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Sample records for pre-registration midwifery education

  1. The MINT project--an evaluation of the impact of midwife teachers on the outcomes of pre-registration midwifery education in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Diane M; Avis, Mark; Mallik, Maggie

    2013-01-01

    to explore the contribution of midwife teachers in preparing student midwives for competent practice. a three phase design using qualitative and quantitative approaches. Phase one involved UK wide on-line questionnaire surveys, phase two was a case study method in six UK approved education institutions and phase three was a diary study with newly qualified midwives. phase one included all UK Lead Midwives for Education (LMEs), midwife teachers and Local Supervising Authority Midwifery Officers; phase two participants were three year and shortened programme student midwives, midwife teachers, LMEs and programme leads from each of the four countries; and phase three included a sample of newly qualified midwives graduating from the case study sites and their preceptors and supervisors of midwives. midwife teachers were valued for their unique and crucial role in supporting the application of knowledge to midwifery practice. Visibility and credibility were two key concepts that can explain the unique contribution of midwife teachers. These concepts included being able to support skills acquisition, understanding of contemporary midwifery practice, having a role in practice contexts and able to offer personal support. Visibility of teachers in practice was vital for students and mentors to assist students put their learning into practice and monitor learning and assessment decisions. given the complexity of midwifery education a team approach is essential in ensuring the effectiveness of these programmes. This requires a sufficient differentiation of midwife teacher roles to deliver the pre-registration curriculum. A set of resource quality indicators is proposed to support midwife teacher teams achieving sufficient clinical and academic expertise to deliver effective education programmes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Preparedness of newly qualified midwives to deliver clinical care: an evaluation of pre-registration midwifery education through an analysis of key events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirton, Heather; Stephen, Nicole; Doris, Faye; Cooper, Maggie; Avis, Mark; Fraser, Diane M

    2012-10-01

    this study was part of a larger project commissioned to ascertain whether midwife teachers bring a unique contribution to the preparation of midwives for practice. The aim of this phase was to determine whether the student midwives' educational programme had equipped them to practise competently after entry to the professional register. this was a prospective, longitudinal qualitative study, using participant diaries to collect data. data were collected from newly qualified midwives during the initial six months after they commenced their first post as a qualified midwife. the potential participants were all student midwives who were completing their education at one of six Universities (three in England, one in Scotland, one in Wales and one in Northern Ireland). Diary data were submitted by 35 newly qualified midwives; 28 were graduates of the three year programme and seven of the shortened programme. diary entries were analysed using thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006), with a focus on identification of key events in the working lives of the newly qualified midwives. A total of 263 key events were identified, under three main themes: (1) impact of the event on confidence, (2) gaps in knowledge or experience and (3) articulated frustration, conflict or distress. essentially, pre-registration education, delivered largely by midwife teachers and supported by clinical mentors, has been shown to equip newly qualified midwives to work effectively as autonomous practitioners caring for mothers and babies. While newly qualified midwives are able to cope with a range of challenging clinical situations in a safe manner, they lack confidence in key areas. Positive reinforcement by supportive colleagues plays a significant role in enabling them to develop as practitioners. whilst acknowledging the importance of normality in childbearing there is a need within the curriculum to enable midwives to recognise and respond to complex care situations by providing theory

  3. Students' and lecturers' perceptions of support in a UK pre-registration midwifery programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Annette Elizabeth; Gidman, Janice; McLaughlin, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports on a study that explored the perceptions of students and lecturers regarding support within a pre-registration midwifery programme in one Higher Education Institution in England. A mixed method design was used: questionnaires were completed by first year and third year students and lecturers, complemented by focus groups with each of the three sets of participants. The findings showed that there are multi-focal challenges for student midwives in undertaking their programme of study. The main theme that emerged was of the difficulties involved in maintaining an appropriate work-life balance, especially within what was seen as a relatively inflexible programme structure. The value of peer support was also highlighted as a key factor in helping the students succeed in their studies. There were a number of implications for midwifery educators to consider in optimising support for students. These include ensuring that students have realistic expectations at the outset of their studies, formalising peer support mechanisms and reviewing programmes to provide more flexibility to better underpin the maintenance of an appropriate work-life balance. Further study is warranted to explore perceptions of support in practice and to identify the factors that help students to persevere in their studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of blended learning to create a module about ill-health during childbirth for pre-registration midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nicki; Randall, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Reforms in the way higher education is delivered in order to address the needs of learners in the 21st century are increasingly being considered by university departments. This has led academics to combine e-learning with more traditional classroom based methods of teaching when designing new modules of study, a method commonly called blended learning. This paper will describe the different teaching and learning methods which were blended together to create a module for second year pre-registration midwifery students in England, which focused upon ill-health during pregnancy and childbearing. It is imperative that at the point of registration midwifery students possess the skills to identify deviations from normal, initiate immediate actions and make appropriate referrals. The health of women all over the world is of concern to health care professionals. Midwives are increasingly being upon to provide expert care. Midwives need a sound education to allow them to carry out their roles effectively. The International Confederation of Midwives global standards for midwifery education (2010) attempts to address the need for competent caring midwives to help women and families in every corner of the world. The paper will also cover the pedagogical issues considered when blending together the different elements of learning namely: traditional discursive lectures, small group work, e-learning, formative presentations and the use of simulation during a skills and drills day. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Measuring critical thinking in pre-registration midwifery students: A multi-method approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Creedy, Debra K; Sidebotham, Mary

    2018-02-01

    Test the concurrent validity of three newly developed tools (student self-rating, preceptor rating, and reflective writing) that aim to measure critical thinking in midwifery practice. A descriptive matched cohort design was used. Australian research intensive university offering a three year Bachelor of Midwifery programme. Fifty-five undergraduate midwifery students. Students assessed their ability to apply critical thinking in midwifery practice using a 25-item tool and a 5-item subscale in Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. Clinical preceptors completed a 24-item tool assessing the students' application of critical thinking in practice. Reflective writing by students was assessed by midwifery academics using a 15-item tool. Internal reliability, and concurrent validity were assessed. Correlations, t-tests, multiple regression and confidence levels were calculated for the three scales and associations with student characteristics. The three scales achieved good internal reliability with a Cronbach's alpha coefficient between 0.93 and 0.97. Matched total scores for the three critical thinking scales were moderately correlated; student/preceptor (r=0.36, pstudent/reflective writing (r=0.38, pstudents with a previous degree, but only significant for reflective writing (t (53)=-2.35, p=0.023). Preceptor ratings were predictive of GPA (beta=0.50, pStudents' self-rating scores were predictive of year level (beta=0.32, pstudent, preceptor, and reflective writing tools were found to be reliable and valid measures of critical thinking. The three tools can be used individually or in combination to provide students with various sources of feedback to improve their practice. The tools allow formative measurement of critical thinking over time. Further testing of the tools with larger, diverse samples is recommended. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Study time within pre-registration nurse education: A critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Caroline; King, Nigel; Snowden, Michael; Ousey, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Pre-registration nursing students throughout the United Kingdom (UK) are required to complete a minimum number of theory hours within the course. Anecdotal evidence suggests that students are required to attend campus for approximately fifty percent of the theory hours. The remaining theory hours are often labelled as 'study time' in which students are not required to attend campus. There is a general assumption amongst many academics that all students are prepared and motivated to direct their learning and therefore use this time to study. However some students chose to work during this time and many have dependents. Considering the increasing cost of nurse education combined with the government cuts to student bursaries in England it is timely to review the literature to determine how study time is used within pre-registration nurse education. To present a critical review of the literature pertaining to study time in pre-registration nurse education. An integrative review of the literature. A search of electronic databases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL); Cochrane; Medline; Science Direct; Blackwell Synergy; Electronic Journals Service (EJS); Scopus; Taylor & Francis, Eric and Routledge Wiley was undertaken. The inclusion criteria consisted of peer reviewed primary research, discussion papers, unpublished doctoral theses' and editorial papers directly related to the key words and nurse education published in English. Twelve papers were included in the review. Analysis of the papers led to the development of two themes: orientation to self-directed learning (SDL) and preparation for SDL. The literature demonstrates that pre-registration nursing students lack the necessary skills for SDL. There is a lack of research on how study time is used within pre-registration nurse education. This calls for empirical research to fully explore how nursing students and lecturers perceive study time within pre-registration nursing curricula. Crown

  7. [The value of mandatory seminars in the education of pre-registration house officers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, A.H.; Ringsted, C.; Pedersen-Reng, S.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There are advantages and disadvantages of general mandatory seminars in the education of pre-registration house officers. The seminars are highly rated by the pre-registration house officers, but we do not know what value they represent for the pre-registration house officers. The aim...... of this study was to explore this further. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four focus group interviews with five junior doctors were conducted. Three themes were discussed: the advantages of the seminars, the disadvantages of the seminars and the needs or wishes concerning both the seminars and education generally....... The interviews were transcribed, and a three-step content analysis was carried out in order to identify general aspects of value. RESULTS: Three general aspects were found: 1) the social aspect--being part of a community of like-minded peers, sharing frustrations and experiences and making comparisons with peers...

  8. Pain education in pre-registration professional health courses: a protocol for a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kate; Milligan, James; Johnson, Mark I; Briggs, Michelle

    2016-07-18

    Pain is a global health concern causing significant health and social problems with evidence that patients experiencing pain are receiving inadequate care. The content of pain education in pre-registration professional health courses is thought to be lacking both in the UK and internationally which is unacceptable considering the prevalence of pain. Evaluating the effect of education is complex in that the outcome (improved healthcare) is some distance from the educational approach. Best evidence medical education has been proposed as a continuum between 'opinion-based teaching' and 'evidence-based teaching'. Searching for evidence to inform best practice in health education is complex. A scoping review provides a practical and comprehensive strategy to locate and synthesise literature of varied methodology including reports from a variety of sources. The aim of this article is to describe a protocol for a scoping review that will locate, map and report research, guidelines and policies for pain education in pre-registration professional health courses. The extent, range and nature of reports will be examined, and where possible titles for potential systematic review will be identified. Reports will be included for review that are directly relevant to the development of the pain curriculum in pre-registration professional health courses, eg nursing, medicine, physiotherapy. The search strategy will identify reports that include [pain] AND [pre-registration education or curriculum] AND [health professionals] in the title or abstract. Two authors will independently screen retrieved studies against eligibility criteria. A numerical analysis regarding the extent, nature and distribution of reports will be given along with a narrative synthesis to describe characteristics of relevant reports. Formal ethical approval was not required to undertake this scoping review. Findings will be published in scientific peer-reviewed journals and via conference presentations

  9. Narrative pedagogy in midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkison, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Narrative pedagogy is an approach to midwifery education which can promote strategies for teaching and learning which effectively prepare graduates for the complex nature of midwifery practice. Knowledge and skills are fundamental to midwifery practice, but knowing about how to use them is the art of practice. Teaching and learning midwifery skills and competencies is straight forward in comparison to teaching and learning about the art of midwifery, yet both are essential for safe practice. Narrative pedagogy may be one way that enhances undergraduate midwifery students' learning about the art of practice.

  10. The effect of high fidelity simulated learning methods on physiotherapy pre-registration education: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Fiona; Cooper, Kay

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this review is to identify if high fidelity simulated learning methods are effective in enhancing clinical/practical skills compared to usual, low fidelity simulated learning methods in pre-registration physiotherapy education.

  11. Pre-registration interprofessional clinical education in the workplace: a realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Fiona; Hayes, Jacinta; Glass, Sharon; Rees, Charlotte E

    2017-09-01

    The inclusion of interprofessional education opportunities in clinical placements for pre-registration learners has recently been proposed as a strategy to enhance graduates' skills in collaborative practice. A realist review was undertaken to ascertain the contexts, mechanisms and outcomes of formal interprofessional clinical workplace learning. Initial scoping was carried out, after which Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL and EMBASE were searched from 2005 to April 2016 to identify formal interprofessional workplace educational interventions involving pre-registration learners. Papers reporting studies conducted in dedicated training wards were excluded, leaving a total of 30 papers to be included in the review. Several educational formats that combined students from medicine, nursing, pharmacy and allied health professions were identified. These included: the use of engagement by student teams with a real patient through interview as the basis for discussion and reflection; the use of case studies through which student teams work to promote discussion; structured workshops; ward rounds, and shadowing. Meaningful interprofessional student discussion and reflection comprised the mechanism by which the outcome of learners acquiring knowledge of the roles of other professions and teamwork skills was achieved. The mechanism of dialogue during an interaction with a real patient allowed the patient to provide his or her perspective and contributed to an awareness of the patient's perspective in health care practice. Medication- or safety-focused interprofessional tasks contributed to improved safety awareness. In the absence of trained facilitators or in the context of negative role-modelling, programmes were less successful. In the design of workplace education initiatives, curriculum decisions should take into consideration the contexts of the initiatives and the mechanisms for achieving the education-related outcomes of interest. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association

  12. Emotional intelligence education in pre-registration nursing programmes: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kim; McCloughen, Andrea; Delgado, Cynthia; Kefalas, Claudia; Harkness, Emily

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the state of knowledge on emotional intelligence (EI) education in pre-registration nursing programmes. Integrative literature review. CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, ERIC, and Web of Knowledge electronic databases were searched for abstracts published in English between 1992-2014. Data extraction and constant comparative analysis of 17 articles. Three categories were identified: Constructs of emotional intelligence; emotional intelligence curricula components; and strategies for emotional intelligence education. A wide range of emotional intelligence constructs were found, with a predominance of trait-based constructs. A variety of strategies to enhance students' emotional intelligence skills were identified, but limited curricula components and frameworks reported in the literature. An ability-based model for curricula and learning and teaching approaches is recommended. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Pain: A content review of undergraduate pre-registration nurse education in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackintosh-Franklin, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    Pain is a global health issue with poor assessment and management of pain associated with serious disability and detrimental socio economic consequences. Pain is also a closely associated symptom of the three major causes of death in the developed world; Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke and Cancer. There is a significant body of work which indicates that current nursing practice has failed to address pain as a priority, resulting in poor practice and unnecessary patient suffering. Additionally nurse education appears to lack focus or emphasis on the importance of pain assessment and its management. A three step online search process was carried out across 71 Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) in the United Kingdom (UK) which deliver approved undergraduate nurse education programmes. Step one to find detailed programme documentation, step 2 to find reference to pain in the detailed documents and step 3 to find reference to pain in nursing curricula across all UK HEI websites, using Google and each HEIs site specific search tool. The word pain featured minimally in programme documents with 9 (13%) documents making reference to it, this includes 3 occurrences which were not relevant to the programme content. The word pain also featured minimally in the content of programmes/modules on the website search, with no references at all to pain in undergraduate pre-registration nursing programmes. Those references found during the website search were for continuing professional development (CPD) or Masters level programmes. In spite of the global importance of pain as a major health issue both in its own right, and as a significant symptom of leading causes of death and illness, pain appears to be a neglected area within the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Evidence suggests that improving nurse education in this area can have positive impacts on clinical practice, however without educational input the current levels of poor practice are unlikely to improve and unnecessary

  14. Spirituality in pre-registration nurse education and practice: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinson, Lesline P; McSherry, Wilfred; Kevern, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Spirituality is known to be an integral part of holistic care, yet research shows that it is not well valued or represented in nurse education and practice. However, the nursing profession continues to make efforts to redress the balance by issuing statements and guidance for the inclusion of spirituality by nurses in their practice. A systematic literature review was undertaken and confirms that nurses are aware of their lack of knowledge, understanding and skills in the area of spirituality and spiritual care, and desire to be better informed and skilled in this area. Consequently, in order for nurses to support the spiritual dimension of their role, nurse education has a vital part to play in raising spiritual awareness and facilitating competence and confidence in this domain. The literature review also reveals that studies involving pre-registration are few, but those available do provide examples of innovation and various teaching methods to deliver this topic in nursing curricular. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Public health education for midwives and midwifery students: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Jenny; Doran, Jackie; Lynn, Fiona; Anderson, Gail; Alderdice, Fiona

    2012-12-07

    Current national and international maternity policy supports the importance of addressing public health goals and investing in early years. Health care providers for women during the reproductive and early postnatal period have the opportunity to encourage women to make choices that will impact positively on maternal and fetal health. Midwives are in a unique position, given the emphasis of the philosophy of midwifery care on building relationships and incorporating a holistic approach, to support women to make healthy choices with the aim of promoting health and preventing ill health. However, exploration of the educational preparation of midwives to facilitate public health interventions has been relatively limited. The aim of the study was to identify the scope of current midwifery pre registration educational provision in relation to public health and to explore the perspectives of midwives and midwifery students about the public health role of the midwife. This was a mixed methods study incorporating a survey of Higher Educational Institutions providing pre registration midwifery education across the UK and focus groups with midwifery students and registered midwives. Twenty nine institutions (53% response) participated in the survey and nine focus groups were conducted (59 participants). Public health education was generally integrated into pre registration midwifery curricula as opposed to taught as a discrete subject. There was considerable variation in the provision of public health topics within midwifery curricula and the hours of teaching allocated to them. Focus group data indicated that it was consistently difficult for both midwifery students and midwives to articulate clearly their understanding and definition of public health in relation to midwifery. There is a unique opportunity to impact on maternal and infant health throughout the reproductive period; however the current approach to public health within midwifery education should be reviewed to

  16. Implementing service improvement projects within pre-registration nursing education: a multi-method case study evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Lesley; Bromley, Barbara; Walker, Moira; Jones, Rebecca; Mhlanga, Fortune

    2014-01-01

    Preparing healthcare students for quality and service improvement is important internationally. A United Kingdom (UK) initiative aims to embed service improvement in pre-registration education. A UK university implemented service improvement teaching for all nursing students. In addition, the degree pathway students conducted service improvement projects as the basis for their dissertations. The study aimed to evaluate the implementation of service improvement projects within a pre-registration nursing curriculum. A multi-method case study was conducted, using student questionnaires, focus groups with students and academic staff, and observation of action learning sets. Questionnaire data were analysed using SPSS v19. Qualitative data were analysed using Ritchie and Spencer's (1994) Framework Approach. Students were very positive about service improvement. The degree students, who conducted service improvement projects in practice, felt more knowledgeable than advanced diploma students. Selecting the project focus was a key issue and students encountered some challenges in practice. Support for student service improvement projects came from action learning sets, placement staff, and academic staff. Service improvement projects had a positive effect on students' learning. An effective partnership between the university and partner healthcare organisations, and support for students in practice, is essential. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Midwifery education in Central-Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mivšek, Polona; Baškova, Martina; Wilhelmova, Radka

    2016-02-01

    Problems in midwifery in many Central-Eastern European countries are very similar; it is possible to speak about the evolving Central-Eastern model of midwifery care. The educational models of this region have a relatively strong theoretical part; however, there is an insufficient practical dimension. Theoretical part of midwifery education in the universities is relatively autonomous and is slowly changing the professional identity of graduates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcohol education and training in pre-registration nursing: a national survey to determine curriculum content in the United Kingdom (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Aisha S; Webster, Brian J

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol-related harm impacts significantly on the health of the population. Nurses are often among the first health professionals that many patients with alcohol-related problems come into contact with and have been identified as playing a key role but may be ill-prepared to respond. Future nurses need to have the skills, knowledge and clinical confidence to respond to patients suffering from alcohol-related harm. A pre-registration curriculum that ensures a nursing workforce fit for practice in responding to alcohol-related harm is necessary. To determine the level of alcohol education and training content in the pre-registration curriculum for nursing in the United Kingdom (UK). To establish whether there are variations in the pre-registration curriculum content across the UK. A descriptive study. All 68 UK Higher Education Institutions offering a total of 111 pre-registration courses for nurses were invited to participate in the study. Twenty nine completed questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 26%. The largest number of identified responders were from England (n=15), with 3 from Scotland and 1 each from Wales and Northern Ireland. Nine Universities chose not to identify themselves. An online semi-structured questionnaire survey was used to collect the study data. Teaching of alcohol and alcohol related harm was mainly delivered during the second year of a pre-registration nursing programme provided mainly to adult and mental health students. Overall, the majority of alcohol related content that is provided within the responding pre-registration nursing courses relates to biophysiology, aetiology, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. This study highlights the need for a greater and more relevant focus of alcohol education to pre-registration nursing students of all fields of practice incorporating an integrated approach across all years of study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An educational partnership in health promotion for pre-registration nurses and further education college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Stephen; Thomas, Nicki; Apau, Daniel; Benato, Rosa; Hicks, Siobhan; MacKenzie, Karin

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a partnership between a university and a college of further education, whereby first-year nursing students administered health checks to college students. Despite many challenges, the experience was positive for both sets of students and has been mainstreamed. Many lessons were learnt about how best to support nursing students to ensure a good quality experience for both student groups. Data gained from the health checks are also presented, and the programme is compared with the brief community placement that previous nursing students had undertaken at this stage of their training. Theoretical underpinnings for the programme are discussed.

  20. Midwifery Education in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Ejder Apay, Serap; Kanbur, Ayla; Özdemir, Funda; Pasinlioglu, Türkan

    2012-01-01

    Midwives are the most important health workers for the protection and improvement of maternal and infant health. A well organized health system and qualified midwife education programs developed in accordance with contemporary requirements are required to ensure the competence of midwives in their practice.

  1. Tools for structured team communication in pre-registration health professions education: a Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) review: BEME Guide No. 41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Sharon; Ambrose, Lucy; Anderson, Elizabeth; Coleman, Jamie J; Hensman, Marianne; Hirsch, Christine; Hodson, James; Morley, David; Pittaway, Sarah; Stewart, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Calls for the inclusion of standardized protocols for information exchange into pre-registration health professions curricula have accompanied their introduction into clinical practice. In order to help clinical educators respond to these calls, we have reviewed educational interventions for pre-registration students that incorporate one or more of these ?tools for structured communication?. Searches of 10 databases (1990?2014) were supplemented by hand searches and by citation searches (to January 2015). Studies evaluating an intervention for pre-registration students of any clinical profession and incorporating at least one tool were included. Quality of included studies was assessed using a checklist of 11 indicators and a narrative synthesis of findings undertaken. Fifty studies met our inclusion criteria. Of these, 21 evaluated the specific effect of a tool on educational outcomes, and 27 met seven or more quality indicators. Pre-registration students, particularly those in the US, are learning to use tools for structured communication either in specific sessions or integrated into more extensive courses or programmes; mostly 'Situation Background Assessment Recommendation' and its variants. There is some evidence that learning to use a tool can improve the clarity and comprehensiveness of student communication, their perceived self-confidence and their sense of preparedness for clinical practice. There is, as yet, little evidence for the transfer of these skills to the clinical setting or for any influence of teaching approach on learning outcomes. Educators will need to consider the positioning of such learning with other skills such as clinical reasoning and decision-making.

  2. "A stressful and frightening experience"? Children's nurses' perceived readiness to care for children with cancer following pre-registration nurse education: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestico, Elizabeth; Finlay, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    In the UK children with cancer are cared for by children's nurses in a variety of settings, specialist and non-specialist. Whilst post-registration specialist education is available to some nurses, many nurses rely solely on pre-registration education to competently care for these children. This study explores whether nurses perceive that this adequately prepares them. To explore the extent to which qualified nurses perceive that pre-registration nurse education prepares them to care for children with cancer; to consider the implications for children's nursing pre-registration curricula. A small-scale qualitative study was undertaken using an interpretivist approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six qualified children's nurses in two clinical areas - a specialist children's cancer inpatient ward, and a general children's ward where inpatients included children with cancer. Findings are discussed in relation to three emergent themes: Learning in Theory and Practice, Care of the Child and Family, and Resilience. Participants attached significance to the quantity and quality of practice experience. They reflected on barriers to specific and transferable theoretical learning and stressed the importance of integrating theory and practice. Understanding of family-centred care formed a significant part of their preparation. Preconceptions, communication with families and the emotional impact of this speciality were stressful. Improved pre-registration preparation may have developed participants' resilience. The complexities of caring for children with cancer and their families require well-prepared nurses. Participants' perceptions of preparedness were influenced by aspects of pre-registration education. Their experiences suggest that curricula should be practice-focused and include a range of placements. Specialist theoretical content must be integrated with practice and transferability of knowledge and skills made explicit. Reflection and problem

  3. The utility and impact of information communication technology (ICT) for pre-registration nurse education: A narrative synthesis systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Lucy; Clough, Jonathan; O'Reilly, Declan; Wilmott, Danita; Witham, Gary

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate and summarise the utility and impact of information communication technology (ICT) in enhancing student performance and the learning environment in pre-registration nursing. A systematic review of empirical research across a range of themes in ICT health-related education. Science Direct, Cinahl, AMED, MEDLINE, PubMed, ASSIA, OVID and OVID SP (2008-2014). Further date parameters were imposed by theme. Evidence was reviewed by narrative synthesis, adopting Caldwell's appraisal framework and CASP for qualitative methods. Selection and inclusion was grounded in the PICOS structure, with language requirements (English), and further parameters were guided by theme appropriateness. Fifty studies were selected for review across six domains: reusable learning objects, media, audience response systems, e-portfolios, computer-based assessment and faculty adoption of e-learning. Educational ICT was found to be non-inferior to traditional teaching, while offering benefits to teaching and learning efficiency. Where support is in place, ICT improves the learning environment for staff and students, but human and environmental barriers need to be addressed. This review illuminates more advantages for ICT in nurse training than previously. The key advantage of flexibility is supported, though with little evidence for effect on depth of learning. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Marketing midwifery education: findings from a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, S C

    1996-03-01

    to collect information from a sample of identified customers (midwives and midwifery managers employed by health authorities and trusts) in order to develop a marketing strategy for a Department of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Care. two descriptive and analytical surveys using questionnaires. mid- and west Wales, UK. randomly selected sample of 75 midwives and census sample of eight midwifery managers working within the National Health Service. quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. organisations have to define, and listen carefully, to their customers and offer courses which are appropriate, related to clinical midwifery practice and have titles that accurately reflect the content. Midwives are enthusiastically committed to continuing education despite the current difficulties. Word of mouth and personal recommendation remains the most effective form of advertising. University departments of nursing and midwifery can easily become removed from clinical practice. Education assists practitioners in changing and adapting to a new order; it is also crucial in developing skills in critical thinking and analysis. New skills are needed if practice is to improve. academic departments can easily become remote and out of touch with the needs of clinicians and midwifery managers. Departments must take steps to define the customer, listen carefully to what they want and make every effort to provide continuing education for midwives that is relevant, responsive, accessible and attainable. The benefits of education also must be marketed.

  5. An integrative review of the literature on the teaching of the history of nursing in pre-registration adult nursing education in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jacinta; Watson, Roger

    2015-02-01

    To present an integrative review of literature on the teaching of nursing history in pre-registration adult nursing education. Despite successive reconfigurations in healthcare systems and education policy, the teaching of the history of nursing remains contested in pre-registration curricula. Recent curriculum reviews acknowledge the need for systematic study of nursing education. To date in the UK, there has been no systematic review of the literature on the teaching of nursing history in pre-registration training programmes. An integrative review of the literature. A search of the electronic databases of CINAHL (1982-2013), HMIC (1979-2013), BNI (1994-2013) and MEDLINE (Pub Med) (1966-2013) was concluded in January 2014, using the keywords 'adult nursing', 'history' 'pre-registration', 'education' and 'teaching'. An integrative literature review was conducted. Identified titles and abstracts were screened separately by researchers for relevance and eligibility and papers were independently assessed for inclusion. Data were abstracted from included papers and quality evaluation of included papers was conducted. The papers were analysed and reported in a narrative synthesis. Twelve papers were selected for review. The majority of articles were discursive papers and there was a paucity of empirical reports. Content indicated concerns for teaching nursing history in regard to curriculum policy and methods of teaching and assessment. Substantial support exists for mandatory inclusion of the teaching of historical literacy in nursing centred on the themes of health and disease, hegemony, nursing work and image and ideology. Due to space and teaching expertise issues this could ideally be achieved through the use of nursing museum visits, the usefulness of which could be critically explored in future research. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Nursing and Midwifery Education in Rwanda: Telling our Story ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nursing and Midwifery Education in Rwanda: Telling our Story. ... Journal Home > Vol 2, No 2 (2015) > ... The establishment of the Kigali Health Institute in1996 greatly advanced nursing and midwifery education with the awarding of an ...

  7. Creation of virtual patients for midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanová, Eva; Bašková, Martina; Maskálová, Erika; Kvaltínyová, Eva

    2018-07-01

    The objective of the study was to create several new, original virtual patients (VPs) in the Slovak language, especially for educational purposes in midwifery. Virtual patients have been created for the needs of university midwifery education in Slovakia. The creation of the six virtual patients basically consisted of three fixed stages: preparation, design and development, implementation into the virtual environment. We used the Open Labyrinth (OL) virtual environment, an open-source system for creating VPs. The VPs include six various scenarios of the most common problems seen in midwifery practice: preterm birth, perinatal loss, gestational diabetes, ineffective breastfeeding, postpartum bleeding and sudden home birth. Currently, six original virtual patients are used in university midwifery education in Slovakia. We use them for contact teaching as well as self-study of students. They present the first VPs in Slovakia and the Czech Republic created in academic settings in these countries. The future perspective of a virtual patient as an interactive process between the student and the medium is that it can deepen and improve learning outcomes, solve specific midwifery issues, and reduce mistakes in the clinical environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The teaching of physical assessment skills in pre-registration nursing programmes in Australia: issues for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birks, Melanie; James, Ainsley; Chung, Catherine; Cant, Robyn; Davis, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Health assessment is a fundamental aspect of the professional nursing role. The teaching of skills in physical assessment is therefore a large component of pre-registration nursing programmes. As the nursing curriculum becomes more crowded with what is deemed to be essential content, there is a need to rationalise what is taught in preparatory nursing programmes to ensure readiness for practice. The study outlined in this paper, as part of a larger project, explored the teaching of physical assessment skills in pre-registration nursing programmes across Australia. Fifty-three academics completed the 121 item online survey, indicating whether each skill was taught with practice, taught with no practice or not taught at all. The results suggest that only half the skills were being taught by more than 80% of the academics and 23 skills (19%) were taught by more than 90%. Of the 121 skills commonly taught--69 skills (57%) were taught with student practice and 29 (24%) were taught with no student practice. The results of this study raise questions about the teaching of physical assessment in pre-registration nursing programmes. The suggestion is not that skills that are used regularly or infrequently should be removed from the curriculum, rather, the authors propose that consideration be given to whether the teaching of skills that are never likely to be used is occurring at the expense of comprehensive mastery of core skills.

  9. Ethics Education in Midwifery Education Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megregian, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Familiarity with ethical concepts is a required competency for new graduates and a component of accreditation for midwifery education programs in the United States. While midwifery educators have acknowledged the importance of ethics education in midwifery programs, little is known about current methods, format, or evaluation of ethics education. A Web-based survey was developed for program directors of accredited midwifery education programs in the United States. Clock hours, formats, venues, content topics, barriers, and evaluation methods were evaluated by descriptive analysis. Fifty-one percent of programs completed the online survey (25/49). Of these, only 7 (28%) offer ethics as a stand-alone class, although all responding programs integrate some ethics education into other core classes. Programs show variation in format, venue, resources, and clock hours dedicated to ethics education. The most frequent barrier to ethics education is an already crowded curriculum (60%), although 32% of programs denied any barriers at all. The majority of programs include the ethical concepts of informed consent, shared decision making, and effective communication in curriculum content. This survey found that there is considerable variation in ethics education in terms of content, format, and evaluation among accredited midwifery education programs in the United States. Midwifery educators have an opportunity to explore the ethical dilemmas unique to maternity care from a midwifery perspective. There is also the opportunity to create a comprehensive and dynamic midwifery ethics curriculum, which incorporates both stand-alone ethics courses and ethics concepts that are woven throughout the core midwifery curriculum. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  10. The role of professional education in developing compassionate practitioners: a mixed methods study exploring the perceptions xof health professionals and pre-registration students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Lucy; O'Brien, Mary R; Kirton, Jennifer; Zubairu, Kate; Christiansen, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Compassionate practice is a public expectation and a core health professional value. However, in the face of growing public and professional unease about a perceived absence of compassion in health care it is essential that the role of education in developing compassionate practitioners is fully understood. The aim of this study was to explore qualified health professionals' and pre-registration students' understanding of compassion and the role of health professional education in promoting compassionate care. A sequential explanatory mixed methods study collected data using surveys and qualitative semi-structured interviews from qualified health professionals (n=155) and pre-registration students (n=197). Participants were from a range of health and social care disciplines and registered at a UK university. The findings indicate a high level of consensus in relation to participants' understanding of compassion in health care. Acting with warmth and empathy, providing individualised patient care and acting in a way you would like others to act towards you, were seen as the most common features of compassionate care. However, ambiguities and contradictions were evident when considering the role of health professional education in promoting compassionate practice. This study adds to the debate and current understanding of the role of education in fostering compassionate health care practice. © 2013.

  11. Team-based learning for midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Davis, Tonia L; Schorn, Mavis N; Collins, Michelle R; Phillippi, Julia; Holley, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Many US health care and education stakeholder groups, recognizing the need to prepare learners for collaborative practice in complex care environments, have called for innovative approaches in health care education. Team-based learning is an educational method that relies on in-depth student preparation prior to class, individual and team knowledge assessment, and use of small-group learning to apply knowledge to complex scenarios. Although team-based learning has been studied as an approach to health care education, its application to midwifery education is not well described. A master's-level, nurse-midwifery, didactic antepartum course was revised to a team-based learning format. Student grades, course evaluations, and aggregate American Midwifery Certification Board examination pass rates for 3 student cohorts participating in the team-based course were compared with 3 student cohorts receiving traditional, lecture-based instruction. Students had mixed responses to the team-based learning format. Student evaluations improved when faculty added recorded lectures as part of student preclass preparation. Statistical comparisons were limited by variations across cohorts; however, student grades and certification examination pass rates did not change substantially after the course revision. Although initial course revision was time-consuming for faculty, subsequent iterations of the course required less effort. Team-based learning provides students with more opportunity to interact during on-site classes and may spur application of knowledge into practice. However, it is difficult to assess the effect of the team-based learning approach with current measures. Further research is needed to determine the effects of team-based learning on communication and collaboration skills, as well as long-term performance in clinical practice. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional

  12. Exploring global recognition of quality midwifery education: Vision or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, Ans; Barger, Mary; Avery, Melissa; Bharj, Kuldip Kaur; O'Connell, Rhona; Fleming, Valerie; Thompson, Joyce; Sherratt, Della

    2017-06-01

    Midwifery education is the foundation for preparing competent midwives to provide a high standard of safe, evidence-based care for women and their newborns. Global competencies and standards for midwifery education have been defined as benchmarks for establishing quality midwifery education and practice worldwide. However, wide variations in type and nature of midwifery education programs exist. To explore and discuss the opportunities and challenges of a global quality assurance process as a strategy to promote quality midwifery education. Accreditation and recognition as two examples of quality assurance processes in education are discussed. A global recognition process, with its opportunities and challenges, is explored from the perspective of four illustrative case studies from Ireland, Kosovo, Latin America and Bangladesh. The discussion highlights that the establishment of a global recognition process may assist in promoting quality of midwifery education programs world-wide, but cannot take the place of formal national accreditation. In addition, a recognition process will not be feasible for many institutions without additional resources, such as financial support or competent evaluators. In order to achieve quality midwifery education through a global recognition process the authors present 5 Essential Challenges for Quality Midwifery Education. Quality midwifery education is vital for establishing a competent workforce, and improving maternal and newborn health. Defining a global recognition process could be instrumental in moving toward this goal, but dealing with the identified challenges will be essential. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Positioning end-of-life care education within the pre-registration therapeutic radiography curriculum: A survey of current practices amongst UK higher education institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, N.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: It is essential that all health professionals who come into contact with patients with terminal diagnoses are equipped to effectively and competently provide end of life care. This study aims to investigate the manner in which Higher Education Institutions address this requirement with their programmes of pre-registration therapeutic radiography education. Method: A structured survey was administered electronically to all UK universities with responsibility for therapeutic radiography education. The scope of the survey addressed mode and duration of end of life care education, its location, curricular assessment, identifiable barriers and best practice. Results: All respondents confirmed the presence of dedicated end of life care education within their curriculum. Variation in the duration and location of this education is reported as are approaches to assessment of associated skills and knowledge. Analysis of respondent commentary has identified three themes-preparedness for the clinical role, dissonance between technology and care, and holistic approaches to course design. Conclusion: Respondents have highlighted the importance of end of life care instruction with their programmes of study and identified aspects of the mode and duration of its delivery. Inclusion of this aspect of study may be problematic in the face of competing demands arising from the volume and complexity of the curriculum. Practical experience of end of life care predominantly occurs within the radiotherapy department, although there is scope to explore opportunities within the hospice and community care setting. - Highlights: • Effective end of life care training within radiotherapy radiography programmes is necessary. • Universities confirm the inclusion of end of life care training in their curriculum. • Variations in contact time and mode of delivery are reported. • The majority of end of life care practice experience is gained within the radiotherapy department. • Wider

  14. Innovation in preregistration midwifery education: Web based interactive storytelling learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamell, Mandie; Hanley, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    through a critical description of the implementation of a web based interactive storytelling learning activity introduced into an undergraduate, preregistration midwifery education programme, this paper will explore how low-cost, low-fidelity online storytelling, designed using Moodle, can be used to enhance students' understanding of compassion and empathy in practice. cross sectional sample of first year undergraduate Midwifery students (n111) METHOD: drawing from both research and audit data collected in an Higher Education Institution in London England, the paper presents the case for using web based technology to create a sustainable model for midwifery education. initial results indicate that it is both the low cost and positive student evaluations of web based interactive storytelling, which make this approach to preregistration midwifery education which suggests that this approach has significant potential for learning and teaching in midwifery education in diverse settings around the world. Or how about: global relevance? . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Abstract: Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Practice: New York University College of Nursing Working with Rwandan Colleagues. ... Conclusion: NYUCN collaboration in the HRH-Rwanda project has demonstrated success in raising the skill level of the nursing and midwifery workforce in Rwandan ...

  16. Towards an epistemological basis for andragogy in midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, E

    1991-04-01

    In designing the curriculum for pre and post registration midwifery courses, the author has utilised an andragogical model. This term refers to the art and science of teaching adults (Knowles 1978). The ideas that Knowles (1978) put forward about andragogy while not new, have been implemented in adult education and are certainly relevant to the modern practice of midwifery education. The aim of this paper is to examine the two extreme philosophical views about the nature of man and to provide an epistemological basis for andragogy in midwifery education.

  17. The catcher in the why: developing an evidence-based approach to the organization, delivery and evaluation of pre-registration nurse educational programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, T; Holland, K; McAndrew, S

    2011-03-01

    Changes to the pedagogy of pre-registration nurse education and training have become a global phenomenon. However, the evidence base to inform responses to these changes and the impact on nursing practice is limited. This paper explores the outcomes of an innovative approach aimed at ensuring responses to these drivers for change, particularly in curriculum development, the organisation, management and delivery of programmes and the enhancement of the student experience, are evidence based. This paper reports on an organisational change project undertaken in a School of Nursing in the North West of England, UK. The project involved 12 interrelated work streams used to explore aspects of the student journey from recruitment through progression to eventual employment. An evidence base was developed through a methodological bricolage that drew upon a robust and authentic mixture of systematic literature reviews, contemporaneous analysis of educational practice and evaluation of the student experience. This was used to underpin the decision making processes required to promote innovation in programme design, to increase the involvement of students in the facilitation and evaluation of their learning experiences, and helped shape the organisational changes required for embedding an evidenced-based culture in the School. Consistent and transformational leadership has been key to the project's success in communicating and managing the changes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Midwifery education and technology enhanced learning: Evaluating online story telling in preregistration midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamell, Mandie; Hanley, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    A major issue regarding the implementation of blended learning for preregistration health programmes is the analysis of students' perceptions and attitudes towards their learning. It is the extent of the embedding of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) into the higher education curriculum that makes this analysis so vital. This paper reports on the quantitative results of a UK based study that was set up to respond to the apparent disconnect between technology enhanced education provision and reliable student evaluation of this mode of learning. Employing a mixed methods research design, the research described here was carried to develop a reliable and valid evaluation tool to measure acceptability of and satisfaction with a blended learning approach, specifically designed for a preregistration midwifery module offered at level 4. Feasibility testing of 46 completed blended learning evaluation questionnaires - Student Midwife Evaluation of Online Learning Effectiveness (SMEOLE) - using descriptive statistics, reliability and internal consistency tests. Standard deviations and mean scores all followed predicted pattern. Results from the reliability and internal consistency testing confirm the feasibility of SMEOLE as an effective tool for measuring student satisfaction with a blended learning approach to preregistration learning. The analysis presented in this paper suggests that we have been successful in our aim to produce an evaluation tool capable of assessing the quality of technology enhanced, University level learning in Midwifery. This work can provide future benchmarking against which midwifery, and other health, blended learning curriculum planning could be structured and evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A review of midwifery education curriculum documents in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Insaf; Leap, Nicky

    2012-12-01

    There is worldwide recognition that midwives are specialists in normal pregnancy, labour and birth and the postnatal period and that they should be educated to be primary providers of maternity care. In Jordan midwives currently have limited opportunities to fulfil this role. Since the mid-1980s, two public community colleges have offered three-year diploma midwifery education programmes in two major cities in Jordan. In 2002 the first and only four-year bachelor of midwifery education programme was established in one public university. A review to describe the design and content of midwifery education programmes in Jordan and address the question: Does the design of midwifery education programmes in Jordan encourage confidence that graduates will be competent to practise to the full capacity of the internationally defined role and scope of practice of the midwife and undertake the role of primary maternity care providers for women with low-risk pregnancies? A review of Jordanian midwifery education curriculum documents was undertaken using information and documents provided by midwifery programme coordinators. Programme coordinators in all institutions in Jordan providing midwifery education programmes. The curriculum documents reflected a medical model, with an emphasis on illness and intervention rather than preparation for the internationally defined full role and scope of practice of the midwife. This study provides a profile of midwifery education curriculum documents in Jordan with recommendations for changes that would position midwives as potential primary maternity care providers for women in Jordan who have uncomplicated pregnancies. Copyright © 2011 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pre-registration nursing students' perceptions and experiences of violence in a nursing education institution in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, Tania; Mayers, Pat M; Khalil, Doris

    2014-11-01

    Violence is a growing problem worldwide in the field of health care and within the nursing profession. A study comprising a survey and focus groups with nursing students, and interviews with nurse educators was conducted to examine nursing students' perceptions and experiences of violence at a nursing education institution in the Western Cape, South Africa. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to all nursing students. Two hundred and twenty three (n = 223) respondents completed the questionnaire. Focus groups were conducted with purposively sampled student participants and semi-structured interviews with nurse educators. The findings indicated that the nature of the violent incidents experienced by students on campus, especially in the residences, ranged from verbal abuse to violation of students' property and personal space, and could be attributed primarily to substance abuse. Violence among student nurses could negatively affect learning. In a profession in which nurses are exposed to violence in the workplace, it is important that violence in the learning environment is actively prevented and respect of individual rights, tolerance and co-operation are promoted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Meeting the health and social care needs of pregnant asylum seekers; midwifery students' perspectives: part 3; "the pregnant woman within the global context"; an inclusive model for midwifery education to address the needs of asylum seeking women in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haith-Cooper, Melanie; Bradshaw, Gwendolen

    2013-09-01

    to describe the conceptualisation and development of an inclusive educational model. The model is designed to facilitate pre-registration midwifery students' learning around the health and social care needs of pregnant women seeking asylum in the United Kingdom. current literature has identified a concern about the standard of maternity care experienced by asylum seeking women accessing maternity services in the United Kingdom. In response to this, a doctorate study was undertaken which focused on examining the way in which a group of midwifery students approached the provision of care for asylum seekers. This study revealed difficulties that these students had both in identifying these women's needs and also in the wider care issues in practice. Consequently, one of the recommendations was to ameliorate these difficulties through midwifery education. the key findings from this study were used together with relevant supporting literature to construct "the pregnant woman within the global context" model for midwifery education. The model is designed to facilitate a holistic assessment of need rather than focusing on the physical assessment at the expense of other aspects of care. It incorporates wider factors, on a global level, which could impact on the health and social care needs of a pregnant woman seeking asylum. It also prompts students to consider the influence of dominant discourses on perceptions of asylum seek;ing and is designed to encourage students' to question these discourses. this model can be used in midwifery education to prepare students in caring for pregnant women seeking asylum. It may be especially helpful when students have close contact with pregnant women seeking asylum, for example through caseloading. Further research is recommended to evaluate the effectiveness of this model in enhancing the care of asylum seeking women in the United Kingdom. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Innovation in preregistration midwifery education: Web based interactive storytelling learning.

    OpenAIRE

    Scamell, M.; Hanley, T.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: through a critical description of the implementation of a web based interactive storytelling learning activity introduced into an undergraduate, preregistration midwifery education programme, this paper will explore how low-cost, low-fidelity online storytelling, designed using Moodle, can be used to enhance students' understanding of compassion and empathy in practice.\\ud \\ud SAMPLE: cross sectional sample of first year undergraduate Midwifery students (n111)\\ud \\ud METHOD: drawi...

  3. 'Ready to hit the ground running': Alumni and employer accounts of a unique part-time distance learning pre-registration nurse education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Jan; Beretta, Ruth; Kenward, Linda; McDonagh, Lin; Messenger, Julie; Rounce, Jill

    2014-10-01

    This study explored the impact of The Open University's (OU) preregistration nursing programme on students' employability, career progression and its contribution to developing the nursing workforce across the United Kingdom. Designed for healthcare support workers who are sponsored by their employers, the programme is the only part-time supported open/distance learning programme in the UK leading to registration as a nurse. The international literature reveals that relatively little is known about the impact of previous experience as a healthcare support worker on the experience of transition, employability skills and career progression. To identify alumni and employer views of the perceived impact of the programme on employability, career progression and workforce development. A qualitative design using telephone interviews which were digitally recorded, and transcribed verbatim prior to content analysis to identify recurrent themes. Three geographical areas across the UK. Alumni (n=17) and employers (n=7). Inclusion criterion for alumni was a minimum of two years' post-qualifying experience. Inclusion criteria for employers were those that had responsibility for sponsoring students on the programme and employing them as newly qualified nurses. Four overarching themes were identified: transition, expectations, learning for and in practice, and flexibility. Alumni and employers were of the view that the programme equipped them well to meet the competencies and expectations of being a newly qualified nurse. It provided employers with a flexible route to growing their own workforce and alumni the opportunity to achieve their ambition of becoming a qualified nurse when other more conventional routes would not have been open to them. Some of them had already demonstrated career progression. Generalising results requires caution due to the small, self-selecting sample but findings suggest that a widening participation model of pre-registration nurse education for

  4. Midwifery in Iceland: From vocational training to university education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsdottir, Olof A; Kristjansdottir, Hildur; Halfdansdottir, Berglind; Gottfredsdottir, Helga

    2018-04-03

    Midwifery education is a foundation for health professionals' competence in providing quality healthcare for the benefit of women, their families and society. This paper describes midwifery and the development of midwifery education in Iceland. It examines policy and extensive reforms, from hospital-based vocational training in midwifery to an academic university education, and the impact on the scope of midwifery practice in Iceland. The university-based programme, with its emphasis on autonomy of the midwife, seems to have affected the context of home birth and strengthened midwives' role in primary healthcare. Education reform with a focus on evidence-based practice and midwife-led continuity of care has had limited influence within the hospital system, where the structure of care is fragmented and childbirth is under threat of increasing interventions. Research is needed on the role of education in supporting evidence-based practice, normal childbirth and reproductive health in the Icelandic context. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nursing and Midwifery Education in Rwanda: Telling our Story

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1University of Rwanda College of Medicine and Health Sciences. 2Human ... This increased level of education for nursing and midwifery was supported by ... education appeared when nursing students were al- lowed to ... study model of innovative E-learning, thus allowing ... the production of qualified teachers. Raising ...

  6. Definitions of midwifery competence: implications for professional learning

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    This study explores the nature of competence required to fulfil the role of the midwife, learning to become competent, and professional learning beyond registration. The research was undertaken through a qualitative, case study approach, exploring competence as a phenomenon, as experienced by thirty-nine student midwives as they went through the final stages of pre-registration midwifery education programmes, were assessed to be competent, and took on the role of the midwife. The views of the...

  7. Irish nursing students' changing levels of assertiveness during their pre-registration programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Cecily M; Glacken, Michèle

    2004-10-01

    Stress and bullying have been found to be common problems in a number of studies of Irish nursing and midwifery. Victims of bullying need high levels of assertiveness to enable them to withstand the stress of victimization. It was deemed important to measure nursing students' level of assertiveness prior to, and near completion of, their pre-registration education programme. Aim. To ascertain nursing students' perceived levels of assertiveness prior to, and nearing the completion of, their three-year pre-registration programme. Ethical approval was given. The students commencing general nurse education programmes in two schools in Southern Ireland agreed to take part (n=72). A questionnaire adapted from a number of assertiveness scales, and tested for validity and reliability in this population, was used to collect data. In general, students' reported assertiveness levels rose as they approached completion of their three-year education programme. The resource constrained health service of the 21st century requires nurses who are assertive to meet the needs of its users. Nursing students' assertiveness skills could be augmented through concentrated efforts from nurse educationalists and clinicians to reduce the communication theory practice gap in nurse education today. To address the multi-dimensional nature of assertiveness, strategies to increase assertiveness should operate at the individual, interface and organisational level. The students in this study reported an increase in levels of assertiveness as they approached completion of their three-year education programme. To function as effective, safe practitioners registered nurses need to be assertive, therefore education in assertiveness should be an integral part of their preparation. The precise composition and mode of delivery of this education requires exploration and evaluation.

  8. Innovative uses of technology in online midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Megan W; Nypaver, Cynthia F; Wika, Judith C

    2015-01-01

    Women's health care in the United States is at a critical juncture. There is increased demand for primary care providers, including women's health specialists such as certified nurse-midwives/certified midwives, women's health nurse practitioners, and obstetrician-gynecologists, yet shortages in numbers of these providers are expected. This deficit in the number of women's health care providers could have adverse consequences for women and their newborns when women have to travel long distances to access maternity health care. Online education using innovative technologies and evidence-based teaching and learning strategies have the potential to increase the number of health care providers in several disciplines, including midwifery. This article reviews 3 innovative uses of online platforms for midwifery education: virtual classrooms, unfolding case studies, and online return demonstrations of clinical skills. These examples of innovative teaching strategies can promote critical and creative thinking and enhance competence in skills. Their use in online education can help enhance the student experience. More students, including those who live in rural and underserved regions and who otherwise might be unable to attend a traditional onsite campus, are provided the opportunity to complete quality midwifery education through online programs, which in turn may help expand the women's health care provider workforce. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  9. Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Practice: New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Innovations in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Practice: New York. University ... Background. New York University College of Nursing (NYUCN) is one of the original U.S. institutions to support the ... Results. Successful faculty recruitment and retention: Since the program's inception NYU has had 33 nursing and mid-.

  10. The cost and value of pre-registration clinical placements for Project 2000 students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M L; Akehurst, R

    1999-07-01

    The research outlined in this article was commissioned by the Sheffield and North Trent College of Nursing and Midwifery to explore the cost implications of pre-registration clinical placements in the context of Project 2000. The authors outline the methodology and findings of an exercise designed to collect relevant cost information which was not readily available. On the basis of these findings, they suggest that: at 1995/1996 pay and prices, clinical placements cost the education provider approximately pound 890 per student per annum; in terms of real resources, the value to service providers of the service contribution made by second- and third-year nursing and midwifery students on ward-based placements outweighs the value of the time spent by qualified staff on their supervision and education. Once the funding assumptions underlying the introduction of Project 2000 have been taken into account, second- and third-year nursing and midwifery students benefit the service provider by on average pound 3.46 for every hour they spend in an unrostered ward-based placement. The service contribution made by students in community-based clinical placements cannot free staff time in the same way as on the wards and, because qualified staff in these areas are generally more highly graded, the value of the time they spend on the supervision and education of students on placement is higher than in ward-based placements. Second- and third-year students therefore appear to cost the service provider on average pound 0.48 for each hour they spend in a community-based placement. It was not possible to determine whether this cost translates into a reduction in patient contacts.

  11. Diversifying the Midwifery Workforce: Inclusivity, Culturally Sensitive Bridging, and Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Holliday; Wilson-Mitchell, Karline

    2016-11-01

    Midwifery educators and regulators in Canada have begun to address diversity, equity, and inclusion in admission processes and program curricula. Populations served by midwives value internationally educated midwives from their countries of origin. The International Midwifery Pre-Registration Program at Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario, provides assessment, midwifery workplace orientation, and accelerated education for internationally educated midwives on behalf of the regulatory College of Midwives of Ontario. Between 2003 and 2015, midwives from 41 countries participated in the bridging program, and 214 (80%) successfully completed the program and qualified for licensure. Of these 214 graduates, 100% passed the Canadian Midwifery Registration Examination and 193 (90%) were employed full time as midwives within 4 months of graduation. The program curriculum enables the integration of these midwives into health care workplaces utilizing innovative approaches to assessment and competency enhancement. Critical to the bridging process are simulation-based practices to develop effective psychomotor learning, virtual and real primary care community placements, and coaching in empathetic, client-centered communication. Cultural sensitivity is embedded into the multiple assessment and learning modalities, and addresses relevant barriers faced by immigrant midwives in the workplace. Findings from the 13 years of the program may be applicable to increase diversity in other North American midwifery settings. This article describes the process, content, outcomes, and findings of the program. Midwifery educators and regulators may consider the utility of these approaches for their settings. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  12. The Clinical Learning Dyad Model: An Innovation in Midwifery Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susanna R; Thomas, Celeste R; Gerard, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    There is a national shortage of women's health and primary care providers in the United States, including certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives. This shortage is directly related to how many students can be trained within the existing system. The current model of midwifery clinical training is based on apprenticeship, with one-on-one interaction between a student and preceptor. Thus, the number of newly trained midwifery providers is limited by the number of available and willing preceptors. The clinical learning dyad model (CLDM), which pairs 2 beginning midwifery students with one preceptor in a busy practice, addresses this problem. In addition, this model brings in a senior midwife student as a near-peer mentor when the students are first oriented into outpatient clinical practice. The model began as a pilot project to improve the quality of training and increase available student spots in clinical education. This article discusses the origins of the model, the specifics of its design, and the results of a midterm and one-year postintervention survey. Students and preceptors involved in this model identified several advantages to the program, including increased student accountability, enhanced socialization into the profession, improved learning, and reduced teaching burden on preceptors. An additional benefit of the CLDM is that students form a learning community and collaborate with preceptors to care for women in busy clinical settings. Challenges of the model will also be discussed. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the CLDM. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  13. Complexities of policy-driven pre-registration nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Jilian; Holt, Maxine

    This article discusses the challenges faced by two nurse educators when incorporating current health policy into a new pre-registration nursing curriculum, using public health and e-learning as examples. The article, which features the results of preliminary work from the authors' doctoral studies, includes summaries of students' discourses about e-learning and public health and how these subject areas are perceived by learners. Practical solutions to the challenges encountered are suggested.

  14. Midwifery education, regulation and association in six South Asian countries--a descriptive report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogren, Malin Upper; Wiseman, Anita; Berg, Marie

    2012-06-01

    To describe the situation of midwifery education, regulation and association in six South Asian countries: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, and Pakistan. Data were collected via three questionnaires, constructed by the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Investing in Midwives Programme, used at a regional workshop in Bangladesh, 2010. Selected for the purpose of this study were 55 out of 134 questions of which two were open-ended. The answers from structured closed-ended questions were analyzed with descriptive statistics and the open ended answers with a qualitative content analysis. There was a variation in midwifery education across South Asia, in terms of entry level, competencies and requirements for teachers. None of the countries had national legislation that recognized midwifery as an autonomous profession. Four of the countries had a midwifery association. Two countries had a curriculum based on ICM's essential competences for basic midwifery practice. Main recommendations for improving formal midwifery education across the countries were development of legislation, strengthened formal midwifery education, strengthened professional value, and an improved learning environment. The findings might benefit the future midwifery profession in South Asia and is an important step in addressing the MDGs to reduce maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality in the region. With assistance, the area of South Asia will be able to create autonomous midwives that comply with ICM's global standards for midwifery education and regulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A qualitative study exploring student midwives' experiences of carrying a caseload as part of their midwifery education in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawnson, Stella

    2011-12-01

    To explore student midwives' experiences of caseloading to develop an understanding of how they perceive this educational strategy has impacted on their learning journey to becoming a midwife. A qualitative approach drawing upon the principles of grounded theory. Data were collected by in-depth semi-structured interviews. A university in the South of England providing undergraduate pre-registration midwifery education across Advanced Diploma and BSc (Hons) programmes. Eight Caucasian female final-year student midwives aged 23-50 years who had completed their caseloading experience. One core category ('making it good') and four major categories emerged: (1) 'developing and managing caseload', (2) 'learning partnerships', (3) 'feeling like a midwife' and (4) 'afterwards'. The core category was reflected in all the other categories and was dependent upon them. Students identified caseloading as a highly beneficial learning approach, facilitating application of theory to practice and acquisition of new skills promoting confidence and competence in practice. Students articulated an overwhelming desire and concern to meet and facilitate women's expectations. Perceptions of letting the woman down evoked feelings of inadequacy and failure. Flexible working practices, on-call commitment and carrying a caseload alongside academic and home commitments was, for many, emotionally stressful. Effective preparation of students for the realities of caseloading, the development of realistic caseloads that take account of the student's individual situation, and the provision of supportive frameworks are essential. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Politics of Representation: A Personal Reflection on the Problematic Positioning of the Midwifery Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Claire

    2004-01-01

    The changing face of midwifery practice and education in Australia is challenging the previously accepted notions of the birth experience, the options of care that are available for women and their families, and the role of the midwife in that experience. The role of the midwifery educator is also challenged by the move away from a predominantly…

  17. Building midwifery educator capacity using international partnerships: Findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Florence; Dawson, Angela; Homer, Caroline S E

    2017-07-01

    Midwifery educators play a critical role in strengthening the midwifery workforce globally, including in low and lower-middle income countries (LMIC) to ensure that midwives are adequately prepared to deliver quality midwifery care. The most effective approach to building midwifery educator capacity is not always clear. The aim of this study was to determine how one capacity building approach in Papua New Guinea (PNG) used international partnerships to improve teaching and learning. A qualitative exploratory case study design was used to explore the perspectives of 26 midwifery educators working in midwifery education institutions in PNG. Seven themes were identified which provide insights into the factors that enable and constrain midwifery educator capacity building. The study provides insights into strategies which may aid institutions and individuals better plan and implement international midwifery partnerships to strengthen context-specific knowledge and skills in teaching. Further research is necessary to assess how these findings can be transferred to other contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Midwifery in American Institutes of Higher Education: Women's Work, Vocations and the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    Midwifery is one of the universal professions. At the end of the nineteenth century, midwives in the United States were disenfranchised from the mainstream. A concerted effort was waged by male physicians to characterize midwifery practices as unscientific while simultaneously preventing midwives from obtaining formal education. Although midwifery…

  19. Establishing midwifery in low-resource settings: guidance from a mixed-methods evaluation of the Afghanistan midwifery education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainullah, Partamin; Ansari, Nasratullah; Yari, Khalid; Azimi, Mahmood; Turkmani, Sabera; Azfar, Pashtoon; LeFevre, Amnesty; Mungia, Jaime; Gubin, Rehana; Kim, Young-Mi; Bartlett, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The shortage of skilled birth attendants has been a key factor in the high maternal and newborn mortality in Afghanistan. Efforts to strengthen pre-service midwifery education in Afghanistan have increased the number of midwives from 467 in 2002 to 2954 in 2010. We analyzed the costs and graduate performance outcomes of the two types of pre-service midwifery education programs in Afghanistan that were either established or strengthened between 2002 and 2010 to guide future program implementation and share lessons learned. We performed a mixed-methods evaluation of selected midwifery schools between June 2008 and November 2010. This paper focuses on the evaluation's quantitative methods, which included (a) an assessment of a sample of midwifery school graduates (n=138) to measure their competencies in six clinical skills; (b) prospective documentation of the actual clinical practices of a subsample of these graduates (n=26); and (c) a costing analysis to estimate the resources required to educate students enrolled in these programs. For the clinical competency assessment and clinical practices components, two Institutes for Health Sciences (IHS) schools and six Community Midwifery Education (CME) schools; for the costing analysis, a different set of nine schools (two IHS, seven CME), all of which were funded by the US Agency for International Development. Midwives who had graduated from either IHS or CME schools. CME graduates (n=101) achieved an overall mean competency score of 63.2% (59.9-66.6%) on the clinical competency assessment compared to 57.3% (49.9-64.7%) for IHS graduates (n=37). Reproductive health activities accounted for 76% of midwives' time over an average of three months. Approximately 1% of childbirths required referral or resulted in maternal death. On the basis of known costs for the programs, the estimated cost of graduating a class with 25 students averaged US$298,939, or US$10,784 per graduate. The pre-service midwifery education experience of

  20. Nutrition Education in Australian Midwifery Programmes: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Arrish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Little research has explored how nutrition content in midwifery education prepares midwives to provide prenatal nutrition advice. This study examined the nature and extent of nutrition education provided in Australian midwifery programmes. A mixed-methods approach was used, incorporating an online survey and telephone interviews. The survey analysis included 23 course coordinators representing 24 of 50 accredited midwifery programmes in 2012. Overall, the coordinators considered nutrition in midwifery curricula and the midwife’s role as important. All programmes included nutrition content; however, eleven had only 5 to <10 hours allocated to nutrition, while two had a designated unit. Various topics were covered. Dietitians/other nutrition experts were rarely involved in teaching or reviewing the nutrition content. Interviews with seven coordinators revealed that nutrition education tended to be problem-oriented and at times based on various assumptions. Nutrition content was not informed by professional or theoretical models. The development of nutrition assessment skills or practical training for midwifery students in providing nutrition advice was lacking. As nutrition is essential for maternal and foetal health, nutrition education in midwifery programmes needs to be reviewed and minimum requirements should be included to improve midwives’ effectiveness in this area. This may require collaboration between nutrition experts and midwifery bodies.

  1. The development and evaluation of a computer-based resource to enhance the education of pre-registration nursing students regarding knowledge and attitudes towards pain management

    OpenAIRE

    Keefe, Gemma

    2011-01-01

    The study is the first in its field to quantitatively explore the effects of e-learning to improve knowledge and attitudes towards pain management. Pain is a fundamental reason for patients seeking healthcare, yet in recent years it has been acknowledged that the importance of pain management is often overlooked or misunderstood, with poor pain education frequently blamed. In fact, the extent of pain education is severely limited in current nursing curricula, primarily due to a lack of priori...

