closed formula covering the whole range between weak and strong correlation. It is found that in general the satellites cover separated

  16. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    , maintaining the scope and the interdisciplinary character of the meeting while keeping the focus on a fundamental scientific problem of non-equilibrium processes and on the Conference objectives. The abstracts of the 194 accepted presentations of more than 400 authors were published in the Book of Abstracts of the Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', 27 July-7 August 2009 , Copyright © 2009, the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy (ISBN 92095003-41-1). This Topical Issue consists of 70 articles accepted for publication in the Conference Proceedings and represents a substantial part of the Conference contributions. The articles are in a broad variety of TMB-2009 themes and are sorted alphabetically by the last name of the first author within each of the following topics: Canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing: invariant, scaling, spectral properties, scalar transports, convection; Wall-bounded flows: structure and fundamentals, non-canonical turbulent boundary layers, including unsteady and transitional flows, supersonic and hypersonic flows, shock-boundary layer interactions; Non-equilibrium processes: unsteady, multiphase and shock-driven turbulent flows, anisotropic non-local dynamics, connection of continuous description at macro-scales to kinetic processes at atomistic scales; Interfacial dynamics: instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Richtmyer-Meshkov, Landau-Darrieus, Saffman-Taylor High energy density physics: inertial confinement and heavy-ion fusion, Z-pinches, light-matter and laser-plasma interactions, non-equilibrium heat transfer; Material science: material transformation under high strain rates, equation of state, impact dynamics, mixing at nano- and micro-scales; Astrophysics: supernovae, interstellar medium, star formation, stellar interiors, early Universe, cosmic-microwave background, accretion disks; Magneto-hydrodynamics: magnetic fusion and magnetically

  17. PREFACE Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanyi, Amalia; Iványi, Péter; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Sobolev, Vladimir A.

    2011-02-01

    The International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis conference series focuses on singular perturbation problems and hysteresis as common strongly nonlinear phenomena occurring in mathematical, physical, economical, engineering and information systems. The term 'strongly nonlinear' means, in particular, that linearization will not encapsulate the observed phenomena. Singular perturbation problems and hysteresis can be manifested at different stages of the same or similar processes. Furthermore, a number of fundamental hysteresis models can be considered as a limit of time relaxation processes, or admit an approximation by a differential equation, which is singular with respect to a particular parameter. However, interaction between researchers in the areas of systems with time relaxation and systems with hysteresis (and between the 'multi-rate' and 'hysteresis' research communities) has so far been limited, and there is little cross-fertilization of ideas. It is the aim of the conference series to fill this gap. The 5th International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis (MURPHYS 2010) was hosted by the Pollack Mihály Faculty of Engineering, University of Pécs, Hungary, from 31 May to 3 June 2010, on the occasion of Pécs being the Cultural Capital of Europe in 2010. The workshop was organized in cooperation with University College Cork, Ireland, which hosted all of the previous Workshops: International Workshop on Multi-rate Processes and Hysteresis (University College, Cork, Ireland, 31 March-5 April 2008). Proceedings are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 138. See http://euclid.ucc.ie/appliedmath/murphys2008/murphys2008.htm; International Workshop on Multi-rate Processes and Hysteresis (University College, Cork, Ireland, 3-8 April 2006). Proceedings are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 55. Further information is available at http://Euclid.ucc.ie/murphys2006.htm; International Workshop on Hysteresis and Multi-scale Asymptotic (University College, Cork, Ireland, 17-21 March 2004). Proceedings are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 22. Further details are available at http://Euclid.ucc.ie/hamsa2004.htm; International Workshop on Relaxation Oscillations and Hysteresis (University College, Cork, Ireland, 1-6 April 2002). The related collection of invited lectures was published as a volume Singular Perturbations and Hysteresis, SIAM, Philadelphia, 2005. International Workshop on Geometrical Methods of Nonlinear Analysis and Semiconductor Laser Dynamics (University College Cork, Ireland, 5-6 April 2001). A collection of invited papers has been published as a special issue of Proceedings of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences: Nonlinear dynamics of laser and reacting system, available at http://euclid.ucc.ie/appliedmath/gmna2001/ProcGMNA2001p1.pdf. Among the aims of this and previous workshops were: to bring together the leading experts in singular perturbation and hysteresis phenomena in applied problems; to discuss important problems in the areas of reacting systems, semiconductor lasers, shock phenomena, economic modelling, fluid mechanics, electrical engineering and modelling biological systems with emphasises on hysteresis and singular perturbations; to learn and share modern techniques in areas of common interest. The International Workshop on Multi-rate Processes and Hysteresis (Pollack Mihály Faculty of Engineering, University of Pécs, Hungary, 31 May-3 June 2010) brought together about 50 scientists who are actively researching the areas of dynamical systems with hysteresis and singular perturbations with applications to physical, engineering and economic systems. The countries represented at the Workshop included the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Poland, Romania, Russia, the United Kingdom and USA. Workshop photo Workshop photo 31 May 2010 Sponsorship of the Workshop by the Pollack Mihály Faculty of Engineering, University of Pécs (Hungary), University College Cork (Ireland), University of Pécs (Hungary), The University of Texas at Dallas (USA), and the Cultural Capital of Europe 2010, Pécs (Hungary), is gratefully acknowledged. The Editors and Organizers of the Workshop are sincerely grateful to Dr Géza Várady, Ms Andrea Zseni and Mr Ádám Schiffer of the Pollack Mihály Faculty of Engineering, University of Pécs, and Dr Alexander Pimenov of University College Cork for managing the organization of the conference and for the assistance in formatting of all the manuscripts. More information about the workshop can be found at http://murphys5.pmmk.pte.hu/ Amalia Ivanyi, Péter Iványi, Dmitrii Rachinskii and Vladimir A SobolevEditors MURPHYS 2010, PMMK PTE, 31 May - 3 June 2010 Sponsored by Pollack Mihály logo POLLACK MIHÁLY FACULTY OF ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF PÉCS UCC logo PÉCSI TUDOMÁNYEGYETEM logo PÉCSI TUDOMÁNYEGYETEM UNIVERSITY OF PÉCS UTD logo Cultural capital logo Cultural Capital of Europe 2010, Pécs, Hungary International Steering Committee Z I BalanovIsrael M BrokateGermany R CrossUK K DahmenUSA M DimianRomania G FriedmanUSA A Ivanyi (Co-Chairman)Hungary P Iványi (Co-Chairman)Hungary L KalachevUSA P KrejčíCzech Republic R O'Malley (Co-Chairman)USA A Pokrovskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland N PopovicUK D Rachinskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland S S SazhinUK V Sobolev (Co-Chairman)Russia S SzabóHungary C VisoneItaly International Program Committee G AlmásiHungary Z BalanovIsrael M BrokateGermany R CrossUK K DahmenUSA M DimianRomania G FriedmanUSA A Ivanyi (Co-Chairman)Hungary P Iványi (Co-Chairman)Hungary S JeneiHungary G KádárHungary L KalachevUSA R KersnerHungary G KovácsHungary P KrejčíCzech Republic P M KuczmannHungary P P O'KaneIreland R O'Malley (Co-Chairman)USA A Pokrovskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland N PopovicUK D Rachinskii (Co-Chairman)Ireland B V H ToppingUK V C VisoneItaly

  18. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2011-03-01

    The 17th edition of the International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters, and Surfaces (MPS) was held in Sendai, Japan, from September 4-7, 2010. It was the first time that a meeting of this series of biennial conferences was hosted in a non-European country. The conference was attended by 110 researchers (90 regular participants and 20 students) from 15 different countries around the world. The themes that the conference covered can be divided into three broad areas: lepton impact, photon impact and heavy-particle impact. A total of 43 oral presentations - including 2 plenary talks, 29 progress reports and 12 hot topics - and 87 poster presentations were held during the course of the program. Rapid progress both in experimental and theoretical techniques has led to discussions across a broad range of currently hot topics, such as many-body dynamics and electron correlation effects in excitation processes, as well as in single and multiple ionization processes for various kinds of targets including atoms, molecules, clusters, solid state and even biological systems. A snapshot of the present status of many particle spectroscopy is given in this proceedings. The chairs of the conference gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Morino Foundation for Molecular Science, Iwatani Naoji Foundation, Sendai Tourism and Convention Bureau, and Intelligent Cosmos Academic Foundation. They are indebted to the Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, for co-hosting the conference, as well as to the international advisory board members for their extremely helpful suggestions to make the program attractive. The united effort of the local organizing committee, involving N Watanabe (Secretary), M Okunishi (Treasurer), H Fukuzawa, M Yamazaki, Y Kino, and N Kishimoto, is also gratefully acknowledged. Without the help of these institutions and individuals it would have been impossible to organize the conference. Finally, the chairs would like to express their thanks to all the participants for contributing to lively and fruitful discussions throughout the conference. Masahiko Takahashi and Kiyoshi Ueda International Advisory Board Lorenzo Avaldi (Italy)Klaus Bartschat (USA) Azzedine Lahmam-Bennani (France)Jamal Berakdar (Germany) Nora Berrah (USA)Igor Bray (Australia) XiangJun Chen (China)Claude Dal Cappello (France) Reinhard Dörner (Germany)Alexander Dorn (Germany) Danielle Dowek (France)Alexey Grum-Grzhimailo (Russia) Noriyuki Kouchi (Japan)Birgit Lohmann (Australia) Don Madison (USA)Fernando Martin (Spain) Andrew Murray (England)Bernard Piraux (Belgium) Roberto Rivarola (Argentina)Emma Sokell (Ireland) Giovanni Stefani (Italy) Conference photograph

  19. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains both invited and contributed papers presented at the International Symposium on "New Quantum Phases Emerging from Novel Crystal Structure", which was held from 24-25 September 2015 at the Minami-Osawa Campus of Tokyo Metropolitan University (TMU). The Graduate School of Science and Engineering of TMU is now promoting a research project on "New Quantum Phases Emerging from Novel Crystal Structure" with the support of the university. This is the cooperative project involving the electrical and electronic engineering and physics departments to discover new quantum phases in strongly correlated electron systems on novel crystal structures, with geometrically characteristic properties such as cage, layered, and geometrical frustrated structures. In this international symposium, we have mainly picked up BiS2-based layered superconductors, cage-structure materials such as 1-2-20 and filled skutterudites, geometrically frustrated systems such as pyrochlore compounds, and noncentrosymmetric materials. Topics on other materials with exotic crystal structure have been also discussed. I believe that this symposium provides a good opportunity to present recent research results on magnetism and superconductivity in such materials, and to discuss future directions of research on strongly correlated electron systems with novel crystal structure. I would like to give thanks, on behalf of the organizing committee, to all participants of the TMU International Symposium and all members of the Advisory Committee, who have contributed to the success of this symposium. I further thank the TMU Research Organization for the financial support of this symposium.

  20. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Keith; Kephart, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    This online volume contains a selection of papers arising from two workshops organised within the six-month programme Topological Dynamics in the Physical and Biological Sciences held at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, from July to December 2012. The first of these was a 'satellite workshop' held at the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences (ICMS), Edinburgh, 15-19 October 2012, under the title Tangled Magnetic Fields in Astro- and Plasma Physics, and with Scientific Organising Committee: Konrad Bajer (Warsaw), Mitchell Berger (Exeter), Steve Cowley (Culham Centre for Fusion Energy), Andrew Gilbert (Exeter), Gunnar Hornig (Dundee), and Clare Parnell (St Andrews). The second was the workshop Quantised Flux in Tightly Knotted and Linked Systems held at the Newton Institute, 3- 7 December 2012, with Scientific Organising Committee: Natalia Berloff (DAMTP, Cambridge), Anne-Christine Davis (DAMTP, Cambridge), Jason Cantarella (University of Georgia), Thomas Kephart (Vanderbilt University), Paul Sutcliffe (Durham University), and Tanmay Vachaspati (Arizona State University). Videos of the lectures given at this second workshop can be viewed at http://www.newton.ac.uk/webseminars. The papers published here follow a natural progression through the following topics: helicity and related invariants of magnetic fields in ideal MHD; relaxation under topological constraints; lower bounds on magnetic energy; current and vortex filaments; applications in the solar corona, tokamak plasmas, and cyclone dynamics; higher-order invariants; topology of curves and surfaces, and energy measures; tight knots; applications to Bose-Einstein condensates, QCD, and cosmic superstring theory. Some of the papers span more than one of these areas. We owe a great debt of gratitude to Konrad Bajer, who was one of the guiding spirits behind the whole Newton Institute program, and who took particular responsibility for the Satellite Workshop at ICMS, Edinburgh. Konrad fell seriously ill in June 2014, having completed much of the editorial work for these Proceedings. Following an operation at the end of July, he remained optimistic of a complete recovery, but sadly this was not to be, and he died from a particularly malignant form of cancer on 29th August. The funeral was held in Warsaw on 5th September. Konrad's warmth of personality and generosity of spirit will be remembered by all who participated in these workshops and in the wider Newton Institute program. The Isaac Newton Institute provided an ideal environment for informal interactions before and after both these workshops. We wish to express our thanks to the Director and staff of the Institute for their tireless efforts to ensure the success of the whole program; also to the staff of ICMS, Edinburgh, for their expert hosting of the satellite workshop.

  1. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    The XXVIIIth International Colloquium on Group-Theoretical Methods in Physics (ICGTMP), also known as the GROUP 28 conference, took place in Newcastle upon Tyne from 26-30 July 2010. There were 128 attendees from 22 countries - physicists, mathematicians, chemists and engineers who use mathematical and numerical methods based on geometry and symmetry in their work. The conference was organised jointly by Northumbria and Durham Universities. The conference website is http://group28.northumbria.ac.uk. Symmetry plays an important role both in science and art, and group theory provides a mathematical framework for the study of symmetries. The series of ICGTMP meetings is the oldest conference series in the fields of geometry and physics. It started in 1972 in Marseilles, and so far 15 meetings have been held in Europe, 8 in North America, 2 in Asia, 1 in Australia and 2 in the Middle East. This was the second time that the conference took place in Britain, 28 years after the Xth Colloquium in Canterbury. While the first meetings were centred on solid-state physics and crystallography, the main topics quickly became more diversified following the success of geometric and algebraic methods for modelling systems in particle physics, quantum mechanics, engineering and chemistry. The aim of the GROUP 28 meeting was to broaden and further diversify mathematical and numerical methods based on geometry and symmetry through their applications to biosciences, physical sciences, quantum information, nonlinearity and complexity. The conference included traditional and novel applications to mathematical and theoretical physics (including particle physics, conformal theory and cosmology), condensed matter, quantum optics and quantum information, complex and nonlinear systems, biosciences and other new exciting areas. The scientific programme was delivered in the form of plenary talks, a public lecture, parallel sessions, a poster session and an open forum. An important feature of the meeting was that all plenary talks presented the state-of-the-art and were at the same time educational and exciting, promoting the multidisciplinary aspects of the research, and thus were inspirational for young scientists considering work in these fields. The plenary talks, each lasting 1 hour, were given by distinguished world experts and some young 'rising stars': Richard Ward, Ulf Leonhardt, Jens Eisert, Michael Berry, Shahn Majid, Arndt von Haeseler, Michio Jimbo, Katrin Wendland, Raymond Goldstein, Mark Trodden, Maria Vozmediano and Giulio Chiribella. The public lecture was given by Francesco Iachello and was open to participants and other people from the Newcastle-Durham region. In addition, talks of 30 minutes duration each and including more technical content, were given in four parallel sessions. Each parallel session had a designated time for informal interaction with the speakers, discussions of new directions of research and for forming new collaborations. The poster session, in a room where posters were exhibited for the duration of the conference, was easily accessible, and had a friendly and relaxed atmosphere, encouraging discussions of work and exchanges of new ideas. To secure a high quality scientific programme, all contributions were reviewed. Another interesting feature of the conference was the Open Forum on the Friday afternoon, which was lively and well attended. It took the form of a question and answer session with a panel chaired by Allan Solomon, with the following members: Gerald Goldin, Jean-Pierre Gazeau, Mark Trodden and Giulio Chiribella. The focus was on new directions of research, novel applications and the further development of group theory, education, training and career opportunities for young researchers. The participants were asked to submit questions in advance; examples are: "What is the role of symmetries and conservation principles in deducing underlying physics from experimental data?" and "What are the most promising research areas where group theory and representations have applications?" All the sessions were easily accessible and took place in the modern premises of the City Campus East of Northumbria University, conveniently located in the city centre of Newcastle. In a separate ceremony on Tuesday evening in the Great Hall of Newcastle's Discovery Museum, the 2010 Wigner Medal was awarded to Michio Jimbo for his seminal work on quantum groups and for his study of affine Lie algebras, in connection with classical and quantum integrable systems. The Hermann Weyl prize was awarded to Giulio Chiribella, in recognition of his pioneering work on the application of group theoretical methods to the problem of quantum estimation, within the framework of quantum information theory. This was followed by a reception, which included a delightful, impromptu violin recital given by Gérard H E Duchamp, one of the conference participants. The social programme included a variety of events. On the Monday evening, the Welcome Address by the Lord Mayor of Newcastle was followed by a Reception in Newcastle's Civic Centre. On the Wednesday afternoon the participants had the opportunity to visit beautiful Alnwick Castle. This was followed by a conference dinner in Newcastle's Assembly Rooms on the Thursday evening. The conference was sponsored by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (grant EP/1009183/1), the London Mathematical Society (grant 1906), the Institute of Physics, Northumbria University, Durham University, Newcastle City Council and Newcastle's Discovery Museum. We thank our sponsors for their generous support. It took two years to organise a conference of such importance. We express our gratitude to the International Advisory Committee for its help in selecting the plenary speakers and to the Standing Committee and its current and former Chairmen, Jean Pierre Gazeau and H D Doebner respectively. We thank the Newcastle-Gateshead Convention Bureau for its support in organising the conference, Sarah Howells for her devoted secretarial, administrative and organisational work, Rosemary Zakrzewski for arranging the "Accompanying persons' programme" and to the research assistants and research students of the Intelligent Modelling research group at Northumbria University - Mu Niu, Sujan Rajbhandari, Helen Gibson, Ahmed Lawgali, Kushwanth Koya, Thuli Mazwi, Osemeke Mosindi and Sirichai Triamlumlerd - for their energetic assistance to the organisers. Finally, a big thank you to all the members of the Local Organising Committee for their devoted and tireless work in preparing and running the conference and our colleagues from both universities for their help and moral support. Maia Angelova and Wojciech ZakrzewskiChairs of the Local Organising Committee

  2. PREFACE Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Migaku; Saito, Hitoshi; Yoshimura, Satoru; Takanashi, Koki; Sahashi, Masashi; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd International Symposium on Advanced Magnetic Materials and Applications 2010 (ISAMMA 2010) was held in Sendai, Japan, from 12-16, July 2010. ISAMMA is the first consolidated symposium of three independent symposia held in the Asian region: ISPMM (International Symposium on Physics of Magnetic Materials) of Japan which was first held in 1987 in Sendai, and was subsequently held five times, Beijing (1992), Seoul (1995), Sendai (1998), Taipei (2001), and Singapore (2005); ISAMT (International Symposium of Advanced Magnetic Technology) of Taiwan, and SOMMA (International Symposium on Magnetic Materials and Applications) of Korea, both of which were started in 1999, and were held five times up to 2005. ISAMMA was established as a new international symposium which will be held every 3 years in Asia. The concept of this unified international symposium was mainly developed by Prof. M. Takahashi, Conference Chair of this conference, ISAMMA 2010. The first memorial symposium, ISAMMA 2007, was held on Jeju Island, Korea, from 28 May to 1 June 2007. The main purpose and scope of the ISAMMA conferences are to provide an opportunity for scientists and engineers from all over the world to meet in Asia to discuss recent advances in the study of magnetic materials and their physics, and spin related phenomena and materials. Conference photograph The categories of ISAMMA 2010 were: Fundamental Properties of Magnetic Materials; Hard/Soft Magnetic Materials and Applications; Spintronics Materials and Devices; Structured Materials; Multi Functional Magnetic Materials; Spin Dynamics and Micromagnetics; Magnetic Storage; Materials for Applications (Sensors, High Frequency, Power, and Bio/Medical devices); Magnetic Imaging and Characterization. The scientific program commenced on Tuesday 13 July 2010 with opening remarks by the Symposium Chairman and the plenary talks were presented by T Rasing, P Fischer, H Yoda and S Sugimoto. The conference was attended by 511 participants from 23 countries, with about 40 percent of participants attending from overseas (see figure). The program involved 4 plenary talks (45 minutes each), 37 invited talks (30 minutes), 85 contributed talks (15 minutes), and 352 posters. Pie chart Organizing Committee of ISAMMA 2010 M TakahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chairman K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chair of the Program Committee H SaitoAkita Univ., Japan, Chair of the Publication Committee M SahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chair of the Treasury Committee M TsunodaTohoku Univ., Japan, General Secretary H AkinagaAIST, Japan H FukunagaNagasaki Univ., Japan K HonoNIMS, Japan S IshioAkita Univ., Japan S IwataNagoya Univ., Japan K NakagawaNihon Univ., Japan S NakagawaTokyo Inst. of Tech., Japan T OnoKyoto Univ., Japan Y SuzukiOsaka Univ., Japan M TanakaEhime Univ., Japan T Tanaka Univ. of Tokyo, Japan Program Committee of ISAMMA 2010 K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, ChairS MizukamiTohoku Univ., Japan M MizuguchiTohoku Univ., Japan, Vice-chairH NaganumaTohoku Univ., Japan M DoiTohoku Univ., JapanS NakagawaTokyo Inst. of Tech., Japan A FujitaTohoku Univ., JapanK NakamuraTohoku Univ., Japan K IshiyamaTohoku Univ., JapanK OnoKEK, Japan T KatoNagoya Univ., JapanT OnoKyoto Univ., Japan T KawagoeOsaka Pref. Univ.of Edu., JapanF SatoTohoku Univ., Japan O KitakamiTohoku Univ., JapanM ShiraiTohoku Univ., Japan Y KitamotoTokyo Inst. of Tech., JapanS SugimotoTohoku Univ., Japan F MatsukuraTohoku Univ., JapanM YamaguchiTohoku Univ., Japan C MitsumataHitachi Metals, Japan Publication Committee of ISAMMA 2010 H SaitoAkita Univ., Japan, ChairS MitaniNIMS, Japan S YoshimuraAkita Univ., Japan, Vice-chairH MuraokaTohoku, Japan Y AndoTohoku Univ., JapanM NakanoNagasaki Univ., Japan J AriakeAIT, JapanR NakataniOsaka Univ., Japan H AsanoNagoya Univ., JapanK O'GradyUniv. of York, UK M FutamotoChuo Univ., JapanA SakumaTohoku Univ., Japan J HayakawaHitachi, ARL, JapanT SatoKeio Univ., Japan T HondaKyushu Inst. of Tech., JapanT SatoShinshu Univ., Japan M IgarashiHitachi, CRL, JapanK TajimaAkita Univ., Japan H ItoKansai Univ., JapanM TakedaJAEA, Japan H IwasakiToshiba, JapanY TakemuraYokohama Nat'l Univ., Japan H KatoYamagata Univ., JapanM TanakaUniv. of Tokyo, Japan M KonotoAIST, JapanA TsukamotoNihon Univ., Japan H KubotaAIST, JapanS YabukamiTohoku Gakuin Univ., Japan Treasury Committee of ISAMMA 2010 M SahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, ChairS SaitoTohoku Univ., Japan K IshiyamaTohoku Univ., JapanT TanakaEhime Univ., Japan K NakagawaNihon Univ., JapanN TezukaTohoku Univ., Japan T OgawaTohoku Univ., Japan Executive Committee of ISAMMA 2010 M TakahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, ChairS SaitoTohoku Univ., Japan K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Vice-chairY SakurabaTohoku Univ., Japan K MiyakeTohoku Univ., JapanT ShimaTohoku Gakuin Univ., Japan T OgawaTohoku Univ., JapanN TezukaTohoku Univ., Japan S OkamotoTohoku Univ., JapanM TsunodaTohoku Univ., Japan M OoganeTohoku Univ., Japan We are grateful to all the participants for their valuable contributions and active discussions. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from 17 Japanese companies (ASAKA RIKEN CO., LTD, Fujikin Incorporated, Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd, Hitachi Metals, Ltd, IZUMI-TEC CO., LTD, Miwa Electric Industrial CO., LTD, MIWA MFG CO., LTD, NEOARK Corporation, Optima Corporation, PRESTO CO., LTD, SHOWA DENKO K.K., TAIYO YUDEN CO., LTD, TDK Corporation, TEIJIN LIMITED, Ube Material Industries, Ltd, ULVAC, Inc, and V TEX Corporation) and 7 foundations (SENDAI TOURISM & CONVENTION BUREAU, The Iwatani Naoji Foundation, Tohoku University Electro-Related Departments Global COE Program 'Center of Education and Research for Information Electronics Systems', The Murata Science Foundation, Research Foundation for Materials Science, Nippon Sheet Glass Foundation for Materials Science and Engineering, and Aoba Foundation for The Promotion of Engineering).

  3. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The bi-annual Meeting of the Spanish Neutron Scattering Association, V RSETN, took place in Gijón (Asturias), Spain, from 28-30 June 2010, at the Hotel Silken 'Ciudad Gijón', close to the beautiful Cantabric seashore. It was the fifth in a series of successful scientific meetings, beginning in 2002 (Donostia - San Sebastián), and followed by conferences in: Puerto de la Cruz (Canary Islands, 2004), Jaca (Pyrenees, 2006) and Sant Feliú de Guixols (Costa Brava, 2008). Vicente Gotor, Rector of the University of Oviedo and Paz Fernández Felgueroso, Mayor of the city of Gijón chaired the opening ceremony. The conference covered a broad range of topics related to the use of neutron scattering techniques, from soft matter and biosciences to magnetism, condensed matter and materials applications. In addition to those topics, Spanish scientists working at neutron facilities talked about the recent upgrades of the neutron instruments. Colin Carlile (ESS, Lund), F J Bermejo (ESS, Bilbao) and Michael Steiner (Chairman of the European Neutron Scattering Association, ENSA) gave their personal views concerning the present and future perspectives of neutron scattering in Europe. They reviewed the situation of the running and new neutron facilities (European Spalation Source, ESS), the increase in the number of users and the spread of the scientific topics in which neutron scattering is used or where the impact of ESS will be most significant. Wonderful Plenary talks by Albert Furrer, Juan Manuel Pérez-Mato and José Antonio Alonso opened the scientific sessions of this three-day meeting. The V RSETN was organized by the Department of Physics of The University of Oviedo in cooperation with the Spanish Society for Neutron Techniques (SETN, 'Sociedad Española de Técnicas Neutrónicas'). The meeting attracted around 80 participants, including 13 invited talks, 23 oral presentations and more than 30 posters, both domestic and from abroad. The three best oral presentations by young Spanish scientists (Imanol de Pedro, Gerardo Garcés and Clara Rodriguez) were awarded with a copy of the book 'Neutron Scattering in Condensed Matter Physics' by A Furrer, J Mesot and Th Strassle, provided by Albert Furrer. The success of the V RSETN was due to the efforts of many colleagues involved at all stages of the meeting. We take the opportunity to thank the Scientific Committee, the local organizing committee, the chairs of the conference sessions as well as all the reviewers who agreed generously to spend much time for our community. We would like also to emphasize the excellent scientific quality of all the presentations, and we would like to thank the support received from the sponsors (Gijon City Council, University of Oviedo, Tekniker, Cajastur, FICYT, MICINN), which was really important for the successful organization of the conference. Finally, we are convinced that the readers will enjoy these 26 scientific contributions published in the present volume, which give an overview of the science currently done by Spanish scientist using neutron scattering techniques. It is worth noting that the Spanish Neutron Scattering Community has experienced major growth during the last two decades, and now more than 200 active researchers belong to it. Pedro Gorria Jesús A Blanco Conference Chairs Conference photograph Chairpersons Pedro Gorria and Jesús A Blanco (Department of Physics, University of Oviedo, Spain) Scientific Committee Arantxa Arbe (San Sebastián), Javier Campo (Zaragoza), Gabriel Cuello (ILL, France), Luis Fernández Barquín (Santander), José Luis García Muñoz (Barcelona), Victoria García-Sakai (ISIS, UK), Pedro Gorria (Oviedo), Jon Gutiérrez (Bilbao) Editors of the Proceedings Pedro Gorria and Jesús A Blanco Plenary speakers Albert Furrer (Wien) J M Pérez-Mato (Bilbao) José Antonio Alonso (Madrid) Invited speakers A Fernández-Martínez (Berkeley) V Recarte (Pamplona) V Carlile (ESS, Lund) M A González (ILL, Grenoble) V García-Sakai (ISIS, UK) L C Pardo (Barcelona) M Steiner (Chair of ENSA) M Rotter (Wien) F J Bermejo (ESS, Bilbao) E López-Cabarcos (Madrid) R Lund (San Sebastián) R Granada (Bariloche) A Sanz (Madrid)

  4. PREFACE Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houée-Levin, Chantal; Gauduel, Yann A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the four day COST CM0603-MELUSYN Joint Meeting 'Damages induced in Biomolecules by Low and High Energy Radiations', held in March 2010 in Paris, France, was to create a timely forum for multi-disciplinary discussions related to the recent developments on biomolecular damage triggered by low or high energy ionising radiations (photons, relativistic particles and accelerated ions). Created in September 2007, the European network COST CM0603 'Free radicals in Chemical Biology' (http://www.chembiorad.inct.pl/index.php) gathers specialists of free radical chemistry, biochemistry and biology. It aims to promote a chemical biology approach for the investigation of free radical pathways of biological interest and the improvement of communication and exchange among neighbouring scientific fields, such as chemistry with several domains of life sciences, specifically addressing the real barriers of specialist language and tools. The MELUSYN network was born in January 2006. This French think-tank and task force involves about one hundred scientists and clinicians who contribute to the emerging interdisciplinary domain of advanced spatio-temporal radiation biomedicine. One important mission of the MELUSYN network is to explore and identify new medical fields to which the specificity of 3rd generation synchrotron sources could be applied, either by themselves or in synergy with other advanced radiation sources. The network also contributes to the organization of international multidisciplinary conferences. In the framework of experimental and theoretical approaches, the conference gathered together 50 scientists from both communities and addressed a number of highly relevant aspects of bioradical chemistry and radiation biology, considering classical and more advanced radiation sources (synchrotron, ultra-short particle bunches based on high power laser technologies, microbeams) operating in the broad energy range eV-MeV, classical or semi-quantum simulations of molecular radiation processes. Considering some physical, chemical and biological aspects of radical mechanisms, including their consequences in medicine (radiotherapy for instance), the selected contributions of this Special Issue provide guidance for future interdisciplinary developments. In this way, the multi-scale aspects of radiation based bioradical chemistry and radiation biology should be considered. We would like to express our thanks to all the authors for their time and genuine efforts, and to the reviewers for their fruitful comments during the preparation of this volume. Editors Chantal Houée-LevinUniversity of Paris Sud, Orsay, France COST logo Yann A GauduelEcole Polytechnique - ENS Techniques Avancées Palaiseau, France MELUSYN logo

  5. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zela, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    RIAO-OPTILAS, one of the most important Iberoamerican conferences for optics, was held on 20-24 September, at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru (PUCP) in Lima. The conference, which is held every three years, gathered around 400 attendees from different countries, some of them coming from beyond the Iberoamerican region. The conference traditionally covers topics which range from optical design to optoelectronics and technological applications, including fundamental as well as applied areas of the optical sciences. A remarkable feature of the present conference was the increased attendance of people working in quantum optics. This area had not been strongly represented in former meetings of RIAO-OPTILAS, something that appears to have now changed, according to the comments of people in the field. Indeed, they realized the advantages of participating in a conference that offers the opportunity to meet researchers from several different areas. Merging expertise with open questions, and delineating new trends and goals; all this becomes possible when direct contact happens, and this has been always the main goal of RIAO-OPTILAS. The first plenary session began with a presentation by Duncan Moore (Rochester) about gradient-index materials, followed by Aristide Dogariu (Central Florida) who talked about variable coherence sensing. The plenary sessions of the following days included James C Wyant (Arizona) who presented precision interferometric measurements in non-ideal environments, and Daniel Malacara (CIO, Mexico) who discussed the design of optical systems with off-axis spherical mirrors. Wolfgang Dultz (Frankfurt, Germany) talked about the transfer of spin angular momentum from photons to birefringent particles, while Ulrik Lund Andersen (Technical University of Denmark) showed how to manipulate continuous variables of light. Halina Rubinzstein (Queensland, Australia) approached the subject of angular momentum of light from the viewpoint of optical tweezers, and Pierre Meystre (Tucson, Arizona) addressed the exciting field of cavity optomechanics. Celebrating 50 years of the laser, Mario Bertolloti (La Sapienza, Rome) revealed the hidden history of the laser and Sune Svanberg (Lund, Sweden) paid homage to the laser from the perspective of its applications in environmental and medical research. Focusing more tightly on cancer diagnosis and therapy, Katarina Svanberg (Lund, Sweden) discussed the application of optical tools in her work as an oncologist. Applications in technology was the chosen subject of Mitsuteru Inoue (Toyohashi University of Technology, Japan), who addressed magneto and multiferroic photonics as applied to spatial light modulators. In a closing plenary session, Luis Jaime Castillo (PUCP, Peru) presented his archeological findings related to ancient Peruvian cultures, something that was not directly related to optics but provided the attendees with the background to better appreciate what they could see during their tourist excursions. Besides the plenary talks, there were also oral and poster sessions that covered a wide range of topics in optics and photonics. Prompted by the fact that several attendees were prestigious authors of books in the optical sciences, a book exhibition was organized giving readers - especially students - the opportunity to meet the authors. In the weeks following the conference and in response to a call for papers, around 170 contributions were submitted for publication in Journal of Physics: Conference Series. RIAO-OPTILAS was partially sponsored by several agencies and organizations: OSA, SPIE, ICO, JPCS, Quantel, and CIO. At the end of the conference four cash awards were granted to students for the best poster presentations. Three awards were sponsored by SPIE. Recipients were Pablo Solano, from Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Dulce-María González-Utrera, from Universidad Autónoma de México, Mexico, and Job Mendoza, from Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico. The OSA award went to Facundo Orte, from ANPCyT and Ceilap (Citefa-Conicet), Argentina. For the first time, RIAO-OPTILAS was preceded by the Andean School for Optics: OPTOANDINA. The School was organized with the aim of boosting the development of optics and photonics in the Andean countries, which are among the less developed ones in the Iberoamerican region. A welcome sign for the effectiveness of such an initiative was given by the increased participation of Bolivia in the present edition of RIAO-OPTILAS. Over one hundred participants attended OPTOANDINA, of which 65 were students and 30 were lecturers, while 6 facilitators were ready to help during the hands-on sessions. RIAO-OPTILAS has traditionally been organized by the host institution. Though this will remain the case for future gatherings of the conference, its increased importance and growing magnitude - in both number of participants and represented areas - has made it necessary to provide the conference with a permanent organizational umbrella. With such an aim, a network called RIAO (Red Iberoamericana de Óptica) - was officially established during RIAO-OPTILAS. One of its main tasks will be to delineate a general framework and guidelines for future sessions of RIAO-OPTILAS. The two next hosts have already been chosen: Portugal in 2013, and Chile in 2016. The contributions contained in the present issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series cover a wide range of subjects in the optical sciences. They reflect the growing scientific production from the Iberoamerican region and provide the reader - or so we hope - with valuable information on what is being developed by several representative research groups of that region. Finally, I would like to gratefully acknowledge the valuable contribution of the Editorial Committee: Guillermo Baldwin (Chairman of RIAO-OPTILAS 2010)Departamento de Ciencias, Sección Física,Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú Enrique J GalvezDepartment of Physics and Astronomy, Colgate University Miguel LevyMichigan Technological University José Benito VázquezDepartamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo Román CastañedaPhysics School, Universidad Nacional de Colombia in Medellin Miguel AsmadDepartamento de Ciencias, Sección FísicaPontificia Universidad Católica del Perú Miguel V AndrésDepartamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Valencia Francisco De Zela

  6. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming; Wang, Lihong V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2011-02-01

