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Sample records for pre-messenger ribonucleoproteins mrnps

  1. The ribonucleoprotein Csr network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyll, Ethel; Van Melderen, Laurence

    2013-11-08

    Ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential regulatory components in bacteria. In this review, we focus on the carbon storage regulator (Csr) network, which is well conserved in the bacterial world. This regulatory network is composed of the CsrA master regulator, its targets and regulators. CsrA binds to mRNA targets and regulates translation either negatively or positively. Binding to small non-coding RNAs controls activity of this protein. Expression of these regulators is tightly regulated at the level of transcription and stability by various global regulators (RNAses, two-component systems, alarmone). We discuss the implications of these complex regulations in bacterial adaptation.

  2. The Ribonucleoprotein Csr Network

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    Ethel Seyll

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential regulatory components in bacteria. In this review, we focus on the carbon storage regulator (Csr network, which is well conserved in the bacterial world. This regulatory network is composed of the CsrA master regulator, its targets and regulators. CsrA binds to mRNA targets and regulates translation either negatively or positively. Binding to small non-coding RNAs controls activity of this protein. Expression of these regulators is tightly regulated at the level of transcription and stability by various global regulators (RNAses, two-component systems, alarmone. We discuss the implications of these complex regulations in bacterial adaptation.

  3. Molecular composition of IMP1 ribonucleoprotein granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønson, Lars; Vikesaa, Jonas; Krogh, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Localized mRNAs are transported to sites of local protein synthesis in large ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules, but their molecular composition is incompletely understood. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (IMP) zip code-binding proteins participate in mRNA localization, and in mo......Localized mRNAs are transported to sites of local protein synthesis in large ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules, but their molecular composition is incompletely understood. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (IMP) zip code-binding proteins participate in mRNA localization...

  4. Exclusion of mRNPs and ribosomal particles from a thin zone beneath the nuclear envelope revealed upon inhibition of transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kylberg, Karin; Bjoerk, Petra; Fomproix, Nathalie; Ivarsson, Birgitta; Wieslander, Lars; Daneholt, Bertil

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the nucleocytoplasmic transport of a specific messenger RNP (mRNP) particle, named Balbiani ring (BR) granule, and ribosomal RNP (rRNP) particles in the salivary glands of the dipteran Chironomus tentans. The passage of the RNPs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) was inhibited with the nucleoporin-binding wheat germ agglutinin, and the effects were examined by electron microscopy. BR mRNPs bound to the nuclear basket increased in number, while BR mRNPs translocating through the central channel decreased, suggesting that the initiation of translocation proper had been inhibited. The rRNPs accumulated heavily in nucleoplasm, while no or very few rRNPs were recorded within nuclear baskets. Thus, the transport of rRNPs had been blocked prior to the entry into the baskets. Remarkably, the rRNPs had been excluded both from baskets and the space in between the baskets. We propose that normally basket fibrils move freely and repel RNPs from the exclusion zone unless the particles have affinity for and bind to nucleoporins within the baskets.

  5. CERKL, a retinal disease gene, encodes an mRNA-binding protein that localizes in compact and untranslated mRNPs associated with microtubules.

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    Alihamze Fathinajafabadi

    Full Text Available The function of CERKL (CERamide Kinase Like, a causative gene of retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy, still awaits characterization. To approach its cellular role we have investigated the subcellular localization and interaction partners of the full length CERKL isoform, CERKLa of 532 amino acids, in different cell lines, including a photoreceptor-derived cell line. We demonstrate that CERKLa is a main component of compact and untranslated mRNPs and that associates with other RNP complexes such as stress granules, P-bodies and polysomes. CERKLa is a protein that binds through its N-terminus to mRNAs and interacts with other mRNA-binding proteins like eIF3B, PABP, HSP70 and RPS3. Except for eIF3B, these interactions depend on the integrity of mRNAs but not of ribosomes. Interestingly, the C125W CERKLa pathological mutant does not interact with eIF3B and is absent from these complexes. Compact mRNPs containing CERKLa also associate with microtubules and are found in neurites of neural differentiated cells. These localizations had not been reported previously for any member of the retinal disorders gene family and should be considered when investigating the pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutical approaches in these diseases.

  6. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP.

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    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5' ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  7. Radioimmunoassay for antibodies to rubella virus and its ribonucleoprotein component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho-Terry, L.; Cohen, A.

    1979-01-01

    Using a radioimmune precipitation technique, the antibody response to intact rubella virus and its ribonucleoprotein component was measured. The method was very sensitive and reproducible, and did not require preliminary serum fractionation for the identification of antibodies of different immunoglobulin classes. The results showed that the IgA and IgG antibodies against the intact virus persisted in the sera of patients long after the initial infection. In contrast, IgA and IgG antibodies against the ribonucleoprotein component of rubella virus were detected only in sera of patients after recent rubella infection. This observation suggested that a test for antibodies to the ribonucleoprotein component may provide additional evidence in the diagnosis of recent rubella infection. This could be potentially a useful test particularly in the management of pregnant patients. (U.K.)

  8. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D/AUF1 interacts with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCHU

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) in cells are bound to proteins. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) is one of the representative proteins bound to RNAs in eukaryotic cells. More than 30 hnRNPs have been determined to exist in human nuclei, and are referred to as hnRNPs A1 through U (Choi and Dreyfuss 1984; ...

  9. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 identified as autoantigens by biochemical and mass spectrometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N H; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Muncrief, T

    2000-01-01

    ribonucleoproteins. The clinical spectrum of patients with these autoantibodies includes arthritis, psoriasis, myositis, and scleroderma. None of 59 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 19 with polymyositis, 33 with scleroderma, and 10 with psoriatic arthritis had similar antibodies. High-resolution protein...