  2. The evidence-based practice profiles of academic and clinical staff involved in pre-registration nursing students' education: a cross sectional survey of US and UK staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Penney; Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Williamson, Kathleen; Rouse, Joanne; Upton, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Competency in evidence-based practice (EBP) is a requirement for graduate nurses. Despite a growing body of research exploring the EBP profiles of students, little research has explored the EBP profiles of nurse educators. To explore: the differences/similarities in the EBP profiles of US and UK clinical and academic faculty; the barriers nurse educators experience when teaching EBP; the impact of postgraduate education on EBP profile and; what nurse educators perceive "success" in implementing and teaching EBP to be. A cross-sectional online survey design was employed. Two Universities delivering undergraduate nursing education in the US and UK, in partnership with large hospital systems, small community hospitals, community settings, and independent sector health organisations. Eighty-one nurse educators working in academic and clinical contexts in the US and UK (US academic=12, US clinical=17, UK academic=9, UK clinical=43) were recruited opportunistically. Participants were emailed a weblink to an online survey, comprising demographic questions, the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire and open-ended questions about EBP barriers, facilitators and successes. Quantitative results indicated that academic faculty scored significantly higher on knowledge and skills of EBP, than clinical faculty, but revealed no other significant differences on EBP use or attitudes, or between US and UK professionals. Participants with postgraduate training scored significantly higher on EBP knowledge/skills, but not EBP attitudes or use. Qualitative findings identified key themes relating to EBP barriers and facilitators, including: Evidence-, organisational-, and teaching-related issues. Perceptions of successes in EBP were also described. Nurse educators working in the UK and US face similar EBP barriers to teaching and implementation, but view it positively and use it frequently. Clinical staff may require extra support to maintain their EBP knowledge and skills in

  3. Final year students' learning experiences of the Bachelor of Midwifery course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan-Olah, Mary; Kruger, Gina

    2014-08-01

    the aim of the study was to explore the concerns of 3rd year Bachelor of Midwifery students. earlier research indicates that midwifery students experience a number of conflicting learning demands and expectations, during their student years. These difficulties can lead to anxiety and a lack of confidence, which have implications for student integration and socialisation into the profession. a qualitative method was used, underpinned by Smith and Osborn's (2008) approach to interpretative phenomenological analysis IPA. In-depth interviews were conducted among 10 senior midwifery students as they looked back over their three year course. Data were analysed using steps proposed by Smith and Osborn (2008). more than two-thirds of participants were over 35 years, and had two or more children. More than half were living with a spouse/partner and the majority worked 16 hours or less per week. Themes emerging from the data included (1) linking theory to practice; (2) a focus on clinical skills; (3) learning expectations and experiences; and (4) the role of midwifery lecturers/educators. midwifery students experience a number of challenges associated with their pre-registration midwifery education, including difficulty understanding the relevance of some study units to midwifery practice. A strong focus on practical skills may inhibit the development of cognitive skills such as critical evaluation and reflection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Practice development for midwifery education: an innovative way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donsante, Jackie; Edgar, Denise; Gill, Leeanne; Thomson, Ceri; Williamson, Moira; Walsh, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Within workplaces there can be several different cultures operating, and it is widely recognised that this occurs in health services. Midwifery and maternity care has, and continues to face many challenges as services continually change and develop to meet the needs of women and their families. To help meet these challenges a practice development initiative was undertaken within a large maternity service in Australia to improve the learning and workplace culture. This service consisted of four separate units providing care for women and their families in the antenatal, birthing, postnatal and neonatal periods. The coming together of these four units as a service began with the creation of a shared values statement which was adopted by all midwifery staff. To obtain evidence of the current workplace, observations of practice, the review of women's stories, and audits of clinical data were undertaken. Nine midwives were trained and supported to facilitate critical discussions of the data. These critical discussions, reflections and analysis of the data, led to the identification of four domains or key areas the staff prioritised for change. This led to practice development groups being formed within the maternity service, who developed collaborative and creative ways of thinking about the issues or problems identified. This paper highlights how the processes of practice development were implemented to improve one of these domains "the learning and workplace culture", especially in relation to educational information and resources for women, their families and staff. The journey began over three years ago and continues to evolve. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of limited midwifery clinical education and practice standardisation of student preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuso, Zanyiwe; James, Sindiwe

    2017-08-01

    To explore the perceptions of midwifery educators regarding effects of limited standardisation of midwifery clinical education and practice on clinical preparedness of midwifery students. Investigation of levels of clinical competency of students is a critical need in the current era. Such competency levels are especially important in midwifery practice in South Africa as there is a significant increase of maternal deaths and litigations in the country. Most of the deaths are in the primary healthcare level maternity units where the newly qualified midwives practise. These areas are mainly run by midwives only. The current article seeks to report the findings of the study that was conducted to investigate how midwifery educators prepare students adequately for clinical readiness. The study was conducted amongst midwifery nurse educators on three campuses of the Nursing College in the Eastern Cape. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research design was used for the study. Seventeen purposively selected midwifery educators, with the researcher using set criteria, from a Nursing college in the Eastern Cape, were the participants in the study. Data was collected using focus-group interviews that were captured by means of an audio-voice recorder. Tesch's data-analysis method was used to develop themes and sub-themes. Trustworthiness of the study was ensured using the criteria of credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability. Inconsistent clinical practice amongst midwifery educators in their clinical teaching and assessment were found to be the major factors resulting from limited standardisation. The inconsistent clinical practice and assessments of midwifery educators was found to lead to loss of the necessary skills required by the students which led them to perform poorly in their final clinical assessments. There are some barriers in the current clinical teaching and education strategy used in this college that prohibit the

  6. Building midwifery educator capacity in teaching in low and lower-middle income countries. A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Florence; Homer, Caroline; Dawson, Angela

    2016-02-01

    midwifery educators play a critical role in strengthening the midwifery workforce in low and lower-middle income countries (LMIC) to ensure that women receive quality midwifery care. However, the most effective approach to building midwifery educator capacity is not always clear. This paper will explore approaches used to build midwifery educator capacity in LMIC and identify evidence to inform improved outcomes for midwifery education. a structured search of bibliographic electronic databases (CINAHL, OVID, MEDLINE, PubMed) and the search engine Google Scholar was performed. It was decided to also review peer reviewed research, grey literature and descriptive papers. Papers were included in the review if they were written in English, published between 2000 and 2014 and addressed building knowledge and/or skills in teaching and/or clinical practice in midwifery educators who work in training institutions in LMIC. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta Analyses (PRISMA) was used to guide the reporting process. The quality of papers was appraised in discussion with all authors. The findings sections of the research papers were analysed to identify successful elements of capacity building approaches. eighteen (six research and 12 discursive) papers were identified as related to the topic, meeting the inclusion criteria and of sufficient quality. The findings were themed according to the key approaches used to build capacity for midwifery education. These approaches are: skill and knowledge updates associated with curriculum review, involvement in leadership, management and research training and, participation in a community of practice within regions to share resources. the study provides evidence to support the benefits of building capacity for midwifery educators. Multilevel approaches that engaged individuals and institutions in building capacity alongside an enabling environment for midwifery educators are needed but more research specific

  7. Australian nursing and midwifery educators delivering evidence-based education in Tanzania: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Shelley; van den Akker, Jose; Jones, Mark; Dantas, Jaya A R; Duggan, Ravani

    2016-05-01

    Since 2011, Western Australian nursing and midwifery educators have been providing evidence-based continuing education to Tanzanian health professionals. Despite thorough preparation before departure, differences in local resource levels and available facilities have necessitated impromptu adaptation of curriculum content and delivery methods to ensure an effective program was delivered. This study explored the personal, cultural and teaching strategies utilised by Western Australian nursing and midwifery educators in Tanzania and examined if the transferability of education packages was influenced by the educators' cultural competence. Using a qualitative exploratory approach, data was collected from 15 Western Australian nursing and midwifery educators using a demographic survey and in-depth individual semi-structured interviews. The core themes identified from the analysis were Determination to learn, Assessing needs, Communication skills and Greater understanding. These findings are described using the conceptual framework of Campinha-Bacote's The Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Healthcare Services. With appropriate levels of cultural competence, international health professionals can be effective at providing ongoing professional development to colleagues in developing country contexts, which may help address difficulties with retention and motivation of staff. It is essential that prior to departure cultural competence training is provided to educators to enhance their teaching capacity and effectiveness in international settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting stress in pre-registration nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryjmachuk, Steven; Richards, David A

    2007-02-01

    To determine which variables from a pool of potential predictors predict General Health Questionnaire 'caseness' in pre-registration nursing students. Cross-sectional survey, utilizing self-report measures of sources of stress, stress (psychological distress) and coping, together with pertinent demographic measures such as sex, ethnicity, educational programme and nursing specialty being pursued, and age, social class and highest qualifications on entry to the programme. Questionnaire packs were distributed to all pre-registration nursing students (N=1,362) in a large English university. Completed packs were coded, entered into statistical software and subjected to a series of logistic regression analyses. Of the questionnaire packs 1,005 (74%) were returned, of which up to 973 were available for the regression analyses undertaken. Four logistic regression models were considered and, on the principle of parsimony, a single model was chosen for discussion. This model suggested that the key predictors of caseness in the population studied were self-report of pressure, whether or not respondents had children (specifically, whether these children were pre-school or school-age), scores on a 'personal problems' scale and the type of coping employed. The overall caseness rate among the population was around one-third. Since self-report and personal, rather than academic, concerns predict stress, personal teachers need to play a key role in supporting students through 'active listening', especially when students self-report high levels of stress and where personal/social problems are evident. The work-life balance of students, especially those with child-care responsibilities, should be a central tenet in curriculum design in nurse education (and, indeed, the education of other professional and occupational groups). There may be some benefit in offering stress management (coping skills) training to nursing students and, indeed, students of other disciplines.

  9. Emotional intelligence increases over time: A longitudinal study of Australian pre-registration nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kim; Fethney, Judith; McKenzie, Heather; Fisher, Murray; Harkness, Emily; Kozlowski, Desirée

    2017-08-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with positive outcomes for nursing students. Higher EI is associated with personal wellbeing and stress management, higher academic performance, stronger nursing leadership and practice performance, and greater patient safety. While there is an increasing body of evidence on nursing students' EI, there is minimal evidence on EI over time during pre-registration programs. To measure EI in pre-registration nursing students from program commencement to conclusion to ascertain EI over time and examine the relationship between EI and academic performance. Longitudinal repeated measures study between March 2010-February 2013 at a metropolitan university in Australia. 111 nursing students (74.8% female) contributed data on at least two occasions. Participants were enrolled in a pre-registration Master of Nursing degree. Half the cohort (55.0%) comprised Graduate Entry students who completed the course in two years full time. The other 45% were enrolled in an undergraduate degree in arts, science or health science, combined with the same pre-registration Master of Nursing Degree. These students completed their Combined Degree program in four years full time. Participants had a mean age of 24.7years (SD=7.36). EI was measured for commencing students (T1) using the Assessing Emotions Scale (AES), then a further three times: end of first year (T2; 9 months follow up); beginning of second year (12 months follow up; T3) and end of the program (T4; 24/36 months follow up). Students' EI was found to increase across the program; one subscale of EI (managing others' emotions) was related to higher academic performance; and there was a significant increase in the Utilising Emotions subscale scores over time. Pre-registration nurse education contributes to strengthening students' EI over time. Specific EI education scaffolded throughout programs is recommended in pre-registration curricula. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Cancer: Implications for pre-registration radiography curricula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss pre-registration radiography education curricula in the context of cancer, changing healthcare delivery in the UK, and the considerable interaction of radiographers with people with cancer. The fitness for purpose of the long-standing curriculum model of alternating academic and clinical learning experiences is questioned and a view expressed that it is no longer sufficient to prepare student radiographers for practice and as professionals. A suggestion is made that curricula should be aligned with cancer (and other) care pathways although it is recognised that such a change would be difficult. It is concluded that the profession should explore what is the appropriate curriculum model given the development of the care pathway approach to healthcare delivery, and, if appropriate, make changes based on research evidence.

  11. Development of a context specific accreditation assessment tool for affirming quality midwifery education in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogren, Malin; Sathyanarayanan Doraiswamy; Erlandsson, Kerstin; Akhter, Halima; Akter, Dalia; Begum, Momtaz; Chowdhury, Merry; Das, Lucky; Akter, Rehana; Begum, Sufia; Akter, Renoara; Yesmin, Syeada; Khatun, Yamin Ara

    2018-06-01

    using the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) Global Standards for Midwifery Education as a conceptual framework, the aim of this study was to explore and describe important 'must haves' for inclusion in a context-specific accreditation assessment tool in Bangladesh. A questionnaire study was conducted using a Likert rating scale and 111 closed-response single items on adherence to accreditation-related statements, ending with an open-ended question. The ICM Global Standards guided data collection, deductive content analysis and description of the quantitative results. twenty-five public institutes/colleges (out of 38 in Bangladesh), covering seven out of eight geographical divisions in the country. one hundred and twenty-three nursing educators teaching the 3-year diploma midwifery education programme. this study provides insight into the development of a context-specific accreditation assessment tool for Bangladesh. Important components to be included in this accreditation tool are presented under the following categories and domains: 'organization and administration', 'midwifery faculty', 'student body', 'curriculum content', 'resources, facilities and services' and 'assessment strategies'. The identified components were a prerequisite to ensure that midwifery students achieve the intended learning outcomes of the midwifery curriculum, and hence contribute to a strong midwifery workforce. The components further ensure well-prepared teachers and a standardized curriculum supported at policy level to enable effective deployment of professional midwives in the existing health system. as part of developing an accreditation assessment tool, it is imperative to build ownership and capacity when translating the ICM Global Standards for Midwifery Education into the national context. this initiative can be used as lessons learned from Bangladesh to develop a context-specific accreditation assessment tool in line with national priorities, supporting the

  12. Time spent studying on a pre-registration nursing programme module: an exploratory study and implications for regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelling, Paul C; Lipscomb, Martin; Lockyer, Lesley; Yates, Sue; Young, Pat

    2010-11-01

    European Union (EU) regulations require that university programmes are of specified duration. Additional EU regulations apply specifically to university based nurse education, enacted in the UK by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). However, little is known about how much time student nurses spend on their studies. In this exploratory study, students undertaking a single module in the pre-registration diploma programme at an English university were asked to keep a log of learning activity for the duration of the module. Twenty-six students completed the log. These students achieved higher grades and attended more lectures than the average for the module. The mean study time was 128.4 h against a regulatory assumption that the module should take 200 h. More than half of the 26 students undertook paid work during the module run, though this work was not associated with poorer performance. Problems in regulation for course duration are discussed and it is suggested that undertaking a 4600 h course in 3 years is problematic. More research is required so that patterns of study can be better understood and student centred programmes meeting regulatory requirements developed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Rapid Assessment Tool for affirming good practice in midwifery education programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Judith T; Johnson, Peter; Lobe, Erika; Myint, Khine Haymar; Aung, Nan Nan; Moe, Thida; Linn, Nay Aung

    2016-03-01

    to design a criterion-referenced assessment tool that could be used globally in a rapid assessment of good practices and bottlenecks in midwifery education programs. a standard tool development process was followed, to generate standards and reference criteria; followed by external review and field testing to document psychometric properties. review of standards and scoring criteria were conducted by stakeholders around the globe. Field testing of the tool was conducted in Myanmar. eleven of Myanmar׳s 22 midwifery education programs participated in the assessment. the clinimetric tool was demonstrated to have content validity and high inter-rater reliability in use. a globally validated tool, and accompanying user guide and handbook are now available for conducting rapid assessments of compliance with good practice criteria in midwifery education programming. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. The experience of graduated midwifery students about clinical education: A phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shahoei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Improvement and promotion of the quality of clinical education requires continuous assessment of the current situation, and also identifying the strengths and weaknesses. Students' views and ideas as learner can help future planning. This study aims to identify the experiences of midwifery graduates about factors affecting their clinical learning. Methods: A qualitative study using phenomenology approach was conducted. Ten midwifery graduates were selected based on purposive sampling and then interviewed. Data were analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: The extracted conceptual codes were classified into several main concepts. There were two main themes factors facilitating learning and factors preventing learning, and seven sub themes performance of instructor, pre-clinical training, students satisfaction, lack of peripheral facilities, lack of coordination of educational planning and behaviors of health care personnel. Conclusion: Trained human resources and equipment for midwifery educational planning are needed to provide a supportive learning atmosphere and promote the quality of clinical learning.

  15. Competency-based education: the essential basis of pre-service education for the professional midwifery workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Judith T; Thompson, Joyce B; Johnson, Peter

    2013-10-01

    many articles published in the decade since promulgation of the Millennium Development Goals have acknowledged the distinct advantages to maternal and newborn health outcomes that can be achieved as a result of expanding access to skilled birth attendant (including midwifery) services. However, these advantages are often predicated on the assumption that the midwifery workforce shares a common definition and identity. Regrettably, a clear delineation of midwifery competencies is rarely addressed. A core set of midwifery competencies is essential to providing the high quality services that lead to the desirable health outcomes described in that body of research. Attribution of improved outcomes to access to midwifery cannot be made without a common understanding of a defined set of services provided to standard by the midwifery workforce across the inter-conceptional and childbearing time frame. The International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) has developed a clear list of competencies that delineate the domains of practice for the fully qualified, professional midwife. These domains frame the educational outcomes that must be conveyed within competency-based education programmes. this article explores the concept of competency-based education for midwives; first exploring the concept of competency itself, then providing examples of what is already known about competency-based approaches to curriculum design, teacher preparation, teacher support and assessment of student learning. These concepts are linked to the ICM competencies as the unifying construct for education of individuals who share a common definition and identity as midwives. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A mixed-method evaluation of a New Zealand based midwifery education development unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAra-Couper, Judith; Gilkison, Andrea; Fielder, Anna; Donald, Heather

    2017-07-01

    The Midwifery Development Education Service was established in the Birthing Unit at Middlemore Hospital in South Auckland New Zealand in 2007. The service is unique in the New Zealand midwifery context for the way it operates as a collaboration between the education and health provider to optimise the clinical learning experience of student midwives. This paper reports on the evaluation of the Midwifery Development Education Service that was undertaken in 2015. The evaluation captured the views and experience of students and midwives who had been involved with, or had worked alongside, the service. A mixed-method approach was adopted for the evaluation study, comprising of an anonymous on-line survey, qualitative interviews and focus group discussion. Considerable satisfaction with the service was identified. This article draws attention to participants' perceptions of the service as supporting student midwives; the significance of quality time in the provision of the clinical midwifery education; the situating of the service at a unique vantage point (overseeing the needs of the university and the hospital) and its impact upon the learning culture of education within the unit. A potential tension is also identified between the provision of a supportive learning environment and the assessment of student performance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Prior Work and Educational Experience Are Not Associated With Successful Completion of a Master's-Level, Distance Education Midwifery Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczyk, Nancy A; Cutts, Alison; Perlman, Dana B

    2018-03-01

    In order to increase and diversify the midwifery workforce, admissions criteria for midwifery education programs must not contain unnecessary barriers to entry. Once accepted, students need to successfully complete the program. Many admissions criteria commonly used in midwifery education programs in the United States are not evidence based and could be unnecessary barriers to education. The primary objective of this study was to identify factors known during the admission process that were related to successful completion or failure to complete a midwifery program educating both student nurse-midwives (SNMs) and student midwives (SMs); a secondary objective was to quantify reasons for program noncompletion. This master's-level, distance education program educates a diverse group of both SNMs and SMs. A pilot, retrospective cohort study examined all students matriculating at the program from fall 2012 on and scheduled to graduate by summer 2016 (N = 58). Demographic information, admissions information, academic records, and advising notes were reviewed. Reasons for noncompletion were identified, and characteristics were compared between students who did and did not complete the program. Program completion was not significantly associated with students' status as nurses prior to admission, labor and delivery nursing experience, length of nursing experience, nursing degree held, presence of children at home, working while in school, or undergraduate grade point average. Being a nurse, years of nursing experience, type of nursing degree, or labor and delivery nursing experience were not associated with completion of this midwifery program. © 2018 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  18. [Current status and problems of regional maternal and child health education in the curriculum of midwifery education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, I

    1989-01-01

    According to the evaluations made by medical Technical Junior Colleges in Japan, general objectives in midwifery education are met, but their curriculum does not cater to each region's health care needs sufficiently. Japanese midwifery students can either attend a 6 month training program offered at 80 different locations, or enroll in a 1 year special-major program at one of the 10 Medical Technical Junior Colleges affiliated with National Universities. According to the curriculum revised in 1971, midwifery students are required to take the following courses and hours in 6 months. Intro. to Maternal and Child Health (15 hours), Maternal and Child Health Medicine (60 hours), Lecture on Midwifery (105 hrs), Practice in Midwifery (135 hrs), Midwifery Business Administration (60 hrs), Maternal and Child Health Administration including internship (225 hrs), Regional Maternal and Child Health including internship (105 hrs) and Family Sociology (15 hours). Regional Maternal and Child Health course (RMCH) is effectively taught only if all the maternal and child health courses and lecture on midwifery are taken beforehand. Objectives for RMCH course are becoming able to assess the state of maternal and child health care in the region and give constructive criticism and suggestions for improvement including legal aspects, acquiring positive attitudes and necessary skills for advancing and having understanding of regional health care and that of midwives' role of it. While the curriculum prepares the students for meeting the patients' physical needs, the students are not ready to cope with their psychological and socio-physiological problems surrounding individuals, families and communities. Changes and diversification of regional communities should be taken into consideration also in the curriculum. Increase in nuclear families, increase in working wives, isolation and/or over-crowding of high rise apartment living are some of the examples. Midwifery activity is also

  19. iMidwife: midwifery students' use of smartphone technology as a mediated educational tool in clinical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeo, Annemarie; Geraghty, Sadie

    2017-12-18

    The increasing use of smartphone technology in health care provides midwifery students with unprecedented access to online resources that facilitates the optimal care of women and supports ongoing learning. A small pilot study was conducted in Western Australia, with 29 undergraduate and postgraduate midwifery students to explore the use of smartphone technology whilst in clinical practice. This study aimed to define the impact of smartphones in clinical decision-making and learning whilst in clinical areas, by midwifery students at the point of care. An online survey was used to collect data. Five consistent themes were identified from the results. Smartphone technology encourages self-directed learning, consolidation of theory, engagement through blended learning, complements online education in clinical practice and is a trend in the future of midwifery curriculum. Smartphones enhance the learning and mobility of supportive resources that consolidate midwifery students' clinical experience in workplace environments.

  20. Meeting the health and social needs of pregnant asylum seekers, midwifery students' perspectives: part 1; dominant discourses and midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haith-Cooper, Melanie; Bradshaw, Gwendolen

    2013-09-01

    Current literature has indicated a concern about standards of maternity care experienced by pregnant women who are seeking asylum. As the next generation of midwives, it is important that students are educated in a way that prepares them to effectively care for these women. To understand how this can be achieved, it is important to explore what asylum seeking means to midwifery students. This article is the first of three parts and reports on one objective from a wider doctorate study. It identifies dominant discourses that influenced the perceptions of a group of midwifery students' about the pregnant asylum seeking woman. The study was designed from a social constructivist perspective, with contextual knowledge being constructed by groups of people, influenced by underpinning dominant discourses, depending on their social, cultural and historical positions in the world. In a United Kingdom University setting, during year two of a pre-registration midwifery programme, eleven midwifery students participated in the study. Two focus group interviews using a problem based learning scenario as a trigger for discussion were conducted. In addition, three students were individually interviewed to explore issues in more depth and two students' written reflections on practice were used to generate data. Following a critical discourse analysis, dominant discourses were identified which appeared to influence the way in which asylum seekers were perceived. The findings suggested an underpinning ideology around the asylum seeker being different and of a criminal persuasion. Although the pregnant woman seeking asylum was considered as deserving of care, the same discourses appeared to influence the way in which she was constructed. However, as the study progressed, through reading alternative sources of literature, some students appeared to question these discourses. These findings have implications for midwifery education in encouraging students to challenge negative discourses

  1. A mixed study systematic review of social media in nursing and midwifery education: Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Jolliffe, Sarah; Stanmore, Emma; Renwick, Laoise; Schmitt, Terri; Booth, Richard

    2017-08-01

    To synthesize evidence on the use of social media in nursing and midwifery education. Social media is one type of online platform that is being explored to determine if there is value in using interactive, digital communication tools to support how nurses and midwives learn in a variety of settings. A sequential explanatory synthesis approach will be used for this mixed study review. Five bibliographic databases; PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, and ERIC will be searched using a combination of keywords relevant to social networking and social media, nursing and midwifery, and education. The search will not be limited by year of publication. Titles, abstracts, and full papers will be screened by two independent reviewers against inclusion and exclusion criteria, with any disagreements resolved via a third reviewer. Selected studies will undergo quality assessment and data extraction. Data synthesis will occur in three sequential phases, with quantitative and qualitative data analysed separately and then integrated where possible to provide a conceptual framework illustrating learning via social media. Funding for this review was confirmed in May 2016 by Sigma Theta Tau International and the National League for Nursing. The mixed study systematic review will produce the first rigorous synthesis on the use of social media in nursing and midwifery education and will have important implications for educators as well as students. It will also highlight knowledge gaps and make recommendations on the use of this novel technology in higher and continuing education. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The politics of midwifery education and training in New South Wales during the last decades of the 19th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcal, Nita K

    2008-03-01

    This paper focuses on the introduction and development of midwifery education and training in Sydney during the last decades of the 19th century. The aim of the training, it is argued, was to displace the lay midwives by trained midwifery nurses who would work under medical control. The lay midwives were one of the largest occupational groups among women and two-thirds of births in NSW were being delivered by them in the late 19th century. It was a period of professionalisation of medicine and medical men laid claim to midwifery as a legitimate sphere of their practice and saw it as the gateway for establishing a family practice. The lay midwife stood in the way of their claim. The training programs were established purportedly to control maternal mortality. From the beginning in 1887 medical men were in control of midwifery nurse training. In addition to training at the Benevolent Society Asylum, three more women's hospitals were established in the 1890s in Sydney making it possible to train a stream of midwifery nurses. The midwifery nurses were charged exorbitant fees for their training; the fees contributed substantially towards running the new hospitals that delivered birth services to the poor and destitute women mostly in their homes. The midwifery nurses worked hard in miserable conditions under the guise of clinical experience required for training. When a critical mass of poorly trained midwifery nurses were in the offing, a Bill was introduced into the Parliament in 1895, restricting registration to midwifery nurses and this would have eliminated the lay midwife if passed. It took more than two decades to get a Registration Bill passed in the NSW Parliament.

  3. Confronting uncomfortable truths: receptivity and resistance to Aboriginal content in midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackrah, Rosalie D; Thompson, Sandra C

    2013-12-01

    The emotional responses of students undertaking a new, compulsory unit on Indigenous cultures and health were investigated as part of a broader study looking at culturally secure practice in midwifery education and service provision for Aboriginal women. Classroom observations were conducted on a first year midwifery cohort from July to October 2012 and students completed 'before and after' questionnaires. A spectrum of emotional responses was identified and found to be consistent with studies of medical student exposure to Aboriginal content. While stereotypes were challenged and perceptions altered as a result of the content, issues surrounding racism remained unresolved, with some students expressing dismay at the attitudes of their peers. This study confirmed the need for content on Aboriginal health and cultures to extend beyond one unit in a course. Learning and knowledge must be carefully integrated and developed to maximise understanding and ensure that unresolved issues are addressed.

  4. Abortion-care education in Japanese nurse practitioner and midwifery programs: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Maki

    2014-01-01

    While various reports have been published concerning ethical dilemmas in nursing and midwifery, and while many nurses and midwives struggle with the conflict between personal feelings raised by abortion and the duties of their position, few studies investigate the extent and conditions of abortion-care education for registered nurses (RNs) and certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) in Japan. To describe Japanese abortion-care education programs and to investigate program directors' or other relevant persons' perceptions of abortion-care education. Descriptive study was used to determine the extent of abortion-care education programs and the respondents' perceptions of abortion-care education. All 228 Japanese nursing and/or midwifery schools were invited to participate in the study. The response rate was 33.8% (n=77). Response rate varied by program type: 18.4% (n=45) for nursing programs and 29.0% (n=32) for midwifery programs. A confidential survey requesting information about curricular coverage of ten reproductive health topics related to abortion was mailed to program directors. The results show that the majority of CNM and RN programs surveyed offer didactic exposure to instruction in family planning and contraception, emergency contraception, legal considerations, and possible medical complications. However, few programs offer clinical exposure to all 10 topics. Of the respondents, 36% reported that lack of time and the low priority given to abortion-care education were issues of curriculum priority. As for educational materials, few textbooks or guidebooks exist on abortion care in Japan, and most educators use general nursing textbooks to cover this topic. Regardless of interest in or intention to provide abortion services as part of their practice, all providers of abortion-care education need to be knowledgeable about the full range of reproductive health options, including family planning and abortion, and to be able to convey this information to clients

  5. Using task analysis to generate evidence for strengthening midwifery education, practice, and regulation in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigzaw, Tegbar; Carr, Catherine; Stekelenburg, Jelle; van Roosmalen, Jos; Gibson, Hannah; Gelagay, Mintwab; Admassu, Azeb

    2016-01-01

    Realizing aspirations for meeting the global reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health goals depends not only on increasing the numbers but also on improving the capability of midwifery workforce. We conducted a task analysis study to identify the needs for strengthening the midwifery workforce in Ethiopia. We conducted a cross-sectional study of recently qualified midwives in Ethiopia. Purposively selected participants from representative geographic and practice settings completed a self-administered questionnaire, making judgments about the frequency of performance, criticality, competence, and location of training for a list of validated midwifery tasks. Using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, Version 20, we computed the percentages and averages to describe participant and practice characteristics. We identified priority preservice education gaps by considering the tasks least frequently learned in preservice, most frequently mentioned for not being trained, and had the highest not capable response. Identification of top priorities for in-service training considered tasks with highest "not capable" and "never" done responses. We determined the licensing exam blueprint by weighing the composite mean scores for frequency and criticality variables and expert rating across practice categories. One hundred and thirty-eight midwives participated in the study. The majority of respondents recognized the importance of midwifery tasks (89%), felt they were capable (91.8%), reported doing them frequently (63.9%), and learned them during preservice education (56.3%). We identified competence gaps in tasks related to obstetric complications, gynecology, public health, professional duties, and prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. Moreover, our study helped to determine composition of the licensing exam for university graduates. The task analysis indicates that midwives provide critical reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health care

  6. Correlation between Students' Self-Efficacy and Teachers' Educational Leadership Style in Iranian Midwifery Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Zohreh; Kheirkhah, Masoomeh; Sahebzad, Elahe Sadegi; Rasoulighasemlouei, Seyedehsahel; Khavandi, Siamak

    2015-12-18

    Self-efficacy is believe in and feeling of ability to complete work. One of these factors is educational teachers ' role. This study aimed to determine relationship between teachers' leadership style and students' self-efficacy in midwifery students. This Study is a cross sectional correlation study. Sampling was conducted in midwifery students in Bachelor Science degree in 2013. Data collection tools were multi leadership questionnaire and self-efficacy clinical performance. After explaining the goals of study, 97 students completed the questionnaire. Scoring the questionnaire was based on a Liker's scale (0-5).Data were analyzed by SPSS 16. Correlation coefficient test was adopted to investigate the relationship and p value was considered 0.05. Mean of self-efficacy scores were 116.12 (24.66.). In 53.3% of the cases, self-efficacy was good, in 42.2% moderate and in 4.3%, it was bad. The majority of the students (88.9%) reported that their teachers had an idealized style in leadership. About 94.6% of the students with good self- efficacy believed that their teachers' leadership style was transformational style. There was a significant correlation between self- efficacy and leadership style (pstyle is appropriate for midwifery teachers.

  7. Correlation between Students’ Self-Efficacy and Teachers’ Educational Leadership Style in Iranian Midwifery Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Zohreh; Kheirkhah, Masoomeh; Sahebzad, Elahe Sadegi; Rasoulighasemlouei, Seyedehsahel; Khavandi, Siamak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-efficacy is believe in and feeling of ability to complete work. One of these factors is educational teachers’ role. This study aimed to determine relationship between teachers’ leadership style and students’ self-efficacy in midwifery students. Method: This Study is a cross sectional correlation study. Sampling was conducted in midwifery students in Bachelor Science degree in 2013. Data collection tools were multi leadership questionnaire and self-efficacy clinical performance. After explaining the goals of study, 97 students completed the questionnaire. Scoring the questionnaire was based on a Liker’s scale (0-5). Data were analyzed by SPSS 16. Correlation coefficient test was adopted to investigate the relationship and p value was considered 0.05. Result: Mean of self-efficacy scores were 116.12 (24.66.). In 53.3% of the cases, self-efficacy was good, in 42.2% moderate and in 4.3%, it was bad. The majority of the students (88.9%) reported that their teachers had an idealized style in leadership. About 94.6% of the students with good self- efficacy believed that their teachers’ leadership style was transformational style. There was a significant correlation between self- efficacy and leadership style (pstyle is appropriate for midwifery teachers. PMID:26925916

  8. Development and implementation of a competency-based clinical evaluation tool for midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woeber, Kate

    2018-03-22

    The learning goals and evaluation strategies of competency-based midwifery programs must be explicit and well-defined. In the US, didactic learning is evaluated through a standardized certification examination, but standardized clinical competence evaluation is lacking. The Midwifery Competency Assessment Tool (MCAT) has been adapted from the International Confederation of Midwives' (ICM) "Essential Competencies" and from the American College of Nurse-Midwives' (ACNM) "Core Competencies", with student self-evaluation based on Benner's Novice-to-Expert theory. The MCAT allows for the measurement and monitoring of competence development in all domains of full-scope practice over the course of the midwifery program. Strengths of the MCAT are that it provides clear learning goals and performance evaluations for students, ensures and communicates content mapping across a curriculum, and highlights strengths and gaps in clinical opportunities at individual clinical sites and for entire programs. Challenges of the MCAT lie in balancing the number of competency items to be measured with the tedium of form completion, in ensuring the accuracy of student self-evaluation, and in determining "adequate" competence achievement when particular clinical opportunities are limited. Use of the MCAT with competency-based clinical education may facilitate a more standardized approach to clinical evaluation, as well as a more strategic approach to clinical site development and use. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation strategies for midwifery education linked to digital media and distance delivery technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Judith T; Ingle, Henry T

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the teaching and learning process for health professionals is the acquisition of a fundamental core of knowledge, the demonstration of critical thinking ability, and the demonstration of competency in the performance of clinical skills. Teaching and learning in distance education programs require that the administration, teachers, and students be creative in developing evaluation strategies that can be adapted to the challenges of the cyberspace on-line educational environment. Evaluation standards for distance education programs recently have been delineated by federal agencies, private organizations, and academic accreditation associations. These standards are linked to principles of sound education practice that promote program quality, high levels of student-faculty interaction, and support effective teaching and learning in the distance education context. A growing body of evidence supports the conclusion that technology-enhanced teaching is equivalent in effectiveness compared with traditional methods when student-learning outcomes are the focus of measurement. An allied body of literature offers model approaches that can be useful to educators who must also conduct the evaluation of clinical skills, provide feedback, and promote socialization to the nurse-midwifery/midwifery role for students being educated in whole or in part through instruction delivered at a distance.

  10. Case Study: The Role of eLearning in Midwifery Pre-Service Education in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiagyei, Martha; Trump, Alison; Danso, Evans; Yeboah, Alex; Searle, Sarah; Carr, Catherine

    The issues and challenges of implementing eLearning in pre-service health education were explored through a pilot study conducted in six nurse-midwifery education programs in Ghana. Case-based, interactive computer mediated eLearning modules, targeted to basic emergency and obstetrical signal functions, were delivered both online and offline using a free-for-use eLearning platform, skoool HE(®). Key success factors included broad stakeholder support, an established curriculum and student and tutor interest. Challenges included infrastructure limitations, large class sizes and added workloads for tutors and information technology staff. National scale up is planned.

  11. Nursing philosophy: A review of current pre registration curricula in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackintosh-Franklin, Carolyn

    2016-02-01

    Nursing in the UK has been subject to criticism for failing to provide care and compassion in practice, with a series of reports highlighting inadequacies in care. This scrutiny provides nursing with an ideal opportunity to evaluate the underpinning philosophy of nursing practice, and for nurse educators to use this philosophy as the basis for programmes which can inculcate neophyte student nurses with a fundamental understanding of the profession, whilst providing other health care professionals and service users with a clear representation of professional nursing practice. The key word philosophy was used in a systematic stepwise descriptive content analysis of the programme specifications of 33 current undergraduate programme documents, leading to an undergraduate award and professional registration as a nurse. The word philosophy featured minimally in programme specification documents, with 12 (36%) documents including it. Its use was superficial in 3 documents and focused on educational philosophy in a further 3 documents. 2 programme specifications identified their philosophy as the NMC (2010) standards for pre-registration nurse education. 2 programme specifications articulated a philosophy specific to that programme and HEI, focusing on caring, and 2 made reference to underpinning philosophies present in nursing literature; the Relationship Centred Care Approach, and The Humanising Care Philosophy. The philosophy of nursing practice is not clearly articulated in pre-registration curricula. This failure to identify the fundamental nature of nursing is detrimental to the development of the profession, and given this lack of direction it is not surprising that some commentators feel nursing has lost its way. Nurse educators must review their current curricula to ensure that there is clear articulation of nursing's professional philosophical stance, and use this as the framework for pre-registration curricula to support the development of neophyte nursing

  12. Pre-registration nursing student's quality of practice learning: Clinical learning environment inventory (actual) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Eleanor; Hasson, Felicity; Slater, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Clinical learning is a vital component of nurse education and assessing student's experiences can provide useful insights for development. Whilst most research in this area has focused on the acute setting little attention has been given to all pre-registration nurses' experience across the clinical placements arenas. To examine of pre-registration nursing students (first, second and third year) assessment of their actual experiences of their most recent clinical learning clinical learning experience. A cross sectional survey involving a descriptive online anonymous questionnaire based on the clinical learning environment inventory tool. One higher education institution in the United Kingdom. Nursing students (n=147) enrolled in an undergraduate nursing degree. This questionnaire included demographic questions and the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI) a 42 item tool measuring student's satisfaction with clinical placement. SPPS version 22 was employed to analyse data with descriptive and inferential statistics. Overall students were satisfied with their clinical learning experience across all placement areas. This was linked to the 6 constructs of the clinical learning environment inventory; personalization, innovation, individualization, task orientation, involvement, satisfaction. Significant differences in student experience were noted between age groups and student year but there was no difference noted between placement type, age and gender. Nursing students had a positive perception of their clinical learning experience, although there remains room for improvement. Enabling a greater understanding of students' perspective on the quality of clinical education is important for nursing education and future research. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Using task analysis to generate evidence for strengthening midwifery education, practice, and regulation in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yigzaw T

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tegbar Yigzaw,1 Catherine Carr,2 Jelle Stekelenburg,3,4 Jos van Roosmalen,5 Hannah Gibson,1 Mintwab Gelagay,1 Azeb Admassu6 1Jhpiego, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 2Jhpiego, Washington DC, USA; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Leeuwarden Medical Centre, Leeuwarden, 4Department of Health Sciences, Global Health, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, 5Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 6Federal Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Purpose: Realizing aspirations for meeting the global reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health goals depends not only on increasing the numbers but also on improving the capability of midwifery workforce. We conducted a task analysis study to identify the needs for strengthening the midwifery workforce in Ethiopia. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of recently qualified midwives in Ethiopia. Purposively selected participants from representative geographic and practice settings completed a self-administered questionnaire, making judgments about the frequency of performance, criticality, competence, and location of training for a list of validated midwifery tasks. Using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, Version 20, we computed the percentages and averages to describe participant and practice characteristics. We identified priority preservice education gaps by considering the tasks least frequently learned in preservice, most frequently mentioned for not being trained, and had the highest not capable response. Identification of top priorities for in-service training considered tasks with highest “not capable” and “never” done responses. We determined the licensing exam blueprint by weighing the composite mean scores for frequency and criticality variables and expert rating across practice categories. Results: One hundred and thirty-eight midwives participated in the study. The majority of

  14. Using task analysis to generate evidence for strengthening midwifery education, practice, and regulation in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigzaw, Tegbar; Carr, Catherine; Stekelenburg, Jelle; van Roosmalen, Jos; Gibson, Hannah; Gelagay, Mintwab; Admassu, Azeb

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Realizing aspirations for meeting the global reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health goals depends not only on increasing the numbers but also on improving the capability of midwifery workforce. We conducted a task analysis study to identify the needs for strengthening the midwifery workforce in Ethiopia. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of recently qualified midwives in Ethiopia. Purposively selected participants from representative geographic and practice settings completed a self-administered questionnaire, making judgments about the frequency of performance, criticality, competence, and location of training for a list of validated midwifery tasks. Using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, Version 20, we computed the percentages and averages to describe participant and practice characteristics. We identified priority preservice education gaps by considering the tasks least frequently learned in preservice, most frequently mentioned for not being trained, and had the highest not capable response. Identification of top priorities for in-service training considered tasks with highest “not capable” and “never” done responses. We determined the licensing exam blueprint by weighing the composite mean scores for frequency and criticality variables and expert rating across practice categories. Results One hundred and thirty-eight midwives participated in the study. The majority of respondents recognized the importance of midwifery tasks (89%), felt they were capable (91.8%), reported doing them frequently (63.9%), and learned them during preservice education (56.3%). We identified competence gaps in tasks related to obstetric complications, gynecology, public health, professional duties, and prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. Moreover, our study helped to determine composition of the licensing exam for university graduates. Conclusion The task analysis indicates that midwives provide critical reproductive

  15. Humanising values at the heart of nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Ann; Scammell, Janet; Heaslip, Vanessa

    This is the second article in a two-part series exploring how nurses can humanise the care patients receive. The first article presented a theoretical framework based on eight dimensions of what it means to be human (Hemingway et al, 2012). This second article explores how the eight dimensions could be incorporated into pre-registration nurse education by linking them to the Nursing and Midwifery Council standards for competence for entry to the nurse register.

  16. Nurse and midwifery education and intimate partner violence: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, Nerissa; Hooker, Leesa; Reisenhofer, Sonia

    2017-08-01

    This scoping review aims to identify the scope of current literature considering nurse/midwife educational practices in the areas of intimate partner violence to inform future nursing/midwifery educational policy and practice. Intimate partner violence is a global issue affecting a significant portion of the community. Healthcare professionals including nurses/midwives in hospital- and community-based environments are likely to encounter affected women and need educational strategies that support best practice and promote positive outcomes for abused women and their families. Scoping review of relevant literature from January 2000 to July 2015. Search of databases: CINHAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PROQUEST Central and COCHRANE Library. Reference lists from included articles were searched for relevant literature as were several grey literature sources. This review demonstrates low levels of undergraduate or postregistration intimate partner violence education for nursing/midwifery staff and students. Existing intimate partner violence education strategies are varied in implementation, method and content. Outcomes of these educational programmes are not always rigorously evaluated for staff or client-based outcomes. Further research is needed to evaluate existing intimate partner violence education programmes for nurses/midwives and identify the most effective strategies to promote improved clinical practice and outcomes for abused women and their families. Intimate partner violence has a significant social and public health impact. The World Health Organization has identified the need to ensure that healthcare professionals are adequately trained to meet the needs of abused women. Intimate partner violence education programmes, commencing at undergraduate studies for nurses/midwives, need to be implemented with rigorously evaluated programmes to ensure they meet identified objectives, promote best practice and improve care for abused women. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Midwifery education roundtable discussion: transitions to the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydon-Rochelle, Mona T; Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Tower, Martha J Jody; Trego, Lori; Lagerberg, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    A snapshot of four graduates' views on their educational experience at a research institution as well as their perspective on how it prepared them for the challenges they faced in entering the workplace is presented. Discussants stated that research knowledge is a critical aspect to clinical practice. Their educational experience provided them with the ability to understand information technology applications, identify and access relevant scientific research, evaluate the integrity and comparability of research findings, and apply research findings to clinical practice. Areas within the curriculum that were identified as needing more content and/or greater emphasis included primary health care, how to work competently and effectively with persons from diverse cultural, socioeconomic, and racial and ethnic backgrounds, experience with public health providers, and content such as intimate partner violence and adolescent behaviors.

  18. Critical thinking skills in midwifery practice: Development of a self-assessment tool for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Creedy, Debra K; Sidebotham, Mary

    2017-07-01

    Develop and test a tool designed for use by pre-registration midwifery students to self-appraise their critical thinking in practice. A descriptive cohort design was used. All students (n=164) enrolled in a three-year Bachelor of Midwifery program in Queensland, Australia. The staged model for tool development involved item generation, mapping draft items to critical thinking concepts and expert review to test content validity, pilot testing of the tool to a convenience sample of students, and psychometric testing. Students (n=126, 76.8% response rate) provided demographic details, completed the new tool, and five questions from the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) via an online platform or paper version. A high content validity index score of 0.97 was achieved through expert review. Construct validity via factor analysis revealed four factors: seeks information, reflects on practice, facilitates shared decision making, and evaluates practice. The mean total score for the tool was 124.98 (SD=12.58). Total and subscale scores correlated significantly. The scale achieved good internal reliability with a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.92. Concurrent validity with the MSLQ subscale was 0.35 (pcritical thinking in practice. Critical thinking skills are vital for safe and effective midwifery practice. Students' assessment of their critical thinking development throughout their pre-registration programme makes these skills explicit, and could guide teaching innovation to address identified deficits. The availability of a reliable and valid tool assists research into the development of critical thinking in education and practice. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of the education effect in simulated environment with educational film on acquiring midwifery students\\' episiotomy skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Kalani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In clinical education, it is essential to prevent patients from injuries  by using the new educational approaches. Therefore, the students must be ready before involving in any procedures. This study aimed to determine the effect of education in simulated environment and instructional videos on the skills of the episiotomy among midwifery students. Methods: In this interventional study, at the beginning of the sixth term, all of the midwifery students, 30 students, were divided randomly into 3 groups. The education was taken place in simulated environment and using educational films without intervention. The training was performed on training mannequin. The film was prepared from this training and presented to each of the students in film group. A practical test done and the results recorded in check list. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: The mean scores of students in performing an episiotomy based on all of the cases in 3 groups was statistically significant difference (p<0.001. But in comparing 3 groups of two, it was not found any statistically significant difference in all cases between the educational groups in simulated environment and educational film (p=0.975. Overall skill level of students on the basis of all the cases in the group without interference was lower than the other two groups. Conclusion: The educational film, which was designed, based on the scientific principles can be effective in gaining skills as a self-taught. Therefore, using the mentioned methods is recommended in clinical education planning.

  20. A survey on viewpoints of nursing and midwifery students and their clinical instructors at Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences towards clinical education during 2009-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Salimi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical environments play a vital role in nursing and midwifery students' learning. The present study investigates the viewpoints of clinical instructors and nursing and midwifery students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences about clinical education status during 2009-2011. Methods: In this cross sectional research data were gathered using a researcher made questionnaire including five domains: educational plan, quality of clinical instructors function, role of clinical professionals in clinical education, educational facilities and space, clinical evaluation and professional satisfaction. The questionnaire was completed by clinical instructors and nursing and midwifery students. Convenient sampling was accomplished. Face validity, content validity and reliability of the questionnaire was assessed and confirmed by test – retest method. Results: Majority of clinical instructors, nursing and midwifery students reported day and evening work shifts more appropriate. Majority of clinical instructors reported the clinical education status pleasant, but 79.8% nursing students and 64.2% midwifery students reported it moderate. Comparing the mean of clinical education status from the viewpoints of clinical instructors didn't show a significant difference in the domain of "the role of the others impressive in clinical education", but there was a significant difference between the nursing and midwifery students in their view points about the domain. Conclusion: Clinical competency is an essential component in providing high quality nursing care, thus the educational planners should continue to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical education. Boosting the clinical learning environment domains such as “successful instructors”, “professional values”, “professional relationship with the members of caring team” and “conflict management” could make the clinical experience attractive and assure students

  1. Can scholarship in nursing/midwifery education result in a successful research career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon; Absalom, Irene; Cant, Robyn; Bogossian, Fiona; Kelly, Michelle; Levett-Jones, Tracy; McKenna, Lisa

    2018-05-07

    In a recent editorial we examined the research outputs of 150 Australian nursing and midwifery professors (McKenna, Cooper, Cant, Bogossian, 2017) identifying publication metrics on par with, and sometimes above those of professors in the UK (Watson, McDonagh & Thompson, 2016). Because global university rankings are heavily weighted towards research, there has been pressure on universities and on academics to maximise research performance (Nguyen, Rambaldi & Tang, 2017). Although many Australian universities have increasingly focused on education delivery, and despite the need for a strong evidence base for learning and teaching, academics are often cautioned against focusing too heavily on educational research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Peer-supported review of teaching: making the grade in midwifery and nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy Tighe, Sylvia; Bradshaw, Carmel

    2013-11-01

    This paper outlines the value of peer-supported review of teaching for nurse and midwifery educators in an academic environment. Reflection and continuing professional development are important tenets of an educators' practice and can be addressed via peer observation. Definitions and models of peer observation are presented. The strengths and challenges associated with peer-supported review of teaching are discussed. The reasons why peer observation is underutilised are explored with some suggestions on how to overcome these challenges. Recent developments in relation to peer observation and peer-supported review are outlined. The need for tangible evidence of development and enhancement of existing teaching expertise is very pronounced in the current economic climate, it is concluded that peer-supported review of teaching can provide such evidence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Does Entry Route Really Affect Academic Outcome? Academic Achievement of Traditional versus Non Traditional Entrants to BN(Hons) Pre-Registration Nursing Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimble, Mandy J.

    2015-01-01

    International trends for pre-registration nurse education at degree level alongside "widening access" initiatives mean that academic achievement of students entering via different educational routes is of interest to both higher and further education institutions. This article examines the academic achievement of students undertaking a…

  4. Conceptualization of competency based curricula in pre-service nursing and midwifery education: A grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraraneza, Claudine; Mtshali, Gloria Ntombifikile

    2018-01-01

    In health professional education, the competency-based curriculum concept has been an important driver of reform in the training of competent graduates for the 21st century. In African countries, although there has been implementing it in pre-service nursing and midwifery education and the literature reports a lack of understanding of what is it on the part of the implementers. This article explores the meaning of competency based curriculum in pre-service nursing and midwifery education in Rwanda. A grounded theory approach, following Corbin and Strauss, was used. Following ethical clearance by the university ethical committee, data was collected from 17 participants through in-depth individual interviews of staff. Four categories emerged: (a) transformation, (b) tool for primary health care philosophy, (c) technological approach to education, (d) and modular system. Competency-based curriculum is confirmed as an appropriate educational tool in producing competent graduates for today and the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Midwifery students' evaluation of team-based academic assignments involving peer-marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parratt, Jenny A; Fahy, Kathleen M; Hastie, Carolyn R

    2014-03-01

    Midwives should be skilled team workers in maternity units and in group practices. Poor teamwork skills are a significant cause of adverse maternity care outcomes. Despite Australian and International regulatory requirements that all midwifery graduates are competent in teamwork, the systematic teaching and assessment of teamwork skills is lacking in higher education. How do midwifery students evaluate participation in team-based academic assignments, which include giving and receiving peer feedback? First and third year Bachelor of Midwifery students who volunteered (24 of 56 students). Participatory Action Research with data collection via anonymous online surveys. There was general agreement that team based assignments; (i) should have peer-marking, (ii) help clarify what is meant by teamwork, (iii) develop communication skills, (iv) promote student-to-student learning. Third year students strongly agreed that teams: (i) are valuable preparation for teamwork in practice, (ii) help meet Australian midwifery competency 8, and (iii) were enjoyable. The majority of third year students agreed with statements that their teams were effectively coordinated and team members shared responsibility for work equally; first year students strongly disagreed with these statements. Students' qualitative comments substantiated and expanded on these findings. The majority of students valued teacher feedback on well-developed drafts of the team's assignment prior to marking. Based on these findings we changed practice and created more clearly structured team-based assignments with specific marking criteria. We are developing supporting lessons to teach specific teamwork skills: together these resources are called "TeamUP". TeamUP should be implemented in all pre-registration Midwifery courses to foster students' teamwork skills and readiness for practice. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Decision-making theories and their usefulness to the midwifery profession both in terms of midwifery practice and the education of midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefford, Elaine; Fahy, Kathleen; Sundin, Deborah

    2011-06-01

    What are the strengths and limitations of existing Decision-Making Theories as a basis for guiding best practice clinical decision-making within a framework of midwifery philosophy? Each theory is compared in relation with how well they provide a teachable framework for midwifery clinical reasoning that is consistent with midwifery philosophy. Hypothetico-Deductive Theory, from which medical clinical reasoning is based; intuitive decision-making; Dual Processing Theory; The International Confederation of Midwives Clinical Decision-Making Framework; Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council Midwifery Practice Decisions Flowchart and Midwifery Practice. Best practice midwifery clinical Decision-Making Theory needs to give guidance about: (i) effective use of cognitive reasoning processes; (ii) how to include contextual and emotional factors; (iii) how to include the interests of the baby as an integral part of the woman; (iv) decision-making in partnership with woman; and (v) how to recognize/respond to clinical situations outside the midwife's legal/personal scope of practice. No existing Decision-Making Theory meets the needs of midwifery. Medical clinical reasoning has a good contribution to make in terms of cognitive reasoning processes. Two limitations of medical clinical reasoning are its reductionistic focus and privileging of reason to the exclusion of emotional and contextual factors. Hypothetico-deductive clinical reasoning is a necessary but insufficient condition for best practice clinical decision-making in midwifery. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Learning to create new solutions together: A focus group study exploring interprofessional innovation in midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate students can learn how to be innovative in partnerships with health care institutions and private enterprises. This study portrays how a three phase innovation model was applied in an interprofessional health education context at a Danish university college. The aim of the study was to explore midwifery, nutrition and health as well physiotherapy students' perceptions of participating in a real-life innovation project situated in antenatal care. A total of eighteen students participated in five focus group interviews. Thematic analysis was used to interpret data findings. Data analysis revealed three themes: 'Navigating in uncertainty', 'Being part of a team' and 'Impact of project learning'. Students found project learning to be the most relevant with regards to their clinical practice. Furthermore, study findings suggest that innovation is promoted by teamwork, interprofessional participation, mentor support and external partnerships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Team based learning in nursing and midwifery higher education; a systematic review of the evidence for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearnley, Chris; Rhodes, Christine; Roberts, Peter; Williams, Pam; Prenton, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the evidence in relation to the experiences and outcomes of students on nursing and/or midwifery higher education programmes, who experience team based learning. To examine the relationship between team based learning and attainment for nursing and midwifery students in professional higher education. To examine the relationship between team based learning and student satisfaction for nurses and midwifery students in higher education. To identify and report examples of good practice in the implementation of team based learning in Nursing and Midwifery higher education. A systematic Review of the literature was undertaken. The population were nurses and midwives studying on higher education pre and post registration professional programmes. The intervention was learning and teaching activities based on a team-based learning approach. Data sources included CINAHL and MEDLINE. ERIC and Index to Theses were also searched. International research papers published in English between 2011 and 2017 that met the inclusion criteria were included in the study. Papers that met the criteria were subjected to quality appraisal and agreement amongst authors for inclusion in the review. A total of sixteen papers were reviewed and four themes emerged for discussion. These were Student Engagement, Student Satisfaction, Attainment and Practice Development and Transformational Teaching and Learning. There is a tentative, though growing body of evidence to support TBL as a strategy that can impact on student engagement, student satisfaction, attainment, practice development and transformative teaching and learning. The literature indicates that implementing TBL within the curriculum is not without challenge and requires a sustained and structured approach. Staff and students need to understand the processes involved, and why they should be adhered to, in the pursuit of enhanced student experiences and outcomes for nurses and midwives in Higher Education

  9. What is provided and what the registered nurse needs--bioscience learning through the pre-registration curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Geraldine M

    2010-11-01

    Registered nurses undertaking programmes of study to become non-medical prescribers appear to have limited biological science knowledge. A case study was undertaken to determine whether the nurses entering Prescriber programmes considered studies in bioscience in their pre-registration nursing courses had been sufficient, linked to practice, and had prepared them for their roles as registered nurses. The literature identifies a continuing trend amongst nursing students describing a lack of sufficient bioscience in initial nurse education; there is limited literature on the views of experienced registered nurses. The participants in this study were 42 registered nurses from adult and mental health nursing, community and inpatient services. The results obtained from questionnaires and interviews are described. Questionnaire analysis identified that 57.1% of participants indicated bioscience in their pre-registration nursing programme had been limited and 40.5% stated the bioscience content had not prepared them for their roles on registration. Those reporting extensive coverage of bioscience were all aged over 41 years and had qualified before 1995. Greatest coverage of bioscience in pre-registration programmes was reported in relation to anatomy and physiology, with relatively limited coverage of microbiology, pharmacology or biochemistry. Respondents considered all five topics to be important. Interviews supported the questionnaire findings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Continuing midwifery education beyond graduation: Student midwives' awareness of continuous professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embo, M; Valcke, M

    2017-05-01

    Midwifery education plays an important role in educating graduates about engaging in continuous professional development (CPD) but there is a lack of empirical research analysing student midwives' awareness of CPD beyond graduation. We aimed to explore student midwives' awareness of the need to become lifelong learners and to map their knowledge of CPD activities available after graduation. Therefore, forty-seven reflective documents, written in the last week of student midwives' training programme, were analysed in a thematic way. Content analysis confirmed student midwives' awareness of the importance of CPD before graduation. They mentioned different reasons for future involvement in CPD and described both, formal and informal CPD-activities. Respondents were especially aware of the importance of knowledge, to a lesser degree of skills-training and still less of the potential value of the Internet for individual and collective learning. Respondents perceived a need for a mandatory preceptorship. Supporting learning guides were highly valued and the importance of reflection on CPD was well-established. This could have resulted from an integrated reflective learning strategy during education. Undergraduate midwives are aware of the importance of CPD and the interplay of formal and informal learning activities. Virtual learning requires special attention to overcome CPD challenges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Implementing reflection: insights from pre-registration mental health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Moira O

    2007-08-01

    Reflection and reflective practice continues to be contentious issues in nursing. The focus of this article is the use of reflection by pre-registration mental health students. The broad aim of this preliminary study was to discover student mental health nurses' perceptions of reflection as a learning strategy during clinical placement. Using a constructivist grounded theory methodology [Charmaz, K., 2000. Grounded theory: Objectivist and Constructivist Methods. In: Denzin, N., Lincoln, Y. (Eds.), Handbook of Qualitative Research, second ed. Sage, Thousand Oaks, California], five students were interviewed individually in their clinical placements. Data analysis revealed three major categories: understanding the process of reflection, using reflection in clinical practice, and needing support and guidance. Findings indicated that students were primarily using reflection-on-action, but to varying extents. Overall, students felt that reflection facilitated their learning. Factors were discovered that both helped and hindered students' use of reflection. These included level of preparation to reflect, a limited culture of reflection and the level of support from preceptors, clinical staff, clinical placement co-ordinators, and lecturers. In conclusion, it appears that a collaborative approach between students, Health Service Providers and institutes of nursing is vital for the successful development and implementation of reflective learning strategies in clinical placement. Suggestions are made as to how a collaborative approach may be developed to enhance this process.

  12. First aid training in pre-registration nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Phillippa

    This article aims to increase awareness of the lack of first aid skills among nurses and midwives. It is intended to appeal to and challenge students and registered practitioners to assess their first aid skills in practice and to seek the necessary training to improve and update their skills.

  13. A descriptive analysis of midwifery education, regulation and association in 73 countries: the baseline for a post-2015 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Lopes, Sofia; Nove, Andrea; Ten Hoope-Bender, Petra; de Bernis, Luc; Bokosi, Martha; Moyo, Nester T; Homer, Caroline S E

    2016-06-08

    Education, regulation and association (ERA) are the supporting pillars of an enabling environment for midwives to provide quality care. This study explores these three pillars in the 73 low- and middle-income countries who participated in the State of the World's Midwifery (SoWMy) 2014 report. It also examines the progress made since the previous report in 2011. A self-completion questionnaire collected quantitative and qualitative data on ERA characteristics and organisation in the 73 countries. The countries were grouped according to World Health Organization (WHO) regions. A descriptive analysis was conducted. In 82% of the participating countries, the minimum education level requirement to start midwifery training was grade 12 or above. The average length of training was higher for direct-entry programmes at 3.1 years than for post-nursing/healthcare provider programmes at 1.9 years. The median number of supervised births that must be conducted before graduation was 33 (range 0 to 240). Fewer than half of the countries had legislation recognising midwifery as an independent profession. This legislation was particularly lacking in the Western Pacific and South-East Asia regions. In most (90%) of the participating countries, governments were reported to have a regulatory role, but some reported challenges to the role being performed effectively. Professional associations were widely available to midwives in all regions although not all were exclusive to midwives. Compared with the 2011 SoWMy report, there is evidence of increasing effort in low- and middle-income countries to improve midwifery education, to strengthen the profession and to follow international ERA standards and guidelines. However, not all elements are being implemented equally; some variability persists between and within regions. The education pillar showed more systematic improvement in the type of programme and length of training. The reinforcement of regulation through the development of

  14. Formação profissional de obstetrizes e enfermeiras obstétricas: velhos problemas ou novas possibilidades? Midwifery and nurse-midwifery education: old problems or new possibilities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Gonzalez Riesco

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Refere-se às transformações na formação profissional de parteiras, obstetrizes e enfermeiras obstétricas no Brasil, desde a criação dos cursos de parteiras vinculados às escolas médicas, no século XIX, até as mais recentes experiências, mediante cursos de especialização em enfermagem obstétrica. Discute os modelos de formação dos profissionais que existem em outros países, considerando tanto o ensino independente da obstetrícia como a modalidade vinculada aos cursos de enfermagem. Apresenta proposta de um curso de obstetrícia para ser oferecido por escolas de enfermagem.This paper presents the historical transformation of midwifery and nurse-midwifery education in Brazil from the 19th century until recent experiencies of training nurse-midwives as a graduate course in obstetrical nursing. It discusses the education models of these professionals in other countries and presents a proposal for midwifery education integrated into nursing schools.