    The 9th International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine (PIBM 2010), combined with the 3rd Photonics and Optoelectronics Meetings (POEM 2010), was held from November 2-5, 2010, at Wuhan Science & Technology Convention & Exhibition Center, Wuhan, PR China. The present volume contains papers from a selection from the invited, oral, and poster presentations. PIBM is the largest international biomedical photonics conference series in Asia. It was initially held at HUST bi-yearly from 1999. After being held three times in Wuhan (1999, 2001 and 2003), it was hosted once in Tianjin (2005), before returning to Wuhan every year since 2006. PIBM is designed to bring together scientists, engineers and clinical researchers from a variety of disciplines engaged in applying optical science, photonics and imaging technologies to problems in biology and medicine. The scope of this conference ranges from basic research to instrumentation engineering, and biological and clinical studies. It is recognized as one of the largest and most comprehensive international conferences in China, and represents the highest level of worldwide research in this field. In the past ten years, 7 volumes of proceedings with a total of 672 papers were published by SPIE (International Society for Optical Engineering), and a volume with 75 papers was published by World Scientific Publishing Co. in 2007. Proceedings of PIBM 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008 and 2009 were indexed by EI Compendex, while proceedings of PIBM 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, and 2007 were indexed by SCI. Some excellent papers were recommended for publication in the peer-reviewed Journal of Innovative Optical Health Sciences (JIOHS). An increasing number of young researchers present and exchange their innovative ideas on this friendly and professional platform, which has made PIBM an unforgettable annual meeting in Wuhan. This year PIBM attracted distinguished scholars in the field of biomedical photonics and imaging from all over the world, including the United States, Russia, Australia, Canada, Israel, France, Ireland, Japan, Korea and China. The major topics covered at the conference and presented in this volume include: Photonic Therapeutics, Diagnostics and Instrumentations; Tissue Optics and Laser Tissue Interaction; Biomedical Spectroscopy and Microscopy; Multimodal and Hybrid Biomedical Imaging; and Optical Molecular Imaging. The conference voted for the three best student papers; awards were presented to the participant students whose posters were recognized as excellent and who took part in the oral presentation competition. The conference received 133 submitted abstracts, and this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes a selection of 53 excellent submissions. The Conference Secretariat and Local Organizing Committee deserve recognition for planning a smoothly run and productive conference with comprehensive, instructive lectures and innovative work displayed in poster presentations. The faculties and students from Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics were dedicated to their work in reception and service during the conference. It is a pleasure to thank all of them for their efficient and hard work. We are also grateful for the financial support from 111 Project (B07038), and the assistance in organization and coordination from Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Finally, we would like to thank all the authors for their contributions to PIBM 2010 and all the members of the Committees for their cooperation and time spent reviewing submissions. Special thanks are due to the Advisory Committee members Shu Chien, Aaron Ciechanover, Steve Dahms, Da Hsuan Feng, Steven R Goodman, Brian Salzberg, Fujia Yang, Jianquan Yao, Baoyong Zheng and Olivia Ho Cheng for their participation on-site, and their significant contributions to the conference. Wuhan, PR ChinaDecember, 2010 Qingming LuoLihong V WangValery V TuchinConference Chairs 9th International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine (PIBM 2010)2-5 November 2010Wuhan, China EditorsQingming Luo, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Lihong V Wang , Washington University in St. Louis (USA)Valery V Tuchin, Saratov State University (Russia) Sponsored and Organized byHuazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics (China) Technical Co-sponsored byIBOS-International Biomedical Optics SocietyThe Chinese Optical SocietyThe Biophysical Society of China Co-organized byKey Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics, Ministry of Education (China)Virtual Research Center of Biomedical Photonics, Ministry of Education (China)Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory (China) CONFERENCE COMMITTEES Honorary ChairsBritton Chance, University of Pennsylvania (USA)Bingkun Zhou, Tsinghua University (China) Conference ChairsQingming Luo, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Lihong V Wang , Washington University in St. Louis (USA)Valery V Tuchin, Saratov State University (Russia) Advisory CommitteeSydney Brenner, The Salk Institute in La Jolla, California (USA)Howard Chen, K&L Gates (USA)Jing Cheng, Tsinghua University (China)Shu Chien, University of California, San Diego (USA)Paul Ching-Wu Chu, University of Houston (USA)Aaron Ciechanover, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)A Stephen Dahms, Alfred E Mann Foundation for Biomedical Engineering (USA)Da Hsuan Feng, National Cheng Kung University (Taiwan, China)Steven R Goodman, SUNY Upstate Medical University (USA)Barry Halliwell, National University of Singapore (Singapore)John Hart, The University of Texas at Dallas (USA)George Radda, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) (Singapore)Zihe Rao, Nankai University (China)Brian M Salzberg, University of Pennsylvania (USA)Ruey-Jen Sung, Stanford University (USA)A Dean Sherry, The University of Texas at Dallas (USA)Bruce Tromberg, University of California/Irvine (USA)Fujia Yang, Nottingham University (UK)Jianquan Yao, Tianjin University (China)Yixin Zeng, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (China)Baoyong Zheng, Hua Wei Technologies Corporation, Inc (China) Program CommitteeWei R Chen, University of Central Oklahoma (USA)Zhongping Chen, University of California/Irvine (USA)Arthur Chiou, National Yang-Ming University (Taiwan, China)Frank Y S Chuang, University of California, Davis (USA)Zhihua Ding, Zhejiang University (China)Congwu Du, Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA)Stefan Haacke, Strasbourg University - IPCMS-DON (France)Weiping Han, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) (Singapore)Zheng Huang, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (USA)Zhiwei Huang, National University of Singapore (Singapore)Steven L Jacques, Oregon Health & Science University (USA)Fu-Jen Kao, National Yang-Ming University (Taiwan, China)Hideaki Koizumi, Hitachi, Ltd (Japan)Xingde Li, Johns Hopkins University (USA)Yong-qing Li, East Carolina University (USA)Chengyi Liu, South China Normal University (China)Hong Liu, University of Oklahoma (USA)Zuhong Lu, Southeast University (China)Dennis L Matthews, University of California/Davis (USA)Avraham Mayevsky, Bar Ilan University (Israel)Stephen P Morgan, University of Nottingham (UK)Shoko Nioka, University of Pennsylvania (USA)Yingtian Pan, State University of New York at Stony Brook (USA)Alexander V Priezzhev, MV Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russia)Jianan Y Qu, The Hongkong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong, China)Colin J R Sheppard, National University of Singapore (Singapore)Mamoru Tamura, Tsinghua University (China)Sergey Ulyanov, Saratov State University (Russia)Ruikang K Wang, Oregon Health & Science University (USA)Xunbin Wei, Fudan University (China)Da Xing, South China Normal University (China)Haishan Zeng, BC Cancer Research Centre (Canada)Gang Zheng, University of Toronto (Canada)Dongping Zhong, The Ohio State University (USA) Organizing CommitteeLing Fu (Chair), Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Yuandi Zhao (Chair), Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Hui Gong, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Pengcheng Li, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Bifeng Liu, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Qian Liu, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Shaoqun Zeng, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Zhihong Zhang, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Dan Zhu, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China) Local SecretariatHua Shi, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)

  7. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The National Seminar on Medical Physics (NSMP) is a scientific conference organised every two years by the Malaysian Association of Medical Physics (MAMP). Its purpose is to provide a platform for researchers, medical physicists and clinicians from Malaysia and surrounding nations to discuss recent advances of research and development in medical imaging and radiotherapy. NSMP 2014, the 9th national medical physics conference was held in Marriott Hotel, Putrajaya, Malaysia on 5 April 2014. The conference was organised in parallel to the College of Radiology (COR) Malaysia Scientific Meeting. The theme for the 9th NSMP is "Advances in Multidisciplinary Research and Clinical Practice". About 65 participants from universities and hospitals participated in the conference. 17 oral contributions and 12 posters were presented at the conference. We had three invited lectures at the conference; two of the lectures were presented by international experts on state-of-the-art medical imaging and radiotherapy. The lectures were: bold dot "Hybrid imaging: research and clinical practice" by Prof David Townsend, A*STAR-National University Singapore Clinical Imaging Research Centre bold dot "Outline of treatment planning for carbon-ion radiotherapy" by Dr Nobuyuki Kanematsu, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan bold dot "Implementing medical physics clinical training programme in Malaysia: challenges and experiences" by Dr Noriah Jamal, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Many thanks to all invited speakers for their participation and to the Organising Committee members for all their hard work in making the conference happen. Thanks to all who submitted an abstract and making this a successful conference. The Scientific Committee members and reviewers are also thanked for reviewing the submitted manuscripts and improve the scientific quality of this proceedings. Finally, thanks to all who attended the conference and the sponsors for their financial support. The proceedings consists of 22 manuscripts, organised into five different topics; medical imaging, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, radiation protection and dosimetry, and biomedical engineering. All papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the proceedings Editors. Reviews were conducted by expert referees to the professional and scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. We would like to thank all authors and reviewers for their contribution to this proceedings. We look forward to seeing everyone in 2016 for the 10th anniversary. Hafiz M Zin, Ahmad Taufek Abdul Rahman, Nahzirul Adib and Rafidah Zainon Editors, Proceedings of NSMP 2014

  8. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chaohui; Wang, Zhong Lin; Zhou, Bingkun

    2011-02-01

    The 3rd International Photonics and OptoElectronics Meeting (POEM 2010) was held from November 2-5, 2011, in Wuhan, China. POEM takes place annually, usually in November, with the aim of focusing on the key techniques of scientific frontiers and industry in the field of optoelectronics, understanding future trends as well as making the most of the industrial advantages of Wuhan - Optics Valley of China (OVC). POEM 2010 presented a plenary session and six parallel sessions. The latter comprised Laser Technology and Applications; Nano-enabled Energy Technologies and Materials; Optoelectronic Devices and Integration; Optoelectronic Sensing and Imaging; Solar Cells, Solid State Lighting and Information Display Technologies; and Tera-Hertz Science and Technology. 700 delegates from the field of optoelectronics - including world-famous experts, researchers, investors and entrepreneurs from more than 20 countries - attended the conference, among whom were 160 invited speakers. POEM 2010 once again received extensive praise for its intricate planning, rich contents, and the high-level and influential invited speakers which it attracted. Participants remarked that the presentations by the invited experts, the 'hot topic' discussions, students' posters, and the awards for papers were very engaging. They appreciated this valuable and beneficial opportunity for exchanging ideas with top photonics and optoelectronics experts. Our thanks are extended to the Conference Secretariat and Local Organizing Committee, who have been completely dedicated to their work, and who made the conference such a great success. We are also grateful for the financial support from 111 Project (B07038), and for the help with organization and coordination from Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Proceedings of POEM 2010234 papers were selected out of the 343 manuscripts submitted. The organizers of POEM 2010 are grateful to all the authors whose papers are being published in this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The proceedings are divided into six sections according to different technical areas: Laser Technology and Applications (LTA) Nano-enabled Energy Technologies and Materials (NETM) Optoelectronic Devices and Integration (OEDI) Optoelectronic Sensing and Imaging (OSI) Solar Cells, Solid State Lighting and Information Display Technologies (SSID) Tera-Hertz Science and Technology (THST) Wuhan, PR ChinaDecember, 2010 Chaohui YeZhong Lin WangBingkun ZhouConference Chairs The 3rd International Photonics and OptoElectronics Meeting (POEM 2010)November 2-5, 2010Wuhan, China Supporters:Ministry of Education of China (MOE)State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs (SAFEA)National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) Sponsors:Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST)China Hubei Provincial Science Technology Department (HBSTD)Wuhan East Lake National Innovation Model Park Co-operating Societies:Institute of Physics (IOP)American Institute of Physics (AIP)International Biomedical Optics Society (IBOS)Laser Institute of America (LIA)Optical Society of America (OSA)IEEE Photonics Society (Singapore and Hongkong Chapters)Chinese Optical Society (COS) Organizer:Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO) 1. LASER TECHNOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS (LTA)Editors:Peixiang Lu, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Katsumi Midorikawa, Extreme Photonics Research Group, RIKEN (Japan)Bernd Wilhelmi, Jenoptik AG, Jena (Germany) 2. NANO-ENABLED ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES AND MATERIALS (NETM)Editors:Zhong Lin Wang, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China) and Georgia Institute of Technology (USA)Guozhen Shen, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China) 3. OPTOELECTRONIC DEVICES AND INTEGRATION (OEDI)Editors:Chinlon Lin, Bell Laboratory (USA)Jesper Moerk, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark)Xun Li, McMaster University (Canada)Xinliang Zhang, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Junqiang Sun, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China) 4. OPTOELECTRONIC SENSING AND IMAGING (OSI)Editors:Kecheng Yang, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Pengcheng Li, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China) 5. SOLAR CELLS, SOLID-STATE LIGHTING AND INFORMATION DISPLAY TECHNOLOGIES (SSID)Editors:Hiroshi Amano, Meijo University (Japan)Yibing Cheng, Monash University (Australia)Jinzhong Yu, Institute of Semiconductor, CAS (China)Changqing Chen, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Hongwei Han, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Guoli Tu, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China) 6. TERA-HERTZ SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (THST)Editors:Jianquan Yao, Tianjin University (China)Shenggang Liu, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (China)X C Zhang, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (USA)Jinsong Liu, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China) International Advisory Committee:Yibing Cheng, Monash University (Australia)Stephen Z D Cheng, University of Akron (USA)Min Gu, Swinburne University of Technology (Australia)Andrew B Holmes, the University of Melbourne (Australia)Chinlon Lin, Bell Laboratory (retired, USA)Xun Li, McMaster University (Canada)Shenggang Liu, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (China)Jesper Moerk, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark)Dennis L Matthews, University of California, Davis (USA)Jiacong Shen, Jilin University (China)Ping Shum, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)Chester C T Shu, Chinese University of Hong Kong (China)Valery V Tuchin, Saratov State University (Russia)Bruce Tromberg, University of California/Irvine (USA)Peiheng Wu, University of Nanjing (China)Alan Willner, University of Southern California (USA)Lihong Wang, Washington University in St. Louis (USA)C P Wong, Georgia Institute of Technology (USA)Jianquan Yao, Tianjin University (China)Xi Zhang, Tsinghua University (China)X C Zhang, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (USA) Program Committee:Qingming Luo, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China) - ChairHiroshi Amano, Meijo University (Japan)Yibing Cheng, Monash University (Australia)Peixiang Lu, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Ruxin Li, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (China)Chinlon Lin, Bell Laboratory (USA)Xun Li, McMaster University (Canada)Shenggang Liu, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (China)Katsumi Midorikawa, Extreme Photonics Research Group, RIKEN (Japan)Jesper Moerk, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark)Valery V Tuchin, Saratov State University (Russia)Lihong Wang, Washington University in St. Louis (USA)Zhong Lin Wang, Georgia Institute of Technology(USA)Jinzhong Yu, Institute of Semiconductor, CAS (China)Jianquan Yao, Tianjin University (China)X C Zhang, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (USA) Local Organizing committee:Lin Lin, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China) - ChairSheng Lu, Administration Committee of Wuhan East Lake Hi-tech Development Zone (China) - ChairChangqing Chen, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Ling Fu, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Hongwei Han, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Peixiang Lu, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Pengcheng Li, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Jinsong Liu, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Junqiang Sun, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Guozhen Shen, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Guoli Tu, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Kecheng Yang, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Xinliang Zhang, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China)Yuandi Zhao, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (China) Local Secretariat:Xiaochun Xiao, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)Weiwei Dong, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)

  9. PREFACE: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audoin, Bertrand; Dehoux, Thomas; Guillet, Yannick

    2011-02-01

    Conference logo In the year 2010 we celebrated the 50th birthday of the laser, and laser-ultrasonics is only slightly younger. For the last few decades, laser-ultrasonics has attracted the attention of an increasing number of academics and engineers. It has motivated research in many directions, often in pluridisciplinary fields; and in parallel, having gained maturity, it has attracted more and more interest from industry. Over the years laser-ultrasonics has been the topic of several sessions in different conferences dedicated to ultrasonics, optics, photo-acoustics, phonon scattering, material characterization, and non-destructive evaluation and control. With the aim of creating a fruitful forum for the exchange of ideas, national periodic meetings dedicated to laser-ultrasonics have been organized in Asia, North America and in Europe. For example, from 1999, we began holding convivial meetings in France, in which contributions by PhD students are strongly encouraged. Discussions at an international level were initated a few years ago, examining the opportunity for creating a dedicated international conference assembling researchers and end-users with an interest in the field. Under Jean-Pierre Monchalin's instigation, the first International Symposium on Laser-Ultrasonics took place in Montreal in July 2008, and was a great success. We were very honoured to be in charge of the organization of the second meeting of the conference in Bordeaux in July 2010. The second symposium assembled about 150 attendees from 30 countries. The program included 90 oral contributions, with 17 invited and plenary talks, and 40 contributions with posters. Despite extending the conference from three to four days, the organization of two parallel sessions was necessary. Thanks to the contributions of the participants, the scientific and organizing committees could construct an intensive and attractive scientific program. The conference tour was a sunny visit to Saint-Emilion vineyard and the gala dinner took place in a wine chateau in the medieval village. We hope this experience will remain in the attendees' memories as a pleasant and convivial time. We would like to express our thanks to the members of the organizing committee, the scientific committee, and all our generous sponsors, either institutions or companies, for their help in making this event possible. We would also like to thank the scientists involved for their confidence in our organization, and for their contributions. As unanimously decided by the attendees, the next symposium will be held in Japan, most likely in 2012. The papers published in this volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series provide a collection of state-of-the-art and recent advances in research and applications of laser ultrasonics as presented at this second Symposium. Bertrand Audoin - Conference ChairThomas Dehoux - Conference proceedings co-editorYannick Guillet - Conference proceedings co-editor Conference photograph Scientific committee Bertrand AudoinUniversité Bordeaux 1, France Alain BlouinNRC, Canada Christ GlorieuxKatholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium Vitalyi GusevUniversité du Maine, France Peter HessUniversity of Heidelberg, Germany Alexander A KarabutovMoscow State University, Russia Sridhar KrishnaswamyNorthwestern University, USA Humphrey MarisBrown University, USA Jean-Pierre MonchalinNRC, Canada Todd MurrayBoston University, USA Makoto OchiaiToshiba Corp, Japan Menglu QianTongji University, China Daniel RoyerEcole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie, France Hervé TrétoutDassault Aviation, France Hubert VoillaumeEADS, France Oliver B WrightHokkaido University, Japan Shu-yi ZhangNanjing University, China Organizing committee Bertrand AudoinChair Sandrine GuitLocal administrator Christophe Aristégui Thomas Dehoux Evelyne Dewayse Yannick Guillet Armelle Guilloux

  10. PREFACE Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachor, Hans; Drummond, Peter; Hannaford, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The 22nd International Conference on Atomic Physics (ICAP 2010) was held from 25 to 30 July, 2010 in Cairns, Tropical North Queensland, Australia. This conference followed on from the series of highly successful biennial ICAP conferences held in Storrs, Innsbruck, Rio, Cambridge MA, Florence, Windsor, Amsterdam, Boulder, Munich, Ann Arbor, Paris, Tokyo, Seattle, Göteborg, Cambridge MA, Riga, Berkeley, Heidelberg, Boulder, Oxford and New York. ICAP 2010 was attended by 630 participants from 37 countries. The conference presented an outstanding program of papers covering the most recent advances in atomic physics, including atomic tests of fundamental physics and basic symmetries; precision measurements, including atomic clocks, atom interferometers and fundamental constants; ultracold gases and Bose-Einstein condensates; ultracold Fermi gases; ultracold molecules; quantum simulators with atoms and ions; few-body systems; ultrafast phenomena and free electron lasers; quantum information with atoms and ions; quantum optics and cavity QED with atoms; and hybrid and optomechanical systems. The papers in this Proceedings represent a collection of the invited talks. The conference program consisted of 48 invited talks presented in plenary sessions, including 10 'hot topic' talks highlighting the most recent advances in the field, and about 490 poster papers presented in three afternoon sessions. The program included talks by Nobel Laureates Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, Wolfgang Ketterle and Bill Phillips, a memorium talk commemorating the scientific life of Vladilen Letokhov, and an evening lecture by Alain Aspect on 'Wave particle duality for a single photon: quantum weirdness brought to light'. The conference was preceded by a two-day workshop in Cairns on Variation of Fundamental Constants and Violation of Fundamental Symmetries P, T(EDM), CPT, Lorentz Invariance, organised by the University of New South Wales; and three-day Student Workshop at Cape Tribulation, organized by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics (ACQAO). A website with full details of the conference program, abstracts and other information can be found at: http://www.swin.edu.au/icap2010. We would like to thank the participants, especially those who contributed talks, posters and manuscripts, for making ICAP2010 such an exciting and memorable conference. We thank the Program Committee for putting together an outstanding program and the ICAP International Advisory Committee for their expert advice and suggestions. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of our sponsors: the Australian National University, the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, Griffith University, the Ian Potter Foundation, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, and contributors to the trade exhibition: Coherent, Coherent Scientific, the Institute of Physics Publishing, Lastek, NewSpec, Nufern, Oxford University Press, Spectra-Physics, Springer, Toptica Photonics and Warsash Scientific. Finally, we thank our Conference Secretariat, Maria Lamari, and the Local Organising Committee for their tireless and expert efforts in the organisation of ICAP2010, and the staff of the Cairns Convention Centre, whose friendly and efficient service contributed much to the success of the conference. The next ICAP conference is planned to be held in Palaiseau, France from 23 to 27 July 2012 (http://www.ifraf.org/icap2012). Hans BachorPeter DrummondPeter HannafordEditors

  11. Significance of non-classical damping in seismic qualification of equipment and piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Abhinav, E-mail: agupta1@ncsu.edu; Bose, Mrinal K.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Damping in coupled building-piping or building-equipment systems is nonlclassical. • Significance of nonclassical damping is illustrated. • Classical damping assumption can over predict or under predict response. • Significance of nonclassical damping increases for very light secondary systems. • Composite modal damping is another form of classical damping. - Abstract: This paper presents a discussion on the significance of non-classical damping in coupled primary-secondary systems such as building-equipment or building-piping. Closed-form expressions are used to illustrate that the effect of non-classical damping is significant in systems with tuned or nearly tuned uncoupled modes when the mass-interaction is sufficiently small. Further, simple primary-secondary systems are used to illustrate that composite modal damping is another form of classical damping for which the transformed damping matrix, obtained after pre- and post-multiplication of the damping matrix with the modal matrix, contains only diagonal terms. Both the composite and the classical damping give almost identical results that can be much different from the corresponding results for non-classical damping. Finally, it is shown that consideration of classical damping (ignoring the off-diagonal terms) can give excessively conservative results in nearly tuned primary-secondary systems. For perfectly tuned primary-secondary systems, however, classical damping can give responses that are much lower than what they should be.

  12. Preface: Current perspectives in modelling, monitoring, and predicting geophysical fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancho, Ana M.; Hernández-García, Emilio; López, Cristóbal; Turiel, Antonio; Wiggins, Stephen; Pérez-Muñuzuri, Vicente

    2018-02-01

    The third edition of the international workshop Nonlinear Processes in Oceanic and Atmospheric Flows was held at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences (ICMAT) in Madrid from 6 to 8 July 2016. The event gathered oceanographers, atmospheric scientists, physicists, and applied mathematicians sharing a common interest in the nonlinear dynamics of geophysical fluid flows. The philosophy of this meeting was to bring together researchers from a variety of backgrounds into an environment that favoured a vigorous discussion of concepts across different disciplines. The present Special Issue on Current perspectives in modelling, monitoring, and predicting geophysical fluid dynamics contains selected contributions, mainly from attendants of the workshop, providing an updated perspective on modelling aspects of geophysical flows as well as issues on prediction and assimilation of observational data and novel tools for describing transport and mixing processes in these contexts. More details on these aspects are discussed in this preface.

  13. Characterization of novel StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein mutations causing non-classic lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa E Flück

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR is crucial for transport of cholesterol to mitochondria where biosynthesis of steroids is initiated. Loss of StAR function causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH. OBJECTIVE: StAR gene mutations causing partial loss of function manifest atypical and may be mistaken as familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Only a few mutations have been reported. DESIGN: To report clinical, biochemical, genetic, protein structure and functional data on two novel StAR mutations, and to compare them with published literature. SETTING: Collaboration between the University Children's Hospital Bern, Switzerland, and the CIBERER, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University, Barcelona, Spain. PATIENTS: Two subjects of a non-consanguineous Caucasian family were studied. The 46,XX phenotypic normal female was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at the age of 10 months, had normal pubertal development and still has no signs of hypergonodatropic hypogonadism at 32 years of age. Her 46,XY brother was born with normal male external genitalia and was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at 14 months. Puberty was normal and no signs of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism are present at 29 years of age. RESULTS: StAR gene analysis revealed two novel compound heterozygote mutations T44HfsX3 and G221S. T44HfsX3 is a loss-of-function StAR mutation. G221S retains partial activity (∼30% and is therefore responsible for a milder, non-classic phenotype. G221S is located in the cholesterol binding pocket and seems to alter binding/release of cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: StAR mutations located in the cholesterol binding pocket (V187M, R188C, R192C, G221D/S seem to cause non-classic lipoid CAH. Accuracy of genotype-phenotype prediction by in vitro testing may vary with the assays employed.

  14. Success through Failure: Wittgenstein and the Romantic Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Rowe

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available I argue that the Preface to Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations represents a form of preface found in several other major works of Romanticism. In essence, this kind of preface says: ‘I have tried very hard to write a work of the following conventional type … . I failed, and have thus been compelled to publish, with some reluctance, the following fragmentary, eccentric, unfinished or otherwise unsatisfactory work.’ It sometimes transpires, however, that a work which appeared unfinished and unsatisfactory to the author and his contemporaries, later comes to be seen as both complete and startlingly original. Indeed, not initially recognizing what you have achieved is sometimes a mark of the greatness-through-originality so highly prized by Romantic writers. Besides the Investigations, I concentrate on Coleridge’s Preface to ‘Kubla Khan’, and the first 269 lines of Wordsworth’s Prelude (in both the 1805 and 1850 versions, discussing exactly why all three authors found their projects so recalcitrant, why their solutions were so original, and why the magnitude of their achievements was not appreciated from the first. I end with some reflections on why Wittgenstein’s work on aesthetics, the aesthetic impact of his work, and the cognitive impact of his work should not be separated.

  15. Common Vocal Effects and Partial Glottal Vibration in Professional Nonclassical Singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffier, Philipp P; Ibrahim Nasr, Ahmed; Ropero Rendon, Maria Del Mar; Wienhausen, Sascha; Forbes, Eleanor; Seidner, Wolfram; Nawka, Tadeus

    2018-05-01

    To multidimensionally investigate common vocal effects in experienced professional nonclassical singers, to examine their mechanism of production and reproducibility, to demonstrate the existence of partial glottal vibration, and to assess the potential of damage to the voice from nonclassical singing. Individual cohort study. Ten male singers aged between 25 and 46 years (34 ± 7 years [mean ± SD]) with different stylistic backgrounds were recruited (five pop/rock/metal, five musical theater). Participants repeatedly presented the usual nonclassical vocal effects and techniques in their repertoire. All performances were documented and analyzed using established instruments (eg, auditory-perceptual assessment, videolaryngostroboscopy, electroglottography, voice function diagnostics). The vocal apparatus of all singers was healthy and capable of high performance. Typical nonclassical vocal effects were breathy voice, creaky voice, vocal fry, grunting, distortion, rattle, belt, and twang. All effects could be easily differentiated from each other. They were intraindividually consistently repeatable and also interindividually produced in a similar manner. A special feature in one singer was the first evidence of partial glottal vibration when belting in the high register. The unintended transition to this reduced voice quality was accompanied by physical fatigue and inflexible respiratory support. The long-lasting use of the investigated nonclassical vocal effects had no negative impact on trained singers. The possibility of long-term damage depends on the individual constitution, specific use, duration, and extent of the hyperfunction. The incidence of partial glottal vibration and its consequences require continuing research to learn more about efficient and healthy vocal function in nonclassical singing. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental detection of nonclassical correlations in mixed-state quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passante, G.; Moussa, O.; Trottier, D. A.; Laflamme, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report on an experiment to detect nonclassical correlations in a highly mixed state. The correlations are characterized by the quantum discord and are observed using four qubits in a liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor. The state analyzed is the output of a DQC1 computation, whose input is a single quantum bit accompanied by n maximally mixed qubits. This model of computation outperforms the best known classical algorithms and, although it contains vanishing entanglement, it is known to have quantum correlations characterized by the quantum discord. This experiment detects nonvanishing quantum discord, ensuring the existence of nonclassical correlations as measured by the quantum discord.

  17. Non-stationary pre-envelope covariances of non-classically damped systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscolino, G.

    1991-08-01

    A new formulation is given to evaluate the stationary and non-stationary response of linear non-classically damped systems subjected to multi-correlated non-separable Gaussian input processes. This formulation is based on a new and more suitable definition of the impulse response function matrix for such systems. It is shown that, when using this definition, the stochastic response of non-classically damped systems involves the evaluation of quantities similar to those of classically damped ones. Furthermore, considerations about non-stationary cross-covariances, spectral moments and pre-envelope cross-covariances are presented for a monocorrelated input process.

  18. Metadiscourse in Book Prefaces of Filipino and English Authors: A Contrastive Rhetoric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munalim, Leonardo O.; Lintao, Rachelle B.

    2016-01-01

    Grounded on the tradition of Contrastive Rhetoric (CR), this paper aimed at contrasting the presence of metadiscourse resources in a book preface of Filipino and English authors. It especially sought to see the similarities and differences of interactive and interactional markers between two cultures. A total of thirty book prefaces on language…

  19. The prognostic role of classical and nonclassical MHC class I expression in endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijen, C.B.; Bantema-Joppe, E.J.; de Jong, Renske; Leffers, N.; Mourits, M.J.; Eggink, Henk F.; van der Zee, A.G.; Hollema, H.; de Bock, G.H.; Nijman, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate classical MHC class I and nonclassical MHC (human leukocyte antigen-G [HLA-GJ) expression in a large cohort of patients with endometrial cancer, to determine the prognostic value of these cell surface markers and their relation with clinicopathological

  20. Higher-order sub-Poissonian-like nonclassical fields: Theoretical and experimental comparison

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřina Jr., J.; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 3 (2017), s. 1-7, č. článku 033852. ISSN 2469-9926 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : twin beams * photon statistics * sub-Poissonian-like nonclassical fields Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.925, year: 2016

  1. Food Stamps and Food Insecurity: What Can Be Learned in the Presence of Nonclassical Measurement Error?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Craig; Kreider, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Policymakers have been puzzled to observe that food stamp households appear more likely to be food insecure than observationally similar eligible nonparticipating households. We reexamine this issue allowing for nonclassical reporting errors in food stamp participation and food insecurity. Extending the literature on partially identified…

  2. "Nonclassical" secretion of annexin A2 to the lumenal side of the enterocyte brush border membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; van Deurs, Bo; Hansen, Gert H

    2003-01-01

    side of the microvilli, showing an apical secretion by a "nonclassical" mechanism. In addition, annexin A2 was associated with surface-connected, deep apical tubules in the apical terminal web region and with an underlying pleiomorphic, tubulo-vesicular compartment (subapical compartment...

  3. Nanoparticle-mediated nonclassical crystal growth of sodium fluorosilicate nanowires and nanoplates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We observed nonclassical crystal growth of the sodium fluorosilicate nanowires, nanoplates, and hierarchical structures through self-assembly and aggregation of primary intermediate nanoparticles. Unlike traditional ion-by-ion crystallization, the primary nanoparticles formed first and their subsequent self-assembly, fusion, and crystallization generated various final crystals. These findings offer direct evidences for the aggregation-based crystallization mechanism.

  4. Nonclassical Effects of a Four-Level Excited-Doublet Atom Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiansong; Xu Jingbo

    2006-01-01

    We adopt a dynamical algebraic method to study a four-level excited-doublet atom model and obtain the explicit expressions of the time-evolution operator and the density operator for the system. The nonclassical effects of the system, such as collapses and revivals of the atomic inversion and squeezing of the radiation field, are also discussed.

  5. Dynamos of the Sun, Stars, and Planets - Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stix, M.

    2005-04-01

    The conference ``Dynamos of the Sun, Stars, and Planets'' was organized by the Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik Freiburg, and was held at the University of Freiburg from 4th to 6th October 2004. About 50 participants attended the conference, with 8 review lectures, 20 contributed talks, and 6 posters. With only few exceptions, these contributions appear in the present issue of Astronomische Nachrichten. This preface summarizes the discussion of the closing session.

  6. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, James; Carr, Ron; Chebl, Maroun; Coleman, Robert; Costantini, William; Cox, Robert; Dial, William; Jenkins, Robert; McGovern, James; Mueller, Peter

    2006-01-01

    ...., trains, ships, etc.) and maximizing intermodal efficiency. A healthy balance must be achieved between the flow of international commerce and security requirements regardless of transportation mode...

  7. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  8. Observational study of differences in head position for high notes in famous classical and non-classical male singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarante Andrade, Pedro; Švec, Jan G

    2016-07-01

    Differences in classical and non-classical singing are due primarily to aesthetic style requirements. The head position can affect the sound quality. This study aimed at comparing the head position for famous classical and non-classical male singers performing high notes. Images of 39 Western classical and 34 non-classical male singers during live performances were obtained from YouTube. Ten raters evaluated the frontal rotational head position (depression versus elevation) and transverse head position (retraction versus protraction) visually using a visual analogue scale. The results showed a significant difference for frontal rotational head position. Most non-classical singers in the sample elevated their heads for high notes while the classical singers were observed to keep it around the neutral position. This difference may be attributed to different singing techniques and phonatory system adjustments utilized by each group.

  9. Non-Classical C–H···X Hydrogen Bonding and Its Role in Asymmetric Organocatalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Ajitha, Manjaly John; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical hydrogen bonds (NCHBs) have attracted significant interest in the past decade particularly because of their important role in asymmetric catalytic systems. These weak interactions (< 4 kcal/mol) offer much flexibility1 Introduction2 Hydrogen Bonds (HBs) and Non-Classical Hydrogen Bonds (NCHBs)3 Early Developments in NCHBs4 Selected Examples of NCHBs in Organic Transformations5 Recent Examples of NCHBs in Enantioselective Reactions6 Conclusions and Outlook

  10. Nonclassicality characterization in photon statistics based on binary-response single-photon detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yanqiang; Yang Rongcan; Li Gang; Zhang Pengfei; Zhang Yuchi; Wang Junmin; Zhang Tiancai

    2011-01-01

    By employing multiple conventional single-photon counting modules (SPCMs), which are binary-response detectors, instead of photon number resolving detectors, the nonclassicality criteria are investigated for various quantum states. The bounds of the criteria are derived from a system based on three or four SPCMs. The overall efficiency and background are both taken into account. The results of experiments with thermal and coherent light agree with the theoretical analysis. Compared with photon number resolving detectors, the use of a Hanbury Brown-Twiss-like scheme with multiple SPCMs is even better for revealing the nonclassicality of the fields, and the efficiency requirements are not so stringent. Some proposals are presented which can improve the detection performance with binary-response SPCMs for different quantum states.

  11. Nonclassicality of Photon-Added Displaced Thermal State via Quantum Phase-Space Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ran; Meng, Xiang-Guo; Du, Chuan-Xun; Wang, Ji-Suo

    2018-02-01

    We introduce a new kind of nonclassical mixed state generated by adding arbitrary photons to a displaced thermal state, i.e., the photon-added displaced thermal state (PADTS), and obtain the normalization factor, which is simply related to two-variable Hermite polynomials. We also discuss the nonclassicality of the PADTS by considering quantum phase-space distributions. The results indicate that the value of the photon count statistics is maximum when the number of detected photons is equal to the number of added photons, and that the photon-added operation has a similar modulation effect with increasing displacement. Moreover, the negative volume of the Wigner function for the PADTS takes a maximal value for a specific photon-added number.

  12. EFFECTS OF PARAMETRIC VARIATIONS ON SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR NON-CLASSICALLY DAMPED COUPLED SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XU, J.; DEGRASSI, G.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive benchmark program was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform an evaluation of state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for performing seismic analyses of coupled systems with non-classical damping. The program, which was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was designed to address various aspects of application and limitations of these state-of-the-art analysis methods to typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) structures with non-classical damping, and was carried out through analyses of a set of representative benchmark problems. One objective was to examine the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled systems. The examination was performed using parametric variations for three simple benchmark models. This paper presents the comparisons and evaluation of the program participants' results to the BNL exact solutions for the applicable ranges of modeling dynamic characteristic parameters

  13. Noncritical generation of nonclassical frequency combs via spontaneous rotational symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Patera, Giuseppe; de Valcárcel, Germán J.

    2017-10-01

    Synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillators (SPOPOs) are optical cavities driven by mode-locked lasers, and containing a nonlinear crystal capable of down-converting a frequency comb to lower frequencies. SPOPOs have received a lot of attention lately because their intrinsic multimode nature makes them compact sources of quantum correlated light with promising applications in modern quantum information technologies. In this work we show that SPOPOs are also capable of accessing the challenging and interesting regime where spontaneous symmetry breaking confers strong nonclassical properties to the emitted light, which has eluded experimental observation so far. Apart from opening the possibility of studying experimentally this elusive regime of dissipative phase transitions, our predictions will have a practical impact, since we show that spontaneous symmetry breaking provides a specific spatiotemporal mode with large quadrature squeezing for any value of the system parameters, turning SPOPOs into robust sources of highly nonclassical light above threshold.

  14. Non-classical Signature of Parametric Fluorescence and its Application in Metrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamar M.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a short theoretical background of what the non-classical light means. We applied the criterion for the existence of non-classical effects derived by C.T. Lee on parametric fluorescence. The criterion was originally derived for the study of two light beams with one mode per beam. We checked if the criterion is still working for two multimode beams of parametric down-conversion through numerical simulations. The theoretical results were tested by measurement of photon number statistics of twin beams emitted by nonlinear BBO crystal pumped by intense femtoseconds UV pulse. We used ICCD camera as the detector of photons in both beams. It appears that the criterion can be used for the measurement of the quantum efficiencies of the ICCD cameras.

  15. Reproducibility of Psychological Experiments as a Problem of Post-Nonclassical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vachkov I.V.,

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental project on reproducibility carried out in the USA by Brian Nosek in 2015 (the Reproducibility Project revealed a serious methodological problem in psychology: the issue of replication of psycho- logical experiments. Reproducibility has been traditionally perceived as one of the basic principles of the scientific method. However, methodological analysis of the modern post-nonclassical stage in the development of science suggests that this might be a bit too uncompromising as applied to psychology. It seems that the very criteria of scientific research need to be reconsidered with regard to the specifics of post-nonclassical science, and, as the authors put it, as a result, reproducibility might lose its key status or even be excluded at all. The reviewed problem and the proposed ways of coping with it are of high importance to research and practice in psychology as they define the strategies for organizing, conducting and evaluating experimental research.

  16. Nonclassicality threshold for the three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertesi, Tamas; Pal, Karoly F.

    2011-01-01

    The nonclassical properties of the noisy three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states, ρ v =v|GHZ> v is nonclassical for the parameter range 1/2< v≤1. It has been posed whether additional settings would allow to lower the threshold visibility. Here we report on Bell inequalities giving a threshold value smaller than v=1/2. This rules out the possibility of a local hidden variable model in the limit of v=1/2. In particular, the lowest threshold visibility we found is v=0.496 057, attainable with 5x5x5 settings, whereas the most economical one in number of settings corresponds to 3x3x4 settings. The method which enabled us to obtain these results, and in particular the about 10 000 tight Bell inequalities giving v<1/2, are also discussed in detail.