  10. The Thoc1 Ribonucleoprotein as a Novel Biomarker for Prostate Cancer Treatment Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    for prostate cancer , the work may impact development of diagnostic /prognostic products based on pThoc1. The presence of the THO ribonucleoprotin...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0475 TITLE: The Thoc1 Ribonucleoprotein as a Novel Biomarker for Prostate Cancer Treatment Assignment PRINCIPAL...15Sept 2016 - 14Sep2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Thoc1 Ribonucleoprotein as a Novel Biomarker for Prostate 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cancer Treatment

  11. RNA processing and ribonucleoprotein assembly studied in vivo by RNA transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, A.M.; Pederson, T.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a method for studying RNA processing and ribonucleoprotein assembly in vivo, by using RNA synthesized in vitro. SP6-transcribed 32 P-labeled U2 small nuclear RNA precursor molecules were introduced into cultured human 293 cells by calcium phosphate-mediated uptake, as in standard DNA transfection experiments. RNase protection mapping demonstrated that the introduced pre-U2 RNA underwent accurate 3' end processing. The introduced U2 RNA was assembled into ribonucleoprotein particles that reacted with an antibody specific for proteins known to be associated with the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle. The 3' end-processed, ribonucleoprotein-assembled U2 RNA accumulated in the nuclear fraction. When pre-U2 RNA with a 7-methylguanosine group at the 5' end was introduced into cells, it underwent conversion to a 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine cap structure, a characteristic feature of the U-small nuclear RNAs. Pre-U2 RNA introduced with an adenosine cap (Ap-ppG) also underwent processing, small nuclear ribonucleoprotein assembly, and nuclear accumulation, establishing that a methylated guanosine cap structure is not required for these steps in U2 small nuclear ribonucleprotein biosynthesis. Beyond its demonstrated usefulness in the study of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein biosynthesis, RNA transfection may be of general applicability to the investigation of eukaryotic RNA processing in vivo and may also offer opportunities for introducing therapeutically targeted RNAs (ribozymes or antisense RNA) into cells

  12. Maximizing mutagenesis with solubilized CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

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    Burger, Alexa; Lindsay, Helen; Felker, Anastasia; Hess, Christopher; Anders, Carolin; Chiavacci, Elena; Zaugg, Jonas; Weber, Lukas M; Catena, Raul; Jinek, Martin; Robinson, Mark D; Mosimann, Christian

    2016-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 enables efficient sequence-specific mutagenesis for creating somatic or germline mutants of model organisms. Key constraints in vivo remain the expression and delivery of active Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) with minimal toxicity, variable mutagenesis efficiencies depending on targeting sequence, and high mutation mosaicism. Here, we apply in vitro assembled, fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs in solubilizing salt solution to achieve maximal mutagenesis efficiency in zebrafish embryos. MiSeq-based sequence analysis of targeted loci in individual embryos using CrispRVariants, a customized software tool for mutagenesis quantification and visualization, reveals efficient bi-allelic mutagenesis that reaches saturation at several tested gene loci. Such virtually complete mutagenesis exposes loss-of-function phenotypes for candidate genes in somatic mutant embryos for subsequent generation of stable germline mutants. We further show that targeting of non-coding elements in gene regulatory regions using saturating mutagenesis uncovers functional control elements in transgenic reporters and endogenous genes in injected embryos. Our results establish that optimally solubilized, in vitro assembled fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs provide a reproducible reagent for direct and scalable loss-of-function studies and applications beyond zebrafish experiments that require maximal DNA cutting efficiency in vivo. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Characterization of MVP and VPARP assembly into vault ribonucleoprotein complexes.

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    Zheng, Chun-Lei; Sumizawa, Tomoyuki; Che, Xiao-Fang; Tsuyama, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Haraguchi, Misako; Gao, Hui; Gotanda, Takenari; Jueng, Hei-Cheul; Murata, Fusayoshi; Akiyama, Shin-Ichi

    2005-01-07

    Vaults are barrel-shaped cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles composed of three proteins: the major vault protein (MVP), the vault poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (VPARP), and the telomerase-associated protein 1, together with one or more small untranslated RNAs. To date, little is known about the process of vault assembly or about the stability of vault components. In this study, we analyzed the biosynthesis of MVP and VPARP, and their half-lives within the vault particle in human ACHN renal carcinoma cells. Using an immunoprecipitation assay, we found that it took more than 4h for newly synthesized MVPs to be incorporated into vault particles but that biosynthesized VPARPs were completely incorporated into vaults within 1.5h. Once incorporated into the vault complex, both MVP and VPARP were very stable. Expression of human MVP alone in Escherichia coli resulted in the formation of particles that had a distinct vault morphology. The C-terminal region of VPARP that lacks poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity co-sedimented with MVP particles. This suggests that the activity of VPARP is not essential for interaction with MVP-self-assembled vault-like particles. In conclusion, our findings provide an insight into potential mechanisms of physiological vault assembly.

  14. The TROVE module: A common element in Telomerase, Ro and Vault ribonucleoproteins

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    Bateman Alex

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribonucleoproteins carry out a variety of important tasks in the cell. In this study we show that a number of these contain a novel module, that we speculate mediates RNA-binding. Results The TROVE module – Telomerase, Ro and Vault module – is found in TEP1 and Ro60 the protein components of three ribonucleoprotein particles. This novel module, consisting of one or more domains, may be involved in binding the RNA components of the three RNPs, which are telomerase RNA, Y RNA and vault RNA. A second conserved region in these proteins is shown to be a member of the vWA domain family. The vWA domain in TEP1 is closely related to the previously recognised vWA domain in VPARP a second component of the vault particle. This vWA domain may mediate interactions between these vault components or bind as yet unidentified components of the RNPs. Conclusions This work suggests that a number of ribonucleoprotein components use a common RNA-binding module. The TROVE module is also found in bacterial ribonucleoproteins suggesting an ancient origin for these ribonucleoproteins.