  15. Successes and Challenges of Interprofessional Physiologic Birth and Obstetric Emergency Simulations in a Nurse-Midwifery Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Belew, Cynthia; Anderson, Deborah; van Schaik, Sandrijn

    2015-01-01

    This article describes childbirth simulation design and implementation within the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. Nurse-midwife and obstetrician faculty coordinators were supported by faculty from multiple professions and specialties in curriculum review and simulation development and implementation. The primary goal of the resulting technology-enhanced simulations of normal physiologic birth and obstetric emergencies was to assist learners' development of interprofessional competencies related to communication, teamwork, and patient-centered care. Trainees included nurse-midwifery students; residents in obstetrics, pediatrics, and family medicine; medical students; and advanced practice nursing students in pediatrics. The diversity of participant types and learning levels provided benefits and presented challenges to effective scenario-based simulation design among numerous other theoretical and logistical considerations. This project revealed practical solutions informed by emerging health sciences and education research literature, faculty experience, and formal course evaluations by learners. Best practices in simulation development and implementation were incorporated, including curriculum revision grounded in needs assessment, case- and event-based clinical scenarios, optimization of fidelity, and ample time for participant debriefing. Adequate preparation and attention to detail increased the immersive experience and benefits of simulation. Suggestions for fidelity enhancement are provided with examples of simulation scenarios, a timeline for preparations, and discussion topics to facilitate meaningful learning by maternity and newborn care providers and trainees in clinical and academic settings. Pre- and postsimulation measurements of knowledge, skills, and attitudes are ongoing and not reported. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice

  16. Using task analysis to generate evidence for strengthening midwifery education, practice, and regulation in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yigzaw, Tegbar; Carr, Catherine; Stekelenburg, Jelle; van Roosmalen, Jos; Gibson, Hannah; Gelagay, Mintwab; Admassu, Azeb

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Realizing aspirations for meeting the global reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health goals depends not only on increasing the numbers but also on improving the capability of midwifery workforce. We conducted a task analysis study to identify the needs for strengthening the

  17. The Virtual Maternity Clinic: a teaching and learning innovation for midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Diane; Duke, Maxine; Nagle, Cate; Macfarlane, Susie; Karantzas, Gery; Patterson, Denise

    2013-10-01

    There are challenges for midwifery students in developing skill and competency due to limited placements in antenatal clinics. The Virtual Maternity Clinic, an online resource, was developed to support student learning in professional midwifery practice. Identifying students' perceptions of the Virtual Maternity Clinic; learning about the impact of the Virtual Maternity Clinic on the students' experience of its use and access; and learning about the level of student satisfaction of the Virtual Maternity Clinic. Two interventions were used including pre and post evaluations of the online learning resource with data obtained from questionnaires using open ended and dichotomous responses and rating scales. The pre-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention used a qualitative design and the post-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention applied both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Three campuses of Deakin University, located in Victoria, Australia. Midwifery students enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Midwifery and Graduate Diploma of Midwifery were recruited across three campuses of Deakin University (n=140). Thematic analysis of the pre-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention (return rate n=119) related to students' expectations of this resource. The data for the post-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention (return rate n=42) including open-ended responses were thematically analysed; dichotomous data examined in the form of frequencies and percentages of agreement and disagreement; and 5-rating scales were analysed using Pearson's correlations (α=.05, two-tailed). Results showed from the pre-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention that students previously had placements in antenatal clinics were optimistic about the online learning resource. The post-Virtual Maternity Clinic intervention results indicated that students were satisfied with the Virtual Maternity Clinic as a learning resource despite some technological issues. The Virtual Maternity Clinic

  18. Assessment of learning needs and the development of an educational programme for registered nurses in advanced midwifery and neonatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AE Fichardt

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A key step in the development of any educational programme is learning needs assessment. This is however often neglected. The purpose of this research was to identify learning needs of potential students in order to develop a relevant educational programme for registered nurses in advanced midwifery and neonatology. A survey design was used, and the population of the study was the registered nurses in the Free State. Two thousand questionnaires were mailed to respondents, selected by means of simple random sampling. Advanced educational programmes emphasize the teaching of advanced knowledge and skills and accept that the students entering these programmes already have specific knowledge and skills included in the curricula for basic programmes. This is contrary to the findings of this study. The results underline the importance of learning needs assessment in the development of relevant educational programmes.

  19. An evaluation of approaches used to teach quality improvement to pre-registration healthcare professionals: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lorraine; Shepherd, Ashley; Harris, Fiona

    2017-08-01

    Improving the quality of healthcare remains central to UK and international policy, practice and research. In 2003, The Institute of Medicine's 'Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality', advocated quality improvement as a core competency for all healthcare professionals. As a result, developing capacity and capability of those applying improvement methodologies in the pre-registration population has risen, yet, little is known about the teaching approaches employed for this purpose. To describe and analyse educational approaches used to teach quality improvement to pre-registration healthcare professionals and identify enabling and impeding factors. Integrative review. CINAHL, PsychINFO, MEDLINE, ERIC, ASSIA, SCOPUS and Google Scholar were accessed for papers published between 2000 and 2016. Publications where quality improvement education was delivered to pre-registration healthcare professionals were eligible. One author independently screened papers, extracted data using a modified version of the Reporting of Primary Studies in Education Guideline and evaluated methodological quality using the Weight of Evidence Framework. The Kirkpatrick Education Evaluation Model was used to explore the impact of teaching approaches. Enabling and impeding factors were thematically analysed. A narrative synthesis of findings is presented. Ten papers were included, representing nursing, pharmacy and medicine from UK, Norway and USA. Studies comprised four quantitative, four mixed method, one qualitative and one cluster randomised trial, all allocated medium Weight of Evidence. Teaching approaches included experiential learning cited in all studies, didactics in seven, group work in four, seminars in three, self-directed learning in three and simulation in one. Most studies measured Level 1 of the Kirkpatrick Model (reaction), all but one measured Level 2 (skills, knowledge or attitudes), none measured Level 3 (behaviour) and one measured Level 4 (patient outcomes

  20. How do student nurses learn to care? An analysis of pre-registration adult nursing practice assessment documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kate; Godbold, Rosemary; Wood, Pat

    2018-01-01

    There is international concern about the quality of nursing in resource constrained, high technology health care settings. This paper reports findings from a research study which explored the experiences and views of those involved in the education and learning of 'caring' with adult pre-registration students. A novel dataset of 39 practice assessment documents (PADs) were randomly sampled and analysed across both bachelors and masters programmes from September 2014-July 2015. Using an appreciative enquiry approach, the Caring Behaviours Inventory aided analysis of qualitative text from both mentors and students within the PADs to identify how student nurses learn to care and to establish whether there were any differences between Masters and Bachelors students. In contrast with existing research, we found a holistic, melded approach to caring. This combined softer skills with highly technologized care, and flexible, tailored approaches to optimise individualised care delivery. Both of these were highly valued by both students and mentors. Pre-registration MSc students tended to have higher perceptual skills and be more analytical than their BSc counterparts. We found no evidence to suggest that caring behaviour or attitudes diminish over the course of either programme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. How well does pre-service education prepare midwives for practice : competence assessment of midwifery students at the point of graduation in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yigzaw, Tegbar; Ayalew, Firew; Kim, Young-Mi; Gelagay, Mintwab; Dejene, Daniel; Gibson, Hannah; Teshome, Aster; Broerse, Jacqueline; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Background: Midwifery support and care led by midwives is the most appropriate strategy to improve maternal and newborn health. The Government of Ethiopia has recently improved the availability of midwives by scaling up pre-service education. However, the extent to which graduating students acquire

  2. How well does pre-service education prepare midwives for practice: competence assessment of midwifery students at the point of graduation in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yigzaw, T; Ayalew, F; Kim, Y.M.; Gelagay, M; Dejene, D; Gibson, H; Teshome, A; Broerse, J.E.W.; Stekelenburg, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Midwifery support and care led by midwives is the most appropriate strategy to improve maternal and newborn health. The Government of Ethiopia has recently improved the availability of midwives by scaling up pre-service education. However, the extent to which graduating students acquire

  3. The Effect of Educational Approaches on Knowledge and Attitude of Midwifery Students in Breaking bad News to Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Baghdari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Breaking bad news is a very stressful task for both health professionals and patients. Teaching how to break bad news appropriately is one of the important concerns in medical education. So, this study aimed to compare role play and multimedia methods based on SPIKES strategy on midwifery students’ knowledge and attitude in breaking bad news to patients. Materials and Methods: A clinical trial study was done in three groups on 90 midwifery students in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences who were selected randomly. Students were trained by role play and multimedia methods. Control group had not received any intervention. Knowledge and attitude questionnaires were filled out before and two weeks after intervention. Results: Knowledge and attitude mean scores after intervention in the 3 groups had significant difference (P< 0.05. Moreover, attitude score in multimedia group was higher than role play group and there was a significant difference between them (P=0.045. Conclusion: Multimedia as an independent and non-attendance program can increase students’ knowledge as same as the role play while, it can change students’ attitude more than the role play method.

  4. Innovation in Health Policy Education: Project-Based Service Learning at a Distance for Graduate Midwifery Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoover, Cheri

    2015-01-01

    Core competencies for midwifery practice include an understanding of systems of health care delivery and advocacy for legislation and policy initiatives that promote quality in health care. Today's rapidly changing health care environment, due in part to the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, mandates that midwives possess greater literacy in health policy and comfort with political action than ever before. Frequently disinterested in politics and intimidated by the policymaking process, student midwives lack the foundational knowledge and practical skills needed to meet this professional obligation. The Midwifery Institute of Philadelphia University graduate program educates both student nurse-midwives and student midwives in health policy using an innovative, project-based service-learning approach featuring real-world collaborative experiences. This novel teaching style is ideally suited for instruction at a distance because of the diversity of experience brought to the virtual classroom by students in widely disparate geopolitical locations. As students accomplish measurable objectives within their individually developed projects and reflect with classmates about their experiences, they feel empowered to effect change and report lower perceived barriers to future political engagement. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  5. Clinical leadership as an integral curriculum thread in pre-registration nursing programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela; Dewing, Jan; Crookes, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in leadership development frameworks in health for the existing workforce. There has also been a related abundance of leadership programmes developed specifically for qualified nurses. There is a groundswell of opinion that clinical leadership preparation needs to extend to preparatory programmes leading to registration as a nurse. To this end a doctoral research study has been completed that focused specifically on the identification and verification of the antecedents of clinical leadership (leadership and management) so they can shape the curriculum content and the best way to deliver the curriculum content as a curriculum thread. To conceptualise how the curriculum content, identified and verified empirically, can be structured within a curriculum thread and to contribute to the discussion on effective pedagogical approaches and educational strategies for learning and teaching of clinical leadership. A multi-method design was utilised in the research in Australia. Drawing on core principles in critical social theory, an integral curriculum thread is proposed for pre-registration nursing programmes that identifies the antecedents of clinical leadership; the core concepts, together with the continuum of enlightenment, empowerment, and emancipation. The curriculum content, the effective pedagogical approaches and the educational strategies are supported theoretically and we believe this offers a design template for action and a way of thinking about this important aspect of preparatory nursing education. Moreover, we hope to have created a process contributing to a heighten sense of awareness in the nursing student (and other key stakeholders) of the what, how and when of clinical leadership for a novice registered nurse. The next stage is to further test through research the proposed integral curriculum thread. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) as a strategy for assessing clinical competence in midwifery education in Ireland: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Valerie; Muldoon, Kathryn; Biesty, Linda

    2012-09-01

    In Ireland, to register as a midwife, all student midwives must be deemed competent to practice with the assessment of competence an essential component of midwifery education. A variety of assessment strategies, including observed practice, clinical interviews, portfolios of reflection, the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and written examination papers, are utilised to assess midwifery students' clinical competence. In this paper, a critical review of the OSCE as a strategy for assessing clinical competence in one third level institution in Ireland is offered. Although utilised for assessing competence across a range of areas (e.g. obstetric emergencies and pharmacology/drug administration), the use of the OSCE for assessing midwifery students' competence in lactation and infant feeding practices, as an example for this paper, is described. The advantages, disadvantages, validity and reliability of the OSCE, as an assessment strategy, are critically explored. Recognising that no single assessment strategy can provide all the information required to assess something as complex as clinical performance, the OSCE, when viewed alongside other forms of assessment, and with relevance to the topic under examination, may be considered a valuable strategy for enhancing the assessment of students' clinical competence, and for embracing diversity within midwifery education and training. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation of the Australian Midwifery Standards Assessment Tool (AMSAT): A tool to assess midwifery competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Linda; Bazargan, Maryam; McKellar, Lois; Gray, Joanne; Henderson, Amanda

    2018-02-01

    There is no current validated clinical assessment tool to measure the attainment of midwifery student competence in the midwifery practice setting. The lack of a valid assessment tool has led to a proliferation of tools and inconsistency in assessment of, and feedback on student learning. This research aimed to develop and validate a tool to assess competence of midwifery students in practice-based settings. A mixed-methods approach was used and the study implemented in two phases. Phase one involved the development of the AMSAT tool with qualitative feedback from midwifery academics, midwife assessors of students, and midwifery students. In phase two the newly developed AMSAT tool was piloted across a range of midwifery practice settings and ANOVA was used to compare scores across year levels, with feedback being obtained from assessors. Analysis of 150 AMSAT forms indicate the AMSAT as: reliable (Cronbach alpha greater than 0.9); valid-data extraction loaded predominantly onto one factor; and sensitivity scores indicating level of proficiency increased across the three years. Feedback evaluation forms (n=83) suggest acceptance of this tool for the purpose of both assessing and providing feedback on midwifery student's practice performance and competence. The AMSAT is a valid, reliable and acceptable midwifery assessment tool enables consistent assessment of midwifery student competence. This assists benchmarking across midwifery education programs. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Facilitating the Transition to Postgraduate Attainment: The Experience of One Postgraduate, Pre-Registration Physiotherapy Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Students on the MSc Physiotherapy (pre-registration) programme at Manchester Metropolitan University work at postgraduate level, whilst studying to become physiotherapists. To facilitate the transition to postgraduate attainment, students participated in two sessions designed to inform them about assessment processes and standards. The hypothesis…

  9. [Why do we need mandatory communication courses for pre-registration house officers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, B.D.; Faarvang, K.L.; Larsen, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the rationale for the composition of a 3-day mandatory communication skills course for pre-registration house officers (PRHOs). In addition to communication skills, the course addresses aspects of competence related to professional performance within areas covered by the legal...

  10. Training reproductive health professionals in a post-conflict environment: exploring medical, nursing, and midwifery education in Mogadishu, Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalahow, Abdiasis; Hassan, Mariam; Foster, Angel M

    2017-11-01

    Following two decades of civil war, Somalia recently entered the post-conflict rebuilding phase that has resulted in the rapid proliferation of higher education institutions. Given the high maternal mortality ratio, the federal government has identified the reproductive health education of health service professionals as a priority. Yet little is known about the coverage of contraception, abortion, pregnancy, childbirth, and sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) in medicine, nursing, or midwifery. In 2016, we conducted a multi-methods study to understand the reproductive health education and training landscape and identify avenues by which development of the next generation of health service professionals could be improved. Our study comprised two components: interviews with 20 key informants and 7 focus group discussions (FGDs) with 48 physicians, nurses, midwives, and medical students. Using the transcripts, memos, and field notes, we employed a multi-phased approach to analyse our data for content and themes. Our findings show that reproductive health education for medical and nursing students is inconsistent and significant content gaps, particularly in abortion and SGBV, exist. Students have few clinical training opportunities and the overarching challenges plaguing higher education in Somalia also impact health professions programmes in Mogadishu. There is currently a window of opportunity to develop creative strategies to improve the breadth and depth of evidence-based education and training, and multi-stakeholder engagement and the promotion of South-South exchanges appear warranted.

  11. Experiences of student midwives learning and working abroad in Europe: The value of an Erasmus undergraduate midwifery education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jayne E

    2017-01-01

    universities in the United Kingdom are being challenged to modify policies and curricula that reflect the changing global reality through internationalisation. An aspect of internationalisation is study abroad which the European Commission Erasmus exchange programme is just one means of addressing this. to explore the experiences of student midwives who are engaged in the Erasmus exchange programme and the effect it has on their learning and working in an international context. approval for the small phenomenological cohort study was obtained from two participating universities: the University of Malta and University of Nottingham. Data were collected from 13 student midwives from a total of five cohorts in the form of diaries to explore their experiences of learning and working in another country. Thematic analysis supported by Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software was used to identify five recurrent themes emerging from the data: the findings of which have served further in developing this programme. students valued the opportunity of undertaking study and midwifery practice in another culture and healthcare system, extending their knowledge and development of clinical competence and confidence. For some, this was the first time outside of their home country and adaptation to a new environment took time. Support from their contemporaries, lecturers and midwife mentors however, was overwhelmingly positive, enabling the students to feel 'part of the local university / midwifery team' By the end of the programme, the students recognised that they had become more independent and felt empowered to facilitate developments in practice when they returned home. IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATION / PRACTICE: this innovative development embracing internationalisation within the curricula has the potential to increase students' employability and further study within Europe and beyond. It can be used as a vehicle to share best practice within an international context

  12. State of Clinical Education at Tehran University of Medical Sciences from the Viewpoint of Students of Nursing & Midwifery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Baraz Pardenjani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Clinical education is considered as the heart of medicine and health care due to the importance of training expert manpower. To achieve this goal, education quality should be promoted, this requiring its continuous evaluation. In this regard, application of appropriate educational strategies by competent clinical trainers or instructors leads to an improvement in the clinical education outcomes. This study was carried out to assess the learning method of clinical skills and its barriers from the viewpoint of students of midwifery. Materials & Methods : This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 140 employed BS midwives in Yazd Province who had a 6-month working experience using a questionnaire including demographic information and items on the common clinical skills grading, skills learning methods, and barriers to clinical learning. Having collected the questionnaires, the data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The findings of the study revealed that the rate of clinical skills was at a good level for most of the subjects (56.5%, at an intermediate level for 30.7 %, and at a low level for 12.8% of the subjects. The correlation coefficients were statistically significant between subjects' level of clinical skills and age, department, and clinical experience. In studying the learning methods of clinical skills, 46.6% of learning was attributed to trainers, while 69.3% of the learning barriers were attributed to lack of sufficient cases during education, and 68.6% were attributed to insufficient practical training. Conclusion : Although the graduates had an acceptable level of clinical skills, the need for improving clinical education and administering continuous education programs for controlling and warranting care quality was markedly obvious. As the subjects reported, learning was attributed to trainers, while learning barriers were attributed to lack of sufficient cases during training, and insufficient practical

  13. Developing awareness of sustainability in nursing and midwifery using a scenario-based approach: Evidence from a pre and post educational intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Janet; Grose, Jane; Bradbury, Martyn; Kelsey, Janet

    2017-07-01

    The delivery of healthcare has an impact on the environment and contributes to climate change. As a consequence, the way in which nurses and midwives use and dispose of natural resources in clinical practice, and the subsequent impact on the environment, should be integral component of nursing and midwifery education. Opportunities need to be found to embed such issues into nursing curricula; thus bringing sustainability issues 'closer to home' and making them more relevant for clinical practice. The study was designed to measure the impact of a sustainability-focussed, scenario-based learning educational intervention on the attitudes and knowledge of student nurses and midwives. Pre test/Post test intervention study using scenario-based learning as the educational intervention. The Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey (SANS_2) was used as the outcome measure. Clinical skills session in a UK University School of Nursing and Midwifery. 676 second year undergraduate nursing and midwifery students. The 7-point scale SANS survey was completed before and after the teaching session; standard non-parametric analysis compared pre and post intervention scores. Changes were observed in attitude towards climate change and sustainability and to the inclusion of these topics within the nursing curricula (p=0.000). Participants demonstrated greater knowledge of natural resource use and the cost of waste disposal following the session (p=0.000). Participants also reported that sessions were realistic, and levels of agreement with statements supporting the value of the session and the interactive nature of delivery were higher following the session. Using a scenario-based learning approach with nursing and midwifery students can change attitudes and knowledge towards sustainability and climate change. Embedding this approach in the context of clinical skills provides a novel and engaging approach that is both educationally sound and clinically relevant. Copyright © 2017

  14. Clinical leadership in pre-registration nursing programmes--an international literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela; Crookes, Patrick; Dewing, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Clinical leadership and the safety, quality and efficiency of patient/client care are inextricably linked in government reports, major inquiries and the professional literature. This review explores the literature on clinical leadership development within pre-registration nursing programmes. The literature retrieved from a scoping review was evaluated to identify what is already published on the development of clinical leadership within pre-registration nursing programmes. Twenty-seven publications matched the inclusion criteria and were included in this review, 14 journal articles, one thesis and 11 chapters within one book were analysed and three themes were identified: clinical leadership; curriculum content and pedagogy. RESULTS AND MAIN OUTCOMES: This review identified a paucity of literature specifically relating to clinical leadership and pre-registration nursing programmes and what is available is inconclusive and unconvincing. Academics, curriculum development leaders and accreditation bodies have a responsibility to influence how nurses are prepared for the profession as such clinical leadership and the new graduate should be considered an area of greater importance.

  15. Gap between the Expectations and Perceptions of Students regarding the Educational Services Offered in a School of Nursing and Midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Fariba; Delaram, Masoumeh; Deris, Fatemeh

    2017-04-01

    Awareness of students' opinions about the various aspects of training provided is an essential factor to evaluate the quality of education. The aim of this study was to determine the gap between the students' expectations and perceptions from the educational services provided to them in the School of Nursing and Midwifery in Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences. In this cross-sectional study, 320 students were selected by stratified random sampling method and data were collected by SERVQUAL questionnaire to examine the areas of assurance, responsiveness, empathy, tangibles and confidence. Data analysis was conducted by descriptive (frequency, percentage, mean±SD) and analytical (paired t-test, independent t-test and One-Way ANOVA) statistics in SPSS 20. The mean scores of the students' expectations and perceptions of the educational services delivered to them were 4.34±0.63 and 3.56±0.68, respectively, with a significant, negative gap (-0.77±0.77, p<0.001). The lowest gap of quality was derived for assurance (-0.65) followed by reliability (-0.69), accountability (-0.74), and empathy (-0.81), and the greatest gap observed in tangibles (-0.96). A negative gap was observed between the students' expectations and perceptions of the quality of educational services delivered to them. This means that the quality of services delivered to students was less than what they expected. The highest gap was related to the tangibles. In order to improve the educational services, paying attention to different areas of quality of educational services, especially, the tangibles, is necessary.

  16. The Effect of Interactive Educational Workshops with or Without Standardized Patients on the Self-Efficacy of Midwifery Students in Sexual Health Counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaat Khadivzadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Modifications in learning systems based on the concepts of self-efficacy and self-esteem are among the suggested strategies to bridge the gap between knowledge and practice. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two interactive educational workshops with or without standardized patients (SPs on midwifery students' self-efficacy in providing sexual health counseling at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran in 2014. Methods:In this quasi-experimental study, 62 B.Sc. and M.Sc. students of midwifery at Mashhad School of Nursing and Midwifery were randomly divided into two groups. The groups were trained, using one of two interactive educational workshops (with or without SPs on sexual health counseling (10 hours. Data were collected, using a demographic questionnaire and a self-efficacy assessment tool. For data analysis, paired and independent t-tests were performed, using SPSS version 16. Results: The mean scores of students' self-efficacy in providing sexual health counseling in the two groups were not significantly different at the beginning of the study (P=0.587, while two weeks after the intervention, the scores were significantly higher in students who participated in SP-based workshops (76.0±10.9 vs. 66.7±5.9, P

  17. 'Chasing the numbers': Australian Bachelor of Midwifery students' experiences of achieving midwifery practice requirements for registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licqurish, Sharon; Seibold, Camel

    2013-06-01

    to explore one aspect of the findings from a qualitative study exploring Australian Bachelor of Midwifery students' experiences of achieving competency for beginning practice. a qualitative study using grounded theory, incorporating situational analysis. Data were collected by interviews, field observation and students' documents. one university in Victoria, Australia, which was a member of a consortium of universities that first implemented Bachelor of Midwifery curricula. 19 women, aged 20-40 years, completing the Bachelor of Midwifery course between the years 2005 and 2008. data analysis revealed an overarching social process of assimilation, and three related subprocesses namely realisation, adaptation and consolidation. This paper focuses on consolidation in terms of competency achievement in relation to set requirements. while generally found competent for beginning practice, the Bachelor of Midwifery students in this study felt that their ability to achieve competency according to professional midwifery standards, was constrained by the restricted nature of midwifery practice and medical dominance in the hospitals where they were placed. Furthermore, they found it challenging to achieve the minimum midwifery experience requirements, as well as their own personal learning objectives, within the clinical practicum hours provided in the curriculum. a review of the clinical hours provided by Bachelor of Midwifery curricula is required, with a view to ensure that clinical hours are consistent with recommended hours suggested by Australian Bachelor of Midwifery course accreditation standards. Universities implementing midwifery curricula in Australia need to be cognisant of the theory-practice gap and therefore the applicability of professional competency standards to the education of midwives. The concerns about the reliability of competency standards need to be addressed. Finally, further research is required to validate the current number of, minimum practice

  18. Exploring midwifery students' views and experiences of caseload midwifery: A cross-sectional survey conducted in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Kate; Newton, Michelle; Forster, Della; McLachlan, Helen

    2015-02-01

    in Australia, models of maternity care that offer women continuity of care with a known midwife have been promoted. Little is known about the intentions of the future midwifery workforce to work in such models. This study aimed to explore midwifery students' views and experiences of caseload midwifery and their work intentions in relation to the caseload model following graduation. cross-sectional survey. Victoria, Australia. 129 midwifery students representing all midwifery course pathways (Post Graduate Diploma, Bachelor of Midwifery, Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Midwifery) in Victoria. midwifery students from all course pathways considered that continuity of care is important to women and indicated that exposure to continuity models during their course was very positive. Two-thirds of the students (67%) considered that the continuity experiences made them want to work in a caseload model; only 5% reported that their experiences had discouraged them from continuity of care work in the future. Most wanted a period of consolidation to gain experience as a midwife prior to commencing in the caseload model. Perceived barriers to caseload work were being on-call, and challenges in regard to work/life balance and family commitments. midwifery students in this study were very positive about caseload midwifery and most would consider working in caseload after a period of consolidation. Continuity of care experiences during students' midwifery education programmes appeared to provide students with insight and understanding of continuity of care for both women and midwives. Further research should explore what factors influence students' future midwifery work, whether or not their plans are fulfilled, and whether or not the caseload midwifery workforce can be sustained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A cross-sectional pilot study of student's proactive behavior in midwifery education : Validation of a developed questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mestdagh, Eveline; Timmermans, Olaf; Colin, Pieter J; Van Rompaey, Bart

    OBJECTIVES: Midwifery students face major challenges in adapting quickly and effectively to different clinical settings. Proactive behavior, triggered by various individual and/or contextual antecedents, could be a significant added value to cope with these challenges. DESIGN: A cross-sectional

  20. Advanced midwifery practice: An evolutionary concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goemaes, Régine; Beeckman, Dimitri; Goossens, Joline; Shawe, Jill; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann

    2016-11-01

    the concept of 'advanced midwifery practice' is explored to a limited extent in the international literature. However, a clear conception of advanced midwifery practice is vital to advance the discipline and to achieve both internal and external legitimacy. This concept analysis aims to clarify advanced midwifery practice and identify its components. a review of the literature was executed using Rodgers' evolutionary method of concept analysis to analyze the attributes, references, related terms, antecedents and consequences of advanced midwifery practice. an international consensus definition of advanced midwifery practice is currently lacking. Four major attributes of advanced midwife practitioners (AMPs) are identified: autonomy in practice, leadership, expertise, and research skills. A consensus was found on the need of preparation at master's level for AMPs. Such midwives have a broad and internationally varied scope of practice, fulfilling different roles such as clinicians, clinical and professional leaders, educators, consultants, managers, change agents, researchers, and auditors. Evidence illustrating the important part AMPs play on a clinical and strategic level is mounting. the findings of this concept analysis support a wide variety in the emergence, titles, roles, and scope of practice of AMPs. Research on clinical and strategic outcomes of care provided by AMPs supports further implementation of these roles. As the indistinctness of AMPs' titles and roles is one of the barriers for implementation, a clear conceptualization of advanced midwifery practice seems essential for successful implementation. an international debate and consensus on the defining elements of advanced midwifery practice could enhance the further development of midwifery as a profession and is a prerequisite for its successful implementation. Due to rising numbers of AMPs, extension of practice and elevated quality requirements in healthcare, more outcomes research exclusively

  1. Claiming an Ethic of Care for midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    The public domain of midwifery practice, represented by the educational and hospital institutions could be blamed for a subconscious ethical dilemma for midwifery practitioners. The result of such tension can be seen in complaints from maternity service users of dehumanised care. When expectations are not met, women report dehumanising experiences that carry long term consequences to both them and their child. To revisit the ethical foundation of midwifery practice to reflect the feminist Ethic of Care and reframe what is valuable to women and midwives during the childbirth experience. A comprehensive literature review is presented from the midwifery and feminist ethics discourse. Nil to report. Women are vulnerable during childbirth as they need care, yet they prioritise elements of relationship in their experience. The Ethic of Care approach equalises the relationship between the midwife and the woman, providing the space for relationship building and allowing midwives to meet the expectations of their accepted responsibility. Some midwives manage to balance the demands of the institution with the needs of the woman. This is described as both an emotional and professionally challenging balancing act. Until there is a formal acknowledgement of the different ethical approach to midwifery practice from within the profession and the Institution, midwifery identity and practice will continue to be compromised. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Enjoyable learning: the role of humour, games, and fun activities in nursing and midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baid, Heather; Lambert, Nicky

    2010-08-01

    Education that captures the attention of students is an essential aspect of promoting meaningful, active learning. Rather than standing at the front of a group of learners simply speaking about a topic, teachers have the opportunity of livening up their teaching with humour, games, and other fun activities. This article critically evaluates the benefits and limitations of humour within nursing education as well as the use of games and fun activities as teaching strategies. Examples of various games and interactive activities are also provided. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A descriptive survey investigating pre-registration student nurses' perceptions of clinical skill development in clinical placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stayt, Louise C; Merriman, Clair

    2013-04-01

    Clinical skill development is essential to nurse education. Clinical skills are frequently taught in higher education institutions using clinical simulation. It is unclear if clinical skills are subsequently consolidated and developed in clinical placements. The aim of this survey was to evaluate pre-registration student nurses perceptions of the frequency of opportunities to practise, the level of supervision and assessment of, clinical skills in their clinical placements. This was a cross-sectional survey design using an online, self-report questionnaire including a Likert-type scale and open ended comments. Four hundred and twenty one students, from all year groups, from a university in the south of England on a wide variety of clinical placements participated. Participants evaluated the frequency of opportunity to practise, level of supervision and assessment of and feedback on performance of specific clinical skills. Clinical skills evaluated were measurement of vital signs, aseptic non-touch technique, assisting with eating and drinking, and assisting with comfort and hygiene. Data were analysed utilising Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 19. The frequency of opportunities to practise skills in clinical placement was variable with some participants reporting that they never had opportunity to practise essential skills. Similarly the level of supervision and assessment was also inconsistent suggesting that participants frequently practised clinical skills unsupervised without being assessed as competent. Inconsistencies in clinical skill development may lead to graduates who are not work ready and as a result, insufficient clinical competence potentially leads to unsafe practice and poor patient care. This calls for stronger partnerships between educators and clinical areas and the prioritisation of mentor preparation and education as well as organisational support in terms of mentor workload planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. [Development of midwifery in Vojvodina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimović, Jovan

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the beginnings and development of midwifery services as well as schooling modalities and professional education of midwives in Vojvodina after gaining freedom from Turkish rule. Obstetrical services in the Military Border Region of Vojvodina were much better organized than in the civil, so-called "provincial" part. In the second half of the 18th century, law regulations were brought and only midwives with certificates of universities and training courses of special midwifery schools in bigger towns could practice midwifery. At that time most trained midwives in Vojvodina were of German nationality, because Serbs knew neither German nor Hungarian and could not get education in Vienna and Budapest. A century later the situation was practically the same. Dr. Svetozar Maksimović, Master of Obstetrics and the first director of the Maternity Hospital and a city physician in Novi Sad, was well aware that this town had no midwifery service. That is why on July 27, 1879 he submitted a suggestion for foundation of a "Government Training Institute for Midwives and Pregnant Women". Although this suggestion was not realized, it was the first attempt to establish a school for midwives in Novi Sad in Serbian language and was of great importance fir history of medicine in Vojvodina, especially in Novi Sad. Furthermore, it points to the fact that physicians in Novi Sad, especially Dr. Svetozar Maksimović, were informed about current medicine in the world. In the frame of public health special attention was paid to Women's Care Services concerning especially pregnancy, delivery and puerperium. However, it was not possible to realize his vision in Vojvodina at that time, due to insufficient number of trained midwives.

  5. Second language learning in a family nurse practitioner and nurse midwifery diversity education project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Frances J; Klopf, Maria Ignacia

    2008-10-01

    To describe the Clinical Communication Program developed to integrate second language learning (L2), multimedia, Web-based technologies, and the Internet in an advanced practice nursing education program. Electronic recording devices as well as audio, video editing, Web design, and programming software were used as tools for developing L2 scenarios for practice in clinical settings. The Clinical Communication Program offers opportunities to support both students and faculty members to develop their linguistic and cultural competence skills to serve better their patients, in general, and their students who speak a language other than English, in particular. The program provided 24 h on-demand access for using audio, video, and text exercises via the Internet. L2 education for healthcare providers includes linguistic (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) experiences as well as cultural competence and practices inside and outside the classroom environment as well as online and offline the Internet realm.

  6. Integrating qualified nurses and non-nurses in midwifery education: the two-year experience of an ACNM DOA Accredited Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, J T; Shah, M A; Schechter, S; Muller, J H

    2000-01-01

    In 1996, the Division of Accreditation (DOA) of the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) preaccredited the first direct entry program of midwifery education for candidates who already possess undergraduate degrees in non-nursing disciplines. Inaugurated through the partnership of the State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn and the North Central Bronx Hospital, this 1-year, postbaccalaureate, certificate program of studies graduated two integrated classes of 22 registered nurse (RN) and nine direct entry (DE) students between 1997 and 1998. This article presents the experience of the first 2 years of this innovative program, focusing on the profiles of the DE students, their achievements, and their experiences entering the workforce. All of the data comparing nurse and non-nurse student progress through the program of studies strongly support the conclusion that, within an ACNM DOA preaccredited/accredited midwifery education program, DE students can achieve standards of academic excellence and clinical competency that are at least equivalent to those demonstrated by their RN peers.

  7. Promoting interprofessional learning and enhancing the pre-registration student experience through reciprocal cross professional peer tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Fiona; Jamison, Caroline; Treasure, Karen

    2018-05-01

    To improve collaboration and the quality of care, healthcare programmes are increasingly promoting interprofessional education thereby enabling students to learn with, from and about each other. A reciprocal peer learning model has developed among pre-registration physiotherapy and adult nursing students at Plymouth University, England. Embedded within the curriculum, it provides voluntary opportunities for year two students to become cross professional peer tutors to year one students while enhancing interprofessional understanding and skills acquisition. To explore participant experiences of two cross professional peer tutored clinical skills workshops delivered to a cohort of nursing (n = 67) and physiotherapy (n = 53) students in 2015. A mixed methods approach generated qualitative and quantitative data. Qualitative data was gathered via focus groups and individual interviews of peer tutors and learners (n = 27). These were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale questionnaire (n = 84) was completed before and after the workshops to consider any influence on students' attitudes towards interprofessional learning. Four themes evolved from thematic analysis; benefits of cross professional peer tutoring, interprofessional teamwork, quality of care and factors influencing the delivery of the workshops. Data showed students felt they developed greater understanding of interprofessional roles and acquired new skills. Peer tutors developed confidence in representing their profession while appearing to inspire early stage students. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale questionnaire data identified very positive attitudes towards interprofessional learning among the majority of students in both cohorts before and after the workshop. This study endorses the utility of enhancing the Higher Education experience by offering voluntary peer tutoring opportunities. Participating students

  8. The use of electronic books in midwifery education: the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Leo

    2004-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are: (i) to illustrate the use of e-books by health studies students at a college of higher education; (ii) to provide a demonstration of how e-books may be facilitated by library and information services staff working across the health and academic sectors; (iii) to comment upon the experiences of health studies students, in using e-books. A focus group of 10 student midwives was used to gain insight into how e-books may be used in an academic context for health professionals. The findings of the student midwives' focus group are reported and discussed. In this instance, the student midwives were encouraged to use e-books as part of a structured information skills programme. The paper concentrates on how the e-books were used within this context and addresses the potential benefits and disadvantages from a student perspective. The results provide evidence of a largely positive experience of using e-books as an electronic information resource. The focus group reveals many benefits and advantages in the facilitation and use of e-books, as well as addressing areas for development. It is concluded that e-books have a place in health library and information resources, but further development of e-books and e-book collections is required and subsequent investigation into their most effective use.

  9. Strengths and Weaknesses of Clinical Education from the Viewpoints of Nursing and Midwifery Students in Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Delaram

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: The viewpoints of students as basic elements of education, can improve the process of education. Thus this study was designed to detect the Strengths and weaknesses of clinical education from the viewpoints of nursing and midwifery students.

     

    Methods: In this cross–sectional study, 150 senior nursing and midwifery students in Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences were asked about the strengths and weaknesses of clinical education using a questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of three sections including demographic characteristics, and the strengths and weaknesses of clinical education which was prepared based on five areas of the aims and educational programs, contact to students, educational environment, supervision and evaluation. Data analysis was done using t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficients and the value of p<0.05 was considered as significant.

     

    Results: The most important strengths points of clinical education included: considering the prerequisite of clinical education (79.7%, clarifying the students tasks (72.5%, on-time presence of trainers (88.7% and trainees (84.2%, providing opportunities of patient care for students (68.5%, good relationship between educational supervisor and the students (56.5%, students' library use in hospital (62.5% and taking practical exams at the end of each clinical education (58.5%. failing to ask students' views in planning the training program (84.9%, lack of congruence between the educational aims and personnel expectations (74.6%, stressful conditions for students (76.8%, lack of student support by personnel (85.5%, failing to use teaching aids (91.2% and lack of supervising in clinical education (69%, were among the most important weaknesses of clinical education.

  10. Capacity building of midwifery faculty to implement a 3-years midwifery diploma curriculum in Bangladesh: A process evaluation of a mentorship programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Kerstin; Doraiswamy, Sathyanarayanan; Wallin, Lars; Bogren, Malin

    2018-03-01

    When a midwifery diploma-level programme was introduced in 2010 in Bangladesh, only a few nursing faculty staff members had received midwifery diploma-level. The consequences were an inconsistency in interpretation and implementation of the midwifery curriculum in the midwifery programme. To ensure that midwifery faculty staff members were adequately prepared to deliver the national midwifery curriculum, a mentorship programme was developed. The aim of this study was to examine feasibility and adherence to a mentorship programme among 19 midwifery faculty staff members who were lecturing the three years midwifery diploma-level programme at ten institutes/colleges in Bangladesh. The mentorship programme was evaluated using a process evaluation framework: (implementation, context, mechanisms of impact and outcomes). An online and face-to-face blended mentorship programme delivered by Swedish midwifery faculty staff members was found to be feasible, and it motivated the faculty staff members in Bangladesh both to deliver the national midwifery diploma curriculum as well as to carry out supportive supervision for midwifery students in clinical placement. First, the Swedish midwifery faculty staff members visited Bangladesh and provided a two-days on-site visit prior to the initiation of the online part of the mentorship programme. The second on-site visit was five-days long and took place at the end of the programme, that being six to eight months from the first visit. Building on the faculty staff members' response to feasibility and adherence to the mentorship programme, the findings indicate opportunities for future scale-up to all institutes/collages providing midwifery education in Bangladesh. It has been proposed that a blended online and face-to-face mentorship programme may be a means to improving national midwifery programmes in countries where midwifery has only recently been introduced. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The influence of critical thinking skills on performance and progression in a pre-registration nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Victoria; Powis, David; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Hunter, Sharyn

    2015-01-01

    The importance of developing critical thinking skills in preregistration nursing students is recognized worldwide. Yet, there has been limited exploration of how students' critical thinking skill scores on entry to pre-registration nursing education influence their academic and clinical performance and progression. The aim of this study was to: i) describe entry and exit critical thinking scores of nursing students enrolled in a three year bachelor of nursing program in Australia in comparison to norm scores; ii) explore entry critical thinking scores in relation to demographic characteristics, students' performance and progression. This longitudinal correlational study used the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) to measure critical thinking skills in a sample (n=134) of students, at entry and exit (three years later). A one sample t-test was used to determine if differences existed between matched student critical thinking scores between entry and exit points. Academic performance, clinical performance and progression data were collected and correlations with entry critical thinking scores were examined. There was a significant relationship between critical thinking scores, academic performance and students' risk of failing, especially in the first semester of study. Critical thinking scores were predictive of program completion within three years. The increase in critical thinking scores from entry to exit was significant for the 28 students measured. In comparison to norm scores, entry level critical thinking scores were significantly lower, but exit scores were comparable. Critical thinking scores had no significant relationship to clinical performance. Entry critical thinking scores significantly correlate to academic performance and predict students risk of course failure and ability to complete a nursing degree in three years. Students' critical thinking scores are an important determinant of their success and as such can inform curriculum development and

  12. Clinical leadership development in a pre-registration nursing curriculum: What the profession has to say about it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela; Crookes, Patrick; Dewing, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade literature, inquiries and reports into the short comings in health services have highlighted the vital role of leadership in clinical practice and the impact on patient care and effective workplace culture. Whilst there is an abundance of literature on leadership and the registered nursing workforce, an international literature review revealed there is very little known on leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes. To identify what the profession's views are on proposed indicative curriculum content suggested for clinical leadership development in a pre-registration nursing degree in Australia. This is a multi-method research study. This paper presents the development and results of one aspect of the study, a national online survey. Nurses: clinicians, managers and academics. In the absence of a strong evidence base in the literature review, additional pre-requisite curriculum content was augmented from the work of two published frameworks of leadership and management. From this a 67-item survey was designed to ask the profession whether the aggregated content is a reasonable view of what should be included in a pre-registration programme to develop clinical leadership. The survey sought the views of nurses on whether the proposed content was relevant (yes/no) and their opinion on whether it is significant via a 5-point Likert scale. Descriptive and chi-square analyses were performed in SPSS v.19. A total of 418 nurses completed the survey; there was consensus amongst the profession on what is considered relevant and important in a pre-registration nursing programme. The content identified could be considered indicative and pre-requisite to include in a pre-registration nursing programme. Members of the nursing profession in Australia have clear views about this. The next step is to design and evaluate a purposeful pedagogical approach and curriculum, leading to the development of clinical leadership knowledge, skills and

  13. Using a communication audit to improve communication on clinical placement in pre-registration nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogard, Elaine; Ellis, Roger; Ellis, Jackie; Barker, Chris

    2005-02-01

    This article describes a novel communication audit conducted with those concerned with the practice placements of pre-registration Nursing students. The study, uniquely, addressed all who were involved in communication concerning placement in what is described as an organisational analysis. The aim of the audit was to identify levels of satisfaction and dissatisfaction with present communication processes and to identify points for improvement. The audit used the Hogard-Barker Communication Audit of Practice a customized version of a well established tool, devised to cover issues relevant to practice placements. A key feature of the tool is the opportunity for participants to identify the amount of communication they are receiving on particular topics and issues against the amount they would like to receive. Participants in the audit included students, assessor mentors, ward managers, clinical facilitators and link tutors. Overall there was considerable dissatisfaction with what was perceived to be the insufficient amount of communication received on a number of topics including allocations, the curriculum, students' learning outcomes and commitments in terms of college work. In addition to identifying points for improvement the audit provides a baseline against which progress can be assessed through a future audit.

  14. A dementia communication training intervention based on the VERA framework for pre-registration nurses: Part I developing and testing an implementation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Corina; Beard, Chloe; Tzouvara, Vasiliki; Pegram, Anne; Verity, Rebecca; Eley, Rhiannon; Hingley, David

    2018-04-01

    People living with dementia experience progressive difficulty in expressing physical and emotional needs. Health care staff including student nurses require training to develop compensatory communication strategies. However, there is no standardised foundation level dementia communication training within pre-registration curricula. This article describes the theoretical underpinnings and development of a foundation level dementia communication skills training based on the VERA (Validation, Emotion, Reassurance, Activity) framework. The training strategies drew on behavioural change theory using the COM-B model and Gagné's 9 Events of Instruction. The VERA framework was operationalised using a multicomponent teaching strategy. The intervention was refined based on quality improvement Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles with feedback from people living with dementia, facilitators and student nurses. Data collection used semi-structured questionnaires (n = 51) and four focus group (n = 19) interviews with students. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. The intervention was a 2.5-hour face-to-face training session delivered at the start of students' older adult unit placement with follow-up reflection sessions during placement. Training was delivered to 51 students, all students described the training as useful and would recommend it to their peers. Elements of the training that were highly valued were: opportunities to express concerns in caring for people with dementia, applying the VERA framework using role play and outlining realistic expectations of VERA. Students recognised the need for on-going training especially for more complex patients. Combining behaviour change and education theory with stakeholder feedback strengthened the development of VERA as a foundation level dementia communication training for pre-registration nurses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of how a real time pre-registration health care curricula was managed through the application of a newly designed Change Management Model: A qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowthi-Williams, Annette

    2018-02-01

    Curricula change in nurse education is of international importance. The pace of such change has been continuous and has triggered criticisms of inadequate preparation of practitioners. There are no change formulae for managing curricula change and despite a raft of change methods, globally change success remains low. A lack of a unified voice, undue focus on cognition, and arguably no existing models for academia and a literature gap contribute to change challenge. A new Change Management Model designed from research with emotion as its underpinning philosophy is evaluated. Evaluation of a newly designed Change Management Model through a real time pre-registration health care curricula change. A qualitative case study was adopted. The single case study was the new pre-registration health care curricula. This study took place in a Faculty of Health and Social care in one HEI in the UK. Four senior academics and fifteen academics across professions and specialisms involved in the curricula change took part in the study. The findings suggested that leadership operated differently throughout the organisation. Distributive and collective leadership created a critical mass of people to help deliver the new curricula but academics felt excluded at the strategic level. Emotion at the strategic level inhibited innovation but boosted engagement, emotional relationships and creativity at the operational level. Face to face communication was favoured for its emotional connection. A top down approach created an emotional disconnect and impacted inclusiveness, engagement, empowerment, vision and readiness for change. Testing the new model widely not only in organisations, practice and team changes but personal change in improving health and wellbeing could be beneficial. The continuing gap in knowledge on the link between emotion and curricula change, practice and organisational change and therapeutic value of the model also warrants further research. Crown Copyright © 2017

  16. Men in Midwifery: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Adriane Ellis, Simon; McFarlane, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Midwifery in the United States suffers from a lack of diversity. More than 91% of midwives are white, and more than 98% are women. Little research has explored the experiences of midwives who are men or transgender. Invitation to an Internet survey was sent to the membership of the American College of Nurse-Midwives. Thirty-one participants who identified as men or transgender completed the survey, which included quantitative and open-ended questions about the impact of gender on education and practice. Data analysis of qualitative responses used qualitative description methodology to identify common themes. Four themes described participating men's experiences of education and practice of midwifery. Challenges included feeling singled out as different and being excluded. Supportive factors came from the social support of family, friends, colleagues, and patients, as well as from taking pride in one's work as a midwife. Midwives who identify as transgender described the challenges of others' confusion about their gender, having to hide their true gender identity, and struggling with the resulting loneliness. This survey highlights the challenges faced by midwives who are men or transgender in education and practice. Midwifery values of respect and acceptance for all women and families need to be applied internally to all members of the profession. This will support increased diversity and openness in midwifery. © 2014 by the American College of Nurse‐Midwives.

  17. Midwifery students׳ experiences of an innovative clinical placement model embedded within midwifery continuity of care in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Wilkes, Elizabeth; Gamble, Jenny; Sidebotham, Mary; Creedy, Debra K

    2015-08-01

    midwifery continuity of care experiences can provide high quality clinical learning for students but can be challenging to implement. The Rural and Private Midwifery Education Project (RPMEP) is a strategic government funded initiative to (1) grow the midwifery workforce within private midwifery practice and rural midwifery, by (2) better preparing new graduates to work in private midwifery and rural continuity of care models. this study evaluated midwifery students׳ experience of an innovative continuity of care clinical placement model in partnership with private midwifery practice and rural midwifery group practices. a descriptive cohort design was used. All students in the RPMEP were invited to complete an online survey about their experiences of clinical placement within midwifery continuity models of care. Responses were analysed using descriptive statistics. Correlations between total scale scores were examined. Open-ended responses were analysed using content analysis. Internal reliability of the scales was assessed using Cronbach׳s alpha. sixteen out of 17 completed surveys were received (94% response rate). Scales included in the survey demonstrated good internal reliability. The majority of students felt inspired by caseload approaches to care, expressed overall satisfaction with the mentoring received and reported a positive learning environment at their placement site. Some students reported stress related to course expectations and demands in the clinical environment (e.g. skill acquisition and hours required for continuity of care). There were significant correlations between scales on perceptions of caseload care and learning culture (r=.87 pflexible academic programme enabled students to access learning at any time and prioritise continuity of care experiences. Strategies are needed to better support students achieve a satisfactory work-life balance. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cross-sectional description of nursing and midwifery pre-service education accreditation in east, central, and southern Africa in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carey F; Gross, Jessica M; Verani, Andre R; Nkowane, Annette M; Wheeler, Erica L; Lipato, Thokozire J; Kelley, Maureen A

    2017-07-24

    In 2013, the World Health Organization issued guidelines, Transforming and Scaling Up Health Professional Education and Training, to improve the quality and relevance of health professional pre-service education. Central to these guidelines was establishing and strengthening education accreditation systems. To establish what current accreditation systems were for nursing and midwifery education and highlight areas for strengthening these systems, a study was undertaken to document the pre-service accreditation policies, approaches, and practices in 16 African countries relative to the 2013 WHO guidelines. This study utilized a cross-sectional group survey with a standardized questionnaire administered to a convenience sample of approximately 70 nursing and midwifery leaders from 16 countries in east, central, and southern Africa. Each national delegation completed one survey together, representing the responses for their country. Almost all countries in this study (15; 94%) mandated pre-service nursing education accreditation However, there was wide variation in who was responsible for accrediting programs. The percent of active programs accredited decreased by program level from 80% for doctorate programs to 62% for masters nursing to 50% for degree nursing to 35% for diploma nursing programs. The majority of countries indicated that accreditation processes were transparent (i.e., included stakeholder engagement (81%), self-assessment (100%), evaluation feedback (94%), and public disclosure (63%)) and that the processes were evaluated on a routine basis (69%). Over half of the countries (nine; 56%) reported limited financial resources as a barrier to increasing accreditation activities, and seven countries (44%) noted limited materials and technical expertise. In line with the 2013 WHO guidelines, there was a strong legal mandate for nursing education accreditation as compared to the global average of 50%. Accreditation levels were low in the programs that produce

  19. Developing clinical teaching capacities of midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Sharon; Sweet, Linda

    2016-06-01

    Competency Standards in Australia articulate that the midwife must be able to contribute to the professional development of themselves and others. Few undergraduate health professional curricula currently incorporate content for the development of specific knowledge and skills required for clinical teaching. This project aimed to understand and enhance midwifery students' preparedness to assume their future clinical teaching responsibilities. Design-based research was used to implement an educational intervention aimed at developing clinical teaching skills through a peer education session between 1st and 3rd year students. The perspectives of 30 undergraduate midwifery students about their preparedness for their teaching role and the intervention were obtained through 3 focus groups. A thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Three themes were identified encompassing the research aims and objectives; 'Co-creating a culture for learning', 'reciprocal teaching and learning' and 'developing clinical teaching capacities'. The findings indicate that the midwifery students had a holistic understanding of their responsibilities in clinical teaching in the workplace. They were able to identify ways in which their teaching capacities were being developed through their clinical experiences and the curriculum, both intended and hidden. Despite limited educational activities for clinical teaching, the midwifery students made explicit connections of the relational interdependence of workplace-based experiences and their learning. Students were clearly able to identify ways in which their own learning experiences and the culture in which this learning is embedded, assists them to develop clinical teaching skills, ready to support the next generation of midwifery students. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Midwifery capacity building in Papua New Guinea: Key achievements and ways forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Angela; Kililo, Mary; Geita, Lahui; Mola, Glen; Brodie, Pat M; Rumsey, Michele; Copeland, Felicity; Neill, Amanda; Homer, Caroline S E

    2016-04-01

    Papua New Guinea has some of the poorest health outcomes in the Asia-Pacific region. Maternal mortality is unacceptably high and there is a severe midwifery shortage requiring a quadrupling of the workforce. This paper outlines the findings of an evaluation of the Maternal Child Health Initiative (MCHI) (2012-2013) to determine key factors contributing to maternal health workforce strengthening. A descriptive mixed methods study was undertaken. Data were gathered through interviews, focus group discussions and surveys with clinicians, midwifery students and staff from nursing and midwifery schools and National Department of Health staff. Documentation from stakeholder meetings and regular site reports were reviewed. Each data set was analysed separately and meta-inferences were drawn across all data. Learning opportunities were found to have increased for midwifery educators and improvements were described in midwifery educators teaching capacity and student clinical education experience. There was an increase in the number of midwifery graduates and improvements were noted in the working environment and skills of clinical staff. Education challenges were described including the lack of clinical preceptoring and limited continuing education for clinical educators. Participants recommended increasing clinical education hours and extending the length of the midwifery program. Ongoing efforts to accredit the midwifery curricula and regulate midwifery graduates were noted. The MCHI has contributed to strengthening the midwifery workforce nationally. However, scaling-up and sustaining these achievements requires leadership and funding commitments from the midwifery schools and government alongside the accreditation of midwifery curricula and regulation of new graduates. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reflecting on practice development school for pre-registration nurses: a student nurse perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Agate

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Practice development has been evolving as a movement in nursing for decades but was first conceptualised by Garbett and McCormack (2002. At its core are the principles that embody a shared intention of developing and improving both professional practice and patient care (McCormack et al., 2013. Through effective, supportive and motivational facilitation, practice development has the capacity to transform dominant and oppressive task-oriented cultures, run by hierarchical leaderships, into cultures that empower and value the contributions of all stakeholders, allowing for transformational and emancipatory learning (McCormack et al., 2013. Aims: Today, there are nine defining principles of practice development (McCormack et al., 2013. Based loosely on Kolb’s model of reflection (1998, this article is an in-depth critical evaluation of my own learning, which took place in the context of a practice development school for pre-registration nurses. I have chosen to focus on the practice development principle that I found to be most transformative. Principle number eight states: ‘Practice development is associated with a set of processes including skilled facilitation that can be translated into a specific skill set required as near to the interface of care as possible’. Conclusions and implications for practice: This journey has taught me that knowledge and experience will inevitably influence facilitation (Crisp and Wilson, 2011. However, the skills and attributes embodied by an effective facilitator are multifaceted and the evolution of my own facilitation expertise will continue alongside with my journey as a practice developer. On the journey so far, I have learned to appreciate the value of authentic and meaningful engagement, how to inspire and evoke it, and to what extent it has the potential to influence effective facilitation. I have learned to use various facilitation methods to create and sustain high levels of engagement

  2. A degree of success? Messages from the new social work degree in England for nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Jo; Manthorpe, Jill; Stevens, Martin; Hussein, Shereen; Macintyre, Gillian; Orme, Joan; Green Lister, Pam; Sharpe, Endellion; Crisp, Beth

    2010-07-01

    In September 2008 the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) approved plans to change pre-registration nursing education in England to an all-graduate qualification in 2015. In 2001 the Department of Health announced a similar decision for social work qualifying education and the first graduate-only qualifying programmes began in 2003-2004. This article presents findings from a national in-depth evaluation of the social work degree in England and describes ways in which efforts have been made to improve the quality of social workers, raise the status of the profession and link practice and theory as part of the transformation to a degree level qualification. Messages for nurse educators are drawn in the light of the professions' commonalities. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Online learning versus blended learning of clinical supervisee skills with pre-registration nursing students: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Karen; O'Halloran, Peter; Lohan, Maria

    2018-06-01

    The World Health Organisation amongst others recognises the need for the introduction of clinical supervision education in health professional education as a central strategy for improving patient safety and patient care. Online and blended learning methods are growing exponentially in use in higher education and the systematic evaluation of these methods will aid understanding of how best to teach clinical supervision. The purpose of this study was to test whether undergraduate nursing students who received clinical supervisee skills training via a blended learning approach would score higher in terms of motivation and attitudes towards clinical supervision, knowledge of clinical supervision and satisfaction of learning method, when compared to those students who received an online only teaching approach. A post-test-only randomised controlled trial. Participants were a total of 122 pre-registration nurses enrolled at one United Kingdom university, randomly assigned to the online learning control group (n = 60) or the blended learning intervention group (n = 62). The blended learning intervention group participated in a face-to-face tutorial and the online clinical supervisee skills training app. The online learning control group participated in an online discussion forum and the same online clinical supervisee skills training app. The outcome measures were motivation and attitudes using the modified Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale, knowledge using a 10 point Multiple Choice Questionnaire and satisfaction using a university training evaluation tool. Statistical analysis was performed using independent t-tests to compare the differences between the means of the control group and the intervention group. Thematic analysis was used to analyse responses to open-ended questions. All three of our study hypotheses were confirmed. Participants who received clinical supervisee skills training via a blended learning approach scored higher in terms of motivation

  4. The primacy of the good midwife in midwifery services: an evolving theory of professionalism in midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, Sigridur; Karlsdottir, Sigfridur Inga

    2011-12-01

    Theory is the acknowledged foundation to practise methodology, professional identity and growth of formalized knowledge. It has been noted that practice must not only be evidence-based but also theory-based. Hence, midwifery must be theory based because theories serve as a broad framework for practice and may also articulate the goals of a profession and core values. In this paper, an evolving theory on the empowerment of childbearing women is introduced, where the midwife's professionalism is central. The theory is synthesized from nine datasets and scholarly work, and then more than three hundred studies were reviewed for clarification and confirmation. According to the theory, the midwife's professionalism is constructed from five main aspects: The professional midwife cares for the childbearing woman and her family. This caring within the professional domain is seen as the core of midwifery. The professional midwife is professionally competent. This professional competence must always have primacy for the sake of safety of woman and child. The professional midwife has professional wisdom and knows how to apply it. Professional wisdom is a new concept used to denote the interplay of knowledge and experience. The professional midwife has interpersonal competence, is capable of empowering communication and positive partnership with the woman and her family. The professional midwife develops herself both personally and professionally, which is the prerequisite for true professionalism. This evolving theory must be regularly reconstructed in the light of current knowledge within midwifery. It is an attempt to identify and articulate the processes and components of the art and science of midwifery practice in an endeavour of continuing the discipline's development by assisting in the understanding and practice of creating further theoretical discourse, processes and products for midwifery practice. The theory has implications for midwifery education and practice.

  5. Important aspects of midwifery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Barnett

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available The art of midwifery must be one of the oldest of acquired skills. In prehistoric times, the more experienced women assisted and comforted their younger relatives during parturition. There are scattered references to midwives in ancient literature, including the Bible. In Genesis 35:17 we learn that Rachel’s death was the result of “ hard labour” . One should congratulate the midwife who delivered Sarah of a son at the age of 90 years - Genesis 17:17. Midwifery stagnated during the Middle Ages due, partly to the ignorance of the midwives as well as to a lack of knowledge of human anatomy coupled with the accepted teaching of the ancients, which was regarded as the ultimate authority. Great advances in the art and science of midwifery have occurred since the Middle Ages, amounting to a revolution in thought and practice. Less than 100 years ago, in 1898, in W.S. Playfair’s “Science and Practice of Midwifery” no mention was made of any form of antenatal examination or even of the testing of urine for albumin. Times have indeed changed - today the whole concept of maternal and child care would be quite unrecognisable to a Victorian midwife. We have also accepted the male midwife into our midst.

  6. Assertiveness training for undergraduate midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warland, Jane; McKellar, Lois; Diaz, Monica

    2014-11-01

    Assertiveness can be defined as an interpersonal behaviour that promotes the fact all people in a relationship are equally important. All health professionals including midwives must work with and care for people. At times this will include facilitating interactions that require skilful negotiation and assertiveness. Yet embedding assertiveness education into undergraduate midwifery curricula has not been widely adopted. This paper explores one method of delivering assertiveness training in an undergraduate midwifery course and provides comment on the effectiveness of this strategy in developing assertiveness skills in a cohort of undergraduate midwifery students. We used an assertiveness survey which was administered immediately before and 3-4 months after an assertiveness training workshop. All students (n = 55) attending the training day were invited to participate. Of these 41 (77% response) chose to participate in the pre intervention survey and 32 participated (9 students lost to follow-up) in the follow up survey. There was an overall improvement in self-perceived assertiveness scores following the assertiveness training workshop. These findings provide encouraging evidence that educational institutions that offer specific and targeted assertiveness education will be rewarded with more assertive graduates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The perceived benefits of belonging to an extra curricular group within a pre-registration nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Sabina; Billington, John

    2014-05-01

    This study describes a qualitative research design that focuses on nursing students who were aligned to different extra-curricular groups (a student representative committee, a Nurses' Day Committee and a magazine editorial team) within the School of Health. The study explores the nursing students' experiences and perceptions of belonging to an extra-curricular group within a pre-registration nursing course. Data were collected using focus groups. The findings of this study suggest that students who are members of extra-curricular groups perceive group membership to have many positive benefits. The findings were grouped into three main themes namely: employability, retention and personal gain. The findings suggest that students are clearly aware of their career development and expressed how group membership meant they were able to develop skills around employability. Students highlighted that they gained support and built lasting relationships through the groups which supported and reassured them which it was felt enabled them to progress successfully through the course. These themes reinforce the value of having established groups within a pre-registration curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An exploration of the value of the role of the mentor and mentoring in midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Margaret; Banks, David

    2016-05-01

    This research project aimed to examine the perceived value sign-off mentors (SOMs) in midwifery have for their role. Using a phenomenological approach, the results were drawn from in-depth interviews. The project included a literature review, methodology, results and discussion. The results indicate that mentors enjoy their role and they see themselves as essentials to the delivery of pre-registration midwifery programmes and for the supervision and assessment of student midwives. Mentors are not sure if student midwives value their sign-off mentor, or whether senior management is aware of the sign-off role and its value. This project also confirms previous findings from other studies, particularly the problem of finding time to complete student assessment paper work, support students in clinical practice and whether there are enough SOMs within clinical practice. The study does not conclude that the issues raised are distinctive to midwifery, potentially all of the points raised translate to the various forms of nursing practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The state of quality improvement and patient safety teaching in health professional education in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Gillian; Stolarek, Iwona; Wells, Susan; Bohm, Gillian

    2017-10-27

    To investigate how quality and patient safety domains are being taught in the pre-registration curricula of health profession education programmes in New Zealand. All tertiary institutions providing training for medicine, nursing, midwifery, dentistry, pharmacy, physiotherapy, dietetics and 11 other allied health professions in New Zealand were contacted and a person with relevant curriculum knowledge was invited to participate. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide to explore nine quality and safety domains; improvement science, patient safety, quality and safety culture, evidence-based practice, patient-centred care, teamwork and communication, leadership for change, systems thinking and use of information technology (IT). Transcribed data were extracted and categorised by discipline and domain. Two researchers independently identified and categorised themes within each domain, using a general inductive approach. Forty-nine institutions were contacted and 43 (88%) people were interviewed. The inclusion and extent of quality and safety teaching was variable. Evidence-based practice, patient-centred care and teamwork and communication were the strongest domains and well embedded in programmes, while leadership, systems thinking and the role of IT were less explicitly included. Except for two institutions, improvement science was absent from pre-registration curricula. Patient safety teaching was focused mainly around incident reporting, and to a lesser extent learning from adverse events. Although a 'no blame' culture was articulated as important, the theme of individual accountability was still apparent. While participants agreed that all domains were important, the main barriers to incorporating improvement science and patient safety concepts into existing programmes included an 'already stretched curriculum' and having faculty with limited expertise in these areas. Although the building blocks for improving the quality and safety of

  10. Out of the ashes: the new bachelor of midwifery curriculum at Victoria University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Mary; Kruger, Gina; Brown, Vera

    2007-09-01

    In the past decade, midwifery education has changed significantly in Australia. Previously, a nursing qualification (division 1) was required for entry into midwifery programs and on completion, graduands obtained a postgraduate diploma of midwifery. More recently, bachelor of midwifery programs have also been offered in Australia and currently, a considerable percentage of midwives are prepared for practice in this way. In Victoria, the bachelor of midwifery has been available since 2002, and at this time the third group of graduands are poised to enter the field. Implementation of the bachelor of midwifery program has given rise to many concerns about the development and applicability of this course. Concerns include: complexities of registration with a regulatory board set up primarily for nursing registration; concerns about readiness for practice among bachelor of midwifery graduands; escalating requirements within midwifery courses; and difficulties with meeting course requirements. As this course comes of age in Victoria, it is useful to reflect on some of the challenges encountered along the way. Thus, this paper reports on the journey of one university as it approaches the end of a first year of implementing an independent bachelor of midwifery program, following 5 years involvement as a consortium partner. In particular, it addresses concerns and difficulties encountered during early implementation of the program and then outlines strategies used to improve and strengthen the course. The basic premise of the paper is lessons learnt along the way.