  17. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, D. W; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  18. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D. Martin

    2011-06-01

    Electrostatics 2011 was held in the city of Bangor which is located in North West Wales in an area of outstanding natural beauty close to the Snowdonia mountain range and bordering the Irish Sea. The history of the area goes back into the mists of times, but a continuous technological thread can be traced from the stone- and bronze-age craftsmen, who inhabited the area several thousand years ago, via the civil engineering and fortifications of the Romans and Edward I of England, through Marconi's long-wave trans-Atlantic transmitter near Caernarfon to the conference host. The School of Electronic Engineering at Bangor University has contributed much to the discipline of Electrostatics not only in teaching and research but also in supporting industry. It was a great pleasure for me, therefore, to have the pleasure of welcoming the world's experts in Electrostatics to Bangor in April 2011. In my preface to the Proceedings of Electrostatics 1999, I reported that almost 90 papers were presented. Interestingly, a similar number were presented in 2011 testifying to the importance and endurance of the subject. The all-embracing nature of electrostatics is captured in the pictorial depiction used for the conference logo: a hand-held plasma ball with its close link to gaseous discharges and the superimposed Antarctic aurora highlighting the featured conference themes of atmospheric, planetary and environmental electrostatics. Leading these themes were three invited contributions, the first by Giles Harrison who delivered the Bill Bright Memorial Lecture 'Fair weather atmospheric electricity', Carlos Calle on 'The electrostatic environments of Mars and the Moon' and Istvan Berta on 'Lightning protection - challenges, solutions and questionable steps in the 21st century'. Leading other key sessions were invited papers by Atsushi Ohsawa on 'Statistical analysis of fires and explosions attributed to static electricity over the last 50 years in Japanese industry' and Antonio

  19. Consequences of nonclassical measurement for the algorithmic description of continuous dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Chris

    1989-01-01

    Continuous dynamical systems intuitively seem capable of more complex behavior than discrete systems. If analyzed in the framework of the traditional theory of computation, a continuous dynamical system with countablely many quasistable states has at least the computational power of a universal Turing machine. Such an analyses assumes, however, the classical notion of measurement. If measurement is viewed nonclassically, a continuous dynamical system cannot, even in principle, exhibit behavior that cannot be simulated by a universal Turing machine.

  20. Phase-space representation of non-classical behaviour of scalar wave-fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canas-Cardona, Gustavo; Castaneda, Roman; Vinck-Posada, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    The modelling of optical fields by using radiant and virtual point sources for the spatial coherence wavelets in the phase-space representation evidences some effects, conventionally attributed to non-classical correlations of light, although such type of correlations are not explicitly included in the model. Specifically, a light state is produced that has similar morphology to the Wigner Distribution Function of the well-known quantum Schroedinger cat and squeezed states.

  1. Joint probability distributions of stimulated parametric down-conversion for controllable nonclassical fluctuations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřina, Jan; Křepelka, Jaromír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 281, č. 18 (2008), s. 4705-4711 ISSN 0030-4018 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100713; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : quantum measurement * parametric down-conversion * nonclassical light * quantum noise Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.552, year: 2008

  2. Non-classical austenite-martensite interfaces observed in single crystals of Cu-Al-Ni

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seiner, Hanuš; Landa, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 11 (2009), s. 793-807 ISSN 0141-1594 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627; GA ČR(CZ) GP202/09/P164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : shape memory alloy s * martensitic microstructure * non-classical interfaces * crossing twins Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.935, year: 2009 http://www.informaworld.com

  3. Direct experimental observation of nonclassicality in ensembles of single-photon emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreva, E.; Traina, P.; Forneris, J.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Ditalia Tchernij, S.; Picollo, F.; Brida, G.; Olivero, P.; Genovese, M.

    2017-11-01

    In this work we experimentally demonstrate a recently proposed criterion addressed to detect nonclassical behavior in the fluorescence emission of ensembles of single-photon emitters. In particular, we apply the method to study clusters of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond characterized with single-photon-sensitive confocal microscopy. Theoretical considerations on the behavior of the parameter at any arbitrary order in the presence of Poissonian noise are presented and, finally, the opportunity of detecting manifold coincidences is discussed.

  4. [A non-classical approach to medical practices: Michel Foucault and Actor-Network Theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bińczyk, E

    2001-01-01

    The text presents an analysis of medical practices stemming from two sources: Michel Foucault's conception and the research of Annemarie Mol and John Law, representatives of a trend known as Actor-Network Theory. Both approaches reveal significant theoretical kinship: they can be successfully consigned to the framework of non-classical sociology of science. I initially refer to the cited conceptions as a version of non-classical sociology of medicine. The identity of non-classical sociology of medicine hinges on the fact that it undermines the possibility of objective definitions of disease, health and body. These are rather approached as variable social and historical phenomena, co-constituted by medical practices. To both Foucault and Mol the main object of interest was not medicine as such, but rather the network of medical practices. Mol and Law sketch a new theoretical perspective for the analysis of medical practices. They attempt to go beyond the dichotomous scheme of thinking about the human body as an object of medical research and the subject of private experience. Research on patients suffering blood-sugar deficiency provide the empirical background for the thesis of Actor-Network Theory representatives. Michel Foucault's conceptions are extremely critical of medical practices. The French researcher describes the processes of 'medicalising' Western society as the emergence of a new type of power. He attempts to sensitise the reader to the ethical dimension of the processes of medicalising society.

  5. Molecular characterization of classical and nonclassical MHC class I genes from the golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Q-Q; Zhong, G-H; He, K; Sun, D-D; Wan, Q-H

    2016-02-01

    Classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I allelic polymorphism is essential for competent antigen presentation. To improve the genotyping efforts in the golden pheasant, it is necessary to differentiate more accurately between classical and nonclassical class I molecules. In our study, all MHC class I genes were isolated from one golden pheasant based on two overlapping PCR amplifications. In total, six full-length class I nucleotide sequences (A-F) were identified, and four were novel. Two (A and C) belonged to the IA1 gene, two (B and D) were alleles derived from the IA2 gene through transgene amplification, and two (E and F) comprised a third novel locus, IA3 that was excluded from the core region of the golden pheasant MHC-B. IA1 and IA2 exhibited the broad expression profiles characteristic of classical loci, while IA3 showed no expression in multiple tissues and was therefore defined as a nonclassical gene. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the three IA genes in the golden pheasant share a much closer evolutionary relationship than the corresponding sequences in other galliform species. This observation was consistent with high sequence similarity among them, which likely arises from the homogenizing effect of recombination. Our careful distinction between the classical and nonclassical MHC class I genes in the golden pheasant lays the foundation for developing locus-specific genotyping and establishing a good molecular marker system of classical MHC I loci. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Assesment of Rhythm Disorders in Classical and Nonclassical Mitral Valve Prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodzic, Enisa

    2018-02-01

    Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) is the most common cardiac valve pathology of to day. Aim of article was to identify the types and frequency of potentially malignant arrhythmia and atrial brillation in patients with MVP, to determine the differences in these arrhythmias between classical and non-classical MVP, to evaluate the correlation of potentially malignant arrhythmia and atrial fibrillation with MVP with possible clinical complications of arrhythmogenic sudden cardiac death and potential risk of thromboembolic vascular incident. Article has retrospective-prospective analytical character and present observational study on 239 patients (120 with MVP (66 with classical and 54 with non-classical MVP), who had a subjective feeling of palpitations and/or pain in the chest, and/or episode of syncope, and did not have ischemic heart disease or another valve pathology) and 119 healthy patients in the control group. All patients were analyzed by 24-hour ECG Holter. Signifficant difference in all analyzed arrhythmias between classical MVP and control group (p MVP (p = 0.016). The potential risk of cardiac death and vascular incidence is signi cantly higher in classical MVP than in non-classical MVP, implying the need for routine ECG-Holter monitoring in their diagnosis for timely prevention of clinical arrhythmogenic complications.

  7. Why aortic elasticity differs among classical and non-classical mitral valve prolapsed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Murat; Demirkol, Sait; Aparci, Mustafa; Arslan, Zekeriya; Balta, Sevket; Dogan, Umuttan; Kilicarslan, Baris; Ozeke, Ozcan; Celik, Turgay; Iyisoy, Atila

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the most common valvular heart disease and characterized by the displacement of an abnormally thickened mitral valve leaflet into the left atrium during systole. There are two types of MVP, broadly classified as classic (thickness ≥5 mm) and non-classic (thickness elastic properties of the aorta in young male patients with classical and non-classical MVP. In the present study, 63 young adult males (mean age: 22.7 ± 4.2) were included. Patients were divided into classic MVP (n = 27) and non-classic MVP (n = 36) groups. Aortic strain, aortic distensibility and aortic stiffness index were calculated by using aortic diameters obtained by echocardiography and blood pressures measured by sphygmomanometer. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age, body mass index, left ventricular mass and ejection fraction. When comparing the MVP group it was found that aortic strain and aortic distensibility were increased (p = 0.0027, p = 0.016, respectively) whereas the aortic stiffness index was decreased (p = 0.06) in the classical MVP group. We concluded that the elastic properties of the aorta is increased in patients with classic MVP. Further large scale studies should be performed to understand of morphological and physiological properties of the aorta in patients with MVP.

  8. Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1973-12-11

    A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

  9. Asymptotic approach to the description of nonclassical transport processes. Fermat's principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratenko, P. S.

    2017-11-01

    A method has been proposed to calculate the concentration distribution at asymptotically long distances from a source of impurity in a medium including long-scale heterogeneities. It has been found that the exponent Γ ≫ 1 in an expression for the concentration satisfies a nonlinear equation with first-order partial derivatives. This has allowed using the variational principle to calculate the function Γ. The pre-exponential factor in the expression for the concentration has been determined in the leading approximation in the small parameter Γ-1. An analogy with geometrical optics and semiclassical approximation in quantum mechanics has been demonstrated.

  10. Discussion of Alfred Alder's preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansbacher, H L

    1981-07-01

    In his preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky, Alfred Adler (1) found his theory of the dynamics of schizophrenia supported in the Diary, (2) alluded to Nijinsky's prepsychotic personality, and (3) briefly touched on the possibility and conditions of recovery. To add to the understanding of Adler's "Preface," this discussion (1) expands his theory of schizophrenia, (2) gives some concrete data of Nijinsky's prepsychotic personality, (3) describes two episodes of recovery subsequent to the "Preface," and (4) introduces an important aspect of Adler's theory, which he had to omit out of consideration for Nijinsky's wife, Romola-namely, her role in her husband's disorder. With the larger theoretical and historical context established. Adler's "Preface" can be appreciated for its predictive validity.

  11. Preface to Berk's "Regression Analysis: A Constructive Critique"

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, Jan

    2003-01-01

    It is pleasure to write a preface for the book ”Regression Analysis” of my fellow series editor Dick Berk. And it is a pleasure in particular because the book is about regression analysis, the most popular and the most fundamental technique in applied statistics. And because it is critical of the way regression analysis is used in the sciences, in particular in the social and behavioral sciences. Although the book can be read as an introduction to regression analysis, it can also be read as a...

  12. Unbound color, prefaced by remarks on baryon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, O.W.

    Theoretical and experimental issues related to the possibility that color is unbound are surveyed. This implies that quarks, gluons and other particles carrying color can exist as isolated objects. It is surprisingly difficult to distinguish models with unbound color from those in which color is permanently confined. None-the-less, the present situation seems discouraging for unbound color because there is no unambiguous support for it and because the crucial prediction of formation of a colored gluon in e + e - collisions has been ruled out wherever sufficient data exists. The above survey is prefaced by remarks on the symmetric quark model for baryon spectroscopy

  13. On The Problem of Constructing Routes, Part I: Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertsbakh Ilya B.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a preface of the translation of the 1967 paper by Linis and Maksim, “On the problem of constructing routes” (in Russian (in the Proceedings of the Institute of Civil Aviation Engineering, Issue 102, pp. 36-45. It marks 50-year to the deficit function (DF model initially developed in this 1967 work; the DF model then paved the way to further research of vehicle-fleet management in terms of optimal routing and scheduling. The merit of this translation is to describe the roots of the DF modelling to enable further studies to emerge with more contributions.

  14. Preface to the Focus Issue: Chaos Detection Methods and Predictability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17–21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue

  15. Preface to the Focus Issue: chaos detection methods and predictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Georg A; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-06-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17-21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue.

  16. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Faculty ii INDUSTRY TRAVEL Domestic Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Transportation Policy), Washington, DC Department of...developed between the railroad and trucking industries. Railroads: Today’s seven Class I freight railroad systems move 42% of the nation’s intercity ...has been successfully employed in London to reduce congestion and observed by this industry study during its travels . It is currently being

  17. Heat control in opto-mechanical system using quantum non-classicality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sushamana; Senwar, Subash

    2016-01-01

    Cooling of matter to the quantum ground state is a primary directive of quantum control. In other words, to extract entropy from a quantum system, efficient indirect quantum measurements may be implemented. The main objective is the cooling of the oscillator either to its motional ground state or to non-classical states, such as low-number Fock states, squeezed states or entangled states. It is shown that the use of quantum control procedure is better choice for even experimental realizations because it leads to a squeezed steady state with less than one phonon on average. The steady state of system corresponds to cooling of the system.

  18. The homology groups of moduli spaces on non-classical Klein surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaw, Myint

    2001-08-01

    We describe the moduli space M-vector±(g,c) of non-classical directed Klein surfaces of genus g=h-c-1 with c≥0 distinguished points as a configuration space B ± (h,c) of classes h-slit pairs in C. Based on this model, we prove that M-vector ± (g,c) is non-orientable for any g and c and we compute the homology groups of the moduli spaces M-vector ± (g,c) for g≤2. (author)

  19. Non-classical solutions of a continuum model for rock descriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Guzev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The strain-gradient and non-Euclidean continuum theories are employed for construction of non-classical solutions of continuum models. The linear approximation of both models' results in identical structures in terms of their kinematic and stress characteristics. The solutions obtained in this study exhibit a critical behaviour with respect to the external loading parameter. The conclusions are obtained based on an investigation of the solution for the scalar curvature in the non-Euclidean continuum theory. The proposed analysis enables us to use different theoretical approaches for description of rock critical behaviour under different loading conditions.

  20. Analysis of the elastic behaviour of nonclassical nonlinear mesoscopic materials in quasi-static experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffino, E.; Scalerandi, M.

    2000-01-01

    As discovered by recent quasi-static and dynamic resonance experiments, the classical nonlinear theory fails in describing the hysteretic behaviour of nonlinear mesoscopic materials like rocks, concrete, etc. The paper applies the local interaction simulation approach (LISA) for studying such kind of nonclassical nonlinearity. To this purpose, in the LISA treatment of ultrasonic wave propagation has been included a phenomenological model, based on the PM space approach, of the local mesoscopic features of rocks and other materials with localized damages. A quantitative comparison of simulation and experimental results in quasi-static experiments is also presented

  1. Nonclassical-light generation in a photonic-band-gap nonlinear planar waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perina, Jan Jr.; Sibilia, Concita; Tricca, Daniela; Bertolotti, Mario

    2004-01-01

    The optical parametric process occurring in a photonic-band-gap planar waveguide is studied from the point of view of nonclassical-light generation. The nonlinearly interacting optical fields are described by the generalized superposition of coherent signals and noise using the method of operator linear corrections to a classical strong solution. Scattered backward-propagating fields are taken into account. Squeezed light as well as light with sub-Poissonian statistics can be obtained in two-mode fields under the specified conditions

  2. Managing the spatial properties and photon correlations in squeezed non-classical twisted light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, R. V.; Tikhonova, O. V.

    2018-05-01

    Spatial photon correlations and mode content of the squeezed vacuum light generated in a system of two separated nonlinear crystals is investigated. The contribution of both the polar and azimuthal modes with non-zero orbital angular momentum is analyzed. The control and engineering of the spatial properties and degree of entanglement of the non-classical squeezed light by changing the distance between crystals and pump parameters is demonstrated. Methods for amplification of certain spatial modes and managing the output mode content and intensity profile of quantum twisted light are suggested.

  3. SPRED: A machine learning approach for the identification of classical and non-classical secretory proteins in mammalian genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar [Institute for Neuro- and Bioinformatics, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany); Pugalenthi, Ganesan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Hartmann, Enno; Kalies, Kai-Uwe [Centre for Structural and Cell Biology in Medicine, Institute of Biology, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany); Moeller, Steffen [Institute for Neuro- and Bioinformatics, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany); Suganthan, P.N. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Martinetz, Thomas, E-mail: martinetz@inb.uni-luebeck.de [Institute for Neuro- and Bioinformatics, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Eukaryotic protein secretion generally occurs via the classical secretory pathway that traverses the ER and Golgi apparatus. Secreted proteins usually contain a signal sequence with all the essential information required to target them for secretion. However, some proteins like fibroblast growth factors (FGF-1, FGF-2), interleukins (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta), galectins and thioredoxin are exported by an alternative pathway. This is known as leaderless or non-classical secretion and works without a signal sequence. Most computational methods for the identification of secretory proteins use the signal peptide as indicator and are therefore not able to identify substrates of non-classical secretion. In this work, we report a random forest method, SPRED, to identify secretory proteins from protein sequences irrespective of N-terminal signal peptides, thus allowing also correct classification of non-classical secretory proteins. Training was performed on a dataset containing 600 extracellular proteins and 600 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. The algorithm was tested on 180 extracellular proteins and 1380 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. We obtained 85.92% accuracy from training and 82.18% accuracy from testing. Since SPRED does not use N-terminal signals, it can detect non-classical secreted proteins by filtering those secreted proteins with an N-terminal signal by using SignalP. SPRED predicted 15 out of 19 experimentally verified non-classical secretory proteins. By scanning the entire human proteome we identified 566 protein sequences potentially undergoing non-classical secretion. The dataset and standalone version of the SPRED software is available at (http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/spred/spred).

  4. SPRED: A machine learning approach for the identification of classical and non-classical secretory proteins in mammalian genomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Hartmann, Enno; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Moeller, Steffen; Suganthan, P.N.; Martinetz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein secretion generally occurs via the classical secretory pathway that traverses the ER and Golgi apparatus. Secreted proteins usually contain a signal sequence with all the essential information required to target them for secretion. However, some proteins like fibroblast growth factors (FGF-1, FGF-2), interleukins (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta), galectins and thioredoxin are exported by an alternative pathway. This is known as leaderless or non-classical secretion and works without a signal sequence. Most computational methods for the identification of secretory proteins use the signal peptide as indicator and are therefore not able to identify substrates of non-classical secretion. In this work, we report a random forest method, SPRED, to identify secretory proteins from protein sequences irrespective of N-terminal signal peptides, thus allowing also correct classification of non-classical secretory proteins. Training was performed on a dataset containing 600 extracellular proteins and 600 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. The algorithm was tested on 180 extracellular proteins and 1380 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. We obtained 85.92% accuracy from training and 82.18% accuracy from testing. Since SPRED does not use N-terminal signals, it can detect non-classical secreted proteins by filtering those secreted proteins with an N-terminal signal by using SignalP. SPRED predicted 15 out of 19 experimentally verified non-classical secretory proteins. By scanning the entire human proteome we identified 566 protein sequences potentially undergoing non-classical secretion. The dataset and standalone version of the SPRED software is available at (http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/spred/spred).

  5. Squeezing, photon bunching, photon antibunching and nonclassical photon statistics in degenerate hyper Raman processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Biswajit; Mandal, Swapan

    2007-01-01

    An initially prepared coherent state coupled to a second-order nonlinear medium is responsible for stimulated and spontaneous hyper Raman processes. By using an intuitive approach based on perturbation theory, the Hamiltonian corresponding to the hyper Raman processes is analytically solved to obtain the temporal development of the field operators. It is true that these analytical solutions are valid for small coupling constants. However, the interesting part is that these solutions are valid for reasonably large time. Hence, the present analytical solutions are quite general and are fresh compared to those solutions under short-time approximations. By exploiting the analytical solutions of field operators for various modes, we investigate the squeezing, photon antibunching and nonclassical photon statistics for pure modes of the input coherent light responsible for hyper Raman processes. At least in one instance (stimulated hyper Raman processes for vibration phonon mode), we report the simultaneous appearance of classical (photon bunching) and nonclassical (squeezing) effects of the radiation field responsible for hyper Raman processes

  6. Non-classic multiscale modeling of manipulation based on AFM, in aqueous and humid ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korayem, M. H.; Homayooni, A.; Hefzabad, R. N.

    2018-05-01

    To achieve a precise manipulation, it is important that an accurate model consisting the size effect and environmental conditions be employed. In this paper, the non-classical multiscale modeling is developed to investigate the manipulation in a vacuum, aqueous and humid ambient. The manipulation structure is considered into two parts as a macro-field (MF) and a nano-field (NF). The governing equations of the AFM components (consist of the cantilever and tip) in the MF are derived based on the modified couple stress theory. The material length scale parameter is used to study the size effect. The fluid flow in the MF is assumed as the Couette and Creeping flows. Moreover, the NF is modeled using the molecular dynamics. The Electro-Based (ELBA) model is considered to model the ambient condition in the NF. The nanoparticle in the different conditions is taken into account to study the manipulation. The results of the manipulation indicate that the predicted deflection of the non-classical model is less than the classical one. Comparison of the nanoparticle travelled distance on substrate shows that the manipulation in the submerged condition is close to the ideal manipulation. The results of humid condition illustrate that by increasing the relative humidity (RH) the manipulation force decreases. Furthermore, Root Mean Square (RMS) as a criterion of damage demonstrates that the submerged nanoparticle has the minimum damage, however, the minimum manipulation force occurs in superlative humid ambient.

  7. ON THE POLARIZATION OF CREATIVE CONSCIOUSNESS IN NON-CLASSICAL ERA OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Nikolaevich Sklyarov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the phenomenon of "branch" of the total flow of philosophical and aesthetic quest in Russian postsimbolism in the early 20th century and the implications of this polarization in the literary process in the following decades. Special attention is paid to the specifics of the non-classical consciousness, an important feature of which is the intention of the "targeting" of artistic expression. The main lines of development of Russian literature in the 20th century are briefly described. The subject of primary attention of the author are mental peculiarities, features of creative thinking inherited in individuals of every from ideological and artistic "vectors", forming a common paradigm of national literature in the non-classical era. The understanding the specifics of the "middle" line of creative research, defined by the concept of "neotraditionalism" becomes the center of the problem field in the article. In understanding and presentation of the essence of the neotraditional type of creative consciousness author moves into the mainstream, a paved by work of V.I. Tyupa, who proposed in the early 90s as the term itself, taken now adopted by many scientists and methodological principles of neotraditionalism identification as a special type of mental orientation in art. 

  8. New fundamental evidence of non-classical structure in the combination of natural concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, D; Sozzo, S; Veloz, T

    2016-01-13

    We recently performed cognitive experiments on conjunctions and negations of two concepts with the aim of investigating the combination problem of concepts. Our experiments confirmed the deviations (conceptual vagueness, underextension, overextension etc.) from the rules of classical (fuzzy) logic and probability theory observed by several scholars in concept theory, while our data were successfully modelled in a quantum-theoretic framework developed by ourselves. In this paper, we isolate a new, very stable and systematic pattern of violation of classicality that occurs in concept combinations. In addition, the strength and regularity of this non-classical effect leads us to believe that it occurs at a more fundamental level than the deviations observed up to now. It is our opinion that we have identified a deep non-classical mechanism determining not only how concepts are combined but, rather, how they are formed. We show that this effect can be faithfully modelled in a two-sector Fock space structure, and that it can be exactly explained by assuming that human thought is the superposition of two processes, a 'logical reasoning', guided by 'logic', and a 'conceptual reasoning', guided by 'emergence', and that the latter generally prevails over the former. All these findings provide new fundamental support to our quantum-theoretic approach to human cognition. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Discriminating strength: a bona fide measure of non-classical correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, A.; De Pasquale, A.; Rigovacca, L.; Giovannetti, V.

    2014-07-01

    A new measure of non-classical correlations is introduced and characterized. It tests the ability of using a state ρ of a composite system AB as a probe for a quantum illumination task (e.g. see Lloyd 2008 Science 321 1463), in which one is asked to remotely discriminate between the two following scenarios: (i) either nothing happens to the probe, or (ii) the subsystem A is transformed via a local unitary {{R}_{A}} whose properties are partially unspecified when producing ρ. This new measure can be seen as the discrete version of the recently introduced interferometric power measure (Girolami et al 2013 e-print arXiv:1309.1472) and, at least for the case in which A is a qubit, it is shown to coincide (up to an irrelevant scaling factor) with the local quantum uncertainty measure of Girolami, Tufarelli and Adesso (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 240402). Analytical expressions are derived which allow us to formally prove that, within the set of separable configurations, the maximum value of our non-classicality measure is achieved over the set of quantum-classical states (i.e. states ρ which admit a statistical unravelling where each element of the associated ensemble is distinguishable via local measures on B).

  10. Local interaction simulation approach to modelling nonclassical, nonlinear elastic behavior in solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalerandi, Marco; Agostini, Valentina; Delsanto, Pier Paolo; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Johnson, Paul A

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies show that a broad category of materials share "nonclassical" nonlinear elastic behavior much different from "classical" (Landau-type) nonlinearity. Manifestations of "nonclassical" nonlinearity include stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasistatic experiments, and specific dependencies of the harmonic amplitudes with respect to the drive amplitude in dynamic wave experiments, which are remarkably different from those predicted by the classical theory. These materials have in common soft "bond" elements, where the elastic nonlinearity originates, contained in hard matter (e.g., a rock sample). The bond system normally comprises a small fraction of the total material volume, and can be localized (e.g., a crack in a solid) or distributed, as in a rock. In this paper a model is presented in which the soft elements are treated as hysteretic or reversible elastic units connected in a one-dimensional lattice to elastic elements (grains), which make up the hard matrix. Calculations are performed in the framework of the local interaction simulation approach (LISA). Experimental observations are well predicted by the model, which is now ready both for basic investigations about the physical origins of nonlinear elasticity and for applications to material damage diagnostics.

  11. The Linear Quadratic Gaussian Multistage Game with Nonclassical Information Pattern Using a Direct Solution Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Joshua William

    Game theory has application across multiple fields, spanning from economic strategy to optimal control of an aircraft and missile on an intercept trajectory. The idea of game theory is fascinating in that we can actually mathematically model real-world scenarios and determine optimal decision making. It may not always be easy to mathematically model certain real-world scenarios, nonetheless, game theory gives us an appreciation for the complexity involved in decision making. This complexity is especially apparent when the players involved have access to different information upon which to base their decision making (a nonclassical information pattern). Here we will focus on the class of adversarial two-player games (sometimes referred to as pursuit-evasion games) with nonclassical information pattern. We present a two-sided (simultaneous) optimization solution method for the two-player linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) multistage game. This direct solution method allows for further interpretation of each player's decision making (strategy) as compared to previously used formal solution methods. In addition to the optimal control strategies, we present a saddle point proof and we derive an expression for the optimal performance index value. We provide some numerical results in order to further interpret the optimal control strategies and to highlight real-world application of this game-theoretic optimal solution.

  12. Discriminating strength: a bona fide measure of non-classical correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, A; De Pasquale, A; Giovannetti, V [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Rigovacca, L [Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    A new measure of non-classical correlations is introduced and characterized. It tests the ability of using a state ρ of a composite system AB as a probe for a quantum illumination task (e.g. see Lloyd 2008 Science 321 1463), in which one is asked to remotely discriminate between the two following scenarios: (i) either nothing happens to the probe, or (ii) the subsystem A is transformed via a local unitary R{sub A} whose properties are partially unspecified when producing ρ. This new measure can be seen as the discrete version of the recently introduced interferometric power measure (Girolami et al 2013 e-print arXiv:1309.1472) and, at least for the case in which A is a qubit, it is shown to coincide (up to an irrelevant scaling factor) with the local quantum uncertainty measure of Girolami, Tufarelli and Adesso (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 240402). Analytical expressions are derived which allow us to formally prove that, within the set of separable configurations, the maximum value of our non-classicality measure is achieved over the set of quantum-classical states (i.e. states ρ which admit a statistical unravelling where each element of the associated ensemble is distinguishable via local measures on B). (paper)

  13. Discriminating strength: a bona fide measure of non-classical correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, A; De Pasquale, A; Giovannetti, V; Rigovacca, L

    2014-01-01

    A new measure of non-classical correlations is introduced and characterized. It tests the ability of using a state ρ of a composite system AB as a probe for a quantum illumination task (e.g. see Lloyd 2008 Science 321 1463), in which one is asked to remotely discriminate between the two following scenarios: (i) either nothing happens to the probe, or (ii) the subsystem A is transformed via a local unitary R A whose properties are partially unspecified when producing ρ. This new measure can be seen as the discrete version of the recently introduced interferometric power measure (Girolami et al 2013 e-print arXiv:1309.1472) and, at least for the case in which A is a qubit, it is shown to coincide (up to an irrelevant scaling factor) with the local quantum uncertainty measure of Girolami, Tufarelli and Adesso (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 240402). Analytical expressions are derived which allow us to formally prove that, within the set of separable configurations, the maximum value of our non-classicality measure is achieved over the set of quantum-classical states (i.e. states ρ which admit a statistical unravelling where each element of the associated ensemble is distinguishable via local measures on B). (paper)

  14. Effect of dielectric medium on the nonclassical properties of nonlinear sphere coherent states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Amooghorban

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of a medium with dissipation and dispersion and also the curvature of the physical space on the properties of the incident quantum states, we use the quantization of electromagnetic field based on phenomenological approach to obtain input-output relations between radiations on both sides of dielectric slab. By using these relations the fidelity, the Wigner function, and also the quantum correlation of the outgoing state through dielectric slab are obtained for a situation in which the rightward incident state is a nonlinear coherent state on a sphere and the leftward incident state is a vacuum state. Here, the incident states are considered monochromatic and the modeling of the medium is given by the Lorentz' model. Accordingly, we study nonclassical properties of the output states such as the quantum entanglement. It will be observed that the nonclassical properties of the outgoing states depend strongly on the optical property of the medium and also on the curvature of the physical state.

  15. Concrete damage diagnosed using the non-classical nonlinear acoustic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Zhou; Xiao-Zhou, Liu; Xiu-Fen, Gong; E, Nazarov V; Li, Ma

    2009-01-01

    It is known that the strength of concrete is seriously affected by damage and cracking. In this paper, six concrete samples under different damage levels are studied. The experimental results show a linear dependence of the resonance frequency shift on strain amplitude at the fundamental frequency, and approximate quadratic dependence of the amplitudes of the second and third harmonics on strain amplitude at the fundamental frequency as well. In addition, the amplitude of the third harmonics is shown to increase with the increase of damage level, which is even higher than that of the second harmonics in samples with higher damage levels. These are three properties of non-classical nonlinear acoustics. The nonlinear parameters increase from 10 6 to 10 8 with damage level, and are more sensitive to the damage level of the concrete than the linear parameters obtained by using traditional acoustics methods. So, this method based on non-classical nonlinear acoustics may provide a better means of non-destructive testing (NDT) of concrete and other porous materials

  16. Overview on methods for formulating explicit damping matrices for non-classically damped structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.

    1998-04-01

    In computing the dynamic response of a connected system with multiple components having dissimilar damping characteristics, which is often referred to as nonclassically damped system such as nuclear power plant piping systems supported by stiff structures, one needs to define the system-level damping based upon the damping information of components. This is frequently done in practice using approximate methods expressed as composite modal damping with weighting functions. However, when the difference in damping among components is substantial, the composite modal damping may become inappropriate in the characterization of the damping behavior of such systems. In recent years, several new methods have emerged with the expectation that they could produce more exact system-level damping for a group of nonclassically damped structures which are comprised of components that possess classical modal damping. In this paper, an overview is presented to examine these methods in the light of their theoretical basis, the technical merits, and practical applications. To this end, a synthesis method is described, which was shown to reduce to the other methods in the literature

  17. Nonclassical Ly6C− Monocytes Drive the Development of Inflammatory Arthritis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Misharin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Different subsets and/or polarized phenotypes of monocytes and macrophages may play distinct roles during the development and resolution of inflammation. Here, we demonstrate in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis that nonclassical Ly6C− monocytes are required for the initiation and progression of sterile joint inflammation. Moreover, nonclassical Ly6C− monocytes differentiate into inflammatory macrophages (M1, which drive disease pathogenesis and display plasticity during the resolution phase. During the development of arthritis, these cells polarize toward an alternatively activated phenotype (M2, promoting the resolution of joint inflammation. The influx of Ly6C− monocytes and their subsequent classical and then alternative activation occurs without changes in synovial tissue-resident macrophages, which express markers of M2 polarization throughout the course of the arthritis and attenuate joint inflammation during the initiation phase. These data suggest that circulating Ly6C− monocytes recruited to the joint upon injury orchestrate the development and resolution of autoimmune joint inflammation.

  18. Immunomodulation of classical and non-classical HLA molecules by ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Cristina E; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Carosella, Edgardo D

    2016-05-01

    Radiotherapy has been employed for the treatment of oncological patients for nearly a century, and together with surgery and chemotherapy, radiation oncology constitutes one of the three pillars of cancer therapy. Ionizing radiation has complex effects on neoplastic cells and on tumor microenvironment: beyond its action as a direct cytotoxic agent, tumor irradiation triggers a series of alterations in tumoral cells, which includes the de novo synthesis of particular proteins and the up/down-regulation of cell surface molecules. Additionally, ionizing radiation may induce the release of "danger signals" which may, in turn lead to cellular and molecular responses by the immune system. This immunomodulatory action of ionizing radiation highlights the importance of the combined use (radiotherapy plus immunotherapy) for cancer healing. Major histocompatibility complex antigens (also called Human Leukocyte Antigens, HLA in humans) are one of those molecules whose expression is modulated after irradiation. This review summarizes the modulatory properties of ionizing radiation on the expression of HLA class I (classical and non-classical) and class II molecules, with special emphasis in non-classical HLA-I molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nonclassicality threshold for the three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertesi, Tamas; Pal, Karoly F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary)

    2011-10-15

    The nonclassical properties of the noisy three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states, {rho}{sub v}=v|GHZ>nonclassical for the parameter range 1/2

  20. Loss of nonclassical properties of quantum states in linear phase-insensitive processes with arbitrary time-dependent parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    Conditions of disappearance of different 'nonclassical' properties (usual and high-order squeezing, sub-Poissonian statistics, negativity of s-parametrized quasidistributions) are derived for a quantum oscillator, whose evolution is governed by the standard master equation of quantum optics with arbitrary time-dependent coefficients.

  1. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Preface These proceedings arose from the 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques (SLOPOS12), which was held on Magnetic Island, North Queensland, Australia, between 1-6th August 2010. Meetings in the SLOPOS series are held (roughly) every three years and have now been held on (almost) all continents, indicating the truly international nature of the field. SLOPOS12 marked the second time that the Workshop had been held in the southern hemisphere, and the first time in Australia. SLOPOS12 attracted 122 delegates from 16 countries. Most encouraging was the attendance of 28 student delegates, and that about half of the overall delegates were early career researchers - a good sign for the future of our field. We also enjoyed the company of more than a dozen partners and families of delegates. In a slight departure from previous SLOPOS meetings, the International Advisory Committee approved a broader scope of scientific topics for inclusion in the program for the 2010 Workshop. This broader scope was intended to capture the applications of positrons in atomic, molecular and biomedical areas and was encapsulated in the byeline for SLOPOS-12: The 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques for Solids, Surfaces, Atoms and Molecules. The scientific and social program for the meeting ran over 6 days with delegates gathering on Sunday August 1st and departing on August 6th. The scientific program included plenary, invited, contributed and student lectures, the latter being the subject of a student prize. In all there were 53 oral presentations during the week. There were also two poster sessions, with 63 posters exhibited, and a prize was awarded for the best poster by a student delegate. The standard of the student presentations, both oral and posters, was outstanding, so much so that the judging panel recommended an additional number of prizes be awarded. Topics that were the focus of invited presentations and contributed papers at

  2. Preface: Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig R.; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2010-11-01

    We are pleased to publish this special issue of the journal Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors entitled "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics". This issue is an outgrowth of the international symposium "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics", which was held on February 25-27, 2009, in Kyoto, Japan. This symposium was organized by the "Stagnant Slab Project" (SSP) research group to present the results of the 5-year project and to facilitate intensive discussion with well-known international researchers in related fields. The SSP and the symposium were supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (16075101) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government. In the symposium, key issues discussed by participants included: transportation of water into the deep mantle and its role in slab-related dynamics; observational and experimental constraints on deep slab properties and the slab environment; modeling of slab stagnation to constrain its mechanisms in comparison with observational and experimental data; observational, experimental and modeling constraints on the fate of stagnant slabs; eventual accumulation of stagnant slabs on the core-mantle boundary and its geodynamic implications. This special issue is a collection of papers presented in the symposium and other papers related to the subject of the symposium. The collected papers provide an overview of the wide range of multidisciplinary studies of mantle dynamics, particularly in the context of subduction, stagnation, and the fate of deep slabs.

  3. Asian Urban Environment and Climate Change: Preface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Julian; Wu, Jianping

    2017-09-01

    The Asian Network on Climate Science and Technology (www.ancst.org), in collaboration with Tsinghua University, held a conference on environmental and climate science, air pollution, urban planning and transportation in July 2015, with over 40 Asian experts participating and presentation. This was followed by a meeting with local government and community experts on the practical conclusions of the conference. Of the papers presented at the conference a selection are included in this special issue of Journal of Environmental Science, which also reflects the conclusions of the Paris Climate meeting in Dec 2015, when the major nations of the world agreed about the compelling need to reduce the upward trend of adverse impacts associated with global climate change. Now is the time for urban areas to work out the serious consequences for their populations, but also how they should work together to take action to reduce global warming to benefit their own communities and also the whole planet! Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Non-classical crystallization of thin films and nanostructures in CVD and PVD processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Nong Moon

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to a recently-developed approach to the growth mechanism of thin films and nanostructures via chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Starting from the underlying principles of the low pressure synthesis of diamond films, it is shown that diamond growth occurs not by individual atoms but by charged nanoparticles. This newly-discovered growth mechanism turns out to be general to many CVD and some physical vapor deposition (PVD) processes. This non-classical crystallization is a new paradigm of crystal growth, with active research taking place on growth in solution, especially in biomineralization processes. Established understanding of the growth of thin films and nanostructures is based around processes involving individual atoms or molecules. According to the author’s research over the last two decades, however, the generation of charged gas phase nuclei is shown to be the rule rather than the exception in the CVD process, and charged gas phase nuclei are actively ...

  5. Nonclassical thermal-state superpositions: Analytical evolution law and decoherence behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiang-guo; Goan, Hsi-Sheng; Wang, Ji-suo; Zhang, Ran

    2018-03-01

    Employing the integration technique within normal products of bosonic operators, we present normal product representations of thermal-state superpositions and investigate their nonclassical features, such as quadrature squeezing, sub-Poissonian distribution, and partial negativity of the Wigner function. We also analytically and numerically investigate their evolution law and decoherence characteristics in an amplitude-decay model via the variations of the probability distributions and the negative volumes of Wigner functions in phase space. The results indicate that the evolution formulas of two thermal component states for amplitude decay can be viewed as the same integral form as a displaced thermal state ρ(V , d) , but governed by the combined action of photon loss and thermal noise. In addition, the larger values of the displacement d and noise V lead to faster decoherence for thermal-state superpositions.