  15. The TROVE module: a common element in Telomerase, Ro and Vault ribonucleoproteins.

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    Bateman, Alex; Kickhoefer, Valerie

    2003-10-16

    Ribonucleoproteins carry out a variety of important tasks in the cell. In this study we show that a number of these contain a novel module, that we speculate mediates RNA-binding. The TROVE module--Telomerase, Ro and Vault module--is found in TEP1 and Ro60 the protein components of three ribonucleoprotein particles. This novel module, consisting of one or more domains, may be involved in binding the RNA components of the three RNPs, which are telomerase RNA, Y RNA and vault RNA. A second conserved region in these proteins is shown to be a member of the vWA domain family. The vWA domain in TEP1 is closely related to the previously recognised vWA domain in VPARP a second component of the vault particle. This vWA domain may mediate interactions between these vault components or bind as yet unidentified components of the RNPs. This work suggests that a number of ribonucleoprotein components use a common RNA-binding module. The TROVE module is also found in bacterial ribonucleoproteins suggesting an ancient origin for these ribonucleoproteins.

  16. Ribonucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic RNA. XXXII. U2 small nuclear RNA precursors and their accurate 3' processing in vitro as ribonucleoprotein particles.

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    Wieben, E D; Nenninger, J M; Pederson, T

    1985-05-05

    Biosynthetic precursors of U2 small nuclear RNA have been identified in cultured human cells by hybrid-selection of pulse-labeled RNA with cloned U2 DNA. These precursor molecules are one to approximately 16 nucleotides longer than mature U2 RNA and contain 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine "caps". The U2 RNA precursors are associated with proteins that react with a monoclonal antibody for antigens characteristic of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Like previously described precursors of U1 and U4 small nuclear RNAs, the pre-U2 RNAs are recovered in cytoplasmic fractions, although it is not known if this is their location in vivo. The precursors are processed to mature-size U2 RNA when cytoplasmic extracts are incubated in vitro at 37 degrees C. Mg2+ is required but ATP is not. The ribonucleoprotein structure of the pre-U2 RNA is maintained during the processing reaction in vitro, as are the 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine caps. The ribonucleoprotein organization is of major importance, as exogenous, protein-free U2 RNA precursors are degraded rapidly in the in vitro system. Two lines of evidence indicate that the conversion of U2 precursors to mature-size U2 RNA involves a 3' processing reaction. First, the reaction is unaffected by a large excess of mature U2 small nuclear RNP, whose 5' trimethylguanosine caps would be expected to compete for a 5' processing activity. Second, when pre-U2 RNA precursors are first stoichiometrically decorated with an antibody specific for 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine, the extent of subsequent processing in vitro is unaffected. These results provide the first demonstration of a eukaryotic RNA processing reaction in vitro occurring within a ribonucleoprotein particle.

  17. Immunolocalization of 7-2-ribonucleoprotein in the granular component of the nucleolus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimer, G.; Raska, I.; Scheer, U.; Tan, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Certain autoimmune sera contain antibodies against a nucleolar ribonucleotprotein particle associated with 7-2-RNA. In this study, the authors showed by immunofluorescence microscopy that antibodies reactive with 7-2-ribonucleoprotein immunolocalized in the granular regions of actinomycin D and 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB)--segregated nucleoli from Vero cells. By electron microscopic immunocytochemistry, antigen-antibody complexes were located in the granular component of transcriptionally active nucleoli from rat liver hepatocytes and HeLa cells. Anti-7-2-RNP antibodies from two autoimmune sera immunoprecipitated a major protein of M r 40,000 from [ 35 S] methionine-labeled HeLa cell extract. The immunolocalization data suggest that 7-2-ribonucleoprotein may be involved in stages of ribosome biogenesis which take place in the granular component of the nucleolus, i.e., assembly, maturation, and/or transport of preribosomes

  18. Localization in the Nucleolus and Coiled Bodies of Protein Subunits of the Ribonucleoprotein Ribonuclease P

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    Jarrous, Nayef; Wolenski, Joseph S.; Wesolowski, Donna; Lee, Christopher; Altman, Sidney

    1999-01-01

    The precise location of the tRNA processing ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease P (RNase P) and the mechanism of its intranuclear distribution have not been completely delineated. We show that three protein subunits of human RNase P (Rpp), Rpp14, Rpp29 and Rpp38, are found in the nucleolus and that each can localize a reporter protein to nucleoli of cells in tissue culture. In contrast to Rpp38, which is uniformly distributed in nucleoli, Rpp14 and Rpp29 are confined to the dense fibrillar component. Rpp29 and Rpp38 possess functional, yet distinct domains required for subnucleolar localization. The subunit Rpp14 lacks such a domain and appears to be dependent on a piggyback process to reach the nucleolus. Biochemical analysis suggests that catalytically active RNase P exists in the nucleolus. We also provide evidence that Rpp29 and Rpp38 reside in coiled bodies, organelles that are implicated in the biogenesis of several other small nuclear ribonucleoproteins required for processing of precursor mRNA. Because some protein subunits of RNase P are shared by the ribosomal RNA processing ribonucleoprotein RNase MRP, these two evolutionary related holoenzymes may share common intranuclear localization and assembly pathways to coordinate the processing of tRNA and rRNA precursors. PMID:10444065

  19. Comparison of the ribonucleoproteins of different rabies virus serotypes by radioimmunoassay

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    Bruns, M; Dietzschold, B; Schneider, L G; Cox, J H [Federal Research Inst. for Animal Virus Diseases, Tuebingen (Germany, F.R.)

    1977-12-01

    Radioimmunoassay (RIA) provides a sensitive serological procedure for detecting rabies virus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) as well as its specific antibodies. RIA was carried out using highly purified RNPs labelled by the chloramine-T method. This paper describes optimal conditions for iodination of RNP with high specific activity. The optimal concentrations of /sup 125/I, RNP, chloramine-T, and reducing agent as well as the effect of pH on the reaction were investigated. RIA proved to be extremely sensitive for detection of homologous antibodies. In competition experiments the part-relationship of the group-specific RNPs of the three rabies virus serotypes (HEP, MOK, and LBV) was confirmed.

  20. Conserved regions of ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP are involved in interactions with its substrate.