  11. Pre-registration children's and young people's nurse preparation. A SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jim; McEwing, Gillian; Glasper, Edward Alan

    2006-12-01

    An investigation was undertaken into the views of nurse educators on current approaches to preparing children's and young people's nurses in the UK. A convenience sample of lead academics in 17 child health nursing departments of British universities was contacted by email and invited to liaise with colleagues to generate lists of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) of the educational system. Thirteen departments provided data that were analysed and themed. Major themes included the common foundation programme, clinical skills learning, clinical placements and employment. More detailed evaluative work should be undertaken before wholesale changes are made to a relatively new curriculum.

  12. Prescription Writing Errors of Midwifery Students in Common Gynecological problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serveh Parang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Giving improper prescriptions is common among medical practitioners, mostly graduates, in most communities even developed countries. So far, to our knowledge, no study has been conducted on prescription writing of graduate midwifery students. Therefore, this study aimed to detect prescription writing errors of midwifery students in common gynecological problems. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 56 bachelor midwifery students, who had passed the theoretical and clinical courses of gynecology, were evaluated by Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE. A demographic questionnaire and a standard checklist for writing the prescriptions and medications were used for data collection. SPSS Version 16 was used to carry out descriptive statistics. Findings: Most of the students were single, with the mean age of 23.0±1.7 years. Most errors were related to not recording the patients’ age and sex, diagnosis, chief complaint, and the prescriber’s name (observed in less than 10% of the prescriptions. The complete dosage schedule and drug name were stated only in 1.8±4.8 and 14±18.6 of prescriptions, respectively. In more than 93% of the cases, route of use and treatment duration were not recorded. Conclusion: According to the results, the number of prescription errors of midwifery students was high. Therefore, it is recommended to run educational courses on prescription writing skills (e.g. writing prescriptions based on World Health Organization (WHO guidelines for the midwifery students.

  13. A mini-midwifery business institute in a midwifery professional roles course: an innovative teaching strategy for successful career planning and business management of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, D Elizabeth; Dewees, Connie; McDowell, William C

    2015-01-01

    It is essential to include teaching strategies in midwifery education that address career planning and the business aspects of practice. This article presents the Mini-Midwifery Business Institute (M-MBI), an innovative teaching strategy for midwives that can also be applied to other advanced practice professions. The M-MBI can be integrated into a professional roles course. Before and after graduation, midwifery students and other advanced practice professionals can use the information to gain confidence and skills for successful career planning and the business management of practice. © 2014 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  14. Clinical leadership and pre-registration nursing programmes: A model for clinical leadership and a prospective curriculum implementation and evaluation research strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela; Dewing, Jan; Crookes, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    To present for wider debate a conceptual model for clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes and a proposed implementation plan. Globally, leadership in nursing has become a significant issue. Whilst there is continued support for leadership preparation in pre-registration nursing programmes, there have been very few published accounts of curriculum content and/or pedagogical approaches that foster clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing. A doctoral research study has resulted in the creation of an overarching model for clinical leadership. A multi-method research study using theoretical and empirical literature 1974-2015, a focus group, expert opinion and a national on-line survey. A conceptual model of clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programme is presented, including the infinity loop of clinical leadership, an integral curriculum thread and a conceptual model: a curriculum-pedagogy nexus for clinical leadership. In order to test out usability and evaluate effectiveness, a multi method programme of research in one school of nursing in Australia is outlined. Implementation of the proposed conceptual model for clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes and a programme of (post-doctoral) research will contribute to what is known about curriculum content and pedagogy for nurse academics. Importantly, for nursing students and the profession as a whole, there is a clearer expectation of what clinical leadership might look like in the novice registered nurse. For nurse academics a model is offered for consideration in curriculum design and implementation with an evaluation strategy that could be replicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Let's talk about society: A Critical Discourse Analysis of sociology courses in pre-registration nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Tomas F; Leal, Valentina J; Ayala, Ricardo A

    2016-01-01

    The discussion of teaching and learning in nursing has been prolific. Whereas most of the debate tends to focus on core contents of nursing programmes, little has been discussed about the teaching in 'supporting subjects' with relevance to both nursing education and nursing practice. This article offers a perspective on sociology scholarship for applied professions by using the case of nursing programmes. Syllabus is a rich source of data, and in its representational capacity it becomes both a discursive construction and a vehicle of ideology. Accordingly, we present a Critical Discourse Analysis of syllabi of nursing schools in Chile as to identify core contents and ideologies, and implied challenges for nursing education. We argue that while the syllabus as a discourse discloses a significant cleavage, the biggest challenge is precisely to challenge the ideologies constructed by and embedded in the syllabi. Our reflection thus points to a better interdisciplinary dialogue as to enhance the actual contribution of sociology to nursing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Course experiences, satisfaction and career intent of final year pre-registration Australian pharmacy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen G

    2014-06-01

    pharmacy. Conclusion: Complex factors including university experiences are involved in shaping students’ satisfaction and perception of career. This may relate to challenges in the community pharmacy sector, job opportunities in hospital and limited understanding of the pharmaceutical industry. The results offer insight for the profession in terms of entry into various roles and also to pharmacy educators for their roles in shaping curricula and placement experiences that attract future graduates to defined career pathways in pharmacy.

  17. Course experiences, satisfaction and career intent of final year pre-registration Australian pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Grace; Fois, Romano; Nissen, Lisa; Saini, Bandana

    2014-04-01

    students' satisfaction and perception of career. This may relate to challenges in the community pharmacy sector, job opportunities in hospital and limited understanding of the pharmaceutical industry. The results offer insight for the profession in terms of entry into various roles and also to pharmacy educators for their roles in shaping curricula and placement experiences that attract future graduates to defined career pathways in pharmacy.

  18. The barriers and motivators to learning infection control in clinical placements: interviews with midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Deborah J

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the barriers to and motivators for learning infection prevention and control as identified by midwifery students. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 15 undergraduate midwifery students within one large university. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis. Barriers to good clinical practice were identified by students which were concordant with previous literature related to reasons for non-compliance with infection control precautions. Issues such as competing demands specific to midwifery were also identified. Factors which act as barriers to learning good practice in placements included conflicting information and practices from different staff and placement areas and staff attitudes towards students who tried to comply with precautions. Motivators to good practice included the perceived vulnerability of infants to infection, the role modelling of good practice to new mothers and the monitoring of practice. This study demonstrated that midwifery students perceive barriers and motivators to learning infection prevention and control in their clinical placements. Many of the barriers identified are related to the attitudes and practices of qualified staff. Some of the motivators are related specifically to midwifery practice. Midwives need to be aware of the effects of what is observed in practice on midwifery students and how their practices and attitudes can influence learning both positively and negatively. As healthcare-associated infection and poor compliance with precautions are a global problem, this research should be of benefit to midwives and midwifery educators worldwide in terms of addressing barriers and ensuring better clinical education. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Administration of medicines. Midwifery basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baston, Helen

    2002-04-01

    Midwifery Basics is a series of articles that cover the main clinical skills underpinning midwifery practice. The series uses National Occupational Standards (Care Sector Consortium 1998) as a framework to identify the areas of competence that students need to achieve in order to master clinical skills. This format is combined with the use of 'triggers' to prompt the student to identify what she needs to know in order to care for a client in such a situation. The information that follows then enables the student to fill in the gaps in her knowledge.

  20. A qualitative study of the perceptions and experiences of Pre-Registration House Officers on teamwork and support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cochrane Mac

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following the implementation of a new final Year 5 curriculum in one medical school we carried out a study to explore the experience of the transition from final student year to Pre-Registration House Officer (PRHO. This study looks at the experiences of two successive cohorts of PRHOs in relation to team work, support and shared responsibility in their transition from final year students to qualified doctors. The involvement of PRHOs in teams is likely to change in the development of Foundation programmes. Methods A qualitative study with semi-structured interviews with 33 PRHOs, stratified by gender, ethnicity and maturity, from two study cohorts, qualifying in 2001 and 2002, from one medical school in the UK, in their first three months following medical graduation. Results Most PRHOs reported positive experiences for their inclusion as a full member of their first ward teams. This contributed to their increasing confidence and competence in this early period of career transition. However, a number of organisational barriers were identified, e.g. incomplete teams, shift work, which produced problems in their integration for one third of newly qualified doctors. Conclusion Recently introduced policies, intended to improve the working lives of newly qualified doctors have produced both benefits and unintended adverse impacts on PRHOs. The changes of the new PRHO Foundation programme will have further impact. Foundation doctors may need to relate to wider teams with more interaction and less protection. Such changes will need to be managed carefully to protect the PRHO at a vulnerable time.

  1. A review of the literature to inform a best-practice clinical supervision model for midwifery students in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Lois; Graham, Kristen

    2017-05-01

    Effective clinical supervision in midwifery programs leading to registration is essential to ensure that students can provide safe and competent woman centred care by the completion of their program. A number of different clinical supervision models exist in Australia and internationally, with varying levels of support and facilitation of student learning opportunities. In Australia, midwifery students must achieve specified learning outcomes and midwifery practice requirements to be eligible to register as a midwife. Identifying a best practice clinical supervision model for Australian midwifery students is therefore a priority for all key stakeholders, particularly education and maternity care providers. The aim of this literature review was to explore different types of clinical supervision models in order to develop and implement a best practice model in midwifery education programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Personal and professional values grading among midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Müesser; Akpinar, Aslihan; Ergin, Ayla B

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the professional and personal values among midwifery students in Turkey and to identify whether the years of study affected these values. A total of 192 participants were asked to prioritize 16 professional and 36 personal values. The relationship between the year of study and value ranking was analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. The first three of the professional values were justice, equality, and human dignity. Equality ranked sixth among the personal terminal values, and it increased with the years of study. Of personal instrumental values, responsibility and cleanliness ranked second and fifth, which are of central importance for the profession of midwifery. However, the other two important values, privacy and preventing unnecessary suffering, ranked lower when the years of study increased, in other words when the students confront clinics. Since these values are important for midwifery, ethics courses should be given throughout the midwifery education to prepare students for the challenges they face in the clinical environment.

  3. Perceptions of nearly graduated fourth year midwifery students regarding a 'good midwife' in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijen-de Jong, Esther I; Kool, Liesbeth; Peters, Lilian L; Jansen, Danielle E M C

    2017-07-01

    Midwifery students have the challenge to learn to be autonomous and capable midwives to ensure a safe and emotionally satisfying experience for mothers (to be) and their babies. They have to develop and acquire knowledge and skills for practice, and they have to adopt and internalize the values and norms of the midwifery profession in order to socialize as a midwife.In this study we explored conceptualisations of 'good midwives' among nearly graduated final year midwifery students as a result of their professional socialization process. A cross-sectional study consisting of an one open-ended question was undertaken. Data was analyzed qualitatively, inductively and deductively by using Halldorsdottir's theory of the primacy of a good midwife. One of three midwifery academies in the Netherlands in July 2016 were included. All midwifery students (N=67) in their final year were included. Student midwives gave broad interpretations of the features of a good midwife. Three themes - next to the themes already conceptualised by Halldorsdottir - were revealed and mentioned by nearly graduated Dutch midwifery students. They added that a good midwife has to have specific personal characteristics, organizational competences, and has to promote physiological reproductive processes in midwifery care. Students' views are broad and deep, reflecting the values they take with them to real midwifery practice. The results of this study can serve as an indicator of the level of professional socialization into the midwifery profession and highlight areas in which changes and improvements to the educational program can be made. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pre-registration Nurse Education in Pharmacology: Is It Adequate for the Roles that Nurses Are Expected To Fulfill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison-Griffiths, Sally; Snowden, Michael A.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2002-01-01

    According to responses from 33 of 52 nursing departments in England, 90% integrated pharmacology into curricula; 82% preferred that nurses teach it; 88% provided no training for lecturers. Lecture was the predominant teaching method. About one-fifth did not formally assess pharmacology knowledge. Students lacked math and science preparation for…

  5. Psychological Distress and Help Seeking Amongst Higher Education Students: Findings from a Mixed Method Study of Undergraduate Nursing/Midwifery and Teacher Education Students in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Christine; Coughlan, Barry; Pironom, Julie; Jourdan, Didier; Mannix-McNamara, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Psychological distress as experienced by higher education students is of major concern because of its potential to adversely impact academic performance, retention, mental health and lifestyle. This paper reports a mixed method investigation of student self-reported psychological distress and help-seeking behaviour. The sample comprised all…

  6. Validation of Perceptions of Empowerment in Midwifery Scale (PEMS in the Portuguese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João José de Sousa Franco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since when midwives are prominent in different socio-cultural contexts of individuals and populations associated with the control of women during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum? In Portugal, the level of training of nurses in breastfeeding and obstetric has evolved, is considered the most advanced in the European context, and this would have posed new challenges for these professionals. Methodology: focusing on what the perception of empowerment that have specialized nurses in midwifery and maternal health in Portugal, it was decided to conduct this study, entitled "Validation of the Portuguese population scale - Perceptions of Empowerment in Midwifery Scale (PEMS" . We responded to the research question, what are the levels of empowerment of nurses in nursing and midwifery maternal health in Portugal? Objective: To determine the level of empowerment of nurses in nursing and midwifery maternal health in Portugal. In this study we used the quantitative method and descriptive. To accomplish this we proceeded to the implementation of a data collection instrument organized into two distinct parts. The first part allowed us to collect sociodemographic data and professional reviewers. In the second use "Perceptions of Empowerment in Midwifery Scale" (Matthews, Scott, and Gallagher, 2009, measuring tool we had to validate cross-culturally. The study presented here took samples of 309 Portuguese health nurses maternal obstetrical nurse specialists. Results: 'Perceptions of Empowerment in Midwifery Scale (PEMS' (Matthews, Scott, and Gallagher, 2009, presents a framework pentafatorial (effective management and interdisciplinary relationships, sustained and autonomous practice, professional communication and consent, recognition health team, training and education, which together account for 72.9% of the variance of the results. On average, nurses in maternal health nursing and midwifery have a low level of empowerment, the lowest level

  7. The challenge of employing and managing new graduate midwives in midwifery group practices in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Allison M; Denney-Wilson, E; Homer, C S E

    2016-07-01

    This study explores the views of midwifery managers and key stakeholders, regarding the facilitators and barriers to employing new graduate midwives in midwifery continuity of care models. Maternity services in Australia are shifting towards midwifery continuity of care models, where midwives work in small group practices, requiring a change to the management of staff. Public policy in Australia supports maternity services to be reconfigured in this way. Historically, experienced midwives work in these models, as demand grows; new graduates are employed to staff the models. A qualitative descriptive approach exploring the manager's experience of employing new graduate's in the models. Managers, clinical educators and hospital midwifery consultants (n = 15) were recruited by purposeful sampling. Drivers, enablers, facilitators and barriers to employing new graduates in the models were identified. Visionary leadership enabled the managers to employ new graduates in the models through initial and ongoing support. Managing the myths stemming from fear of employing new graduates to work in midwifery continuity of care models was challenging. Managers and other key stakeholders provide initial and ongoing support through orientation and providing a reduced workload. Visionary leadership can be seen as critical to supporting new graduates into midwifery continuity of care models. The challenges for management to overcome include managing the myths stemming from fear of employing new graduates to work in a flexible way around the needs of the women within an organisation culture. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The state of the world's midwifery: making the invisible visible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Stirk, Frances; Fauveau, Vincent

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents the evidence for maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity, and provides the background to the publication of the ground-breaking Global State of the World's Midwifery Report (SoWMy) in 2011. Supported by 30 agencies, the SoWMy provides data gathered from 58 countries on their maternity services, and makes recommendations for improving the care of and services for childbearing women by improving the status, education, and regulation of midwives globally. If governments, policy makers, professional associations, international organizations, donor agencies, and civil society take the recommended steps and invest accordingly, this will effectively lead to an improvement in access to quality midwifery services and maternal and newborn health globally. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Critical thinking evaluation in reflective writing: Development and testing of Carter Assessment of Critical Thinking in Midwifery (Reflection).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Creedy, Debra K; Sidebotham, Mary

    2017-11-01

    develop and test a tool designed for use by academics to evaluate pre-registration midwifery students' critical thinking skills in reflective writing. a descriptive cohort design was used. a random sample (n = 100) of archived student reflective writings based on a clinical event or experience during 2014 and 2015. a staged model for tool development was used to develop a fifteen item scale involving item generation; mapping of draft items to critical thinking concepts and expert review to test content validity; inter-rater reliability testing; pilot testing of the tool on 100 reflective writings; and psychometric testing. Item scores were analysed for mean, range and standard deviation. Internal reliability, content and construct validity were assessed. expert review of the tool revealed a high content validity index score of 0.98. Using two independent raters to establish inter-rater reliability, good absolute agreement of 72% was achieved with a Kappa coefficient K = 0.43 (pcritical thinking in reflective writing. Validation with large diverse samples is warranted. reflective practice is a key learning and teaching strategy in undergraduate Bachelor of Midwifery programmes and essential for safe, competent practice. There is the potential to enhance critical thinking development by assessingreflective writing with the CACTiM (reflection) tool to provide formative and summative feedback to students and inform teaching strategies. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Crossing professional barriers with peer-assisted learning: undergraduate midwifery students teaching undergraduate paramedic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLelland, Gayle; McKenna, Lisa; French, Jill

    2013-07-01

    Peer assisted learning (PAL) has been shown in undergraduate programmes to be as effective as learning from instructors. PAL is a shared experience between two learners often with one being more senior to the other but usually both are studying within the same discipline. Interprofessional education occurs when two or more professionals learn with, from and about each other. Benefits of PAL in an interprofessional context have not been previously explored. As part of a final year education unit, midwifery students at Monash University developed workshops for second year undergraduate paramedic students. The workshops focused on care required during and after the birth of the baby. To investigate the benefits of an interprofessional PAL for both midwifery and paramedic students. Data for this project were obtained by both quantitative and qualitative methods. Questionnaires were distributed to both cohorts of students to explore experiences of peer teaching and learning. Results were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Focus groups were conducted separately with both cohorts of students and transcripts analysed using a thematic approach. Response rates from the midwifery and paramedic students were 64.9% and 44.0% respectively. The majority of students regardless of discipline enjoyed the interprofessional activity and wanted more opportunities in their curricula. After initial anxieties about teaching into another discipline, 97.3 (n = 36) of midwifery students thought the experience was worthwhile and personally rewarding. Of the paramedic students, 76.9% (n = 60) reported enjoying the interaction. The focus groups supported and added to the quantitative findings. Both midwifery and paramedic students had a new-found respect and understanding for each other's disciplines. Midwifery students were unaware of the limited knowledge paramedics had around childbirth. Paramedic students admired the depth of knowledge displayed by the midwifery

  11. Chilean midwives and midwifery students' views of women's midlife health-care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binfa, Lorena; Pantoja, Loreto; Gonzalez, Hilda; Ransjö-Arvidson, Anna-Berit; Robertson, Eva

    2011-08-01

    to determine Chilean midwives' views with regard to Chilean women's health-care needs in midlife. The aim was also to explore Chilean midwifery students' views on the clinical care provided to women in midlife. a qualitative study using focus group discussions and narratives which were analysed using thematic manifest and latent content analysis. 10 different primary health care (PHC) centres in Santiago, Chile. 22 midwives, working in PHC clinics and 13 (n = 13) midwifery students with PHC clinical experience, attending their fourth or fifth year of midwifery education at the School of Midwifery in Santiago. the midwives felt that women in midlife have special health-care service needs. They also considered themselves to be the most appropriate health staff to provide health care for women in midlife, but recognised that they lacked competence in attending psychological and social health-care needs of women in midlife such as violence, abuse and sexuality issues. The midwifery students remarked that many midwives focused their attention on fulfilling the biomedical requirements. Even if the midwives had knowledge about recent research on menopause, they had difficulties in approaching this issue and including it in their counselling. Some students also questioned the sometimes disrespectful attitude shown, especially towards Peruvian immigrants and women with psychosocial problems. the findings suggest that midwives need more education about women's health-care needs in midlife, and that more focus should be placed on the psychosocial aspects of midwifery. More reflections about the quality of the client-provider relationship in clinical practice are needed. Gender issues, the structure of power relationships, and empowerment should be incorporated and critically discussed during midwifery education and training, and also in clinics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The pursuit of excellence and innovation in service user involvement in nurse education programmes: report from a travel scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Julia M

    2013-05-01

    The involvement of service users and carers in nurse education is increasing, with the new standards for pre-registration nurse education in the UK, which require nurse education providers to demonstrate how they are involving users and carers in the planning, delivery, teaching and evaluation of nursing curricula (Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2010). A travel scholarship provided the opportunity to explore best practice in this area, focussing on identifying support systems and processes that enable user involvement. The scholarship was undertaken in the UK and Ireland during a 4 week study tour between June and July 2011, during which I visited 15 universities, and met with nurse education staff, users and carers involved in nurse education programmes. Prerequisite processes, the spectrum and variety of involvement activities, quality assurance and evaluation; and sustainability of user involvement in nurse education are reported in this paper. Service users and carers are an under-utilised resource, and as experts by experience have much to offer students and staff by increased involvement in nurse education programmes. The importance of values, enthusiasm and relationships, the cornerstones that strengthen user involvement; often sustain such partnerships. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Perception of mobbing during the study: results of a national quantitative research among Slovenian midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Došler, Anita Jug; Skubic, Metka; Mivšek, Ana Polona

    2014-09-01

    Mobbing, defined as sustained harassment among workers, in particular towards subordinates, merits investigation. This study aims to investigate Slovenian midwifery students' (2nd and 3rd year students of midwifery at the Faculty for Health Studies Ljubljana; the single educational institution for midwives in Slovenia) perception of mobbing, since management of acceptable behavioural interrelationships in midwifery profession forms already during the study, through professional socialization. Descriptive and causal-nonexperimental method with questionnaire was used. Basic descriptive statistics and measures for calculating statistical significance were carried out with SPSS 20.0 software version. All necessary ethical measures were taken into the consideration during the study to protect participants. The re- sults revealed that several participants experienced mobbing during the study (82.3%); 58.8% of them during their practical training and 23.5% from midwifery teachers. Students are often anxious and nervous in face of clinical settings (60.8%) or before faculty commitments (exams, presentations etc.) (41.2%). A lot of them (40.4%) estimate that mobbing affected their health. They did not show effective strategies to solve relationship problems. According to the findings, everyone involved in midwifery education, but above all students, should be provided with more knowledge and skills on successful management of conflict situations.

  14. Real life narratives enhance learning about the 'art and science' of midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkison, Andrea; Giddings, Lynne; Smythe, Liz

    2016-03-01

    Health professional educators have long grappled with how to teach the more elusive art of practice alongside the science (a term that encompasses the sort of professional knowledge that can be directly passed on). A competent practitioner is one who knows when, how and for whom to apply knowledge and skills, thereby making the links between theory and practice. They combine art and science in such a way that integrates knowledge with insight. This participatory hermeneutic study explored the experience of teachers and students of implementing a narrative-centred curriculum in undergraduate midwifery education. It revealed that when real life narratives were central to the learning environment, students' learning about the art of midwifery practice was enhanced as they learned about midwifery decisions, reflected on their own values and beliefs and felt an emotional connection with the narrator. Further, art and science became melded together in the context specific wisdom of practice (phronesis).

  15. Joys and challenges of relationships in Scotland and New Zealand rural midwifery: A multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan; Deery, Ruth; Daellenbach, Rea; Davies, Lorna; Gilkison, Andrea; Kensington, Mary; Rankin, Jean

    2018-04-21

    Globally there are challenges meeting the recruitment and retention needs for rural midwifery. Rural practice is not usually recognised as important and feelings of marginalisation amongst this workforce are apparent. Relationships are interwoven throughout midwifery and are particularly evident in rural settings. However, how these relationships are developed and sustained in rural areas is unclear. To study the significance of relationships in rural midwifery and provide insights to inform midwifery education. Multi-centre study using online surveys and discussion groups across New Zealand and Scotland. Descriptive and template analysis were used to organise, examine and analyse the qualitative data. Rural midwives highlighted how relationships with health organisations, each other and women and their families were both a joy and a challenge. Social capital was a principal theme. Subthemes were (a) working relationships, (b) respectful communication, (c) partnerships, (d) interface tensions, (e) gift of time facilitates relationships. To meet the challenges of rural practice the importance of relationship needs acknowledging. Relationships are created, built and sustained at a distance with others who have little appreciation of the rural context. Social capital for rural midwives is thus characterised by social trust, community solidarity, shared values and working together for mutual benefit. Rural communities generally exhibit high levels of social capital and this is key to sustainable rural midwifery practice. Midwives, educationalists and researchers need to address the skills required for building social capital in rural midwifery practice. These skills are important in midwifery pre- and post-registration curricula. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. All rights reserved.

  16. [Revised practice guideline 'Anaemia in midwifery practice'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, M.; Jans, S.M.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The practice guideline of the Royal Dutch Organization of Midwives 'Anaemia in primary care midwifery practice' published in 2000, has recently been revised. The revised guideline takes physiological haemodilution during pregnancy into consideration and provides gestation specific reference values

  17. Optimizing Nursing and Midwifery Practice in Rwanda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Rwanda have worked diligently to build human resources and infrastructure to provide health ser- vices to Rwandan .... tion of human resources in nursing and midwifery. To ensure that nurses and .... cisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Government of ...

  18. Do action learning sets facilitate collaborative, deliberative learning?: A focus group evaluation of Graduate Entry Pre-registration Nursing (GEN) students' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Charlotte; Strang, Gus

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if by participating in action learning sets, Graduate Entry Pre-registration Nursing (GEN) students were able to engage in collaborative and deliberative learning. A single focus group interview involving eleven participants was used to collect data. Data analysis identified five themes; collaborative learning; reflection; learning through case study and problem-solving; communication, and rejection of codified learning. The themes are discussed and further analysed in the context of collaborative and deliberative learning. The evidence from this small scale study suggests that action learning sets do provide an environment where collaborative and deliberative learning can occur. However, students perceived some of them, particularly during year one, to be too 'teacher lead', which stifled learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Being with woman: claiming midwifery space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Louise

    2015-03-01

    Being 'with woman' is characterised as presence, a spiritual concept which is nevertheless bound up with physical space. In this article, the work of the American philosopher Judith Butler is used to explore the interplay between space and relationships in midwifery practice. Butler argues that relationships based on mutual recognition and respect define the actions possible within physical space. In midwifery, being with woman creates a therapeutic space necessary for the wellbeing and empowerment of women and midwives alike.

  20. Midwifery student reactions to workplace violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Jesse; Boyle, Malcolm J; McKenna, Lisa

    2018-02-01

    Workplace violence, incidents against people in their workplaces, is a growing problem in Australia causing untold personal suffering as well as costing Australian businesses in productivity. Midwives have been highlighted as a group particularly at risk, yet in Australia there is little research into workplace violence against midwives and even less into midwifery students. This study aimed to explore Australian midwifery students' responses to workplace violence as well as to gauge the impact of workplace violence on them. Cross-sectional survey design was employed. Second and third year students were invited to participate at the end of a scheduled lecture. Fifty-two female midwifery students who had completed their work placement completed a survey indicating their immediate responses to workplace violence as well as the Impact of Event Scale. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Most students notified a co-worker immediately after a workplace violence incident, yet few completed an incident form or received official debriefing. There is a need for the reporting of workplace violence against midwifery students to be made easier to access thereby ensuring they can receive the assistance they require. Midwifery students need to understand the processes and supports in place for managing instances of workplace violence. Clinical placements can impact on midwifery students' future careers. Universities need to prepare students for the possibility of workplace violence and arm them with appropriate strategies for safely dealing with it. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Determinants of Social Accountability in Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools: A Delphi Study

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    Amir Reza Salehmoghaddam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Revising the medical education programs to meet the needs of society has become both a necessity and an important priority due to the considerable increase of population, changing patterns of diseases, and new health priorities. While this necessity has been highlighted in Iran’s Fifth Development Plan as well as its National 2025 Vision Plan, the determinants of social accountability have not been explained yet. This study aimed to develop determinants of social accountability in the Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools. Methods: This classic Delphi study included thirty experts in Nursing and Midwifery Education, Research and Services selected based on purposive sampling and three rounds of Delphi technique and conducted in Nursing and Midwifery School of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The primary data were collected using an initial structured questionnaire prepared through extensive review of literature. SPSS 11.5 software was used to analyze the data. The interquartile deviation and percentage of agreement were also used to study the consensus of opinion by experts. Results: Finding obtained from the rounds of Delphi resulted in selecting 69 determinants out of the initial pool of 128 primary determinants of social accountability. The items were selected based on experts’ consensus and categorized under three main activities of Nursing and Midwifery School, namely education, research, and service. Conclusion: Social accountability determinants were explained by 69 items for Schools of Nursing and Midwifery in Iran. The proposed determinants can be used by managers and authorities of Nursing and Midwifery School, policy makers, and evaluating institutions associated with them to ensure realizing social accountability goals.

  2. Midwives' perceptions of women's preferences related to midwifery care in Germany: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Susanne; Mattern, Elke; Ayerle, Gertrud M

    2018-06-01

    To explore how midwives perceive patient preferences related to midwifery care in Germany. This qualitative study, which was part of a larger study, used a hermeneutic-interpretive approach and involved focus group interviews with midwives. Data collection and analysis were done in a conjoined fashion between April 2015 and September 2016. Four focus group interviews were conducted in four different federal states of Germany. The sample of 20 qualified midwives was heterogeneous with regards to age, educational level, professional experience, type of midwifery care provided, and setting (employed, caseload, education) in which they provided services. Three main themes were identified: Strengths and limitations of midwives' present professional profile (midwives' area of responsibility, range of services, and competency); lack of midwives and midwifery services; women's experiences of conflict in interprofessional care. Each main theme is broken down into several aspects of content. Many women are not aware of the scope of professional knowledge and expertise of midwives. Moreover, the poor delineation of midwives' and obstetricians' areas of competency in Germany's hospitals seems to be disadvantageous for the women. Midwives feel that due to context implications they cannot live up to the quality of midwifery care they aspire to. Lack of midwives results in midwives being overwhelmed, women underserved, and both disappointed. On the one hand, new models of midwifery/maternity care need to be developed to solve some of the existing problems; on the other hand, new forms of interprofessional cooperation and management of transition of care points are required. Overall it is important that changes are implemented in such a way that women are enabled, and welcome, to clearly state their preferences for midwifery and maternity care. Particularly in Germany, tertiary education of midwives is needed to broaden their expertise and place them on an equal footing with

  3. The Impact of Racism and Midwifery's Lack of Racial Diversity: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren Serbin, Jyesha; Donnelly, Elizabeth

    2016-11-01

    The United States is increasingly racially diverse. Racial disparities in maternal-child health persist. Despite national calls for workforce diversification, more than 90% of certified nurse-midwives are white. This systematic review examines how racism and midwifery's lack of racial diversity impact both midwives and their patients. Databases were searched in January 2016 for studies that explored 1) racially concordant or racially discordant maternity care provided, at least in part, by midwives; 2) women of color's experience of race and discrimination in maternity care provided, at least in part, by midwives; and 3) midwives of color's experience of race and discrimination in clinical, educational, and/or professional settings. Studies were excluded if they were conducted outside the United States, focused on recent immigrant populations, or didn't have an English-language abstract. Selected studies were each reviewed by 2 independent reviewers, and data from the studies were entered into literature tables and synthesized for discussion. A total of 7 studies was retained for review-3 on the experience of patients and 4 on the experience of providers. The studies show racism is common in midwifery education, professional organizations, and clinical practices. Racism and midwifery's lack of racial diversity act as a barrier to people of color completing midwifery education programs and fully participating in midwifery professional organizations. Both patients and midwives of color identified midwives of color as uniquely positioned to provide high-quality care for communities of color. The midwifery profession and its patients stand to substantially benefit from diversification of the field, which requires addressing racism within the profession. Structural competency is a new theory that offers an effective framework to guide these efforts. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  4. Negotiating competing discourses in narratives of midwifery leadership in the English NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divall, Bernie

    2015-11-01

    to explore midwifery leaders' narratives of identity, within the context of one region of England. a qualitative study using narrative identity theory. Data were collected using in-depth, loosely structured narrative interviews. the study was undertaken in the Midlands region of England, in the context of a midwifery-specific leadership development programme. Participants were located in local NHS organisations and higher education institutions. the interviewees were midwives currently in one of a variety of formal leadership roles, who had recently completed a midwifery leadership development programme. Nine leaders were interviewed for the study. two central themes emerged: 'I am still a midwife' showed interviewees' continued self-identification according to their professional identity, despite the majority no longer holding a clinical role; 'Between a rock and a hard place' showed the challenges of maintaining a professionally-based identity narrative in the face of group and organisational discourses. among the midwifery leaders interviewed, narratives centred on a continued midwife self-identification. However, participants faced a number of challenges in maintaining this narrative, within the context of wider professional group and organisational discourses. midwifery leaders require the support of their professional group and organisational structures if they are to maintain a positive self- and social-identity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preparing midwifery students for practice: The value of elective placements in enhancing midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Carmel; Barry, Maebh; Noonan, Maria; Tighe, Sylvia Murphy; Atkinson, Sandra

    2018-04-01

    An elective placement where students are facilitated to access different models of midwifery care was included in the 18 month Higher Diploma Midwifery programme in 2008 in a university in Ireland. All students since then have had the opportunity to experience this placement which is advocated by the regulatory board for Nursing and Midwifery in Ireland (NMBI). This paper details the integration of an elective placement referred to as an 'observation week' into the 18 month midwifery programme. It includes a description of the organisation of the observation week, a summary of services accessed by midwifery students, student evaluation of their experience and mechanisms for feedback of these experiences to our partners in clinical practice. The benefits and the challenges of the observation week are considered with reference to the published literature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of knowledge of Turkish midwifery students about human papilloma virus infection and its vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Rabia Ekti; Sarican, Emine Serap; Turgay, Ayse San; Icke, Sibel; Sari, Dilek; Saydam, Birsen Karaca

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted agents and its infection is the most established cause of cervical cancer. Midwives play a key position in the implementation of cervical cancer. This descriptive study aimed to determine the level of knowledge concerning HPV and HPV vaccination among 268 midwifery students. Data were collected between November 15 and 30, 2011, through a self-reported questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 20.75 ± 1.60. Among all students, 44.4% had heard of HPV, while 40.4% had heard of HPV vaccinatiob. The relationship between the midwifery student knowledge on HPV and HPV vaccine and their current educational year was significant (p=0.001). In conclusion midwifery students have moderate level of knowledge about HPV and its vaccine and relevant information should be included in their teaching curriculum.

  7. Sustainability and resilience in midwifery: a discussion paper

    OpenAIRE

    Crowther, Susan; Hunter, Billie; McAra-Couper, Judith; Warren, Lucie; Gilkison, Andrea; Hunter, Marion; Fielder, Anna; Kirkham, Mavis

    2016-01-01

    Background\\ud \\ud midwifery workforce issues are of international concern. Sustainable midwifery practice, and how resilience is a required quality for midwives, have begun to be researched. How these concepts are helpful to midwifery continues to be debated. It is important that such debates are framed so they can be empowering for midwives. Care is required not to conceptually label matters concerning the midwifery workforce without judicious scrutiny and diligence.\\ud \\ud Aim\\ud \\ud the ai...

  8. First year midwifery students' experience with self-recorded and assessed video of selected midwifery practice skills at Otago Polytechnic in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Carolyn; Patterson, Jean; Miller, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Studying undergraduate midwifery at a distance has advantages in terms of accessibility and community support but presents challenges for practice based competence assessment. Student -recorded videos provide opportunities for completing the assigned skills, self-reflection, and assessment by a lecturer. This research asked how midwifery students experienced the process of completing the Video Assessment of Midwifery Practice Skills (VAMPS) in 2014 and 2015. The aim of the survey was to identify the benefits and challenges of the VAMPS assessment and to identify opportunities for improvement from the students' perspective. All students who had participated in the VAMPS assessment during 2014 and 2015 were invited to complete an online survey. To maintain confidentiality for the students, the Qualtrics survey was administered and the data downloaded by the Organisational Research Officer. Ethical approval was granted by the organisational ethics committee. Descriptive statistics were generated and students' comments were collated. The VAMPS provided an accessible option for the competence assessment and the opportunity for self-reflection and re-recording to perfect their skill which the students appreciated. The main challenges related to the technical aspects of recording and uploading the assessment. This study highlighted some of the benefits and challenges experienced by the midwifery students and showed that practice skills can be successfully assessed at distance. The additional benefit of accessibility afforded by video assessment is a new and unique finding for undergraduate midwifery education and may resonate with other educators seeking ways to assess similar skill sets with cohorts of students studying at distance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Decision making in midwifery: rationality and intuition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, Suyai

    2015-04-01

    Decision making in midwifery is a complex process that shapes and underpins clinical practice and determines, to a large extent, the quality of care. Effective decision making and professional accountability are central to clinical governance, and being able.to justify all decisions is a professional and legal requirement. At the same time, there is an emphasis in midwifery on shared decision making, and keeping women at the centre of their care, and research reveals that feelings of choice, control and autonomy are central to a positive birth experience. However the extent to which decisions are really shared and care truly woman-centred is debatable and affected by environment and culture. Using a case study of a decision made in clinical practice around amniotomy, this article explores the role of the intuitive thinking system in midwifery decision making, and highlights the importance of involving women in the decision making process.

  10. Midwifery 2030: a woman's pathway to health. What does this mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hoope-Bender, Petra; Lopes, Sofia Tavares Castro; Nove, Andrea; Michel-Schuldt, Michaela; Moyo, Nester T; Bokosi, Martha; Codjia, Laurence; Sharma, Sheetal; Homer, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 State of the World's Midwifery report included a new framework for the provision of woman-centred sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn and adolescent health care, known as the Midwifery2030 Pathway. The Pathway was designed to apply in all settings (high-, middle- and low-income countries, and in any type of health system). In this paper, we describe the process of developing the Midwifery2030 Pathway and explain the meaning of its different components, with a view to assisting countries with its implementation. The Pathway was developed by a process of consultation with an international group of midwifery experts. It considers four stages of a woman's reproductive life: (1) pre-pregnancy, (2) pregnancy, (3) labour and birth, and (4) postnatal, and describes the care that women and adolescents need at each stage. Underpinning these four stages are ten foundations, which describe the systems, services, workforce and information that need to be in place in order to turn the Pathway from a vision into a reality. These foundations include: the policy and working environment in which the midwifery workforce operates, the effective coverage of sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn and adolescent services (i.e. going beyond availability and ensuring accessibility, acceptability and high quality), financing mechanisms, collaboration between different sectors and different levels of the health system, a focus on primary care nested within a functional referral system when needed, pre- and in-service education for the workforce, effective regulation of midwifery and strengthened leadership from professional associations. Strengthening of all of these foundations will enable countries to turn the Pathway from a vision into reality. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Learning style preferences of Australian accelerated postgraduate pre-registration nursing students: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; Copnell, Beverley; Butler, Ashleigh E; Lau, Rosalind

    2018-01-01

    Graduate entry programs leading to registration are gaining momentum in nursing. These programs attract student cohorts with professional, cultural, gender and age diversity. As a consequence of this diversity, such accelerated programs challenge traditional pedagogical methods used in nursing and require different approaches. To date, however, there has been limited research on the learning styles of students undertaking these programs to inform academics involved in their delivery. Kolb's Experiential Learning model has been used widely in a variety of educational settings because it is based on the theory of experiential learning. More recently VARK (Visual, Aural, Read/write and Kinaesthetic) model has become popular. The aim of this study was to investigate the learning styles of two cohorts of graduate entry nursing students undertaking an accelerated masters-level program. This was a cross-sectional survey of two cohorts of Master of Nursing Practice students enrolled at a large Australian university. The students were more inclined toward converging (practical) and least toward concrete experience (experiencing) learning styles. The majority of students were more inclined toward kinaesthetic and least toward aural learning style. Findings have implications for academics engaged in teaching graduate entry nursing students. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. A discussion paper: Do national maternity policy reviews take account of the education and training of the future midwifery workforce? An example from England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dr Jenny; Way, Dr Sue

    2018-03-30

    The development and provision of maternity services globally are continuing to receive much attention in order to improve care and safety for women and babies. In the UK national reviews of the maternity services have taken place, with local services taking forward specific pilot projects to support the implementation of policy recommendations. This paper argues that, in order to meet the requirements of change in maternity services, there also needs to be a prompt review of the education of student midwives in order to be confident that the workforce of the future is equipped to implement these changes successfully. Using changes to national policy in England, this paper raises the question of the need for flexible national education standards, to ensure a curriculum can meet the needs of the changing workforce without the need for constant revision of the curriculum. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulating and Funding Midwifery in Nova Scotia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Morrison

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Midwives have been working in Nova Scotia for many years, and midwifery became a government funded and regulated health profession in the province in 2009. Despite the will among many decision-makers in the province to regulate the profession since the mid 1980s, several elections and lack of a management model slowed the program’s development. Implicit goals of having midwifery services included improving the quality of maternal care and health outcomes, keeping up with other provinces, responding to public demand, and saving costs. Strong and persistent bureaucratic and public advocacy work, inter-party collaboration, and research demonstrating positive and safe maternal and newborn health outcomes under midwifery care all had a role in the decision-making process. The implementation responsibility was delegated to three health districts in the province, each being responsible for designing a program to integrate midwives into maternal health care teams. The program has thus far been evaluated in an ad hoc manner with external teams performing comprehensive assessments, though the need for a cost-benefit analysis as well as more systematic assessments has been identified. Though many opportunities exist with midwifery in the province, including a continued high demand for the service, and research demonstrating positive outcomes for mothers and babies, significant challenges and threats remain to be addressed to ensure long-term sustainability of the program.

  14. We're all in this together: Midwifery student peer mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Lois; Kempster, Cathy

    2017-05-01

    Many higher education institutions have adopted mentoring programs for students as a means of providing support, improve learning and enhance the student experience. The aim of this project was to improve midwifery students experience by offering a peer mentoring program to commencing students to assist with the transition to university life and the rigours of the midwifery program. This paper reports the evaluation of this specific mentoring program and the ongoing development and implementation of a sustainable program within an Australian University. A survey design was adopted to gather feedback from both mentees to evaluate if the peer mentoring program enhanced the first year midwifery student experience and ascertain how the program could be further developed. Fifty-five students engaged with the peer mentors and completed the questionnaire regarding the mentoring program. Specifically valuable was the positive impact that mentoring had on midwifery student confidence, managing the demands of the program and being motivated to keep going when the program requirements were challenging. The success of this program rested largely with mentoring students sharing their own experiences and providing reassurance that other students could also succeed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Midwifery students' experiences of learning clinical skills in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Golnoosh; Shahriari, Mohsen; Keyvanara, Mahmood; Kohan, Shahnaz

    2018-03-09

    A qualitative study was used. Midwifery students from three universities in Iran participated. The study used a convenience sample of eighteen students. Data for this study was collected using semi-structured interviews (N=12) and focus groups (N=6). Data were recorded on a digital audio recorder and then transcribed. The qualitative data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. Six broad themes emerged from the analysis: Limited opportunities to experience skills, difficulties with course plan gaps, need for creating a supportive clinical environment, learning drives, confusion between different methods, and stress in the clinical setting. Short verbatim quotations from the participants were presented to provide evidence for the interpretation of data. The findings of this study have provided a clear picture of the factors and mechanisms involved in learning clinical skills by midwifery students. This study showed that students had some difficulties and concerns during learning of clinical midwifery skills. The findings of this study suggest that midwifery educators conduct further studies to tackle these issues in clinical skills learning. The findings of this study are subject to some limitations which are discussed.

  16. The Relationship between Clinical Competence and Clinical Self-efficacy among Nursing and Midwifery Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Mohamadirizi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction  Self-efficacy in clinical performance had an important role in applying competencies; also competencies and self-efficacy in clinical performance influenced to quality care of nursing and midwifery students. So the present study aimed to define the relationship between clinical competencies and clinical self-efficacy among nursing and midwifery students. Materials and Methods  This is a cross-sectional study conducted on 150 of nursing and midwifery students in Isfahan University of Medical Science, selected through two stage sampling in 2014. The participant completed questionnaires about personal/ educational characteristics and nursing competencies questionnaire (18 items and clinical self-efficacy scale (37 items. The data were analyzed by, Pearson statistical test, t-test, variance analysis through SPSS version16. Results The results showed that 50% (n=75 and 37.4% (n=56 of nursing and midwifery students had good clinical competence and clinical Self-Efficacy, respectively. Also the mean competencies and self-efficacy in clinical performance scores were 35.05± 1.2 and 76.03± 0.4 respectively. Pearson correlation coefficient showed that there was a positive linear correlation between the score of clinical competence and clinical self-efficacy (P

  17. 'Asking the hard questions': Improving midwifery students' confidence with domestic violence screening in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel; Wight, Raechel; Homer, Caroline S E

    2018-01-01

    Domestic violence is a global public health issue. Midwives are ideally placed to screen for, and respond to, disclosure of domestic violence. Qualified midwives and midwifery students report a lack of preparedness and low levels of confidence in working with women who disclose domestic violence. This paper reports the findings from an education intervention designed to increase midwifery students' confidence in working with pregnant women who disclose domestic violence. An authentic practice video and associated interactive workshop was developed to bring the 'woman' into the classroom and to provide role-modelling of exemplary midwifery practice in screening for and responding to disclosure of domestic violence. The findings demonstrated that students' confidence increased in a number of target areas, such as responding appropriately to disclosure and assisting women with access to support. Students' confidence increased in areas where responses needed to be individualised as opposed to being able to be scripted. Students appreciated visual demonstration (video of authentic practice) and having the opportunity to practise responding to disclosures through experiential learning. Given the general lack of confidence reported by both midwives and students of midwifery in this area of practice, this strategy may be useful in supporting midwives, students and other health professionals in increasing confidence in working with women who are experiencing domestic violence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Midwifery Services Framework: Lessons learned from the initial stages of implementation in six countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shantanu; Moyo, Nester T; Nove, Andrea; Bokosi, Martha

    2018-07-01

    In 2015, the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) launched the Midwifery Services Framework (MSF): an evidence-based tool to guide countries through the process of improving their sexual, reproductive, maternal and newborn health services through strengthening and developing the midwifery workforce. The MSF is aligned with key global architecture for sexual, reproductive, maternal and newborn health and human resources for health. This third in a series of three papers describes the experience of starting to implement the MSF in the first six countries that requested ICM support to adopt the tool, and the lessons learned during these early stages of implementation. The early adopting countries selected a variety of priority work areas, but nearly all highlighted the importance of improving the attractiveness of midwifery as a career so as to improve attraction and retention, and several saw the need for improvements to midwifery regulation, pre-service education, availability and/or accessibility of midwives. Key lessons from the early stages of implementation include the need to ensure a broad range of stakeholder involvement from the outset and the need for an in-country lead organisation to maintain the momentum of implementation even when there are changes in political leadership, security concerns or other barriers to progress. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Postpartum haemorrhage in midwifery care in the Netherlands: validation of quality indicators for midwifery guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Marrit; Chan, Kar-Li L; Middeldorp, Johanna M; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2014-12-07

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is still one of the major causes of severe maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, no guideline for PPH occurring in primary midwifery care in the Netherlands is available. A set of 25 quality indicators for prevention and management of PPH in primary care has been developed by an expert panel consisting of midwives, obstetricians, ambulance personal and representatives of the Royal Dutch College of Midwives (KNOV) and the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology (NVOG). This study aims to assess the performance of these quality indicators as an assessment tool for midwifery care and suitability for incorporation in a professional midwifery guideline. From April 2008 to April 2010, midwives reported cases of PPH. Cases were assessed using the 25 earlier developed quality indicators. Quality criteria on applicability, feasibility, adherence to the indicator, and the indicator's potential to monitor improvement were assessed. 98 cases of PPH were reported during the study period, of which 94 were analysed. Eleven indicators were found to be applicable and feasible. Five of these indicators showed improvement potential: routine administration of uterotonics, quantifying blood loss by weighing, timely referral to secondary care in homebirth and treatment of PPH using catherisation, uterine massage and oxytocin and the use of oxygen. Eleven out of 25 indicators were found to be suitable as an assessment tool for midwifery care of PPH and are therefore suitable for incorporation in a professional midwifery guideline. Larger studies are necessary to confirm these results.

  20. Sustainability and resilience in midwifery: A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan; Hunter, Billie; McAra-Couper, Judith; Warren, Lucie; Gilkison, Andrea; Hunter, Marion; Fielder, Anna; Kirkham, Mavis

    2016-09-01

    midwifery workforce issues are of international concern. Sustainable midwifery practice, and how resilience is a required quality for midwives, have begun to be researched. How these concepts are helpful to midwifery continues to be debated. It is important that such debates are framed so they can be empowering for midwives. Care is required not to conceptually label matters concerning the midwifery workforce without judicious scrutiny and diligence. the aim of this discussion paper is to explore the concepts of sustainability and resilience now being suggested in midwifery workforce literature. Whether sustainability and resilience are concepts useful in midwifery workforce development is questioned. using published primary midwifery research from United Kingdom and New Zealand the concepts of sustainability and resilience are compared, contrasted and explored. there are obvious differences in models of midwifery care in the United Kingdom and New Zealand. Despite these differences, the concepts of resilience and sustainability emerge as overlapping themes from the respective studies' findings. Comparison between studies provides evidence of what is crucial in sustaining healthy resilient midwifery practice. Four common themes have been identified that traverse the different models of care; Self-determination, ability to self-care, cultivation of relationships both professionally and with women/families, and a passion, joy and love for midwifery. the impact that midwifery models of care may have on sustainable practice and nurturing healthy resilient behaviors remains uncertain. The notion of resilience in midwifery as the panacea to resolve current concerns may need rethinking. Resilience may be interpreted as expecting midwives 'to toughen up' in a workplace setting that is socially, economically and culturally challenging. Sustainability calls for examination of the reciprocity between environments of working and the individual midwife. The findings invite

  1. Friendliness, functionality and freedom: Design characteristics that support midwifery practice in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Athena; Homer, Caroline S E; Foureur, Maralyn

    2017-07-01

    to identify and describe the design characteristics of hospital birth rooms that support midwives and their practice. this study used a qualitative exploratory descriptive methodology underpinned by the theoretical approach of critical realism. Data was collected through 21 in-depth, face-to-face photo-elicitation interviews and a thematic analysis guided by study objectives and the aims of exploratory research was undertaken. the study was set at a recently renovated tertiary hospital in a large Australian city. participants were 16 registered midwives working in a tertiary hospital; seven in delivery suite and nine in birth centre settings. Experience as a midwife ranged from three to 39 years and the sample included midwives in diverse roles such as educator, student support and unit manager. three design characteristics were identified that supported midwifery practice. They were friendliness, functionality and freedom. Friendly rooms reduced stress and increased midwives' feelings of safety. Functional rooms enabled choice and provided options to better meet the needs of labouring women. And freedom allowed for flexible, spontaneous and responsive midwifery practice. hospital birth rooms that possess the characteristics of friendliness, functionality and freedom offer enhanced support for midwives and may therefore increase effective care provision. new and existing birth rooms can be designed or adapted to better support the wellbeing and effectiveness of midwives and may thereby enhance the quality of midwifery care delivered in the hospital. Quality midwifery care is associated with positive outcomes and experiences for labouring women. Further research is required to investigate the benefit that may be transmitted to women by implementing design intended to support and enhance midwifery practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Continuous professional development of Liberia's midwifery workforce-A coordinated multi-stakeholder approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel-Schuldt, Michaela; Billy Dayon, Matilda; Toft Klar, Robin; Subah, Marion; King-Lincoln, Esther; Kpangbala-Flomo, Cecelia; Broniatowski, Raphaël

    2018-03-03

    Maternal and newborn mortality remains high in Liberia. There is a severe rural-urban gap in accessibility to health care services. A competent midwifery workforce is able to meet the needs of mothers and newborns. Evidence shows that competence can be assured through initial education along with continuous professional development (CPD). In the past, CPD was not regulated and coordinated in Liberia which is cpommon in the African region. To Support a competent regulated midwifery workforce through continuous professional development. A new CPD model was developed by the Liberian Board for Nursing and Midwifery. With its establishment, all midwives and nurses are required to undertake CPD programmes consisting of certified training and mentoring in order to renew their practicing license. The new model is being piloted in one county in which regular mentoring visits that include skills training are being conducted combined with the use of mobile learning applications addressing maternity health issues. Quality control of the CPD pilot is assured by the Liberian Board for Nursing and Midwifery. The mentoring visits are conducted on a clinical level but are coordinated on the national and county level. CPD using mobile learning on smartphones and regular mentoring visits not only improved knowledge and skills of midwives and nurses but also provided a solution to enhance accessibility in rural areas through improved communication and transportation, as well as improved career development of health personnel working in remote areas. Mentors were trained on a national, county, and health facility level in the pilot county with mentoring visits conducted regularly. The CPD programme of the Liberian Board for Nursing and Midwifery, currently in pilot-testing by various partners, aims to highlight the positive impact of the coordinating role of both the regulatory body and health authorities. Using regular process and programme reviews to improve capacity, knowledge, and

  3. Gossip, stories and friendship: confidentiality in midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S

    1995-12-01

    Women often seek midwifery care as an alternative to the maternity services that are readily available within the insured health care system in Alberta. Some aspects of community-based, primary care midwifery in Alberta that characterize this alternative are the use of story-telling as a form of knowledge, the development of social connections among women seeking midwifery care, and nonauthoritarian relationships between midwives and women. In this paper, the concept of confidentiality, as it relates to these aspects of midwifery practice, is explored, using traditional, caring and feminist models of ethics.

  4. Developing leadership roles in nursing and midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Clare; Ray, Devashish

    2014-11-04

    This article is the first in a series of seven articles on an initiative undertaken in NHS Lanarkshire where a creative partnership with the University of the West of Scotland established a shared commitment to developing nursing and midwifery leadership. This article describes the national context within Scotland. It provides an overview of the innovative programmes of work and systems devised to support leadership throughout the organisation with a particular focus on quality of care.

  5. Midwifery in New Zealand 1904-1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovic, Jane

    2008-10-01

    Childbirth for European women in early twentieth century New Zealand was family centred. The majority of births took place in the home, accepted as a difficult but natural part of a woman's role in life. Midwives were mostly married women who worked autonomously and had usually borne children themselves. By the 1970s this picture had dramatically changed. Virtually all births took place in hospital and were under the control of medical men and women. When legislation was passed (the Nurses Act 1971) that removed the right of New Zealand midwives to practice autonomously, New Zealand midwifery had largely been subsumed by nursing, controlled by medicine and displaced from a community based profession into a hospital based workforce. This article examines how the trends of medicalisation, hospitalisation, and nursification changed the New Zealand maternity services from 1900 to 1971, outlining the effect those changes had on the midwifery profession. The changes described here were also common to other western societies; examining how they occurred provides a context for understanding the history of midwifery in New Zealand.

  6. An exploration of the internationalisation of the nursing and midwifery curriculum in Brunei Darussalam

    OpenAIRE

    Haji Abdul Mumin, Khadizah

    2013-01-01

    This study explored curriculum developers’ experiences of developing and internationalising the nursing and midwifery curriculum in Brunei Darussalam (henceforth: ‘Brunei’), and students’ and graduates’ views of learning from the curriculum. The internationalisation of the curriculum, in education generally and health care and nursing in particular, has featured as a phenomenon in much global literature, describing attempts to ensure that curricula are fit for purpose, both to meet globally a...

  7. A framework to facilitate self-directed learning, assessment and supervision in midwifery practice: A qualitative study of supervisors' perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embo, M.; Driessen, E.; Valcke, M.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-directed learning is an educational concept that has received increasing attention. The recent workplace literature, however, reports problems with the facilitation of self-directed learning in clinical practice. We developed the Midwifery Assessment and Feedback Instrument (MAFI)

  8. Conflicting ideologies as a source of emotion work in midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Billie

    2004-09-01

    to explore how a range of midwives experienced and managed emotion in their work. a qualitative study using an ethnographic approach. Data were collected in three phases using focus groups, observations and interviews. South Wales, UK. Phase One: self-selected convenience sample of 27 student midwives in first and final years of 18-month (postnursing qualification) and 3-year (direct entry) programmes. Phase Two: opportunistic sample of 11 qualified midwives representing a range of clinical locations and clinical grades. Phase Three: purposive sample of 29 midwives working within one NHS Trust, representing a range of clinical locations, length of clinical experience and clinical grades. community and hospital environments presented midwives with fundamentally different work settings that had diverse values and perspectives. The result was two primary occupational identities and ideologies that were in conflict. Hospital midwifery was dominated by meeting service needs, via a universalistic and medicalised approach to care; the ideology was, by necessity, 'with institution'. Community-based midwifery was more able to support an individualised, natural model of childbirth reflecting a 'with woman' ideology. This ideology was officially supported, both professionally and academically. When midwives were able to work according to the 'with woman' ideal, they experienced their work as emotionally rewarding. Conversely, when this was not possible, they experienced work as emotionally difficult and requiring regulation of emotion, i.e. 'emotion work'. unlike findings from other studies, that have located emotion work primarily within worker/client relationships, the key source of emotion work for participants was conflicting ideologies of midwifery practice. These conflicts were particularly evident in the accounts of novice midwives (i.e. students and those who had been qualified for less than 1 year) and integrated team midwives. Both groups held a strong commitment to

  9. Mentorship from the student perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, Dawn; Marshall, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Midwifery Basics: Mentorship 3\\ud When undertaking a programme of pre-registration midwifery education, student midwives are working towards responsible and accountable practice at the point of registration. In order to facilitate this, mentors are required to support learning in a range of clinical settings and contribute to the development of the students ability to practice as a safe and competent midwife (Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2008, 2011). Experiences of mentorship can influence ...

  10. Patient safety in midwifery-led care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martijn, L.L.M.; Jacobs, A.J.E.; Maassen, I.I.M.; Buitendijk, S.S.E.; Wensing, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to describe the incidence and characteristics of patient safety incidents in midwifery-led care for low-risk pregnant women. Design: multi-method study. Setting: 20 midwifery practices in the Netherlands; 1,000 patient records. Population: low-risk pregnant women. Methods: prospective

  11. Postpartum haemorrhage in midwifery care in the Netherlands: validation of quality indicators for midwifery guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Chan, K.L.L.; Middeldorp, J.M.; van Roosmalen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is still one of the major causes of severe maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, no guideline for PPH occurring in primary midwifery care in the Netherlands is available. A set of 25 quality indicators for prevention and management of PPH in

  12. The reliability and validity of multiple mini interviews (MMIs) in values based recruitment to nursing, midwifery and paramedic practice programmes: Findings from an evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callwood, Alison; Cooke, Debbie; Bolger, Sarah; Lemanska, Agnieszka; Allan, Helen

    2018-01-01

    Universities in the United Kingdom (UK) are required to incorporate values based recruitment (VBR) into their healthcare student selection processes. This reflects an international drive to strengthen the quality of healthcare service provision. This paper presents novel findings in relation to the reliability and predictive validity of multiple mini interviews (MMIs); one approach to VBR widely being employed by universities. To examine the reliability (internal consistency) and predictive validity of MMIs using end of Year One practice outcomes of under-graduate pre-registration adult, child, mental health nursing, midwifery and paramedic practice students. Cross-discipline evaluation study. One university in the United Kingdom. Data were collected in two streams: applicants to A) The September 2014 and 2015 Midwifery Studies programmes; B) September 2015 adult; Child and Mental Health Nursing and Paramedic Practice programmes. Fifty-seven midwifery students commenced their programme in 2014 and 69 in 2015; 47 and 54 agreed to participate and completed Year One respectively. 333 healthcare students commenced their programmes in September 2015. Of these, 281 agreed to participate and completed their first year (180 adult, 33 child and 34 mental health nursing and 34 paramedic practice students). Stream A featured a seven station four-minute model with one interviewer at each station and in Stream B a six station model was employed. Cronbach's alpha was used to assess MMI station internal consistency and Pearson's moment correlation co-efficient to explore associations between participants' admission MMI score and end of Year one clinical practice outcomes (OSCE and mentor grading). Stream A: Significant correlations are reported between midwifery applicant's MMI scores and end of Year One practice outcomes. A multivariate linear regression model demonstrated that MMI score significantly predicted end of Year One practice outcomes controlling for age and academic

  13. Feminism and nurse-midwifery. Historical overview and current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, W F; McCool, S J

    1989-01-01

    Despite the fact that the profession of nurse-midwifery and feminism are both disciplines concerned with women and issues affecting women's lives, there has been little investigation or acknowledgement of relationships between their two paradigms. The work presented here is an attempt to discover both similarities and differences between nurse-midwifery and feminist thought. Using a historical approach, it is shown that despite the common goal of improving and maintaining women's status in the world, whether in general or more specifically with regard to health, feminist theorists and nurse-midwives, to a large degree, have worked separately from each other, rarely acknowledging in any formal way the importance of the other discipline. Current issues that have an effect on the practice of nurse-midwifery today--lay midwifery, the profession of nursing, and nurse-midwifery research--are presented in relation to contemporary feminist thought.