  6. Non-classical homogeneous precipitation mediated by compositional fluctuations in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, S.; Zheng, Y.; Williams, R.E.A.; Devaraj, A.; Boyne, A.; Wang, Y.; Collins, P.C.; Viswanathan, G.B.; Tiley, J.S.; Muddle, B.C.; Banerjee, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents experimental evidence of homogeneous precipitation of the α-phase within the β matrix of a titanium alloy, and then accounts for this phase transformation by a new, non-classical mechanism involving compositional fluctuations, based on the pseudo-spinodal concept [1]. This mechanism involves local compositional fluctuations of small amplitude which, when of a certain magnitude, can favor thermodynamically certain regions of the β matrix to transform congruently to the α-phase but with compositions far from equilibrium. Subsequently, as measured experimentally using the tomographical atom probe, continuous diffusional partitioning between the parent β- and product α-phases during isothermal annealing drives their compositions towards equilibrium. For a given alloy composition, the decomposition mechanism is strongly temperature dependent, which would be expected for homogeneous precipitation via the compositional fluctuation-mediated mechanism but not necessarily for one based on classical nucleation theory. The applicability of this mechanism to phase transformations in general is noted.

  7. Non-classicality criteria: Glauber-Sudarshan P function and Mandel ? parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2018-01-01

    We calculate exactly the quantum mechanical, temporal Wigner quasiprobability density for a single-mode, degenerate parametric amplifier for a system in the Gaussian state, viz., a displaced-squeezed thermal state. The Wigner function allows us to calculate the fluctuations in photon number and the quadrature variance. We contrast the difference between the non-classicality criteria, which is independent of the displacement parameter ?, based on the Glauber-Sudarshan quasiprobability distribution ? and the classical/non-classical behaviour of the Mandel ? parameter, which depends strongly on ?. We find a phase transition as a function of ? such that at the critical point ?, ?, as a function of ?, goes from strictly classical, for ?, to a mixed classical/non-classical behaviour, for ?.

  8. Is the anomalous magnetic moment the consequence of a non-classical transformation for rotating frames?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisin, B V

    2002-01-01

    We consider the anomalous magnetic moment from an 'optical viewpoint' using an analogy between the motion of a particle with a magnetic moment in a magnetic field and the propagation of an optical pulse through an electro-optical crystal in an electric field. We show that an optical experiment similar to electron magnetic resonance is possible in some electro-optical crystals possessing the Faraday effect. This phenomenon is described by an analogue of the Pauli equation extracted from the Maxwell equation in the slowly varied amplitude approximation. In such an experiment the modulation by rotating fields plays a significant role. From the optical viewpoint the modulation assumes introducing the concept of a point rotation frame with the rotation axis at every point originated from the concept of the optical indicatrix (index ellipsoid). We discuss the connection between the non-classical transformation by transition from one such frame to another and an anomalous magnetic moment

  9. Multinomial Bayesian learning for modeling classical and nonclassical receptive field properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Haruo

    2012-08-01

    We study the interplay of Bayesian inference and natural image learning in a hierarchical vision system, in relation to the response properties of early visual cortex. We particularly focus on a Bayesian network with multinomial variables that can represent discrete feature spaces similar to hypercolumns combining minicolumns, enforce sparsity of activation to learn efficient representations, and explain divisive normalization. We demonstrate that maximal-likelihood learning using sampling-based Bayesian inference gives rise to classical receptive field properties similar to V1 simple cells and V2 cells, while inference performed on the trained network yields nonclassical context-dependent response properties such as cross-orientation suppression and filling in. Comparison with known physiological properties reveals some qualitative and quantitative similarities.

  10. New perspectives for "non-classical" molecules: heavy [1.1.1]propellanes of group 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nied, Dominik; Breher, Frank

    2011-07-01

    Heavy analogues of hydrocarbons intrigue chemists for a number of reasons, not least because they are often fundamentally different from their carbon counterparts and have remained a challenge for both experimentalists and theoreticians for a long time. The appealing properties of [1.1.1]propellanes of group 14 consisting of inverted tetrahedral bridgehead atoms can mainly be attributed to the particular bonding between the latter. More than 20 years after the first member of this family has been published, several contributions to this area have impressively extended the spectrum of these so-called main-group biradicaloids. Still in its infancy, further perspectives for these "non-classical" molecules are now arising. In this tutorial review, early findings and recent developments in this area are presented. Particular attention is drawn on the relationship of unusual structures and unusual reactivities of main-group element compounds in general and in particular of heavy propellane scaffolds of group 14.

  11. Entanglement swapping of noisy states: A kind of superadditivity in nonclassicality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal; Brukner, Caslav; Buzek, Vladimir; Zukowski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    We address the question as to whether an entangled state that satisfies local realism will give a violation of the same after entanglement swapping in a suitable scenario. We consider such a possibility as a kind of superadditivity in nonclassicality. Importantly, it will indicate that checking for violation of local realism, in the state obtained after entanglement swapping, can be a method for detecting entanglement in the input state of the swapping procedure. We investigate various entanglement swapping schemes, which involve mixed initial states. The strength of violation of local realism by the state obtained after entanglement swapping is compared with the one for the input states. We obtain a kind of superadditivity of violation of local realism for Werner states, consequent upon entanglement swapping involving Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-state measurements. We also discuss whether entanglement swapping of specific states may be used in quantum repeaters with a substantially reduced need to perform the entanglement distillation step

  12. Universality of Nonclassical Nonlinearity Applications to Non-Destructive Evaluations and Ultrasonic

    CERN Document Server

    Delsanto, Pier Paolo

    2006-01-01

    This book comes as a result of the research work developed in the framework of two international projects: the European Science Foundation supported program NATEMIS (Nonlinear Acoustic Techniques for Micro-Scale Damage Diagnostics) and a Los Alamos-based international network. The main topics of both the programs and the book cover the phenomenology, theory and applications of Nonclassical Nonlinearity (NCNL). NCNL techniques have been found in recent years to be extremely powerful (up to 1000 times more than the corresponding linear techniques) in a wide range of applications, including Material Characterization, Ultrasonics, Geophysics and Maintenance and Restoration of artifacts. These techniques are being adopted as the main inspection and research tool in another European program: AERONEWS (Health monitoring of aircraft by nonlinear elastic wave propagation). In the future, the proposed Universality of NCNL is expected to extend the range of applications to numerous other fields and scientific discipline...

  13. Contemporary commercial music (CCM) survey: who's teaching what in nonclassical music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVetri, Jeannette L; Weekly, Edrie Means

    2003-06-01

    Currently, there is an increasing interest in and demand for training in a wide variety of nonclassical music--contemporary commercial music (CCM)--and most particularly for music theater. A survey of singing teachers was completed to elucidate their training, education, and experience with and methods of teaching CCM. Teachers were at colleges, universities, and conservatories as well as in private studios, both nationally and in several foreign countries. A substantial percentage of those teaching CCM had neither formal education in teaching it nor professional experience. Many of the respondents indicated conflict between classical and CCM styles. Respondents were generally familiar with voice science and voice medicine as well as certain CCM terminology. Teachers expressed an interest in obtaining more information, with an emphasis on healthy vocal production. These results are discussed, as well as implications for the singing teacher who desires specific training to teach CCM.

  14. Higher-order nonclassical effects generated by multiple-photon annihilation-then-creation and creation-then-annihilation coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Hong-Chun; Xiao Jin; Xiong Chao; Zhu Xi-Fang; Xu Xue-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    We explore two observable nonclassical properties of quantum states generated by repeatedly operating annihilation-then-creation (AC) and creation-then-annihilation (CA) on the coherent state, respectively, such as higher-order sub-Poissonian statistics and higher-order squeezing-enhanced effect. The corresponding analytical expressions are derived in detail depending on m . By numerically comparing those quantum properties, it is found that these states above have very different nonclassical properties and nonclassicality is exhibited more strongly after AC operation than after CA operation. (paper)

  15. Investigating β-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophy through computational approach: classical and non-classical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilimeybodi, Ali; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Sharif-Kashani, Babak

    2018-07-01

    The chronic stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors plays a crucial role in cardiac hypertrophy and its progression to heart failure. In β-adrenergic signaling, in addition to the well-established classical pathway, Gs/AC/cAMP/PKA, activation of non-classical pathways such as Gi/PI3K/Akt/GSK3β and Gi/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK contribute in cardiac hypertrophy. The signaling network of β-adrenergic-induced hypertrophy is very complex and not fully understood. So, we use a computational approach to investigate the dynamic response and contribution of β-adrenergic mediators in cardiac hypertrophy. The proposed computational model provides insights into the effects of β-adrenergic classical and non-classical pathways on the activity of hypertrophic transcription factors CREB and GATA4. The results illustrate that the model captures the dynamics of the main signaling mediators and reproduces the experimental observations well. The results also show that despite the low portion of β2 receptors out of total cardiac β-adrenergic receptors, their contribution in the activation of hypertrophic mediators and regulation of β-adrenergic-induced hypertrophy is noticeable and variations in β1/β2 receptors ratio greatly affect the ISO-induced hypertrophic response. The model results illustrate that GSK3β deactivation after β-adrenergic receptor stimulation has a major influence on CREB and GATA4 activation and consequent cardiac hypertrophy. Also, it is found through sensitivity analysis that PKB (Akt) activation has both pro-hypertrophic and anti-hypertrophic effects in β-adrenergic signaling.

  16. PREFACE: Statistical Physics of Complex Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestanian, R.; Khajehpour, M. R. H.; Kolahchi, M. R.; Rouhani, S.

    2005-04-01

    The field of complex fluids is a rapidly developing, highly interdisciplinary field that brings together people from a plethora of backgrounds such as mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, materials science, applied mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology. In this melting pot of science, the traditional boundaries of various scientific disciplines have been set aside. It is this very property of the field that has guaranteed its richness and prosperity since the final decade of the 20th century and into the 21st. The C3 Commission of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), which is the commission for statistical physics that organizes the international STATPHYS conferences, encourages various, more focused, satellite meetings to complement the main event. For the STATPHYS22 conference in Bangalore (July 2004), Iran was recognized by the STATPHYS22 organizers as suitable to host such a satellite meeting and the Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS) was chosen to be the site of this meeting. It was decided to organize a meeting in the field of complex fluids, which is a fairly developed field in Iran. This international meeting, and an accompanying summer school, were intended to boost international connections for both the research groups working in Iran, and several other groups working in the Middle East, South Asia and North Africa. The meeting, entitled `Statistical Physics of Complex Fluids' was held at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS) in Zanjan, Iran, from 27 June to 1 July 2004. The main topics discussed at the meeting included: biological statistical physics, wetting and microfluidics, transport in complex media, soft and granular matter, and rheology of complex fluids. At this meeting, 22 invited lectures by eminent scientists were attended by 107 participants from different countries. The poster session consisted of 45 presentations which, in addition to the main topics of the

  17. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    compressible fluids Kerstin Falk and Klaus Mecke Wetting, roughness and flow boundary conditions Olga I Vinogradova and Aleksey V Belyaev Molecular transport and flow past hard and soft surfaces: computer simulation of model systems F Léonforte, J Servantie, C Pastorino, and M Müller Simulations of slip flow on nanobubble-laden surfaces J Hyväluoma, C Kunert and J Harting Electrophoretic transport of biomolecules across liquid-liquid interfaces Thomas Hahn, Götz Münchow and Steffen Hardt Wetting morphologies and their transitions in grooved substrates Ralf Seemann, Martin Brinkmann, Stephan Herminghaus, Krishnacharya Khare, Bruce M Law, Sean McBride, Konstantina Kostourou, Evgeny Gurevich, Stefan Bommer, Carsten Herrmann and Dominik Michler Imbibition in mesoporous silica: rheological concepts and experiments on water and a liquid crystal Simon Gruener, and Patrick Huber Theory and simulations of water flow through carbon nanotubes: prospects and pitfalls Douwe Jan Bonthuis, Klaus F Rinne, Kerstin Falk, C Nadir Kaplan, Dominik Horinek, A Nihat Berker, Lydéric Bocquet, and Roland R Netz Structure and flow of droplets on solid surfaces P Müller-Buschbaum, D Magerl, R Hengstler, J-F Moulin, V Körstgens, A Diethert, J Perlich, S V Roth, M Burghammer, C Riekel, M Gross, F Varnik, P Uhlmann, M Stamm, J M Feldkamp and C G Schroer Stability and dynamics of droplets on patterned substrates: insights from experiments and lattice Boltzmann simulations F Varnik, M Gross, N Moradi, G Zikos, P Uhlmann, P Müller-Buschbaum, D Magerl, D Raabe, I Steinbach and M Stamm Micro-capsules in shear flow R Finken, S Kessler and U Seifert Micro-rheology on (polymer-grafted) colloids using optical tweezers C Gutsche, M M Elmahdy, K Kegler, I Semenov, T Stangner, O Otto, O Ueberschär, U F Keyser, M Krueger, M Rauscher, R Weeber, J Harting, Y W Kim, V Lobaskin, R R Netz, and F Kremer Dynamics of colloids in confined geometries L Almenar and M Rauscher Dynamics of red blood cells and vesicles in

  18. PREFACE: International Conference on Magnetism (ICM 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, Gernot; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.; Loidl, Alois; Pruschke, Thomas; Richter, Manuel; Schultz, Ludwig; Sürgers, Christoph; Wosnitza, Jochen

    2010-11-01

    The International Conference on Magnetism 2009 (ICM 2009) was held in Karlsruhe, Germany, from 26-31 July 2009. Previous conferences in this series were organized in Edingburgh, United Kingdom (1991), Warsaw, Poland (1994), Cairns, Australia (1997), Recife, Brazil (2000), Rome, Italy (2003) and Kyoto, Japan (2006). As with previous ICM conferences, the annual Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES) was integrated into ICM 2009. Conference photograph Participants of ICM 2009 in front of the Stadthalle Karlsruhe. Topics of ICM 2009 were: Strongly Correlated Electron Systems; Quantum and Classical Spin Systems; Magnetic Structures and Interactions; Magnetization Dynamics and Micromagnetics; Spin-Dependent Transport; Spin Electronics; Magnetic Thin Films, Particles, and Nanostructures; Soft and Hard Magnetic Materials and their Applications; Novel Materials and Device Applications; Magnetic Recording and Memories; Measuring Techniques and Instrumentation, as well as Interdisciplinary Topics. We are grateful to the International Advisory Committee for their help in putting up an attractive program encompassing practically all aspects of magnetism, both experimentally and theoretically. The program committee comprised A Loidl, Germany (Chair), M A Continentino, Brazil, D E Dahlberg, USA, D Givord, France, G Güntherodt, Germany, H Mikeska, Germany, D Kaczorowski, Poland, Ching-Ray Chang, South Korea, I Mertig, Germany, D Vollhardt, Germany and E F Wassermann, Germany was also head of the National Organizing Committee. His help is gratefully acknowledged. Photographs Left: Poster session in the Stadthalle Karlsruhe. Upper right: H v Löhneysen (Conference Chairman), Nobel Laureates A Fert and P. Grünberg, E Umbach (Chairman of the Executive Board of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe) (left to right). Lower right: Nobel Laureate P W Anderson. The scientific program started on Monday 27 July 2009 with opening addresses by the Conference Chairman, the deputy

  19. PREFACE: Dielectrics 2009: Measurement Analysis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Alun; Williams, Graham

    2009-07-01

    the Website of the IOP Dielectrics Group by Professor John Fothergill. The 2009 meeting of The Dielectrics Group of the IOP at Reading was therefore held to celebrate 40 years of coordinated dielectrics research activity in the UK and beyond, as presented at these DDG and Dielectrics Society Meetings. To reflect the range of topics addressed since the first DDG meeting in 1968, the organizing committee chose to break away from the tradition of a strongly- themed event and, rather, adopted a general, inclusive approach, albeit based upon four broad technical areas: Theme 1: Molecular and bulk relaxation processes Theme 2: Space charge and charge transport in insulators Theme 3: Functional materials Theme 4: Bio-dielectrics and complex systems. The result was a highly successful conference that attracted some 90 delegates from 11 countries, giving the event a truly international flavour, and which included both regular and new attendees. Consequently, the organizing committee would like to thank, our colleagues at the IOP, the invited speakers, our sponsors at National Grid, EDF Energy and Dow Wire and Cables and all the delegates for making the event such a success. Professor Alun Vaughan, Professor Graham Williams

  20. Preface: Introductory Remarks: Linear Scaling Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, D. R.; Fattebert, J.-L.; Gillan, M. J.; Haynes, P. D.; Skylaris, C.-K.

    2008-07-01

    Haynes, Chris-Kriton Skylaris, Arash Mostofi and Mike Payne A miscellaneous overview of SIESTA algorithms Jose M Soler Wavelets as a basis set for electronic structure calculations and electrostatic problems Stefan Goedecker Wavelets as a basis set for linear scaling electronic structure calculationsMark Rayson O(N) Krylov subspace method for large-scale ab initio electronic structure calculations Taisuke Ozaki Linear scaling calculations with the divide-and-conquer approach and with non-orthogonal localized orbitals Weitao Yang Toward efficient wavefunction based linear scaling energy minimization Valery Weber Accurate O(N) first-principles DFT calculations using finite differences and confined orbitals Jean-Luc Fattebert Linear-scaling methods in dynamics simulations or beyond DFT and ground state properties An O(N) time-domain algorithm for TDDFT Guan Hua Chen Local correlation theory and electronic delocalization Joseph Subotnik Ab initio molecular dynamics with linear scaling: foundations and applications Eiji Tsuchida Towards a linear scaling Car-Parrinello-like approach to Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics Thomas Kühne, Michele Ceriotti, Matthias Krack and Michele Parrinello Partial linear scaling for quantum Monte Carlo calculations on condensed matter Mike Gillan Exact embedding of local defects in crystals using maximally localized Wannier functions Eric Cancès Faster GW calculations in larger model structures using ultralocalized nonorthogonal Wannier functions Paolo Umari Other approaches for linear-scaling, including methods formetals Partition-of-unity finite element method for large, accurate electronic-structure calculations of metals John E Pask and Natarajan Sukumar Semiclassical approach to density functional theory Kieron Burke Ab initio transport calculations in defected carbon nanotubes using O(N) techniques Blanca Biel, F J Garcia-Vidal, A Rubio and F Flores Large-scale calculations with the tight-binding (screened) KKR method Rudolf Zeller

  1. An example of enhancement of a non-classical feature of a light beam by mixing with another classical light beam using a beam splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Hari; Mishra, Devendra Kumar

    2005-01-01

    We present here an example where a non-classical feature of a light beam is enhanced simply by mixing with another classical coherent light beam using a beam splitter. This non-classical feature is amplitude-squared squeezing of a Gaussian light beam expressed by a negative value of Y e or a negative value of the normalized quantity W e which can become more negative on enhancement. Here, these values comprise the density, annihilation and creation operators, respectively

  2. Sustainability in the Design, Synthesis and Analysis of Chemical Engineering Processes 1st edition (Preface)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book preface explains the needs found by the book editors for assembling the state of the art of technical and scientific knowledge relevant to chemical engineering, sustainability, and sustainable uses of wastes and materials management, and to do so in an accessible and c...

  3. Preface [Special issue on dataTEL – Data Supported Research in Technology-Enhanced Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Verbert, Katrien; Manouselis, Nikos; Vuorikari, Riina; Wolpers, Martin; Lindstaedt, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Drachsler, H., Verbert, K., Manouselis, N., Vuorikari, R., Wolpers, M., & Lindstaedt, S. (2012). Preface [Special issue on dataTEL – Data Supported Research in Technology-Enhanced Learning]. International Journal Technology Enhanced Learning, Vol. 4, Nos. 1/2, 2012.

  4. PREFACE: XXX International Conference on Interaction of Intense Energy Fluxes with Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortov, V. E.; Khishchenko, K. V.; Karamurzov, B. S.; Efremov, V. P.; Sultanov, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is a preface to the proceedings of the XXX International Conference on Interaction of Intense Energy Fluxes with Matter, which was held in Elbrus settlement, in the Kabardino-Balkar Republic of the Russian Federation, from March 1-6, 2015.

  5. Improved CORF model of simple cell combined with non-classical receptive field and its application on edge detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Chai, Guobei; Liu, Wei; Bao, Wenzhuo; Zhao, Xiaoning; Ming, Delie

    2018-02-01

    Simple cells in primary visual cortex are believed to extract local edge information from a visual scene. In this paper, inspired by different receptive field properties and visual information flow paths of neurons, an improved Combination of Receptive Fields (CORF) model combined with non-classical receptive fields was proposed to simulate the responses of simple cell's receptive fields. Compared to the classical model, the proposed model is able to better imitate simple cell's physiologic structure with consideration of facilitation and suppression of non-classical receptive fields. And on this base, an edge detection algorithm as an application of the improved CORF model was proposed. Experimental results validate the robustness of the proposed algorithm to noise and background interference.

  6. Qubit-oscillator systems in the ultrastrong-coupling regime and their potential for preparing nonclassical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco; Ashhab, Sahel

    2011-03-01

    We consider a system composed of a two-level system (i.e. a qubit) and a harmonic oscillator in the ultrastrong-coupling regime, where the coupling strength is comparable to the qubit and oscillator energy scales. We explore the possibility of preparing nonclassical states in this system, especially in the ground state of the combined system. The nonclassical states that we consider include squeezed states, Schrodinger-cat states and entangled states. We also analyze the nature of the change in the ground state as the coupling strength is increased, going from a separable ground state in the absence of coupling to a highly entangled ground state in the case of very strong coupling. Reference: S. Ashhab and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. A 81, 042311 (2010). We thank support from DARPA, AFOSR, NSA, LPS, ARO, NSF, MEXT, JSPS, FIRST, and JST.

  7. PREFACE: International Conference on Structural Nano Composites (NANOSTRUC 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuguna, James

    2012-09-01

    Dear Colleagues It is a great pleasure to welcome you to NanoStruc2012 at Cranfield University. The purpose of the 2012 International Conference on Structural Nano Composites (NanoStruc2012) is to promote activities in various areas of materials and structures by providing a forum for exchange of ideas, presentation of technical achievements and discussion of future directions. NanoStruc brings together an international community of experts to discuss the state-of-the-art, new research results, perspectives of future developments, and innovative applications relevant to structural materials, engineering structures, nanocomposites, modelling and simulations, and their related application areas. The conference is split in 7 panel sessions, Metallic Nanocomposites and Coatings, Silica based Nanocomposites, safty of Nanomaterials, Carboin based Nanocomposites, Multscale Modelling, Bio materials and Application of Nanomaterials. All accepted Papers will be published in the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), and included in the NanoStruc online digital library. The abstracts will be indexed in Scopus, Compedex, Inspec, INIS (International Nuclear Information System), Chemical Abstracts, NASA Astrophysics Data System and Polymer Library. Before ending this message, I would like to acknowledge the hard work, professional skills and efficiency of the team which ensured the general organisation. As a conclusion, I would like to Welcome you to the Nanostruc2012 and wish you a stimulating Conference and a wonderful time. On behalf of the scientific committee, Signature James Njuguna Conference Chair The PDF of this preface also contains committee listings and associates logos.

  8. Preface of the Special Issue: “Recent CMV Research”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla Dufrene

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This Viruses Special Issue on Recent Cytomegalovirus (CMV Research is dedicated to the patients who have suffered CMV infection and to their parents, families and caregivers. We are including as a Preface to this issue the insights of a young college student, Kayla Dufrene, who suffered congenital CMV infection and contacted me and Dr. Roberta DeBiasi, to interview us to learn more about CMV. As I was just returning to the DC area from the 4th Congenital CMV Conference in San Francisco, I was particularly receptive to her request. When we met Kayla, we were both impressed with her personal strength and ability to cope with her disabilities and needed medical treatments. Despite it all, Kayla has an exceptionally positive outlook on life, feeling even lucky. She has not only coped, but has transcended her difficulties. I am proud to say that she was on the Dean’s List (Figure 1 at Gallaudet University. Ultimately, her hope lies in our fields’ efforts to develop a vaccine to prevent CMV disease in other children.

  9. Non-Classical C–H···X Hydrogen Bonding and Its Role in Asymmetric Organocatalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Ajitha, Manjaly John

    2016-08-17

    Non-classical hydrogen bonds (NCHBs) have attracted significant interest in the past decade particularly because of their important role in asymmetric catalytic systems. These weak interactions (< 4 kcal/mol) offer much flexibility in the preorganization of molecular entities required to achieve high enantioselectivity. Herein, we review some recent important organocatalytic asymmetric reactions where a NCHB serves as a critical factor in determining the stereoselectivity.

  10. Nonclassicality and decoherence of photon-added squeezed coherent Schrödinger kitten states in a Kerr medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, R.; Yogesh, V.

    2018-01-01

    We study the nonclassicality of the evolution of a superposition of an arbitrary number of photon-added squeezed coherent Schrödinger cat states in a nonlinear Kerr medium. The nonlinearity of the medium gives rise to the periodicities of the quantities such as the Wehrl entropy SQ and the negativity δW of the W-distribution, and a series of local minima of these quantities arise at the rational submultiples of the said period. At these local minima the evolving state coincides with the transient Yurke-Stoler type of photon-added squeezed kitten states, which, for the choice of the phase space variables reflecting their macroscopic nature, show extremely short-lived behavior. Proceeding further we provide the closed form tomograms, which furnish the alternate description of these short-lived states. The increasing complexity in the kitten formations induces more number of interference terms that trigger more quantumness of the corresponding states. The nonclassical depth of the photon-added squeezed kitten states are observed to be of maximum possible value. Employing the Lindblad master equation approach we study the amplitude and the phase damping models for the initial state considered here. In the phase damping model the nonclassicality is not completely erased even in the long time limit when the dynamical quantities, such as the negativity δW and the tomogram, assume nontrivial asymptotic values.

  11. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Squeezed and Non-classical Light

    CERN Document Server

    Pike, E; Squeezed and Non-classical Light

    1988-01-01

    The recent generation in the laboratory of phase squeezed and intensity squeezed light beams has brought to fruition the theoretical predictions of such non-classical phenomena which have been made and developed in recent years by a number of workers in the field of quantum optics. A vigorous development is now underway of both theory and experiment and the first measurements have been coi:Jfirmed and extended already in some half dozen laboratories. Although the fields of application of these novellight sources are as yet somewhat hazy in our minds and some inspired thinking is required along these lines, the pace and excitement of the research is very clear. It is to he hoped that the new possibilities of: making measurements below the quantum shot noise lirnit which is made possible by these squeezed states of light willlead to further fundamental advances in the near future. In this NATO ARW a number of the leaders in the field met in the extremely pleasant surroundings of Cortina d'Ampezzo and th...

  12. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Prenucleation Clusters, Classical and Non-Classical Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2015-07-20

    Recent observations of prenucleation species and multi-stage crystal nucleation processes challenge the long-established view on the thermodynamics of crystal formation. Here, we review and generalize extensions to classical nucleation theory. Going beyond the conventional implementation as has been used for more than a century now, nucleation inhibitors, precursor clusters and non-classical nucleation processes are rationalized as well by analogous concepts based on competing interface and bulk energy terms. This is illustrated by recent examples of species formed prior to/instead of crystal nucleation and multi-step nucleation processes. Much of the discussed insights were obtained from molecular simulation using advanced sampling techniques, briefly summarized herein for both nucleation-controlled and diffusion-controlled aggregate formation. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

  13. Imidazolines as Non-Classical Bioisosteres of N-Acyl homoserine lactones and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Montenegro-Sustaita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of selected 2-substituted imidazolines were synthesized in moderate to excellent yields by a modification of protocols reported in the literature. They were evaluated as potential non-classical bioisosteres of AHL with the aim of counteracting bacterial pathogenicity. Imidazolines 18a, 18e and 18f at various concentrations reduced the violacein production by Chromobacterium violaceum, suggesting an anti-quorum sensing profile against Gram-negative bacteria. Imidazoline 18b did not affect the production of violacein, but had a bacteriostatic effect at 100 µM and a bactericidal effect at 1 mM. Imidazoline 18a bearing a hexyl phenoxy moiety was the most active compound of the series, rendering a 72% inhibitory effect of quorum sensing at 100 µM. Imidazoline 18f bearing a phenyl nonamide substituent presented an inhibitory effect on quorum sensing at a very low concentration (1 nM, with a reduction percentage of 28%. This compound showed an irregular performance, decreasing inhibition at concentrations higher than 10 µM, until reaching 100 µM, at which concentration it increased the inhibitory effect with a 49% reduction percentage. When evaluated on Serratia marcescens, compound 18f inhibited the production of prodigiosin by 40% at 100 μM.

  14. Chem/bio sensing with non-classical light and integrated photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, J; Schwartz, M; Rengstl, U; Jetter, M; Michler, P; Mizaikoff, B

    2018-01-29

    Modern quantum technology currently experiences extensive advances in applicability in communications, cryptography, computing, metrology and lithography. Harnessing this technology platform for chem/bio sensing scenarios is an appealing opportunity enabling ultra-sensitive detection schemes. This is further facilliated by the progress in fabrication, miniaturization and integration of visible and infrared quantum photonics. Especially, the combination of efficient single-photon sources together with waveguiding/sensing structures, serving as active optical transducer, as well as advanced detector materials is promising integrated quantum photonic chem/bio sensors. Besides the intrinsic molecular selectivity and non-destructive character of visible and infrared light based sensing schemes, chem/bio sensors taking advantage of non-classical light sources promise sensitivities beyond the standard quantum limit. In the present review, recent achievements towards on-chip chem/bio quantum photonic sensing platforms based on N00N states are discussed along with appropriate recognition chemistries, facilitating the detection of relevant (bio)analytes at ultra-trace concentration levels. After evaluating recent developments in this field, a perspective for a potentially promising sensor testbed is discussed for reaching integrated quantum sensing with two fiber-coupled GaAs chips together with semiconductor quantum dots serving as single-photon sources.

  15. Algebraic and group treatments to nonlinear displaced number states and their nonclassicality features: A new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asili Firouzabadi, N; Tavassoly, M K; Faghihi, M J

    2015-01-01

    Recently, nonlinear displaced number states (NDNSs) have been manually introduced, in which the deformation function f(n) has been artificially added to the previously well-known displaced number states (DNSs). Indeed, just a simple comparison has been performed between the standard coherent state and nonlinear coherent state for the formation of NDNSs. In the present paper, after expressing enough physical motivation of our procedure, four distinct classes of NDNSs are presented by applying algebraic and group treatments. To achieve this purpose, by considering the DNSs and recalling the nonlinear coherent states formalism, the NDNSs are logically defined through an algebraic consideration. In addition, by using a particular class of Gilmore–Perelomov-type of SU(1, 1) and a class of SU(2) coherent states, the NDNSs are introduced via group-theoretical approach. Then, in order to examine the nonclassical behavior of these states, sub-Poissonian statistics by evaluating Mandel parameter and Wigner quasi-probability distribution function associated with the obtained NDNSs are discussed, in detail. (paper)

  16. On Some Nonclassical Algebraic Properties of Interval-Valued Fuzzy Soft Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interval-valued fuzzy soft sets realize a hybrid soft computing model in a general framework. Both Molodtsov’s soft sets and interval-valued fuzzy sets can be seen as special cases of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets. In this study, we first compare four different types of interval-valued fuzzy soft subsets and reveal the relations among them. Then we concentrate on investigating some nonclassical algebraic properties of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets under the soft product operations. We show that some fundamental algebraic properties including the commutative and associative laws do not hold in the conventional sense, but hold in weaker forms characterized in terms of the relation =L. We obtain a number of algebraic inequalities of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets characterized by interval-valued fuzzy soft inclusions. We also establish the weak idempotent law and the weak absorptive law of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets using interval-valued fuzzy soft J-equal relations. It is revealed that the soft product operations ∧ and ∨ of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets do not always have similar algebraic properties. Moreover, we find that only distributive inequalities described by the interval-valued fuzzy soft L-inclusions hold for interval-valued fuzzy soft sets.

  17. On some nonclassical algebraic properties of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Feng, Feng; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Interval-valued fuzzy soft sets realize a hybrid soft computing model in a general framework. Both Molodtsov's soft sets and interval-valued fuzzy sets can be seen as special cases of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets. In this study, we first compare four different types of interval-valued fuzzy soft subsets and reveal the relations among them. Then we concentrate on investigating some nonclassical algebraic properties of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets under the soft product operations. We show that some fundamental algebraic properties including the commutative and associative laws do not hold in the conventional sense, but hold in weaker forms characterized in terms of the relation = L . We obtain a number of algebraic inequalities of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets characterized by interval-valued fuzzy soft inclusions. We also establish the weak idempotent law and the weak absorptive law of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets using interval-valued fuzzy soft J-equal relations. It is revealed that the soft product operations ∧ and ∨ of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets do not always have similar algebraic properties. Moreover, we find that only distributive inequalities described by the interval-valued fuzzy soft L-inclusions hold for interval-valued fuzzy soft sets.

  18. Skeletal muscle wasting: new role of nonclassical renin-angiotensin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Rivera, Juan C; Garcia, Dominga

    2017-05-01

    Skeletal muscle can be affected by many physiological and pathological conditions that contribute to the development of muscle weakness, including skeletal muscle loss, inflammatory processes, or fibrosis. Therefore, research into therapeutic treatment alternatives or alleviation of these effects on skeletal muscle is of great importance. Recent studies have shown that angiotensin (1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] - a vasoactive peptide of the nonclassical axis in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) - and its Mas receptor are expressed in skeletal muscle. Ang-(1-7), through its Mas receptor, prevents or diminishes deleterious effects induced by skeletal muscle disease or injury. Specifically, the Ang-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis modulates molecular mechanisms involved in muscle mass regulation, such as the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, the insulin-like growth factor type 1/Akt (protein kinase B) pathway, or myonuclear apoptosis, and also inflammation and fibrosis pathways. Although further research into this topic and the possible side effects of Ang-(1-7) is necessary, these findings are promising, and suggest that the Ang-(1-7)-Mas axis can be considered a possible therapeutic target for treating patients with muscular disorders.

  19. On Some Nonclassical Algebraic Properties of Interval-Valued Fuzzy Soft Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Interval-valued fuzzy soft sets realize a hybrid soft computing model in a general framework. Both Molodtsov's soft sets and interval-valued fuzzy sets can be seen as special cases of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets. In this study, we first compare four different types of interval-valued fuzzy soft subsets and reveal the relations among them. Then we concentrate on investigating some nonclassical algebraic properties of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets under the soft product operations. We show that some fundamental algebraic properties including the commutative and associative laws do not hold in the conventional sense, but hold in weaker forms characterized in terms of the relation =L. We obtain a number of algebraic inequalities of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets characterized by interval-valued fuzzy soft inclusions. We also establish the weak idempotent law and the weak absorptive law of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets using interval-valued fuzzy soft J-equal relations. It is revealed that the soft product operations ∧ and ∨ of interval-valued fuzzy soft sets do not always have similar algebraic properties. Moreover, we find that only distributive inequalities described by the interval-valued fuzzy soft L-inclusions hold for interval-valued fuzzy soft sets. PMID:25143964

  20. Does Wearing Textured Insoles during Non-class Time Improve Proprioception in Professional Dancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, N; Tirosh, O; Adams, R; Karin, J; Waddington, G

    2015-11-01

    This study sought to determine whether textured insoles inserted in the sports shoes of young dancers improved their inversion and eversion ankle movement discrimination. 26 ballet dancers (14 female, 12 male) from the Australian Ballet School, ages 14-19 years, were divided into 2 groups according to sex and class levels. During the first 4 weeks, the first intervention group (GRP1) was asked to wear textured insoles in their sports shoes during non-class periods, and the second intervention group (GRP2) followed standard practice. In the next 4 weeks, GRP2 was asked to wear the textured insoles and GRP1 did not wear the textured insoles. Participants were tested pre-intervention, after 4 weeks, and at 8 weeks for both inversion and eversion ankle discrimination. In both inversion and eversion testing positions, interaction was found between the 2 groups and the 3 testing times (p<0.001), with significant differences between the first testing and the second testing (p=0.038 and p=0.019, respectively), and between the third testing and the second testing (p=0.003 and p=0.029, respectively). In conclusion, the stimulation to the proprioceptive system arising from textured insoles worn for 4 weeks was sufficient to improve the ankle proprioception of ballet dancers, in both inversion and eversion movements. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Prevalence of Nonclassic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in Turkish Children Presenting with Premature Pubarche, Hirsutism, or Oligomenorrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Binay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH, caused by mutations in the gene encoding 21-hydroxylase, is a common autosomal recessive disorder. In the present work, our aim was to determine the prevalence of NCAH presenting as premature pubarche (PP, hirsutism, or polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS and to evaluate the molecular spectrum of CYP21A2 mutations in NCAH patients. Methods. A total of 126 patients (122 females, 4 males with PP, hirsutism, or PCOS were included in the present study. All patients underwent an ACTH stimulation test. NCAH was considered to be present when the stimulated 17-hydroxyprogesterone plasma level was >10 ng/mL. Results. Seventy-one of the 126 patients (56% presented with PP, 29 (23% with PCOS, and 26 (21% with hirsutism. Six patients (4,7% were diagnosed with NCAH based on mutational analysis. Four different mutations (Q318X, P30L, V281L, and P453S were found in six NCAH patients. One patient with NCAH was a compound heterozygote for this mutation, and five were heterozygous. Conclusion. NCAH should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with PP, hirsutism, and PCOS, especially in countries in which consanguineous marriages are prevalent.