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    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2013-08-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a ubiquitous and essential site-specific eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein with a large catalytic RNA moiety that is closely related to the RNA component of RNase P, and multiple proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. Here, we report the results of an ultraviolet-cross-linking analysis of interactions between a photoreactive RNase MRP substrate and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP holoenzyme. The results show that the substrate interacts with phylogenetically conserved RNA elements universally found in all enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family, as well as with a phylogenetically conserved RNA region that is unique to RNase MRP, and demonstrate that four RNase MRP protein components, all shared with RNase P, interact with the substrate. Implications for the structural organization of RNase MRP and the roles of its components are discussed.

  1. Spinal muscular atrophy: Selective motor neuron loss and global defect in the assembly of ribonucleoproteins.

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    Beattie, Christine E; Kolb, Stephen J

    2018-08-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by deletions or mutations in the SMN1 gene that result in reduced expression of the SMN protein. The SMN protein is an essential molecular chaperone that is required for the biogenesis of multiple ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes including spliceosomal small nuclear RNPs (snRNPs). Reductions in SMN expression result in a reduced abundance of snRNPs and to downstream RNA splicing alterations. SMN is also present in axons and dendrites and appears to have important roles in the formation of neuronal mRNA-protein complexes during development or neuronal repair. Thus, SMA is an exemplar, selective motor neuron disorder that is caused by defects in fundamental RNA processing events. A detailed molecular understanding of how motor neurons fail, and why other neurons do not, in SMA will yield important principals about motor neuron maintenance and neuronal specificity in neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear dynamics of influenza A virus ribonucleoproteins revealed by live-cell imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loucaides, Eva M.; Kirchbach, Johann C. von; Foeglein, Agnes; Sharps, Jane; Fodor, Ervin; Digard, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The negative sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by the viral RNA polymerase. Only four viral polypeptides are required but multiple cellular components are potentially involved. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to characterise the dynamics of GFP-tagged viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components in living cells. The nucleoprotein (NP) displayed very slow mobility that significantly increased on formation of transcriptionally active RNPs. Conversely, single or dimeric polymerase subunits showed fast nuclear dynamics that decreased upon formation of heterotrimers, suggesting increased interaction of the full polymerase complex with a relatively immobile cellular component(s). Treatment with inhibitors of cellular transcription indicated that in part, this reflected an interaction with cellular RNA polymerase II. Analysis of mutated influenza virus polymerase complexes further suggested that this was through an interaction between PB2 and RNA Pol II separate from PB2 cap-binding activity.

  3. Peptide/Cas9 nanostructures for ribonucleoprotein cell membrane transport and gene edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lostalé-Seijo, Irene; Louzao, Iria; Juanes, Marisa; Montenegro, Javier

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of RNA guided endonucleases has emerged as one of the most important tools for gene edition and biotechnology. The selectivity and simplicity of the CRISPR/Cas9 strategy allows the straightforward targeting and editing of particular loci in the cell genome without the requirement of protein engineering. However, the transfection of plasmids encoding the Cas9 and the guide RNA could lead to undesired permanent recombination and immunogenic responses. Therefore, the direct delivery of transient Cas9 ribonucleoprotein constitutes an advantageous strategy for gene edition and other potential therapeutic applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. The covalent fusion of Cas9 with penetrating peptides requires multiple incubation steps with the target cells to achieve efficient levels of gene edition. These and other recent reports suggested that covalent conjugation of the anionic Cas9 ribonucleoprotein to cationic peptides would be associated with a hindered nuclease activity due to undesired electrostatic interactions. We here report a supramolecular strategy for the direct delivery of Cas9 by an amphiphilic penetrating peptide that was prepared by a hydrazone bond formation between a cationic peptide scaffold and a hydrophobic aldehyde tail. The peptide/protein non-covalent nanoparticles performed with similar efficiency and less toxicity than one of the best methods described to date. To the best of our knowledge this report constitutes the first supramolecular strategy for the direct delivery of Cas9 using a penetrating peptide vehicle. The results reported here confirmed that peptide amphiphilic vectors can deliver Cas9 in a single incubation step, with good efficiency and low toxicity. This work will encourage the search and development of conceptually new synthetic systems for transitory endonucleases direct delivery.

  4. Purification of ribonucleoproteins by a novel approach: isolation of the SSB1 ribonucleoprotein from yeast and demonstration that it has no role in mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, M E

    1992-12-29

    A novel approach is described to purify potential ribonucleoproteins (RNP) of yeast. The method assays a yeast RNP complex, assembled in vitro on actin pre-mRNA, by low-ionic strength acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The minimal protein components of this RNP complex were three proteins, one of 30 kDa and two at 42-44 kDa, defined by formation of the complex on biotinylated-RNA, binding of this complex to avidin-agarose, and salt elution of the protein in the biotinylated-RNP complex. Using the assay for RNP complex formation, an RNP protein was purified to homogeneity on the basis of its affinity towards single-stranded DNA and RNA. This RNP protein turned out to be identical to a known RNP protein, the single-stranded binding protein 1 (ssb1) of yeast, on the basis of identical gel electrophoretic migration, antibody cross-reactivity, and identical properties on the gel complex formation assay. In vitro mRNA splicing was normal in extracts made from a yeast strain missing ssb1 (ssb1- strain). Addition of anti-ssb1 antibody to splicing extracts made from a wild type strain did not inhibit or diminish splicing. Instead, mRNA splicing was reproducibly stimulated several fold, indicating competition between ssb1 and splicing factors for binding to single-stranded RNA in the extracts. RNP complexes still formed in the ssb1- strain, demonstrating that it would be possible to purify other RNP proteins from this strain using the gel complex formation assay.