  14. Development and psychometric testing of the Carter Assessment of Critical Thinking in Midwifery (Preceptor/Mentor version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Creedy, Debra K; Sidebotham, Mary

    2016-03-01

    develop and test a tool designed for use by preceptors/mentors to assess undergraduate midwifery students׳ critical thinking in practice. a descriptive cohort design was used. participants worked in a range of maternity settings in Queensland, Australia. 106 midwifery clinicians who had acted in the role of preceptor for undergraduate midwifery students. this study followed a staged model for tool development recommended by DeVellis (2012). This included generation of items, content validity testing through mapping of draft items to critical thinking concepts and expert review, administration of items to a convenience sample of preceptors, and psychometric testing. A 24 item tool titled the XXXX Assessment of Critical Thinking in Midwifery (CACTiM) was completed by registered midwives in relation to students they had recently preceptored in the clinical environment. ratings by experts revealed a content validity index score of 0.97, representing good content validity. An evaluation of construct validity through factor analysis generated three factors: 'partnership in practice', 'reflection on practice' and 'practice improvements'. The scale demonstrated good internal reliability with a Cronbach alpha coefficient of 0.97. The mean total score for the CACTiM scale was 116.77 (SD=16.68) with a range of 60-144. Total and subscale scores correlated significantly. the CACTiM (Preceptor/Mentor version) was found to be a valid and reliable tool for use by preceptors to assess critical thinking in undergraduate midwifery students. given the importance of critical thinking skills for midwifery practice, mapping and assessing critical thinking development in students׳ practice across an undergraduate programme is vital. The CACTiM (Preceptor/Mentor version) has utility for clinical education, research and practice. The tool can inform and guide preceptors׳ assessment of students׳ critical thinking in practice. The availability of a reliable and valid tool can be used to

  15. The more things change, the more they stay the same: whither midwifery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M J

    1997-12-01

    The pace of change is said to increase over the next few years. One of the most significant recent changes has been the "McDonaldization of Society". The notion of "fastness" is permeating all society, including health and education. The concentration of rationalization through the principles of efficiency, calculability predictability and control, when extended to its logical conclusion, results in irrationality or dehumanization. Childbirth has been "McDonaldized" by the medical profession, but modern midwifery, is leading the way in an anti McDonald's movement to rehumanize it. Returning to past values contained in aesthetics, use of the partnership model, different forms of research and political action, midwifery is taking control of childbirth away from the rationalists and returning it to women. It is reclaiming childbirth by placing value on women and empowering them to take control of their own childbirth.

  16. Transformers: changing the face of nursing and midwifery in the media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Margaret; Downer, Terri; Hanson, Julie; Oprescu, Florin

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports an educational strategy designed to sensitise and empower students about the impact of media representations of nursing and midwifery on their public image. Numerous studies continue to reveal that stories about nursing and midwifery presented in the mainstream media are often superficial, stereotypical and demeaning. Inaccurate portrayals of nursing damage our professional reputation with the public and potential consumers. It also sends the wrong message to future nursing students. Images are a powerful conductor of misinformation, suggesting to others that nurses are not important agents for social change. In 2012, a small team of academics designed a photography competition and judging process for undergraduate and postgraduate students of nursing and midwifery enrolled at a regional Australian university. The winning entries were photographs of high quality and conveyed rich meaning. They provide an interesting and positive counterpoint to derogatory images often propagated by mainstream media. There is benefit in extending this project so that it: appeals to more students, builds leadership skills, leads to wider social change and benefits society. The intention is to develop the process of student engagement as an educational intervention, and explore experiences and outcomes with stakeholders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Legal briefing: home birth and midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Fisch, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    This issue's "Legal Briefing" column covers recent legal developments involving home birth and midwifery in the United States. Specifically, we focus on new legislative, regulatory, and judicial acts that impact women's' access to direct entry (non-nurse) midwives. We categorize these legal developments into the following 12 categories. 1. Background and History 2. Certified Nurse-Midwives 3. Direct Entry Midwives 4. Prohibition of Direct Entry Midwives 5. Enforcement of Prohibition 6. Challenges to Prohibition 7. Forbearance without License 8. Voluntary Licensure 9. Unclear and Uncertain Status 10. Growth of DEM Licensure 11. Licensure Restrictions 12. Medicaid Coverage

  18. Nursing and midwifery regulation and HIV scale-up: establishing a baseline in East, Central and Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carey F; Voss, Joachim; Verani, Andre R; Vidot, Peggy; Salmon, Marla E; Riley, Patricia L

    2013-03-25

    Shifting HIV treatment tasks from physicians to nurses and midwives is essential to scaling-up HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa. Updating nursing and midwifery regulations to include task shifting and pre-service education reform can help facilitate reaching new HIV targets. Donor-supported initiatives to update nursing and midwifery regulations are increasing. However, there are gaps in our knowledge of current practice and education regulations and a lack of information to target and implement regulation strengthening efforts. We conducted a survey of national nursing and midwifery councils to describe current nursing and midwifery regulations in 13 African countries. A 30-item survey was administered to a convenience sample of 13 national nursing and midwifery regulatory body leaders in attendance at the PEPFAR-supported African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative meeting in Nairobi, Kenya on 28 February, 2011. The survey contained questions on task shifting and regulations such as registration, licensure, scope of practice, pre-service education accreditation, continuing professional development and use of international guidelines. Survey data were analyzed to present country-level, comparative and regional findings. Task shifting to nurses and midwives was reported in 11 of the 13 countries. Eight countries updated their scope of practice within the last five years; only one reported their regulations to reflect task shifting. Countries vary with regard to licensure, pre-service accreditation and continuing professional development regulations in place. There was no consistency in terms of what standards were used to design national practice and education regulations. Many opportunities exist to assist countries to modernise regulations to incorporate important advancements from task shifting and pre-service reform. Appropriate, revised regulations can help sustain successful health workforce strategies and contribute to further scale-up HIV services

  19. Diversity in midwifery care: working toward social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Nadya; Ariss, Rachel

    2014-08-01

    As midwifery moved from lay practice to a regulated health-care profession in Ontario toward the end of the twentieth century, it brought with it many of its social movement goals and aspirations. Among these was the desire to attend to diversity and equity in the provision of birthing care. Drawing on interviews with currently practicing Ontario midwives, this paper focuses on midwives' conceptualizations of diversity and explores their everyday work to support and strengthen diversity among those using and those providing midwifery care. We argue that midwifery's recent relocation within state structured health care means neither that the social change projects of midwifery are complete nor that midwifery has abandoned its movement-based commitment to social change. Responses to social diversity in health care range from efforts to simply improve access to care to analyses of the role of social justice in recognizing the needs of diverse populations. The social justice aspiration to "create a better world" continues to animate the work of midwives postregulation. This paper explores the legacy of midwifery as a social movement, addressing the connections between diversity, social justice and midwifery care.

  20. Birth Territory: a theory for midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Kathleen M; Parratt, Jenny Anne

    2006-07-01

    The theory of Birth Territory describes, explains and predicts the relationships between the environment of the individual birth room, issues of power and control, and the way the woman experiences labour physiologically and emotionally. The theory was synthesised inductively from empirical data generated by the authors in their roles as midwives and researchers. It takes a critical post-structural feminist perspective and expands on some of the ideas of Michel Foucault. Theory synthesis was also informed by current research about the embodied self and the authors' scholarship in the fields of midwifery, human biology, sociology and psychology. In order to demonstrate the significance of the theory, it is applied to two clinical stories that both occur in hospital but are otherwise different. This analysis supports the central proposition that when midwives use 'midwifery guardianship' to create and maintain the ideal Birth Territory then the woman is most likely to give birth naturally, be satisfied with the experience and adapt with ease in the post-birth period. These benefits together with the reduction in medical interventions also benefit the baby. In addition, a positive Birth Territory is posited to have a broader impact on the woman's partner, family and society in general.

  1. Consumerism 2: preregistration nursing and midwifery curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jane

    This article, the second of two parts, presents findings from a four-stage study exploring the extent to which consumerism and its related aspects have been incorporated into the preregistration nursing and midwifery curriculum. The study was undertaken in recognition that NHS policy (as considered in the first article: Vol 12(5): 321-6) increasingly gave emphasis to the development of a health service that was more consumer and user focused. The study involved use of a Delphi panel, postal questionnaire, review of curriculum documentation, and timetables, together with a small focused group discussion. Findings indicate some aspects relevant to consumerism in health care, e.g. communication and ethical principles were included in the curriculum. Other aspects, such as advocacy, quality assurance, and lay health beliefs, were viewed logically from the perspective of the professional role. In essence, no curriculum transparently addressed consumerism in a central and focused way, although midwifery--and to some extent mental health, learning disabilities, and child branches--gave more overt attention to consumerism than adult branches.

  2. Sustainability of midwifery practice within the South African healthcare system

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Cur. The study on ‘Sustainability of midwifery practice within the South African healthcare system’ is stimulated by the lack of research that influences policy to support midwifery practice in South Africa. The poor database and health information systems for midwives result in the poor performance of maternal healthcare in the public sector (Parkhurst, Penn- Kekana, Blaauw, Balabanova, Danishevski, Rahman, Onama, & Ssengooba 2005) in spite of meeting the Safe Motherhood Initiative of t...

  3. Enhancing and developing leadership in midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalmont, Carmel; Bailey, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    Leadership is a word often heard in any workplace, and healthcare services are no different. Much has been written about leadership styles and theories, with a search of one online retailer revealing 153,589 books available on the subject. How many midwives have those books on their shelves? In a time when maternity services are rising to meet new pressures and demands, many commentators are calling for leadership to drive the profession on. How do we, as midwives, reflect on our own leadership style and the impact it has on others? Here we discuss the importance of leadership in midwifery as a profession, and to individuals, regardless of grade or position. We use an example of a project within our service to illustrate the opportunities for leadership to flourish throughout a whole team in order to achieve an end goal.

  4. Man-midwifery history: 1730-1930.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, D C

    2012-11-01

    This paper seeks to determine whether the man-midwives William Smellie and William Hunter deserve continuing approbation as 'Founding Fathers' of the obstetrics profession. Scrutiny of their careers reveals their involvement in murders for dissection. In addition, the man-midwifery initiative of delivery in lying-in hospitals resulted in around 1 million more deaths in Britain and Ireland between 1730 and 1930, than would have occurred had home-births remained as the norm. While some may still credit Smellie and Hunter with obstetric discoveries, their knowledge was obtained by murder-for-dissection. That indictment, together with the lying-in hospital legacy, far outweighs their discoveries. The paper invites further constructive discussion and debate, but concludes the accolade of Founding Fathers is undeserved. Any continuing endorsement of Smellie and Hunter effectively demeans the high ethical standards and reputation of current obstetric professionals.

  5. To embed or not to embed? A longitudinal study exploring the impact of curriculum design on the evidence-based practice profiles of UK pre-registration nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Upton, Penney; Rouse, Joanne; Upton, Dominic

    2017-11-01

    The use of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) is increasingly emphasized within healthcare. However, little research has focused on nurses' pre-registration training; particularly regarding the impact of curriculum-design on learning EBP. This study compared the impact of embedding EBP throughout the curriculum, with modular-based teaching, on pre-registration nursing students' EBP profiles. A longitudinal panel study. A convenience sample of fifty-six pre-registration nursing students (55.4% studying an embedded EBP-curriculum and 44.6% studying a modular EBP-curriculum), were recruited from a UK University between 2011 and 2014. Participants completed the Student Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (S-EBPQ) in the first, second and third year of their course. This questionnaire measures four EBP domains: frequency of use, attitude, knowledge and skills in retrieving and reviewing evidence, and knowledge and skills in applying and sharing evidence. Two-way mixed between-within Analyses of Variance revealed significant improvements across all domains, except attitude (which remained broadly positive across all years), for both curriculum-groups. No significant differences in this improvement were identified between the two curricula overall. However, the direction and rate of change of scores on the retrieving and applying subscales (but not frequency of use) for the two groups differed across time; specifically those on the embedded curriculum showed a dip in scores on these subscales in year 2. This appeared to be related to associated features of the course such as the timing of placements and delivery of theory. Taking a modular or embedded approach to EBP may have little impact on students' final EBP profiles. However, careful consideration should be given to the timing of related course features which may play a key role in students' perceptions of their knowledge and skills in its application. Further research should explore how curriculum-design might build on

  6. Future-Proofing Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Ralph

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of pre-registration programs of nursing education to current and emerging trends in healthcare and society could have a significant future impact on the nursing profession. In this article, we use a PESTEL (politics, economics, society, technology, environment, and law framework to identify significant current and future priorities in Australian healthcare. Following the PESTEL analysis, we conduct a review of the curriculum content of current Australian undergraduate pre-registration nursing curricula. The data were analyzed to determine how nursing curricula were aligned with the priorities identified in the PESTEL analysis. Findings suggest that preparation–practice gaps are evident in nursing curricula as the broad priorities identified were poorly reflected in undergraduate pre-registration programs. The study recommended (a the establishment of a nationally consistent mechanism to identify current and emerging trends in healthcare and higher education, and (b an evidence-based framework that enhances forward planning in the design of undergraduate pre-registration nursing curricula.

  7. Comparison of midwifery students' satisfaction with direct observation of procedural skills and current methods in evaluation of procedural skills in Mashhad Nursing and Midwifery School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Bibi Leila; Mazloum, Seyed Reza; Jafarnejad, Farzaneh; Foroughipour, Mohsen

    2013-03-01

    The clinical evaluation, as one of the most important elements in medical education, must measure students' competencies and abilities. The implementation of any assessment tool is basically dependent on the acceptance of students. This study tried to assess midwifery students' satisfaction with Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) and current clinical evaluation methods. This quasi-experimental study was conducted in the university hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The subjects comprised 67 undergraduate midwifery students selected by convenience sampling and allocated to control and intervention groups according to the training transposition. Current method was performed in the control group, and DOPS was conducted in the intervention group. The applied tools included DOPS rating scales, logbook, and satisfaction questionnaires with clinical evaluation methods. Validity and reliability of these tools were approved. At the end of training, students' satisfaction with the evaluation methods was assessed by the mentioned tools. The data were analyzed by descriptive and analytical statistics. Satisfaction mean scores of midwifery students with DOPS and current methods were 76.7 ± 12.9 and 62.6 ± 14.7 (out of 100), respectively. DOPS students' satisfaction mean score was significantly higher than the score obtained in current method (P satisfactory domains in the current method were "consistence with learning objectives" (71.2 ± 14.9) and "objectiveness" in DOPS (87.9 ± 15.0). In contrast, the least satisfactory domains in the current method were "interested in applying the method" (57.8 ± 26.5) and "number of assessments for each skill" (58.8 ± 25.9) in DOPS method. This study showed that DOPS method is associated with greater students' satisfaction. Since the students' satisfaction with the current method was also acceptable, we recommend combining this new clinical evaluation method with the current method, which covers

  8. Capacity building of skilled birth attendants: A review of pre-service education curricula.

    OpenAIRE

    Adegoke, Adetoro; Mani, Safiyanu; Abubakar, Aisha; Van Den Broek, Nynke

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the level, type and content of pre-service education curricula of health workers providing maternity services against the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential competencies for midwifery practice. We reviewed the quality and relevance of pre-service education curricula of four cadres of health-care providers of maternity care in Northern Nigeria.\\ud DESIGN AND SETTING: we adapted and used the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential ...

  9. Development and implementation of a clinical needs assessment to support nursing and midwifery students with a disability in clinical practice: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, Frances; Halligan, Phil; O'Toole, Sinead

    2014-09-01

    Equality and disability legislation, coupled with increasing numbers of students with a disability, and inadequate supports in clinical practice, acted as catalysts to explore how best to support undergraduate nursing and midwifery students on clinical placements. Historically, higher education institutions provide reasonable accommodations for theoretical rather than clinical modules for practice placements. This paper describes the development and implementation of a Clinical Needs Assessment designed to identify the necessary supports or reasonable accommodations for nursing and midwifery students with a disability undertaking work placements in clinical practice. The existing literature, and consultation with an expert panel, revealed that needs assessments should be competency based and clearly identify the core skills or elements of practice that the student must attain to achieve proficiency and competence. The five Domains of Competence, advocated by An Bord Altranais, the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland, formed the framework for the Clinical Needs Assessment. A panel of experts generated performance indicators to enable the identification of individualised reasonable accommodations for year 1 nursing and midwifery students in one Irish University. Development and implementation of the Clinical Needs Assessment promoted equality, inclusion and a level playing field for nursing and midwifery students with a disability in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Research priorities for nursing and midwifery in Southern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, G; Savage, E; Lehane, E

    2006-06-01

    To identify research priorities for nursing and midwifery in the Southern Health Board area in Ireland for the immediate and long term. Ten focus groups were conducted over a 2-month period with 70 nurses and midwives working in clinical, managerial and educational roles participating. Based on focus group findings and a literature review a multi-item Likert type questionnaire was constructed and administered to 520 nurses and midwives (response rate 95%n=494). Research priorities were identified as: (1) impact of staff shortages on retention of RNs/RM's (80%); (2) quality of life of chronically ill patients (76%); (3) stress and bullying in the workplace (76%); (4) assessment and management of pain (75%); (5) skill mix and staff burnout (73%); (6) cardio-pulmonary resuscitation decision making (72%); (7) coordination of care between hospital and primary care settings (69%); (8) medication errors (67%); and (9) promoting healthy lifestyles (64%). Respondents also indicated that these priorities warranted immediate attention. Implications for practice include the need for: (1) emphasis on quality pain control; (2) recognition and exploration of the ethical issues relating to resuscitation; and (3) management of the context within which clinical care is given.

  11. Home births in the Netherlands: midwifery-related factors of influence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jabaaij, L.; Meijer, W.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Identification of midwifery-related factors influencing the varied percentage of home births in the practices of Dutch midwives. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Independent midwifery practices in the Netherlands. Participants: 115 independent midwives. Measurements: Recording of

  12. Learning Styles of Medical and Midwifery Students in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zeraati

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Students have individual learning style preferences including visual (V; learning from graphs, charts, and flow diagrams, auditory (A; learning from speech, read-write(R; learning from reading and writing, and kinesthetic (K; learning from touch, hearing, smell, taste, and sight.These preferences can be assessed using the VARK questionnaire.Purpose: We aimed to assess different learning styles of medical students in our collage.Methods: This study was conducted to describe learning styles of 214 Medical and Midwifery students in Mashhad University of medical sciences. By using the English version of the VARK questionnaire, we measured the difference in learning styles of medical students and midwifery students and compared with 57336 global general students who completed the test in VARK website up to Sep 2007.Results: The dominant learning preference of our students was Aural preference (30.8% followed by Read/Write (20.6%, while (7.5% were in Kinesthetic and (5.6% were Visual learners; still most of the students (35.5% represented a multimodal learning preference. No significant difference was found between males and females. The general pattern between medical student and Midwifery student is the same. There was a significant relation between Internship Entrance Exam score and thelearning styles of medical student and who were more Read/Write got higher scores.Conclusion: Knowing that our students have different preferred learning modes will help medical instructors in our faculty develop appropriate learning approaches and explore opportunities so that they will be able to make the educational experience more productive.Key words: MEDICAL EDUCATION, LEARNING MODELS VARK, VISUAL, AUDITORY, READ-WRITE, KINESTHETIC, SSTUDENTS.

  13. Midwifery care: a perinatal mental health case scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnes, Joanne; Hall, Pauline

    2013-12-01

    The establishment of the National Perinatal Depression Initiative (NPDI, 2008-2013) has brought a focus across Australia for the need to identify women at risk of perinatal mental health disorders, suggesting that routine screening by relevant health professionals may aid earlier detection, better care and improved outcomes. Midwives are frequently the primary point of contact in the perinatal period and thus ideally placed to identify, interpret and manage complex situations, including screening for perinatal mental health disorders. This paper offers strategies that could be implemented into daily midwifery practice in order to achieve the goals consistent with the National Perinatal Depression Initiative. A case study (Jen) and discussion, guided by recommendations from the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Competency standards and beyondblue Clinical Practice Guidelines, are used to demonstrate how midwifery care can be provided. In accordance with her legal obligations, the midwife should act within her scope of practice to undertake a series of psychosocial and medical assessments in order to best determine how midwifery care and support can be of benefit to Jen, her infant and her family. Suggestions described include administration of validated screening questionnaires, clinical interview, physical assessment, discussion with partner, awareness of the mother-infant interactions and questioning around baby's sleep and feeding. Based on evaluation of the information gained from a bio-psycho-social assessment, suggestions are made as to the midwifery care options that could be applied. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. All rights reserved.

  14. Freestanding midwifery unit versus obstetric unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Charlotte; Møller, Anna Margrethe; Fenger-Grøn, Morten

    2011-01-01

    low-risk women intending FMU birth and a matched control group of 839 low-risk women intending OU birth were included at the start of care in labour. OU women were individually chosen to match selected obstetric/socio-economic characteristics of FMU women. Analysis was by intention to treat. Main......Objective To compare perinatal and maternal morbidity and birth interventions in low-risk women giving birth in two freestanding midwifery units (FMUs) and two obstetric units (OUs). Design A cohort study with a matched control group. Setting The region of North Jutland, Denmark. Participants 839...... women were significantly less likely to experience an abnormal fetal heart rate (RR: 0.3, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.5), fetal–pelvic complications (0.2, 0.05 to 0.6), shoulder dystocia (0.3, 0.1 to 0.9), occipital–posterior presentation (0.5, 0.3 to 0.9) and postpartum haemorrhage >500 ml (0.4, 0.3 to 0...

  15. Research capacity building in midwifery: Case study of an Australian Graduate Midwifery Research Intern Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Yvonne L; Lewis, Lucy; Bayes, Sara; Keyes, Louise

    2015-09-01

    Having the research capacity to identify problems, create new knowledge and most importantly translate this knowledge into practice is essential within health care. Midwifery, as well as other health professions in Australia, is challenged in building its research capacity to contribute evidence to inform clinical practice. The aim of this project was to evaluate an innovative Graduate Midwifery Research Intern Programme offered at a tertiary obstetric hospital in Western Australia, to determine what was working well and how the programme could be improved. A case study approach was used to gain feedback from graduate midwives within a Graduate Research Intern (GRI) Programme. In addition outcomes were compiled of all projects the GRI midwives contributed to. Six GRI midwives participated in a survey comprising of four open ended questions to provide feedback about the programme. Findings confirm that the GRI programme increased the graduates understanding of how research works, its capacity to define a problem, generate new knowledge and inform clinical practice. The GRI midwives' feedback suggested the programme opened their thinking to future study and gave them enhanced insight into women's experiences around childbirth. To grow our knowledge as a professional group, midwives must develop and promote programmes to build our pool of research capable midwives. By sharing our programme evaluation we hope to entice other clinical settings to consider the value in replicating such a programme within their context. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Critical realism: an important theoretical perspective for midwifery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Denis; Evans, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    there is a dearth of papers in midwifery journals exploring the philosophical underpinnings of various research methods. However, explaining and justifying particular ontological and epistemological positions gives coherence and credibility to chosen research methods. to explore and explain the philosophical underpinning of critical realism and argue for it to be more widely adopted by midwifery researchers, using the exemplar of dystocia research. critical realism as originally espoused by Bhaskar sees reality as layered (realist ontology) and seeks to explore causative mechanisms for what is experienced and observed. In this way it illuminates the complexity of health care, though recognising that knowledge of this complexity is filtered through an interpretive lens (constructionist epistemology). Critical realism encourages a holistic exploration of phenomena, premised on multiple research questions that utilise multiple research methods. critical realism as a philosophical underpinning is therefore particularly apposite for researching midwifery issues and concerns. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 'TeamUP': An approach to developing teamwork skills in undergraduate midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn Ruth

    2018-03-01

    to develop an effective model to enable educators to teach, develop and assess the development of midwifery students' teamwork skills DESIGN: an action research project involving participant interviews and academic feedback. a regional university PARTICIPANTS: midwifery students (n = 21) and new graduate midwives (n = 20) INTERVENTIONS: a whole of course program using a rubric, with five teamwork domains and behavioural descriptors, to provide a framework for teaching and assessment. Students self and peer assess. Lectures, tutorials and eight different groupwork assignments of increasing difficulty, spread over the three years of the undergraduate degree are incorporated into the TeamUP model. the assignments provide students with the opportunity to practice and develop their teamwork skills in a safe, supported environment. the social, emotional and practical behaviours required for effective teamwork can be taught and developed in undergraduate health students. students require a clear overview of the TeamUP model at the beginning of the degree. They need to be informed of the skills and behaviours that the TeamUP model is designed to help develop and why they are important. The success of the model depends upon the educator's commitment to supporting students to learn teamwork skills. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The 'values journey' of nursing and midwifery students selected using multiple mini interviews; Year One findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callwood, Alison; Bolger, Sarah; Allan, Helen T

    2018-05-01

    To explore how adult, child and mental health nursing and midwifery students, selected using multiple mini interviews, describe their 'values journey' following exposure to the clinical practice environment. Values based recruitment (VBR) incorporates assessment of healthcare students' personal values using approaches like multiple mini interviews. Students' experience of adjustment to their values during their programme is conceptualized as a 'values journey'. The impact of VBR in alleviating erosion of personal values remains unclear. A cross-professional longitudinal cohort study was commenced at one university in England in 2016 with data collection points at the end of years one, two and three. Non-probability consecutive sampling resulted in 42 healthcare students (8 adult, 8 child and 9 mental health nursing and 17 midwifery students) taking part. Six semi-structured focus groups were conducted at the end of participants' Year One (DC1). Data analysis incorporated inductive and deductive approaches in a hybrid synthesis. Participants described a 'values journey' where their values, particularly communication, courage and wanting to make a difference, were both challenged and retained. Participants personal journeys also acknowledged the: 'courage it takes to use values'; 'reality of values in practice' and 'need for self-reflection on values'. A 'values journey' may begin early in a healthcare student's education programme. This is important to recognize so that appropriate interventions designed to support students in higher education and clinical practice can be implemented. The values incorporated in VBR should be continually evaluated for fitness for purpose. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Exploring undergraduate midwifery students' readiness to deliver culturally secure care for pregnant and birthing Aboriginal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackrah, Rosalie D; Thompson, Sandra C; Durey, Angela

    2015-04-16

    Culturally secure health care settings enhance accessibility by Aboriginal Australians and improve their satisfaction with service delivery. A culturally secure health service recognises and responds to the legitimate cultural rights of the recipients of care. Focus is upon the health care system as well as the practice and behaviours of the individuals within it. In an attempt to produce culturally secure practitioners, the inclusion of Aboriginal content in health professional programs at Australian universities is now widespread. Studies of medical students have identified the positive impact of this content on knowledge and attitudes towards Aboriginal people but relatively little is known about the responses of students in other health professional education programs. This study explored undergraduate midwifery students' knowledge and attitudes towards Aboriginal people, and the impact of Aboriginal content in their program. The study surveyed 44 students who were in their first, second and third years of a direct entry, undergraduate midwifery program at a Western Australian (WA) university. The first year students were surveyed before and after completion of a compulsory Aboriginal health unit. Second and third year students who had already completed the unit were surveyed at the end of their academic year. Pre- and post-unit responses revealed a positive shift in first year students' knowledge and attitudes towards Aboriginal people and evidence that teaching in the unit was largely responsible for this shift. A comparison of post-unit responses with those from students in subsequent years of their program revealed a significant decline in knowledge about Aboriginal issues, attitudes towards Aboriginal people and the influence of the unit on their views. Despite this, all students indicated a strong interest in more clinical exposure to Aboriginal settings. The inclusion of a unit on Aboriginal health in an undergraduate midwifery program has been shown to

  20. Exploring the Midwifery Training Challenges in Iran from the Viewpoint of Faculty Members and Graduates of this Field: Content Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman Ahmady

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Midwifery importance is obvious due to its role in the health of mothers and children. For this reason, educating human resources trained in midwifery field as an effective measure to promote natural parturition and upgrade health services to mothers and children is attended in many countries worldwide. Ensuring efficient staffs that are capable to respond to the health needs of the target population is necessary, and education in this field is considered as a serious and crucial issue. Educational programs in this field shall be designed such that, in addition to the intellectual development of students, a platform is provided for achieving clinical skills and conversances and prepare midwives to perform tasks and skills acquisition and achieve professional independence. Some evidence indicates that there are disorganizations in maternal and child care system that, the root of many of them can be directly or indirectly traced in education for midwifery students.Methods: In this qualitative study designed with content analysis method, 14 participants (including policy-makers, faculty members and alumni of Midwifery were interviewed. Selection method of key informants was based on purposive sampling and, information were collected and implemented based on the experiences of participants in the study using semi-structured individual interviews. Interviews were gradually continued until data saturation. Using the methodology of content, thematic analysis of meaning units, primary codes, and then sub-themes and finally the main themes were extracted.Results: About 300 primary codes were extracted from the transcript of the interview that, after reduction were finally summarized to 10 sub-themes and three main themes. The main theme was " weakness of educational program " which included a sub-themes entitled: inadequate educational environment, failure of practical skills, lack of appropriate training sources and inappropriate

  1. Missing Midwifery: Relevance for Contemporary Challenges in Maternal Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupa Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Midwifery is rooted in public health, and most of its history has been community oriented. In India, midwifery evolved during the British rule; but over the years with changes in political and program priorities, the role and the capacity of midwives has changed substantially. The verticalization of national health programs has obscured the midwives′ community focus and inhibited its contribution to the wider public health. There is a global acceptance and recognition of the midwifery model of care and skilled delivery for ensuring effective maternal health outcomes. The approaches are in line with local needs and have proved its effectiveness in resource-constrained settings. It is important to recognize the substantial contribution they make to public health, working to promote the long-term well-being of women, their babies and families, by offering information and advice on nutrition, supplementation, breastfeeding, and immunization. There is considerable scope for developing the midwifery model through enhancing the extent of their involvement in assessing health needs of local populations, designing, managing and evaluating maternal and health services, making timely and effective referrals and developing family-centered care.

  2. Missing midwifery: relevance for contemporary challenges in maternal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rupa; Dasgupta, Rajib

    2013-01-01

    Midwifery is rooted in public health, and most of its history has been community oriented. In India, midwifery evolved during the British rule; but over the years with changes in political and program priorities, the role and the capacity of midwives has changed substantially. The verticalization of national health programs has obscured the midwives' community focus and inhibited its contribution to the wider public health. There is a global acceptance and recognition of the midwifery model of care and skilled delivery for ensuring effective maternal health outcomes. The approaches are in line with local needs and have proved its effectiveness in resource-constrained settings. It is important to recognize the substantial contribution they make to public health, working to promote the long-term well-being of women, their babies and families, by offering information and advice on nutrition, supplementation, breastfeeding, and immunization. There is considerable scope for developing the midwifery model through enhancing the extent of their involvement in assessing health needs of local populations, designing, managing and evaluating maternal and health services, making timely and effective referrals and developing family-centered care.

  3. Rhetorical skills as a component of midwifery care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domajnko, Barbara; Drglin, Zalka; Pahor, Majda

    2011-04-01

    this article argues that rhetorical skills are an important quality factor of midwifery care. In particular, it aims to identify and discuss the relevance of three classical means of persuasion: ethos, pathos and logos. secondary analysis, rhetorical analysis of semi-structured interviews. Slovenia. Interviews were carried out predominantly in 2006. Data refer to childbirths in 2005 and 2006. four women with recent experience of childbirth. analysis identified the presence of all three means of persuasion in the interaction between midwives and women. Focusing on midwives, the quality of their awareness and command of rhetorical skills remains questionable. In particular, women experienced lack of a rational account of the situation and decisions made by health-care professionals involved in maternity care. acknowledging professional ethics, awareness and good command of all three means of persuasion [but above all, argumentative persuasion (logos)] is an integral component of midwifery care. It can contribute to collaborative relations between midwives and women, and thus promote women-centred midwifery care. knowledge of the three classical rhetorical means of persuasion should be integrated into professional midwifery curricula. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genesis and Evolution of the Nursing and Midwifery Program

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    managed all of those changes. Lessons Learned. Developing an effective partnership between national nursing leadership and foreign academic institutions requires flexibility, respect, and thoughtful planning. Conclusions. The Rwanda HRH Nursing and Midwifery Program is a remarkable example of professional ...

  5. Innovative Work Behaviour of teachers in Higher Education : An extended view; A first exploration : Paper presented at the International Scientific Nursing and Midwifery Congress Care4, Antwerp, Belgium, February 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcel van der Klink; Mien Segers; Maike Gerken; Peggy Lambriex-Schmitz

    2015-01-01

    Within health education, many innovations are introduced, but are often not successful or sustainable. It is generally acknowledged that the quality of an educational system mainly depends on the quality of the teachers. Innovations will only succeed if teachers experience a climate that stimulates

  6. Attitudes of midwifery and nursing students in a Turkish university toward lesbians and gay men and opinions about healthcare approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Dilek; Daglar, Gulseren; Sabanciogullari, Selma; Ozkan, Semiha Aydin

    2018-03-01

    Lesbians and gay men are subjected to negative attitudes and poor quality health care by midwives in the process of having children and by nurses in the process of receiving general health care services. Our aim was to investigate midwifery and nursing students' attitudes towards lesbians and gay men and their opinions about health care approaches displayed towards them. The study was designed as a cross-sectional and descriptive one and conducted in one midwifery and two nursing schools in a city in Turkey and comprised 1321 students. To assess the participants' attitudes, the Attitudes toward Lesbians and Gays (ATLG) Scale was used. To assess opinions about health care approaches, the students were asked open-ended questions. All the participating students' attitude scores were below the average and they exhibited negative attitudes towards lesbians and gays. While very few of the participants had positive views about health care given to, most of them either had negative views or did not have any opinions. The midwifery students' attitudes were more positive than were those of the nursing students. Students' health care approaches towards lesbians and gay men were insufficient and negative. Educators need to develop training programs, which can help students gain cultural awareness of the health care needs of lesbians and gay men in different cultures before they graduate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An investigation on the quality of midwifery services from the viewpoint of the clients in Isfahan through SERVQUAL model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliaee, Zohreh; Jabbari, Alireza; Ehsanpour, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Quality of care is of great importance in health services as these services have the important mission to preserve health, and to give care to the society. The present study aimed to investigate the quality of midwifery services from the viewpoint of the clients, under coverage of health care centers in Isfahan, through SERVQUAL model. This descriptive and analytical study was conducted on 218 subjects in 2014. Study population comprised the women referring to midwifery services clinics in health care centers in Isfahan. Data of the subjects (n = 218) were collected by SERVQUAL model containing the dimensions of tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy. Data were analyzed by paired t-test, Spearman and Pearson correlation coefficients, and independent t-test through SPSS 20. There was a negative gap in all five relevant dimensions of giving services. The widest gap was in the mean of dimension of tangibles (-1.5), and the narrowest gap was in the dimension of assurance (-0.9). There was no significant association between the scores of expectations and perceptions, and age, education level, occupation, and marital status. The obtained negative gap showed that the level of service receivers' perception from existing condition was far from their expectation, and there was a wide gap between attaining their satisfaction with midwifery services and their expectation and reaching their appropriate level of services.

  8. What Prevents Quality Midwifery Care? A Systematic Mapping of Barriers in Low and Middle Income Countries from the Provider Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Filby

    Full Text Available Quality of care is essential for further progress in reducing maternal and newborn deaths. The integration of educated, trained, regulated and licensed midwives into the health system is associated with improved quality of care and sustained decreases in maternal and newborn mortality. To date, research on barriers to quality of care for women and newborns has not given due attention to the care provider's perspective. This paper addresses this gap by presenting the findings of a systematic mapping of the literature of the social, economic and professional barriers preventing midwifery personnel in low and middle income countries (LMICs from providing quality of care.A systematic search of five electronic databases for literature published between January 1990 and August 2013. Eligible items included published and unpublished items in all languages. Items were screened against inclusion and exclusion criteria, yielding 82 items from 34 countries. 44% discussed countries or regions in Africa, 38% in Asia, and 5% in the Americas. Nearly half the articles were published since 2011. Data was extracted and presented in a narrative synthesis and tables. Items were organized into three categories; social; economic and professional barriers, based on an analytical framework. Barriers connected to the socially and culturally constructed context of childbirth, although least reported, appear instrumental in preventing quality midwifery care.Significant social and cultural, economic and professional barriers can prevent the provision of quality midwifery care in LMICs. An analytical framework is proposed to show how the overlaps between the barriers reinforce each other, and that they arise from gender inequality. Links are made between burn out and moral distress, caused by the barriers, and poor quality care. Ongoing mechanisms to improve quality care will need to address the barriers from the midwifery provider perspective, as well as the underlying

  9. Evaluation of tools used to measure critical thinking development in nursing and midwifery undergraduate students: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Creedy, Debra K; Sidebotham, Mary

    2015-07-01

    Well developed critical thinking skills are essential for nursing and midwifery practices. The development of students' higher-order cognitive abilities, such as critical thinking, is also well recognised in nursing and midwifery education. Measurement of critical thinking development is important to demonstrate change over time and effectiveness of teaching strategies. To evaluate tools designed to measure critical thinking in nursing and midwifery undergraduate students. The following six databases were searched and resulted in the retrieval of 1191 papers: CINAHL, Ovid Medline, ERIC, Informit, PsycINFO and Scopus. After screening for inclusion, each paper was evaluated using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Tool. Thirty-four studies met the inclusion criteria and quality appraisal. Sixteen different tools that measure critical thinking were reviewed for reliability and validity and extent to which the domains of critical thinking were evident. Sixty percent of studies utilised one of four standardised commercially available measures of critical thinking. Reliability and validity were not consistently reported and there was a variation in reliability across studies that used the same measure. Of the remaining studies using different tools, there was also limited reporting of reliability making it difficult to assess internal consistency and potential applicability of measures across settings. Discipline specific instruments to measure critical thinking in nursing and midwifery are required, specifically tools that measure the application of critical thinking to practise. Given that critical thinking development occurs over an extended period, measurement needs to be repeated and multiple methods of measurement used over time. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Midwifery students experience of teamwork projects involving mark-related peer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn R; Fahy, Kathleen M; Parratt, Jenny A; Grace, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Lack of teamwork skills among health care professionals endangers patients and enables workplace bullying. Individual teamwork skills are increasingly being assessed in the undergraduate health courses but rarely defined, made explicit or taught. To remedy these deficiencies we introduced a longitudinal educational strategy across all three years of the Bachelor of Midwifery program. To report on students' experiences of engaging in team based assignments which involved mark-related peer feedback. Stories of midwifery students' experiences were collected from 17 participants across the three years of the degree. These were transcribed and analysed thematically and interpreted using feminist collaborative conversations. Most participants reported being in well-functioning teams and enjoyed the experience; they spoke of 'we' and said 'Everyone was on Board'. Students in poorly functioning teams spoke of 'I' and 'they'. These students complained about the poor performance of others but they didn't speak up because they 'didn't want to make waves' and they didn't have the skills to be able to confidently manage conflict. All participants agreed 'Peer-related marks cause mayhem'. Teamwork skills should be specifically taught and assessed. These skills take time to develop. Students, therefore, should be engaged in a teamwork assignment in each semester of the entire program. Peer feedback should be moderated by the teacher and not directly related to marks. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Midwifery Workforce: ACNM 2012 and AMCB 2013 Core Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Judith; Sipe, Theresa Ann; Hastings-Tolsma, Marie; McFarlin, Barbara L; Schuiling, Kerri; Bright, Carrie D; Havens, Lori B; Krulewitch, Cara J

    2015-01-01

    Core data are crucial for detailing an accurate profile of the midwifery workforce in the United States. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) and the American Midwifery Certification Board, Inc. (AMCB), at the request and with support from the US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), are engaged in a collaborative effort to develop a data collection strategy (the Midwifery MasterFile) that will reflect demographic and practice characteristics of certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) in the United States. Two independent datasets, one collected by ACNM in 2012 and one by AMCB in 2013, were examined to determine key workforce information. ACNM data were collected from the online Core Data Survey sent to ACNM members. AMCB data were extracted from information submitted online by applicants seeking initial certification in 2013 and applicants seeking to recertify following 5 years of initial certification. The ACNM 2012 survey was partially or fully completed by 36% (n = 2185) of ACNM members (N = 6072). AMCB respondents included 100% of new certificants (N = 539) and those applying for recertification in 2013 (n = 1323) of the total 11,682 certificants in the AMCB database. These two datasets demonstrate that midwives remain largely white, female, and older in age, with most engaged in clinical midwifery while employed primarily by hospitals and medical centers. Differences were reported between the ACNM membership and AMCB certification datasets in the numbers of midwives holding other certifications, working full-time, attending births, and providing newborn care. The new collaboration among HRSA, ACNM, and AMCB, represented as the Midwifery MasterFile, provides the opportunity to clearly profile CNMs/CMs, distinct from advanced practice registered nurses, in government reports about the health care workforce. This information is central to identifying and marketing the role and contribution of CNMs/CMs in the provision

  12. Nurse and midwifery prescribing in Ireland: A scope-of-practice development for worldwide consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna M; Murphy, Jill; Nam, Mavis A; Fahy, Anne; Tella, Susanna

    2018-01-29

    For 10 years, select Irish nurses and midwives who pass a rigorous 6 month theory and practical program can prescribe medications and other medicinal products. Given the need for timely, accessible, and affordable health-care services in all countries, this nursing/midwifery education and practice development is worthy of examination. Irish nurse/midwife prescribing occurred following long-term deliberative nursing profession advocacy, nursing education planning, nursing administration and practice planning, interdisciplinary health-care team support and complementary efforts, and government action. A review of documents, research, and other articles was undertaken to examine this development process and report evaluative information for consideration by other countries seeking to improve their health-care systems. Nurse/midwife prescribing was accomplished successfully in Ireland, with the steps taken there to initiate and establish nurse/midwife prescribing of value internationally. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. An evaluation of nursing and midwifery sign off mentors, new mentors and nurse lecturers' understanding of the sign off mentor role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooke, Nickey

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a small scale evaluation examining nursing and midwifery mentors and nursing lecturers perceptions of the Nursing and Midwifery Council 'sign off' mentor role (NMC, 2008). For this evaluation 114 new sign off mentors, 37 preparation for mentorship students and 13 nursing and midwifery lecturers within a Higher Education Institute (HEI) in the United Kingdom participated in the evaluation project. Nursing and midwifery students were not included in this initial evaluation. The initial findings suggested that all participants viewed the introduction of sign off mentors positively; offering a more robust mechanism for ensuring students were competent, helped to protect the public, and offered an increased level of support for students themselves. Concerns were raised about varying levels of support available for sign off mentors and some Stage 2 mentors' abilities to assess competence. Several participants felt the 1 h protected time per week per final placement student would be difficult to implement, whilst anxieties were also expressed about levels of responsibility for ensuring fitness to practice alongside concern that some mentors may leave sign off mentors to manage and identify under-achieving students. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Using root cause analysis to promote critical thinking in final year Bachelor of Midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Sidebotham, Mary; Creedy, Debra K; Fenwick, Jennifer; Gamble, Jenny

    2014-06-01

    Midwives require well developed critical thinking to practice autonomously. However, multiple factors impinge on students' deep learning in the clinical context. Analysis of actual case scenarios using root cause analysis may foster students' critical thinking and application of 'best practice' principles in complex clinical situations. To examine the effectiveness of an innovative teaching strategy involving root cause analysis to develop students' perceptions of their critical thinking abilities. A descriptive, mixed methods design was used. Final 3rd year undergraduate midwifery students (n=22) worked in teams to complete and present an assessment item based on root cause analysis. The cases were adapted from coroners' reports. After graduation, 17 (77%) students evaluated the course using a standard university assessment tool. In addition 12 (54%) students provided specific feedback on the teaching strategy using a 16-item survey tool based on the domain concepts of Educational Acceptability, Educational Impact, and Preparation for Practice. Survey responses were on a 5-point Likert scale and analysed using descriptive statistics. Open-ended responses were analysed using content analysis. The majority of students perceived the course and this teaching strategy positively. The domain mean scores were high for Educational Acceptability (mean=4.3, SD=.49) and Educational Impact (mean=4.19, SD=.75) but slightly lower for Preparation for Practice (mean=3.7, SD=.77). Overall student responses to each item were positive with no item mean less than 3.42. Students found the root cause analysis challenging and time consuming but reported development of critical thinking skills about the complexity of practice, clinical governance and risk management principles. Analysing complex real life clinical cases to determine a root cause enhanced midwifery students' perceptions of their critical thinking. Teaching and assessment strategies to promote critical thinking need to be

  15. Being a young midwifery student: A qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, J; Cullen, D; Gamble, J; Sidebotham, M

    2016-08-01

    undergraduate midwifery programmes offer opportunities for school leavers and young people (aged less than 21 years) to enter the profession. There is limited research exploring this age groups experience of their Bachelor of Midwifery programme. In order to retain these students we need to ensure that their experiences of undertaking a Bachelor of Midwifery program are positive and barriers and challenges are minimised. this study explored young midwifery students' experience of their Bachelor of Midwifery program. a descriptive exploratory qualitative approach was used to explore the experiences of eleven students aged 20 years or less on enrolment. Data was collected using face-to-face or telephone-recorded interviews. Thematic analysis was used to analysis the data set. three major themes described the young students' experiences. The first labelled 'The challenges of being young' presented a number of age related challenges including transport issues with on-call commitments as some students had not gained a driver's license. Students experienced some degree of prejudice relating to their age from their older student peers and some clinical staff during placements. 'Finding your way' was the second theme and described the strategies students used to build confidence and competence both in the university and clinical environment. The young students reported a strong commitment to the profession. They demonstrated high levels of connection with women and found the continuity of care experiences invaluable to their learning. The final theme 'Making the transition from teenager to midwife' demonstrated some unique insights into how studying to become a midwife impacted upon their personal and professional growth. the young students in this study encountered some unique issues related to their age. However as they progressed through the program they developed confidence in themselves and visualised themselves as having a long midwifery career. They were strongly

  16. Workplace culture and the practice experience of midwifery students: A meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arundell, Fiona; Mannix, Judy; Sheehan, Athena; Peters, Kath

    2018-04-01

    To describe midwifery students' practice experience and to explore facilitators and barriers to positive clinical learning experiences. Practice experience is a vital component of every midwifery course. Course dissatisfaction and attrition of midwifery students has been attributed to sub-optimal practice experiences. Events or actions experienced by midwifery students that trigger dissatisfaction and attrition need to be identified. A meta-synthesis was based on that developed by Noblit and Hare. Students perceive workplaces as poorly prepared for their arrival and subsequent support. Students' experience in the practice setting is influenced by the existing workplace culture. Workplace culture influences institutional functioning and individuals within the culture. Enculturation of students into the midwifery culture and subsequent learning is affected by the support received. The practice experience of midwifery students was profoundly influenced by workplace culture. Students tended to have polarized accounts of their experience that were predominantly negative. To provide an optimal environment for midwifery students; midwifery managers and individual midwives need to be aware of the facilitators and barriers to midwifery student development in the practice setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Shaping the midwifery profession in Nepal - Uncovering actors' connections using a Complex Adaptive Systems framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogren, Malin Upper; Berg, Marie; Edgren, Lars; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Wigert, Helena

    2016-12-01

    To explore how actors connect in a system aiming at promoting the establishment of a midwifery profession in Nepal. A qualitative explorative study based on the framework of Complex Adaptive Systems. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 key people representing eight different organisations (actors) promoting the development of the midwifery profession. The actors' connections can be described with a complex set of facilitators for and barriers to promoting the establishment of a midwifery profession. The identified facilitators for this establishment in Nepal are (1) a common goal and (2) a desire to collaborate, whilst the barriers are (1) different political interests and priorities, (2) competing interests of the nursing profession and societal views, (3) divergent academic opinions on a midwifery profession, and (4) insufficient communication. The results also showed that Nepalese society cannot distinguish between nursing and midwifery and that the public support for a midwifery profession was hence minimal. The move of midwifery from an occupation to a profession in Nepal is an on-going, challenging process. The study indicates the importance of understanding the motivations of, and barriers perceived by, actors that can promote or obstruct the establishment of the midwifery profession. It also points to the importance of informing the wider public about the role and responsibility of an autonomous midwifery profession. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Midwifery students learning experiences in labor wards: a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstad, Anne; Hjälmhult, Esther

    2014-12-01

    The labor ward is an important and challenging learning area for midwifery students. It is there the students learn in authentic complex situations, in intimate situations, with potential risk for the life and health of mothers and their babies. The aim of this study was to explore the main concern expressed by midwifery students in labor wards and how they handled this concern. A longitudinal study based on grounded theory methodology was used. The participants were 10 postgraduate midwifery students, from a University College in Norway. Data were gathered and analyzed throughout the 2-year postgraduate program, in the students first, third and fourth semesters. Every student was interviewed three times in a total of 15 single and three focus-group sessions. The grounded theory of "building relationships" explains how students dealt with their main concern: "how to gain access to learning experiences". This theory consisted of three strategies; a) controlling vulnerability, b) cultivating trust and c) obtaining acceptance. Clarifying discussions involving midwives and students may facilitate the process of building relationships and contribute to confident learning. Students appreciate it when the midwives initiate discussions about acute situations and state that a novice may perceive labor and childbirth as more frightening than an experienced midwife would. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Midwifery Legacies Project: history, progress, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Davis, Tonia L; McGee, Karen B; Moore, Elaine M; Paine, Lisa L

    2015-01-01

    The Midwifery Legacies Project, formerly known as the OnGoing Group, was founded as an annual greeting card outreach aimed at maintaining contact with midwives as they approached retirement and beyond. In 2009, the importance of documenting personal and professional stories of midwives arose out of a bequest by a midwife who was relatively unknown outside of the community she served. The result has been the evolution of a robust collection of stories, which are known as the 20th Century Midwife Story Collection. Between 2009 and 2014, more than 120 US midwives aged 65 years or older were interviewed by a midwife, a student midwife, or a professional filmmaker. Collectively, these midwives' stories offer an intimate snapshot of the social, political, and cultural influences that have shaped US midwifery during the past half century. Individually, the stories honor and recognize midwives' contributions to the profession and the women they have served. This article details the development, progress, and future directions of the Midwifery Legacies Project. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  20. Taiwanese women's experiences of hospital midwifery care: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Su-Chen; Wu, Cheng Jing; Mu, Pei-Fan

    2010-08-01

    to explore women's experiences in interaction with their midwives during their antenatal checks and during labour. a qualitative study using a phenomenological approach. Data were collected via tape-recorded interviews. All interviews were transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using Colaizzi's method for data analysis. the homes of the study participants in the district of a Taipei (Taiwan) teaching hospital. a purposive sample of 11 Taiwanese women, one primipara, and 10 multiparae, who were one to three months post-childbirth at the time of interview. five major themes revealed the essence of women's experiences of their interaction with a midwife during pregnancy and childbirth: (1) being respected, (2) being accompanied, (3) trust, (4) being satisfied, and (5) professional competence. the women recognised the service model of the midwife; they treasured their mutual relationships and the benefits that women derived from midwifery care during childbirth. In Taiwan, the government is mandated to offer midwifery models of care in hospitals, and to allow women to choose different types of care provider. an awareness of women's experiences will help identify the caring behaviours as recognised by the women and may help health-care professionals provide better support and care for women during the pregnancy and childbirth periods. These findings can serve as references for future midwifery practice models and improvements in quality of care. Crown Copyright 2008. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A mixed methods study to develop and pilot a competency assessment tool to support midwifery care of women with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beake, Sarah; Clark, Louise L; Turner, Toni; Bick, Debra

    2013-08-01

    Recent reports have highlighted the poor quality of health care received by people with intellectual disabilities (otherwise known as 'learning disabilities') in the United Kingdom (UK). UK Confidential Enquiries into maternal deaths have highlighted adverse pregnancy outcomes for women with intellectual disabilities and need for timely and appropriate clinical care. To develop and test a competency assessment tool to support midwifery care of women with intellectual disabilities. A mixed methods study. Large inner city maternity unit. Midwives and key experts in intellectual disabilities, maternity policy and midwifery education. Phase one comprised a systematic narrative review of the literature. Evidence identified informed phase two which included focus groups and interviews. Emergent themes informed the development of a competency assessment tool which was piloted in phase three. Phase one: Four primary research papers and two systematic reviews met the review inclusion criteria. Support to develop parenting skills of women with intellectual disabilities was highlighted as was the need to optimise organisation of maternity services. No studies specifically considered midwifery competencies to support women with intellectual disabilities. Phase two: 23 midwives attended three focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with national leaders in intellectual disability (n=6) and midwifery policy and education (n=7). Themes identified included need for individualised care provided by a known midwife, the importance of effective communication skills and need for clear knowledge and understanding of the legislative framework relevant to intellectual disability. Phase three: A convenience sample of 60 midwives was asked to participate in a pilot study to test the tool, 46 (77%) of whom responded. Thirty midwives (65%) felt competent in their ability to recognise intellectual disability and 37 (80%) competent or expert in understanding women have the right

  2. Evaluation of strategies designed to enhance student engagement and success of indigenous midwifery students in an Away-From-Base Bachelor of Midwifery Program in Australia: A qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Paula M; Dunne, Carmel L; Burdett-Jones, Denise; Gamble, Natalie S; Kosiak, Machellee M; Neal, Joclyn M; Baker, Gail E

    2018-04-01

    A strategy to close the gap in relation to Indigenous health is the employment of more Indigenous health professionals. However, despite government reviews, research studies and educational initiatives, Indigenous students' retention and completion rates of tertiary education remains below those of non-Indigenous Australians. To evaluate two enhancements to an Away-from-Base Bachelor of Midwifery program for Indigenous students, namely the appointment of an Indigenous Academic Liaison Midwife to provide academic and cultural support and an additional clinical placement in a high-volume tertiary hospital. In this qualitative study, 10 Indigenous students enrolled in the Away-from-Base Bachelor of Midwifery program participated in one of two focus groups. Focus group transcriptions were subjected to a manual thematic analysis, and key themes were identified and explored. The role of the Indigenous Academic Liaison Midwife was highly valued as students had access to a resource who provided cultural and academic support, and who encouraged and advocated for them. Regular contact with the Indigenous Academic Liaison Midwife enabled students to stay connected with and focussed on their study. Students were overwhelmingly positive about the opportunity to undertake the additional clinical placement, as it exposed them to complex clinical cases they may not have seen in their home communities. The introduction of an Indigenous Academic Liaison Midwife and an additional clinical placement in a high-volume tertiary hospital were perceived as valuable additions to the range of support mechanisms already in place for Indigenous Away-from-Base Bachelor of Midwifery students. These interventions have had a direct impact on retention, course progression and completion rates for Indigenous students. Students expressed enhanced clinical learning and knowledge retention as a result of the additional clinical placement, and the Indigenous Academic Liaison Midwife provided culturally

  3. A Qualitative Study on the Academic Approach to the Professionalization of Midwifery in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil GÜNER

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed as a qualitative descriptive study to map out the challenges and suggestions in regard to the problems of professionalization of midwifery in Turkey and it was presented as a master thesis in June 2012. The study was conducted in seven universities in Turkey which provided master programs in midwifery. The study participants included twenty faculty members in midwifery departments in these universities who consented to participate. An interview guide consisting of 10 semistructured open-ended questions was used as an instrument of data collection and interviews were recorded. The process of data collections was conducted as face-to-face interviews by a researcher between 28th June 2011-7th December 2011. The recordings were transformed into text. Written audio recording outputs were analyzed by the content analysis which is one of the qualitative data analysis method. Major problems of professionalization of midwifery in Turkey were found as incompetent legislative regulations in midwifery, insufficient professional organizations, problems of autonomy, and insufficient scientific researches in the field. The participants suggested updating the legislative regulations, opening doctoral programs in midwifery departments, strenghtening professional organizations, supporting clinical midwifes to conduct scientific researches. In light of the results, it was concluded that professionalization of midwifery has still certain structural problems. It is maintained that regulations to be made in line with the suggestions in this study will certainly enhance professionalization of midwifery. It was pointed out that it is required to support graduate programs in midwifery, to open new doctoral programs, to support midwifery departments in terms of equipment and human resources, to clarify job definitions, to decrease the number of students in these faculties and to enact legislative regulations in regard to midwifery profession.

  4. Feasibility of pulse oximetry for assessment of infants born in community based midwifery care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Ganzeboom, A.; Dawson, J.A.; Walther, F.J.; Bustraan, J.; van Roosmalen, Jos; te Pas, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using pulse oximetry (PO) for evaluating infants born in community-based midwifery care. Design: a prospective, observational study of infants born after midwifery supervised (home) births. Setting: 27 midwives from seven practices providing primary care in (home)

  5. Variation in home-birth rates between midwifery practices in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegers, T.A.; Zee, J. van der; Kerssens, J.J.; Keirse, M.J.N.C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: to examine the reasons for the variation in home-birth rates between midwifery practices. method: multi-level analysis of client and midwife associated, case-specific and structural factors in relation to 4420 planned and actual home or hospital births in 42 midwifery practices. Findings:

  6. Widening participation in nurse education: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslip, Vanessa; Board, Michele; Duckworth, Vicky; Thomas, Liz

    2017-12-01

    Widening participation into higher education is espoused within educational policy in the UK, and internationally, as a mechanism to promote equality and social mobility. As nurse education is located within higher education it has a responsibility to promote widening participation within pre-registration educational programmes. It could also be argued that the profession has a responsibility to promote equality to ensure its' workforce is as diverse as possible in order to best address the health needs of diverse populations. To undertake an integrative review on published papers exploring Widening Participation in undergraduate, pre-registration nurse education in the UK. A six step integrative review methodology was utilised, reviewing papers published in English from 2013-2016. Search of CINAHL, Education Source, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, SocINDEX, Science Direct, Business Source Complete, ERIC, British Library ETOS, Teacher Reference Centre, Informit Health Collection and Informit Humanities and Social Science Collection which highlighted 449 citations; from these 14 papers met the review inclusion criteria. Both empirical studies and editorials focusing upon widening participation in pre-registration nurse education in the UK (2013-2016) were included. Papers excluded were non UK papers or papers not focussed upon widening participation in pre-registration nursing education. Research papers included in the review were assessed for quality using appropriate critical appraisal tools. 14 papers were included in the review; these were analysed thematically identifying four themes; knowledge and identification of WP, pedagogy and WP, attrition and retention and career prospects. Whilst widening participation is a key issue for both nurse education and the wider profession there is a lack of conceptualisation and focus regarding mechanisms to both encourage and support a wider diversity of entrant. Whilst there are some studies, these focus on particular individual

  7. Freestanding midwifery units versus obstetric units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Charlotte; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Sandall, Jane

    2012-01-01

    prospectively and individually matched on nine selected obstetric/socio-economic factors to 839 low-risk women intending OU birth. Educational level was chosen as a proxy for social position. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Results Women intending to give birth in an FMU had a significantly higher...

  8. Optimizing Nursing and Midwifery Practice in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Following the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, the number of nurses remaining in practice in Rwanda was critically low. Since that time the leaders of Rwanda have worked diligently to increase both the number of nurses in Rwanda and their level of education. They have also set goals for the number of healthcare workers that ...

  9. Analysis of Self-esteem and Academic Achievement among the Midwifery Students of Mashhad School of Nursing and Midwifery in 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Rashidi Fakari; Mahin Tafazzoli

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The students’ academic achievement is of paramount significance for their future accomplishments. Academic achievement is associated with various effective factors, one of which is self-esteem. The current study was conducted to assess the correlation between self-esteem and academic achievement of the midwifery students at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Methods: This analytical study was carried out on the midwifery students of Mashhad School of Nursing and...

  10. The Practice of Midwifery in Rural US Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Hung, Peiyin

    2016-07-01

    Workforce shortages limit access to care for pregnant women in rural and remote areas. The goal of this analysis was to describe the role of certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) in providing maternity care in rural US hospitals and to examine state-level variation in rural CNM practice. We identified 306 rural hospitals with at least 10 births in 2010 using discharge data from the Statewide Inpatient Databases for 9 US states. We conducted a telephone survey of hospital maternity unit managers (N = 244) from November 2013 to March 2014 to understand their maternity care workforce and practice models. We describe the presence of CNMs attending births by hospital and state characteristics. Using logistic multivariate regression, we examined whether CNMs attend births, adjusting for hospital characteristics, practice regulations, and state. We also analyzed the content of open-ended responses about staffing plans, challenges, and opportunities that unit managers identified, with a focus on midwifery practice. CNMs attend births at one-third of rural maternity hospitals in 9 US states. Significant variability across states appears to be partially related to autonomous practice regulations: states allowing autonomous midwifery practice have a greater proportion of rural hospitals with midwives attending births (34% vs 28% without autonomous midwifery practice). In rural maternity hospitals, CNMs practice alongside obstetricians in 86%, and with family physicians in 44%, of hospitals. Fourteen percent of all respondents planned recruitment to increase the number of midwives at their hospital, although many, especially in smaller hospitals, noted challenges in doing so. CNMs play a crucial role in the maternity care workforce in rural US hospitals. The participation of CNMs in birth attendance varies by hospital birth volume and across state settings. Interprofessional practice is common for CNMs attending births in rural hospitals, and administrators hope to increase the

  11. Factors that influence nursing and midwifery students' intentions to study abroad: A qualitative study using the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Seán; FitzGerald, Serena; Hegarty, Josephine

    2016-09-01

    Future health care professionals need to be broadly-educated, adaptable individuals who have significant experience in the world beyond the classroom. Study abroad is an ideal means of developing some of the skills and attitudes that are not only valued among health professionals, but also have global applicability. Although internationalisation through study abroad is widely publicised as a preferred means of developing globally competent third level graduates very little is known about the factors that influence students' predisposition to study abroad, students decision making process and how various factors influence that process. To explore the motivating factors that influence nursing and midwifery student's intentions to study abroad. Qualitative descriptive. A third level institution in Ireland. A purposive sample (n=25) of undergraduate nursing and midwifery students. Data were obtained individually and in a free response format by means of an open ended belief elicitation questionnaire. The theory of planned behaviour was used a theoretical framework to guide both the structure of the questionnaire and the content analysis. The study's findings support earlier works in identifying the main behavioural, normative and control factors that influence a student's decision to study abroad and is the first study to recognise enhanced professional identity as a potential benefit of study abroad. Factors such as cultural sensitivity, employability, language and cost emerged as important issues in need of further investigation. The findings of this study have implications for administrators, academics, and others involved in the development of third level study abroad programmes for nursing and midwifery students. New methods which promote the perceived benefits of study abroad, address the perceived barriers and ultimately increase student participation are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Knowledge and reported confidence of final year midwifery students regarding giving advice on contraception and sexual health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susan H; Davis, Geraldine

    2014-05-01

    this study explored the views of three cohorts of final year midwifery students, regarding their confidence in giving advice to women on contraception and sexual health in the postnatal period. The project also investigated knowledge of contraception using a factual quiz, based on clinical scenarios regarding contraception and sexual health in the postpartum period. a mixed method design using qualitative data from focus groups, and mixed qualitative and quantitative data from a paper based questionnaire was used. the project was carried out in one higher educational institution in England. findings demonstrate that expressed confidence varies according to contraceptive method, with most confidence being reported when advising on the male condom. The findings of the factual quiz indicate that students applied theoretical knowledge poorly in a practically oriented context. These findings also indicated that most students limited advice to general advice. the paper concludes that midwifery students need more practically oriented education in contraception and sexual health, and that the role of mentors is very important in helping students feel confident when giving advice in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reflexivity in midwifery research: the insider/outsider debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elaine; Fenwick, Jennifer; Schmied, Virginia; Sheehan, Athena

    2012-02-01

    To explore the challenges of conducting an observational study of postnatal interactions, between midwives and women, when the researcher was a midwife observing in familiar midwifery settings. Participant observation conducted by researchers who are themselves midwives raises questions regarding the influence of 'identity' and 'insider' knowledge on the conduct of such projects. The insider/outsider status of researchers has been explored in other disciplines, yet this is an area which is underdeveloped in the midwifery literature where few attempts have been made to subject this issue to sustained analysis. A qualitative study (investigating the provision of breast-feeding support in the first week after birth) provided the opportunity for reflexive exploration of the tensions faced by midwife researchers. Two maternity units in New South Wales, Australia. Participants included 40 midwives and 78 breast-feeding women. Possessing 'insider' midwifery knowledge was advantageous in the 'getting in' and 'fitting in' phases of this research study however unanticipated role ambiguity, and moral and ethical challenges, arose as a result of this 'insider' knowledge and status. Prolonged periods of observation challenged the midwife researcher's preconceived ideas and early decisions about the advantages and disadvantages of being an 'insider' or an 'outsider' in the research setting. Reflexive analysis of insider/outsider experiences revealed the middle ground which participant observers tend to navigate. Whilst professional insider knowledge and status offered many advantages, especially at the first study setting, some of the inherent embodied, and socially constructed features of the 'midwife' observer role, were unanticipated. Cultural competence, in these observational study settings, translated into role ambiguity, and at times, culturally entrenched role expectations. Midwifery observation of clinical practice, for research, or practice development purposes

  14. Integrating communication skills training in the curricula of 5 healthcare professions: nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiography and midwifery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Tørring, Birgitte; Hansen, Susanne Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    for professionals. In the effort of integrating communication skills training in the undergraduate curricula of nursing, radiography, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and midwifery, we established a communication skills laboratory and arranged a 5 day course for communication teachers from all 5 educational......Structured training of communication skills are needed in undergraduate healthcare education in order to prepare the future professionals to cooperate with patients. Often education in communication is not integrated in the curriculum – making it seem a side activity of less importance...... programs at University College North Denmark. After the course communication skills training was offered at least once during every 3½ year program and after 3 years this is retained and in some cases developed further. The combination of getting a room where to train and developing the skills to train...