  2. Propagation of biochirality: crossovers and nonclassical crystallization kinetics of aspartic acid in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tu; Lin, Yu Kun; Tsai, Ya Chung; Lee, Hung Lin

    2013-11-01

    All experimental procedures discussed could be treated as a screening tool for probing the existence of molecular association among the chiral molecules and the solvent system. The molecular association phases of a racemic conglomerate solution (CS) and a racemic compound solution (RCS), and the templating effect of aspartic acid solid surface were observed to minimize the chance of redissolving racemic conglomerate and racemic compound aspartic acid in water and reforming an RCS in crossovers experiments. Only 1 %wt% of l-aspartic acid was adequate enough to induce a transformation from a racemic compound aspartic acid to a racemic conglomerate aspartic acid. This would make the propagation of biochirality more feasible and sound. However, tetrapeptide, (l-aspartic acid)4 , failed to induce enantioseparation as templates purely by crystallization. Nonclassical crystallization theory was needed to take into account the existence of a CS. Fundamental parameters of the crystallization kinetics such as the induction time, interfacial energy, Gibbs energetic barrier, nucleation rate, and critical size of stable nuclei of: (i) racemic compound aspartic acid, (ii) racemic compound aspartic acid seeded with 1 %wt% l-aspartic acid, (iii) racemic conglomerate aspartic acid, and (iv) l-aspartic acid were evaluated and compared with different initial supersaturation ratios. Morphological studies of crystals grown from the crystallization kinetics were also carried out. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Identification and estimation of nonlinear models using two samples with nonclassical measurement errors

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, Raymond J.

    2010-05-01

    This paper considers identification and estimation of a general nonlinear Errors-in-Variables (EIV) model using two samples. Both samples consist of a dependent variable, some error-free covariates, and an error-prone covariate, for which the measurement error has unknown distribution and could be arbitrarily correlated with the latent true values; and neither sample contains an accurate measurement of the corresponding true variable. We assume that the regression model of interest - the conditional distribution of the dependent variable given the latent true covariate and the error-free covariates - is the same in both samples, but the distributions of the latent true covariates vary with observed error-free discrete covariates. We first show that the general latent nonlinear model is nonparametrically identified using the two samples when both could have nonclassical errors, without either instrumental variables or independence between the two samples. When the two samples are independent and the nonlinear regression model is parameterized, we propose sieve Quasi Maximum Likelihood Estimation (Q-MLE) for the parameter of interest, and establish its root-n consistency and asymptotic normality under possible misspecification, and its semiparametric efficiency under correct specification, with easily estimated standard errors. A Monte Carlo simulation and a data application are presented to show the power of the approach.

  4. Non-classical neutron beams for fundamental and solid state research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauch, H.

    2008-01-01

    The curious dual nature of the neutron, sometimes a particle, sometimes a wave, is wonderfully manifested in the various non-local interference and quantum contextuality effects observed in neutron interferometry. Non-classical states may become useful for novel fundamental and solid state research. Here we discuss unavoidable quantum losses as they appear in neutron phase-echo and spin rotation experiments and we show how entanglement effects in a single particle system demonstrate quantum contextuality. In all cases of interactions, parasitic beams are produced which cannot be recombined completely with the original beam. This means that a complete reconstruction of the original state would, in principle, be impossible which causes a kind of intrinsic irreversibility. Even small interaction potentials can have huge effects when they are applied in quantum Zeno-like experiments. Recently, it has been shown that an entanglement between external and internal degrees of freedom exists even in single particle systems. This contextuality phenomenon also shows that a quantum system carries much more information than usually extracted. The path towards advanced neutron quantum optics will be discussed. (author)

  5. Functionality of Preface in the Integral Perception of Text (“Trans-Atlantic” by Witold Gombrowicz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyona Tychinina

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of detection of paratextual connections detailed by Gerard Genette is analyzed. It is proved that such at first sight peripheral elements of a text are able not only to frame it specifically but also to make possible its transformation into a book. It is emphasized that paratextual modi respectively generate the mechanism of receptive action, narrow or/and broaden the expectation horizon of a reader. Subsequently, adjusted by the experience, they form a different perspective of perception which nevertheless is restricted and emphasized by a kind of paratextual “frame” that is sometimes called the interpretational one. An author's foreword is a sort of proxemic center in architectonics of literary text. The main function of the textual threshold that can be created directly by an author, publisher, and other writer is to inform readers about circumstances the text was written under, stages of creation, interpretation of important or complicated (from the standpoint of the author moments of the text, its conception, genre, biographic motives that guide a reader's reception in one way or another. In line with the historical poetry considering a text with a few author's prefaces is the most effective way. Three prefaces (1951, 1953, 1957 to the novel “Trans-Atlantic” (1953 by the Polish writer-immigrant Witold Gombrowicz (1904–1969 have become the subject of the analysis. Obviously, the specifics of narration in the aforementioned prefaces appear interesting. Not only is the experimental character of Gombrowicz's shape proved but also the dynamics of his texts' content in the historical time. Proofs of that, apart from the prefaces, are found in his diaries. The function of the author's preface has the exceptional receptive weight as it directs the reader's receptions only to the indicated destination and establishes the profound contact, more precisely the dialog, with a reader. Serving as an interpretative frame that

  6. A non-classical view of the modulation of mineral precipitation by organic additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Ruiz-Agudo, Cristina; Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Putnis, Christine; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Questions persist on the mechanisms of crystallization of sparingly soluble minerals such as calcium carbonate, calcium oxalate or barium sulphate. Compared to CaCO3, the mechanisms of nucleation and growth in the CaC2O4-H2O or BaSO4-H2O systems have received less attention. These phases are important due to their relevance as biominerals and/or unwanted mineral deposits in technological applications. Growing evidence suggests that sparingly soluble salts form by non-classical nucleation and growth pathways, where pre-nucleation ion associates and amorphous (solid or liquid) precursor phase(s) play a critical role (e.g. Rodríguez-Navarro et al. (2015), Ruiz-Agudo et al. (2015)). Indeed the identification of pre-nucleation species in these systems and their strong interactions with organic compounds (Verch et al. 2011) raises the possibility that the control of organics on biomineralization may begin even earlier than previously thought. A sound knowledge of the physical mechanisms by which acidic macromolecules affect nucleation and early growth may offer general insights concerning the molecular control of biomineralization, as well as being critical for improving strategies to control unwanted mineral deposition or for the synthesis of biomimetic materials. Here we present investigations on the initial stages of the precipitation of these relevant minerals in organic-free solutions to identify the precipitation pathway and to look for any potential precursor phase(s) to the final, crystalline polymorph. As well, we explore the effects that several acidic organic compounds have on the different precipitation stages identified. We find that organic additives such as citric acid, polyacrilic acid or a commercial copolymer of maleic acid/allyl sulfonic acid with phosphonate groups can be active at modifying pre-nucleation stages (destabilizing of pre-nucleation species or hampering the aggregation and growth of pre-nucleation associates) and subsequently strongly

  7. Diagnosis and molecular characterization of non-classic forms of Tay-Sachs disease in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, R; Kok, F; Burin, M G; Sá Miranda, M C; Vasques, C; Henriques-Souza, A M M; Giugliani, R; Vainzof, Mariz; Pereira, L V

    2006-06-01

    Molecular analysis of five Brazilian families, including eight patients presenting with nonclassic Tay-Sachs disease, was performed to identify frequent causative mutations and their correlation with clinical course. Three patients were affected by the B1 subacute variant and were shown to carry the R178H mutation (the DN allele), which is also common among Portuguese patients. Two of them were compound heterozygotes, whereas the third presented with the mutation in both alleles. Since Brazil was a Portuguese colony for over two centuries, common ancestry might be the probable explanation. The fourth patient presented with a juvenile phenotype and carries the R499H mutation, which has been reported only once worldwide and is associated with residual enzyme activity, responsible for a slower clinical course. The fifth family, of an Ashkenazi Jewish background, showed an extensive intrafamilial clinical variability among three affected sibs presenting with muscle atrophy, ataxia, and psychiatric symptoms. They were first diagnosed as having atypical spinal muscular atrophy and, subsequently, spinocerebellar ataxia, but, recently, the diagnosis of late-onset Tay-Sachs disease was confirmed based on reduced plasma hexosaminidase A activity and the G269S/InsTATC1278 genotype. It is therefore highly recommended to test patients with a similar clinical history for Tay-Sachs disease. In the same family, one first cousin committed suicide at the age of 24 years, presenting with a clinical phenotype that suggested an undiagnosed case and highlighting the effect of the intrafamilial clinical variability in delaying a prompt diagnosis. It is now recognized that his parents are, in fact, a carrier couple. Additionally, another relative had been previously identified as a heterozygote in a Tay-Sachs disease screening program, but the information was not shared among the family. Since this information might anticipate diagnosis and genetic counseling, it is advisable that

  8. Mathematical and numerical study of nonlinear hyperbolic equations: model coupling and nonclassical shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutin, B.

    2009-11-01

    This thesis concerns the mathematical and numerical study of nonlinear hyperbolic partial differential equations. A first part deals with an emergent problematic: the coupling of hyperbolic equations. The pursued applications are linked with the mathematical coupling of computing platforms, dedicated to an adaptative simulation of multi-scale phenomena. We propose and analyze a new coupling formalism based on extended PDE systems avoiding the geometric treatment of the interfaces. In addition, it allows to formulate the problem in a multidimensional setting, with possible covering of the coupled models. This formalism allows in particular to equip the coupling procedure with viscous regularization mechanisms, useful in the selection of natural discontinuous solutions. We analyze existence and uniqueness in the framework of a parabolic regularization a la Dafermos. Existence of a solution holds true under very general conditions but failure of uniqueness may naturally arise as soon as resonance occurs at the interfaces. Next, we highlight that our extended PDE framework gives rise to another regularization strategy based on thick interfaces. In this setting, we prove existence and uniqueness of the solutions of the Cauchy problem for initial data in L ∞ . The main tool consists in the derivation of a flexible and robust finite volume method for general triangulation which is analyzed in the setting of entropy measure-valued solutions by DiPerna. The second part is devoted to the definition of a finite volume scheme for the computing of nonclassical solutions of a scalar conservation law based on a kinetic relation. This scheme offers the feature to be stricto sensu conservative, in opposition to a Glimm approach that is only statistically conservative. The validity of our approach is illustrated through numerical examples. (author)

  9. Nonlocal transport in hot plasma. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brantov, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of describing charged particle transport in hot plasma under the conditions in which the ratio of the electron mean free path to the gradient length is not too small is one of the key problems of plasma physics. However, up to now, there was a deficit of the systematic interpretation of the current state of this problem, which, in most studies, is formulated as the problem of nonlocal transport. In this review, we fill this gap by presenting a self-consistent linear theory of nonlocal transport for small plasma perturbations and an arbitrary collisionality from the classical highly collisional hydrodynamic regime to the collisionless regime. We describe a number of nonlinear transport models and demonstrate the application of the nonclassical transport theory to the solution of some problems of plasma physics, first of all for plasmas produced by nanosecond laser pulses with intensities of 10 13 –10 16 W/cm 2

  10. Behavior of thin-walled beams made of advanced composite materials and incorporating non-classical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librescu, Liviu; Song, Ohseop

    1991-11-01

    Several results concerning the refined theory of thin-walled beams of arbitrary closed cross-section incorporating nonclassical effects are presented. These effects are related both with the exotic properties characterizing the advanced composite material structures and the nonuniform torsional model. A special case of the general equations is used to study several problems of cantilevered thin-walled beams and to assess the influence of the incorporated effects. The results presented in this paper could be useful toward a more rational design of aeronautical or aerospace constructions, as well as of helicopter or tilt rotor blades constructed of advanced composite materials.

  11. Preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky by Alfred Adler, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansbacher, H L

    1981-07-01

    This is a previously unpublished work by Alfred Adler that was written in 1936 as a preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky. A theory of schizophrenia is described in which characteristic prepsychotic features, especially lack of social interest and oversensitivity to real and imagined slights, lead to increasing irrationalism and preoccupation with grandiose ideas. The establishment of a cooperative therapeutic relationship and the instilling of hope are presented as central factors for successful treatment.

  12. A nonclassical Radau collocation method for solving the Lane-Emden equations of the polytropic index 4.75 ≤ α < 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirani, M. D.; Maleki, M.; Kajani, M. T.

    2014-11-01

    A numerical method for solving the Lane-Emden equations of the polytropic index α when 4.75 ≤ α ≤ 5 is introduced. The method is based upon nonclassical Gauss-Radau collocation points and Freud type weights. Nonclassical orthogonal polynomials, nonclassical Radau points and weighted interpolation are introduced and are utilized in the interval [0,1]. A smooth, strictly monotonic transformation is used to map the infinite domain x ∈ [0,∞) onto a half-open interval t ∈ [0,1). The resulting problem on the finite interval is then transcribed to a system of nonlinear algebraic equations using collocation. The method is easy to implement and yields very accurate results.

  13. Comparison between photon annihilation-then-creation and photon creation-then-annihilation thermal states: Non-classical and non-Gaussian properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xue-Xiang; Yuan, Hong-Chun; Wang, Yan

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the nonclassical properties of arbitrary number photon annihilation-then-creation operation (AC) and creation-then-annihilation operation (CA) to the thermal state (TS), whose normalization factors are related to the polylogarithm function. Then we compare their quantum characters, such as photon number distribution, average photon number, Mandel Q-parameter, purity and the Wigner function. Because of the noncommutativity between the annihilation operator and the creation operator, the ACTS and the CATS have different nonclassical properties. It is found that nonclassical properties are exhibited more strongly after AC than after CA. In addition we also examine their non-Gaussianity. The result shows that the ACTS can present a slightly bigger non-Gaussianity than the CATS.

  14. Comparison between photon annihilation-then-creation and photon creation-then-annihilation thermal states: Non-classical and non-Gaussian properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xue-Xiang; Wang Yan; Yuan Hong-Chun

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the nonclassical properties of arbitrary number photon annihilation-then-creation operation (AC) and creation-then-annihilation operation (CA) to the thermal state (TS), whose normalization factors are related to the polylogarithm function. Then we compare their quantum characters, such as photon number distribution, average photon number, Mandel Q-parameter, purity and the Wigner function. Because of the noncommutativity between the annihilation operator and the creation operator, the ACTS and the CATS have different nonclassical properties. It is found that nonclassical properties are exhibited more strongly after AC than after CA. In addition we also examine their non-Gaussianity. The result shows that the ACTS can present a slightly bigger non-Gaussianity than the CATS. (general)

  15. Estrogens induce rapid cytoskeleton re-organization in human dermal fibroblasts via the non-classical receptor GPR30.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Carnesecchi

    Full Text Available The post-menopausal decrease in estrogen circulating levels results in rapid skin deterioration pointing out to a protective effect exerted by these hormones. The identity of the skin cell type responding to estrogens is unclear as are the cellular and molecular processes they elicit. Here, we reported that lack of estrogens induces rapid re-organization of the human dermal fibroblast cytoskeleton resulting in striking cell shape change. This morphological change was accompanied by a spatial re-organization of focal adhesion and a substantial reduction of their number as evidenced by vinculin and actin co-staining. Cell morphology and cytoskeleton organization was fully restored upon 17β-estradiol (E2 addition. Treatment with specific ER antagonists and cycloheximide respectively showed that the E2 acts independently of the classical Estrogen Receptors and that cell shape change is mediated by non-genomic mechanisms. E2 treatment resulted in a rapid and transient activation of ERK1/2 but not Src or PI3K. We show that human fibroblasts express the non-classical E2 receptor GPR30 and that its agonist G-1 phenocopies the effect of E2. Inhibiting GPR30 through treatment with the G-15 antagonist or specific shRNA impaired E2 effects. Altogether, our data reveal a novel mechanism by which estrogens act on skin fibroblast by regulating cell shape through the non-classical G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 and ERK1/2 activation.

  16. Estrogens induce rapid cytoskeleton re-organization in human dermal fibroblasts via the non-classical receptor GPR30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnesecchi, Julie; Malbouyres, Marilyne; de Mets, Richard; Balland, Martial; Beauchef, Gallic; Vié, Katell; Chamot, Christophe; Lionnet, Claire; Ruggiero, Florence; Vanacker, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    The post-menopausal decrease in estrogen circulating levels results in rapid skin deterioration pointing out to a protective effect exerted by these hormones. The identity of the skin cell type responding to estrogens is unclear as are the cellular and molecular processes they elicit. Here, we reported that lack of estrogens induces rapid re-organization of the human dermal fibroblast cytoskeleton resulting in striking cell shape change. This morphological change was accompanied by a spatial re-organization of focal adhesion and a substantial reduction of their number as evidenced by vinculin and actin co-staining. Cell morphology and cytoskeleton organization was fully restored upon 17β-estradiol (E2) addition. Treatment with specific ER antagonists and cycloheximide respectively showed that the E2 acts independently of the classical Estrogen Receptors and that cell shape change is mediated by non-genomic mechanisms. E2 treatment resulted in a rapid and transient activation of ERK1/2 but not Src or PI3K. We show that human fibroblasts express the non-classical E2 receptor GPR30 and that its agonist G-1 phenocopies the effect of E2. Inhibiting GPR30 through treatment with the G-15 antagonist or specific shRNA impaired E2 effects. Altogether, our data reveal a novel mechanism by which estrogens act on skin fibroblast by regulating cell shape through the non-classical G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 and ERK1/2 activation.

  17. PREFACE: EDS2010 Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Malcolm I.

    2011-03-01

    The biennial international conference on Extended Defects in Semiconductors started in 1978 with a meeting in Hünfeld, Germany. Subsequent meetings rotated between Poland, France, Great Britain, Germany, Russia and Italy, culminating in EDS2004 in Chernogolovka, EDS2006 in Halle and EDS2008 in Poitiers. EDS2010 was held at the University of Sussex at Brighton, UK from September 19th to 24th. An extension of the tabulation of this history, which first appeared on the EDS2006 website, is given in the attached PDF. It is with sadness that we note one of the founders of the series, Prof. Dr Helmut Alexander, passed away on 3 December 2009 and we were proud to dedicate EDS2010 to his memory. It has become a tradition to make an award in his name, and this year it was made to Ivan Isacov for his poster "Electrical levels of dislocation networks in p- and n-type silicon". A short and warm celebration of Prof. Dr Alexander's life by his friends and colleagues, Prof. Drs Helmut Gottschalk, Eicke Weber and Wolfgang Schröter, is included in this volume. The conference was a forum for the state-of-the-art of investigation and modelling of extended defects in semiconductors. Scientists from universities, research institutes and industry made contributions to a deeper understanding of extended defects, their interaction with point defects and their role in the development of semiconductor technology. The remit of the conference included extended defects, nanostructures, nanoparticles, quantum dots and interfaces within semiconducting materials ranging from narrow to wide band gaps, including graphene-derived materials and diamond. Scientific interests range from defect geometry, electronic structure, dynamics, spectroscopy, microscopy, reactions and chemistry to introduction mechanisms, such as implantation and strained layers and the operation of devices such as integrated circuits, heterostructures, and solar cells. The organisers were confronted with a long period between the afternoon outing to Arundel Castle and dinner in the evening at Wiston House, a mansion of Tudor origin near Steyning, West Sussex. So a short audience-participation seminar was held in the conference room of the manor, covering the history of dislocations and the history of the conference series. We were also able to extend the appreciation of the life of Prof. Yuri Ossipyan (15 Feb 1931 - 10 Sep 2008) briefly given at EDS2008. EDS2010 continued the drive into graphene-based materials with a session devoted to them, and it gave immense pleasure to many of us who were his former students to dedicate a session to the work of Professor R Jones. We are grateful to his present and former co-workers who came and presented an impressive perspective on their work with him and a vision of a vigorous future for him in his retirement and for AIMPRO, the current Density Functional Theory code that derives from the one he established with his former student, Dr Patrick Briddon. For EDS2010 we made two minor modifications to the appearance of the conference: a central webpage www.eds-conferences.org, ably managed by our webmaster, Dr Gemma Haffenden, and a Facebook page, "EDS conference series", which Dr Amy Gandy runs enthusiastically. Amongst other things the conference photographs appear here. "I like this". In fact, currently 22 FB-ers "like this" and I am sure it will grow. Finally, it is a pleasure to acknowledge the significant contributions of Co-Chair, Prof. Marek Skowronski, Conference Manager, Dr Christopher Latham, and the editors of this volume, Drs Jon Goss and Chris Ewels, who in turn wish to thank Dr Alexis Vlandas for his help proof reading the articles. We all wish the best of luck to Prof. Philomela Khomninou and her team in the organisation of EDS2012.

  18. Towards the unified non-classical physics: account for quantum fluctuations in equilibrium thermodynamics via the effective temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.G.Rudoy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of effective temperature (ET T*(T0, T is used in order to approximately "quantize" the thermodynamic functions of the dynamical object which is in the thermal equilibrium with thermal bath being at constant temperature T (T0=E0/kB, where E0 is the ground-state energy, kB - Boltzmann constant, is the characteristic ``quantum'' temperature of the system itself. On these grounds the extensive comparative investigation is carried out for the ``standard model'' of statistical mechanics - the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator (HO. Three well-known approaches are considered and their thermodynamic consequences thoroughly studied. These are: the exact quantum, or non-classical Planck-Einstein approach, intermediate, or semiclassical Bloch-Wigner approach and, finally, the pure classical, or Maxwell-Boltzmann approach.

  19. Non-classical logic inverter coupling a ZnO nanowire-based Schottky barrier transistor and adjacent Schottky diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Shokouh, Seyed Hossein; Raza, Syed Raza Ali; Lee, Hee Sung; Im, Seongil

    2014-08-21

    On a single ZnO nanowire (NW), we fabricated an inverter-type device comprising a Schottky diode (SD) and field-effect transistor (FET), aiming at 1-dimensional (1D) electronic circuits with low power consumption. The SD and adjacent FET worked respectively as the load and driver, so that voltage signals could be easily extracted as the output. In addition, NW FET with a transparent conducting oxide as top gate turned out to be very photosensitive, although ZnO NW SD was blind to visible light. Based on this, we could achieve an array of photo-inverter cells on one NW. Our non-classical inverter is regarded as quite practical for both logic and photo-sensing due to its performance as well as simple device configuration.

  20. Influence of pump-field scattering on nonclassical-light generation in a photonic-band-gap nonlinear planar waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perina, Jan Jr.; Sibilia, Concita; Tricca, Daniela; Bertolotti, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Optical parametric process occurring in a nonlinear planar waveguide can serve as a source of light with nonclassical properties. The properties of the generated fields are substantially modified by scattering of the nonlinearly interacting fields in a photonic-band-gap structure inside the waveguide. A general quantum model of linear operator amplitude corrections to the amplitude mean values and its numerical analysis provide conditions for efficient squeezed-light generation as well as generation of light with sub-Poissonian photon-number statistics. The destructive influence of phase mismatch of the nonlinear interaction can fully be compensated using a suitable photonic-band-gap structure inside the waveguide. Also an increase of the signal-to-noise ratio of the incident optical field can be reached in the waveguide

  1. "Prefacing the Script" as an Ethical Response to State-Mandated Abortion Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Mara; Lassiter, Dragana; Mercier, Rebecca; Bryant, Amy; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    Laws governing abortion provision are proliferating throughout the United States, yet little is known about how these laws affect providers. We investigated the experiences of abortion providers in North Carolina practicing under the 2011 Women's Right to Know Act, which mandates that women receive counseling with specific, state-prescribed information at least 24 hours prior to an abortion. We focus here on a subset of the data to examine one strategy by which providers worked to minimize moral conflicts generated by the counseling procedure. Drawing on Erving Goffman's work on language and social interaction, we highlight how providers communicated moral objections and layered meanings through a practice that we call prefacing the script . We conducted semi-structured interviews with 31 physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and clinic managers who provide abortion care in North Carolina. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using an inductive, iterative analytic approach, which included reading for context, interpretive memo-writing, and focused coding. Roughly half of the participants (14/31) reported that they or the clinicians who performed the counseling in their institution routinely prefaced the counseling script with qualifiers, disclaimers, and apologies that clarified their relationship to the state-mandated content. We identified three performative functions of this practice: 1) enacting a frame shift from a medical to a legal interaction, 2) distancing the speaker from the authorial voice of the counseling script, and 3) creating emotional alignment. Prefacing state-mandated abortion counseling scripts constitutes a practical strategy providers use to balance the obligation to comply with state law with personal and professional responsibilities to provide tailored care, emotional support, and serve the patient's best interests. Our findings suggest that language constitutes a powerful resource for navigating and

  2. Prefacing the Script” as an Ethical Response to State-Mandated Abortion Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassiter, Dragana; Mercier, Rebecca; Bryant, Amy; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Laws governing abortion provision are proliferating throughout the United States, yet little is known about how these laws affect providers. We investigated the experiences of abortion providers in North Carolina practicing under the 2011 Women’s Right to Know Act, which mandates that women receive counseling with specific, state-prescribed information at least 24 hours prior to an abortion. We focus here on a subset of the data to examine one strategy by which providers worked to minimize moral conflicts generated by the counseling procedure. Drawing on Erving Goffman’s work on language and social interaction, we highlight how providers communicated moral objections and layered meanings through a practice that we call prefacing the script. METHODS We conducted semi-structured interviews with 31 physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and clinic managers who provide abortion care in North Carolina. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using an inductive, iterative analytic approach, which included reading for context, interpretive memo-writing, and focused coding. RESULTS Roughly half of the participants (14/31) reported that they or the clinicians who performed the counseling in their institution routinely prefaced the counseling script with qualifiers, disclaimers, and apologies that clarified their relationship to the state-mandated content. We identified three performative functions of this practice: 1) enacting a frame shift from a medical to a legal interaction, 2) distancing the speaker from the authorial voice of the counseling script, and 3) creating emotional alignment. CONCLUSIONS Prefacing state-mandated abortion counseling scripts constitutes a practical strategy providers use to balance the obligation to comply with state law with personal and professional responsibilities to provide tailored care, emotional support, and serve the patient’s best interests. Our findings suggest that language constitutes a

  3. Nonclassical dynamics of the methyl group in 1,1,1-triphenylethane. Evidence from powder 1H NMR spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Osior, Agnieszka

    2017-03-14

    According to the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory, hindered rotation of methyl groups, evidenced in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) line shapes, is a nonclassical process. It comprises a number of quantum-rate processes measured by two different quantum-rate constants. The classical jump model employing only one rate constant is reproduced if these quantum constants happen to be equal. The values of their ratio, or the nonclassicallity coefficient, determined hitherto from NMR spectra of single crystals and solutions range from about 1.20 to 1.30 in the latter case to above 5.0 in the former, with the value of 1 corresponding to the jump model. Presently, first systematic investigations of the DQR effects in wide-line NMR spectra of a powder sample are reported. For 1,1,1-triphenylethane deuterated in the aromatic positions, the relevant line-shape effects were monitored in the range 99–121 K. The values of the nonclassicality coefficient dropping from 2.7 to 1.7 were evaluated in line shape fits to the experimental powder spectra from the range 99–108 K. At these temperatures, the fits with the conventional line-shape model are visibly inferior to the DQR fits. Using a theoretical model reported earlier, a semiquantitative interpretation of the DQR parameters evaluated from the spectra is given. It is shown that the DQR effects as such can be detected in wide-line NMR spectra of powdered samples, which are relatively facile to measure. However, a fully quantitative picture of these effects can only be obtained from the much more demanding experiments on single crystals.

  4. Thomas Jefferson, I dilemmi della democrazia americana, translated and edited by Alberto Giordano, with a preface by Dino Cofrancesco (Novi Ligure: Città del Silenzio, 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Chiassoni

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of Thomas Jefferson, I dilemmi della democrazia americana, translated and edited by Alberto Giordano, with a preface by Dino Cofrancesco (Novi Ligure: Città del Silenzio, 2007

  5. Preface for Discussion on Mid-Ocean Ridges: dynamics of processes associated with creation of new ocean crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, J. R.; Elderfield, H.; Laughton, A.

    Preface for Discussion on Mid-Ocean Ridges: dynamics of processes associated with creation of new ocean crust. A Discussion held at the Royal Society on 6th and 7th March 1996. Organized and edited by J. R. Cann, H. Elderfield and A. Laughton.

  6. CHAIRMEN'S PREFACE AND EDITORS' NOTE: Unification of Fundamental Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Lars; Nilsson, Jan S.; Salomonson, Per; Skagerstam, Bo-Sture

    1987-01-01

    Chairmen's PrefaceIn 1984 we obtained a grant from the Nobel Foundation to organize a Nobel Symposium on "Unification of the Fundamental Interactions". In our proposal which we submitted in the fall of 1983 we stated that we wanted to cover the various attempts to unification such as GUT'S, supergravity, Kaluza-Klein theories and superstrings. What has happened in particle physics since then is already history. With the realization that certain superstring theories could be anomaly free, it became clear that these models could encompass earlier attempts to unification as well as solving the fundamental problem of quantum gravity. The excitement that some of us had felt for some time now spread through most of the particle physics community and this excitement certainly was evident during the Symposium. With the international advisory committee we originally chose a list of around 30 invitees which could best represent the various subjects listed above. When it came to the final planning of the programme essentially all talks dealt with superstrings! We were very fortunate that almost all of the invitees managed to come to the Symposium. From the western world only three were unable to participate, André Neveu, Steven Weinberg and Bruno Zumino. We certainly missed them during the meeting. We were particularly happy that Stephen Hawking managed to take part actively. Our real problem was to get participants from the Soviet Union. Out of eight invitations only one came through. We were very happy to have Renata Kallosh, who really did her utmost to enlighten us about not only her own work but also about recent progress in the USSR, However, we were very sorry that in spite of all our letters, telegrammes and endless attempts to get telephone calls through and despite the good relations between the Swedish and Soviet Academies of Sciences we had to miss Ludwig Faddeev, Valodja Gribov, Andrej Linde, Victor Ogievetsky, Sasha Polyakov, Misha Shifman and Arkadij

  7. PREFACE International Symposium on Spintronic Devices and Commercialization 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, You-wei; Judy, Jack; Qian, Zhenghong; Wang, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    SSDC logo Preface The International Symposium on Spintronic Devices and Commercialization (ISSDC' 2010) was held in Beijing, China, from 21 to 24 October 2010. The aim of the symposium was to provide an opportunity for international experts, academics, researchers, practitioners and students working in the areas of spintronic theories, spintronic materials, and spintronic devices to exchange information on the R&D and commercialization of spintronic materials and devices. New developments, concepts, future research trends and potential commercialization areas were also discussed. The topics covered by ISSDC' 2010 were: Fundmental Spintronic Theories/Experiments Spin polarization, spin-dependent scattering, spin relaxation, spin manipulation and optimization, as well as other related characterizations and applications, etc. Spintronic Materials Giant magnetoresistance materials, magnetic tunnel junction materials, magnetic semiconductor materials, molecular spintronic materials. Spintronic Devices Sensors, isolators, spin logic devices and magnetic random access memories (MRAMs), microwave devices, spin diodes, spin transistor, spin filters and detectors, spin optoelectronic devices, spin quantum devices, single chip computer, spin molecule and single electron devices. Other Magnetic Materials Soft magnetic materials, hard magnetic materials, magneto-optical materials, magnetostriction materials. Applications of Spintronic Devices Magnetic position/angle/velocity/rotation velocity sensors, magnetic encoders, magnetic compasses, bio-medical magnetic devices and other applications. Future Research Trends and the Commercialization of Spintronic Devices Approximately 85 scientists from almost 10 countries participated in the conference. The conference featured 6 keynote lectures, 8 invited lectures, 12 contributed lectures and about 30 posters. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions, which made the conference

  8. Tax wedge on labour income in Croatia and the European Union : Preface to the special issue of Financial Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Urban

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is a preface to a special issue of Financial Theory and Practice, which is devoted to the comparison of tax wedge on labour income in Croatia and other EU countries. The articles in this issue have arisen from the students’ research project, undertaken in 2015. This Preface outlines the motivation behind the research project, explains the most important methodological issues, and reviews the literature on the measurement of tax wedge in Croatia.

  9. PREFACE: Atom-surface scattering Atom-surface scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2010-08-01

    had to decline with regret because they had been retired for a long time, or had changed their research field, or were not able to meet the deadline. In any case, this initiative was really very welcome and supported with great enthusiasm by everybody. From all of the correspondence I have received expressing gratitude and honor for being invited to contribute, I would like to quote some words from G Comsa which reflect all of these feelings: 'Dick deserves, indeed, to be honored for both his scientific accomplishments and certainly no less for his modesty, honesty, friendliness and human warmth, qualities which are rarely honored'. I certainly cannot close this preface without mentioning the praiseworthy and professional work carried out by the Editorial Board, publishing team and Editors; in particular, L Smith and G Wright for their help and enthusiastic disposition. Thank you very much to everybody. 1 A healthy mind in a healthy body.

  10. Simulation, Modeling, and Programming for Autonomous Robots : preface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugali, Davide; Broenink, Johannes F.; Kroeger, Torsten; MacDonald, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Robots are versatile machines that are increasingly being used not only to per- form dirty, dangerous, and dull tasks in manufacturing industries, but also to achieve societal objectives, such as enhancing safety in transportation, reducing the use of pesticide in agriculture, helping people with

  11. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in the treatment of non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-hydroxylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Amir; Thomas, Nithin; Sacerdote, Alan; Bahtiyar, Gül

    2013-03-18

    Non-classic adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) has been associated with insulin resistance (IR). Therapies such as metformin, thiazolidinediones and lifestyle alterations improve IR and also ameliorate the biochemical and clinical abnormalities of NCAH, much as they do in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). More recently, bariatric surgery, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), has also been associated with improvement in IR and amelioration of PCOS and may, therefore, be beneficial in NCAH. We report a case of a 39-year-old, deaf-mute, obese woman with NCAH due to 11-hydroxylase deficiency who underwent RYGBP followed by improvement of NCAH manifestations. She was initially treated with metformin and pioglitazone, which lowered serum 11-deoxycortisol from 198 ng/dl (irregular menses normalised as well. We conclude that RYGBP, like other interventions that reduce IR, may be another way of treating non-classic 11-hydroxylase deficiency in selected patients.

  12. Transport Statistics - Transport - UNECE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable Energy Statistics Trade Transport Themes UNECE and the SDGs Climate Change Gender Ideas 4 Change UNECE Weekly Videos UNECE Transport Areas of Work Transport Statistics Transport Transport Statistics About us Terms of Reference Meetings and Events Meetings Working Party on Transport Statistics (WP.6

  13. The synthesis of [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]venlafaxine: a non-classical, fast-acting antidepressant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, A.D.; Gjedde, A. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital, PET Center, Aarhus (Denmark); Smith, D.F. [Aarhus Univ. Psychiatric Hospital, Inst. for Biological Psychiatry, Risskov (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    As part of our program to develop PET tracers for the 5-HT reuptake site, venlafaxine, a non-classical, fast-acting antidepressant, was selected as a candidate for labelling with {sup 11}C for in vivo evaluation. [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]venlafaxine was produced by the alkylation of O-desmethyl venlafaxine with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide followed by HPLC purification and formulation. Radiochemically pure [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]venlafaxine was obtained in a 30 {+-} 5% decay corrected radiochemical yield and a specific activity > 50 GBq/{mu}mol(1.4 Ci/{mu}mol) at the end of synthesis. For a typical production starting with 46 GBq (1.3 Ci) [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2}, 5.2 GBq (140 mCi) [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]venlafaxine was obtained as a sterile, formulated solution in a synthesis time of 30 min (counted from EOB). (Author).

  14. Non-classical nuclear localization signal peptides for high efficiency lipofection of primary neurons and neuronal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H; Zhu, J; Maronski, M; Kotzbauer, P T; Lee, V M-Y; Dichter, M A; Diamond, S L

    2002-01-01

    Gene transfer into CNS is critical for potential therapeutic applications as well as for the study of the genetic basis of neural development and nerve function. Unfortunately, lipid-based gene transfer to CNS cells is extremely inefficient since the nucleus of these post-mitotic cells presents a significant barrier to transfection. We report the development of a simple and highly efficient lipofection method for primary embryonic rat hippocampal neurons (up to 25% transfection) that exploits the M9 sequence of the non-classical nuclear localization signal of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 for targeting beta(2)-karyopherin (transportin-1). M9-assistant lipofection resulted in 20-100-fold enhancement of transfection over lipofection alone for embryonic-derived retinal ganglion cells, rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, embryonic rat ventral mesencephalon neurons, as well as the clinically relevant human NT2 cells or retinoic acid-differentiated NT2 neurons. This technique can facilitate the implementation of promoter construct experiments in post-mitotic cells, stable transformant generation, and dominant-negative mutant expression techniques in CNS cells.

  15. P2X7 receptors regulate multiple types of membrane trafficking responses and non-classical secretion pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yan; Dubyak, George R

    2009-06-01

    Activation of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) triggers a remarkably diverse array of membrane trafficking responses in leukocytes and epithelial cells. These responses result in altered profiles of cell surface lipid and protein composition that can modulate the direct interactions of P2X7R-expressing cells with other cell types in the circulation, in blood vessels, at epithelial barriers, or within sites of immune and inflammatory activation. Additionally, these responses can result in the release of bioactive proteins, lipids, and large membrane complexes into extracellular compartments for remote communication between P2X7R-expressing cells and other cells that amplify or modulate inflammation, immunity, and responses to tissue damages. This review will discuss P2X7R-mediated effects on membrane composition and trafficking in the plasma membrane (PM) and intracellular organelles, as well as actions of P2X7R in controlling various modes of non-classical secretion. It will review P2X7R regulation of: (1) phosphatidylserine distribution in the PM outer leaflet; (2) shedding of PM surface proteins; (3) release of PM-derived microvesicles or microparticles; (4) PM blebbing; (5) cell-cell fusion resulting in formation of multinucleate cells; (6) phagosome maturation and fusion with lysosomes; (7) permeability of endosomes with internalized pathogen-associated molecular patterns; (8) permeability/integrity of mitochondria; (9) exocytosis of secretory lysosomes; and (10) release of exosomes from multivesicular bodies.