  5. Active Yeast Telomerase Shares Subunits with Ribonucleoproteins RNase P and RNase MRP.

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    Lemieux, Bruno; Laterreur, Nancy; Perederina, Anna; Noël, Jean-François; Dubois, Marie-Line; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2016-05-19

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that replenishes telomeric DNA and maintains genome integrity. Minimally, telomerase activity requires a templating RNA and a catalytic protein. Additional proteins are required for activity on telomeres in vivo. Here, we report that the Pop1, Pop6, and Pop7 proteins, known components of RNase P and RNase MRP, bind to yeast telomerase RNA and are essential constituents of the telomerase holoenzyme. Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 binding is specific and involves an RNA domain highly similar to a protein-binding domain in the RNAs of RNase P/MRP. The results also show that Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 function to maintain the essential components Est1 and Est2 on the RNA in vivo. Consistently, addition of Pop1 allows for telomerase activity reconstitution with wild-type telomerase RNA in vitro. Thus, the same chaperoning module has allowed the evolution of functionally and, remarkably, structurally distinct RNPs, telomerase, and RNases P/MRP from unrelated progenitor RNAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Unexpected heterogeneity derived from Cas9 ribonucleoprotein-introduced clonal cells at the HPRT1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Mochida, Keiji; Nakade, Shota; Ezure, Toru; Minagawa, Sachi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    Single-cell cloning is an essential technique for establishing genome-edited cell clones mediated by programmable nucleases such as CRISPR-Cas9. However, residual genome-editing activity after single-cell cloning may cause heterogeneity in the clonal cells. Previous studies showed efficient mutagenesis and rapid degradation of CRISPR-Cas9 components in cultured cells by introducing Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). In this study, we investigated how the timing for single-cell cloning of Cas9 RNP-transfected cells affected the heterogeneity of the resultant clones. We carried out transfection of Cas9 RNPs targeting several loci in the HPRT1 gene in HCT116 cells, followed by single-cell cloning at 24, 48, 72 hr and 1 week post-transfection. After approximately 3 weeks of incubation, the clonal cells were collected and genotyped by high-resolution microchip electrophoresis and Sanger sequencing. Unexpectedly, long-term incubation before single-cell cloning resulted in highly heterogeneous clones. We used a lipofection method for transfection, and the media containing transfectable RNPs were not removed before single-cell cloning. Therefore, the active Cas9 RNPs were considered to be continuously incorporated into cells during the precloning incubation. Our findings provide a warning that lipofection of Cas9 RNPs may cause continuous introduction of gene mutations depending on the experimental procedures. © 2018 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Investigating Engineered Ribonucleoprotein Particles to Improve Oral RNAi Delivery in Crop Insect Pests

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    François-Xavier Gillet

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetically modified (GM crops producing double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs are being investigated largely as an RNA interference (RNAi-based resistance strategy against crop insect pests. However, limitations of this strategy include the sensitivity of dsRNA to insect gut nucleases and its poor insect cell membrane penetration. Working with the insect pest cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis, we showed that the chimeric protein PTD-DRBD (peptide transduction domain—dsRNA binding domain combined with dsRNA forms a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP that improves the effectiveness of the RNAi mechanism in the insect. The RNP slows down nuclease activity, probably by masking the dsRNA. Furthermore, PTD-mediated internalization in insect gut cells is achieved within minutes after plasma membrane contact, limiting the exposure time of the RNPs to gut nucleases. Therefore, the RNP provides an approximately 2-fold increase in the efficiency of insect gene silencing upon oral delivery when compared to naked dsRNA. Taken together, these data demonstrate the role of engineered RNPs in improving dsRNA stability and cellular entry, representing a path toward the design of enhanced RNAi strategies in GM plants against crop insect pests.

  8. Investigating Engineered Ribonucleoprotein Particles to Improve Oral RNAi Delivery in Crop Insect Pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, François-Xavier; Garcia, Rayssa A; Macedo, Leonardo L P; Albuquerque, Erika V S; Silva, Maria C M; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2017-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops producing double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) are being investigated largely as an RNA interference (RNAi)-based resistance strategy against crop insect pests. However, limitations of this strategy include the sensitivity of dsRNA to insect gut nucleases and its poor insect cell membrane penetration. Working with the insect pest cotton boll weevil ( Anthonomus grandis ), we showed that the chimeric protein PTD-DRBD (peptide transduction domain-dsRNA binding domain) combined with dsRNA forms a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) that improves the effectiveness of the RNAi mechanism in the insect. The RNP slows down nuclease activity, probably by masking the dsRNA. Furthermore, PTD-mediated internalization in insect gut cells is achieved within minutes after plasma membrane contact, limiting the exposure time of the RNPs to gut nucleases. Therefore, the RNP provides an approximately 2-fold increase in the efficiency of insect gene silencing upon oral delivery when compared to naked dsRNA. Taken together, these data demonstrate the role of engineered RNPs in improving dsRNA stability and cellular entry, representing a path toward the design of enhanced RNAi strategies in GM plants against crop insect pests.

  9. Regulatory RNPs: a novel class of ribonucleoproteins that potentially contribute to ribosome heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R. Poole

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Many ribonucleoproteins (RNPs, which are comprised of noncoding RNA and associated proteins, are involved in essential cellular processes such as translation and pre-mRNA splicing. One class of RNP is the small Cajal body-specific RNP (scaRNP, which contributes to the biogenesis of small nuclear RNPs (snRNPs that are central components of the spliceosome. Three scaRNAs are internally processed, generating stable nucleolus-enriched RNAs of unknown function. Here, we provide data that show that these RNAs become part of RNPs we term regulatory RNPs (regRNPs. Most modifications within rRNA (predominantly pseudouridylation and ribose 2′-O-methylation are conducted by small nucleolar RNPs (snoRNPs, and we provide evidence that the activity of at least some of these snoRNPs is under the control of regRNPs. Because modifications within rRNA can vary in different physiological or pathological situations, rRNA modifications are thought to be the major source of ribosome heterogeneity. Our identification of regRNPs thus provides a potential mechanism for how ribosome heterogeneity may be accomplished. This work also provides additional functional connections between the Cajal body and the nucleolus.

  10. Fractionation of HeLa cell nuclear extracts reveals minor small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroemer, A.