  15. The ethos of caring within midwifery: A history of ideas study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Åsa; Hilli, Yvonne

    2016-10-19

    The midwifery profession in Sweden has a history since the early 1700s when government training for midwives began. Midwifery is historically well described, but the idea of caring within midwifery is not described. The aim was to describe the patterns of ideas of caring as they appeared in midwifery during the first half of the 20th century. This study has a hermeneutic approach and the method is history of ideas. Sources of material are taken from the journal Jordemodern (Midwifery), textbooks for midwives, and midwifery regulations. The study has a caring science perspective according to Eriksson. This study is conducted in accordance with the ethical guidelines for good scientific practice issued by The Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity. The special demands on approach to the analyzed text in history of ideas have been met. Three themes were identified: Serving as a way of life, Acting in a redemptive spirit, and Having independence with heavy responsibility. The various themes are not refined, but current ideas are woven into the weave that were characteristic of midwifery during the first half of the 20th century. History of ideas is a fruitful method for understanding and re-finding valuable cultural goods. We can once more stress the manner of being within the midwife's profession where inner values, ethos, shape the manner of conduct in the care of women in childbirth. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Fathers' birth experience in relation to midwifery care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildingsson, Ingegerd; Cederlöf, Linnea; Widén, Sara

    2011-09-01

    The aim was to identify the proportion of fathers having a positive experience of a normal birth and to explore factors related to midwifery care that were associated with a positive experience. Research has mainly focused on the father's supportive role during childbirth rather than his personal experiences of birth. 595 new fathers living in a northern part of Sweden, whose partner had a normal birth, were included in the study. Data was collected by questionnaires. Odds Ratios with 95% confidence interval and logistic regression analysis were used. The majority of fathers (82%) reported a positive birth experience. The strongest factors associated with a positive birth experience were midwife support (OR 4.0; 95 CI 2.0-8.1), the midwife's ongoing presence in the delivery room (OR 2.0; 1.1-3.9), and information about the progress of labour (OR 3.1; 1.6-5.8). Most fathers had a positive birth experience. Midwifery support, the midwife's presence and sufficient information about the progress of labour are important aspects in a father's positive birth experience. The role of the midwife during birth is important to the father, and his individual needs should be considered in order to enhance a positive birth experience. Copyright © 2010 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing a blended learning program for nursing and midwifery students in Iran: Process and preliminary outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari, Mitra; Negarandeh, Reza; Eybpoosh, Sana

    2013-01-01

    Background: We aimed to develop and evaluate outcomes of a blended learning (BL) program for educating nursing and midwifery students of Tehran university of medical sciences (Tehran, Iran). Materials and Methods: This was a participatory action research project. After designing BL website, providing technological infrastructures, and holding preparatory workshops, 22 blended courses were designed. BL method was implemented for one semester. Students’ grade point average, participation with courses, and opinion about educational methods, and instructors’ attitude and opinion about educational methods were assessed. Results: Most students (n = 181; 72.1%) and 17 instructors (28.3%) consented to participate in the study. Students’ grade point average and participation was significantly higher in BL rather than in face-to-face method (P students preferred BL method and felt more independent in this method. However, they complained about lack of easy access to Internet and weakness in computer skills. Instructors admired the flexibility and incentives that had been provided in the program. However, some of them complained about the time-consuming nature of BL course design. Conclusion: The program showed positive effect on students’ learning outcomes and participation. The strengths and weaknesses of the program should be considered for development of next phase of the project. Lessons learned in this phase might be helpful for decision makers who tend to develop similar programs in Iran. Motivational and communicational issues and users’ IT skills should be addressed in every BL program. PMID:23983723

  18. Peer to peer mentoring: Outcomes of third-year midwifery students mentoring first-year students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Rosemarie; Fox, Deborah; Barratt-See, Georgina

    2017-06-01

    Undergraduate midwifery students commonly experience anxiety in relation to their first clinical placement. A peer mentoring program for midwifery students was implemented in an urban Australian university. The participants were first-year mentee and third-year mentor students studying a three-year Bachelor degree in midwifery. The program offered peer support to first-year midwifery students who had little or no previous exposure to hospital clinical settings. Mentors received the opportunity to develop mentoring and leadership skills. The aim was to explore the benefits, if any, of a peer mentoring program for midwifery students. The peer mentoring program was implemented in 2012. Sixty-three peer mentors and 170 mentees participated over three academic years. Surveys were distributed at the end of each academic year. Quantitative survey data were analysed descriptively and qualitative survey data were analysed thematically using NVivo 10 software. Over 80% of mentors and mentees felt that the program helped mentees adjust to their midwifery clinical placement. At least 75% of mentors benefited, in developing their communication, mentoring and leadership skills. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data, including 'Receiving start-up advice'; 'Knowing she was there' and 'Wanting more face to face time'. There is a paucity of literature on midwifery student peer mentoring. The findings of this program demonstrate the value of peer support for mentees and adds knowledge about the mentor experience for undergraduate midwifery students. The peer mentor program was of benefit to the majority of midwifery students. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Professional midwifery in Guatemala: A qualitative exploration of perceptions, attitudes and expectations among stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summer, Anna; Guendelman, Sylvia; Kestler, Edgar; Walker, Dilys

    2017-07-01

    Despite recommendations that women give birth with a skilled birth attendant (SBA), 70% of births in Guatemala occur outside health facilities with informally trained traditional birth attendants (TBAs). To increase SBA in rural, indigenous communities, a professional midwifery school accredited by the government is scheduled to open in 2017. Drawing from Filby's model on barriers to the successful integration of professional midwifery into health systems, this paper aims to identify threats - and facilitators-toward professional midwifery's re-introduction in Guatemala. To elucidate perceptions, attitudes and expectations towards professional midwifery, qualitative, in-depth interviews were conducted with 32 physicians, nurses, and TBAs in six health centers and with key decision makers and professional midwives (PMs) in Guatemala City. We conducted open and axial coding in Atlas.ti and performed normative comparisons of participants' attitudes, perceptions, and expectations with the National Vision for professional midwifery and relative comparisons within and across disciplinary subgroups. Unprompted, physicians, nurses and TBAs were unable to correctly define professional midwifery. Yet, when professional midwifery was defined for them, they expressed willingness to work with PMs, seeing them as a needed human resource, instrumental in providing intercultural care and strengthening facility relationships with TBAs. Some stakeholders anticipated resistance toward PMs due to provider turf issues. Notable differences in expectations among all groups included ideas for supervision of and by the PMs and the PM's role in monitoring women and conducting births in communities alongside TBAs. Facilitators to professional midwifery's success include national political will, stakeholders' uniformity of vision, and the potential for improved intercultural care. Barriers are mostly professional in nature, including impediments to autonomous practice by PMs, hierarchical

  20. 'Just waiting to be hauled over the coals': home birth midwifery in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBoyle, Colm

    2013-08-01

    to describe the context of Irish home birth midwives' practise experience. ethnography derived from participant observation, unstructured interview and documentary analysis. women and midwives' homes and meeting places in Ireland. 21 self-employed community midwives. choice of place of birth is extremely limited in Ireland. Structural and professional supports for home birth and midwifery are lacking. Home birth midwives highly value midwifery professionalism but are professionally isolated. They promote women's birthing autonomy and choice of place of birth. However, they experience and anticipate negative, even punitive, responses from their own and other professions. This ethnography describes a particularly volatile period in Irish home birth midwifery practice. Irish home birth midwives are professionally isolated which, given wider cultural antagonism to home birth, perfuses their practice with an element of defensiveness. Strong midwifery association is a key pillar of professionalism globally. In Ireland, the lack of a strong professional body undermines autonomous midwifery practice in all settings but particularly in the home. The midwifery philosophy of 'being with woman' appears to run contrary to professionalising discourses where the professional 'knows best'. Contemporary cultural expectations of professionalism such as clinical indemnification and risk averse practice protocols, bring challenges to autonomous midwifery practice. place and context of birth effects not only the woman's birth experience but the midwife's professional autonomy. Without supports for autonomous midwifery, autonomous birthing is under threat. Place of birth effects birth experience and birth quality, not least because it is that context which also influences, for good or ill, midwifery autonomy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationships between work-related characteristics, needs satisfaction, motivation and mental health in midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrand, Claude; Courtois, Robert; Martinent, Guillaume; Rivière, Michèle; Rusch, Emmanuel

    2017-07-01

    The present study examined the relationships between work-related characteristics in internships, psychological needs satisfaction, motivation and mental health using a partial least squares path modeling. Midwifery students (N = 214; M age = 22.8 years) from three French schools completed different questionnaires online. Results showed (1) the importance of work resources (work control and social support) as protective factors of psychological needs satisfaction; and (2) the role of competence need satisfaction through motivation in the relationships between work resources and mental health. Midwifery schools should pay more attention to these two results, and take them into account in midwifery students' training.

  2. Efficacy of teaching methods used to develop critical thinking in nursing and midwifery undergraduate students: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Creedy, Debra K; Sidebotham, Mary

    2016-05-01

    The value and importance of incorporating strategies that promote critical thinking in nursing and midwifery undergraduate programmes are well documented. However, relatively little is known about the effectiveness of teaching strategies in promoting CT. Evaluating effectiveness is important to promote 'best practise' in teaching. To evaluate the efficacy of teaching methods used to develop critical thinking skills in nursing and midwifery undergraduate students. The following six databases; CINAHL, Ovid Medline, ERIC, Informit, PsycINFO and Scopus were searched and resulted in the retrieval of 1315 papers. After screening for inclusion, each paper was evaluated using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. Twenty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria and quality appraisal. Twelve different teaching interventions were tested in 8 countries. Results varied, with little consistency across studies using the same type of intervention or outcome tool. Sixteen tools were used to measure the efficacy of teaching in developing critical thinking. Seventeen studies identified a significant increase in critical thinking, while nine studies found no increases, and two found unexplained decreases in CT when using a similar educational intervention. Whilst this review aimed to identify effective teaching strategies that promote and develop critical thinking, flaws in methodology and outcome measures contributed to inconsistent findings. The continued use of generalised CT tools is unlikely to help identify appropriate teaching methods that will improve CT abilities of midwifery and nursing students and prepare them for practise. The review was limited to empirical studies published in English that used measures of critical thinking with midwifery and nursing students. Discipline specific strategies and tools that measure students' abilities to apply CT in practise are needed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing midwifery practice through work-based learning: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jayne E

    2012-09-01

    To explore what effect the introduction of a Work-Based Learning Module undertaken by midwives in a range of maternity settings has had on their personal professional development, as well as the impact on developing local maternity and neonatal care provision. A case study approach was used consisting of mixed methods. Quantitative data were collected through questionnaires from midwives and their Clinical Supervisors at the end of the module, with a survey questionnaire to each midwifery manager, six months following the implementation of the midwives' project in practice. Qualitative data were collected by focus groups at six different work place locations, with health professionals who had experienced the midwives' projects within the workplace. Quantitative data were manually analysed whereas content analysis was used to identify recurrent themes from the qualitative data, with the support of Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software. The University of Nottingham granted ethical approval for the study. Twelve midwives who undertook the work-based module, their respective Clinical Supervisors (n = 12), their employers/managers (n = 12) and health professionals (n = 28) within six individual National Health Service Trusts in the East Midlands of the United Kingdom took part in the study. The work-based learning module not only led to the personal and professional development of the midwife, but also to improving multi-professional collaboration and the consequential development of maternity services within the local Trusts. The value of leading change by completing an innovative and tangible work-based project through a flexible mode of study strengthened the midwives' clinical credibility among colleagues and employers and supports the philosophy of inter-professional learning and working. This novel Work Based approach to learning has the potential to further develop the provision of post-registration education for midwives and other health

  4. The iPad: tablet technology to support nursing and midwifery student learning: an evaluation in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Janie; McCrorie, Pamela

    2015-03-01

    This research explored the impact of tablet technology, in the form of Apple iPads, on undergraduate nursing and midwifery students' learning outcomes. In simulated clinical learning environments, first-year nursing students (n = 30) accessed apps and reference materials on iPads. Third-year nursing students (n = 88) referred to clinical guidelines to aid their decision making when problem solving. First-year midwifery students (n = 25) filmed themselves undertaking a skill and then immediately played back the video file. A total of 45 students completed an online questionnaire that allowed for qualitative comments. Students reported finding the use of iPads easy and that iPads provided point-of-care access to resources, ensuring an evidence-based approach to clinical decision making. iPads reportedly improved student efficiency and time management, while improving their ability to provide patient education. Students who used iPads for the purpose of formative self-assessment appreciated the immediate feedback and opportunity to develop clinical skills.

  5. Teaching evidence based practice and research through blended learning to undergraduate midwifery students from a practice based perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Sidebotham; Julie, Jomeen; Jennifer, Gamble

    2014-03-01

    The international world of higher education is changing with universities now offering students flexible delivery options that allow them to study away from campus and at a time convenient to them. Some students prefer on line learning while others prefer face to face contact offered through a traditional lecture and tutorial delivery modes. The response by many universities is to offer a blend of both. While online and blended mode of delivery may be suitable for some subjects there is little knowledge of the efficacy of blended learning models to teach evidence based practice and research (EBPR) to undergraduate midwifery students. EBPR is a challenging, threshold level subject upon which deeper knowledge and skills are built. This paper describes the design, delivery, and evaluation of an undergraduate EBPR course delivered in blended mode to first year midwifery students. Components of the blended learning innovation included: novel teaching strategies, engaging practical activities, role play, and e-learning strategies to maintain engagement. University-based course evaluation outcomes revealed very positive scores and the course was rated within the top ten percent of all courses offered within the Health Group at the host University. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Study on the learning Styles of Nursing and Midwifery Students in Yasuj According to the VARK Model (2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Behnam Moghadam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: learning style(s is one of the factors effective learning. Information about students learning styles can aid the presentation of teaching appropriate to their individual style. The purpose of this study was to determine the learning styles of Yasuj nursing and midwifery students based on the VARK model in 2013. Methods: The present research was a descriptive- analytical study which was conducted on 140 students from nursing and midwifery faculty of Yasuj university of Medical Sciences in the academic year of 2013. Sampling was done using census method, and data were collected using demographic information questionnaire followed by questionnaire of learning styles. The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 18, and descriptive- inferential statistics. Results: The mean age of the students was 20.68±1.34. Of the total of 140 students, 98 (70% just selected only one type of the learning styles, whereas, 42 students preferred combination of different styles. Reading-writing style was the prevailing style among single learning style which selected by 43 students but the most frequent style among multi style was double style which was selected only by 15% of the participants. Conclusion: Most of the students had an individual learning style. Identifying the dominant learning style(s of the students and adjusting them to the teaching methods of lecturers and also developing lesson plans based on learning styles could improve educational objectives.

  7. Determination of national midwifery ethical values and ethical codes: in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Ayla; Özcan, Müesser; Acar, Zeynep; Ersoy, Nermin; Karahan, Nazan

    2013-11-01

    It is important to define and practice ethical rules and codes for professionalisation. Several national and international associations have determined midwifery ethical codes. In Turkey, ethical rules and codes that would facilitate midwifery becoming professionalised have not yet been determined. This study was planned to contribute to the professionalisation of midwifery by determining national ethical values and codes. A total of 1067 Turkish midwives completed the survey. The most prevalent values of Turkish midwives were care for mother-child health, responsibility and professional adequacy. The preferred professional codes chosen by Turkish midwives were absence of conflicts of interest, respect for privacy, avoidance of deception, reporting of faulty practices, consideration of mothers and newborns as separate beings and prevention of harm. In conclusion, cultural values, beliefs and expectations of society cannot be underestimated, although the international professional values and codes of ethics contribute significantly to professionalisation of the midwifery profession.

  8. A qualitative study of how caseload midwifery is constituted and experienced by Danish midwives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Mark, Edith; Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

    2016-01-01

    and pressure to perform well and the disadvantages to the midwives׳ personal lives are counterbalanced by the feeling of doing a meaningful and important job. Working in caseload midwifery creates a feeling of working in a self-governing model within the public hospital, without losing the technological...... benefits of a modern birth unit. Midwives in caseload midwifery worked on welcoming and including all pregnant women allocated to their care; even women/families where relationships with the midwives were challenging were recognised and respected. KEY CONCLUSIONS: caseload midwifery is a work...... for the personal life of the midwife, but benefits were found to outweigh disadvantages. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: In expanding caseload midwifery, it is necessary to understand that the midwives׳ personal lives need to be prepared for this work-form. The number of women per full time midwife has to be surveilled...

  9. A qualitative study of how caseload midwifery is constituted and experienced by Danish midwives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard; Nøhr, Ellen Ågaard

    is essential to women (1, 2, 3) and because evidence shows that continuity of care seems to promote uncomplicated births (4-8). International studies indicate that midwives’ perspectives on caseload midwifery are varied (9-11). Purpose/Objective: The aim of this study is to advance knowledge about the working...... and pressure to perform well and the disadvantages to the midwives’ personal lives are counterbalanced by the feeling of doing a meaningful and important job. Working in caseload midwifery creates a feeling of working in a self-governing model within the public hospital, without losing the technological...... benefits of a modern birth unit. Midwives in caseload midwifery worked on welcoming and including all pregnant women allocated to their care. Discussion: In expanding caseload midwifery, it is necessary to understand that the midwives’ personal lives need to be prepared for this work-form. The number...

  10. A qualitative study of how caseload midwifery is experienced by couples in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Mark, Edith; Foureur, Maralyn

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caseload midwifery is expanding in Denmark. There is a need for elaborating in-depth, how caseload midwifery influences the partner and the woman during childbirth and how this model of care influences the early phases of labour. AIM: To follow, explore and elaborate women's and their...... and acknowledged and experienced working in a team with the midwife. Caseload midwifery was able to solve problems concerning labour onset or gaining access to the labour ward....... was that the woman was at risk of being disappointed if her expectations of having a known midwife at birth were not fulfilled. KEY CONCLUSIONS: From the perspective of women and their partners, attending caseload midwifery meant being recognised and cared for as an individual. The partner felt included...

  11. Fear, an unpleasant experience among undergraduate midwifery students: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Golnoosh; Shahriari, Mohsen; Kohan, Shahnaz; Keyvanara, Mahmood

    2018-03-01

    Fear is a normal emotion that can evoke an appropriate response when facing threat. However, sometimes the consequences of fear can lead to responses that are maladaptive. Fear can have negative effects on learning. Research has focused on the experience of fear and its consequences among midwifery students during their undergraduate program. A qualitative analysis was conducted of interviews with ten midwifery students in different years of an undergraduate program. The data was analyzed through a content analysis approach. Two main categories and five subcategories emerged. The first category, areas of fear in midwifery students, consisted of the following subcategories: fear of doing harm, fear of encountering their first childbirth, and fear of penalties. The second category, consequences of fear, consisted of the following subcategories: general physical and psychological consequences and interference in adopting the professional role. In this study, fear not only raised the students' stress levels thereby, leading to physical and psychological issues but also hindered their adoption of their professional role. These findings will potentially inform support and retention strategies within midwifery undergraduate programs in the future. Maternity care in Iran is provided mainly within a medical model of care. The majority of women give birth in hospital, where care is provided by midwives who work under the direction and supervision of an obstetrician. Midwives within the medically dominated system lack autonomy and have very little opportunity to gain experience in providing continuity of care for women as midwife-led models of care are rare. This practice context means that midwifery students have very little opportunity to gain experience in autonomous midwifery practice. Midwifery undergraduate program in Iran is for four years. Admission to the undergraduate program is implemented via a direct entry route. Nearly all of the midwifery students are school

  12. The Evolution of World Health Organization's Initiatives for the Strengthening of Nursing and Midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa; Fumincelli, Laís; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora

    2015-09-01

    To describe the evolution in the resolutions approved by World Health Organization (WHO)'s World Health Assembly (WHA) to strengthen nursing and midwifery. Qualitative and descriptive study, undertaken through a search of resolutions presented by WHA, on the WHO website, regarding the theme "strengthening of nursing and midwifery." The resolutions on the theme "nursing and midwifery" were included, whose titles were available and whose full texts were accessed, excluding those on general health themes. The key words used were resolutions, strengthening, and nursing and midwifery. Among the 20 resolutions found, 12 were selected, adopted between 1948 and 2013, in accordance with the study inclusion criteria. The data were interpreted using thematic qualitative analysis, identifying and grouping the data in categories related to the study theme. Based on the content analysis of the 12 resolutions studied, three thematic categories were defined: "nursing and midwifery in primary health"; "role of nursing and midwifery in health for all"; and "nurses and midwives' professional training." Based on the categories, the evolution in the strengthening of nursing and midwifery was demonstrated through the initiatives and resolutions approved by WHA, highlighting the importance of nurses and midwives as multiprofessional health team members and their fundamental role in the improvements of the health system. Therefore, in accordance with the needs of each country, the member states can implement strategies presented by the WHA resolutions to strengthen nursing and midwifery services. This study has relevance for the development of health policies considering the relevant contributions of nurses and midwives to healthcare systems and services, based on the analysis of WHO resolutions involving these professions. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. The Five Attributes of a Supportive Midwifery Practice Climate: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumm, E Brie; Flynn, Linda

    2018-01-01

    A supportive work climate is associated with decreased burnout and attrition, and increased job satisfaction and employee health. A review of the literature was conducted in order to determine the unique attributes of a supportive practice climate for midwives. The midwifery literature was reviewed and synthesized using concept analysis technique guided by literature from related professions. The search was conducted primarily in PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Articles were included if they were conducted between 2006 and 2016 and addressed perceptions of the midwifery practice climate as it related to patient, provider, and organizational outcomes. The literature identified 5 attributes consistent with a supportive midwifery practice climate: effective leadership, adequate resources, collaboration, control of one's work, and support of the midwifery model of care. Effective leadership styles include situational and transformational, and 9 traits of effective leaders are specified. Resources consist of time, personnel, supplies, and equipment. Collaboration encompasses relationships with all members of the health care team, including midwives inside and outside of one's practice. Additionally, the patients are considered collaborating members of the team. Characteristics of effective collaboration include a shared vision, role clarity, and respectful communication. Support for the midwifery model of care includes value congruence, developing relationships with women, and providing high-quality care. The attributes of a supportive midwifery practice climate are generally consistent with theoretical models of supportive practice climates of advanced practice nurses and physicians, with the exception of a more inclusive definition of collaboration and support of the midwifery model of care. The proposed Midwifery Practice Climate Model can guide instrument development, determining relationships between the attributes of the practice climate and

  14. Making midwives: postmodern conditions and midwifery training in Saint Lucia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C

    2001-01-01

    Drawing on material from fieldwork conducted on the island of Saint Lucia, I examine how Saint Lucian nurse-midwives and student midwives negotiate multiple ways of understanding and evaluating their practices and roles in light of contradictory and powerful cultural, historical, and political forces. I argue that, although Saint Lucian nurse-midwives may not qualify as "postmodern" according to the criteria proposed by Davis-Floyd and Davis (1996), they are nonetheless struggling with postmodern conditions as they negotiate between competing healing ideologies. I illustrate the significance of these negotiations through analyzing: (1) the ways nurse-midwives understand and articulate the healing ideologies at play in Saint Lucia, (2) historical and ideological aspects of the Saint Lucian nurse-midwifery training program, and (3) a classroom discussion during which student reported on "bush-midwives."

  15. The development of a caseload midwifery service in rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tara; Longman, Jo; Kornelsen, Jude; Barclay, Lesley

    2017-08-01

    The past two decades have seen progressive decline in the number of rural birthing services across Australia. Despite health system pressures on small birthing units to close there have been examples of resistance and survival. This descriptive study explored the evolution of a rural birthing service in a small town to offer insight into the process of transition which may be helpful to other small healthcare services in rural Australia. Quantitative data derived from birth registers on number and types of birth from 1993-2011 were analysed. Interviews were conducted between January and August 2012 with nine participants (GP obstetricians, midwives, a health service manager and a consumer representative). This rural maternity service developed gradually from a GP obstetrician-led service to a collaborative care team approach with midwifery leadership. This development was in response to a changing rural medical workforce, midwifery capacity and the needs and wants of women in the local community. Four major themes were developed from interview data: (1) development of the service (2) drivers of change (3) outcomes and (4) collaborative care and inter-professional practice. The success of this transition was reported to rest on strategic planning and implementation and respectful inter-professional practice and alignment of birth philosophy across the team. This team created a unified, progressive community-focused birthing service. The development of collaborative care models that embrace and build on established inter-professional relationships can maximise existing rural workforce potential and create a sustainable rural service into the future. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Women's Suggestions for Improving Midwifery Care in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Carien I; Erwich, Jan Jaap H M; Wiegers, Therese A; de Cock, T Paul; Hutton, Eileen K

    2015-12-01

    The experience of the care a woman receives during pregnancy and childbirth has an immediate and long-lasting effect on her well being. The involvement of patients and clients in health care has increased over the last decades. The Dutch maternity care system offers an excellent opportunity to explore and involve women's suggestions for the improvement of midwifery care in the current maternity care model. This qualitative study is part of the "DELIVER" study. Clients were recruited from 20 midwifery practices. Purposive sampling was used to select the practices. The clients received up to three questionnaires, in which they could respond to the question; "Do you have any suggestions on how your midwife could improve his/her provision of care?" The answers were analyzed with a qualitative thematic content analysis, using the software program MAXQDA. Altogether, 3,499 answers were provided. One overarching concept emerged: clients' desire for individualized care. Within this concept, suggestions could be clustered around 1) provider characteristics: interpersonal skills, communication, and competence, and 2) service characteristics: content and quantity of care, guidance and support, continuity of care provider, continuity of care, information, and coordination of care. Informed by the suggestions of women, care to women and their families could be improved by the following: 1) more continuity of the care provider during the prenatal, natal, and postnatal periods, 2) more information and information specifically tailored for the person, 3) client-centered communication, and 4) a personal approach with 5) enough time spent per client. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A methodological review of qualitative case study methodology in midwifery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchan, Marjorie; Davis, Deborah; Foureur, Maralyn

    2016-10-01

    To explore the use and application of case study research in midwifery. Case study research provides rich data for the analysis of complex issues and interventions in the healthcare disciplines; however, a gap in the midwifery research literature was identified. A methodological review of midwifery case study research using recognized templates, frameworks and reporting guidelines facilitated comprehensive analysis. An electronic database search using the date range January 2005-December 2014: Maternal and Infant Care, CINAHL Plus, Academic Search Complete, Web of Knowledge, SCOPUS, Medline, Health Collection (Informit), Cochrane Library Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, Wiley online and ProQuest Central. Narrative evaluation was undertaken. Clearly worded questions reflected the problem and purpose. The application, strengths and limitations of case study methods were identified through a quality appraisal process. The review identified both case study research's applicability to midwifery and its low uptake, especially in clinical studies. Many papers included the necessary criteria to achieve rigour. The included measures of authenticity and methodology were varied. A high standard of authenticity was observed, suggesting authors considered these elements to be routine inclusions. Technical aspects were lacking in many papers, namely a lack of reflexivity and incomplete transparency of processes. This review raises the profile of case study research in midwifery. Midwives will be encouraged to explore if case study research is suitable for their investigation. The raised profile will demonstrate further applicability; encourage support and wider adoption in the midwifery setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Midwives' experiences of labour care in midwifery units. A qualitative interview study in a Norwegian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogheim, Gry; Hanssen, Tove A

    2015-12-01

    In some economically developed countries, women's choice of birth care and birth place is encouraged. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of midwives who started working in alongside/free-standing midwifery units (AMU/FMU) and their experiences with labour care in this setting. A qualitative explorative design using a phenomenographic approach was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten strategically sampled midwives working in midwifery units. The analysis revealed the following five categories of experiences noted by the midwives: mixed emotions and de-learning obstetric unit habits, revitalising midwifery philosophy, alertness and preparedness, presence and patience, and coping with time. Starting to work in an AMU/FMU can be a distressing period for a midwife. First, it may require de-learning the medical approach to birth, and, second, it may entail a revitalisation (and re-learning) of birth care that promotes physiological birth. Midwifery, particularly in FMUs, requires an especially careful assessment of the labouring process, the ability to be foresighted, and capability in emergencies. The autonomy of midwives may be constrained also in AMUs/FMUs. However, working in these settings is also viewed as experiencing "the art of midwifery" and enables revitalisation of the midwifery philosophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Making of Informed Choice in Midwifery: A Feminist Experiment in Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Margaret E

    2017-11-15

    This paper is about the clinical principle of informed choice-the hallmark feature of the midwifery model of care in Ontario, Canada. Drawing on ethnographic history interviews with midwives, I trace the origins of the idea of informed choice to its roots in the social movement of midwifery in North America in the late 1960s and 1970s. At that time informed choice was not the distinctive feature of midwifery but was deeply embedded what I call midwifery's feminist experiment in care. But as midwifery in Ontario transitioned from a social movement to a full profession within the formal health care system, informed choice was strategically foregrounded in order to make the midwifery model of care legible and acceptable to a skeptical medical profession, conservative law makers, and a mainstream clientele. As mainstream biomedicine now takes up the rhetoric of patient empowerment and informed choice, this paper is at once a nuanced history of the making of the concept and also a critique of the ascendant 'regime of choice' in contemporary health care, inspired by the reflections of the midwives in my study for whom choice is impossible without care.

  20. Learning to be a midwife in the clinical environment; tasks, clinical practicum hours or midwifery relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Lyn; Tierney, Olivia; Jones, Donovan

    2016-01-01

    Discussions continue within the midwifery profession around the number of and type of clinical experiences required to ensure competent midwifery graduates. Introduction of the three year Bachelor of Midwifery in Australia, almost two decades ago, was intended to reduce the pressure students were under to complete their academic requirements whilst ensuring students developed midwifery practice that encapsulates the philosophical values of midwifery. Currently, midwifery students are mandated to achieve a minimum number of clinical skills and Continuity of Care Experience (CCE) relationships in order to register upon completion of their degree. To achieve these experiences, universities require students to complete a number of clinical practicum hours. Furthermore students are required to demonstrate competent clinical performance of a number of clinical skills. However, there is no evidence to date that a set number of experiences or hours ensures professional competence in the clinical environment. The aim of this paper is to promote discussion regarding the mandated requirements for allocated clinical practicum hours, specified numbers of clinical-based skills and CCE relationships in the context of learning to be a midwife in Australia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Exercise of essential competencies for midwifery care by nurses in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narchi, Nadia Zanon

    2011-02-01

    GENERAL OBJECTIVE: to analyse the exercise of essential competencies for midwifery care by nurses and/or midwives in the public health system of São Paulo (eastern zone), Brazil. to develop a profile of the public health institutions and of the nurses and/or midwives who care for women before, during and following childbirth; to identify the activities performed in providing such care, as well as their frequency; and to specify the possible obstacles or difficulties encountered by them when exercising their competencies. a descriptive and exploratory research design, using a quantitative approach. the study was conducted in all public health services of São Paulo (eastern zone), Brazil, namely 59 basic health-care units and six hospitals, during the period of October 2006-December 2007. the study population consisted of 272 nurses and/or midwives who provide care for pregnant women and newborns at the primary health-care units and maternity hospitals of the public health system. Participants comprised 100% of hospital nurse coordinators (n=6), 61% of hospital maternity nursing and/or midwifery staff (n=62) and 64% (n=204) of nursing and/or midwifery staff working at primary health-care units. the data collection was based on a single form given to the coordinators and two questionnaires, one handed out to antenatal and postnatal nursing and/or midwifery staff and another handed out to labour and birth nursing and/or midwifery staff. The results showed that nurses and/or midwives providing care for women during pregnancy, labour, birth and the postnatal period did not put the essential competencies for midwifery care into practice, because they encountered institutional barriers and personal resistance, and lacked protocols based on best practice and on the exercise of essential competencies needed for effective midwifery care. the model of care in the public health services of São Paulo (eastern zone) is based much more on hierarchical positions than on

  2. Addressing the midwifery workforce crisis: evaluating an employment model for undergraduate midwifery students at a tertiary maternity hospital in Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Helen L; Forster, Della A; Ford, Rachael L; Farrell, Tanya

    2011-12-01

    In Victoria, maternity services are under significant strain due to increased numbers of women giving birth and critical workforce shortages. Hospitals have experienced challenges in adequately staffing maternity units, particularly on postnatal wards. In 2008, a tertiary maternity hospital in Melbourne introduced a model where undergraduate midwifery students were employed as Division 2 nurses (SMW_Div2) (enrolled nurses), to work in the postnatal area only. This study explored the pilot employment model from the perspective of the SMW_Div2 and hospital midwives. A web-based survey was administered to hospital midwives and the SMW_Div2s in the employment model in January 2010. The survey explored the views of midwives and SMW_Div2s regarding the perceived impact of the model on workforce readiness, recruitment and retention, and clinical competence and confidence. Forty-seven of 158 midwives (30%) and five of nine SMW_Div2s employed in the model responded to the survey. Both groups considered the model to have benefits for the organisation, including increased: student workforce readiness; clinical confidence and competence; and organisational loyalty. Both groups also considered that the model would facilitate: workforce recruitment; a teaching and learning culture within the organisation; and enhanced partnerships between students, hospitals and universities. Caution was expressed regarding workload and the need for ongoing support for SMW_Div2s working in the model. SMW_Div2s and midwives were positive about the introduction of the paid employment model at the Women's. The findings are consistent with evaluations of similar programs in the nursing setting. The employment model has potential short and long term individual and organisational advantages, which is important in the context of increasing births and workforce shortages. Progression of such models will be contingent on the collaboration and cooperation of the various stakeholders involved in maternity

  3. Fear of childbirth: mothers' experiences of team-midwifery care - a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyberg, Anne; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate mothers' fear of childbirth and their experiences of the team-midwifery care model during pregnancy, childbirth and the postnatal period. Maternal anxiety and fear of childbirth lead to emotional suffering and affected women's well-being. A previous negative experience of childbirth may result in postnatal depression or avoidance of future pregnancies. This hermeneutic study comprised interviews with 13 women, which were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim, after which interpretative content analysis was performed. Ethical approval was granted. The findings revealed one main theme: The woman's right to ownership of the pregnancy, childbirth and postnatal care as a means of maintaining dignity and three themes; Being aware of barriers and reasons for fear; Being prepared for childbirth and Being confirmed and treated with dignity by the midwife. Each theme contained several sub-themes. The findings contribute insights into how midwives can be educated to reduce fear of childbirth and promote positive birth experiences, despite the existence of negative memories of previous births. In order to achieve continuity and a trusting relationship it is necessary to organise leadership and to adopt models that are flexible and support women's health.

  4. Do you use social media? A study into new nursing and midwifery graduates' uptake of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckett, Anthony; Turner, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Social media use is expanding rapidly, so too is its use within hospitals and amongst healthcare professionals. This study describes the use of social media by Australian and New Zealand nursing and midwifery graduates of the Graduate e-Cohort study; there were 112 (93%) respondents from a 2014 sample of 121 nurses and midwives. Findings suggest that the professional peak body goal of using social media as a vehicle for professional education requires consideration of the social media platforms that are actually being used by new graduates. We recommend that work by the respective professions at both an undergraduate and graduate level needs to focus on the implications of social media use or policy and practice to ensure that everyone is aware of when and how to engage in social media platforms and what to do and how to behave when using social media. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. The relationship between perceived stress and gastrointestinal symptoms in nursing and midwifery students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Huseyin Cam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Students are subjected to different kinds of stressors, such as the pressure of academics with an obligation, an uncertain future and difficulties of integrating into the system. Although nursing and midwifery students experience a high level of stress during their training, there has been limited research on stress and its impact on the student's physical responses, such as gastrointestinal symptoms. The aims of this study are to assess the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in nursing and midwifery students and to examine the association between the perceived stress and gastrointestinal symptoms. Methods: This performed using cross-sectional descriptive study design study enrolled a total of 449 students participates in the study in a university degree program was carried out on 366 nursing and midwifery students accepted. A personal information questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale and a Gastrointestinal Symptoms Questionnaire were administered through a self-reported system. Results: Seventy point two percent of the nursing and midwifery students experienced at least one gastrointestinal symptom, with 35.8% of students reporting at least three gastrointestinal symptoms. Most of the nursing and midwifery students complained of upper dysmotility and bowel symptoms. In addition, students who reported higher perceived stress were significantly more likely to complain of gastrointestinal symptoms. Compared to students with the lowest perceived stress level, the adjusted odds ratio for gastrointestinal symptoms in students with the highest perceived stress level was 6.45 times higher. Conclusions: Gastrointestinal symptoms that are highly prevalent among nursing and midwifery students are significantly associated with the perceived stress level. High perceived stress should be considered a risk factor for gastrointestinal symptoms. Based on the study findings, there is a critical need of instructing the nursing and midwifery students

  6. Are we failing to prepare nursing and midwifery students to deal with domestic abuse? Findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Broadhurst, Karen

    2015-09-01

    To investigate student nurses' and midwives' knowledge, confidence and educational needs regarding recognition and responses to domestic abuse. Domestic abuse is a serious global problem and has greater, negative effects on long-term health than more obvious diseases, such as diabetes. Nurses and midwives are well-placed to recognize and respond to domestic abuse but many lack confidence in this area. There is firm evidence that training can increase the confidence of Registered Nurses and midwives in responding to domestic abuse. But the issue of undergraduate preparation is significantly under-investigated. A qualitative study. Nursing and midwifery students were recruited using purposive sampling. We facilitated eight focus groups with a total of 55 students (student midwives N = 32; student nurses n = 23). Data were collected between May-November 2014. Students in the study viewed the issue of domestic abuse as important and they possessed sound theoretical knowledge of its nature and consequences. However, they lacked confidence in recognizing and responding to abuse and were concerned about the implications of this for their future practice as registered practitioners. Interactive learning opportunities that engaged with service users and involved experts from practice were viewed as important educational requirements. Most students in the study felt insufficiently prepared to deal with the issue of domestic abuse. They perceived this as a cyclical state of disempowerment that would impact negatively on their practice and on their own ability to support nursing and midwifery students of the future. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Clinical nursing and midwifery research: grey literature in African countries.

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    Sun, C; Dohrn, J; Omoni, G; Malata, A; Klopper, H; Larson, E

    2016-03-01

    This study reviewed grey literature to assess clinical nursing and midwifery research conducted in southern and eastern African countries over the past decade. The shortage of published nursing research from African countries severely limits the ability of practicing nurses and midwives to base clinical decisions on solid evidence. However, little is known regarding unpublished or unindexed clinical research ('grey literature'), a potentially rich source of information. Identifying these sources may reveal resources to assist nurses in providing evidence-based care. This scoping review of grey literature on clinical nursing and midwifery research in southern and eastern African countries helped to identify gaps in research and assess whether these gaps differ from published research. Systematic searches of grey literature were performed. Research was included if it was conducted by nurses in 1 of 25 southern or eastern African countries, between 2004 and 2014 and included patient outcomes. Data were extracted on location, institution, research topic, institutional connections and author information. Chi-square tests were performed to compare differences between indexed and non-indexed literature. We found 262 studies by 287 authors from 17 southern and eastern African countries covering 13 topics. Although all topics were also found in indexed literature and there were statistically significant differences between the number of times, fewer topics were covered in grey literature vs. indexed. Patient satisfaction and experience and traditional health practices were more likely to be published, whereas chronic disease, assault and paediatric-related research were less often published. Generally, there is a paucity of clinical nursing research in this region. This could reflect the shortage of nurses prepared to conduct research in this region. Nurses may find additional resources for evidence in the grey literature. A complete understanding of the state of nursing

  8. A case study evaluation of an intervention aiming to strengthen the midwifery professional role in Morocco: anticipated barriers to reaching outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Malham, Sabina; Hatem, Marie; Leduc, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to reduce the high maternal mortality ratio, Morocco is strongly committed to strengthen its midwifery professional role. This study aimed to identify barriers that could potentially hinder an action plan to strengthen the midwifery professional role from achieving desired outcomes. We used a conceptual framework, which is derived from Hatem-Asmar’s (1997) framework on the interaction of educational, professional, and sociocultural systems in which a professional role evolves and from Damschroder et al’s (2009) framework for the implementation analysis. Methods This paper builds on a qualitative case study on the factors affecting the action plan’s implementation process that also revealed rich data about anticipated barriers to reaching outcomes. Data were collected through training sessions, field observations, documents, focus groups (n=20), and semistructured interviews (n=11) with stakeholders pertaining to the three systems under study. Content analysis was used to identify themes related to barriers. Results Seven barriers that may compromise the achievement of desired results were found. They relate to the legal framework, social representations, and media support in the sociocultural system and the practice environment, networks and communication mechanisms, and characteristics related to the role and the readiness in the professional system. Conclusion Disregarding sociocultural and professional system level, barriers may impede efforts to strengthen the midwife’s role and to provide qualified midwives who can improve the quality of maternal care. Making changes in the educational system cannot be thought of as an isolated process. Its success is closely tied with multiple contextual factors pertaining to the two other systems. Activities recommended to address these barriers may have great potential to build a competent midwifery workforce that contributes to positive maternal and neonatal health outcomes. PMID:26445547

  9. Approaches to improving the contribution of the nursing and midwifery workforce to increasing universal access to primary health care for vulnerable populations: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, A J; Nkowane, A M; Whelan, A

    2015-12-18

    Despite considerable evidence showing the importance of the nursing and midwifery workforce, there are no systematic reviews outlining how these cadres are best supported to provide universal access and reduce health care disparities at the primary health care (PHC) level. This review aims to identify nursing and midwifery policy, staffing, education and training interventions, collaborative efforts and strategies that have improved the quantity, quality and relevance of the nursing and midwifery workforce leading to health improvements for vulnerable populations. We undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature using a focused review question and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The quality of retrieved papers was appraised using standard tools. The characteristics of screened papers were described, and a deductive qualitative content analysis methodology was applied to analyse the interventions and findings of included studies using a conceptual framework. Thirty-six papers were included in the review, the majority (25) from high-income countries and nursing settings (32). Eleven papers defined leadership and governance approaches that had impacted upon the health outcomes of disadvantaged groups including policies at the national and state level that had led to an increased supply and coverage of nursing and midwifery staff and scope of practice. Twenty-seven papers outlined human resource management strategies to support the expansion of nurse's and midwives' roles that often involved task shifting and task sharing. These included approaches to managing staffing supply, distribution and skills mix; workloads; supervision; performance management; and remuneration, financial incentives and staffing costs. Education and training activities were described in 14 papers to assist nurses and midwives to perform new or expanded roles and prepare nurses for inclusive practice. This review identified collaboration between

  10. Technologies of birth and models of midwifery care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine McCourt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a study of a reform in the organisation of maternity services in the United Kingdom, which aimed towards developing a more woman-centred model of care. After decades of fragmentation and depersonalisation of care, associated with the shift of birth to a hospital setting, pressure by midwives and mothers prompted government review and a relatively radical turnaround in policy. However, the emergent model of care has been profoundly influenced by concepts and technologies of monitoring. The use of such technologies as ultrasound scans, electronic foetal monitoring and oxytocic augmentation of labour, generally supported by epidural anaesthesia for pain relief, have accompanied the development of a particular ecological model of birth – often called active management –, which is oriented towards the idea of an obstetric norm. Drawing on analysis of women’s narrative accounts of labour and birth, this article discusses the impact on women’s embodiment in birth, and the sources of information they use about the status of their own bodies, their labour and that of the child. It also illustrates how the impact on women’s experiences of birth may be mediated by a relational model of support, through the provision of caseload midwifery care.

  11. The role of quality assurance in future midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, J

    1993-08-01

    Recent recommendations have been made which would give midwives a more central role in maternity care and a greater degree of independence than they currently enjoy. This paper argues that midwives' current attitudes to quality assurance are incompatible with this enhanced role. Research conducted in three health districts is described, which explored the perceptions of nurses, midwives and managers towards quality assurance. The findings indicate that quality assurance (in whatever form that concept is operationalized) is a demonstration of accountability. For managers this accountability is primarily for the service as a whole, whilst nurses and midwives view their accountability as being owed to patients/clients. The main methodology which the study identified as being used for monitoring nursing care was the development and auditing of explicit standards. This approach has been actively promoted by the Royal College of Nursing, enabling nurses to regain control of the purely professional aspects of the nursing profession. Midwives in the study districts showed a marked reluctance to adopt such a strategy, taking the view that as independent practitioners consensus standards would be unacceptable. It is argued that this attitude is inconsistent with the basic principle that professionals are accountable for both demonstrating and developing the quality of professional practice. It is further suggested that midwives currently have an opportunity to regain professional control of midwifery practice, which will be lost unless they are prepared to take responsibility for evaluating the standards for which they are accountable.

  12. Disciplinary discourses: rates of cesarean section explained by medicine, midwifery, and feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy Su May; Kirkman, Maggie

    2008-05-01

    In the context of international concern about increasing rates of cesarean sections, we used discourse analysis to examine explanations arising from feminism and the disciplines of medicine and midwifery, and found that each was positioned differently in relation to the rising rates. Medical discourses asserted that doctors are authorities on birth and that, although cesareans are sometimes medically necessary, women recklessly choose unnecessary cesareans against medical advice. Midwifery discourses portrayed medicine as paternalistic toward both women and midwifery, and feminist discourses situated birth and women's bodies in the context of a patriarchally structured society. The findings illustrate the complex ways in which this intervention in birth is discursively constructed, and demonstrate its significance as a site of disciplinary conflict.

  13. Western Australia facing critical losses in its midwifery workforce: a survey of midwives' intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Judith D; Twigg, Diane E; Martin, Tracy L; Rai, Tapan

    2013-05-01

    the ongoing attrition of the midwifery workforce frustrates future workforce planning and the provision of maternity services in Western Australia. This project determined factors contributing to the intention of the midwives to move jobs and/or leave the profession. a cross-sectional survey approach was taken for this descriptive research utilising a self-administered questionnaire developed by the Nursing and Midwifery Office, Department of Health, Western Australia. public and private health sectors in Western Australia, April-May 2010. 1,600 midwives employed in the public and private health sectors throughout Western Australia were invited to participate: 712 responded (44.5%), one-fifth of the state's registered midwives. most midwives worked part-time in a clinical role in public hospitals. Almost half intended moving jobs within 5 years and/or leaving midwifery. Excluding midwives of retirement age, the most common reasons for intending to move jobs were family commitments, working conditions and role dissatisfaction. Those intending to leave midwifery cited work-life balance, career change and family commitments. Midwives thought addressing the following issues would improve midwifery retention: flexible work arrangements, remuneration, staffing and caseload, workplace culture, professional development and models of care. retaining the midwifery workforce requires attention to workforce practices particularly flexible work arrangements and workloads; models of care to strengthen midwives' relationships with clients and colleagues; and accessible professional development. a review of workplace practices at unit and institution levels is urgently required in Western Australia so that midwives can achieve work-life balance and practice to the full extent of their professional role. These changes are necessary to forestall premature retirement of skilled and experienced midwives from the profession and workforce churn. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by

  14. Bachelor of Midwifery students' experiences of achieving competencies: the role of the midwife preceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licqurish, Sharon; Seibold, Camel

    2008-12-01

    to explore and describe Bachelor of Midwifery students' learning experiences, specifically the role of the midwifery preceptor in learning and development of competency, from the students' perspective. The findings reported are taken from a wider investigation into Bachelor of Midwifery student's achievement of competency. grounded theory methodology using in-depth interviews for data collection. school of nursing and midwifery of one university, and associated clinical teaching hospitals in Victoria, Australia. eight Bachelor of Midwifery students completing their final clinical placement. data analysis in the broader study identified the categories of: hands-on practice; reflecting on practice; building confidence; gaining knowledge; working with midwives; and constructing a sense of self as a midwife. This paper focuses on one category 'working with midwives', which encompasses the therapeutic, interpersonal and clinical characteristics of the preceptor and their impact on student learning. Generally speaking, students identified midwife preceptors as helpful and unhelpful, and students indicated that they prefer to work with a caring midwife preceptor, who enjoys teaching, answers questions fairly and is philosophically similar. Students also felt that they benefited from opportunities for responsibility for care under supportive supervision, hands-on learning and debriefing. Midwife preceptors described as unhelpful were poor role models, did not allow the space for 'hands-on' practice or 'took over', were generally unsupportive and operated in a hierarchical system within the clinical agencies. a positive midwife preceptor-student relationship is an integral part of successful student midwife learning, and preceptors with helpful qualities enhance learning. Hands-on learning was emphasised as the most beneficial learning experience and students sought opportunities to work with midwives who imbued the philosophy they admired rather than becoming desensitised

  15. Developing a digital learning version of a mentorship training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Debbie; Clark, Liz; Gould, Kathryn

    2018-01-25

    This article describes the experience of one university team in developing, delivering and evaluating an online Nursing and Midwifery Council-approved mentorship programme for nurses and midwives who support pre-registration students in practice. Although the authors are confident of the quality of the educational provision, this article does not discuss this programme as an exemplar of best practice, but aims to share the learning gained from the experience of introducing a digital learning version of a mentorship course.

  16. Predictors of early postpartum mental distress in mothers with midwifery home care--results from a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehelin, Katharina; Kurth, Elisabeth; Schindler, Christian; Schmid, Monika; Zemp Stutz, Elisabeth

    2013-08-27

    The prevalence of early postpartum mental health conditions is high. Midwives and other health professionals visiting women at home may identify mothers at risk. This seems crucial given decreasing trends of length of hospital stay after childbirth. This study aimed to identify predictors of maternal mental distress in a midwifery home care setting. Using the statistical database of independent midwives' services in Switzerland in 2007, we conducted a matched nested case-control study. Out of a source population of 34,295 mothers with midwifery home care in the first ten days after childbirth, 935 mothers with maternal distress and 3,645 controls, matched by midwife, were included. We analysed whether socio-demographic, maternal and neonatal factors predict maternal mental distress by multivariable conditional logistic regression analysis. Infant crying problems and not living with a partner were the strongest predictors for maternal distress, whereas higher parity was the most protective factor. Significantly elevated risks were also found for older age, lower educational levels, breast/breastfeeding problems, infant weight gain concerns, neonatal pathologies and use of midwifery care during pregnancy. A lower likelihood for maternal distress was seen for non-Swiss nationality, full-time employment before birth, intention to return to work after birth and midwife-led birth. The study informs on predictors of maternal mental distress identified in a home care setting in the early postpartum period. Midwives and other health care professionals should pay particular attention to mothers of excessively crying infants, single mothers and primipara, and assess the need for support of these mothers.

  17. The trials of Hanna Porn: the campaign to abolish midwifery in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, E R

    1994-06-01

    The case of Hanna Porn affords an opportunity to examine how the laws that led to the abolition of midwifery in Massachusetts evolved and were applied to the midwife whose case set the state legal precedent. Mrs Porn served primarily a Finnish-Swedish clientele of wives of laborers. The outcomes of the births she attended appear to have been positive, and she maintained a neonatal mortality rate of less than half that of local physicians. She also repeatedly defied court orders to stop practicing. Her case exemplifies the efforts that occurred nationally to abolish midwifery in the United States.

  18. A qualitative study of how caseload midwifery is constituted and experienced by Danish midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Mark, Edith; Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard; Foureur, Maralyn; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    2016-05-01

    the aim of this study is to advance knowledge about the working and living conditions of midwives in caseload midwifery and how this model of care is embedded in a standard maternity unit. This led to two research questions: 1) What constitutes caseload midwifery from the perspectives of the midwives? 2) How do midwives experience working in caseload midwifery? phenomenology of practice was the analytical approach to this qualitative study of caseload midwifery in Northern Denmark. The methodology was inspired by ethnography, and applied methods were field observations followed by interviews. thirteen midwives working in caseloads were observed during one or two days in the antenatal clinic and were interviewed at a later occasion. being recognised and the feeling of doing high quality care generate high job satisfaction. The obligation and pressure to perform well and the disadvantages to the midwives׳ personal lives are counterbalanced by the feeling of doing a meaningful and important job. Working in caseload midwifery creates a feeling of working in a self-governing model within the public hospital, without losing the technological benefits of a modern birth unit. Midwives in caseload midwifery worked on welcoming and including all pregnant women allocated to their care; even women/families where relationships with the midwives were challenging were recognised and respected. caseload midwifery is a work-form with an embedded and inevitable commitment and obligation that brings forward the midwife׳s desire to do her utmost and in return receive appreciation, social recognition and a meaningful job with great job satisfaction. There is a balance between the advantages of a meaningful job and the disadvantages for the personal life of the midwife, but benefits were found to outweigh disadvantages. In expanding caseload midwifery, it is necessary to understand that the midwives׳ personal lives need to be prepared for this work-form. The number of women per full

  19. Assessing the Nursing and Midwifery Students Competencies in Communication With Patients With Severe Communication Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Rezaei Shahsavarloo, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clients with communication impairment are at risk for health disparity. Hence, health care workers should be knowledgeable and skillful in communication. However, no studies are available on Iranian nursing and midwifery students’ communication skills with patients with severe communication problems. Objectives: The present study was conducted to investigate Iranian nursing and midwifery students' competencies in communication with patients with severe communication problems. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on all senior nursing and midwifery students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in spring 2013. Data were collected through a knowledge questionnaire and two checklists for evaluation of skills needed for communication with patients with severe communication problems. Data analysis was performed through independent samples t test, and Fisher’s exact test. Results: In total, 68.8% of the participants were female, 37.6% had a history of part-time job as a nurse or midwife. The mean score of knowledge were 4.41 ± 1.42 and 4.77 ± 1.77 for nursing and midwifery students, respectively and the difference was not significant (P = 0.312). In addition, the mean score of communication skills with deaf patients was 13.23 ± 4.68 and 11.86 ± 5.55 for nursing and midwifery students, respectively and the difference was not significant (P = 0.258). Also, the mean score of communication skills with stutter patients was 23.91 ± 4.17 and 21.25 ± 3.91 for nursing and midwifery students, respectively but the difference was not significant (P = 0.269). Conclusions: Nursing and midwifery students did not significantly differ in terms of communication with patients with severe communication problems. Most of the students had low or very low knowledge and skills in communication with patients with hearing impairment. However, they had better skills in communication with patient with speech problem. Special workshops or training programs are

  20. Shoulder dystocia in primary midwifery care in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallianidis, Athanasios F; Smit, Marrit; Van Roosmalen, Jos

    2016-02-01

    In the Netherlands, low-risk pregnancies are managed by midwives in primary care. Despite strict definitions of low risk, obstetric complications can occur. Midwives seldom encounter uncommon labour complications, but are sufficiently trained to manage these. We assessed neonatal and maternal outcome after management of shoulder dystocia in primary midwifery care. In this 2-year prospective cohort study from April 2008 to April 2010, primary-care midwives, who participated in an obstetric emergency course, reported all obstetric complications. Main outcome was neonatal and maternal outcome. In sixty-four cases of shoulder dystocia McRoberts was the first maneuver in 42/64 (65.6%) cases with a success rate of 23.8%. All-fours maneuver was most frequently used as the second maneuver (24/45; 53.3%). No neonatal mortality occurred, none of the infants suffered from hypoxic ischemic injury, two (3.1%) had transient brachial plexus injuries, two (3.1%) had fractured clavicles and one (1.6%) had a fractured humerus. Eight (12.5%) neonates were successfully resuscitated because of birth asphyxia. All infants fully recovered. In neonates with immediate adverse outcome significantly more maneuvers were used compared with those without adverse neonatal outcome (p = 0.02). Postpartum hemorrhage occurred in 2/64 (3.1%) women, deep vaginal lacerations in 2/64 (3.1%), perineal tears in 23/64 (35.9%). No anal sphincter injuries occurred. McRoberts and all-fours maneuvers are widely used by primary-care midwives in the management of shoulder dystocia. Low rates of adverse neonatal and maternal outcomes were observed in cases of shoulder dystocia up to 6 weeks postpartum. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Integrating Maternal and Children's Oral Health Promotion into Nursing and Midwifery Practice- A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham Abou El Fadl

    Full Text Available Globally, oral diseases contribute to major disease problems and oral health disparities persistently exist amongst vulnerable population groups. Two contributory factors to these challenges are the shortage of dental practitioners and the characteristic separation between the medical and dental professions. Nurses and midwives, in particular, are in a potentially excellent position to assist in basic oral health services such as dental health education and intraoral screening. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of integrating promotion of oral health of young children and their mothers into nursing and midwifery practice.Seven electronic databases including CENTRAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, GLOBAL HEALTH, CINHAL, Scopus, and Web of Science were systematically searched whereas conference proceedings and theses were retrieved via PROQUEST. Only randomized, non-randomized trials and observational studies on preventive oral health programs delivered by nurses or midwives in healthcare settings or through home visits were included. Two investigators reviewed full-text articles independently to decide on eligibility for inclusion. Quality assessment was done using Cochrane tool for risk of bias for randomized trials and Downs and Black assessment tool for all other studies. Out of 3162 retrieved records, twenty one trials on oral health interventions incorporated into standard nursing practice were reviewed. Eighteen programs reported significant positive outcomes including reduction in caries experience, better oral hygiene and dietary habits and increased rates of dental visits amongst young children as reported by their caregivers.Incorporating oral health promotion into nursing practice is a promising initiative for reducing oral health disparities by contributing to a downward trend in caries experience and increased access to dental care especially amongst the poor disadvantaged communities.

  2. The development of a rubric for peer assessment of individual teamwork skills in undergraduate midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn; Fahy, Kathleen; Parratt, Jenny

    2014-09-01

    Poor teamwork is cited as one of the major root causes of adverse events in healthcare. Bullying, resulting in illness for staff, is an expression of poor teamwork skills. Despite this knowledge, poor teamwork persists in healthcare and teamwork skills are rarely the focus of teaching and assessment in undergraduate health courses. To develop and implement an assessment tool for use in facilitating midwifery students' learning of teamwork skills. This paper describes how the TeamUP rubric tool was developed. A review of the literature found no research reports on how to teach and assess health students' teamwork skills in standing teams. The literature, however, gives guidance about how university educators should evaluate individual students using peer assessment. The developmental processes of the rubric were grounded in the theoretical literature and feminist collaborative conversations. The rubric incorporates five domains of teamwork skills: Fostering a Team Climate; Project Planning; Facilitating Teams; Managing Conflict and Quality Individual Contribution. The process and outcomes of student and academic content validation are described. The TeamUP rubric is useful for articulating, teaching and assessing teamwork skills for health professional students. The TeamUP rubric is a robust, theoretically grounded model that defines and details effective teamwork skills and related behaviours. If these skills are mastered, we predict that graduates will be more effective in teams. Our assumption is that graduates, empowered by having these skills, are more likely to manage conflict effectively and less likely to engage in bullying behaviours. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiographer interpretation of trauma radiographs: Issues for radiography education providers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, Maryann; Snaith, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    Background: The role of radiographers with respect to image interpretation within clinical practice is well recognised. It is the expectation of the professional, regulatory and academic bodies that upon qualification, radiographers will possess image interpretation skills. Additionally, The College of Radiographers has asserted that its aspiration is for all radiographers to be able to provide an immediate written interpretation on skeletal trauma radiographs by 2010. This paper explores the readiness of radiography education programmes in the UK to deliver this expectation. Method: A postal questionnaire was distributed to 25 Higher Education Institutions in the UK (including Northern Ireland) that provided pre-registration radiography education as identified from the Society and College of Radiographers register. Information was sought relating to the type of image interpretation education delivered at pre- and post-registration levels; the anatomical range of image interpretation education; and education delivery styles. Results: A total of 19 responses (n = 19/25; 76.0%) were received. Image interpretation education was included as part of all radiographer pre-registration programmes and offered at post-registration level at 12 academic centres (n = 12/19; 63.2%). The anatomical areas and educational delivery methods varied across institutions. Conclusion: Radiography education providers have embraced the need for image interpretation education within both pre- and post-registration radiography programmes. As a result, UK education programmes are able to meet the 2010 College of Radiographers aspiration.

  4. Opportunities, challenges and strategies when building a midwifery profession. Findings from a qualitative study in Bangladesh and Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogren, Malin; Erlandsson, Kerstin

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to identify opportunities and challenges when building a midwifery profession in Bangladesh and Nepal. Data were collected through 33 semi-structured interviews with government officials, policy-makers, donors, and individuals from academia and non-government organizations with an influence in building a midwifery profession in their respective countries. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The opportunities and challenges found in Bangladesh and Nepal when building a midwifery profession emerged the theme "A comprehensive collaborative approach, with a political desire, can build a midwifery profession while competing views, interest, priorities and unawareness hamper the process". Several factors were found to facilitate the establishment of a midwifery profession in both countries. For example, global and national standards brought together midwifery professionals and stakeholders, and helped in the establishment of midwifery associations. The challenges for both countries were national commitments without a full set of supporting policy documents, lack of professional recognition, and competing views, interests and priorities. This study demonstrated that building a midwifery profession requires a political comprehensive collaborative approach supported by a political commitment. Through bringing professionals together in a professional association will bring a professional status. Global standards and guidelines need to be contextualized into national policies and plans where midwives are included as part of the national health workforce. This is a key for creating recognized midwives with a protected title to autonomously practice midwifery, to upholding the sexual and reproductive health and rights for women and girls. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Perceptions of nearly graduated fourth year midwifery students regarding a 'good midwife' in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Esther I. Feijen-de; Kool, Liesbeth; Peters, Lilian L.; Jansen, Danielle E. M. C.

    Objective: Midwifery students have the challenge to learn to be autonomous and capable midwives to ensure a safe and emotionally satisfying experience for mothers (to be) and their babies. They have to develop and acquire knowledge and skills for practice, and they have to adopt and internalize the

  6. Global Collaboration in Nursing and Midwifery “Talking it out ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collaboration between disciplines is essential to furthering clinical and academic progress in healthcare, particularly for Nursing and Midwifery. With rapid advances in health care related technology, additional options for cross- continental interactions present themselves. This article provides a description of a discussion ...