  16. Cytokines in the host response to Candida vaginitis: Identifying a role for non-classical immune mediators, S100 alarmins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Junko; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), caused by Candida albicans, affects a significant number of women during their reproductive years. More than two decades of research have been focused on the mechanisms associated with susceptibility or resistance to symptomatic infection. Adaptive immunity by Th1-type CD4+ T cells and downstream cytokine responses are considered the predominant host defense mechanisms against mucosal Candida infections. However, numerous clinical and animal studies have indicated no or limited protective role of cells and cytokines of the Th1 or Th2 lineage against vaginal infection. The role for Th17 is only now begun to be investigated in-depth for VVC with results already showing significant controversy. On the other hand, a clinical live-challenge study and an established animal model have shown that a symptomatic condition is intimately associated with the vaginal infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) but with no effect on vaginal fungal burden. Subsequent studies identified S100A8 and S100A9 Alarmins as key chemotactic mediators of the acute PMN response. These chemotactic danger signals appear to be secreted by vaginal epithelial cells upon interaction and early adherence of Candida. Thus, instead of a putative immunodeficiency against Candida involving classical immune cells and cytokines of the adaptive response, the pathological inflammation in VVC is now considered a consequence of a non-productive innate response initiated by non-classical immune mediators. PMID:22182685

  17. In Vitro Characterization of the Two-Stage Non-Classical Reassembly Pathway of S-Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Breitwieser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant bacterial surface layer (S-layer protein rSbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 is an ideal model system to study non-classical nucleation and growth of protein crystals at surfaces since the recrystallization process may be separated into two distinct steps: (i adsorption of S-layer protein monomers on silicon surfaces is completed within 5 min and the amount of bound S-layer protein sufficient for the subsequent formation of a closed crystalline monolayer; (ii the recrystallization process is triggered—after washing away the unbound S-layer protein—by the addition of a CaCl2 containing buffer solution, and completed after approximately 2 h. The entire self-assembly process including the formation of amorphous clusters, the subsequent transformation into crystalline monomolecular arrays, and finally crystal growth into extended lattices was investigated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Moreover, contact angle measurements showed that the surface properties of S-layers change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic as the crystallization proceeds. This two-step approach is new in basic and application driven S-layer research and, most likely, will have advantages for functionalizing surfaces (e.g., by spray-coating with tailor-made biological sensing layers.

  18. Itk tyrosine kinase substrate docking is mediated by a nonclassical SH2 domain surface of PLCgamma1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Lie; Joseph, Raji E; Fulton, D Bruce; Andreotti, Amy H

    2009-12-15

    Interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase (Itk) is a Tec family tyrosine kinase that mediates signaling processes after T cell receptor engagement. Activation of Itk requires recruitment to the membrane via its pleckstrin homology domain, phosphorylation of Itk by the Src kinase, Lck, and binding of Itk to the SLP-76/LAT adapter complex. After activation, Itk phosphorylates and activates phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1), leading to production of two second messengers, DAG and IP(3). We have previously shown that phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 by Itk requires a direct, phosphotyrosine-independent interaction between the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of PLC-gamma1 and the kinase domain of Itk. We now define this docking interface using a combination of mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy and show that disruption of the Itk/PLCgamma1 docking interaction attenuates T cell signaling. The binding surface on PLCgamma1 that mediates recognition by Itk highlights a nonclassical binding activity of the well-studied SH2 domain providing further evidence that SH2 domains participate in important signaling interactions beyond recognition of phosphotyrosine.

  19. Expression of bovine non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I proteins in mouse P815 and human K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasar, Parveen; Wilhelm, Amanda; Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Thomas, Aaron J; Teng, Lihong; Shi, Bi; Davis, William C; Suarez, Carlos E; New, Daniel D; White, Kenneth L; Davies, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins can be expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins. To investigate whether bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins are expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins, and to assess the reactivity pattern of monoclonal antibodies with non-classical MHC-I isoforms, we expressed the MHC proteins in murine P815 and human K562 (MHC-I deficient) cells. Following antibiotic selection, stably transfected cell lines were stained with H1A or W6/32 antibodies to detect expression of the MHC-I proteins by flow cytometry. Two non-classical proteins (BoLA-NC1*00501 and BoLA-NC3*00101) were expressed on the cell surface in both cell lines. Surprisingly, the BoLA-NC4*00201 protein was expressed on the cell membrane of human K562 but not mouse P815 cells. Two non-classical proteins (BoLA-NC1*00401, which lacks a transmembrane domain, and BoLA-NC2*00102) did not exhibit cell surface expression. Nevertheless, Western blot analyses demonstrated expression of the MHC-I heavy chain in all transfected cell lines. Ammonium-sulfate precipitation of proteins from culture supernatants showed that BoLA-NC1*00401 was secreted and that all surface expressed proteins where shed from the cell membrane by the transfected cells. Interestingly, the surface expressed MHC-I proteins were present in culture supernatants at a much higher concentration than BoLA-NC1*00401. This comprehensive study shows that bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins BoLA-NC1*00501, BoLA-NC3*00101, and BoLA-NC4*00201 are expressed as surface isoforms with the latter reaching the cell membrane only in K562 cells. Furthermore, it demonstrated that BoLA-NC1*00401 is a secreted isoform and that significant quantities of membrane associated MHC-I proteins can be shed from the cell membrane. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent Trends in the Presentation of Neuroanatomy in Contemporary Neuroanatomy Books as Revealed in Their 'Preface's: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Q S; Banu, L A; Rahman, M F; Paul, S

    2015-04-01

    Many changes have been made in the field of Neuroanatomy teaching and assessment. One important way to know the changes in other country is by analyzing the Neuroanatomy text books and we can compare their reflections in our curriculum by analyzing the assessment system. To analyze the 'Preface's of contemporary Neuroanatomy text books, qualitatively, for noting the approaches taken and means applied in dealing with Neuroanatomy in the text books. This review was done in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka from July 2008 and June 2009. The 'Preface's of ten contemporary text books dealing with Neuroanatomy, published since 1993, was analyzed. Among them, the two that are most commonly recommended to the medical postgraduates in Bangladesh were selected for analyzing their presentation of text and illustrations. The 'Preface's of ten books were analyzed qualitatively to identify the information and explanations provided and comments made by their author(s)/editor(s) on the approaches taken and the means applied in the books in selecting and presenting topics, text and illustrations. The observations were organized into specific 'theme's. Twelve 'theme's were identified from the analyses of the 'Preface's of ten contemporary Neuroanatomy text books. These include special emphasis in the books on incorporation of new information, on practical application of Neuroanatomical facts. Addition and improvement regarding illustrations are also highlighted. By incorporating the findings of the present study with the present-day ideas and trends in Neuroanatomy in the developed world as evident from the available literature, suggestions could be formulated on improving the methods of teaching and assessment of Neuroanatomy in Bangladesh.

  1. Preface "Nonlinear processes in oceanic and atmospheric flows"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. García-Ladona

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear phenomena are essential ingredients in many oceanic and atmospheric processes, and successful understanding of them benefits from multidisciplinary collaboration between oceanographers, meteorologists, physicists and mathematicians. The present Special Issue on "Nonlinear Processes in Oceanic and Atmospheric Flows" contains selected contributions from attendants to the workshop which, in the above spirit, was held in Castro Urdiales, Spain, in July 2008. Here we summarize the Special Issue contributions, which include papers on the characterization of ocean transport in the Lagrangian and in the Eulerian frameworks, generation and variability of jets and waves, interactions of fluid flow with plankton dynamics or heavy drops, scaling in meteorological fields, and statistical properties of El Niño Southern Oscillation.

  2. PREFACE: International Workshop on Dirac Electrons in Solids 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, M.; Suzumura, Y.; Fuseya, Y.; Matsuura, H.

    2015-04-01

    It is our pleasure to publish the Proceedings of the International Workshop on Dirac Electrons in Solids held in University of Tokyo, Japan, for January 14-15, 2015. The workshop was organized by the entitled project which lasted from April 2012 to March 2015 with 10 theorists. It has been supported by a Grand-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, Japan. The subjects discussed in the workshop include bismuth, organic conductors, graphene, topological insulators, new materials including Ca3PbO, and new directions in theory (superconductivity, orbital susceptibility, etc). The number of participants was about 70 and the papers presented in the workshop include four invited talks, 16 oral presentations, and 23 poster presentations. Dirac electron systems appear in various systems, such as graphene, quasi-two-dimensional organic conductors, bismuth, surface states in topological insulators, new materials like Ca3PbO. In these systems, characteristic transport properties caused by the linear dispersion of Dirac electrons and topological properties, have been extensively discussed. In addition to these, there are many interesting research fields such as Spin-Hall effect, orbital diamagnetism due to interband effects, Landau levels characteristic to Dirac dispersion, anomalous interlayer transport phenomena and magnetoresistance, the effects of spin-orbit interaction, and electron correlation. The workshop focused on recent developments of theory and experiment of Dirac electron systems in the above materials. We note that all papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series were peer reviewed. Reviews were performed by expert referees with professional knowledge and high scientific standards in this field. Editors made efforts so that the papers may satisfy the criterion of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. We hope that all the participants of the workshop

  3. PREFACE: MRS International Materials Research Conference (IMRC-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanguo; Qiu, Yong; Li, Yongxiang

    2009-03-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the MRS International Materials Research Conference (IMRC-2008) held in Chongqing, China, 9-12 June 2008. IMRC-2008 included 9 symposia of A. Eco/Environmental Materials, B. Sustainable Energy Materials, C. Electronic Packaging Materials, D. Electronic Materials, E. Materials and Processes for Flat-panel Displays, F. Functional Ceramics, G. Transportation Materials, H. Magnesium and I. Biomaterials for Medical Applications. Nearly 1200 participants from 33 countries attended the conference, and the conference organizers received more than 700 papers. After the peer review processes, 555 papers were selected to be published in 9 Journals or proceedings, including J. of Materials Research (JMR), Rare Metal Materials and Engineering, J. of Univ. Science and Technology Beijing, Biomedical Materials: Materials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Chinese Journal of Aeronautics, Materials Science Forum, and Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Among the 555 selected papers, 91 papers are published in this volume, and the topics mainly cover electronic matrials, processes for flat-panel displays and functional ceramics. The editors would like to give special thanks to the graduate students Liwu Jiang, Ming Li and Di He from Beihang University for their hard work compiling and typesetting each paper in this volume. Zhanguo Wang, Yong Qiu and Yongxiang Li Editors

  4. Characterization of a Nonclassical Class I MHC Gene in a Reptile, the Galápagos Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaberman, Scott; Du Pasquier, Louis; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2008-01-01

    Squamates are a diverse order of vertebrates, representing more than 7,000 species. Yet, descriptions of full-length major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in this group are nearly absent from the literature, while the number of MHC studies continues to rise in other vertebrate taxa. The lack of basic information about MHC organization in squamates inhibits investigation into the relationship between MHC polymorphism and disease, and leaves a large taxonomic gap in our understanding of amniote MHC evolution. Here, we use both cDNA and genomic sequence data to characterize a class I MHC gene (Amcr-UA) from the Galápagos marine iguana, a member of the squamate subfamily Iguaninae. Amcr-UA appears to be functional since it is expressed in the blood and contains many of the conserved peptide-binding residues that are found in classical class I genes of other vertebrates. In addition, comparison of Amcr-UA to homologous sequences from other iguanine species shows that the antigen-binding portion of this gene is under purifying selection, rather than balancing selection, and therefore may have a conserved function. A striking feature of Amcr-UA is that both the cDNA and genomic sequences lack the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are necessary to anchor the class I receptor molecule into the cell membrane, suggesting that the product of this gene is secreted and consequently not involved in classical class I antigen-presentation. The truncated and conserved character of Amcr-UA lead us to define it as a nonclassical gene that is related to the few available squamate class I sequences. However, phylogenetic analysis placed Amcr-UA in a basal position relative to other published classical MHC genes from squamates, suggesting that this gene diverged near the beginning of squamate diversification. PMID:18682845

  5. A NRC-BNL benchmark evaluation of seismic analysis methods for non-classically damped coupled systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; DeGrassi, G.; Chokshi, N.

    2004-01-01

    Under the auspices of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a comprehensive program to evaluate state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) systems with non-classical damping. In this program, four benchmark models of coupled building-piping/equipment systems with different damping characteristics were developed and analyzed by BNL for a suite of earthquakes. The BNL analysis was carried out by the Wilson-θ time domain integration method with the system-damping matrix computed using a synthesis formulation as presented in a companion paper [Nucl. Eng. Des. (2002)]. These benchmark problems were subsequently distributed to and analyzed by program participants applying their uniquely developed methods and computer programs. This paper is intended to offer a glimpse at the program, and provide a summary of major findings and principle conclusions with some representative results. The participant's analysis results established using complex modal time history methods showed good comparison with the BNL solutions, while the analyses produced with either complex-mode response spectrum methods or classical normal-mode response spectrum method, in general, produced more conservative results, when averaged over a suite of earthquakes. However, when coupling due to damping is significant, complex-mode response spectrum methods performed better than the classical normal-mode response spectrum method. Furthermore, as part of the program objectives, a parametric assessment is also presented in this paper, aimed at evaluation of the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled NPP systems. It is believed that the findings and insights learned from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving license

  6. Characterization of a nonclassical class I MHC gene in a reptile, the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Glaberman

    Full Text Available Squamates are a diverse order of vertebrates, representing more than 7,000 species. Yet, descriptions of full-length major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes in this group are nearly absent from the literature, while the number of MHC studies continues to rise in other vertebrate taxa. The lack of basic information about MHC organization in squamates inhibits investigation into the relationship between MHC polymorphism and disease, and leaves a large taxonomic gap in our understanding of amniote MHC evolution. Here, we use both cDNA and genomic sequence data to characterize a class I MHC gene (Amcr-UA from the Galápagos marine iguana, a member of the squamate subfamily Iguaninae. Amcr-UA appears to be functional since it is expressed in the blood and contains many of the conserved peptide-binding residues that are found in classical class I genes of other vertebrates. In addition, comparison of Amcr-UA to homologous sequences from other iguanine species shows that the antigen-binding portion of this gene is under purifying selection, rather than balancing selection, and therefore may have a conserved function. A striking feature of Amcr-UA is that both the cDNA and genomic sequences lack the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are necessary to anchor the class I receptor molecule into the cell membrane, suggesting that the product of this gene is secreted and consequently not involved in classical class I antigen-presentation. The truncated and conserved character of Amcr-UA lead us to define it as a nonclassical gene that is related to the few available squamate class I sequences. However, phylogenetic analysis placed Amcr-UA in a basal position relative to other published classical MHC genes from squamates, suggesting that this gene diverged near the beginning of squamate diversification.

  7. Cardiotonic steroids trigger non-classical testosterone signaling in Sertoli cells via the α4 isoform of the sodium pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Lutz; Dietze, Raimund; Kirch, Ulrike; Kirch, Herbert; Eva, Alexander; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2011-12-01

    The α4 isoform of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (sodium pump) is known to be expressed in spermatozoa and to be critical for their motility. In the investigation presented here, we find that the rat-derived Sertoli cell line 93RS2 also expresses considerable amounts of the α4 isoform in addition to the α1 isoform. Since Sertoli cells are not motile, one can assume that the function of the α4 isoform in these cells must differ from that in spermatozoa. Thus, we assessed a potential involvement of this isoform in signaling pathways that are activated by the cardiotonic steroid (CTS) ouabain, a highly specific sodium pump ligand. Treatment of 93RS2 cells with ouabain leads to activation of the c-Src/c-Raf/Erk1/2 signaling cascade. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the activation of this cascade by ouabain results in phosphorylation and activation of the transcription factor CREB. This signaling cascade is induced at low nanomolar concentrations of ouabain, consistent with the involvement of the α4 isoform. This is further supported by experiments involving siRNA: silencing of α4 expression entirely blocks ouabain-induced activation of Erk1/2 whereas silencing of α1 has no effect. The findings of this study unveil new aspects in CTS/sodium pump interactions by demonstrating for the first time ouabain-induced signaling through the α4 isoform. The c-Src/c-Raf/Erk1/2/CREB cascade activated by ouabain is identical to the so-called non-classical signaling cascade that is normally triggered in Sertoli cells by testosterone. Taking into consideration that CTS are produced endogenously, our results may help to gain new insights into the physiological mechanisms associated with male fertility and reproduction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. PREFACE: Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, Evgeniya; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2007-04-01

    The Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'06) organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the Bulgarian Nuclear Society, was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 3-9 July 2006. As with the first of these scientific meetings (IWSSPP'05 Journal of Physics: Conference Series 44 (2006)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 33 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma research, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of these papers were presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing procedure and our referees for their patience and considerable effort to improve the manuscripts. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at the University of Sofia and Natsionalna Elektricheska Kompania EAD. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited

  9. PREFACE: Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lebedev, Yu

    2010-01-01

    The Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'08) organized by St Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from 30 June to 5 July 2008. A Special Session on Plasmas for Environmental Issues was co-organised by the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal and the Laboratory of Plasmas and Energy Conversion, University of Toulouse, France. That puts the beginning of a series in Workshops on Plasmas for Environmental Issues, now as a satellite meeting of the European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 38 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the

  10. South Asian aerosols in perspective: Preface to the special issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, K. Krishna; Satheesh, S. K.; Sarin, M. M.; Panday, Arnico K.

    2016-01-01

    The south Asian region is one the world's most populous and fast-developing regions. The more than 1.7 billion population (˜24% of the world population) with highly diverse living habits, fast growing industrial and transport sectors, large and increasing demand for power, diverse fuel use for domestic and industrial purposes, and equally diverse geographical features make this region a large cauldron of emissions and atmospheric processes. It is being increasingly recognized to be among the global hotspots of aerosols and anthropogenic trace gases. The complex geography of this region adds considerable amount of natural aerosols (sea spray, windblown desert dust, pollen, etc) into the atmosphere, which mix with the man-made ones, making the aerosol environment one of the most complex in the world. The large spatial diversity of the sources coupled with the varying atmospheric dynamics, driven by the contrasting monsoons and the topography, make South Asia's aerosol and pollution very difficult to characterize, to model and to plan effective mitigation measures, despite the fairly good knowledge on their implications to radiative and climate forcing, health effects and environmental degradation. In the recent years, there have been several reports on the impact of aerosols (more importantly black carbon - BC) on the regional and global climate system including Asian monsoon, with the caveats of long-term impacts on the livelihoods of tens of millions of people in this region; though specifics of these are not yet unequivocally established. While tropospheric perturbations would produce strong regional signatures, their global impacts still remain marginally above the uncertainty levels (IPCC, 2013). There have been several recent investigations showing that deposition of aerosol black carbon (BC) on snow can reduce the snow albedo, leading to enhanced absorption of solar radiation and hence faster melting rates of glaciers. Though several investigators have

  11. PREFACE: 5th International Conference on Mechatronics (ICOM'13)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akramin Shafie, Amir; Raisuddin Khan, Md

    2013-12-01

    The Fifth International Conference on Mechatronics (ICOM2013), took place in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia from 2-4 July 2013. The biannual conference which started in 2001 is regularly organized by Faculty of Engineering, International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) with the aims to serve as a platform for exchange of ideas on advances of in mechatronics and their applications as well as to foster research and worldwide collaboration. The theme for the 2013 conference was 'Mechatronics: Sustainable Development through Innovative Solutions'. The ICOM 2013 Conference consisted of Keynote Speeches (5) and oral contributions (150). The topics of the conference were: Mechatronic systems and Applications Intelligent Systems Control and Instrumentation Signal and Image Processing Machine Vision Robotics and Automation Manufacturing Mechatronics Green Mechatronics Mechatronic Education Smart Materials and Structures Active Vibration Control Computer and Information Technology MEMS and NEMS Biomechatronics and Rehabilitation Engineering Autonomous Systems Energy and Sustainability Transportation System It is our great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) to the scientific community to promote further research in these areas. We believe that this volume will be both an excellent source of scientific material in the fast evolving fields that were covered by ICOM 2013. We thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. We would also like to express our gratitude to the Organizing Committee, the Institutions and Sponsors and everyone who contributed to this conference through their supports and invaluable efforts. Editors Amir A Shafie aashafie@iium.edu.my Raisuddin Khan raisuddin@iium.edu.my Mahbubur Rashid mahbub@iium.edu.my Department of Mechatronics, International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM), Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Organizing Committee Md Raisuddin Khan Md Mozasser Rahman Shahrul Naim

  12. PREFACE: Joint Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on the theory of fusion plasmas was once more a great meeting. The programme covers a wide variety of topics, namely turbulence, MHD, edge physics and RF wave heating. The broad spectrum of skills involved in this meeting, from fundamental to applied physics, is striking. The works published in this special issue combine mathematics, numerics and physics at various levels - confirming the increasing integration of expertise in our community. As an incentive to read this cluster, let us mention a few outstanding results. Several papers address fundamental issues in turbulent transport, in particular the dynamics of structures. It is quite remarkable that this subject is now mature enough to propose signatures that can be tested by measurements. Linear and non linear MHD was also at the forefront. Several works illustrate the increasing level of realistic description of a fusion device, in particular by implementing complicated wall geometries. Moreover some noticeable progress has been made in the understanding of reconnection processes in collisionless regimes. The activity on radio-frequency heating and current drive is well represented, driven by the future operation of W7-X, ITER, and DEMO on a longer time scale. Finally the development of innovative numerical techniques, an old tradition of the conference, has driven several nice articles. The programme committee is traditionally keen in promoting young scientists. A number of senior scientists also attend the meeting on a regular basis, so that the attendance was nicely balanced. We believe that these efforts have been particularly fruitful this year. The number of young (and less young) faces was particularly impressive and this special issue illustrates this feature. The success of the 2014 edition brings evidence that the joint Varenna-Lausanne is the right place for presenting th The quality and size of the scientific production is illustrated by the

  13. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 243/5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artacho, Emilio; Beck, Thomas L.; Hernández, Eduardo

    physics communities in methods that had the potential to overcome the unfavourable scaling of the computational cost with the system size, implicit in the momentum-space formalism familiar to solid-state physicists and the quantum chemistry approaches more common in chemical physics and physical chemistry. This interest was sparkled by the famous paper in which Weitao Yang [2] introduced the Divide and Conquer method. Soon afterwards several practical schemes aiming to achieve linear-scaling calculations, by exploiting what Walter Kohn called most aptly the near-sightedness of quantum mechanics [3], were proposed and explored (for a review on linear-scaling methods, see [4]). This search for novel, more efficient and better scaling algorithms proved to be fruitful in more than one way. Not only was it the start of several packages which are well-known today (such as Siesta, Conquest, etc.), but it also leads to new ways of representing electronic states and orbitals, such as grids [5, 6], wavelets [7], finite elements, etc. Also, the drive to exploit near-sightedness attracted computational solid state physicists to the type of atomic-like basis functions traditionally used in the quantum chemistry community. At the same time computational chemists learnt about plane waves and density functional theory, and thus a fruitful dialogue was started between two communities that hitherto had not had much contact.Another interesting development that has begun to take place over the last decade or so is the convergence of several branches of science, notably physics, chemistry and biology, at the nanoscale. Experimentalists in all these different fields are now performing highly sophisticated measurements on systems of nanometer size, the kind of systems that us theoreticians can address with our computational methods, and this convergence of experiment and theory at this scale has also been very fruitful, particularly in the fields of electronic transport and STM image simulation

  14. PREFACE: Continuum Models and Discrete Systems Symposia (CMDS-12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2011-09-01

    of interest were: Thermodynamics, transport theory and statistical mechanics in the context of continuum modeling discrete systems; Statistical mechanics and dynamics of fluid flows; Continuum mechanics of complex fluids and deformable solids with microstructure; Fundamentals of fracture, defect dynamics, fatigue, and fracture dynamics; Statics and dynamics of dislocations, dislocation mediated phase transitions and plasticity; Granular materials: statics and dynamics; Physics and mechanics of earthquakes; Transport in composite materials; and Continuum theory of soft matter systems of biological motivation and living structures. The scientific program consisted of General Lectures and Research Communications. The four General Lectures (40 min + 5 min) introduced the most recent ideas and advances in the fields covered. The 25 Research Communications reported new results and methods in these fields and were presented orally (30 min + 5 min). In addition there were 15 posters which also presented interesting results and five of these posters were selected by a special committee chaired by David J Bergman to contribute to this proceedings. The selected five posters were presented by Moutushi D Choudhury, Morten Grova, Arya Paul, Arnab Saha and Amartya Sarkar. We were happy to note that 32 scientists from ten countries and a large number of students (both from India and other countries) participated in this symposium. The talks and poster sessions generated a lot of discussions, arguments and collaborations. The articles that appear in this proceedings are based on the invited talks and selected poster presentations. We would like to thank the Journal of Physics Conference Series (IOP Publishing) for publishing the proceedings of the conference. We would also like to thank all the contributors to this proceedings for their kind co-operation and the referees for their prompt and active support. A number of invited participants (Amit Acharya, Alexander Altland, Kamal K

  15. Expression and phylogenetic analyses reveal paralogous lineages of putatively classical and non-classical MHC-I genes in three sparrow species (Passer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Anna; Strandh, Maria; Råberg, Lars; Westerdahl, Helena

    2017-06-26

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) plays a central role in immunity and has been given considerable attention by evolutionary ecologists due to its associations with fitness-related traits. Songbirds have unusually high numbers of MHC class I (MHC-I) genes, but it is not known whether all are expressed and equally important for immune function. Classical MHC-I genes are highly expressed, polymorphic and present peptides to T-cells whereas non-classical MHC-I genes have lower expression, are more monomorphic and do not present peptides to T-cells. To get a better understanding of the highly duplicated MHC genes in songbirds, we studied gene expression in a phylogenetic framework in three species of sparrows (house sparrow, tree sparrow and Spanish sparrow), using high-throughput sequencing. We hypothesize that sparrows could have classical and non-classical genes, as previously indicated though never tested using gene expression. The phylogenetic analyses reveal two distinct types of MHC-I alleles among the three sparrow species, one with high and one with low level of polymorphism, thus resembling classical and non-classical genes, respectively. All individuals had both types of alleles, but there was copy number variation both within and among the sparrow species. However, the number of highly polymorphic alleles that were expressed did not vary between species, suggesting that the structural genomic variation is counterbalanced by conserved gene expression. Overall, 50% of the MHC-I alleles were expressed in sparrows. Expression of the highly polymorphic alleles was very variable, whereas the alleles with low polymorphism had uniformly low expression. Interestingly, within an individual only one or two alleles from the polymorphic genes were highly expressed, indicating that only a single copy of these is highly expressed. Taken together, the phylogenetic reconstruction and the analyses of expression suggest that sparrows have both classical and non-classical

  16. Regulation of non-classical immune parameters in immune thrombocytopenic purpura mice by a spleen-invigorating, qi-replenishing and blood-containing formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Li

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: The SQBF had a similar effect to prednisone with regards to enhancing peripheral blood platelet counts in ITP mice. Furthermore, it decreased β-EP levels and increased VIP and SIgA, and protected the thymus. This shows that, on base of the brain-gut axis functions, some non-classical immune vascular active factors or neurotransmitters are also involved in immune responses, and also have relationship with the onset of ITP and bleeding and/or hemostasis. It needs further study to determine whether a change in these active factors is related to immediate hemostasis.

  17. PREFACE: Nanobiology: from physics and engineering to biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Alemán, Carlos

    2006-03-01

    shapes and materials. Inspection of the protein structure databank illustrates the breadth of scaffolds, shapes and properties that protein molecules and their building blocks can provide. Via a shape-guided self-assembly strategy, these can be put together toward a specific function. Further, by inserting synthetic non-natural residues at judiciously selected positions, or synthetic peptide linkers, we may selectively rigidify the construct, or obtain a totally new world of shapes and scaffolds. Such broadening of the chemical space may lead to an almost unlimited range of nanosystems and architectures. Merging computation with experiment will accelerate nanodesign. Computational modeling will enhance the application of nanotechnology to key areas such as drug delivery and biomaterial design. Nanobiology is a field where interdisciplinary collaborations are essential and disciplines converge. Discipline convergence should enable the quantitation, leading to a better understanding of the regulatory networks within cells and between cells of an organism. These networks dictate how a cell responds to external stimuli, which in turn activate signaling cascades. It should allow the addressing of a broad range of questions on the structure and function of the cytoskeleton; the nuclear envelope; signal transduction by membrane embedded receptors; the nanomechanical properties of the extracellular matrix; nuclear transport; and voltage induced channel gating. For successful nanostructure design, we need to figure out and be able to control the intermolecular associations. For a stable functional construct, there are two key elements: first, the conformations of the building blocks in the designed structure should follow their natural tendencies; and second, the associations should be favorable. Molecules interact through their surfaces. Thus, favorable associations derive from shape complementarity and contributions of the various physical components. Nanobiology is in its

  18. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Liquid and Amorphous Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popel, Pjotr; Gelchinskii, Boris; Sidorov, Valeriy; Son, Leonid; Sabirzjanov, Alexandre

    2007-06-01

    The state of the art in the field of liquid and amorphous metals and alloys is regularly updated through two series of complementary international conferences, the LAM (Liquid and Amorphous Metals) and the RQ (Rapidly Quenched Materials). The first series of the conferences started as LM-1 in 1966 at Brookhaven for the basic understanding of liquid metals. The subsequent LM conferences were held in Tokyo (1972) and Bristol (1976). The conference was renewed in Grenoble (1980) as a LAM conference including amorphous metals and continued in Los Angeles (1983), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (1986), Kyoto (1989), Vienna (1992), Chicago (1995), Dortmund (1998), Yokohama (2001) and Metz (2004). The conferences are mainly devoted to liquid and amorphous metals and alloys. However, communications on some non-metallic systems such as semi conductors, quasicrystals etc, were accepted as well. The conference tradition strongly encourages the participation of junior researchers and graduate students. The 13th conference of the LAM series was organized in Ekaterinburg, Russia, by the Institute of Metallurgy of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IMet UB RAS) and Ural State Pedagogical University (USPU) and held on 8-13 July 2007 under the chairmanship of Professors Pjotr Popel (USPU) and Boris Gelchinskii (IMet UB RAS). There were 242 active and about 60 guest participants from 20 countries who attended the conference. There were no parallel sessions and all oral reports were separated into three groups: invited talks (40 min), full-scale (25 min) and brief (15 min) oral reports. The program included 10 sessions, ranging from purely theoretical subjects to technological application of molten and amorphous alloys. The following sessions took place: A) Electronic structure and transport, magnetic properties; B) Phase transitions; C) Structure; D) Atomic dynamics and transport; E) Thermodynamics; F) Modelling, simulation; G) Surface and interface; H) Mechanical properties

  19. PREFACE: IUPAP C20 Conference on Computational Physics (CCP 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troparevsky, Claudia; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2012-12-01

    Increasingly, computational physics stands alongside experiment and theory as an integral part of the modern approach to solving the great scientific challenges of the day on all scales - from cosmology and astrophysics, through climate science, to materials physics, and the fundamental structure of matter. Computational physics touches aspects of science and technology with direct relevance to our everyday lives, such as communication technologies and securing a clean and efficient energy future. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the proceedings of the scientific contributions presented at the 23rd Conference on Computational Physics held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, USA, in November 2011. The annual Conferences on Computational Physics (CCP) are dedicated to presenting an overview of the most recent developments and opportunities in computational physics across a broad range of topical areas and from around the world. The CCP series has been in existence for more than 20 years, serving as a lively forum for computational physicists. The topics covered by this conference were: Materials/Condensed Matter Theory and Nanoscience, Strongly Correlated Systems and Quantum Phase Transitions, Quantum Chemistry and Atomic Physics, Quantum Chromodynamics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics, Nuclear and High Energy Physics, Complex Systems: Chaos and Statistical Physics, Macroscopic Transport and Mesoscopic Methods, Biological Physics and Soft Materials, Supercomputing and Computational Physics Teaching, Computational Physics and Sustainable Energy. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our sponsors: International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), IUPAP Commission on Computational Physics (C20), American Physical Society Division of Computational Physics (APS-DCOMP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Center for Defect Physics (CDP), the University of Tennessee (UT)/ORNL Joint Institute for Computational Sciences (JICS) and Cray, Inc

  20. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    make use of 'small' electrons packed to the highest possible density. These are by definition 'strongly correlated'. For example: good photovoltaics must be efficient optical absorbers, which means that photons will generate tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) that must then be ionised at a heterointerface and transported to contacts; efficient solid state refrigeration depends on substantial entropy changes in a unit cell, with large local electrical or magnetic moments; efficient lighting is in a real sense the inverse of photovoltaics; the limit of an efficient battery is a supercapacitor employing mixed valent ions; fuel cells and solar to fuel conversion require us to understand electrochemistry on the scale of a single atom; and we already know that the only prospect for effective high temperature superconductivity involves strongly correlated materials. Even novel IT technologies are now seen to have value not just for novel function but also for efficiency. While strongly correlated electron systems continue to excite researchers and the public alike due to the fundamental science issues involved, it seems increasingly likely that support for the science will be leveraged by its impact on energy and sustainability. Strongly correlated electron systems contents Strongly correlated electron systemsSiddharth S Saxena and P B Littlewood Magnetism, f-electron localization and superconductivity in 122-type heavy-fermion metalsF Steglich, J Arndt, O Stockert, S Friedemann, M Brando, C Klingner, C Krellner, C Geibel, S Wirth, S Kirchner and Q Si High energy pseudogap and its evolution with doping in Fe-based superconductors as revealed by optical spectroscopyN L Wang, W Z Hu, Z G Chen, R H Yuan, G Li, G F Chen and T Xiang Structural investigations on YbRh2Si2: from the atomic to the macroscopic length scaleS Wirth, S Ernst, R Cardoso-Gil, H Borrmann, S Seiro, C Krellner, C Geibel, S Kirchner, U Burkhardt, Y Grin and F Steglich Confinement of chiral magnetic

  1. PREFACE: International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism-ICSM2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencer, Ali; Grasso, Gianni

    2009-03-01

    Karlsruhe C E Gough Birmingham University R Huebener Tubingen University K Kadowaki NIMS, Tsukuba University M A R LaBlanch UO, CA E Inger Boren E Ozdas Hacettepe University H Ozkan METU, Ankara R Penko ASG V Vlasov Argonne National Laboratory Scientific Programme Committee E H Brandt Max-Planck-Institute, Stuttgart W Goldacker FZ Karlsruhe C Ferdeghini CNR INFM, Genova D M Hampshire Durham University Y Oner ITU, Instanbul B Aktas GYTE, Gebze B Ramaev GYTE, Gebze E Ozdas Hacettepe University—Coordinator M A Aksan Inonu University—Abstract Handling Local Organizing Committee S Safran Ankara University—General Secretary E Ertekin Ankara University—Registrar A Kilic Nigde University U Kolemen G O Pasa University K Guven Kirikkale University—Transport and Accommodation B Ozkurt Mersin University Ö Çiçek Renko D Bumin Boren S Altin Inonu University O Nane Çukurova University Editorial Board for Proceedings A Gencer Ankara University—Guest Editor G Grasso Columbus Superconductors SpA, Genova—Guest Editor B Aktas GYTE, Gebze I Belenli Hakkari University M A Aksan Inonu University—Scientific Secretary M I J Probert York University M E Yakinci Inonu University A Bozbey TOBB, University of Economics and Technology Finance Director S Kervan Nevsehir University Bursary Coordinator H Agil Ankara University

  2. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, P. B.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Saxena, S. S.; Sutherland, M. L.; Sebastian, S. E.; Artacho, E.; Grosche, F. M.; Hadzibabic, Z.

    2012-11-01

    The Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 was dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covered a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The meeting welcomed to Cambridge 657 participants from 23 countries, who presented 127 talks (including 16 plenary, 57 invited, and 54 contributed) and 736 posters in 40 sessions over five full days of meetings. This proceedings volume contains papers reporting on the science presented at the meeting. This work deepens our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. Strongly correlated systems are known for their remarkable array of emergent phenomena: the traditional subjects of superconductivity, magnetism and metal-insulator transitions have been joined by non-Fermi liquid phenomena, topologically protected quantum states, atomic and photonic gases, and quantum phase transitions. These are some of the most challenging and interesting phenomena in science. As well as the science driver, there is underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which make use of 'small' electrons packed to the highest possible density. These are by definition 'strongly correlated'. For example: good photovoltaics must be efficient optical absorbers, which means that photons will generate tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) that must then be ionised at a heterointerface and transported to contacts; efficient solid state refrigeration depends on substantial entropy changes in a unit cell, with large local electrical or magnetic moments; efficient lighting is in a real sense the inverse of photovoltaics; the limit of an efficient battery is a supercapacitor employing mixed valent ions; fuel cells and solar to fuel conversion

  3. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    presentations were published in the Book of Abstracts, International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', August 18-26, 2007, Copyright 2007 Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, ISBN 92-95003-36-5. This Topical Issue consists of nearly 60 articles accepted for publication in the Conference Proceedings and reflects a substantial part of the Conference contributions. The articles cover a broad variety of TMB-2007 themes and are sorted alphabetically by the last name of the first author within each of the following topics: Canonical Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing (invariant, scaling, spectral properties, scalar transports) Wall-bounded Flows (structure and fundamentals, unsteady boundary layers, super-sonic flows, shock - boundary layer interaction) Interfacial Dynamics (Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities) Unsteady Turbulent Processes (turbulence and turbulent mixing in unsteady, multiphase and anisotropic flows) High Energy Density Physics (laser-material interaction, Z-pinches, laser-driven, heavy-ion and magnetic fusion) Astrophysics (supernovae, interstellar medium, star formation, stellar interiors, early Universe, cosmic micro-wave background) Magneto-hydrodynamics (magneto-convection, magneto-rotational instability, accretion disks, dynamo) Plasmas in Ionosphere (coupled plasmas, anomalous resistance, ionosphere) Physics of Atmosphere (environmental fluid dynamics, forecasting, data analysis, error estimate) Geophysics (turbulent convection in stratified, rotating and active flows) Combustion (dynamics of flames, fires, blast waves and explosions) Mathematical Aspects of Multi-Scale Dynamics (vortex dynamics, singularities, discontinuities, asymptotic dynamics, weak solutions, well- and ill-posedness) Statistical Approaches, Stochastic Processes and Probabilistic Description (uncertainty quantification, anomalous diffusion, long-tail distributions, wavelets) Advanced Numerical Simulations

  4. Screening non-classical 21-hydroxylase gene deficiency from patients diagnosed as polycystic ovary syndrome by gene assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie HU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To screen non-classical 21-hydroxylase deficiency (NC-21OHD from patients diagnosed as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS by gene assay. Methods  Ninety-eight patients with PCOS were enrolled according to 2003 Rotterdam criteria from Department of Endocrinology, Tangdu Hospital of Fourth Military Medical University, and they were divided into three groups according to the modified Ferriman-Gallway (mF-G score as follows: group A with score 0-2; group B with score 3-5, and group C with score ≥6. Meanwhile, 30 healthy subjects from the Medical Center of the Hospital were recruited as control group. Peripheral blood of all subjects were collected for extracting DNA, the CYP21A2 gene were amplified by 5 pairs of specific primers, and then the PCR products were sequenced by Shanghai Sangon Co. The subjects would accept test for serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH at 8:00am if their CYP21A2 was proved to be abnormal. Results  Thirty subjects of control group had no any defects in CYP21A2, but 5 of 98 patients with PCOS were proved to be deficient in CYP21A2, and the genotypes were V281L/920-921insT (P1, V281L/I230M (P2, V281L/Normal (P3, P4, P5, respectively, and all of them were heterozygous mutations. The incidences of NC-21OHD in group C and B were 28.6% and 3.3%, respectively. Genotype P1 had been identified to belong to NC-21OHD, which was consistent with its clinical phenotype. All genotypes P3, P4 and P5 belonged to carriers. But for P2, since I230M hadn't been reported in literature, the patient with V281L/I230M couldn't be classified now. Serum biochemical results showed that only in P1 the cortisol was close to the normal lower level, and ACTH was close to the normal upper limit of the reported level in the literature, and the remainders were all normal. Conclusions  Although PCOS and NC-21OHD are very similar in clinical manifestations, they are different completely in the pathogenesis and treatment. So it

  5. PREFACE: Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, A.; Boccaletti, S.; Caldarelli, G.; Chessa, A.; Latora, V.; Motter, A. E.