    1987-01-01

    Upon chromatographic fractionation of HeLa cell nuclear extracts, small RNAs of 145 and 66/65 nucleotides, respectively, were detected that are distinct from the abundant small RNAs present in the extract. These RNAs are precipitated by antibodies directed against the trimethylguanosine cap structure, characteristic for small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) of the U type. The RNAs of 145 and 66/65 nucleotides appear to be associated with at least one of the proteins common to the major small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles U1 to U6, since they are specifically bound by anti-Sm antibodies. These criteria characterize the RNAs that are 145 and 66/65 nucleotides in length as U-type snRNAs. Upon gel filtration, the RNAs are found within particles of molecular weights ≅ 150,000 and 115,000 respectively. The RNA of 145 nucleotides represents a different minor snRNA, designated U11, whereas the RNA of 66/65 nucleotides may correspond to either mammalian U7 or U10 RNA

  11. Targeted Gene Knockin in Porcine Somatic Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Ribonucleoproteins

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    Ki-Eun Park

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The pig is an ideal large animal model for genetic engineering applications. A relatively short gestation interval and large litter size makes the pig a conducive model for generating and propagating genetic modifications. The domestic pig also shares close similarity in anatomy, physiology, size, and life expectancy, making it an ideal animal for modeling human diseases. Often, however, the technical difficulties in generating desired genetic modifications such as targeted knockin of short stretches of sequences or transgenes have impeded progress in this field. In this study, we have investigated and compared the relative efficiency of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in engineering targeted knockin of pseudo attP sites downstream of a ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene in porcine somatic cells and generated live fetuses by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. By leveraging these knockin pseudo attP sites, we have demonstrated subsequent phiC31 integrase mediated integration of green fluorescent protein (GFP transgene into the site. This work for the first time created an optimized protocol for CRISPR/Cas mediated knockin in porcine somatic cells, while simultaneously creating a stable platform for future transgene integration and generating transgenic animals.

  12. Apical transport of influenza A virus ribonucleoprotein requires Rab11-positive recycling endosome.

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    Fumitaka Momose

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus RNA genome exists as eight-segmented ribonucleoprotein complexes containing viral RNA polymerase and nucleoprotein (vRNPs. Packaging of vRNPs and virus budding take place at the apical plasma membrane (APM. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of apical transport of newly synthesized vRNP. Transfection of fluorescent-labeled antibody and subsequent live cell imaging revealed that punctate vRNP signals moved along microtubules rapidly but intermittently in both directions, suggestive of vesicle trafficking. Using a series of Rab family protein, we demonstrated that progeny vRNP localized to recycling endosome (RE in an active/GTP-bound Rab11-dependent manner. The vRNP interacted with Rab11 through viral RNA polymerase. The localization of vRNP to RE and subsequent accumulation to the APM were impaired by overexpression of Rab binding domains (RBD of Rab11 family interacting proteins (Rab11-FIPs. Similarly, no APM accumulation was observed by overexpression of class II Rab11-FIP mutants lacking RBD. These results suggest that the progeny vRNP makes use of Rab11-dependent RE machinery for APM trafficking.

  13. Nuclear TRIM25 Specifically Targets Influenza Virus Ribonucleoproteins to Block the Onset of RNA Chain Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Nicholas R; Zhou, Ligang; Guo, Yusong R; Zhao, Chen; Tao, Yizhi J; Krug, Robert M; Sawyer, Sara L

    2017-11-08

    TRIM25 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that activates RIG-I to promote the antiviral interferon response. The NS1 protein from all strains of influenza A virus binds TRIM25, although not all virus strains block the interferon response, suggesting alternative mechanisms for TRIM25 action. Here we present a nuclear role for TRIM25 in specifically restricting influenza A virus replication. TRIM25 inhibits viral RNA synthesis through a direct mechanism that is independent of its ubiquitin ligase activity and the interferon pathway. This activity can be inhibited by the viral NS1 protein. TRIM25 inhibition of viral RNA synthesis results from its binding to viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs), the structures containing individual viral RNA segments, the viral polymerase, and multiple viral nucleoproteins. TRIM25 binding does not inhibit initiation of capped-RNA-primed viral mRNA synthesis by the viral polymerase. Rather, the onset of RNA chain elongation is inhibited because TRIM25 prohibits the movement of RNA into the polymerase complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An association between RBMX, a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, and ARTS-1 regulates extracellular TNFR1 release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamik, Barbara; Islam, Aminul; Rouhani, Farshid N.; Hawari, Feras I.; Zhang Jing; Levine, Stewart J.

    2008-01-01

    The type I, 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR1) is released to the extracellular space by two mechanisms, the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains. Both pathways appear to be regulated by an interaction between TNFR1 and ARTS-1 (aminopeptidase regulator of TNFR1 shedding). Here, we sought to identify ARTS-1-interacting proteins that modulate TNFR1 release. Co-immunoprecipitation identified an association between ARTS-1 and RBMX (RNA-binding motif gene, X chromosome), a 43-kDa heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein. RNA interference attenuated RBMX expression, which reduced both the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the IL-1β-mediated inducible proteolytic cleavage of soluble TNFR1 ectodomains. Reciprocally, over-expression of RBMX increased TNFR1 exosome-like vesicle release and the IL-1β-mediated inducible shedding of TNFR1 ectodomains. This identifies RBMX as an ARTS-1-associated protein that regulates both the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains

  15. Expression and localization of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Ningling; Lin, Xianhua; Jin, Li; Xu, Hong; Li, Rong; Huang, Hefeng

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), an evolutionarily conserved protein, is involved in several important cellular processes that are relevant to cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cancer development. However, details of hnRNP K expression during mammalian oogenesis and preimplantation embryo development are lacking. The present study investigates the expression and cellular localization of K protein in the mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos using immunostaining. We demonstrate, for the first time, that hnRNP K is abundantly expressed in the nuclei of mouse oocytes in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. In germ vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes, hnRNP K accumulates in the germinal vesicle in a spot distribution manner. After germinal vesicle breakdown, speckled hnRNP K is diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm. However, after fertilization, the K protein relocates into the female and male pronucleus and persists in the blastomere nuclei. Localization of K protein in the human ovary and ovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT) was also investigated. Overall, this study provides important morphological evidence to better understand the possible roles of hnRNP K in mammalian oogenesis and early embryo development. - Highlights: • HnRNP K localizes in the nucleus of GV-stage oocyte in a punctate distribution. • HnRNP K strongly accumulates in zygotic pronuclei as condensed spots. • The localization of hnRNP K during oogenesis and embryogenesis is characteristic. • HnRNP K might have an important role in oogenesis and embryonic development.