  7. Home or hospital birth: a prospective study of midwifery care in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegers, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    A large scale study on maternity care in the Netherlands, describing many facets of midwifery care in relation to the preferred place of birth (at home or in hospital), the obstetric result, and the experiences of childbirth. In the Netherlands only women with low risk pregnancies are free to

  8. The mentoring experiences of new graduate midwives working in midwifery continuity of care models in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Allison M; Denney-Wilson, E; Homer, C S E

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore the mentoring experiences of new graduate midwives working in midwifery continuity of care models in Australia. Most new graduates find employment in hospitals and undertake a new graduate program rotating through different wards. A limited number of new graduate midwives were found to be working in midwifery continuity of care. The new graduate midwives in this study were mentored by more experienced midwives. Mentoring in midwifery has been described as being concerned with confidence building based through a personal relationship. A qualitative descriptive study was undertaken and the data were analysed using continuity of care as a framework. We found having a mentor was important, knowing the mentor made it easier for the new graduate to call their mentor at any time. The new graduate midwives had respect for their mentors and the support helped build their confidence in transitioning from student to midwife. With the expansion of midwifery continuity of care models in Australia mentoring should be provided for transition midwives working in this way. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Promoting women's health in remote Aboriginal settings: Midwifery students' insights for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackrah, Rosalie D; Thompson, Sandra C; Durey, Angela

    2015-12-01

    To describe midwifery students' insights on promoting health to Aboriginal women in remote Australia following a supervised clinical placement. Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted with all midwifery students who undertook the placement between 2010 and 2013. Aboriginal communities on the Ngaanyatjarra Lands, Western Australia. Undergraduate and postgraduate midwifery students from a Western Australian university. Remote cultural immersion clinical placement. Student learning related to culturally respectful health care delivery and promotion of health. Students observed that, despite vast distances, high rates of participation in a breast screening program were achieved due to the informal provision of culturally relevant information and support. Opportunistic encounters in communities also enabled sexual health messages to be delivered more widely and in less formal settings. The role played by Aboriginal Health Workers and female family members was vital. The importance of culturally respectful approaches to sensitive women's business, including discretion, the use of local language and pictorial representations of information, was recognised as was the socio-cultural context and its impact on the health and well-being of the community. Although short in duration, the Ngaanyatjarra Lands clinical placement provided midwifery students with a rare opportunity to observe the importance of local contexts and cultural protocols in Aboriginal communities, and to adapt health promotion strategies to meet local needs and ways of doing things. These strategies embraced the strengths, assets and capacities of communities, yet students also witnessed challenges associated with access, delivery and acceptance of health care in remote settings. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  10. Implementation in nursing and midwifery. A scoping review / Implementationsprojekte in der Pflege und Hebammenarbeit. Scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loytved Christine Anna Lieselotte

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based expertise in nursing and midwifery is growing but is not automatically turned into practice. The importance of implementation research is therefore increasing. International research results on factors facilitating implementation have not yet been sufficiently presented.

  11. Conceptualising a model to guide nursing and midwifery in the community guided by an evidence review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy-Warren, Patricia; Mulcahy, Helen; Benefield, Lazelle; Bradley, Colin; Coffey, Alice; Donohoe, Ann; Fitzgerald, Serena; Frawley, Tim; Healy, Elizabeth; Healy, Maria; Kelly, Marcella; McCarthy, Bernard; McLoughlin, Kathleen; Meagher, Catherine; O'Connell, Rhona; O'Mahony, Aoife; Paul, Gillian; Phelan, Amanda; Stokes, Diarmuid; Walsh, Jessica; Savage, Eileen

    2017-01-01

    Successful models of nursing and midwifery in the community delivering healthcare throughout the lifespan and across a health and illness continuum are limited, yet necessary to guide global health services. Primary and community health services are the typical points of access for most people and the location where most care is delivered. The scope of primary healthcare is complex and multifaceted and therefore requires a practice framework with sound conceptual and theoretical underpinnings. The aim of this paper is to present a conceptual model informed by a scoping evidence review of the literature. A scoping evidence review of the literature was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement. Databases included CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and SocINDEX using the EBSCO platform and the Cochrane Library using the keywords: model, nursing, midwifery, community, primary care. Grey literature for selected countries was searched using the Google 'advanced' search interface. Data extraction and quality appraisal for both empirical and grey literature were conducted independently by two reviewers. From 127 empirical and 24 non-empirical papers, data extraction parameters, in addition to the usual methodological features, included: the nature of nursing and midwifery; the population group; interventions and main outcomes; components of effective nursing and midwifery outcomes. The evidence was categorised into six broad areas and subsequently synthesised into four themes. These were not mutually exclusive: (1) Integrated and Collaborative Care; (2) Organisation and Delivery of Nursing and Midwifery Care in the Community; (3) Adjuncts to Nursing Care and (4) Overarching Conceptual Model. It is the latter theme that is the focus of this paper. In essence, the model depicts a person/client on a lifespan and preventative-curative trajectory. The health related needs of the client, commensurate with their point

  12. Caseload midwifery as organisational change: the interplay between professional and organisational projects in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burau, Viola; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-05-27

    The large obstetric units typical of industrialised countries have come under criticism for fragmented and depersonalised care and heavy bureaucracy. Interest in midwife-led continuity models of care is growing, but knowledge about the accompanying processes of organisational change is scarce. This study focuses on midwives' role in introducing and developing caseload midwifery. Sociological studies of midwifery and organisational studies of professional groups were used to capture the strong interests of midwives in caseload midwifery and their key role together with management in negotiating organisational change. We studied three hospitals in Denmark as arenas for negotiating the introduction and development of caseload midwifery and the processes, interests and resources involved. A qualitative multi-case design was used and the selection of hospitals aimed at maximising variance. Ten individual and 14 group interviews were conducted in spring 2013. Staff were represented by caseload midwives, ward midwives, obstetricians and health visitors, management by chief midwives and their deputies. Participants were recruited to maximise the diversity of experience. The data analysis adopted a thematic approach, using within- and across-case analysis. The analysis revealed a highly interdependent interplay between organisational and professional projects in the change processes involved in the introduction and development of caseload midwifery. This was reflected in three ways: first, in the key role of negotiations in all phases; second, in midwives' and management's engagement in both types of projects (as evident from their interests and resources); and third in a high capacity for resolving tensions between the two projects. The ward midwives' role as a third party in organisational change further complicated the process. For managers tasked with the introduction and development of caseload midwifery, our study underscores the importance of understanding the

  13. Comparison of Direct and Indirect Methods of Teaching Breast Self-Examination – Influence on Knowledge and Attitudes of Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Sara; Heidari, Mohammad; Ghafourifard, Mansour

    2017-04-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Monthly breast self-examination (BSE) has been presented as one of the best screening methods available. The aim of this study was to compare effects of both direct and indirect methods of teaching of BSE on knowledge and attitudes of nursing and midwifery personnel. Materials and Methods: The present study was performed on 89 nursing and midwifery personnel in Valiasr hospital of Borujen city. Participants were randomly divided into a direct and an indirect training group. Researcher-designed BSE knowledge and attitude and demographic information questionnaires were used for data collection. Results: Before the education intervention, the mean levels of knowledge and attitude were 9.82±2.79 and 56.5±6.21 in the direct training group and 9.59±2.71 and 54.5±4.51 in the indirect training group; after the intervention, they reached 19.2±0.96 and 62.9±4.21, and 11.0±2.58 and 59.0±3.44, respectively. The difference in the mean levels of knowledge and attitude were significantly higher in the direct training group post intervention (Pdirect training methods. Creative Commons Attribution License

  14. Assessing time-management skills in terms of age, gender, and anxiety levels: a study on nursing and midwifery students in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Hatice; Kaya, Nurten; Palloş, Aylin Öztürk; Küçük, Leyla

    2012-09-01

    The success of university students depends on their ability to utilize time properly and completely. Students are required to learn to manage time so that they are able to apply the same degree of efficiency in the profession they choose after completing their education. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted to determine nursing and midwifery students' time management skills in terms of their age, gender, and anxiety levels. The study population consisted of 1002 students, of which 584 students were selected for sampling. A Student Information Form, Time Management Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were used to collect data. Among the students, 89.9% were female, and the average age was 20.58 years (SD = 2.10). The average score of the Time Management Inventory was 87.79 (SD = 11.78), the mean score of the State Anxiety Inventory was 40.11 (SD = 10.84), and that of the Trait Anxiety Inventory was 43.95 (SD = 7.98). Nursing and midwifery students' time management skills are at mid-level point. Female students were able to manage time better than male students and the time management skills of the students decreased as the anxiety level increased. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of Academic Performance with Outcome Expectations and Its Domains in Nursing and Midwifery Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Bakhtiari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Outcome expectation is considered as a basic and significant variable in education. It is a cognitive-motivational component that takes the individual into account as an active and sensible decision-maker. The present study was conducted to investigate the correlation of outcome expectations with academic performance of students of nursing and midwifery in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the sample size included 218 nursing and midwifery students selected through convenient random sampling method. The instrument for data collection was the questionnaire of “outcome expectations of career decision-making and discovery targets”, which comprised of 13 questions in three domains of future orientation, job satisfaction and personal expectations. The questionnaires were coded after being completed and the obtained data were fed into SPSS-16 software and analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test, Kolmogrov-Smirnov, ANOVA and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The findings indicated no statistically significant difference between place of living (dormitory or home and outcome expectations along with its domains (39.4% and 60-6%. However, a significant correlation was reported between discipline, gender, admittance year and academic performance of the students (p0.05. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated a positively positive significant relationship between students’ academic performance and outcome expectations along with its domains.

  16. Identifying key performance indicators for nursing and midwifery care using a consensus approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCance, Tanya; Telford, Lorna; Wilson, Julie; Macleod, Olive; Dowd, Audrey

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to gain consensus on key performance indicators that are appropriate and relevant for nursing and midwifery practice in the current policy context. There is continuing demand to demonstrate effectiveness and efficiency in health and social care and to communicate this at boardroom level. Whilst there is substantial literature on the use of clinical indicators and nursing metrics, there is less evidence relating to indicators that reflect the patient experience. A consensus approach was used to identify relevant key performance indicators. A nominal group technique was used comprising two stages: a workshop involving all grades of nursing and midwifery staff in two HSC trusts in Northern Ireland (n = 50); followed by a regional Consensus Conference (n = 80). During the workshop, potential key performance indicators were identified. This was used as the basis for the Consensus Conference, which involved two rounds of consensus. Analysis was based on aggregated scores that were then ranked. Stage one identified 38 potential indicators and stage two prioritised the eight top-ranked indicators as a core set for nursing and midwifery. The relevance and appropriateness of these indicators were confirmed with nurses and midwives working in a range of settings and from the perspective of service users. The eight indicators identified do not conform to the majority of other nursing metrics generally reported in the literature. Furthermore, they are strategically aligned to work on the patient experience and are reflective of the fundamentals of nursing and midwifery practice, with the focus on person-centred care. Nurses and midwives have a significant contribution to make in determining the extent to which these indicators are achieved in practice. Furthermore, measurement of such indicators provides an opportunity to evidence of the unique impact of nursing/midwifery care on the patient experience. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. "It's like a puzzle": Pregnant women's perceptions of professional support in midwifery care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, Caroline A; Mårtensson, Lena B; Golsäter, Marie H; Thorstensson, Stina A

    2016-12-01

    Pregnant women are not always satisfied with the professional support they receive during their midwifery care. More knowledge is needed to understand what professional support pregnant women need for childbirth and parenting. Childbearing and the transition to becoming a parent is a sensitive period in one's life during which one should have the opportunity to receive professional support. Professional support does not always correspond to pregnant women's needs. To understand pregnant women's needs for professional support within midwifery care, it is crucial to further illuminate women's experiences of this support. To explore pregnant women's perceptions of professional support in midwifery care. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Fifteen women were interviewed during gestational weeks 36-38. Data was analysed using phenomenography. The women perceived professional support in midwifery care to be reassuring and emotional, to consist of reliable information, and to be mediated with pedagogical creativity. The professional support facilitated new social contacts, partner involvement and contributed to mental preparedness. The findings of the study were presented in six categories and the category Professional support contributes to mental preparedness was influenced by the five other categories. Pregnant women prepare for childbirth and parenting by using several different types of professional support in midwifery care: a strategy that could be described as piecing together a puzzle. When the women put the puzzle together, each type of professional support works as a valuable piece in the whole puzzle. Through this, professional support could contribute to women's mental preparedness for childbirth and parenting. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A review of the literature: midwifery decision-making and birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefford, Elaine; Fahy, Kathleen; Sundin, Deborah

    2010-12-01

    Clinical decision-making was initially studied in medicine where hypothetico-deductive reasoning is the model for decision-making. The nursing perspective on clinical decision-making has largely been shaped by Patricia Benner's ground breaking work. Benner claimed expert nurses use humanistic-intuitive ways of making clinical decisions rather than the 'rational reasoning' as claimed by medicine. Clinical decision-making in midwifery is not the same as either nursing or medical decision-making because of the woman-midwife partnership where the woman is the ultimate decision-maker. CINHAL, Medline and Cochrane databases were systematically searched using key words derived from the guiding question. A review of the decision-making research literature in midwifery was undertaken where studies were published in English. The selection criteria for papers were: only research papers of direct relevance to the guiding research question were included in the review. Decision-making is under-researched in midwifery and more specifically birth, as only 4 research articles met the inclusion criteria in this review. Three of the studies involved qualified midwives, and one involved student midwives. Two studies were undertaken in England, one in Scotland and one in Sweden. The major findings synthesised from this review, are that; (1) midwifery decision-making during birth is socially negotiated involving hierarchies of surveillance and control; (2) the role of the woman in shared decision-making during birth has not been explored by midwifery research; (3) clinical decision-making encompasses clinical reasoning as essential but not sufficient for midwives to actually implement their preferred decision. We argue that existing research does not inform the discipline of the complexity of midwifery clinical decision-making during birth. A well-designed study would involve investigating the clinical reasoning skills of the midwife, her relationship with the woman, the context of the

  19. Primary health care as a philosophical and practical framework for nursing education: rhetoric or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Sandra; Hatcher, Deborah; Happell, Brenda; Cleary, Michelle

    2013-08-01

    At least three decades after primary health care (PHC) took nursing by storm it is time to re-examine the philosophical shift to a PHC framework in pre-registration nursing curricula and overview factors which may hinder or promote full integration of PHC as a course philosophy and a contemporary approach to professional practice. Whilst nurse education has traditionally focused on preparing graduates for practice in the acute care setting, there is continuing emphasis on preparing nurses for community based primary health roles, with a focus on illness prevention and health promotion. This is driven by growing evidence that health systems are not responding adequately to the needs and challenges of diverse populations, as well as economic imperatives to reduce the burden of disease associated with the growth of chronic and complex diseases and to reduce the costs associated with the provision of health care. Nursing pre-registration programs in Australia and internationally have philosophically adopted PHC as a curriculum model for preparing graduates with the necessary competencies to function effectively across a range of settings. Anecdotal evidence, however, suggests that when adopted as a program philosophy PHC is not always well integrated across the curriculum. In order to develop a strong and resilient contemporary nursing workforce prepared for practice in both acute and community settings, pre-registration nursing programs need to comprehensively consider and address the factors impacting on the curricula integration of PHC philosophy.

  20. "A midwife at every confinement": Midwifery and Medicalized Childbirth in Ontario and Britain, 1920-1950.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Gwenith Siobhan

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares midwifery in Ontario and Britain in the first half of the 20th century. British midwives improved maternal and infant health and welfare by making childbirth a cooperative, medically managed event in conjunction with physicians. British midwives thus participated in, and contributed to, developments in obstetrics. In contrast, Ontario physicians worked to exclude midwives from participation in the modernization of birth management, relying on a narrower concept of "medicalization" defined as physician dominance. This study challenges the medical profession's assumptions that the exclusion of midwifery in Ontario was necessary to the medicalization of childbirth. The British alternative, where midwives were seen as partners rather than obstacles, illustrates that medicalization in the interest of infant and maternal safety could be integrated with the work of midwives.

  1. The fear factor of risk - clinical governance and midwifery talk and practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamell, Mandie

    2016-07-01

    Through the critical application of social theory, this paper will scrutinise how the operations of risk management help to constitute midwives׳ understandings of childbirth in a particular way. Drawing from rich ethnographic data, collected in the southeast of England, the paper presents empirical evidence to critically explore how institutional concerns around risk and risk management impact upon the way midwives can legitimately imagine and manage labour and childbirth. Observational field notes, transcribed interviews with various midwives, along with material culture in the form of documentary evidence will be used to explore the unintended consequences of clinical governance and its risk management technologies. Through this analysis the fear factor of risk in midwifery talk and practice will be introduced to provide an insight into how risk management impacts midwifery practice in the UK. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Is caseload midwifery a healthy work-form? - A survey of burnout among midwives in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Juul, Svend; Foureur, Maralyn

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the level of burnout among midwives working in caseloading practices compared to other models of midwifery care. Study design and setting: In this survey the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory was used to measure burnout among midwives working in a tertiary maternity unit...... Denmark. Main outcome measures: Mean burnout scores and the proportion of midwives with high burnout scores (a score >= 50). Results: The response rate was 82.0% as 50 out of 61 midwives answered the questionnaire. In caseload midwifery the burnout scores in personal, work-related and client......-related burnout were significantly lower when compared to ‘‘other models of care”. Among caseloading midwives, none had high scores of burnout in any of the measured domains. The proportions of high burnout scores among all of the participating midwives were 22% (95% CI: 12%–36%) in personal burnout, 20% (95% CI...

  3. Birth Care Providers’ Experiences and Practices in a Brazilian Alongside Midwifery Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelly Christiny M. Nunes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of a new birthing facility in a country such as Brazil requires an extensive in-depth analysis of the challenges faced. The aim of this study was to explore beliefs, values, experiences, and practices related to the provision of birthing and neonatal care with the implementation of a new birth care facility structure called alongside midwifery units in Brazil. The study utilizes an ethnographic method to evaluate members of a Brazilian public hospital’s midwifery unit. The ethnographic study focuses on the cultural theme of “between the proposed and the possible”: the following birthing care guidelines require overcoming numerous obstacles, and four other cultural subthemes toward revealing the analyzed birth care team’s perspectives. The study found that prior training and preparation of all members of the care team, as well as the provision of adequate institutional infrastructure are essential for the implementation of a new and innovative birthing care center.

  4. Determining the psychometric properties of the Enhancing Decision-making Assessment in Midwifery (EDAM) measure in a cross cultural context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefford, Elaine; Jomeen, Julie; Martin, Colin R

    2016-04-28

    The ability to act on and justify clinical decisions as autonomous accountable midwifery practitioners, is encompassed within many international regulatory frameworks, yet decision-making within midwifery is poorly defined. Decision-making theories from medicine and nursing may have something to offer, but fail to take into consideration midwifery context and philosophy and the decisional autonomy of women. Using an underpinning qualitative methodology, a decision-making framework was developed, which identified Good Clinical Reasoning and Good Midwifery Practice as two conditions necessary to facilitate optimal midwifery decision-making during 2nd stage labour. This study aims to confirm the robustness of the framework and describe the development of Enhancing Decision-making Assessment in Midwifery (EDAM) as a measurement tool through testing of its factor structure, validity and reliability. A cross-sectional design for instrument development and a 2 (country; Australia/UK) x 2 (Decision-making; optimal/sub-optimal) between-subjects design for instrument evaluation using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, internal consistency and known-groups validity. Two 'expert' maternity panels, based in Australia and the UK, comprising of 42 participants assessed 16 midwifery real care episode vignettes using the empirically derived 26 item framework. Each item was answered on a 5 point likert scale based on the level of agreement to which the participant felt each item was present in each of the vignettes. Participants were then asked to rate the overall decision-making (optimal/sub-optimal). Post factor analysis the framework was reduced to a 19 item EDAM measure, and confirmed as two distinct scales of 'Clinical Reasoning' (CR) and 'Midwifery Practice' (MP). The CR scale comprised of two subscales; 'the clinical reasoning process' and 'integration and intervention'. The MP scale also comprised two subscales; women's relationship with the midwife' and 'general

  5. Nursing MSc theses: a study of an Iranian College of Nursing and Midwifery in two decades (1990-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamed-Jahromi, Mohadeseh; Leila Dehghani, Seyedeh

    2014-05-15

    A thesis is an important part of nursing graduate students' education, which is also their first systematic and scientific attempt to learn the ABCs of research. Articles derived from theses are important for the dissemination of science and the improvement of nursing as a field. Therefore, it is the goal of the present research is to analyze the different aspects of nursing MSc theses and the number of published articles derived from them. This was a descriptive research carried out on 145 nursing MSc theses defended in Razi Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery in Kerman between 1990 and 2010. All of the extracted data were put into an Excel file (2007 version) followed by a data analysis. The results of this study were then presented via the use of descriptive statistics and figures. The research findings showed that most of the theses used a descriptive or analytical-descriptive method, and 42% of them had patients as their participants. They were usually delivered on the subject of health care, and only 58 articles were extracted from the whole 145 theses. The process of writing nursing MSc theses and thesis research articles is improving gradually. However, there is a growing need for empirical and semi-empirical research to bridge the gap between theory and practice, which is also a major concern among nurses.

  6. Sustaining and growing the rural nursing and midwifery workforce: understanding the issues and isolating directions for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Karen L; Mills, Jane E

    2011-01-01

    Nurses and midwives represent the largest group of health professionals in the Australian health care system. In rural environments nurses and midwives make up a greater proportion of the health workforce than in urban settings, which makes their role in service provision even more significant. The role and scope of these nurses and midwives' practice is by necessity more generalist than specialist, which results in disciplinary strengths and weaknesses. As generalist health professionals they work in diverse settings such as public hospitals, multi-purpose services, community health, aged care and in non-government and private for profit and no-profit organisations including general practices. Their scope of practice covers prevention, intervention and rehabilitation and is lifespan inclusive. Rural nurses and midwives are older than their metropolitan based counterparts, work part-time and traditionally have limited access to professional development often due to ineffective locum relief programs. Workplace inflexibility, access to acceptable housing and partner employment are factors cited as inhibitors to growing this workforces. The future of the rural nursing and midwifery workforce will only be secured if Government invests to a greater degree in both education and training and the development of a nationally agreed remuneration scale that allows for part-time work.

  7. Nursing and midwifery students' experiences with the course of infertility and assisted reproductive techniques: A focus group study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbir, Gozde Gokçe; Ozan, Yeter Durgun

    2018-01-01

    Nurses and midwifes without sufficient knowledge of infertilitare not likely to provide counseling and support for people suffering from infertility. This study aimed to evaluate nursing and midwifery students' experiences with the Course on Infertility and Assisted Reproductive Techniques. Our study had a qualitative descriptive design. Total number of the participants was 75. The analysis revealed five primary themes and twenty-one sub-themes. The themes were (1) action, (2) learner centered method, (3) interaction, (4) nursing competencies, and (5) evaluation. The active learning techniques enabled the students to retrieve the knowledge that they obtained for a long time, contributed to social and cultural development and improved skills required for selfevaluation, communication and leadership, enhanced critical thinking, skills increased motivation and satisfaction and helped with knowledge integration. Infertility is a biopsychosocial condition, and it may be difficult for students to understand what infertile individuals experience. The study revealed that active learning techniques enabled the students to acquire not only theoretical knowledge but also an emotional and psychosocial viewpoint and attitude regarding infertility. The content of an infertility course should be created in accordance with changes in the needs of a given society and educational techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Is faculty practice valuable? The experience of Western Australian nursing and midwifery academics undertaking faculty clinical practice - A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Amanda C; Baker, Melanie; Geraghty, Sadie

    2017-09-01

    The faculty clinical practice model provides dedicated time for nursing lecturers and educators in a university school of nursing to work with supervision in the clinical environments for an agreed amount of time each year. Allowing academics to partake in faculty clinical practice this way has been shown to update skills and retain clinical competency. Some nursing and midwifery academics believe it is essential to remain clinically current and up-to-date with professional issues in the clinical environments, whereas other academics believe reading current research maintains clinical competency. This discussion paper will explore the authors' own experiences of faculty clinical practice as an opportunity to enhance their learning. Narrative accounts of time spent in the clinical areas being expressed as invaluable as it allowed the authors to become part of the health professional team, refine clinical skills, gain clinical confidence, and share knowledge. This, in turn, impacted upon the academic's teaching style as well as redefined it by introducing incidents and stories from their experience. It has been concluded by the authors that faculty clinical practice allows academics to increase confidence, encourage leadership skills, and improve their teaching abilities in their clinical area of expertise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical nursing and midwifery research in Middle Eastern and North African Countries: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malak Alashal Alhusaini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The professions of nursing and midwifery currently face many challenges, such as an increasing number of patients with communicable and non-communicable diseases, which strains resources and requires nurses and midwives to develop their knowledge and skills to a higher level. This is also true in the Middle East, including the Mediterranean East and North African regions, which means it is vitally important that nurses and midwives have access to and use current research to inform their practice, with research targeting the most relevant issues, including complex humanitarian emergency situations that increase health issues and challenge health infrastructure. For this to be achieved, a scoping review of the indexed clinical nursing and midwifery literature in the Middle East was performed to identify gaps in clinical nursing and midwifery research and areas requiring focus. A search of PubMed, CINAHL/EBSCO, EMBASE, the Jordanian Database for Nursing Research resulted in 210/1398 articles which met the inclusion criteria: (1 original research, (2 conducted in Middle Eastern countries as defined by the World Health Organization, (3 had at least one nurse or midwife author (but not limited to nurses in Middle Eastern countries, (4 published in an indexed, peer-reviewed journal between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2015, (5 included patient outcomes in the results, (6 written in English or Arabic and (7 included an abstract. Studies were found from 10 of the 22 countries; the majority (n = 199; 94.76% was conducted in three countries: Jordan, Iran and Lebanon. Most studies (n = 158, 75.24% used quantitative designs, primarily cross-sectional, descriptive studies (n = 106 and the most frequently researched topics were related to maternal child health and women′s health (n = 95, 48.5%. Strategies are needed to encourage collaboration between nursing and midwifery faculty members including clinicians to assure that clinical research is

  10. Trends in nursing and midwifery research and the need for change in complementary therapy research

    OpenAIRE

    Biley, Francis; Freshwater, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    In recent years there has been a change in nursing and midwifery research. Whilst many of the subjects being studied remain the same, nurses and midwives have started to employ a range of data collection methods that are relatively new to the profession. Predominantly quantitative research, which concentrates on reduction, objectivity, manipulation, categorization, passivity, control, prediction, causality and generalizability (Munhall & Oiler 1986), is starting to be replaced by other approa...

  11. Midwifery one-to-one support in labour: ethnographic study of midwife-led birth environments

    OpenAIRE

    Sosa, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Background: This research is about midwifery one-to-one support in labour. One-to-one support in labour is associated with improved birth outcomes. However, uncertainty exists as to what it is that produces such positive birth outcomes. UK publications advocate the midwife to provide one-to-one support in labour, but research findings question their ability to focus entirely on women due to their medical, technological and documentation responsibilities. All of these studies were based within...

  12. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Regarding Physical Activity in Nursing and Midwifery Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Hosseinzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background There are some mediators that affect physical activity such as knowledge and attitude. Some barriers such as lack of time, bad environments may impede doing physical activities. It sounds that lack of time is a common barrier to do physical activity in nursing and midwifery students. Since they encounter some factors that affect their health, this knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP study may be helpful to maintain and improve their health. Objectives The current study aimed to explore the knowledge, attitude and practice related to physical activity in nursing and midwifery students. Patients and Methods By simple randomized sampling method, 200 subjects were enrolled in the study. Based on the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ, a standard checklist was used to gather the related data. Then, the data were analyzed by SPSS software in 95% confidence interval (CI. Results Mean and standard deviation of subjects’ attitude was 5.9 ± 3.1 (minimum: -3, maximum: 14, median: 6. There was no significant difference in the means of knowledge and attitude between genders, and also between nursing and midwifery students. There was significant difference only regarding walking (P = 0.017, stretching (P = 0.050 and body building (P = 0.040 between the students in 95% CI. Conclusions Based on the current study finding, planning is needed to increase KAP of the students regarding physical activity. Some types of physical activity are more attractive than others for males and females separately, yet it is important to encourage the nursing and midwifery students to examine a variety of physical activities and help them find suitable activities.

  13. Paramedic and midwifery student exposure to workplace violence during clinical placements in Australia ? A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Malcolm; McKenna, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this pilot study was to identify the type of workplace violence experienced by undergraduate paramedic and midwifery students. Methods The study used a cross-sectional methodology with the self-administered paper-based Paramedic Workplace Violence Exposure Questionnaire to elicit undergraduate paramedic and midwife responses to workplace violence whilst on clinical placements. There were 393 students eligible for inclusion in the study. A convenience sample was use...

  14. Mobile technologies and communication strategies in an urban Midwifery Group Practice setting. An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forti, Amanda; Stapleton, Helen; Kildea, Sue

    2013-12-01

    Around-the-clock access to a known midwife is a distinct feature of Midwifery Group Practice (MGP) and caseload midwifery settings; although the literature suggests this aspect of working life may hinder recruitment and retention to this model of care. Mobile technologies, known as mHealth where they are used in health care, facilitate access and hence communication, however little is known about this area of midwifery practice. Which communication modalities are used, and most frequently, by MGP midwives and clients? A prospective, cross sectional design included a purposive sample of MGP midwives from an Australian tertiary maternity hospital. Data on modes of midwife-client contact were collected 24h/day, for two consecutive weeks, and included: visits, phone-calls, texts and emails. Demographic data were also collected. Details about 1442 midwife-client contacts were obtained. The majority of contact was via text, between the hours of 07:00 and 14:59, with primiparous women, when the primary midwife was on-call. An average of 96 contacts per fortnight occurred. The majority of contact was between the midwife and their primary clients, reiterating a key tenet of caseload models and confirming mobile technologies as a significant and evolving aspect of practice. The pattern of contact within social (or daytime) hours is reassuring for midwives considering caseload midwifery, who are concerned about the on-call burden. The use of text as the preferred communication modality raises issues regarding data security and retrieval, accountability, confidentiality and text management during off-duty periods. The development of Australian-wide guidelines to inform local policies and best practice is recommended. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Occupational Health Teaching for Pre Registration Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Stuart; Wynn, Philip; Williams, Nerys

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 41 of 66 nursing schools showed that occupational health is taught in 88% of nursing diploma and 80% of nursing degree programs. However, the majority focus on nurses' own occupational safety and health, not how patients' health can be affected by work or can affect the ability to work. (SK)

  16. Pre-registration dietetic students' attitudes to learning communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, B T; Lennie, S C

    2012-04-01

      Communication is a core skill and a prerequisite for dietitians' clinical competence. It is generally acknowledged that communication skills can be taught and learned. There is a paucity of published work identifying dietetic students' attitudes towards learning communication skills, and understanding this is important.   The present cross-sectional study aimed to address this issue using an adapted version of the Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS), which was designed to capture information concerning positive and negative attitudes to learning communication skills. An online questionnaire was sent to all undergraduate and post-graduate dietetic programmes in the UK.   Of the students' solicited for enrolment in the study, 33.4% (n = 300) completed the questionnaire. A one-way analysis of variance showed attitudes to learning communication skills differed significantly between years of study on both subscales of the CSAS. Subsequent analyses indicated that first-year students' attitudes to learning communication skills were significantly more positive than those of fourth-year students (P = 0.042). Third-year students had significantly more positive attitudes to learning communication skills than fourth-year students (P = 0.028). Negative attitudes were also linked to the year of study with fourth-year students having significantly more negative attitudes than third-year students (P = 0.046). Sex, practice placement experience and parental occupation did not significantly influence attitudes to learning communication skills.   These findings indicate that efforts are required to maintain positive attitudes to learning communication skills. Further longitudinal studies are recommended in this respect. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2012 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  17. Rating and Ranking the Role of Bibliometrics and Webometrics in Nursing and Midwifery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M. Davidson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bibliometrics are an essential aspect of measuring academic and organizational performance. Aim. This review seeks to describe methods for measuring bibliometrics, identify the strengths and limitations of methodologies, outline strategies for interpretation, summarise evaluation of nursing and midwifery performance, identify implications for metric of evaluation, and specify the implications for nursing and midwifery and implications of social networking for bibliometrics and measures of individual performance. Method. A review of electronic databases CINAHL, Medline, and Scopus was undertaken using search terms such as bibliometrics, nursing, and midwifery. The reference lists of retrieved articles and Internet sources and social media platforms were also examined. Results. A number of well-established, formal ways of assessment have been identified, including h- and c-indices. Changes in publication practices and the use of the Internet have challenged traditional metrics of influence. Moreover, measuring impact beyond citation metrics is an increasing focus, with social media representing newer ways of establishing performance and impact. Conclusions. Even though a number of measures exist, no single bibliometric measure is perfect. Therefore, multiple approaches to evaluation are recommended. However, bibliometric approaches should not be the only measures upon which academic and scholarly performance are evaluated.

  18. Rating and ranking the role of bibliometrics and webometrics in nursing and midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Patricia M; Newton, Phillip J; Ferguson, Caleb; Daly, John; Elliott, Doug; Homer, Caroline; Duffield, Christine; Jackson, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Bibliometrics are an essential aspect of measuring academic and organizational performance. Aim. This review seeks to describe methods for measuring bibliometrics, identify the strengths and limitations of methodologies, outline strategies for interpretation, summarise evaluation of nursing and midwifery performance, identify implications for metric of evaluation, and specify the implications for nursing and midwifery and implications of social networking for bibliometrics and measures of individual performance. A review of electronic databases CINAHL, Medline, and Scopus was undertaken using search terms such as bibliometrics, nursing, and midwifery. The reference lists of retrieved articles and Internet sources and social media platforms were also examined. A number of well-established, formal ways of assessment have been identified, including h- and c-indices. Changes in publication practices and the use of the Internet have challenged traditional metrics of influence. Moreover, measuring impact beyond citation metrics is an increasing focus, with social media representing newer ways of establishing performance and impact. Even though a number of measures exist, no single bibliometric measure is perfect. Therefore, multiple approaches to evaluation are recommended. However, bibliometric approaches should not be the only measures upon which academic and scholarly performance are evaluated.

  19. Clinical nursing and midwifery research in Latin American and Caribbean countries: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, Sarah; Stonbraker, Samantha; Larsen, Brandon; Santos, Islane; Faria, Renata; Góes, Fernanda S N; Binfa, Lorena; Larson, Elaine

    2018-04-01

    To identify and describe published, nursing-led and midwifery-led, clinical research that has been conducted in Latin America and the Caribbean. Peer-reviewed published research may correspond to and elucidate country's realities, priorities, and needs. A 6-stage scoping review methodology was used to search scientific databases using an applied search strategy. Five databases were searched for articles published in English, Spanish, or Portuguese conducted in a Latin American or Caribbean country between January 1, 2006 and June 14, 2016. Articles were independently considered for inclusion by 2 researchers, data extracted, and study characteristics described. Of 6922 articles identified, 404 were included. The majority were conducted in Brazil (90.6%) followed by Chile (2.5%). Most were nurse-led (95.8%) and were implemented in hospitals (48.6%). Studies frequently explored patient knowledge or characterized patient populations (61.3%) and commonly assessed chronic disease (19.3%) or maternity/child health outcomes (15.9%). Findings revealed a large number of publications but an uneven geographical distribution of nurse-led clinical research and an evident gap of midwifery-related research in Latin America and the Caribbean. Results may be used to build research agendas to promote nursing and midwifery research capacity and further establish evidence-based practice. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. 'Risk or Right': a discourse analysis of midwifery and obstetric colleges' homebirth position statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licqurish, Sharon; Evans, Alicia

    2016-03-01

    Within the context of global debates about safety and ethics of supporting women to give birth at home, it is important to analyse documents governing midwifery and obstetric practice and influence decision-making around place of birth. In Australia, the United States and the United Kingdom, relatively small numbers of women choose to give birth at home despite their midwifery colleges' support. In the United States and Australia, the obstetric colleges do not support homebirth and these countries have lower numbers of women who birth at home, compared with the United Kingdom. There are numerous regulatory and industry challenges for midwives attending homebirths. This paper reports on a Foucauldian analysis of Australian obstetric and midwifery colleges' position statements about homebirth, who have conflicting views, with the view to understanding their arguments and underlying assumptions. The documents highlighted tensions between competing discourses of risk and autonomy and differences in academic argument. Opportunities for strengthening their statements are highlighted. The methodology is applicable for future analysis of similar documents governing practice in other countries. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Midwifery and nursing students' communication skills and life orientation: correlation with stress coping approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Gülsün; Kaya, Hatice

    2013-06-01

    Methods learnt by nursing and midwifery students' such as communication skills, optimisim and coping with stress would be used in their profeesional life. It is very important to promote their positive thinking and communication skills to raise coping with stress. This cross sectional study was performed to examine the nursing and midwifery students' communication skills and optimistic life orientation and its correlation with coping strategies with stress. The study population included 2572 students who were studying in departments of nursing and midwifery in Istanbul. The sample was included 1419 students. Three questionnaires including Communication Skills Test, Life Orientation Test and Ways of Coping Inventory were used for data collection. The data were evaluated by calculating frequency, percentage, arithmetic mean, standard deviation and Pearson correlation coefficient. Students' total mean score from the Communication Skills Scale was 165.27 ± 15.39 and for the Life Orientation Test was 18.51 ± 4.54. There was a positive correlation between their Life Orientation scores and the scores for self confidence (r = 0.34, P students in optimistic life orientation and communication skills increased self confidence approach, optimistic, and social support seeking scores increased, whereas helpless, and submissive scores decreased.

  2. Midwifery student exposure to workplace violence in clinical settings: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; Boyle, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Evidence indicates that nurses regularly experience bullying within the workplace which has the potential for health and social effects, as well as worker attrition. Literature suggests that nursing students are exposed to workplace violence during clinical placements including from health professionals and mentors, however little is known about midwifery students. This study sought to examine undergraduate midwifery students' experiences of workplace violence during clinical placements. A cross-sectional approach using a paper-based survey, the Paramedic Workplace Questionnaire, was used to solicit the information. Students were exposed to workplace violence with the main act being intimidation (30%), verbal abuse (17%), physical abuse (3%), and sexual harassment (3%). In more than three-quarters of the incidents the students had some level of apprehension or were frightened as a result of the violence. Students responded to the acts of violence with changes to emotions, self-confidence, and a desire to "give up". This paper demonstrates ways in which midwifery students are vulnerable to potential workplace violence from various sources. Support mechanisms need to be developed to ensure this can be minimised. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Embracing service user involvement in radiotherapy education: A discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Gareth; Thompson, Gillian; Willis, Susan; Hodgson, Denyse

    2014-01-01

    Aim: There is currently a drive within cancer services to incorporate user involvement in delivery and education, as such the aim of this article is to investigate the potential role of service users in pre-registration education and how this could impact on radiotherapy programmes. Method: Key databases were searched for terms: patient participation, service user involvement, health care education, student assessment, patient involvement, pre-registration education and training. Suitable literature was reviewed and references within all articles and documents were investigated to ensure as broad and an inclusive search possible. Results: There is little published literature indicating user involvement in radiotherapy education but many studies in nursing, medicine and other allied health professions indicate a rationale for user involvement. Discussion: There are benefits of involving service users, i.e. gaining insight from patients and carers perspectives, challenges stereotypes and assumptions. Disadvantages include the quality of the feedback from users in assessment, resources required, and the ethical considerations. Conclusion: Inclusion of service users in radiotherapy education is recommended in line with cancer care policy, they provide a unique perspective to learning and involvement should be encouraged

  4. Do the pre-service education programmes for midwives in India prepare confident ‘registered midwives’? A survey from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharati Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The graduates of the diploma and degree programmes of nursing and midwifery in India are considered skilled birth attendants (SBAs. This paper aimed to assess the confidence of final-year students from pre-service education programmes (diploma and bachelor's in selected midwifery skills from the list of midwifery competencies of the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM. Design: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Gujarat, India, involving 633 final-year students from 25 educational institutions (private or government, randomly selected, stratified by the type of programme (diploma and bachelor's. Students assessed their confidence on a four-point scale, in four midwifery competency domains – antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn care. Explorative factor analysis was used to reduce skill statements into separate subscales for each domain. Results: Overall, 25–40% of students scored above the 75th percentile and 38–50% below the 50th percentile of confidence in all subscales for antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn care. The majority had not attended the required number of births prescribed by the Indian Nursing Council. Conclusions: The pre-service education offered in the diploma and bachelor's programmes in Gujarat does not prepare confident SBAs, as measured on selected midwifery competencies of the ICM. One of the underlying reasons was less clinical experience during their education. The duration, content, and pedagogy of midwifery education within the integrated programmes need to be reviewed.

  5. Working in caseload midwifery care: the experience of midwives working in a birth centre in North Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Marissa C; Walker, Sandra B

    2014-03-01

    Pregnancy, birth and child rearing are significant life events for women and their families. The demand for services that are family friendly, women focused, safe and accessible is increasing. These demands and rights of women have led to increased government and consumer interest in continuity of care and the establishment in Australia of birth centres, and the introduction of caseload midwifery models of care. The aim of this research project was to uncover how birth centre midwives working within a caseload model care constructed their midwifery role in order to maintain a positive work-life balance. A Grounded Theory study using semi-structured individual interviews was undertaken with seven midwives who work at a regional hospital birth centre to ascertain their views as to how they construct their midwifery role while working in a caseload model of care. The results showed that caseload midwifery care enabled the midwives to practice autonomously within hospital policies and guidelines for birth centre midwifery practice and that they did not feel too restricted in regards to the eligibility of women who could give birth at the centre. Work relationships were found to be a key component in being able to construct their birth centre midwifery role. The midwives valued the flexibility that came with working in supportive partnerships with many feeling this enabled them to achieve a good work-life balance. The research contributes to the current body of knowledge surrounding working in a caseload model of care as it shows how the birth centre midwives construct their midwifery role. It provides information for development and improvement of these models of care to ensure that sustainability and quality of care is provided to women and their families. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Capacity building of skilled birth attendants: a review of pre-service education curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Adetoro A; Mani, Safiyanu; Abubakar, Aisha; van den Broek, Nynke

    2013-07-01

    to assess the level, type and content of pre-service education curricula of health workers providing maternity services against the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential competencies for midwifery practice. We reviewed the quality and relevance of pre-service education curricula of four cadres of health-care providers of maternity care in Northern Nigeria. we adapted and used the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential competencies for midwifery practice to design a framework of criteria against which we assessed curricula for pre-service training. We reviewed the pre-service curricula for Nurses, Midwives, Community Health Extension Workers (CHEW) and Junior Community Health Extension Workers (JCHEW) in three states. Criteria against which the curricula were evaluated include: minimum entry requirement, the length of the programme, theory: practice ratio, curriculum model, minimum number of births conducted during training, clinical experience, competencies, maximum number of students allowable and proportion of Maternal, Newborn and Child Health components (MNCH) as part of the total curriculum. four pre-service education programmes were reviewed; the 3 year basic midwifery, 3 year basic nursing, 3 year Community Health Extension Worker (CHEW) and 2 year Junior Community Health Extension Worker (JCHEW) programme. Findings showed that, none of these four training curricula met all the standards. The basic midwifery curriculum most closely met the standards and competencies set out. The nursing curriculum showed a strong focus on foundations of nursing practice, theories of nursing, public health and maternal newborn and child health. This includes well-defined modules on family health which are undertaken from the first year to the third year of the programme. The CHEW and JCHEW curricula are currently inadequate with regard to training health-care workers to be skilled birth attendants. although the midwifery curriculum

  7. A randomised controlled trial of caseload midwifery care: M@NGO (Midwives @ New Group practice Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Sally K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australia has an enviable record of safety for women in childbirth. There is nevertheless growing concern at the increasing level of intervention and consequent morbidity amongst childbearing women. Not only do interventions impact on the cost of services, they carry with them the potential for serious morbidities for mother and infant. Models of midwifery have proliferated in an attempt to offer women less fragmented hospital care. One of these models that is gaining widespread consumer, disciplinary and political support is caseload midwifery care. Caseload midwives manage the care of approximately 35-40 a year within a small Midwifery Group Practice (usually 4-6 midwives who plan their on call and leave within the Group Practice. We propose to compare the outcomes and costs of caseload midwifery care compared to standard or routine hospital care through a randomised controlled trial. Methods/design A two-arm RCT design will be used. Women will be recruited from tertiary women's hospitals in Sydney and Brisbane, Australia. Women allocated to the caseload intervention will receive care from a named caseload midwife within a Midwifery Group Practice. Control women will be allocated to standard or routine hospital care. Women allocated to standard care will receive their care from hospital rostered midwives, public hospital obstetric care and community based general medical practitioner care. All midwives will collaborate with obstetricians and other health professionals as necessary according to the woman's needs. Discussion Data will be collected at recruitment, 36 weeks antenatally, six weeks and six months postpartum by web based or postal survey. With 750 women or more in each of the intervention and control arms the study is powered (based on 80% power; alpha 0.05 to detect a difference in caesarean section rates of 29.4 to 22.9%; instrumental birth rates from 11.0% to 6.8%; and rates of admission to neonatal intensive

  8. A randomised controlled trial of caseload midwifery care: M@NGO (Midwives @ New Group practice Options).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Sally K; Hartz, Donna; Hall, Bev; Allen, Jyai; Forti, Amanda; Lainchbury, Anne; White, Jan; Welsh, Alec; Tracy, Mark; Kildea, Sue

    2011-10-26

    Australia has an enviable record of safety for women in childbirth. There is nevertheless growing concern at the increasing level of intervention and consequent morbidity amongst childbearing women. Not only do interventions impact on the cost of services, they carry with them the potential for serious morbidities for mother and infant.Models of midwifery have proliferated in an attempt to offer women less fragmented hospital care. One of these models that is gaining widespread consumer, disciplinary and political support is caseload midwifery care. Caseload midwives manage the care of approximately 35-40 a year within a small Midwifery Group Practice (usually 4-6 midwives who plan their on call and leave within the Group Practice.) We propose to compare the outcomes and costs of caseload midwifery care compared to standard or routine hospital care through a randomised controlled trial. A two-arm RCT design will be used. Women will be recruited from tertiary women's hospitals in Sydney and Brisbane, Australia. Women allocated to the caseload intervention will receive care from a named caseload midwife within a Midwifery Group Practice. Control women will be allocated to standard or routine hospital care. Women allocated to standard care will receive their care from hospital rostered midwives, public hospital obstetric care and community based general medical practitioner care. All midwives will collaborate with obstetricians and other health professionals as necessary according to the woman's needs. Data will be collected at recruitment, 36 weeks antenatally, six weeks and six months postpartum by web based or postal survey. With 750 women or more in each of the intervention and control arms the study is powered (based on 80% power; alpha 0.05) to detect a difference in caesarean section rates of 29.4 to 22.9%; instrumental birth rates from 11.0% to 6.8%; and rates of admission to neonatal intensive care of all neonates from 9.9% to 5.8% (requires 721 in each arm

  9. Continuity of midwifery care and gestational weight gain in obese women: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson Denise

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increased prevalence of obesity in pregnant women in Australia and other developed countries is a significant public health concern. Obese women are at increased risk of serious perinatal complications and guidelines recommend weight gain restriction and additional care. There is limited evidence to support the effectiveness of dietary and physical activity lifestyle interventions in preventing adverse perinatal outcomes and new strategies need to be evaluated. The primary aim of this project is to evaluate the effect of continuity of midwifery care on restricting gestational weight gain in obese women to the recommended range. The secondary aims of the study are to assess the impact of continuity of midwifery care on: women's experience of pregnancy care; women's satisfaction with care and a range of psychological factors. Methods/Design A two arm randomised controlled trial (RCT will be conducted with primigravid women recruited from maternity services in Victoria, Australia. Participants will be primigravid women, with a BMI≥30 who are less than 17 weeks gestation. Women allocated to the intervention arm will be cared for in a midwifery continuity of care model and receive an informational leaflet on managing weight gain in pregnancy. Women allocated to the control group will receive routine care in addition to the same informational leaflet. Weight gain during pregnancy, standards of care, medical and obstetric information will be extracted from medical records. Data collected at recruitment (self administered survey and at 36 weeks by postal survey will include socio-demographic information and the use of validated scales to measure secondary outcomes. Discussion Continuity of midwifery care models are well aligned with current Victorian, Australian and many international government policies on maternity care. Increasingly, midwifery continuity models of care are being introduced in low risk maternity care, and

  10. 'Twin2twin' an innovative method of empowering midwives to strengthen their professional midwifery organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadée, Franka; Perdok, Hilde; Sam, Betty; de Geus, Myrte; Kweekel, Liselotte

    2013-10-01

    midwives need professional support from a national midwifery organisation to be able to provide the services that are by regulatory mechanisms and accreditation expected of them. Not all midwives in the world are united in a professional organisation. The aim of this project was to strengthen the midwifery organisations of Sierra Leone and the Netherlands. During the process of the project it was realised that the development of a platform of exchange at organisational level would be enhanced by introducing personal exchange between individual midwives. In response to this new insight the original project plan was adjusted by incorporating the twin2twin method. twin2twin is a feminist methodology of mutual exchange between twenty pairs of midwives from different organisations (in this case Sierra Leone and the Netherlands). The method can be distinguished by 10 specific steps. It was developed, used and (re)evaluated through focus group discussions, storytelling and written evaluations. twinning of organisations was strengthened by adding a human component to the process. With the use of the 'twin2twin' method, midwives were encouraged to invested in a professional and personal bond with their 'twin sister'. This bond was independent and went beyond the relatively short four year project period. Through personal engagement and mutual exchange of knowledge and skills, midwives empowered each other to build and strengthen their midwifery organisations both in Sierra Leone and the Netherlands. (Empowerment refers to the expansion in people's ability to make strategic life choices in a context where this ability was previously denied to them (Narayan, 2005); organisational empowerment includes processes and structures that enhance members' skills and provides them with the mutual support necessary to effect community level change (Zimmerman, 1995).). despite challenges we are convinced that twin2twin can be of additional benefit for the success of other projects

  11. Exploring factors that influence students' attitudes toward midwifery in Jordan: Measuring psychometric properties of a newly developed tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hadid, Lourance A; Al-Rajabi, Omaymah; AlBarmawi, Marwa; Yousef Sayyah, Najah Sayyah; Toqan, Lwiza Moh'd

    2018-03-01

    Students' professional choice to proceed in midwifery is influenced by many factors. This study validated an instrument developed to assess students' attitudes toward midwifery in Jordan. It also addressed the motivating and de-motivating factors influencing students' decision concerning joining and continuing in midwifery. A descriptive, cross-section study was conducted on a convenience sample of 374 midwifery students representing private, governmental, and military midwifery colleges. The researchers developed the study questionnaire through conducting a comprehensive literature review, organizing common themes and consulting experts. Exploratory factor analysis and tests of normality and reliability, including Cronbach's Alpha and Bartlett's test, were used in the analysis. The result was three factors were explained by 23 items. They were as follows: professional knowledge, professional motivation factors, and de-motivating professional factors. The first 8 items explained nearly 61% of the variance. Cronbach's Alpha was 0.834 with a range of 0.835-0.839. The Spearman-Brown coefficient was 0.81 and Guttman Split-Half coefficient was 0.83. Issues of reliability and validity require a repetitive process of testing under a range of circumstances to ensure both stability and representation of the construct. However, addressing factors found to have impact of students' decisions is crucial to improve retention of high quality students. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The universal, collaborative and dynamic model of specialist and advanced nursing and midwifery practice: A way forward?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Laserina; Casey, Mary; Smith, Rita; Fealy, Gerard M; Brien, Denise O'; O'Leary, Denise; Stokes, Diarmuid; McNamara, Martin S; Glasgow, Mary Ellen; Cashin, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    To inform and guide the development of a future model of specialist and advanced nursing and midwifery practice. There is a sizable body of empirical literature supporting the unique contributions of specialist and advanced practice roles to health care. However, there is very little international evidence to inform the integration of a future model for advanced or specialist practice in the Irish healthcare system. A qualitative study was conducted to initiate this important area of inquiry. Purposive sampling was used to generate a sample of informants (n = 15) for the interviews. Nurses and midwives working in specialist and advanced practice and participants from other areas such as legislative, regulatory, policy, medicine and education were included in the sampling frame. Arguments for a new model of specialist and advanced practice were voiced. A number of participants proposed that flexibility within specialist and advanced practitioner career pathways was essential. Otherwise, there existed the possibility of being directed into specialised "silos," precluding movement to another area of integrated practice. Future specialist and advanced practice education programmes need to include topics such as the development of emotional and political intelligence. The contribution of specialist and advanced practice roles to the health service includes providing rapid access to care, seamless patient flow across services, early discharge and lead coordinator of the patient's care trajectory. There was a recommendation of moving towards a universal model to cultivate specialist and advanced nurse and midwife practitioners. The model design has Universal application in a range of contexts "U." It is Collaborative in its inclusivity of all key stakeholders "C." The model is Dynamic pertinent to accommodating movement of nurses and midwives across health continua rather than plateauing in very specialised "silos" "D." © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Using the Five Senses of Success framework to understand the experiences of midwifery students enroled in an undergraduate degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, M; Fenwick, J; Carter, A; Gamble, J

    2015-01-01

    developing a student's sense of capability, purpose, resourcefulness, identity and connectedness (five-senses of success) are key factors that may be important in predicting student satisfaction and progression within their university program. the study aimed to examine the expectations and experiences of second and third year midwifery students enroled in a Bachelor of Midwifery program and identify barriers and enablers to success. a descriptive exploratory qualitative design was used. Fifty-six students enroled in either year 2 or 3 of the Bachelor of Midwifery program in SE Queensland participated in an anonymous survey using open-ended questions. In addition, 16 students participated in two year-level focus groups. Template analysis, using the Five Senses Framework, was used to analyse the data set. early exposure to 'hands on' clinical midwifery practice as well as continuity of care experiences provided students with an opportunity to link theory to practice and increased their perception of capability as they transitioned through the program. Students' sense of identity, purpose, resourcefulness, and capability was strongly influenced by the programs embedded meta-values, including a 'woman centred' approach. In addition, a student's ability to form strong positive relationships with women, peers, lecturers and supportive clinicians was central to developing connections and ultimately a sense of success. A sense of connection not only fostered an ongoing belief that challenges could be overcome but that students themselves could initiate or influence change. the five senses framework provided a useful lens through which to analyse the student experience. Key factors to student satisfaction and retention within a Bachelor of Midwifery program include: a clearly articulated midwifery philosophy, strategies to promote student connectedness including the use of social media, and further development of clinicians' skills in preceptorship, clinical teaching and

  14. Paramedic and midwifery student exposure to workplace violence during clinical placements in Australia - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Malcolm; McKenna, Lisa

    2016-12-11

      The objective of this pilot study was to identify the type of workplace violence experienced by undergraduate paramedic and midwifery students. The study used a cross-sectional methodology with the self-administered paper-based Paramedic Workplace Violence Exposure Questionnaire to elicit undergraduate paramedic and midwife responses to workplace violence whilst on clinical placements. There were 393 students eligible for inclusion in the study. A convenience sample was used. The anonymous questionnaire took 10 to 20 minutes to complete. Descriptive statistics are used to summarise the data with a two-tailed t-test used to compare groups. The main form of workplace violence was verbal abuse 18% and intimidation 17%.  There was a statistically significant difference between midwifery and paramedic students for intimidation (t (134) =-3.143, CI: -0.367 to -0.082, p=0.002) and between females and males for sexual harassment (t (134) =2.029, CI: 0.001 to 0.074, p=0.045), all other results were not statistically different. This pilot study is the first of its kind in Australia and internationally to identify exposure rates of workplace violence by undergraduate paramedic students during clinical placements and one of very few to identify midwifery students' exposure rates of workplace violence. The study identified that students were exposed to a range of workplace violence acts from verbal abuse through to sexual harassment. These findings highlight a need for investigation of workplace violence exposure of medical, nursing and allied health students during the clinical phase of their studies.

  15. Efficacy of neurolinguistic programming training on mental health in nursing and midwifery students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebalzamani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neurolinguistic programming (NLP) refers to the science and art of reaching success and perfection. It is a collection of the skills based on human beings’ psychological characteristics through which the individuals obtain the ability to use their personal capabilities as much as possible. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of NLP training on mental health in nursing and midwifery students in Islamic Azad University Tehran Medical Sciences branch. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, the study population comprised all nursing and midwifery students in Islamic Azad University, Tehran Medical branch, of whom 52 were selected and assigned to two groups through random sampling. Data collection tool was Goldberg General Health Questionnaire (28-item version). After primary evaluation, NLP training was given in five 120-min sessions and the groups were re-evaluated. The obtained data were analyzed. Results: In the nursing group, paired t-test showed a significant difference in the scores of mental health (with 39 points decrease), physical signs (with 7.96 scores decrease), anxiety (with 10.75 scores decrease), social function (with 7.05 scores decrease) and depression (with 9.38 scores decrease). In the midwifery group, it showed a significant difference in mental health (with 22.63 scores decrease), physical signs (with 6.54 scores decrease), anxiety (with nine scores decrease), and depression (with 8.38 scores decrease). Conclusions: This study showed that NLP strategies are effective in the improvement of general health and its various dimensions. Therefore, it is essential to conduct structured and executive programs concerning NLP among the students. PMID:25400679

  16. Efficacy of neurolinguistic programming training on mental health in nursing and midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebalzamani, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    Neurolinguistic programming (NLP) refers to the science and art of reaching success and perfection. It is a collection of the skills based on human beings' psychological characteristics through which the individuals obtain the ability to use their personal capabilities as much as possible. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of NLP training on mental health in nursing and midwifery students in Islamic Azad University Tehran Medical Sciences branch. In this quasi-experimental study, the study population comprised all nursing and midwifery students in Islamic Azad University, Tehran Medical branch, of whom 52 were selected and assigned to two groups through random sampling. Data collection tool was Goldberg General Health Questionnaire (28-item version). After primary evaluation, NLP training was given in five 120-min sessions and the groups were re-evaluated. The obtained data were analyzed. In the nursing group, paired t-test showed a significant difference in the scores of mental health (with 39 points decrease), physical signs (with 7.96 scores decrease), anxiety (with 10.75 scores decrease), social function (with 7.05 scores decrease) and depression (with 9.38 scores decrease). In the midwifery group, it showed a significant difference in mental health (with 22.63 scores decrease), physical signs (with 6.54 scores decrease), anxiety (with nine scores decrease), and depression (with 8.38 scores decrease). This study showed that NLP strategies are effective in the improvement of general health and its various dimensions. Therefore, it is essential to conduct structured and executive programs concerning NLP among the students.

  17. Evaluation of primary care midwifery in The Netherlands: design and rationale of a dynamic cohort study (DELIVER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manniën, Judith; Klomp, Trudy; Wiegers, Therese; Pereboom, Monique; Brug, Johannes; de Jonge, Ank; van der Meijde, Margreeth; Hutton, Eileen; Schellevis, Francois; Spelten, Evelien

    2012-03-20

    In the Netherlands, midwives are autonomous medical practitioners and 78% of pregnant women start their maternity care with a primary care midwife. Scientific research to support evidence-based practice in primary care midwifery in the Netherlands has been sparse. This paper describes the research design and methodology of the multicenter multidisciplinary prospective DELIVER study which is the first large-scale study evaluating the quality and provision of primary midwifery care. Between September 2009 and April 2011, data were collected from clients and their partners, midwives and other healthcare professionals across the Netherlands. Clients from twenty midwifery practices received up to three questionnaires to assess the expectations and experiences of clients (e.g. quality of care, prenatal screening, emotions, health, and lifestyle). These client data were linked to data from the Netherlands Perinatal Register and electronic client records kept by midwives. Midwives and practice assistants from the twenty participating practices recorded work-related activities in a diary for one week, to assess workload. Besides, the midwives were asked to complete a questionnaire, to gain insight into collaboration of midwives with other care providers, their tasks and attitude towards their job, and the quality of the care they provide. Another questionnaire was sent to all Dutch midwifery practices which reveals information regarding the organisation of midwifery practices, provision of preconception care, collaboration with other care providers, and provision of care to ethnic minorities. Data at client, midwife and practice level can be linked. Additionally, partners of pregnant women and other care providers were asked about their expectations and experiences regarding the care delivered by midwives and in six practices client consults were videotaped to objectively assess daily practice. In total, 7685 clients completed at least one questionnaire, 136 midwives and

  18. Evaluation of primary care midwifery in the Netherlands: design and rationale of a dynamic cohort study (DELIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manniën Judith

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, midwives are autonomous medical practitioners and 78% of pregnant women start their maternity care with a primary care midwife. Scientific research to support evidence-based practice in primary care midwifery in the Netherlands has been sparse. This paper describes the research design and methodology of the multicenter multidisciplinary prospective DELIVER study which is the first large-scale study evaluating the quality and provision of primary midwifery care. Methods/Design Between September 2009 and April 2011, data were collected from clients and their partners, midwives and other healthcare professionals across the Netherlands. Clients from twenty midwifery practices received up to three questionnaires to assess the expectations and experiences of clients (e.g. quality of care, prenatal screening, emotions, health, and lifestyle. These client data were linked to data from the Netherlands Perinatal Register and electronic client records kept by midwives. Midwives and practice assistants from the twenty participating practices recorded work-related activities in a diary for one week, to assess workload. Besides, the midwives were asked to complete a questionnaire, to gain insight into collaboration of midwives with other care providers, their tasks and attitude towards their job, and the quality of the care they provide. Another questionnaire was sent to all Dutch midwifery practices which reveals information regarding the organisation of midwifery practices, provision of preconception care, collaboration with other care providers, and provision of care to ethnic minorities. Data at client, midwife and practice level can be linked. Additionally, partners of pregnant women and other care providers were asked about their expectations and experiences regarding the care delivered by midwives and in six practices client consults were videotaped to objectively assess daily practice. Discussion In total, 7685

  19. Il-Musbieh : Malta Nursing and Midwifery Journal : Issue 27 : June 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Cini, Louise

    2005-01-01

    The aim of Il-Musbieh, Malta Nursing and Midwifery Journal, is to provide a link between the Malta Union of Midwives and Nurses (MUMN) and its members. In this issue : [Editorial] Bi ftit kuragg by Louise Cini – Message from the president by Rudolph Cini - Too many babies, don’t get counted – Kelmtejn mis-segretarju generali – Sub committee’s reports – L-influwenza tat-tjur by Amante Darmanin – Society’s contribution to mental illness by Stephen Demicoli – From our diary – Stop poverty by Arc...

  20. [Historical Review of Cesarean Section at King's Maternity Hospital and Midwifery School Zagreb 1908-1918].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habek, D; Kruhak, V

    2016-04-01

    This article presents a historical review of the performance of 23 cesarean sections at the King’s Maternity Hospital and Midwifery School in Zagreb during the 1908-1918 period. Following prenatal screening by midwives and doctors in the hospital, deliveries in high risk pregnant women were performed at maternity hospitals, not at home. The most common indication for cesarean section was narrowed pelvis in 65.2% of women, while postpartum febrile condition was the most common complication in the puerperium. Maternal mortality due to sepsis after the procedure was 8.69% and overall perinatal mortality was 36.3% (stillbirths and early neonatal deaths).