    2008-06-01

    consecutive calls is heavy tailed, which agrees with results previously reported on other human activities. In Mining the inner structure of the Web graph, Donato et al present a series of measurements of the Web, which offer a better understanding of the individual components of its bow-tie structure. The scale-free properties permeate all bow-tie components although they do not exhibit self-similarity and their inner structure is quite distinct. Effects of network topology on wealth distributions, by Garlaschelli and Loffredo, shows that a networked economic system self-organises towards a stationary state whose associated wealth distribution depends crucially on the underlying interaction network. In particular, this study implies that first-order topological properties alone (such as the scale-free property) are not enough to explain the emergence of the empirically observed mixed form of the wealth distribution. In the paper Resource allocation pattern in infrastructure networks, Kim and Motter show that real communication and transportation networks tend to exhibit larger load-to-capacity ratio in nodes and links with larger capacities. This surprising pattern, which is a consequence of decentralised evolution and network traffic fluctuations, suggests that infrastructure networks have evolved to prevent local failures but not necessarily large-scale failures that can be caused by cascading processes. The paper Consensus formation on coevolving networks: groups' formation and structure by Kozma and Barrat addresses the effect of adaptivity on a social model of opinion dynamics and consensus formation. The authors find that on adaptive networks the rewiring process fosters group formation by enhancing communication between agents of similar opinion, though it also makes possible the division of clusters. This result is significantly different from the percolation phenomena observed to govern the process in static networks. Capocci and Caldarelli, in the paper

  6. Thermal Stress Analysis of a Continuous and Pulsed End-Pumped Nd:YAG Rod Crystal Using Non-Classic Conduction Heat Transfer Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojahedi, Mahdi; Shekoohinejad, Hamidreza

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, temperature distribution in the continuous and pulsed end-pumped Nd:YAG rod crystal is determined using nonclassical and classical heat conduction theories. In order to find the temperature distribution in crystal, heat transfer differential equations of crystal with consideration of boundary conditions are derived based on non-Fourier's model and temperature distribution of the crystal is achieved by an analytical method. Then, by transferring non-Fourier differential equations to matrix equations, using finite element method, temperature and stress of every point of crystal are calculated in the time domain. According to the results, a comparison between classical and nonclassical theories is represented to investigate rupture power values. In continuous end pumping with equal input powers, non-Fourier theory predicts greater temperature and stress compared to Fourier theory. It also shows that with an increase in relaxation time, crystal rupture power decreases. Despite of these results, in single rectangular pulsed end-pumping condition, with an equal input power, Fourier theory indicates higher temperature and stress rather than non-Fourier theory. It is also observed that, when the relaxation time increases, maximum amounts of temperature and stress decrease.

  7. Bipartite non-classical correlations for a lossy two connected qubit-cavity systems: trace distance discord and Bell's non-locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Baset A.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, some non-classical correlations are investigated for bipartite partitions of two qubits trapped in two spatially separated cavities connected by an optical fiber. The results show that the trace distance discord and Bell's non-locality introduce other quantum correlations beyond the entanglement. Moreover, the correlation functions of the trace distance discord and the Bell's non-locality are very sensitive to the initial correlations, the coupling strengths, and the dissipation rates of the cavities. The fluctuations of the correlation functions between their initial values and gained (loss) values appear due to the unitary evolution of the system. These fluctuations depend on the chosen initial correlations between the two subsystems. The maximal violations of Bell's inequality occur when the logarithmic negativity and the trace distance discord reach certain values. It is shown that the robustness of the non-classical correlations, against the dissipation rates of the cavities, depends on the bipartite partitions reduced density matrices of the system, and is also greatly enhanced by choosing appropriate coupling strengths.

  8. Antibodies induced by vaccination with purified chick embryo cell culture vaccine (PCECV) cross-neutralize non-classical bat lyssavirus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerczyk, Claudius; Selhorst, Thomas; Tordo, Noël; Moore, Susan; Müller, Thomas

    2009-08-27

    Tissue-culture vaccines like purified chick embryo cell vaccine (PCECV) have been shown to provide protection against classical rabies virus (RABV) via pre-exposure or post-exposure prophylaxis. A cross-neutralization study was conducted using a panel of 100 human sera, to determine, to what extent after vaccination with PCECV protection exists against non-classical bat lyssavirus strains like European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) type 1 and 2 and Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV). Virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) concentrations against the rabies virus variants CVS-11, ABLV, EBLV-1 and EBLV-2 were determined by using a modified rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. For ABLV and EBLV-2, the comparison to CVS-11 revealed almost identical results (100% adequate VNA concentrations >or=0.5 IU/mL; correlation coefficient r(2)=0.69 and 0.77, respectively), while for EBLV-1 more scattering was observed (97% adequate VNA concentrations; r(2)=0.50). In conclusion, vaccination with PCECV produces adequate VNA concentrations against classical RABV as well as non-classical lyssavirus strains ABLV, EBLV-1, and EBLV-2.

  9. Book received: Paul van den Akker, Looking for Lines: Theories of the Essence of Art and the Problem of Mannerism, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press 2010 including preface, contents and introduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul van den Akker

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul van den Akker, Looking for Lines: Theories of the Essence of Art and the Problem of Mannerism, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press 2010 including preface, contents and introduction.

  10. Nonclassical Vitamin D Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Zittermann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that vitamin D has a broad range of actions in the human body. Besides its well-known effects on calcium/phosphate homeostasis, vitamin D influences muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nervous function, and the immune response. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency has been associated with muscle weakness and a high incidence of various chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes. Most importantly, low vitamin D status has been found to be an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. Several recent randomized controlled trials support the assumption that vitamin D can improve muscle strength, glucose homeostasis, and cardiovascular risk markers. In addition, vitamin D may reduce cancer incidence and elevated blood pressure. Since the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is high throughout the world, there is a need to improve vitamin D status in the general adult population. However, the currently recommended daily vitamin D intake of 5–15 µg is too low to achieve an adequate vitamin D status in individuals with only modest skin synthesis. Thus, there is a need to recommend a vitamin D intake that is effective for achieving adequate circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (>75 nmol/L.

  11. Preface paper to the Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere (SALSA) Program special issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, D.C.; Chehbouni, A.; Goff, B.; MacNish, B.; Maddock, T.; Moran, S.; Shuttleworth, W.J.; Williams, D.G.; Watts, C.; Hipps, L.H.; Cooper, D.I.; Schieldge, J.; Kerr, Y.H.; Arias, H.; Kirkland, M.; Carlos, R.; Cayrol, P.; Kepner, W.; Jones, B.; Avissar, R.; Begue, A.; Bonnefond, J.-M.; Boulet, G.; Branan, B.; Brunel, J.P.; Chen, L.C.; Clarke, T.; Davis, M.R.; DeBruin, H.; Dedieu, G.; Elguero, E.; Eichinger, W.E.; Everitt, J.; Garatuza-Payan, J.; Gempko, V.L.; Gupta, H.; Harlow, C.; Hartogensis, O.; Helfert, M.; Holifield, C.; Hymer, D.; Kahle, A.; Keefer, T.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Lhomme, J.-P.; Lagouarde, J.-P.; Lo, Seen D.; Luquet, D.; Marsett, R.; Monteny, B.; Ni, W.; Nouvellon, Y.; Pinker, R.; Peters, C.; Pool, D.; Qi, J.; Rambal, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Santiago, F.; Sano, E.; Schaeffer, S.M.; Schulte, M.; Scott, R.; Shao, X.; Snyder, K.A.; Sorooshian, S.; Unkrich, C.L.; Whitaker, M.; Yucel, I.

    2000-01-01

    The Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere Program (SALSA) is a multi-agency, multi-national research effort that seeks to evaluate the consequences of natural and human-induced environmental change in semi-arid regions. The ultimate goal of SALSA is to advance scientific understanding of the semi-arid portion of the hydrosphere-biosphere interface in order to provide reliable information for environmental decision making. SALSA approaches this goal through a program of long-term, integrated observations, process research, modeling, assessment, and information management that is sustained by cooperation among scientists and information users. In this preface to the SALSA special issue, general program background information and the critical nature of semi-arid regions is presented. A brief description of the Upper San Pedro River Basin, the initial location for focused SALSA research follows. Several overarching research objectives under which much of the interdisciplinary research contained in the special issue was undertaken are discussed. Principal methods, primary research sites and data collection used by numerous investigators during 1997-1999 are then presented. Scientists from about 20 US, five European (four French and one Dutch), and three Mexican agencies and institutions have collaborated closely to make the research leading to this special issue a reality. The SALSA Program has served as a model of interagency cooperation by breaking new ground in the approach to large scale interdisciplinary science with relatively limited resources.

  12. Acknowledgements; Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Valkenburg

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 180 people attended the 10th North American Caribou Workshop which was held immedi¬ately following the annual meeting of the Northwest Section of The Wildlife Society. Participants came from Canada, Greenland, Finland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States (primarily Alaska. Over 80 papers and posters were presented and about 25% of those are published here in this special edition of Rangifer. Many of the papers, including the keynote address by Dr. Gunter Weller, concerned climate change and global warming.

  13. PREFACE: Ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbach, Professor Stefan

    2006-09-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to results in the field of ferrofluid research. Ferrofluids—suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles—exhibit as a specific feature the magnetic control of their physical parameters and of flows appearing in such fluids. This magnetic control can be achieved by means of moderate magnetic fields with a strength of the order of 10 mT. This sort of magnetic control also enables the design of a wide variety of technical applications such as the use of the magnetic forces for basic research in fluid dynamics. The overall field of ferrofluid research is already about 40 years old. Starting with the first patent on the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions by S Papell in 1964, a vivid field of research activities has been established. Looking at the long time in which ferrofluids have been the focus of scientific interest, one can ask the question, what kind of recent developments justify a special issue of a scientific journal? New developments in a field, which depends strongly on a certain material class and which opens research possibilities in different scientific fields will nowadays usually require an interdisciplinary approach. This kind of approach starting from the synthesis of magnetic suspensions, including research concerning their basic properties and flow behaviour and focusing on new applications has been the core of a special research programme funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) over the past 6 years. Within this programme—entitled `Colloidal Magnetic Fluids: Basics, Synthesis and Applications of New Ferrofluids'—more than 30 different research groups have been coordinated to achieve new results in various fields related to ferrofluid research. The basic approach of the program has been the assumption that new applications well beyond the typical ferrofluid techniques, for example loud speaker cooling or sealing of rotary shafts, will require tailored magnetic suspensions with properties clearly focused towards the need of the application. While such tailoring of fluids to certain well defined properties sounds like a straightforward approach one has to face the fact that it requires a clear definition of the required properties. This definition itself has to be based on a fundamental physical knowledge of the processes determining certain magnetically controlled phenomena in ferrofluids. To make this point concrete one can look into the detailed aims of the mentioned research program. The application areas identified for the future development of research and application of suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles have been on the one hand the biomedical application—especially with respect to cancer treatment—and on the other hand the use of magnetically controlled rheological properties of ferrofluids for new active technical devices. Both directions require, as mentioned, as a basis for success the synthesis of new ferrofluids with dedicated properties. While the medical applications have to rely on biocompatibility as well as on stability of the suspensions in a biomedical environment, the use of ferrofluids in technical devices employing their magnetically controlled rheological properties will depend on an enhancement of the changes of the fluid's viscous properties in the presence of moderate magnetic fields. For both requirements ferrofluids with a make up clearly different from the usual magnetite based fluids have to be synthesized. The question of how the detailed microscopic make up of the fluids would have to look has to be answered on the basis of basic research results defining the physics background of the respective phenomena. Taking these aspects together it becomes obvious that the aforementioned research program had goals aiming far beyond the state of the art of classical ferrofluid research. These goals as well as the basic strategy to achieve them is in a way reflected by the structure of this issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. The issue contains results emerging from the research programme as well as invited papers from researchers not participating in the programme but working in closely related areas. The issue is subdivided into five main sections dealing with synthesis, basic physical description, rheology, and both the medical and technical applications of ferrofluids. As can be expected from work done within an interdisciplinary context many of the papers would fit into more than one of these sections and catagorization is thus sometimes difficult. We have therefore tried to place them into the section reflecting the main field of research to which the respective results belong. The first section is on synthesis and characterization of magnetic suspensions. The first paper in this section is dedicated partly to magnetite ferrofluids but with special aspects concerning the particle size tailoring them for applications especially in the field of magnetic hyperthermia. After this, three different types of `new' ferrofluids are presented. Fluids based on pure metal particles exhibiting much stronger magnetic properties than the common magnetite fluids, fluids with a temperature sensitive surfactant shell allowing a change of the particle’s hydrodynamic diameter by variation of the fluid’s temperature and fluids containing spheres of nonmagnetic material with embedded magnetic particles which are already used in new medical applications. The second section is dedicated to the basic physics of ferrofluids and highlights three different topics. First the question of magnetization dynamics is discussed and different aspects of this fundamental problem, which determines the basic description of ferrofluids, are highlighted. The second topic is the well known surface instability appearing in ferrofluids in a homogeneous magnetic field perpendicular to the fluid surface. This part shows clearly how many undiscovered phenomena can be found, even in an area which is as old as the whole research field, if an appropriate measuring technique is used and fresh ideas help to find unexpected effects. The last part of this section deals with the question of dynamics and structure of ferrofluids and shows the experimental possibilities of scattering techniques in this field. Within the third section the question of field dependent changes of the rheological behaviour of ferrofluids is discussed. The first three papers provide theoretical approaches for the understanding of the connection between the rheological properties and shear and field induced changes in the fluid’s microstructure. The fourth paper provides the related experimental results showing the combination of microstructural and rheological measurements under well defined conditions. The last paper of this section does not directly belong to ferrofluid research but to a closely related field—so called magneto-rheological (MR) suspensions, which differ from ferrofluids mainly by the size of the suspended particles and the strength of the rheological effects. As modern theoretical approaches, like the one discussed by Liu et al in the second section have shown, the relation between the effects in ferrofluids and those in MR fluids is so close that it could probably be described in a common theory. Sections four and five contain the application orientated results. In the fourth section the medical applications are the focus of interest. The section starts with a paper which could have also been placed in the synthesis section—the growth of magnetotactic bacteria and the extraction of the magnetic particles produced by these bacteria. The paper also contains information about the characterization of the particles especially with respect to their application. The characterization aspect is then continued in two papers outlining new diagnostic techniques with close relation to future biomedical application of magnetic fluids. Next in vitro applications, especially questions of cell separation using magnetic forces, are highlighted before the final papers address the therapeutic aspects of magnetic drug targeting and magnetic hyperthermia. Finally the fifth section describes three different new approaches for the technical use of ferrofluids. Again, the specialized design of the fluids themselves is an important step towards the new application goals. Altogether the papers within this issue outline the unique potential of magnetically controlled suspensions, the interdisciplinary nature of the related research and the prospects of strongly networked and interdisciplinary activities in the field. I hope that it will give an insight into the fascination of ferrofluid research and a feeling for the advances made in the past years.

  14. Forord - Preface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Skjenneberg (ed.

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available As the case in the previous year, the conference was highly marked by the Chernobyl reactor accident. According to the contributed papers and the subsequent discussions, the problems are a good step nearer to be solved after one year trials and efforts.

  15. Editor's Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Jon Bartley

    2007-01-01

      This volume, the third in the series, contains the proceedings of the conference 'Law before Gratian' and covers a wide range of topics from individual and local studies to broader reflections on the status and function of law in medieval European societies before the scholastic legal 'revoluti...... to this volume are Maurizio Lupoi (Genova), Alic Rio (Oxford), Charles Radding (Michigan), Martin Brett (Cambridge), Bruce Brasington (West Texas A&M) and Dominique Bauer (Ghent)....

  16. PREFACE: Editorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikhanov, Mikhail N.; Pivovarov, Yury L.

    2010-04-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at 8th International Symposium on Radiation from Relativistic Electrons in Periodic Structures (RREPS'09), which was held in Zvenigorod, Moscow Region, Russia, from 7 to 11 September 2009, organized jointly by National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow) and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk), Russia. University MEPhI (Moscow) and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk), Russia. RREPS was founded in September 1993 by an initiative of the Nuclear Physics Institute at Tomsk Polytechnic University, Russia, with the intention of strengthening basic and applied research focused on radiation from relativistic particles in natural and artificial periodic structures. Since then, the symposium has developed into a forum attracting scientists from different fields and from many countries all over the world. RREPS'09 followed previous successful series of biennial RREPS symposia at Tomsk (1993, 1995, 1997, 2003), Baikal Lake (1999), Aya Lake (Altai, Russia, 2001) and Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic, 2007). Five NIMB topical issues (V 145 No 1-2, October 1998; V 173 No 1-2, January 2001; V 201(1) January 2003; V 227, Issues 1-2, January 2005; V 266, Issue 17, September 2008) have been published as outgrowth of these symposia. Traditionally, the RREPS program includes following topics: General Properties of Electromagnetic Radiation from Relativistic Particles Transition Radiation Parametric X- Radiation Diffraction Radiation and Smith-Purcell Effect Coherent Bremsstrahlung and Channeling Radiation Crystal- Assisted Processes Applications of Monochromatic X- and Gamma- Beams Produced at Electron Accelerators The present RREPS'09 Symposium was dedicated to the modern problems in radiation from relativistic electrons in crystals and other periodic structures, as well as to new applications of photon and electron beams. During the last few decades, electromagnetic radiation from relativistic particles, both in external fields and in matter, has always been an interesting field for investigation. Every kind of radiation reflects specific processes of fundamental atomic physics, classical or quantum electrodynamics and might have specific applications in accelerator physics (beam diagnostics), nuclear physics (hard photon sources), material science and medicine (X-Ray sources). Nowadays, electromagnetic radiation studies cover electron energies from a few MeV up to hundreds of GeV in many laboratories throughout the world. The goal is to study the physics of generation of various kinds of radiation and their interplay or combined effects and to find successful applications for them. New photon sources, which use new types of radiation at new accelerators (e.g. tabletop synchrotrons), may be considered complementary to conventional photon sources based on synchrotron radiation, undulator radiation and free electron lasers. We express our thanks to the members of the International Program Committee for their suggestions during the preparation of the scientific program of the workshop. We warmly thank the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow) and the Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk) for the financial and administrative support. We also acknowledge the valuable financial contributions by Russian Fund for Basic Research and "Dynasty" Foundation. Editors Mikhail N. Strikhanov National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Yury L. Pivovarov Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia

  17. GISP Preface

    OpenAIRE

    Pries-Heje , Jan; Roseman , Michael

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The process-based view is now an established paradigm for the design of organizations and their supportive systems. Business process management (BPM) is the discipline that comprises the set of methodologies, tools and techniques which facilitate the enterprise-wide establishment of process capabilities and projectspecific process lifecycle management support. Over the last decade, the field of BPM has matured substantially in terms of its practical uptake and impact a...

  18. Editor's preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    2001-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The Symposium on Fundamental Issues in Elementary Matter was held from September 25-29, 2000, in Bad Honnef, Germany. It brought together more than 50 leading experts on the structure and dynamics of elementary matter. The aim was to present a synopsis of recent developments in this rapidly progressing field. These proceedings bear witness that this goal has been fulfilled. The scope of the conference has been broad, spanning a variety of topics at the interface of nuclear and elementary particle physics. In the low-energy domain the focus was on nuclear structure, in particular exotic and superheavy nuclei. The recent discovery of new elements and of new fission phenomena makes this a fascinating topic. As a second focus of attention the many facets of elementary matter at high energies were the subject of various talks. Heavy ion collisions are in wide use to probe hadronic matter under conditions of extreme temperature and high density. Several phase transitions are expected to occur, most notably the phase transition to the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Various speakers addressed the physics of dense hadronic matter, the nuclear equation of state, strangeness and antimatter production and many related subjects, both from the theoretical and the experimental perspective. Other talks reported on recent advances like color superconductivity as a new theoretical speculation, first results from the STAR experiment at RHIC, or the newest developments in cosmic ray physics. This high-level symposium was dedicated to the memory of a distinguished scientist. Michael Danos, who died on Aug. 30, 1999 in Washington, DC. He had spent most of his professional life as a researcher at NIST, the former National Bureau of Standards. Michael was a physicist of wide ranging interests who made various important contributions to theoretical nuclear physics, e.g. in the areas of photonuclear reactions, relativistic many-body physics, and high-energy heavy ion collisions. This symposium was meant as a token of appreciation for his life, his work and his personality by his friends and colleagues. Mike certainly would have enjoyed the fine talks, the lively discussions, the excursion to the Oelberg, and the hospitable setting at the DPG conference center. My special thanks go to the Wilhelm und Else Heraeus Stiftung for its generous support, which made this symposium possible. I want to express my gratitude to Johann Rafelski, Tucson, for his advice. Thanks are also due to Mathias Brandstetter for his assistance in organizing the conference and to Joachim Reinhardt for his help in preparing the proceedings. Finally, I acknowledge the agreeable collaboration with Istvan Lovas, editor-in-chief of Heavy Ion Physics. (author)

  19. WLC Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret, Josep M.; Sebé, Francesc

    Low-cost devices are the key component of several applications: RFID tags permit an automated supply chain management while smart cards are a secure means of storing cryptographic keys required for remote and secure authentication in e-commerce and e-government applications. These devices must be cheap in order to permit their cost-effective massive manufacturing and deployment. Unfortunately, their low cost limits their computational power. Other devices such as nodes of sensor networks suffer from an additional constraint, namely, their limited battery life. Secure applications designed for these devices cannot make use of classical cryptographic primitives designed for full-fledged computers.

  20. Bifunctional Alkylating Agent-Induced p53 and Nonclassical Nuclear Factor kB Responses and Cell Death are Altered by Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: A Potential Role for Antioxidant/Electrophilic Response-Element Signaling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Minsavage, Gary D; Dillman III, James F

    2007-01-01

    ...) occurred within 5 min after exposure to tumor necrosis factor-alpha. However, exposure to BFA induced nonclassical NF-kB signaling as loss of IkBa was not observed until 2 or 6 h in NHEK or HaCaT cells, respectively...

  1. Functional contribution of elevated circulating and hepatic non-classical CD14CD16 monocytes to inflammation and human liver fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning W Zimmermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocyte-derived macrophages critically perpetuate inflammatory responses after liver injury as a prerequisite for organ fibrosis. Experimental murine models identified an essential role for the CCR2-dependent infiltration of classical Gr1/Ly6C(+ monocytes in hepatic fibrosis. Moreover, the monocyte-related chemokine receptors CCR1 and CCR5 were recently recognized as important fibrosis modulators in mice. In humans, monocytes consist of classical CD14(+CD16(- and non-classical CD14(+CD16(+ cells. We aimed at investigating the relevance of monocyte subpopulations for human liver fibrosis, and hypothesized that 'non-classical' monocytes critically exert inflammatory as well as profibrogenic functions in patients during liver disease progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed circulating monocyte subsets from freshly drawn blood samples of 226 patients with chronic liver disease (CLD and 184 healthy controls by FACS analysis. Circulating monocytes were significantly expanded in CLD-patients compared to controls with a marked increase of the non-classical CD14(+CD16(+ subset that showed an activated phenotype in patients and correlated with proinflammatory cytokines and clinical progression. Correspondingly, CD14(+CD16(+ macrophages massively accumulated in fibrotic/cirrhotic livers, as evidenced by immunofluorescence and FACS. Ligands of monocyte-related chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR1 and CCR5 were expressed at higher levels in fibrotic and cirrhotic livers, while CCL3 and CCL4 were also systemically elevated in CLD-patients. Isolated monocyte/macrophage subpopulations were functionally characterized regarding cytokine/chemokine expression and interactions with primary human hepatic stellate cells (HSC in vitro. CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes released abundant proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, CD14(+CD16(+, but not CD14(+CD16(- monocytes could directly activate collagen-producing HSC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data

  2. Squeezing and other non-classical features in k-photon anharmonic oscillator in binomial and negative binomial states of the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, A.; Lawande, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic study of squeezing obtained from k-photon anharmonic oscillator (with interaction hamiltonian of the form (a † ) k , k ≥ 2) interacting with light whose statistics can be varied from sub-Poissonian to poissonian via binomial state of field and super-Poissonian to poissonian via negative binomial state of field is presented. The authors predict that for all values of k there is a tendency increase in squeezing with increased sub-Poissonian character of the field while the reverse is true with super-Poissonian field. They also present non-classical behavior of the first order coherence function explicitly for k = 2 case (i.e., for two-photon anharmonic oscillator model used for a Kerr-like medium) with variation in the statistics of the input light

  3. Entanglement and Other Nonclassical Properties of Two Two-Level Atoms Interacting with a Two-Mode Binomial Field: Constant and Intensity-Dependent Coupling Regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoly, M.K.; Hekmatara, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the interaction between two two-level atoms and a two-mode binomial field with a general intensity-dependent coupling regime. The outlined dynamical problem has explicit analytical solution, by which we can evaluate a few of its physical features of interest. To achieve the purpose of the paper, after choosing a particular nonlinearity function, we investigate the quantum statistics, atomic population inversion and at last the linear entropy of the atom-field system which is a good measure for the degree of entanglement. In detail, the effects of binomial field parameters, in addition to different initial atomic states on the temporal behavior of the mentioned quantities have been analyzed. The results show that, the values of binomial field parameters and the initial state of the two atoms influence on the nonclassical effects in the obtained states through which one can tune the nonclassicality criteria appropriately. Setting intensity-dependent coupling function equal to 1 reduces the results to the constant coupling case. By comparing the latter case with the nonlinear regime, we will observe that the nonlinearity disappears the pattern of collapse-revival phenomenon in the evolution of Mandel parameter and population inversion (which can be seen in the linear case with constant coupling), however, more typical collapse-revivals will be appeared for the cross-correlation function in the nonlinear case. Finally, in both linear and nonlinear regime, the entropy remains less than (but close to) 0.5. In other words the particular chosen nonlinearity does not critically affect on the entropy of the system. (paper)

  4. Pravastatin and endothelium dependent vasomotion after coronary angioplasty: the PREFACE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, H J; Schalij, M J; Kauer, B; Visser, R F; van Dijkman, P R; Jukema, J W; Zwinderman, A H; Bruschke, A V

    2001-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitor pravastatin ameliorates endothelium mediated responses of dilated coronary segments: the PREFACE (pravastatin related effects following angioplasty on coronary endothelium) trial. A double blind, randomised, placebo controlled, multicentre study. Four hospitals in the Netherlands. 63 non-smoking, non-hypercholesterolaemic patients scheduled for elective balloon angioplasty (pravastatin 34, placebo 29). The effects of three months of pravastatin treatment (40 mg daily) on endothelium dependent vasomotor function were studied. Balloon angioplasty was undertaken one month after randomisation, and coronary vasomotor function tests using acetylcholine were performed two months after balloon angioplasty. The angiograms were analysed quantitatively. The efficacy measure was the acetylcholine induced change in mean arterial diameter, determined in the dilated segment and in an angiographically normal segment of an adjacent non-manipulated coronary artery. Increasing acetylcholine doses produced vasoconstriction in the dilated segments (p = 0.004) but not in the normal segments. Pravastatin did not affect the vascular response to acetylcholine in either the dilated segments (p = 0.09) or the non-dilated sites. Endothelium dependent vasomotion in normal segments was correlated with that in dilated segments (r = 0.47, p < 0.001). There were fewer procedure related events in the pravastatin group than in the placebo group (p < 0.05). Endothelium dependent vasomotion in normal segments is correlated with that in dilated segments. A significant beneficial effect of pravastatin on endothelial function could not be shown, but in the dilated segments there was a trend towards a beneficial treatment effect in the pravastatin group.

  5. Energy, Transport, & the Environment Addressing the Sustainable Mobility Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    King, Sir

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable mobility is a highly complex problem as it is affected by the interactions between socio-economic, environmental, technological and political issues. Energy, Transport, & the Environment: Addressing the Sustainable Mobility Paradigm brings together leading figures from business, academia and governments to address the challenges and opportunities involved in working towards sustainable mobility. Key thinkers and decision makers approach topics and debates including:   ·         energy security and resource scarcity ·         greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions ·         urban planning, transport systems and their management ·         governance and finance of transformation ·         the threats of terrorism and climate change to our transport systems.   Introduced by a preface from U.S. Secretary Steven Chu and an outline by the editors, Dr Oliver Inderwildi and Sir David King, Energy, Transport, & the Environment is divided into six secti...

  6. Developing Space Weather products and services in Europe – Preface to the Special Issue on COST Action ES0803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belehaki Anna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available COST Action ES0803 “Developing Space Weather products and services in Europe” primarily aimed at forming an interdisciplinary network among European scientists dealing with different issues relevant to Geospace as well as warning system developers and operators in order to assess existing Space Weather products and recommend new ones. The work that has been implemented from 2008 to 2012 resulted in advances in modeling and predicting Space Weather, in recommendations for the validation of Space Weather models, in proposals for new Space Weather products and services, and in dissemination, training, and outreach activities. This preface summarizes the most important achievements of this European activity that are detailed in this special issue by the key scientists who participated in COST Action ES0803.

  7. DNA binding mode of the cis and trans geometries of new antitumor nonclassical platinum complexes containing piperidine, piperazine or 4-picoline ligand in cell-free media. Relations to their activity in cancer cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpárková, Jana; Marini, Victoria; Najajreh, Y.; Gibson, D.; Brabec, Viktor

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 20 (2003), s. 6321-6332 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5004101; GA AV ČR KJB5004301; GA ČR GA305/01/0418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : cross links * DNA * nonclassical platinum complexes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.922, year: 2003

  8. Number-phase entropic squeezing and nonclassical properties of a three-level atom interacting with a two-mode field: intensity-dependent coupling, deformed Kerr medium, and detuning effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Mohammad Javad; Tavassoly, Mohammad Kazem

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we follow our presented model in J. Opt. Soc. Am. B {\\bf 30}, 1109--1117 (2013), in which the interaction between a $\\Lambda$-type three-level atom and a quantized two-mode radiation field in a cavity in the presence of nonlinearities is studied. After giving a brief review on the procedure of obtaining the state vector of the atom-field system, some further interesting and important physical features (which are of particular interest in the quantum optics field of research) of the whole system state, i.e., the number-phase entropic uncertainty relation (based on the two-mode Pegg-Barnett formalism) and some of the nonclassicality signs consist of sub-Poissonian statistics, Cauchy-Schwartz inequality and two kinds of squeezing phenomenon are investigated. During our presentation, the effects of intensity-dependent coupling, deformed Kerr medium and the detuning parameters on the depth and domain of each of the mentioned nonclassical criteria of the considered quantum system are studied, in detail. It is shown that each of the mentioned nonclassicality aspects can be obtained by appropriately choosing the related parameters.

  9. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  10. Glucose transporter expression differs between bovine monocyte and macrophage subsets and is influenced by milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, M; Hussen, J; Koy, M; Dänicke, S; Schuberth, H-J; Breves, G

    2016-03-01

    The peripartal period of dairy cows is characterized by negative energy balance and higher incidences of infectious diseases such as mastitis or metritis. With the onset of lactation, milk production is prioritized and large amounts of glucose are transported into the mammary gland. Decreased overall energy availability might impair the function of monocytes acting as key innate immune cells, which give rise to macrophages and dendritic cells and link innate and adaptive immunity. Information on glucose requirements of bovine immune cells is rare. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate glucose transporter expression of the 3 bovine monocyte subsets (classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes) and monocyte-derived macrophages and to identify influences of the peripartal period. Blood samples were either collected from nonpregnant healthy cows or from 16 peripartal German Holstein cows at d -14, +7, and +21 relative to parturition. Quantitative real-time PCR was applied to determine mRNA expression of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 in monocyte subsets and monocyte-derived macrophages. The low GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression in nonclassical monocytes was unaltered during differentiation into macrophages, whereas in classical and intermediate monocytes GLUT expression was downregulated. Alternatively activated M2 macrophages consumed more glucose compared with classically activated M1 macrophages. The GLUT4 mRNA was only detectable in unstimulated macrophages. Neither monocytes nor macrophages were insulin responsive. In the peripartum period, monocyte GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression and the GLUT3/GLUT1 ratio were negatively correlated with lactose production. The high-affinity GLUT3 transporter appears to be the predominant glucose transporter on bovine monocytes and macrophages, especially in the peripartal period when blood glucose levels decline. Glucose transporter expression in monocytes is downregulated as a function of lactose production, which

  11. Chamber transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system

  12. The production, purification and crystallization of a soluble form of the nonclassical MHC HLA-G: the essential role of cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, Craig S.; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Kostenko, Lyudmila; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2005-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å from crystals of HLA-G. Cobalt ions were found to be essential for the production of diffracting crystals. HLA-G is a nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule that is primarily expressed at the foetal–maternal interface. Although the role of HLA-G has not been fully elucidated, current evidence suggests it protects the foetus from the maternal immune response. In this report, HLA-G (44 kDa) is characterized by expression in Escherichia coli. The inclusion bodies were refolded in complex with a peptide derived from histone H2A (RIIPRHLQL), purified and subsequently crystallized. Correct refolding was determined using two conformation-dependent antibodies. Cobalt ions were shown to be an essential ingredient for obtaining diffraction-quality crystals. The crystals, which diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution, belonged to space group P3 2 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 77.15, c = 151.72 Å

  13. High-Density Lipoprotein Reduction Differentially Modulates to Classical and Nonclassical Monocyte Subpopulations in Metabolic Syndrome Patients and in LPS-Stimulated Primary Human Monocytes In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Johanna L.; Manjarrez-Reyna, Aaron N.; Gómez-Arauz, Angélica Y.; Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Bueno-Hernández, Nallely; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2018-01-01

    The effect of metabolic syndrome on human monocyte subpopulations has not yet been studied. Our main goal was to examine monocyte subpopulations in metabolic syndrome patients, while also identifying the risk factors that could directly influence these cells. Eighty-six subjects were divided into metabolic syndrome patients and controls. Monocyte subpopulations were quantified by flow cytometry, and interleukin- (IL-) 1β secretion levels were measured by ELISA. Primary human monocytes were cultured in low or elevated concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The nonclassical monocyte (NCM) percentage was significantly increased in metabolic syndrome patients as compared to controls, whereas classical monocytes (CM) were reduced. Among all metabolic syndrome risk factors, HDL reduction exhibited the most important correlation with monocyte subpopulations and then was studied in vitro. Low HDL concentration reduced the CM percentage, whereas it increased the NCM percentage and IL-1β secretion in LPS-treated monocytes. The LPS effect was abolished when monocytes were cultured in elevated HDL concentrations. Concurring with in vitro results, IL-1β serum values significantly increased in metabolic syndrome patients with low HDL levels as compared to metabolic syndrome patients without HDL reduction. Our data demonstrate that HDL directly modulates monocyte subpopulations in metabolic syndrome. PMID:29850624

  14. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA and Immune Regulation: How Do Classical and Non-Classical HLA Alleles Modulate Immune Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole B. Crux

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetic factors associated with susceptibility or resistance to viral infections are likely to involve a sophisticated array of immune response. These genetic elements may modulate other biological factors that account for significant influence on the gene expression and/or protein function in the host. Among them, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in viral pathogenesis in particular human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, is very well documented. We, recently, added a novel insight into the field by identifying the molecular mechanism associated with the protective role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-B27/B57 CD8+ T cells in the context of HIV-1 infection and why these alleles act as a double-edged sword protecting against viral infections but predisposing the host to autoimmune diseases. The focus of this review will be reexamining the role of classical and non-classical HLA alleles, including class Ia (HLA-A, -B, -C, class Ib (HLA-E, -F, -G, -H, and class II (HLA-DR, -DQ, -DM, and -DP in immune regulation and viral pathogenesis (e.g., HIV and HCV. To our knowledge, this is the very first review of its kind to comprehensively analyze the role of these molecules in immune regulation associated with chronic viral infections.

  15. A BENCHMARK PROGRAM FOR EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR COMPUTING SEISMIC RESPONSE OF COUPLED BUILDING-PIPING/EQUIPMENT WITH NON-CLASSICAL DAMPING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Degrassi, G.; Chokshi, N.

    2001-01-01

    Under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a comprehensive program to evaluate state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) systems with nonclassical damping. In this program, four benchmark models of coupled building-piping/equipment systems with different damping characteristics were analyzed for a suite of earthquakes by program participants applying their uniquely developed methods and computer programs. This paper presents the results of their analyses, and their comparison to the benchmark solutions generated by BNL using time domain direct integration methods. The participant's analysis results established using complex modal time history methods showed good comparison with the BNL solutions, while the analyses produced with either complex-mode response spectrum methods or classical normal-mode response spectrum method, in general, produced more conservative results, when averaged over a suite of earthquakes. However, when coupling due to damping is significant, complex-mode response spectrum methods performed better than the classical normal-mode response spectrum method. Furthermore, as part of the program objectives, a parametric assessment is also presented in this paper, aimed at evaluation of the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled NPP systems. It is believed that the findings and insights learned from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving licensing applications of these alternate methods to coupled systems

  16. High-Density Lipoprotein Reduction Differentially Modulates to Classical and Nonclassical Monocyte Subpopulations in Metabolic Syndrome Patients and in LPS-Stimulated Primary Human Monocytes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna L. Grün

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of metabolic syndrome on human monocyte subpopulations has not yet been studied. Our main goal was to examine monocyte subpopulations in metabolic syndrome patients, while also identifying the risk factors that could directly influence these cells. Eighty-six subjects were divided into metabolic syndrome patients and controls. Monocyte subpopulations were quantified by flow cytometry, and interleukin- (IL- 1β secretion levels were measured by ELISA. Primary human monocytes were cultured in low or elevated concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The nonclassical monocyte (NCM percentage was significantly increased in metabolic syndrome patients as compared to controls, whereas classical monocytes (CM were reduced. Among all metabolic syndrome risk factors, HDL reduction exhibited the most important correlation with monocyte subpopulations and then was studied in vitro. Low HDL concentration reduced the CM percentage, whereas it increased the NCM percentage and IL-1β secretion in LPS-treated monocytes. The LPS effect was abolished when monocytes were cultured in elevated HDL concentrations. Concurring with in vitro results, IL-1β serum values significantly increased in metabolic syndrome patients with low HDL levels as compared to metabolic syndrome patients without HDL reduction. Our data demonstrate that HDL directly modulates monocyte subpopulations in metabolic syndrome.