  16. The Thoc1 encoded ribonucleoprotein is required for myeloid progenitor cell homeostasis in the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzonka, Laura; Ullas, Sumana; Chinnam, Meenalakshmi; Povinelli, Benjamin J; Fisher, Daniel T; Golding, Michelle; Appenheimer, Michelle M; Nemeth, Michael J; Evans, Sharon; Goodrich, David W

    2014-01-01

    Co-transcriptionally assembled ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes are critical for RNA processing and nuclear export. RNPs have been hypothesized to contribute to the regulation of coordinated gene expression, and defects in RNP biogenesis contribute to genome instability and disease. Despite the large number of RNPs and the importance of the molecular processes they mediate, the requirements for individual RNP complexes in mammalian development and tissue homeostasis are not well characterized. THO is an evolutionarily conserved, nuclear RNP complex that physically links nascent transcripts with the nuclear export apparatus. THO is essential for early mouse embryonic development, limiting characterization of the requirements for THO in adult tissues. To address this shortcoming, a mouse strain has been generated allowing inducible deletion of the Thoc1 gene which encodes an essential protein subunit of THO. Bone marrow reconstitution was used to generate mice in which Thoc1 deletion could be induced specifically in the hematopoietic system. We find that granulocyte macrophage progenitors have a cell autonomous requirement for Thoc1 to maintain cell growth and viability. Lymphoid lineages are not detectably affected by Thoc1 loss under the homeostatic conditions tested. Myeloid lineages may be more sensitive to Thoc1 loss due to their relatively high rate of proliferation and turnover.

  17. The Thoc1 encoded ribonucleoprotein is required for myeloid progenitor cell homeostasis in the adult mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pitzonka

    Full Text Available Co-transcriptionally assembled ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes are critical for RNA processing and nuclear export. RNPs have been hypothesized to contribute to the regulation of coordinated gene expression, and defects in RNP biogenesis contribute to genome instability and disease. Despite the large number of RNPs and the importance of the molecular processes they mediate, the requirements for individual RNP complexes in mammalian development and tissue homeostasis are not well characterized. THO is an evolutionarily conserved, nuclear RNP complex that physically links nascent transcripts with the nuclear export apparatus. THO is essential for early mouse embryonic development, limiting characterization of the requirements for THO in adult tissues. To address this shortcoming, a mouse strain has been generated allowing inducible deletion of the Thoc1 gene which encodes an essential protein subunit of THO. Bone marrow reconstitution was used to generate mice in which Thoc1 deletion could be induced specifically in the hematopoietic system. We find that granulocyte macrophage progenitors have a cell autonomous requirement for Thoc1 to maintain cell growth and viability. Lymphoid lineages are not detectably affected by Thoc1 loss under the homeostatic conditions tested. Myeloid lineages may be more sensitive to Thoc1 loss due to their relatively high rate of proliferation and turnover.

  18. Structural basis for substrate placement by an archaeal box C/D ribonucleoprotein particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Song; Wang, Ruiying; Yang, Fangping; Terns, Rebecca M; Terns, Michael P; Zhang, Xinxin; Maxwell, E Stuart; Li, Hong

    2010-09-24

    Box C/D small nucleolar and Cajal body ribonucleoprotein particles (sno/scaRNPs) direct site-specific 2'-O-methylation of ribosomal and spliceosomal RNAs and are critical for gene expression. Here we report crystal structures of an archaeal box C/D RNP containing three core proteins (fibrillarin, Nop56/58, and L7Ae) and a half-mer box C/D guide RNA paired with a substrate RNA. The structure reveals a guide-substrate RNA duplex orientation imposed by a composite protein surface and the conserved GAEK motif of Nop56/58. Molecular modeling supports a dual C/D RNP structure that closely mimics that recently visualized by electron microscopy. The substrate-bound dual RNP model predicts an asymmetric protein distribution between the RNP that binds and methylates the substrate RNA. The predicted asymmetric nature of the holoenzyme is consistent with previous biochemical data on RNP assembly and provides a simple solution for accommodating base-pairing between the C/D guide RNA and large ribosomal and spliceosomal substrate RNAs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism.

  20. Torsin Mediates Primary Envelopment of Large Ribonucleoprotein Granules at the Nuclear Envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahbiz Jokhi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A previously unrecognized mechanism through which large ribonucleoprotein (megaRNP granules exit the nucleus is by budding through the nuclear envelope (NE. This mechanism is akin to the nuclear egress of herpes-type viruses and is essential for proper synapse development. However, the molecular machinery required to remodel the NE during this process is unknown. Here, we identify Torsin, an AAA-ATPase that in humans is linked to dystonia, as a major mediator of primary megaRNP envelopment during NE budding. In torsin mutants, megaRNPs accumulate within the perinuclear space, and the messenger RNAs contained within fail to reach synaptic sites, preventing normal synaptic protein synthesis and thus proper synaptic bouton development. These studies begin to establish the cellular machinery underlying the exit of megaRNPs via budding, offer an explanation for the “nuclear blebbing” phenotype found in dystonia models, and provide an important link between Torsin and the synaptic phenotypes observed in dystonia.

  1. Functions of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins in Stem Cell Potency and Differentiation

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    Qishan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells possess huge importance in developmental biology, disease modelling, cell replacement therapy, and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine because they have the remarkable potential for self-renewal and to differentiate into almost all the cell types in the human body. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell potency and differentiation is essential and critical for extensive application. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs are modular proteins consisting of RNA-binding motifs and auxiliary domains characterized by extensive and divergent functions in nucleic acid metabolism. Multiple roles of hnRNPs in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation enable them to be effective gene expression regulators. More recent findings show that hnRNP proteins are crucial factors implicated in maintenance of stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency and cell differentiation. The hnRNPs interact with certain sequences in target gene promoter regions to initiate transcription. In addition, they recognize 3′UTR or 5′UTR of specific gene mRNA forming mRNP complex to regulate mRNA stability and translation. Both of these regulatory pathways lead to modulation of gene expression that is associated with stem cell proliferation, cell cycle control, pluripotency, and committed differentiation.