  1. An investigation on nursing, midwifery and health care students' learning motivation in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosgeroglu, Nedime; Acat, M Bahaddin; Ayranci, Unal; Ozabaci, Nilufer; Erkal, Sibel

    2009-09-01

    The aim was to determine differences between the dimensions of motivational learning and sociodemographic characteristics of nursing, midwifery and health care students. For the purpose of collecting data on learning-oriented motivations, occupational learning motivation scale (OLMS) was used. The OLMS was designed to assess the constructs of extrinsic, intrinsic and negative factors for learning, cognitive and lifelong learning goals. The mean levels of the items "willingness to help people", "fear of making mistakes" and "willingness to work with those likely to motivate them" were all determined to be high. Significant differences were revealed for the sex of the students (p<0.05).

  2. Home or hospital birth: a prospective study of midwifery care in the Netherlands.

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegers, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    A large scale study on maternity care in the Netherlands, describing many facets of midwifery care in relation to the preferred place of birth (at home or in hospital), the obstetric result, and the experiences of childbirth. In the Netherlands only women with low risk pregnancies are free to choose where to give birth, at home or in hospital, assisted by an midwife (or general practitioner). The study showed that for these women the outcome of planned home births is at least as good as that ...

  3. Home Birth Midwifery in the United States : Evolutionary Origins and Modern Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Bria

    2016-12-01

    Human childbirth is distinct in requiring-or at least strongly profiting from-the assistance of a knowledgeable attendant to support the mother during birth. With economic modernization, the role of that attendant is transformed, and increased access to obstetric interventions may bring biomedicine into conflict with anatomical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations for childbirth. This article provides an overview of the role of midwifery in human evolution and ways in which this evolutionary heritage is reflected in home birth in the contemporary United States. Opportunities remain for evolutionary scholars to apply their knowledge and skills to strengthen culturally consonant, evolutionarily grounded maternity care within a complex, multilevel, pluralistic medical system.

  4. The lived experiences of flemish midwifery students undertaking an internship in Suriname: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilde, Curinckx; Marion, Welsh; Marianne, Nieuwenhuijze

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the lived experience of Flemish midwifery students undertaking an internship in Suriname. Hermeneutic phenomenological method as described by van Manen. Seven midwifery students from one University College were selected purposefully for an in-depth interview during their internship abroad within the period October-November 2014. All interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. The study revealed five overarching themes: (1) A time to reconsider the time, (2) a time of connection and disconnection, (3) spatiality for thought and rethinking, (4) a body to undergo or a body to respond and (5) the other(s) among the others. The experience of an internship in Suriname presents itself in each individual as: 'A process of awareness from the self with a main focus on the professional'. Meaning that it was a process of 'disconnection' from their own culture towards 'connection' with another culture. Both, the 'rethinking' of their role as a midwife, as well as, balancing between guarding one's own authenticity by 'responding' or being the friendly stranger through 'undergoing', was noticeably striking. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 'She sort of shines': midwives' accounts of 'good' midwifery and 'good' leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrom, Sheena; Downe, Soo

    2010-02-01

    to explore midwives' accounts of the characteristics of 'good' leadership and 'good' midwifery. a phenomenological interview survey. Participants were asked about what made both good and poor midwives and leaders. two maternity departments within National Health Service trusts in the North West of England. qualified midwives, selected by random sampling stratified to encompass senior and junior grades. thematic analysis, carried out manually. ten midwives were interviewed. Sixteen codes and six sub-themes were generated. Across the responses, two clear dimensions (themes) were identified, relating on the one hand to aspects of knowledge, skill and competence (termed 'skilled competence'), and on the other hand to specific personality characteristics (termed 'emotional intelligence'). This study suggests that the ability to act knowledgeably, safely and competently was seen as a basic requirement for both clinical midwives and midwife leaders. The added element which made both the midwife and the leader 'good' was the extent of their emotional capability. this small-scale in-depth study could form the basis for hypothesis generation for larger scale work in this area in future. The findings offer some reinforcement for the potential applicability of theories of transformational leadership to midwifery management and practice. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A study on self concept and adjustment of auxiliary nursing and midwifery (revised) students in a selected school of nursing, Purulia, West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ruby; Mukhopadhyay, Asiah; Mallik, Sarmila; Sarkar, Sharmila; Debnath, Ashis; Patra, Paramita

    2012-07-01

    Nursing students are exposed to different types of stress, with which they have to make adjustments. Self concept Influences their capability of adjustment. The study was done to find out the levels of self concept in different dimensions and levels of adjustment in different spheres of the auxiliary nursing and midwifery (revised) [ANM(R)] students, to find out the association between their self concept and adjustment with different sociodemographic factors and to assess the correlation between self concept and adjustment of these students. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted on the ANM(R) students of School of Nursing, Purulia, West Bengal from October 2008 to January 2009 with sample size 50. Chi-square test was done to find out statistical association. Majority of students (64%) had self concept above average category (145-192). Considering levelsof adjustment, majority of the students (56%) fell in the above average category (5572). Mean score of adjustment was highest in the health dimension (9.96) and lowest in the area of education (6.88). No significant association was found between self concept and age, education and family income. The associations of marital status and type of family with self concept are statistically significant. No significant association was found between adjustment and sociodemographic characteristics. Positive correlation was found between self concept and adjustment (correlation co-efficient r = 0.6109). This study has various implications for nursing administration, nursing education, nursing practice and nursing research.

  7. The effect of face-to-face or group education during pregnancy on sexual function of couples in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Bahadoran

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of the study showed that type of education plays a role in improvement of sexual function in pregnancy. In addition, sex education is effective in prevention of sexual disorders in pregnancy. Therefore, having a special approach toward sex education classes during pregnancy is important for the health providers, particularly midwifery professionals.

  8. Group marking and peer assessment during a group poster presentation: the experiences and views of midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohaja, Magdalena; Dunlea, Margaret; Muldoon, Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    Traditionally, written examination and clinical practice assessments are the main ways of deeming midwifery students fit and competent for practice. Contemporary academics in an effort to engage the students in the learning process have employed alternative teaching and assessment strategies. Among the alternative strategies are group projects after which members of the group are awarded the same grade, and peer assessment. With the purpose of informing the midwifery curricular, we utilised a qualitative descriptive approach to explore midwifery students' experiences and views on the use of group poster presentation for learning and assessment. The participants consisted of a purposive sample of 14 higher diploma midwifery students who were registered in a third level institution in Ireland. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted following the completion of the poster presentation assessment. Permission to undertake the study was obtained from the college ethics committee. In this paper, we focus on the participants' views of group marking and peer assessment which are among the key elements that emerged in this study. While awarding a group mark was overall accepted, peer assessment proved a more contentious issue. Most of the participants found it challenging marking their friends. Reactions to group marks were very much influenced by the group dynamics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of primary care midwifery in the Netherlands: design and rationale of a dynamic cohort study (DELIVER)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniën, J.; Klomp, T.; Wiegers, T.; Pereboom, M.T.R.; Brug, J.; de Jonge, J.; van der Meijde, M.; Hutton, E.K.; Schellevis, F.; Spelten, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, midwives are autonomous medical practitioners and 78% of pregnant women start their maternity care with a primary care midwife. Scientific research to support evidence-based practice in primary care midwifery in the Netherlands has been sparse. This paper describes

  10. Evaluation of primary care midwifery in the Netherlands: design and rationale of a dynamic cohort study (DELIVER).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniën, J.; Klomp, T.; Wiegers, T.; Pereboom, M.; Brug, J.; Jonge, A. de; Meijde, M. van der; Hutton, E.; Schellevis, F.; Spelten, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, midwives are autonomous medical practitioners and 78% of pregnant women start their maternity care with a primary care midwife. Scientific research to support evidence-based practice in primary care midwifery in the Netherlands has been sparse. This paper describes

  11. Caesarean section deliveries: Experiences of mothers of midwifery care at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thobeka P. Jikijela

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Experiences of mothers following a caesarean section delivery with midwifery services at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay were explored and described as diverse. A need for adequate pain management as well as assistance and breastfeeding support to mothers following caesarean delivery was identified as crucial to promote a good mother-to-child relationship.

  12. Definition of the ethical values and ethics codes for Turkish midwifery: a focused group study in kocaeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkiten Ergin, Ayla; Ozcan, Müesser; Ersoy, Nermin; Acar, Zeynep

    2013-09-01

    The independent roles of midwives have not been properly defined, and midwifery ethical values and moral codes proper to Turkish culture have not been developed. The absence of legal regulations concerning midwifery has negatively affected midwifery in the process of professionalization. The purpose of this study was to identify the professional values of midwifery in Turkey. A focus group was created with the participation of nine midwives working at two state hospitals and a university hospital that provide birth service for women in Kocaeli, which is the most important industrial city in Turkey. The opinions of the midwives on the characteristics that a good midwife should possess and the professional values that a good midwife should observe were collected via in-depth interviews. The interviews were recorded. A total of three meetings were held with the participants. Finally, the notes taken by the reporter during these interviews were rearranged, and the recordings were transcribed by the researchers. THE CHARACTERISTICS SUGGESTED BY THE PARTICIPANTS WERE CLASSIFIED INTO THREE CATEGORIES: professional, personal, and interpersonal. Professional competence, capacity to properly inform interested parties, trustworthiness, respect for individuals and human dignity, and empathy were the most commonly named characteristics. As for the professional values of midwifery, professional competence, trustworthiness, responsibility, maximum benefit, and protection of privacy were the most often identified. Midwives also reported that most of the difficulties they faced in the exercise of daily tasks concerned protecting the privacy of their patients as well as the integrity and prestige of the profession, achieving the maximum benefit and least harm for patients, and providing a just and equal service. The professional values were mentioned by participant midwives were similar to the values proposed by international professional organizations. But there were some

  13. Definition of the Ethical Values and Ethics Codes for Turkish Midwifery: A Focused Group Study in Kocaeli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkiten Ergin, Ayla; Özcan, Müesser; Ersoy, Nermin; Acar, Zeynep

    2013-01-01

    Background: The independent roles of midwives have not been properly defined, and midwifery ethical values and moral codes proper to Turkish culture have not been developed. The absence of legal regulations concerning midwifery has negatively affected midwifery in the process of professionalization. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify the professional values of midwifery in Turkey. Materials and Methods: A focus group was created with the participation of nine midwives working at two state hospitals and a university hospital that provide birth service for women in Kocaeli, which is the most important industrial city in Turkey. The opinions of the midwives on the characteristics that a good midwife should possess and the professional values that a good midwife should observe were collected via in-depth interviews. The interviews were recorded. A total of three meetings were held with the participants. Finally, the notes taken by the reporter during these interviews were rearranged, and the recordings were transcribed by the researchers. Results: The characteristics suggested by the participants were classified into three categories: professional, personal, and interpersonal. Professional competence, capacity to properly inform interested parties, trustworthiness, respect for individuals and human dignity, and empathy were the most commonly named characteristics. As for the professional values of midwifery, professional competence, trustworthiness, responsibility, maximum benefit, and protection of privacy were the most often identified. Midwives also reported that most of the difficulties they faced in the exercise of daily tasks concerned protecting the privacy of their patients as well as the integrity and prestige of the profession, achieving the maximum benefit and least harm for patients, and providing a just and equal service. Conclusions: The professional values were mentioned by participant midwives were similar to the values proposed by

  14. Developing interprofessional education online: An ecological systems theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluteau, Patricia; Clouder, Lynn; Cureton, Debra

    2017-07-01

    This article relates the findings of a discourse analysis of an online asynchronous interprofessional learning initiative involving two UK universities. The impact of the initiative is traced over three intensive periods of online interaction, each of several-weeks duration occurring over a three-year period, through an analysis of a random sample of discussion forum threads. The corpus of rich data drawn from the forums is interpreted using ecological systems theory, which highlights the complexity of interaction of individual, social and cultural elements. Ecological systems theory adopts a life course approach to understand how development occurs through processes of progressively more complex reciprocal interaction between people and their environment. This lens provides a novel approach for analysis and interpretation of findings with respect to the impact of pre-registration interprofessional education and the interaction between the individual and their social and cultural contexts as they progress through 3/4 years of their programmes. Development is mapped over time (the chronosystem) to highlight the complexity of interaction across microsystems (individual), mesosystems (curriculum and institutional/care settings), exosystems (community/wider local context), and macrosystems (national context and culture). This article illustrates the intricacies of students' interprofessional development over time and the interactive effects of social ecological components in terms of professional knowledge and understanding, wider appreciation of health and social care culture and identity work. The implications for contemporary pre-registration interprofessional education and the usefulness and applicability of ecological systems theory for future research and development are considered.

  15. Degree-level education is an essential part of modern health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Dame Janet

    2016-08-17

    Dame Jill Macleod Clark is leading the work of the Nursing and Midwifery Council on education standards for the registered nurse degree, compiling views from nurses, students, educators and patients across the UK about the key competencies registered nurses need, both now and in the future.

  16. Retraction of publications in nursing and midwifery research: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghareeb, Amal; Hillel, Stav; McKenna, Lisa; Cleary, Michelle; Visentin, Denis; Jones, Martin; Bressington, Daniel; Gray, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Rates of manuscript retraction in academic journals are increasing. Papers are retracted because of scientific misconduct or serious error. To date there have been no studies that have examined rates of retraction in nursing and midwifery journals. A systematic review of Journal Citation Report listed nursing science journals. The Medline database was searched systematically from January 1980 through July 2017, and www.retractionwatch.com was manually searched for relevant studies that met the inclusion criteria. Two researchers undertook title and abstract and full text screening. Data were extracted on the country of the corresponding author, journal title, impact factor, study design, year of retraction, number of citations after retraction, and reason for retraction. Journals retraction index was also calculated. Twenty-nine retracted papers published in nursing science journals were identified, the first in 2007. This represents 0.029% of all papers published in these journals since 2007. We observed a significant increase in the retraction rate of 0.44 per 10,000 publications per year (95% CI; 0.03-0.84, p = .037). There was a negative association between a journal's retraction index and impact factor with a significant reduction in retraction index of -0.57 for a one-point increase in impact factor (95% CI; -1.05 to -0.09, p = .022). Duplicate publication was the most common reason for retraction (n = 18, 58%). The mean number of citations manuscripts received after retraction was seven, the highest was 52. Most (n = 27, 93.1%) of the retracted papers are still available online (with a watermark indicating they are retracted). Compared to more established academic disciplines, rates of retraction in nursing and midwifery are low. Findings suggest that unsound research is not being identified and that the checks and balances incumbent in the scientific method are not working. In a clinical discipline, this is concerning and may indicate that

  17. Midwifery practice and maternity services: A multisite descriptive study in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binfa, Lorena; Pantoja, Loreto; Ortiz, Jovita; Cavada, Gabriel; Schindler, Peter; Burgos, Rosa Ypania; Maganha E Melo, Célia Regina; da Silva, Lúcia Cristina Florentino Pereira; Lima, Marlise de Oliveira Pimentel; Hernández, Laura Valli; Schlenker Rm, Rosana; Sánchez, Verdún; Rojas, Mirian Solis; Huamán, Betty Cruz; Chauca, Maria Luisa Torres; Cillo, Alicia; Lofeudo, Susana; Zapiola, Sandra; Weeks, Fiona; Foster, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    over the past three decades there has been a social movement in Latin American countries (LAC) to support humanised, physiologic birth. Rates of caesarean section overall in Latin America are approximately 35%, increasing up to 85% in some cases. There are many factors related to poor outcomes with regard to maternal and newborn/infant health in LAC countries. Maternal and perinatal outcome data within and between countries is scarce and inaccurate. The aims of this study were to: i) describe selected obstetric and neonatal outcomes of women who received midwifery care, ii) identify the level of maternal well-being after experiencing midwifery care in 6 Latin America countries. this was a cross sectional and descriptive study, conducted in selected maternity units in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, the Dominican Republic, Peru, and Uruguay. Quantitative methods were used to measure midwifery processes of care and maternal perceptions of well-being in labour and childbirth through a validated survey of maternal well-being and an adapted version of the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) standardized antepartum and intrapartum data set. Maternity units from 6 Latin American countries. the final sample was a convenience sample, and the total participants for all sites in the six countries was 3009 low risk women. for the countries reporting, overall, 82% of these low risk women had spontaneous vaginal deliveries. The rate of caesarean section was 16%; the Dominican Republic had the highest rate of Caesarean sections (30%) and Peru had the lowest rate (4%). The use of oxytocin in labour was widely variable, although overall there was a high proportion of women whose labour was augmented or induced. Ambulation was common, with the lowest proportion (48%) of women ambulating in labour in Chile, Uruguay (50%), Peru (65%), Brazil (85%). The presence of continuous support was highest in Uruguay (93%), Chile (75%) and Argentina (55%), and Peru had the lowest (22

  18. Clinical nursing and midwifery research in African countries: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Carolyn; Larson, Elaine

    2015-05-01

    Globally, the nursing shortage has been deemed a crisis, but African countries have been hit hardest. Therefore, it is of utmost importance nurses use the best available evidence and that nursing research is targeted to address gaps in the evidence. To achieve this, an understanding of what is currently available and identification of gaps in clinical nursing research is critical. We performed a scoping review of existing literature to assess clinical nursing research conducted in all African countries over the past decade, identify gaps in clinical nursing and midwifery research, determine whether they match with health priorities for countries, and define priorities for regional clinical nursing research agendas to improve health outcomes. This is a scoping review of published clinical nursing research conducted in African countries. Systematic searches of literature published between January 01, 2004 and September 15, 2014 were performed in PubMed, Medline, CINHAL, and Embase. Research was included if it was conducted by nurses, included data obtained in African countries or regions within the African continent, published in a peer-reviewed journal with an abstract, and included patient outcomes. Abstracts were independently reviewed for inclusion by two authors. The following data were extracted: countries of publication and study, study type and design, journal, language, and topics of research. Gaps in the literature were identified. Initially, 1091 papers were identified with a final sample of 73 articles meeting inclusion criteria. Studies used 12 designs, were published in 35 journals published in five countries (including two African countries); 29% of the research was published in a single journal (Curatonis). Research was mostly qualitative (57%) and included twenty countries in Africa (38%). There were 12 major topics of study, most often midwifery/maternal/child health (43%), patient experiences (38%), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

  19. These terrifying three words: A qualitative, mixed methods study of students' and mentors' understandings of 'fitness to practise'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock-Stuart, Elaine; MacLaren, Jessica; McLachlan, Alison; James, Christine

    2016-08-01

    There is little empirical published research pertaining to fitness to practise and pre-registration nursing students. Much of the existing fitness to practise literature focuses on medical students and there is a preponderance of literature reviews and descriptive or discursive papers. The multicentre study aimed to explore students' and mentor's understandings of fitness to practise processes in pre-registration nursing programmes. A qualitative study in the interpretive paradigm with interpretive analysis involving 6 focus groups and 4 face-to-face interviews with nursing students and mentors. Eleven Higher Education Institutions providing pre-registration nursing education in the UK. Data were collected January 2014-March 2015 following ethical approval. Purposive sampling was used to recruit mentors and nursing (but not midwifery) students from pre-registration nursing programmes at different stages of educational preparation. Qualitatively driven semi-structured focus groups (n=6) and interviews (n=4) were conducted with a total of 35 participants (17 pre-registration nursing students and 18 nursing mentors). Three themes identified from the student and mentor data are considered: Conceptualising Fitness to Practise; Good Health and Character; and Fear and Anxiety Surrounding Fitness to Practise Processes. Uncertainty about understandings of fitness to practise contributed to a pervasive fear among students and reluctance among mentors to raise concerns about a student's fitness to practise. Both students and mentors expressed considerable anxiety and engaged in catastrophic thinking about fitness to practise processes. Higher Education Institutes should reinforce to students that they are fit to practise the majority of the time and reduce the negative emotional loading of fitness to practise processes and highlight learning opportunities. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of depression among successful and unsuccessful students of Public Health and Nursing-Midwifery schools of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H Baghiani Moghaddam

    2012-02-01

    Conclusion: Public Health and Nursing- Midwifery students in Yazd had a high prevalence of depression. Therefore planning is required to support advisory services to control and prevent depression among students.

  1. Protectionism or competition in managing British nursing research? Current debate among nurse and midwifery teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzon, M; Gass, L; Wimpenny, P; Gibb, S

    1998-01-01

    The intention is to highlight key issues related to research by nurse and midwifery teachers. The debate centres on the 'culture change' facing teachers from traditional colleges moving to universities where a more formal research requirement prevails. Data were drawn from selected official reports and other literature informing the introductory discussion. Emerging themes were discussed by 25 nurse and midwife teachers at Forresterhill College, Aberdeen in March 1996 and their views were recorded and analysed. Selected documents and discussion records were reviewed, using a thematic approach. Main themes concerned nursing as art and science, balance between multidisciplinary and unidisciplinary research and ring-fencing nursing research funds. Anxieties among teachers centred on the increased research requirement in universities with possible neglect of teaching excellence.

  2. Critical Medical Anthropology in Midwifery Research: A Framework for Ethnographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, Elizabeth C; Pincombe, Jan I; McKellar, Lois V

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of critical medical anthropology (CMA) as a theoretical framework for research in the maternity care setting. With reference to the doctoral research of the first author, we argue for the relevance of using CMA for research into the maternity care setting, particularly as it relates to midwifery. We then give an overview of an existing analytic model within CMA that we adapted for looking specifically at childbirth practices and which was then used in both analyzing the data and structuring the thesis. There is often no clear guide to the analysis or writing up of data in ethnographic research; we therefore offer this Critical analytic model of childbirth practices for other researchers conducting ethnographic research into childbirth or maternity care.

  3. Scoring and setting pass/fail standards for an essay certification examination in nurse-midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, J T; Greener, D L; Gross, L J

    1992-03-01

    Examination for certification or licensure of health professionals (credentialing) in the United States is almost exclusively of the multiple choice format. The certification examination for entry into the practice of the profession of nurse-midwifery has, however, used a modified essay format throughout its twenty-year history. The examination has recently undergone a revision in the method for score interpretation and for pass/fail decision-making. The revised method, described in this paper, has important implications for all health professional credentialing agencies which use modified essay, oral or practical methods of competency assessment. This paper describes criterion-referenced scoring, the process of constructing the essay items, the methods for assuring validity and reliability for the examination, and the manner of standard setting. In addition, two alternative methods for increasing the validity of the pass/fail decision are evaluated, and the rationale for decision-making about marginal candidates is described.

  4. Women's experiences of self-reporting health online prior to their first midwifery visit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Helle; Clausen, Jette Aaroe; Hvidtjørn, Dorte

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information and communication technologies are increasingly used in health care to meet demands of efficiency, safety and patient-centered care. At a large Danish regional hospital, women report their physical, mental health and personal needs prior to their first antenatal visit....... Little is known about the process of self-reporting health, and how this information is managed during the client-professional meeting. AIM: To explore women's experiences of self-reporting their health status and personal needs online prior to the first midwifery visit, and how this information may...... personal health', 'Reducing and generating risk', and 'Bridges and gaps'. Compared to reporting physical health information, more advanced levels of health literacy might be needed to self-assess mental health and personal needs. Self-reporting health can induce feelings of being normal but also increase...

  5. Social Well-Being and Related Factors in Students of School of Nursing and Midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Alireza; Marzban, Maryam; Sourosh, Maryam; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Nejabat, Mahmoud; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi

    2017-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization viewpoint, social well-being is an important dimension of health along with physical and mental aspects. Evaluation of social well-being is necessary in students, especially in medical sciences students due to future responsibility as health care professionals. The present study attempted to investigate the level of social well-being, five domains of it (like actualization, integration, contribution), and some related factors in the school of nursing and midwifery students. This cross-sectional study was carried out between Julys to December 2015 and comprised 346 students in the school of nursing and midwifery in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Social well-being, socio-demographic status and physical activity were measured by valid questionnaires. Univariate linear regression analysis, multiple imputation method, ANOVA and independent sample t-test were used as different statistical methods. The P values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. The mean score of social well-being was 50. The minimum and maximum scores of social well-being were 20 to 100. Married students had higher social well-being than single students in univariate linear regression (Beta: 2.111, 95% CI: (0.387 to 3.738), P=0.017). Also, social integration had higher scores in married students (P=0.015). Social actualization was higher in male students (P=0.015); on the other hand, social contribution was higher in female students (P=0.026). The results of our study showed that social well-being status of students in this research was not satisfactory. Designing and conducting programs for promotion of social well-being, for example preparing facilities for marriage of students, can be helpful. Evaluation of social well-being in students of other schools with multicenter studies seems to be useful.

  6. An investigation into the use of aromatherapy in intrapartum midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E E; Blamey, C; Ersser, S J; Barnetson, L; Lloyd, A J

    2000-04-01

    The principal aim of the study was to examine the contribution of aromatherapy to the promotion of maternal comfort during labor and as a tool to improve the quality of midwifery care. Evaluative study. Delivery suite in a large British teaching hospital with approximately 6,500 deliveries per annum. A total of 8,058 mothers were evaluated between 1990 and 1998. Women were offered aromatherapy to relieve anxiety, pain, nausea and/or vomiting or to strengthen contractions. Routine data collected on the use of aromatherapy over the period were analyzed. Data from the unit audit were used to provide a comparison group of mothers not given aromatherapy (n = 15,799) from the study center. Outcome measures include mothers' ratings of effectiveness, outcomes of labor, use of pharmacologic pain relief, uptake of intravenous oxytocin, reported associated symptoms, and annual costs. The use of aromatherapy during childbirth was an increasingly popular care option with mothers and midwives. More than 50% of mothers rated it as helpful, and only 14% found it unhelpful. The use of aromatherapy was not confined to low-risk mothers. Sixty percent of the sample were primigravidae, and 32% overall had had their labor induced. The administration of aromatherapy in childbirth did appear to reduce the need for additional pain relief in a proportion of mothers. More than 8% of primigravidae and 18% of multigravidae used no conventional pain relief during labor after using essential oils. During the years of the study, the use of pethidine in the study center declined from 6% to 0.2% of women. The study also showed that aromatherapy may have the potential to augment labor contractions for women in dysfunctional labour. A very low number of associated adverse symptoms were reported (1%). This study represents a successful example of the integration of a complementary therapy into mainstream midwifery practice and forms a basis for future research.

  7. Burning bridges: policy, practice, and the destruction of midwifery in rural Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Gwynne L

    2003-05-01

    The trend toward hospitalization of birth has a long history in Costa Rica and currently approximately 98% of births take place in the clinical setting. Impoverished rural areas, like the town of Buenos Aires, lag behind national trends and only recently has birth moved from the home to the hospital. Costa Rica's midwife certification program co-opted rural midwives as bridges to biomedicalization, responsible for both pushing women into the biomedical setting and filling the gaps left by a limited national health care system. Despite the eventual illegalization of key practices and of home birth itself, local use of midwives' services continues, albeit with local demands that have transformed midwives into bridges to biomedical care in ways unanticipated by and invisible to national programmers. Midwives provide key services like prenatal massage, treatment of pregnancy crises, and attending unforeseen home births and women unable to afford the modest costs of hospitalization. Yet, midwives report increasing dissatisfaction and the desire to stop providing services in their communities. Practices like prenatal massage are in demand, but are no longer embedded in a system of local exchange that is socially and economically meaningful. Midwives blame their clientele for their dissatisfaction, but directly link these changes to the notions of professionalism, compensation, and changing community values. Thus, the social relationship between midwives and their clients must also be understood as a destructive force burning midwifery as a bridge to safe birth. In this essay, I argue that the process of both remodeling and subsequently destroying midwifery practices begun in the formal health care sector at the national level continues at the local level through changing values and meanings associated with midwives' practices.

  8. Social Well-Being and Related Factors in Students of School of Nursing and Midwifery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Salehi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the World Health Organization viewpoint, social well-being is an important dimension of health along with physical and mental aspects. Evaluation of social well-being is necessary in students, especially in medical sciences students due to future responsibility as health care professionals. The present study attempted to investigate the level of social well-being, five domains of it (like actualization, integration, contribution, and some related factors in the school of nursing and midwifery students. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out between Julys to December 2015 and comprised 346 students in the school of nursing and midwifery in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Social well-being, socio-demographic status and physical activity were measured by valid questionnaires. Univariate linear regression analysis, multiple imputation method, ANOVA and independent sample t-test were used as different statistical methods. The P values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results: The mean score of social well-being was 50. The minimum and maximum scores of social well-being were 20 to 100. Married students had higher social well-being than single students in univariate linear regression (Beta: 2.111, 95% CI: (0.387 to 3.738, P=0.017. Also, social integration had higher scores in married students (P=0.015. Social actualization was higher in male students (P=0.015; on the other hand, social contribution was higher in female students (P=0.026. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that social well-being status of students in this research was not satisfactory. Designing and conducting programs for promotion of social well-being, for example preparing facilities for marriage of students, can be helpful. Evaluation of social well-being in students of other schools with multicenter studies seems to be useful.

  9. Achieving success in intervention studies: an analysis of variable staff engagement across three midwifery settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Schoonbeek, Sue; Ossenberg, Christine; Caddick, Alison; Wing, Diane; Capell, Lorna; Gould, Karen

    2014-06-01

    To critically analyse the success of staff's behaviour changes in the practice setting. Facilitators were employed to initiate and facilitate a four-step process (optimism, overcoming obstacles, oversight and reinforcing outcomes) that fostered development of behaviours consistent with learning in everyday practice. Many studies seek to engage staff in workplace behaviour improvement. The success of such studies is highly variable. Little is known about the work of the facilitator in ensuring success. Understanding the contextual factors that contribute to effective facilitation of workplace improvement is essential to ensure best use of resources. Mixed methods Facilitators employed a four-step process - optimism, overcoming obstacles, oversight and reinforcing outcomes - to stage behaviour change implementation. The analysis of staff engagement in behaviour changes was assessed through weekly observation of workplaces, informal discussions with staff and facilitator diaries. The impact of behaviour change was informed through pre- and postsurveys on staff's perception across three midwifery sites. Surveys measured (1) midwives' perception of support for their role in facilitating learning (Support Instrument for Nurses Facilitating the Learning of Others) and (2) development of a learning culture in midwifery practice settings (Clinical Learning Organisational Culture Survey). Midwives across three sites completed the presurvey (n = 216) and postsurvey (n = 90). Impact varied according to the degree that facilitators were able to progress teams through four stages necessary for change (OOORO). Statistically significant results were apparent in two subscales important for supporting staff, namely teamwork and acknowledgement; in the two areas, facilitators worked through 'obstacles' and coached staff in performing the desired behaviours and rewarded them for their success. Elements of the learning culture also statistically improved in one site. Findings suggest

  10. A Survey of Knowledge, Individual Perceived Risk, General Perceived Risk, and Behavioral Intentions Regarding Hepatitis B among Students in the Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health at Shahrekord Islamic Azad University in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimiankakolaki, Zohreh; Baghianimoghadam, Mohammad Hossein; Gerayllo, Sakineh; Sheikh Samani, Nadia; Hadipour, Hajar

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis B is the most common cause of liver disease, and medical students are a risk group for the disease given their future occupations. The aim of the study was to assess of predictors of hepatitis B in the Faculty of nursing, midwifery and health at Shahrekord Islamic Azad University in 2014. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 300 students from the Faculty of nursing, midwifery and health at Shahrekord Islamic Azad University. The students answered questionnaires with items covering demographic characteristics, individual knowledge, public risk perception, perceived personal risk, and behavioral intentions regarding hepatitis B. The data were analyzed with SPSS version 18 software. The mean knowledge score of the students was 4.77 ± 1.71, the mean public risk perception score was 24.22 ± 3.44, the mean perceived personal risk score was 6.51 ± 1.97, and the mean behavioral intention score was 12.06 ± 2.97. There were significant differences in the mean knowledge scores in terms of gender, level of awareness, and level of education. There were also differences in the mean behavioral intention scores in terms of gender and field of study, the mean perceived personal risk scores in terms of level of education and field of study, and the mean public risk perception scores in terms of field of study. According to the results of this study, it is necessary to implement educational intervention in order to allow students to identify risk factors and overcome barriers to understanding the implications of the disease in this context.

  11. Teaching research methodology to student midwives through a socio-constructivist educational model: The experience of the high school for science and health techniques of Tunis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherissi, Atf; Tinsa, Francine; Soussi, Sonia; Benzarti, Anis

    2016-02-01

    Since its independence in 1956, Tunisia's maternal health indicators have steadily improved as the result of the implementation of a national holistic strategy that emancipated women and developed midwifery education and maternal health services provision. The last review of the midwifery education programme, occurred in 2008, and was based on evidence based core competencies. This paper describes the implementation process of the socio-constructivist educational model used by to teach research methodology to student midwives, the changes observed among them, the challenges and the lessons learned. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nature and Scope of Certified Nurse-Midwifery Practice in One Large State in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings-Tolsma, Marie; Wilcox Foster, Sarah; Brucker, Mary C; Nodine, Priscilla; Burpo, Rebecca; Camune, Barbara; Griggs, Jackie; Callahan, Tiffany J

    2018-04-21

    To describe the nature and scope of nurse-midwifery practice in Texas and to determine legislative priorities and practice barriers. Across the globe, midwives are the largest group of maternity care providers despite little known about midwifery practice. With a looming shortage of midwives, there is a pressing need to understand midwives' work environment and scope of practice. Mixed methods research utilizing prospective descriptive survey and interview. An online survey was administered to nurse-midwives practicing in the state of Texas (N=449) with a subset (n=10) telephone interviewed. Descriptive and inferential statistics and content analysis was performed. The survey was completed by 141 midwives with 8 interviewed. Most were older, Caucasian, and held a master's degree. A majority worked full-time, were in clinical practice in larger urban areas, and were employed by a hospital or physician-group. Care was most commonly provided for Hispanic and white women; approximately a quarter could care for greater numbers of patients. Most did not clinically teach midwifery students. Physician practice agreements were believed unnecessary and prescriptive authority requirements restrictive. Legislative issues were typically followed through the professional organization or social media sites; most felt a lack of competence to influence health policy decisions. While most were satisfied with current clinical practice, a majority planned a change in the next 3 to 5 years. An aging midwifery workforce, not representative of the race/ethnicity of the populations served, is underutilized with practice requirements that limit provision of services. Health policy changes are needed to ensure unrestricted practice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Developing, implementing and evaluating a simulation learning package on post-partum haemorrhage for undergraduate midwifery students in KwaZulu-Natal*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafaza B. Amod

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The training of undergraduate midwifery students to identify and manage post-partum haemorrhage, is an essential skill in midwifery. Aim: The aim of this study was to develop, implement and evaluate a simulation learning package (SLP on post-partum haemorrhage for undergraduate midwifery students using high fidelity simulation without risks to real-life patients. Methods: An exploratory sequential mixed methodology was used in this study. The study was made up of three phases namely; the development, implementation and evaluation of the learning package. The research participants were fourth year baccalaureate of nursing midwifery students and midwifery experts involved in teaching midwifery. Data was collected using an evaluation checklist for experts, a student satisfaction survey and focus group sessions. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS Version 23.0 and the qualitative data was analysed using content analysis as described by Graneheim and Lundman(2004. Results: The evaluation checklist for experts revealed that the developed SLP was considered suitable for undergraduate students. It encouraged active learning, teamwork and accommodated diverse learning styles. The package was easy to use and offered opportunities for student feedback. The student satisfaction survey revealed that the pre-simulation support received was adequate and helpful, and the post simulation outcomes showed that using high fidelity simulation improved clinical skills, knowledge, critical thinking, self-confidence and satisfaction. The focus group sessions revealed that the SLP was an innovative and interactive method of learning; it improved the student's perception of their clinical competence, stimulated critical thinking and increased self-confidence. Conclusion: A simulation learning package, that uses high fidelity simulation, can be an innovative and interactive method to teach midwifery emergencies.

  14. Feasibility of PBL implementation in clinical courses of nursing and midwifery from the viewpoints of faculty members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahidi R.Gh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: PBL, as a teaching method, has a basic role in promoting education level and combining the theoretical and practical knowledge. But there still exist serious obstacles to implementing this educational method Purpose: To recognize the impediments an obstacle preventing PBL method implementation. Methods: The Subjects studied in this research are all the tutors who taught basic and clinical courses in the faculty of nursing and midwifery in the first and second terms of the year 2001-2002. Choosing subjects was done by using census method and the number of subjects was 33 basic course teachers and 20 clinical course teachers. A questionnaire developed based on the studies’ goals was the tool used for collecting data. Data was analysed by means of SPSS/Win 10 Soft ware using descriptive statistics Results: The 95% of basic course teachers and 93.9% clinical course teachers think of the conditions and facilities needed for implementing PBL as of medium level. Tutors believe that most of the impediments are related to student's lack of group work skills, and the skills needed for making correct communication, and the need for students practical participation in PBL for making them ready and receptive. They also relate most of the strong points to PBL's being efficient in training community – oriented students. The tutors state that performing PBL does not decrease their motivation at all, due to the change in their role from lecturer to facilitator. Conclusion: The Although findings of this research indicate that the conditions needed for implementing PBL exist at present, still there are many obstacles to its performance such as student's lack of group work skills and their disability in making correct interaction, costliness of beginning and marinating PBL, large number of students and lack of tutors Keywords: PBL IMPLEMENTATION, MEDICAL EDUCATION

  15. Facilitating values awareness through the education of health professionals: Can web based decision making technology help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbold, Rosemary; Lees, Amanda

    2016-03-01

    Recent events in the health care landscape have focused nursing's collective mind on the role of values in health care delivery. For example, in England, the government has issued a mandate to health educators that places primacy on developing a workforce who prioritise and implement the core values of the National Health Service. In the current environment in which 'values' have become common currency, this paper begins by asking what values are, arguing for greater understanding and recognition of their intrinsic role in driving decisions. It then reports on research carried out in New Zealand exploring the potential of the Values Exchange web based educational technology to promote and facilitate a values aware health workforce. Qualitative thematic analysis from a cohort of pre-registration health professionals revealed new understandings about values through the facilitation of deeper, multi-layered thinking. The unique online space provided a safe pre-registration environment for deliberating complex cases, with students readily identifying advantages for future practice and patients. For lasting and meaningful change to occur, a fundamental shift is required in our understanding of values and how they ultimately impact on the way we individually and collectively deliver care to our patients. The Values Exchange may offer a contemporary and timely vehicle for achieving these goals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Impact of Wireless Keypads in an Interprofessional Education Context with Health Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Lewis, Belinda; Boyle, Malcolm; Brown, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify if wireless keypads could facilitate interprofessional interaction among undergraduate paramedic, nursing, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, health science, social work and midwifery students. Secondary research aims included the examination of students' perceptions of interprofessional education and how…

  17. Director of nursing and midwifery leadership: informed through the lens of critical social science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solman, Annette

    2010-05-01

    Highlight the use of critical social science theories, practice development principles and a situational leadership framework within transformational leadership to inform Directors of Nursing and Midwifery (DoNM) practices as leaders. Healthcare is constantly changing, unpredictable, strives for quality service and cost containment, which can result in stress and crisis for healthcare workers. DoNM leadership is critical to supporting and leading staff through these complex times within healthcare. Understanding theories, frameworks and their application to real-world practice can assist in supporting individuals and teams to navigate through the changing healthcare environment. Blending critical social science theories with practice development principles and the situational leadership framework can assist the DoNM to enact transformational leadership to support the development of individuals and teams to meet the complex healthcare needs of patients within the clinical setting. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSE MANAGEMENT: This article contributes through the practical application of critical social science theories, practice development principles and situational leadership framework within transformational leadership as an approach for enacting DoNM leadership. To further understand and develop in the role of the contemporary DoNM in leadership, these directors are encouraged to publish their work.

  18. Midwifery Provision of Home Birth Services: American College of Nurse-Midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The number of women in the United States choosing to give birth at home has risen substantially in the past decade, creating an increased need for understanding of the evidence regarding the provision of midwifery care to women and families considering this option. The safety of home birth has been evaluated in observational studies in several industrialized nations, including the United States. Most studies find that women who are essentially healthy at term with a singleton fetus and give birth at home have positive outcomes and a lower rate of interventions during labor. Although some studies have found increased neonatal morbidity and mortality in newborns born at home when compared to newborns born in a hospital, the absolute numbers reported in both birth sites are very low. The purpose of this clinical bulletin is to review the evidence on provision of care to women and families who plan to give birth at home, including roles and responsibilities, shared decision making, informed consent, and ongoing assessment for birth site selection. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  19. Self-tracking, governmentality, and Nursing and Midwifery Council's (2016) revalidation policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanlehin, Rosemary M

    2018-05-01

    In April 2016 the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) introduced a new revalidation continuous professional development (CPD) policy. This policy states that revalidation is the responsibility of nurses, and although employers are urged to support the revalidation process, the NMC clearly states that employers have no legal requirement to provide either time or funds for the CPD activities of nurses and midwives (NMC, 2014, 2016; Royal College of Nursing, 2016). The aim of this professional development policy is to ensure that nurses and midwives maintain their professional competency and to promote public safety and confidence in nurses and midwives. A closer look at the process of revalidation suggests that several measures have been introduced to ensure that nurses and midwives conform to the CPD policy, and this paper examines the influence of governmentality and neoliberalism on the NMC's self-tracking revalidation policy. It will be recommended that the responsibility for the revalidation process should be shared by nurses, midwives, and their employers, and that time and money should be allocated for the professional development of nurses and midwives. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modern Times, New Birth and New Midwives: Midwifery in Japan, 1868–1930s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Homei

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The shin-sanba, or medical ‘new-midwife’ who emerged during the Meiji period (1868- 1912 in Japan seems, looked at from the present, to have successfully replaced the ‘old-midwife’ (kyû-sanba and the increasingly criminalised ‘non-licensed midwife’ (mumenkyo-sanba, while midwifery was constantly developing as a modern medical profession. This paper suggests that the history of the midwife during the modern time was more complex than what we see today. First, the emergence and prosperity of shin-sanba were specific to the historical contingencies of modern Japan and the interplay of various groups of historical actors – hygiene officers, sankai (obstetrician-gynaecologists, other midwives, and ‘clients’. Second, through the course of the modern period, shin-sanba did not replace other types of midwives and in fact, different kinds of midwives did coexist. Finally, the existence and status of midwives greatly depended upon the laissez faire medical market, and the market’s realities often contradicted the medical rhetoric that favoured shin-sanba over other kinds of midwives.

  1. Paired peer review of university classroom teaching in a school of nursing and midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul N; Parker, Steve; Smigiel, Heather

    2012-08-01

    Peer review of university classroom teaching can increase the quality of teaching but is not universally practiced in Australian universities. To report an evaluation of paired peer-review process using both paper and web based teaching evaluation tools. Twenty university teachers in one metropolitan Australian School of Nursing and Midwifery were randomly paired and then randomly assigned to a paper based or web-based peer review tool. Each teacher reviewed each other's classroom teaching as part of a peer review program. The participants then completed an 18 question survey evaluating the peer review tool and paired evaluation process. Responses were analyzed using frequencies and percentages. Regardless of the tool used, participants found this process of peer review positive (75%), collegial (78%), supportive (61%) and non-threatening (71%). Participants reported that the peer review will improve their own classroom delivery (61%), teaching evaluation (61%) and planning (53%). The web-based tool was found to be easier to use and allowed more space than the paper-based tool. Implementation of a web-based paired peer review system can be a positive method of peer review of university classroom teaching. Pairing of teachers to review each other's classroom teaching is a promising strategy and has the potential to improve teaching in teaching universities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Making Sense of Participant Experiences: Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis in Midwifery Research

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    Samantha J Charlick

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Selecting the most appropriate methodology for research as a doctoral student is one of the most important yet difficult decisions. Not only should the methodology suit the research question, it is important that it resonates with the philosophy of one’s discipline and produces needed results that will contribute to knowledge. Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA is an approach to qualitative enquiry. IPA seeks to explore how individuals make sense of their major life experiences and is committed to the detailed study of each particular case before moving to broader claims. In the field of midwifery, midwives work with women throughout pregnancy, childbirth and the early postnatal period, offering individualized care based on the unique needs of each woman. IPA aligns with this women-centered philosophy as it offers a methodological approach that considers the individual in a local context. By capturing context specific situations, IPA allows broad-based knowledge to be contextualized within a social and cultural context, producing relevant findings. Thus the access to IPA studies will enable midwives to better care for women and their families through understanding the experiences and perceptions of those in their scope of practice. This paper presents the theoretical framework leading to practical guidelines on how to con-duct a doctoral-level IPA study, as experienced by the first author. It also addresses the advantages and challenges around utilizing IPA, illustrated through examples from the doc-toral student’s study on the journey of exclusive breastfeeding in Australia.

  3. Effectiveness of virtual classroom training in improving the knowledge and key maternal neonatal health skills of general nurse midwifery students in Bihar, India: A pre- and post-intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Neeraj; Kumar, Somesh; Balasubramaniam, Sudharsanam Manni; Bhargava, Saurabh; Sinha, Pallavi; Bakshi, Bhawna; Sood, Bulbul

    2016-01-01

    In 2008-09, the National Health Systems Resource Center of India reported overall quality of nurse-midwifery education in Bihar as grossly sub-optimal. To address this, we implemented a competency-based training using virtual classrooms in two general nurse midwives (GNM) schools of Bihar. The students from remotely located nursing institutions were now able to see live demonstrations of maternal and newborn health (MNH) practices performed by a trained faculty on simulation models at instructor location. To evaluate the effectiveness of virtual classroom training in improving the MNH-related skills of the nursing-midwifery students in Bihar, India. This study used a pre- and post-intervention design without a control group. Students from two public GNM schools of Bihar. Final-year students from both the GNM schools who have completed their coursework in MNH. A total of 83 students from selected GNM schools were assessed for their competencies in six key MNH practices using objective structured clinical examination method prior to intervention. A 72hour standardized training package was then implemented in these schools through virtual classroom approach. Post-intervention, 92 students from the next batch who attended virtual training were assessed for the same competencies. The mean student score assessed before the intervention was 21.3 (95% CI, 19.9-22.6), which increased to 62.0 (95% CI, 60.3-63.7) post-intervention. This difference was statistically significant. When adjusted for clustering using linear regression analysis, the students in post-intervention scored 52.3 (95% CI, 49.4%-55.3%) percentage points higher than pre-intervention, and this was statistically significant. Virtual classroom training was found to be effective in improving knowledge and key MNH skills of GNM students in Bihar, India. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Midwives and nutrition education during pregnancy: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrish, Jamila; Yeatman, Heather; Williamson, Moira

    2014-03-01

    This review explored the extent to which the role of midwives in nutrition education during pregnancy has been reported in the literature and areas requiring further research were identified. A review of the literature was undertaken. Articles included in the review were published in English, in scholarly journals, and provided information about the knowledge, education, and attitudes of midwives towards nutrition during pregnancy. Few studies were identified. The included studies were exploratory and descriptive. Studies had reported that midwives lacked a basic knowledge of nutrition requirements during pregnancy. This might be attributed to inadequate nutrition education provided in both undergraduate and postgraduate midwifery programmes. The nutrition education components of midwifery courses were not identified within the studies reviewed. Limited international or Australian research is available that reports on the role of midwives in nutrition education during pregnancy and the nutrition content of midwifery curricula. This represents an important omission in midwives capacity to support the health of pregnant women and their babies. More research is required to explore the educational needs of midwives to enhance nutritional care for pregnant women. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Midwifery continuity of carer in an area of high socio-economic disadvantage in London: A retrospective analysis of Albany Midwifery Practice outcomes using routine data (1997-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Caroline Se; Leap, Nicky; Edwards, Nadine; Sandall, Jane

    2017-05-01

    in 1997, The Albany Midwifery Practice was established within King's College Hospital NHS Trust in a South East London area of high social disadvantage. The Albany midwives provided continuity of care to around 216 women per year, including those with obstetric, medical or social risk factors. In 2009, the Albany Midwifery Practice was closed in response to concerns about safety, amidst much publicity and controversy. The aim of this evaluation was to examine trends and outcomes for all mothers and babies who received care from the practice from 1997-2009. a retrospective, descriptive analysis of data routinely collected over the 12.5 year period was undertaken including changes over time and outcomes by demographic features. all women booked with the Albany Midwifery Practice were included. of the 2568 women included over the 12.5 year period, more than half (57%) were from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities; one third were single and 11.4% reported being single and unsupported. Almost all women (95.5%) were cared for in labour by either their primary or secondary midwife. There were high rates of spontaneous onset of labour (80.5%), spontaneous vaginal birth (79.8%), homebirth (43.5%), initiation of breastfeeding (91.5%) and breastfeeding at 28 days (74.3% exclusively and 14.8% mixed feeding). Of the 79% of women who had a physiological third stage, 5.9% had a postpartum haemorrhage. The overall rate of caesarean section was 16%. The preterm birth rate was low (5%). Ninety-five per cent of babies had an Apgar score of 8 or greater at 5minutes and 6% were admitted to a neonatal unit for more than two days. There were 15 perinatal deaths (perinatal mortality rate of 5.78 per 1000 births); two were associated with significant congenital abnormalities. There were no intrapartum intrauterine deaths. this analysis has shown that the Albany Midwifery Practice demonstrated positive outcomes for women and babies in socially disadvantaged and BAME groups

  6. Paramedic and midwifery student exposure to workplace violence during clinical placements in Australia – A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this pilot study was to identify the type of workplace violence experienced by undergraduate paramedic and midwifery students. Methods The study used a cross-sectional methodology with the self-administered paper-based Paramedic Workplace Violence Exposure Questionnaire to elicit undergraduate paramedic and midwife responses to workplace violence whilst on clinical placements. There were 393 students eligible for inclusion in the study. A convenience sample was used. The anonymous questionnaire took 10 to 20 minutes to complete. Descriptive statistics are used to summarise the data with a two-tailed t-test used to compare groups. Results The main form of workplace violence was verbal abuse 18% and intimidation 17%. There was a statistically significant difference between midwifery and paramedic students for intimidation (t(134)=-3.143, CI: -0.367 to -0.082, p=0.002) and between females and males for sexual harassment (t(134)=2.029, CI: 0.001 to 0.074, p=0.045), all other results were not statistically different. Conclusions This pilot study is the first of its kind in Australia and internationally to identify exposure rates of workplace violence by undergraduate paramedic students during clinical placements and one of very few to identify midwifery students’ exposure rates of workplace violence. The study identified that students were exposed to a range of workplace violence acts from verbal abuse through to sexual harassment. These findings highlight a need for investigation of workplace violence exposure of medical, nursing and allied health students during the clinical phase of their studies. PMID:27941182

  7. Contexto, desafios e perspectivas na formação de obstetrizes no Brasil Midwifery training in Brazil: context, challenges and perspectives

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    Nádia Zanon Narchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo descreve o processo de criação do Curso de Obstetrícia da Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades da Universidade de São Paulo. Ele apresenta o projeto político pedagógico e os referenciais teóricos que suportam a formação de obstetrizes, a resistência ou os movimentos que se opõem à formação e ao registro desses profissionais, os desafios que precisam ser superados e, finalmente, as perspectivas nas quais as obstetrizes podem contribuir não só para melhorar a qualidade dos cuidados em saúde, como também para diminuir as taxas de morbidade e mortalidade materna e perinatal e de cesarianas desnecessárias no país.This article describes the creation process of the first direct-entry Midwifery Course in Brazil, at the School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. It presents the course's political-educational project and the theoretical references that support it; the movements or resistances that are opposed to the training and registration of midwives; the challenges that need to be overcome. Finally, the paper presents the foreseen perspectives of contribution of these professionals towards the improvement of healthcare quality, the decrease in maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality rates, as well as of unnecessary cesarean sections in the country.

  8. The introduction of computer assisted learning in a school of midwifery using the Wessex Care Plan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, W C

    1989-04-01

    This case study was the result of attending the Computer Assisted Learning (CAL) Course sponsored by the Wessex Regional CAL Project. This was the Region's initiative to prepare Nurse and Midwife Teachers in developing CAL in the curriculum. The small scale qualitative classroom study was conducted in the School of Midwifery. The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of the content-free Wessex Care Plan Program (WCPP) in the Midwifery curriculum. For the evaluation of the study, a triangulation of data were obtained from the following sources: 1) classroom observation 2) questionnaires and interviews of eight Student Midwives 3) colleagues' responses to the introduction of CAL and personal experience The findings of this study showed that the content-free WCPP was easy to prepare and implement. The Student Midwives found the program easy to follow and a useful means of learning. At the same time it was enjoyable and fun; a dimension of learning that we could do with more often!

  9. The Effect of Training Problem-Solving Skills on Coping Skills of Depressed Nursing and Midwifery Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Barzanjeh Atri, Shirin; Ghavipanjeh, Somayeh; Farnam, Alireza; Gholizadeh, Leyla

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses have a considerable role in caring and health promotion. Depressed nurses are deficient in their coping skills that are important in mental health. This study evaluated the effectiveness of training problem-solving skills on coping skills of depressed nursing and midwifery students. Methods: The Beck Depression Scale and coping skills questionnaire were administered in Tabriz and Urmia nursing and midwifery schools. 92 students, who had achieved a score above 10 on the Beck Depression Scale, were selected. 46 students as study group and 46 students as control group were selected randomly. The intervention group received six sessions of problem-solving training within three weeks. Finally, after the end of sessions, coping skills and depression scales were administered and analyzed for both groups. Results: Comparing the mean coping skills showed that before the intervention there were no significant differences between the control and study groups. However, after the intervention, a significant difference was observed between the control group and the study group. By comparing the mean coping skills before and after the intervention, a significant difference was observed in the study group. Conclusion: Training problem-solving skills increased the coping skills of depressed students. According to the role of coping skills in people's mental health, increasing coping skills can promote mental health, provide the basis for caring skills, and improve the quality of nurses’ caring skills. PMID:25276704

  10. Caesarean section deliveries: Experiences of mothers of midwifery care at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jikijela, Thobeka P; James, Sindiwe; Sonti, Balandeli S I

    2018-01-30

    The rate of caesarean section deliveries has increased globally and mothers are faced with challenges of postoperative recovery and caring thereof. Midwives have a duty to assist these mothers to self-care. The objective was to explore and describe experiences of post-caesarean section delivered mothers of midwifery care at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay. A qualitative, descriptive and explorative research design was used in the study. Data were collected from 11 purposively criterion-selected mothers who had a caesarean section delivery. One-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted in the post-natal wards. Research ethics, namely autonomy, beneficence, justice and informed consent, were adopted in the study. All participants were informed of their right to withdraw from the study at any stage without penalties. Interviews were analysed using Tesch's method of data analysis. Three main themes were identified as experiences of: diverse pain, physical limitation and frustration and health care services as different. Experiences of mothers following a caesarean section delivery with midwifery services at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay were explored and described as diverse. A need for adequate pain management as well as assistance and breastfeeding support to mothers following caesarean delivery was identified as crucial to promote a good mother-to-child relationship.

  11. The relationship between gender role stereotypes and requisite managerial characteristics: the case of nursing and midwifery professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkery, Elaine; Tiernan, Siobhan; Morley, Michael

    2014-09-01

    To examine the relationship between gender role stereotypes and requisite managerial characteristics within the nursing and midwifery profession. Studies have been carried out to determine gender role stereotypes and requisite managerial characteristics across a number of industries and among student samples. No study has been carried out within the nursing and midwifery profession. In order to allow for direct comparisons with previous research Schein's Descriptive Index (SDI) was used. A total 239 undergraduate and 171 postexperience responses were collected. Female nurses and midwives did not gender type the managerial role, whereas males gender typed the managerial role in favour of men. Student nurses and midwives recorded a stronger correlation between women and management than their qualified counterparts. Males gender typed the managerial role in favour of men. With an increase in numbers of men joining the profession and increased representation of males at the Clinical Nurse Manager (CMN) level there is a possibility that the profession will become two tiered. Health care organisations should pay careful consideration to career development and implement career structures which ensure equal access to managerial roles for both genders. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Operationalising caseload midwifery in the Australian public maternity system: Findings from a national cross-sectional survey of maternity managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Kate; Forster, Della A; McLachlan, Helen L; Newton, Michelle S

    2018-06-01

    Despite high-level evidence of the benefits of caseload midwifery for women and babies, little is known about specific practice arrangements, organisational barriers and facilitators, nor about workforce requirements of caseload. This paper explores how caseload models across Australia operate. A national cross-sectional, online survey of maternity managers in public maternity hospitals with birthing services was undertaken. Only services with a caseload model are included in the analysis. Of 253 eligible hospitals, 149 (63%) responded, of whom 44 (31%) had a caseload model. Operationalisation of caseload varied across the country. Most commonly, caseload midwives were required to work more than 0.5 EFT, have more than one year of experience and have the skills across the whole scope of practice. On average, midwives took a caseload of 35-40 women when full time, with reduced caseloads if caring for women at higher risk. Leave coverage was complex and often ad-hoc. Duration of home-based postnatal care varied and most commonly provided to six weeks. Women's access to caseload care was impacted by many factors with geographical location and obstetric risk being most common. Introducing, managing and operationalising caseload midwifery care is complex. Factors which may affect the expansion and availability of the model are multi-faceted and include staffing and model inclusion guidelines. Coverage of leave is a factor which appears particularly challenging and needs more focus. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Relationship between reflection ability and clinical performance: a cross-sectional and retrospective-longitudinal correlational cohort study in midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embo, M; Driessen, E; Valcke, M; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2015-01-01

    increasingly, reflection is highlighted as integral to core practice competencies but empirical research into the relationship between reflection and performance in the clinical workplace is scarce. this study investigated the relationship between reflection ability and clinical performance. we designed a cross-sectional and a retrospective-longitudinal cohort study. Data from first, second and third year midwifery students were collected to study the variables 'clinical performance' and 'reflection ability'. Data were analysed with SPSS for Windows, Release 20.0. Descriptive statistics, Pearson׳s Product Moment Correlation Coefficients (r) and r² values were computed to investigate associations between the research variables. the results showed a moderate observed correlation between reflection ability and clinical performance scores. When adopting a cross-sectional perspective, all correlation values were significant (p0.6). The results based on the retrospective-longitudinal data set explained a moderate proportion of the variance after correction for attenuation. Finally, the results indicate that 'reflection ability' scores of earlier years are significant related with 'clinical performance' scores of subsequent years. These results suggest that (1) reflection ability is linked to clinical performance; (2) that written reflections are an important, but not the sole way to assess professional competence and that (3) reflection is a contributor to clinical performance improvement. the data showed a moderate but significant relationship between 'reflection ability' and 'clinical performance' scores in clinical practice of midwifery students. Reflection therefore seems an important component of professional competence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of training problem-solving skills on coping skills of depressed nursing and midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Barzanjeh Atri, Shirin; Ghavipanjeh, Somayeh; Farnam, Alireza; Gholizadeh, Leyla

    2013-03-01

    Nurses have a considerable role in caring and health promotion. Depressed nurses are deficient in their coping skills that are important in mental health. This study evaluated the effectiveness of training problem-solving skills on coping skills of depressed nursing and midwifery students. The Beck Depression Scale and coping skills questionnaire were administered in Tabriz and Urmia nursing and midwifery schools. 92 students, who had achieved a score above 10 on the Beck Depression Scale, were selected. 46 students as study group and 46 students as control group were selected randomly. The intervention group received six sessions of problem-solving training within three weeks. Finally, after the end of sessions, coping skills and depression scales were administered and analyzed for both groups. Comparing the mean coping skills showed that before the intervention there were no significant differences between the control and study groups. However, after the intervention, a significant difference was observed between the control group and the study group. By comparing the mean coping skills before and after the intervention, a significant difference was observed in the study group. Training problem-solving skills increased the coping skills of depressed students. According to the role of coping skills in people's mental health, increasing coping skills can promote mental health, provide the basis for caring skills, and improve the quality of nurses' caring skills.

  15. Correlation between Spiritual Health and Health Locus of Control in Nursing and Midwifery Students of the Islamic Azad University of Urmia, Iran

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    Moradali Zareipour

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In today's world, the role of spirituality and its components in the prevention and treatment of public health and health issues is being taken into consideration. Given the importance of nursing and midwifery, this study was conducted to determine correlation between spiritual health and health locus of control in nursing and midwifery students. Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was conducted on 300 nursing and midwifery students in 2015. Spiritual health was measured by Paloutzian and Ellison's Spiritual Well-Being Scale and locus of control measured by Walston's Multidimensional Measure of Health Locus of Control. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient in SPSS 16. Results: The students' mean score for spiritual health was 92.28±16.35 of total score 120. The mean score for religious and existential well-being was 48.54 and 43.74, respectively. There was a significant and positive correlation between spiritual health and internal health locus of control, and a significant and negative correlation between spiritual health and external health locus of control. Conclusion: Spiritual health was significantly correlated with health locus of control. Therefore, planners are recommended to take necessary measures to promote nursing and midwifery students' spiritual health so that their health loci of control can be improved.

  16. Expectations and voluntary attrition in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a series of findings generated during a larger study which aimed to develop a theoretical understanding of the reasons why nursing students voluntarily leave pre-registration nursing programmes. In this study, significant incongruence was found to exist between student expectations of pre-registration nursing programmes and the reality of these programmes following entry. The resulting dissonance was identified as an important factor in student decisions to voluntarily withdraw. A single case study design was selected to explore the causes of voluntary attrition in nursing students within a School of Nursing and Midwifery. The study population was obtained through purposeful sampling and consisted of 15 students who had previously voluntarily withdrawn from pre-registration nursing programmes. A semi-structured interview method was used to collect data from study participants. The interview schedule developed for use in the study reflected the key components of the conceptual model of higher education (HE) student attrition (Tinto, 1975, 1987, 1993). All interviews were tape recorded to facilitate later transcription. The Cyclical or Interactive Model of Qualitative Research (Miles and Huberman, 1994) was used to analyse data collected from study participants. This paper describes the unrealistic range of expectations which nursing students have of nursing, the information sources and experiences which inform student expectations and how ambiguous expectations contributed to voluntarily attrition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Labor and birth care by nurse with midwifery skills in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Silvana Granado Nogueira da; Viellas, Elaine Fernandes; Torres, Jacqueline Alves; Bastos, Maria Helena; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Theme Filha, Mariza Miranda; Schilithz, Arthur Orlando Correa; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2016-10-17

    and birth care. The adoption of good practices in managing labor and birth could be the first step toward more effective obstetric and midwifery care in Brazil. It may be easier to introduce new approaches rather than to eliminate old ones, which may explain why the reduction of unnecessary interventions during labor and birth was less pronounced than the adoption of new practices.

  18. The utilisation of a midwifery obstetrical unit (mou in a metropolitan area

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    M I Mashazi

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study an explorative, descriptive design which is contextual in nature, is utilized. The objective of the study is three-fold: Firstly, to describe the opinions of members of the community about the reasons for the under-utilization of the Midwifery Obstetrical Unit (MOU; secondly, to describe the suggestions of the community for improving the utilization of the MOU and thirdly, to describe intervention strategies for community nurses to improve the utilization of the MOU. Data was collected by means of focus group interviews, and was analysed using Tesch’s (in Cresswell, 1994: 154-155 method of data analysis. Trustworthiness was ensured by using the method of Guba and Lincoln (1985. The respondents were mothers who delivered their babies at the hospital, mothers who delivered their babies at the MOU, members of the Community Health Committee and MOU nurses. Data was collected in two phases. Phase I dealt with th