  17. The E7 oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 enters the nucleus via a nonclassical Ran-dependent pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeline, Michael; Merle, Eric; Moroianu, Junona

    2003-01-01

    E7, the major transforming protein of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV), type 16, binds and inactivates the retinoblastoma protein (pRb), and the Rb-related proteins p107 and p130. HPV16 E7 is a nuclear protein lacking a classical basic nuclear localization signal. In this study we investigated the nuclear import of HPV16 E7 oncoprotein in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. HPV16 E7 nuclear import was independent of pRb, as an E7 ΔDLYC variant defective in pRb binding was imported into the nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized cells as efficiently as wild-type E7 in the presence of exogenous cytosol. Interestingly, we discovered that HPV16 E7 is imported into the nuclei via a novel pathway different from those mediated by Kap α2β1 heterodimers, Kap β1, or Kap β2. Nuclear accumulation of E7 required Ran and was not inhibited by the RanG19V-GTP variant, an inhibitor of Kap β mediated import pathways. Together the data suggest that HPV16 E7 translocates through the nuclear pores via a nonclassical Ran-dependent pathway, independent of the main cytosolic Kap β import receptors

  18. The non-classical antigens of HLA-G and HLA-E as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and as therapeutic targets in transplantation and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigen HLA-G represents a tolerogenic molecule and is involved in the inhibition of natural killer cell and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. Under physiological conditions, HLA-G expression is mainly restricted to immune-privileged tissues, whereas it is overexpressed in tumors and transplants as well as in virus-infected cells. Due to its immunosuppressive features, HLA-G is important for pregnancy or organ transplantation and autoimmune diseases as well as cancer immune escape. This review focusses on the expression, regulation, and function of HLA-G in tumor cells andlor in transplants as well as therapeutic tools for enhancing (transplantation) or avoiding (tumor) tolerance. Thus, HLA-G or HLA-G-derived synthetic molecules might be used as therapeutic agents in combination with immunosuppressive drugs to enhance organ tolerance upon transplantation. In addition, HLA-G neoexpressing tumor cells could be targeted by HLA-G-specific microRNAs in order to enhance tumor immunogenicity.

  19. The preface by João Cabral de Melo Neto to Em Va Fer Joan Brossa: Theory and practice of realism in two poets from the post-war.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melcion Mateu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1951, the book Em va fer Joan Brossa [Joan Brossa  Made me] was published in Barcelona, with a preface by João Cabral de Melo Neto. It is a useful text to better understand Brossa as well as Cabral; it is a significant text in order to grasp the individual response of these poets to the problem of returning to realism for the early post-war period. A translation of João Cabral de Melo Neto's preface, previously unpublished in Portuguese, is presented here.

  20. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  1. Transport phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirczenow, G.; Marro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Some simple remarks on the basis of transport theory. - Entropy, dynamics and scattering theory. - Response, relaxation and fluctuation. - Fluctuating hydrodynamics and renormalization of susceptibilities and transport coefficients. - Irreversibility of the transport equations. - Ergodic theory and statistical mechanics. - Correlation functions in Heisenberg magnets. - On the Enskog hard-sphere kinetic eqquation and the transport phenomena of dense simple gases. - What can one learn from Lorentz models. - Conductivity in a magnetic field. - Transport properties in gases in presence of external fields. - Transport properties of dilute gases with internal structure. (orig.) [de

  2. Ex-Th17 (Nonclassical Th1) Cells Are Functionally Distinct from Classical Th1 and Th17 Cells and Are Not Constrained by Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basdeo, Sharee A; Cluxton, Deborah; Sulaimani, Jamal; Moran, Barry; Canavan, Mary; Orr, Carl; Veale, Douglas J; Fearon, Ursula; Fletcher, Jean M

    2017-03-15

    Th17 cells are an important therapeutic target in autoimmunity. However, it is known that Th17 cells exhibit considerable plasticity, particularly at sites of autoimmune inflammation. Th17 cells can switch to become ex-Th17 cells that no longer produce IL-17 but produce IFN-γ. These ex-Th17 cells are also called nonclassical Th1 cells because of their ability to produce IFN-γ, similar to Th1 cells; however, it is unclear whether they resemble Th1 or Th17 cells in terms of their function and regulation, and whether they have a pathogenic role in autoimmunity. We compared the phenotypic and functional features of human Th17, Th1, and ex-Th17 cell populations. Our data showed that despite their loss of IL-17 expression, ex-Th17 cells were more polyfunctional in terms of cytokine production than either Th1 or bona fide Th17 cells, and produced increased amounts of proinflammatory cytokines. The proliferative brake on Th17 cells appeared to be lifted because ex-Th17 cells proliferated more than Th17 cells after stimulation. In contrast with Th1 and Th17 cells, ex-Th17 cells were highly resistant to suppression of proliferation and cytokines by regulatory T cells. Finally, we showed that ex-Th17 cells accumulated in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these data indicate that human ex-Th17 cells are functionally distinct from Th1 and Th17 cells, and suggest that they may play a pathogenic role at sites of autoimmunity, such as the rheumatoid arthritis joint where they accumulate. These findings have implications for therapeutic strategies that target IL-17, because these may not inhibit pathogenic ex-Th17 cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Ouabain interactions with the α4 isoform of the sodium pump trigger non-classical steroid hormone signaling and integrin expression in spermatogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upmanyu, Neha; Dietze, Raimund; Kirch, Ulrike; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2016-11-01

    In addition to the ubiquitous α1 isoform of the sodium pump, sperm cells also express a male-specific α4 isoform whose function has been associated with sperm motility, fertility, and capacitation. Here we investigate in the murine spermatogenic cell line GC-2 interactions of the α4 isoform with the cardiotonic steroid ouabain in signaling cascades involved in the non-classical action of steroid hormones. Exposure of GC-2 cells to low concentrations of ouabain stimulates the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and of the transcription factors CREB and ATF-1. As a consequence of this signaling cascade, ouabain stimulates on the mRNA level the expression of integrins αv, β3 and α5, whose expression is also modulated by the cAMP response element. Increased expression of integrins αv and β3 is also seen in cultures of seminiferous tubules exposed to 10nM ouabain. At the protein level we observed a significant stimulation of β3 integrin expression by ouabain. Abrogation of α4 isoform expression by siRNA leads to the complete suppression of all ouabain-induced signaling mentioned above, including its stimulatory effect on the expression of β3 integrin. The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the induction of signaling cascades through the interaction of ouabain with the α4 isoform in a germ-cell derived cell line. The novel finding that these interactions lead to increased expression of integrins in GC-2 cells and the confirmation of these results in the ex vivo experiments indicate that hormone/receptor-like interactions of ouabain with the α4 isoform might be of significance for male physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters...

  5. Sustainable Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Ralph P.; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Marsden, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The transportation system is the backbone of economic and social progress and the means by which humans access goods and services and connect with one another. Yet, as the scale of transportation activities has grown worldwide, so too have the negative environmental, social, and economic impacts...... that relate to the construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure and the operation or use of the different transportation modes. The concept of sustainable transportation emerged in response to these concerns as part of the broader notion of sustainable development. Given the transportation...... sector’s significant contribution to global challenges such as climate change, it is often said that sustainable development cannot be achieved without sustainable transportation....

  6. Nuclear transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    During january and february 2003, a unique event concerning nuclear transport was reported and rated 1 on the INES scale. This event concerns the absence of a maintenance operation on a shipping cask. This shipping cask was used for several years for nuclear transport inside La-hague site before being re-assigned to transport on public thoroughfare. The re-assignment of the cask should have been preceded and conditioned by a maintenance operation whose purpose is to check the efficiency of its radiation shield. During this period 2 on-site inspections concerning the transport of nuclear materials were performed. (A.C.)

  7. Ocean transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frankel, Ernst G; Marcus, Henry S

    1973-01-01

    .... This analysis starts with a review of ocean transportation demand and supply including projections of ship capacity demand and world shipbuilding capacity under various economic and political assumptions...

  8. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-En

    2014-03-01

    hospitality. It is my privilege and pleasure to welcome you all to the 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces here in Taipei. Tom Thomas Halmstad, 1st June 2013 Greetings from Chairman of Local Organizing CommitteeVictor Lin It is the great honor of Center for Measurement Standards (CMS), metrology group of Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), to host the 14th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met & Props 2013) from 17-21 June, 2013, in Taipei, Taiwan. In collaboration with four local universities, National Taiwan University (NTU), National Cheng-Kung University (NCKU), National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (NTST) and National Tsing-Hua University (NTHU), we have spent more than one year to prepare this Conference since the approval by the International Programme Committee (IPC). With the guidance from the IPC, we are able to go through the laborious, but important, process of paper selection and review from more than 100 submissions, and also to maintain the tradition in gathering the high quality and state-of-the-art papers. Finally, more than 65 full papers are collected in the programme (oral and poster), and over 120 surface metrologists from 17 countries (or economies) will attend the Conference. As stated in the preface by Professor Thomas, this series of conferences were founded by Tom and late Professor Ken Stout in the United Kingdom more than thirty years ago. I was lucky to join Ken's research group in Birmingham, and to start my journey over surface metrology in 1989, under the financial support from ITRI. With the encouragement from Professor Liam Blunt and endeavors of my colleagues, we are able to hold the Conference first time in emerging Asia, and to ''carry on the heritage and pave the way to the future'' (a Chinese proverb) in surface metrology. Taiwan is also known as Formosa, from Portuguese Ilha Formosa, which means ''Beautiful Island

  9. Dynamics of entropy and nonclassical properties of the state of a Λ-type three-level atom interacting with a single-mode cavity field with intensity-dependent coupling in a Kerr medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, M J; Tavassoly, M K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the interaction between a three-level atom and a quantized single-mode field with ‘intensity-dependent coupling’ in a ‘Kerr medium’. The three-level atom is considered to be in a Λ-type configuration. Under particular initial conditions, which may be prepared for the atom and the field, the dynamical state vector of the entire system will be explicitly obtained, for the arbitrary nonlinearity function f(n) associated with any physical system. Then, after evaluating the variation of the field entropy against time, we will investigate the quantum statistics as well as some of the nonclassical properties of the introduced state. During our calculations we investigate the effects of intensity-dependent coupling, Kerr medium and detuning parameters on the depth and domain of the nonclassicality features of the atom–field state vector. Finally, we compare our obtained results with those of V-type three-level atoms. (paper)

  10. Dynamics of entropy and nonclassical properties of the state of a Λ-type three-level atom interacting with a single-mode cavity field with intensity-dependent coupling in a Kerr medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, M. J.; Tavassoly, M. K.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we study the interaction between a three-level atom and a quantized single-mode field with ‘intensity-dependent coupling’ in a ‘Kerr medium’. The three-level atom is considered to be in a Λ-type configuration. Under particular initial conditions, which may be prepared for the atom and the field, the dynamical state vector of the entire system will be explicitly obtained, for the arbitrary nonlinearity function f(n) associated with any physical system. Then, after evaluating the variation of the field entropy against time, we will investigate the quantum statistics as well as some of the nonclassical properties of the introduced state. During our calculations we investigate the effects of intensity-dependent coupling, Kerr medium and detuning parameters on the depth and domain of the nonclassicality features of the atom-field state vector. Finally, we compare our obtained results with those of V-type three-level atoms.

  11. Neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, Georges; Ducros, Gerard; Feron, Damien; Guerin, Yannick; Latge, Christian; Limoge, Yves; Santarini, Gerard; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Vernaz, Etienne; Coste-Delclaux, Mireille; M'Backe Diop, Cheikh; Nicolas, Anne; Andrieux, Catherine; Archier, Pascal; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Bernard, David; Biaise, Patrick; Blanc-Tranchant, Patrick; Bonin, Bernard; Bouland, Olivier; Bourganel, Stephane; Calvin, Christophe; Chiron, Maurice; Damian, Frederic; Dumonteil, Eric; Fausser, Clement; Fougeras, Philippe; Gabriel, Franck; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Gallo, Daniele; Hudelot, Jean-Pascal; Hugot, Francois-Xavier; Dat Huynh, Tan; Jouanne, Cedric; Lautard, Jean-Jacques; Laye, Frederic; Lee, Yi-Kang; Lenain, Richard; Leray, Sylvie; Litaize, Olivier; Magnaud, Christine; Malvagi, Fausto; Mijuin, Dominique; Mounier, Claude; Naury, Sylvie; Nicolas, Anne; Noguere, Gilles; Palau, Jean-Marc; Le Pallec, Jean-Charles; Peneliau, Yannick; Petit, Odile; Poinot-Salanon, Christine; Raepsaet, Xavier; Reuss, Paul; Richebois, Edwige; Roque, Benedicte; Royer, Eric; Saint-Jean, Cyrille de; Santamarina, Alain; Serot, Olivier; Soldevila, Michel; Tommasi, Jean; Trama, Jean-Christophe; Tsilanizara, Aime; Behar, Christophe; Provitina, Olivier; Lecomte, Michael; Forestier, Alain; Bender, Alexandra; Parisot, Jean-Francois; Finot, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    This bibliographical note presents a reference book which addresses the study of neutron transport in matter, the study of conditions for a chain reaction and the study of modifications of matter composition due to nuclear reactions. This book presents the main nuclear data, their measurement, assessment and processing, and the spallation. It proposes an overview of methods applied for the study of neutron transport: basic equations and their derived forms, deterministic methods and Monte Carlo method of resolution of the Boltzmann equation, methods of resolution of generalized Bateman equations, methods of time resolution of space kinetics coupled equations. It presents the main calculation codes, discusses the qualification and experimental aspects, and gives an overview of neutron transport applications: neutron transport calculation of reactors, neutron transport coupled with other disciplines, physics of fuel cycle, criticality

  12. Advancements in nonclassical gas dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nannan, N.R.

    2009-01-01

    Shock waves can be formed in all states of matter, be it in the single- or multi-phase condition, when the substance is subjected to a rapid change of state, e.g., a sudden pressure variation. In the case of shock waves in vapors and gases, because of the fact that the developed theory is often

  13. PREFACE: Festschrift to mark the sixtieth birthday of Professor Jens Lothe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jøssang, Torstein; Barnett, David M.

    1992-01-01

    with their work. No doubt his warm personality, natural curiosity and willingness to promote and seize opportunities for collaboration across national boundaries is what has allowed great intellect stationed in a somewhat remote part of the scientific community to engender such a large international following, when other gifted men might have chosen to work in isolation under similar circumstances. Vladimir Alshits may have said it best during his visit to Oslo last April, namely, "There are three Norwegian names known to every Russian—Henrik Ibsen, Fridtjof Nansen and Jens Lothe". None of this is meant to imply that Jens has neglected or ignored his colleagues in Norway. Indeed, quite the contrary is true, but we believe the exposition on the development within the Solid State Group and the Cooperative Phenomena Program at the University of Oslo and at NTH in Trondheim in this symposium and its proceedings, presented by the local staff and present close associates addresses Jens Lothe's contribution on the home front far better than this preface would allow. We believe we speak for all the symposium attendees by extending to Jens the happiest greetings and our best wishes for continued health and happiness.

  14. Animal Transports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ludrovcová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Originality: The research is aimed to the animal transports issue, from two points of view – first is the animal cruelty and second is the policy and economic consideration. The goal is to acquaint the readers with the transports risks and its cruelty and evaluation of the economic, political aspects for he involved countries. The study is oriented on more points of view, what is rare in works with a similar theme. Method: This paper examines many issues and examinations from different authors and subsequently summarized the findings with authors own knowledge to one expanded unit. Results: Results proves, that livestock transports have negative impact on animal´s health, environment. Number of transported animals is rising every year. Society: Research familiarize the society with the animal transports, cruelty against animals during them, and influence of transports on some countries, their economy, policy. People get better informed and can form their own opinion on this topic. They may start acting, undertaking some steps to improve the present situation, what could help a lot to animals and environment. Limitations / further research: Future research could show progress and improvement of transports, quality of food supply and economics.

  15. Preface: Special issue featuring papers from the International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggiani, L.; Bordone, P.; Brunetti, R.

    2004-02-01

    The International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors (HCIS-13) celebrates 30 years since it first took place in Modena. Nonequilibrium dynamics of charge carriers, pioneered by the hot-electron concept, is an important issue for understanding electro-optic transport properties in semiconductor materials and structures. In these 30 years several topics have matured, and new ones have emerged thus fertilizing the field with a variety of physical problems and new ideas. The history of the conference is summarized in the opening paper `30 years of HCIS'. The future of the conference seems secure considering the continued lively interest of the participants. The conference addressed eleven major topics which constitute the backbone of the proceedings and are summarized as follows: carrier transport in low dimensional and nanostructure systems, nonequilibrium carriers in superlattices and devices, small devices and related phenomena, carrier dynamics and fluctuations, carrier quantum dynamics, coherent/incoherent carrier dynamics of optical excitations and ultra-fast optical phenomena, nonlinear optical effects, transport in organic matter, semiconductor-based spintronics, coherent dynamics in solid state systems for quantum processing and communication, novel materials and devices. Nanometric space scale and femtosecond time scale represent the ultimate domains of theoretical, experimental and practical interest. Traditional fields such as bulk properties, quantum transport, fluctuations and chaotic phenomena, etc, have received thorough and continuous attention. Emerging fields from previous conferences, such as quantum processing and communication, have been better assessed. New fields, such as spintronics and electron transport in organic matter, have appeared for the first time. One plenary talk, 11 invited talks, 230 submitted abstracts covering all these topics constituted a single-session conference. Following scientific selection

  16. Ocean transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frankel, Ernst G; Marcus, Henry S

    1973-01-01

    .... The discussion of technology considers the ocean transportation system as a whole, and the composite subsystems such as hull, outfit, propulsion, cargo handling, automation, and control and interface technology...

  17. Ocean transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frankel, Ernst G; Marcus, Henry S

    1973-01-01

    .... In ocean transportation economics we present investment and operating costs as well as the results of a study of financing of shipping. Similarly, a discussion of government aid to shipping is presented.

  18. Nicaragua - Transportation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation examines impacts of the Transportation Project in three ways. First, we calculate economic rates of return associated with reduced user costs for each...

  19. Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou

    Flow and sediment transport are important in relation to several engineering topics, e.g. erosion around structures, backfilling of dredged channels and nearshore morphological change. The purpose of the present book is to describe both the basic hydrodynamics and the basic sediment transport...... mechanics. Chapter 1 deals with fundamentals in fluid mechanics with emphasis on bed shear stress by currents, while chapter 3 discusses wave boundary layer theory. They are both written with a view to sediment transport. Sediment transport in rivers, cross-shore and longshore are dealt with in chapters 2......, 4 and 5, respectively. It is not the intention of the book to give a broad review of the literature on this very wide topic. The book tries to pick up information which is of engineering importance. An obstacle to the study of sedimentation is the scale effect in model tests. Whenever small...

  20. RF transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems. (author)

  1. Public transport

    OpenAIRE

    Lethbridge, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Public transport plays an essential role in enabling people from low income and other disadvantaged groups to access employment and services. It also contributes to the development of social networks and social capital, by helping people to visit friends and relatives and take part in community and other social activities. Public policy makers have begun to recognise that adequate public transport provision can play an important role in reducing social exclusion. [Taken from introductory para...

  2. Orbital transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oertel, H. Jr.; Koerner, H.

    1993-01-01

    The Third Aerospace Symposium in Braunschweig presented, for the first time, the possibility of bringing together the classical disciplines of aerospace engineering and the natural science disciplines of meteorology and air chemistry in a european setting. In this way, aspects of environmental impact on the atmosphere could be examined quantitatively. An essential finding of the european conference, is the unrestricted agreement of the experts that the given launch frequencies of the present orbital transport result in a negligible amount of pollutants being released in the atmosphere. The symposium does, however, call attention to the increasing need to consider the effect of orbital and atmospheric environmental impact of a future increase in launch frequencies of orbital transport in connection with future space stations. The Third Aerospace Symposium, 'Orbital Transport, Technical, Meteorological and Chemical Aspects', constituted a first forum of discussion for engineers and scientists. Questions of new orbital transport technologies and their environmental impact were to be discussed towards a first consensus. Through the 34 reports and articles, the general problems of space transportation and environmental protection were addressed, as well as particular aspects of high temperatures during reentry in the atmosphere of the earth, precision navigation of flight vehicles or flow behavior and air chemistry in the stratosphere. (orig./CT). 342 figs

  3. Unusual evolutionary conservation and further species-specific adaptations of a large family of nonclassical MHC class Ib genes across different degrees of genome ploidy in the amphibian subfamily Xenopodinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Goyos, Ana; Taran, Joseph; De Jesús Andino, Francisco; Ohta, Yuko; Robert, Jacques

    2014-06-01

    Nonclassical MHC class Ib (class Ib) genes are a family of highly diverse and rapidly evolving genes wherein gene numbers, organization, and expression markedly differ even among closely related species rendering class Ib phylogeny difficult to establish. Whereas among mammals there are few unambiguous class Ib gene orthologs, different amphibian species belonging to the anuran subfamily Xenopodinae exhibit an unusually high degree of conservation among multiple class Ib gene lineages. Comparative genomic analysis of class Ib gene loci of two divergent (~65 million years) Xenopodinae subfamily members Xenopus laevis (allotetraploid) and Xenopus tropicalis (diploid) shows that both species possess a large cluster of class Ib genes denoted as Xenopus/Silurana nonclassical (XNC/SNC). Our study reveals two distinct phylogenetic patterns among these genes: some gene lineages display a high degree of flexibility, as demonstrated by species-specific expansion and contractions, whereas other class Ib gene lineages have been maintained as monogenic subfamilies with very few changes in their nucleotide sequence across divergent species. In this second category, we further investigated the XNC/SNC10 gene lineage that in X. laevis is required for the development of a distinct semi-invariant T cell population. We report compelling evidence of the remarkable high degree of conservation of this gene lineage that is present in all 12 species of the Xenopodinae examined, including species with different degrees of ploidy ranging from 2, 4, 8 to 12 N. This suggests that the critical role of XNC10 during early T cell development is conserved in amphibians.

  4. Preface: Research advances in vadose zone hydrology through simulations with the TOUGH codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterle, Stefan; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2004-01-01

    Numerical simulators are playing an increasingly important role in advancing our fundamental understanding of hydrological systems. They are indispensable tools for managing groundwater resources, analyzing proposed and actual remediation activities at contaminated sites, optimizing recovery of oil, gas, and geothermal energy, evaluating subsurface structures and mining activities, designing monitoring systems, assessing the long-term impacts of chemical and nuclear waste disposal, and devising improved irrigation and drainage practices in agricultural areas, among many other applications. The complexity of subsurface hydrology in the vadose zone calls for sophisticated modeling codes capable of handling the strong nonlinearities involved, the interactions of coupled physical, chemical and biological processes, and the multiscale heterogeneities inherent in such systems. The papers in this special section of ''Vadose Zone Journal'' are illustrative of the enormous potential of such numerical simulators as applied to the vadose zone. The papers describe recent developments and applications of one particular set of codes, the TOUGH family of codes, as applied to nonisothermal flow and transport in heterogeneous porous and fractured media (http://www-esd.lbl.gov/TOUGH2). The contributions were selected from presentations given at the TOUGH Symposium 2003, which brought together developers and users of the TOUGH codes at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California, for three days of information exchange in May 2003 (http://www-esd.lbl.gov/TOUGHsymposium). The papers presented at the symposium covered a wide range of topics, including geothermal reservoir engineering, fracture flow and vadose zone hydrology, nuclear waste disposal, mining engineering, reactive chemical transport, environmental remediation, and gas transport. This Special Section of ''Vadose Zone Journal'' contains revised and expanded versions of selected papers from the

  5. Travel and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Jan; Roesdahl, Else

    2007-01-01

    On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments......On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments...

  6. Transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    The transport system comprises at least one road surface (2) and at least one vehicle (4) on wheels (6). The road surface (2) has a substantially bowl-shaped cross section and the vehicle (4) is designed so that the wheels (6) run directly on the road surface (2) while the road surface (2) acts as a

  7. Optimal transport

    CERN Document Server

    Eckmann, B

    2008-01-01

    At the close of the 1980s, the independent contributions of Yann Brenier, Mike Cullen and John Mather launched a revolution in the venerable field of optimal transport founded by G Monge in the 18th century, which has made breathtaking forays into various other domains of mathematics ever since. The author presents a broad overview of this area.

  8. Nuclear transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Here is given the decree (2001/1199) of the 10. of december 2001 relative to the passing of safety rules concerning the maritime transport of spent fuels, plutonium and high-level radioactive wastes contained in packages. (O.M.)

  9. Transport fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Jørgensen, Henning; Schüßler, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the use of transport fuel derived from biomass increased four-fold between 2003 and 2012. Mainly based on food resources, these conventional biofuels did not achieve the expected emission savings and contributed to higher prices for food commod - ities, especially maize and oilseeds...

  10. Nuclear transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    During September and October 2001, 1 event has been reported and classified at the first level of the INES scale. This incident concerns the violation of the European regulation that imposes to any driver of radioactive matter of being the holder of a certificate asserting that he attended a special training. During this period, 13 in-site inspections have been made in places related to nuclear transport. (A.C.)

  11. PREFACE: The 7th International Seminar on Geometry, Continua and Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, David A.

    2007-04-01

    It gives me great pleasure to present the proceedings of the 7th International Seminar on Geometry, Continua and Microstructures (GCM 7). The conference took place on 25-27 September 2006 at Lancaster University and the local organisers were Robin Tucker, Tim Walton, myself and Jonathan Gratus of the Lancaster University Mathematical Physics Group. Modern field theories of mechanically and electrically responsive continua have a wealth of interesting applications in physics. Such theories provide effective macroscopic models of complex systems, such as living tissue and material with dynamical defects, that capture macroscopic consequences of microscopic phenomena. GCM is an interdisciplinary conference series, initiated by the Eringen medallist Gérard A Maugin, that brings together physicists and applied mathematicians who have interests in continuum mechanics and differential geometry and who aim to develop new and powerful methods for analysing the behaviour of complex mechanical systems. The earlier conferences in the series were held in Paris, Madrid, Mannheim, Turin, Sinaia and Belgrade. This volume addresses a variety of topics including the physics of saturated porous media, the relationship between growth in living tissue and molecular transport, the mechanics of polymer bonds, the macroscopic properties of damaged elastomers, the mechanics of carbon nanotubes, the geometry of balance systems in Continuum Thermodynamics and wave propagation in the material manifold. I would like to warmly thank the rest of the organising committee and the conference participants for making GCM 7 an enjoyable and rewarding occasion. Photographs may be found at http://www.lancs.ac.uk/depts/spc/conf/gcm7/wss/index.htm David A Burton Editor

  12. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ručevskis, Sandris

    2015-11-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies (IMST 2015) took place in Riga, Latvia from 30th September - 2nd October, 2015. The first event of the conference series, dedicated to the 150th anniversary of the Faculty of Civil Engineering of Riga Technical University, was held in 2013. Following the established tradition, the aim of the conference was to promote and discuss the latest results of industrial and academic research carried out in the following engineering fields: analysis and design of advanced structures and buildings; innovative, ecological and energy efficient building materials; maintenance, inspection and monitoring methods; construction technologies; structural management; sustainable and safe transport infrastructure; and geomatics and geotechnics. The conference provided an excellent opportunity for leading researchers, representatives of the industrial community, engineers, managers and students to share the latest achievements, discuss recent advances and highlight the current challenges. IMST 2015 attracted over 120 scientists from 24 countries. After rigorous reviewing, over 80 technical papers were accepted for publication in the conference proceedings. On behalf of the organizing committee I would like to thank all the speakers, authors, session chairs and reviewers for their efficient and timely effort. The 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies was organized by the Faculty of Civil Engineering of Riga Technical University with the support of the Latvia State Research Programme under the grant agreement "INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND SMART TECHNOLOGIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, IMATEH". I would like to express sincere gratitude to Juris Smirnovs, Dean of the Faculty of Civil Engineering, and Andris Chate, manager of the Latvia State Research Programme. Finally, I would like to thank all those who helped to make this event happen. Special thanks go to Diana

  13. Time-resolved lateral spin-caloric transport of optically generated spin packets in n-GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbbels, Stefan; Güntherodt, Gernot; Beschoten, Bernd

    2018-05-01

    We report on lateral spin-caloric transport (LSCT) of electron spin packets which are optically generated by ps laser pulses in the non-magnetic semiconductor n-GaAs at K. LSCT is driven by a local temperature gradient induced by an additional cw heating laser. The spatio-temporal evolution of the spin packets is probed using time-resolved Faraday rotation. We demonstrate that the local temperature-gradient induced spin diffusion is solely driven by a non-equilibrium hot spin distribution, i.e. without involvement of phonon drag effects. Additional electric field-driven spin drift experiments are used to verify directly the validity of the non-classical Einstein relation for moderately doped semiconductors at low temperatures for near band-gap excitation.

  14. PREFACE: 4th International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Fourth International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2010 The Fourth International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'10) is organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. It was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from July 5 to July 10, 2010. The scientific programme covers the topics Fusion Plasma and Materials; Plasma Modeling and Fundamentals; Plasma Sources, Diagnostics and Technology. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007), IWSSPP'08, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 207 (2010), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 34 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing

  15. PREFACE: Light element atom, molecule and radical behaviour in the divertor and edge plasma regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kung

    2015-01-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains contributions by participants in an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on "Light element atom, molecule and radical behaviour in the divertor and edge plasma regions" (in magnetic fusion devices). Light elements are the dominant impurity species in fusion experiments and in the near-wall plasma they occur as atoms or ions and also as hydrides and other molecules and molecular ions. Hydrogen (H or D, and T in a reactor) is the dominant species in fusion experiments, but all light elements He - O and Ne are of interest for various reasons. Helium is a product of the D+T fusion reaction and is introduced in experiments for transport studies. Lithium is used for wall coating and also as a beam diagnostic material. Beryllium is foreseen as a wall material for the ITER experiment and is used on the Joint European Torus (JET) experiment. Boron may be used as a coating material for the vessel walls. Carbon (graphite or carbon-fiber composite) is often used as the target material for wall regions subject to high heat load. Nitrogen may be used as a buffer gas for edge plasma cooling. Oxygen is a common impurity in experiments due to residual water vapor. Finally, neon is another choice as a buffer gas. Data for collisional and radiative processes involving these species are important for plasma modelling and for diagnostics. The participants in the CRP met 3 times over the years 2009-2013 for a research coordination meeting. Reports and presentation materials for these meetings are available through the web page on coordinated research projects of the (IAEA) Atomic and Molecular Data Unit [1]. Some of the numerical data generated in the course of the CRP is available through the ALADDIN database [2]. The IAEA takes the opportunity to thank the participants in the CRP for their dedicated efforts in the course of the CRP and for their contributions to this volume. The IAEA

  16. PREFACE: Euro-TMCS I: Theory, Modelling and Computational Methods for Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Campos, F. M.; Rodríguez-Bolívar, S.; Tomić, S.

    2015-05-01

    The present issue contains a selection of the best contributed works presented at the first Euro-TMCS conference (Theory, Modelling and Computational Methods for Semiconductors, European Session). The conference was held at Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Granada, Spain on 28st-30st January 2015. This conference is the first European edition of the TMCS conference series which started in 2008 at the University of Manchester and has always been held in the United Kingdom. Four previous conferences have been previously carried out (Manchester 2008, York 2010, Leeds 2012 and Salford 2014). Euro-TMCS is run for three days; the first one devoted to giving invited tutorials, aimed particularly at students, on recent development of theoretical methods. On this occasion the session was focused on the presentation of widely-used computational methods for the modelling of physical processes in semiconductor materials. Freely available simulation software (SIESTA, Quantum Espresso and Yambo) as well as commercial software (TiberCad and MedeA) were presented in the conference by members of their development team, offering to the audience an overview of their capabilities for research. The second part of the conference showcased prestigious invited and contributed oral presentations, alongside poster sessions, in which direct discussion with authors was promoted. The scope of this conference embraces modelling, theory and the use of sophisticated computational tools in semiconductor science and technology. Theoretical approaches represented in this meeting included: Density Functional Theory, Semi-empirical Electronic Structure Methods, Multi-scale Approaches, Modelling of PV devices, Electron Transport, and Graphene. Topics included, but were not limited to: Optical Properties of Quantum Nanostructures including Colloids and Nanotubes, Plasmonics, Magnetic Semiconductors, Photonic Structures, and Electronic Devices. The Editors Acknowledgments: We would like to thank all

  17. PREFACE: Advanced many-body and statistical methods in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Dragos Victor; Sabin Delion, Doru; Sorin Paraoanu, Gheorghe

    2012-02-01

    It has increasingly been realized in recent times that the borders separating various subfields of physics are largely artificial. This is the case for nanoscale physics, physics of lower-dimensional systems and nuclear physics, where the advanced techniques of many-body theory developed in recent times could provide a unifying framework for these disciplines under the general name of mesoscopic physics. Other fields, such as quantum optics and quantum information, are increasingly using related methods. The 6-day conference 'Advanced many-body and statistical methods in mesoscopic systems' that took place in Constanta, Romania, between 27 June and 2 July 2011 was, we believe, a successful attempt at bridging an impressive list of topical research areas: foundations of quantum physics, equilibrium and non-equilibrium quantum statistics/fractional statistics, quantum transport, phases and phase transitions in mesoscopic systems/superfluidity and superconductivity, quantum electromechanical systems, quantum dissipation, dephasing, noise and decoherence, quantum information, spin systems and their dynamics, fundamental symmetries in mesoscopic systems, phase transitions, exactly solvable methods for mesoscopic systems, various extension of the random phase approximation, open quantum systems, clustering, decay and fission modes and systematic versus random behaviour of nuclear spectra. This event brought together participants from seventeen countries and five continents. Each of the participants brought considerable expertise in his/her field of research and, at the same time, was exposed to the newest results and methods coming from the other, seemingly remote, disciplines. The talks touched on subjects that are at the forefront of topical research areas and we hope that the resulting cross-fertilization of ideas will lead to new, interesting results from which everybody will benefit. We are grateful for the financial and organizational support from IFIN-HH, Ovidius

  18. PREFACE: First International Workshop on Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasma Physics and Studies of Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Malović, G.; Tasić, M.; Nikitović, Ž.

    2007-06-01

    from many different standpoints. A special case of non-equilibrium is that of non-neutral plasmas, i.e. plasmas devoid of ions, as described in the lecture and paper by J Marler (Appleton, USA). Physics of swarms (the low space charge limit of ionized gases) is similar to the previous study in the fact that we may have only one group of charged particles electrons (or ions). But the difference is that the latter has a much higher pressure and therefore number of collisions. In the lecture on one aspect of the application of swarm data (transport coefficients) to determine the electron scattering cross sections R White (Townsville, Australia) addresses a long standing controversy in the vibrational excitation of H2 of an unacceptable discrepancy between swarm results and binary collision experiments and theories, (a problem that has been of particular importance to the host Laboratory). The lecture of N Dyatko (Troitsk, Russian Federation) tackles one of the most interesting recent problems in the transport theory of ionized gases, that of the negative absolute conductivity and attempts to translate it to solid state physics where the stakes are much higher. The swarm studies were always based on excellent experimental data and the leading experimental group today is that of J de Urquijo (Cuernavaca, Mexico) who presents a review of a wide range of transport data that his group obtained in fluorinated gases. The gas breakdown in dc and high frequency fields was addressed by M Radmilović-Rađenović (Belgrade, Serbia) by applying a detailed secondary electron production model in Particle in Cell (PIC) code and comparing the results to a broad range of experimental data. The hybrid (fluid-Monte Carlo) model has been applied in the study by Z Donko and K Kutasi (Budapest, Hungary) of low pressure obstructed glow discharges to decribe the effect of fast neutrals on gas discharges. A study of kinetics of negative ions of hydrogen in glow discharges with positive column and

  19. PREFACE: 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows (GasMems 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijns, Arjan; Valougeorgis, Dimitris; Colin, Stéphane; Baldas, Lucien

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is to advance research in Europe and worldwide in the field of gas micro flows as well as to improve global fundamental knowledge and to enable technological applications. Gas flows in microsystems are of great importance and touch almost every industrial field (e.g. fluidic microactuators for active control of aerodynamic flows, vacuum generators for extracting biological samples, mass flow and temperature micro-sensors, pressure gauges, micro heat-exchangers for the cooling of electronic components or for chemical applications, and micro gas analyzers or separators). The main characteristic of gas microflows is their rarefaction, which for device design often requires modelling and simulation both by continuous and molecular approaches. In such flows various non-equilibrium transport phenomena appear, while the role played by the interaction between the gas and the solid device surfaces becomes essential. The proposed models of boundary conditions often need an empirical adjustment strongly dependent on the micro manufacturing technique. The 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is organized under the umbrella of the recently established GASMEMS network (www.gasmems.eu/) consisting of 13 participants and six associate members. The main objectives of the network are to structure research and train researchers in the fields of micro gas dynamics, measurement techniques for gaseous flows in micro experimental setups, microstructure design and micro manufacturing with applications in lab and industry. The conference takes place on June 6-8 2012, at the Skiathos Palace Hotel, on the beautiful island of Skiathos, Greece. The conference has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement ITN GASMEMS no. 215504. It owes its success to many people. We would like to acknowledge the support of all members of the Scientific Committee and of all

  20. Michigan transportation facts & figures : public transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-16

    This on-line document is part of a series, Transportation Facts & Figures, by the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT). The Public Transit section of Transportation Facts & Figures cover such topics as intercity bus service, intercity rail se...