  2. Expression and localization of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ping [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Wang, Ningling [Department of Assisted Reproduction, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Lin, Xianhua; Jin, Li [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Xu, Hong, E-mail: xuhong1168@126.com [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Li, Rong [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Huang, Hefeng, E-mail: huanghefg@hotmail.com [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-02-26

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), an evolutionarily conserved protein, is involved in several important cellular processes that are relevant to cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cancer development. However, details of hnRNP K expression during mammalian oogenesis and preimplantation embryo development are lacking. The present study investigates the expression and cellular localization of K protein in the mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos using immunostaining. We demonstrate, for the first time, that hnRNP K is abundantly expressed in the nuclei of mouse oocytes in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. In germ vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes, hnRNP K accumulates in the germinal vesicle in a spot distribution manner. After germinal vesicle breakdown, speckled hnRNP K is diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm. However, after fertilization, the K protein relocates into the female and male pronucleus and persists in the blastomere nuclei. Localization of K protein in the human ovary and ovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT) was also investigated. Overall, this study provides important morphological evidence to better understand the possible roles of hnRNP K in mammalian oogenesis and early embryo development. - Highlights: • HnRNP K localizes in the nucleus of GV-stage oocyte in a punctate distribution. • HnRNP K strongly accumulates in zygotic pronuclei as condensed spots. • The localization of hnRNP K during oogenesis and embryogenesis is characteristic. • HnRNP K might have an important role in oogenesis and embryonic development.

  3. Fragile X mental retardation protein stimulates ribonucleoprotein assembly of influenza A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuo; Cao, Mengmeng; Guo, Yang; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Jingfeng; Jia, Xue; Li, Jianguo; Wang, Conghui; Gabriel, Gülsah; Xue, Qinghua; Yi, Yonghong; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Deng, Tao

    2014-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) of the influenza A virus is responsible for the transcription and replication of viral RNA in the nucleus. These processes require interplay between host factors and RNP components. Here, we report that the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) targets influenza virus RNA synthesis machinery and facilitates virus replication both in cell culture and in mice. We demonstrate that FMRP transiently associates with viral RNP and stimulates viral RNP assembly through RNA-mediated interaction with the nucleoprotein. Furthermore, the KH2 domain of FMRP mediates its association with the nucleoprotein. A point mutation (I304N) in the KH2 domain, identified from a Fragile X syndrome patient, disrupts the FMRP-nucleoprotein association and abolishes the ability of FMRP to participate in viral RNP assembly. We conclude that FMRP is a critical host factor used by influenza viruses to facilitate viral RNP assembly. Our observation reveals a mechanism of influenza virus RNA synthesis and provides insights into FMRP functions.

  4. U1 small nuclear RNA variants differentially form ribonucleoprotein particles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somarelli, Jason A; Mesa, Annia; Rodriguez, Carol E; Sharma, Shalini; Herrera, Rene J

    2014-04-25

    The U1 small nuclear (sn)RNA participates in splicing of pre-mRNAs by recognizing and binding to 5' splice sites at exon/intron boundaries. U1 snRNAs associate with 5' splice sites in the form of ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) that are comprised of the U1 snRNA and 10 core components, including U1A, U1-70K, U1C and the 'Smith antigen', or Sm, heptamer. The U1 snRNA is highly conserved across a wide range of taxa; however, a number of reports have identified the presence of expressed U1-like snRNAs in multiple species, including humans. While numerous U1-like molecules have been shown to be expressed, it is unclear whether these variant snRNAs have the capacity to form snRNPs and participate in splicing. The purpose of the present study was to further characterize biochemically the ability of previously identified human U1-like variants to form snRNPs and bind to U1 snRNP proteins. A bioinformatics analysis provided support for the existence of multiple expressed variants. In vitro gel shift assays, competition assays, and immunoprecipitations (IPs) revealed that the variants formed high molecular weight assemblies to varying degrees and associated with core U1 snRNP proteins to a lesser extent than the canonical U1 snRNA. Together, these data suggest that the human U1 snRNA variants analyzed here are unable to efficiently bind U1 snRNP proteins. The current work provides additional biochemical insights into the ability of the variants to assemble into snRNPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Combining native MS approaches to decipher archaeal box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particle structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliou, Jean-Michel; Manival, Xavier; Tillault, Anne-Sophie; Atmanene, Cédric; Bobo, Claude; Branlant, Christiane; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Charpentier, Bruno; Cianférani, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Site-specific isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in RNAs is catalyzed either by stand-alone enzymes or by box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (sno/sRNPs). The archaeal box H/ACA sRNPs are five-component complexes that consist of a guide RNA and the aCBF5, aNOP10, L7Ae, and aGAR1 proteins. In this study, we performed pairwise incubations of individual constituents of archaeal box H/ACA sRNPs and analyzed their interactions by native MS to build a 2D-connectivity map of direct binders. We describe the use of native MS in combination with ion mobility-MS to monitor the in vitro assembly of the active H/ACA sRNP particle. Real-time native MS was used to monitor how box H/ACA particle functions in multiple-turnover conditions. Native MS also unambiguously revealed that a substrate RNA containing 5-fluorouridine (f(5) U) was hydrolyzed into 5-fluoro-6-hydroxy-pseudouridine (f(5) ho(6) Ψ). In terms of enzymatic mechanism, box H/ACA sRNP was shown to catalyze the pseudouridylation of a first RNA substrate, then to release the RNA product (S22 f(5) ho(6) ψ) from the RNP enzyme and reload a new substrate RNA molecule. Altogether, our native MS-based approaches provide relevant new information about the potential assembly process and catalytic mechanism of box H/ACA RNPs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. N-methylation of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieker, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Several of the core proteins on the 40S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (hnRNP) from HeLa cells contain N/sup G/,N/sup G/-dimethyl-L-arginine (uDMA). 3-deazaadenosine (c 3 Ado), an inhibitor of and substrate for s-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, has been used to study the methylation patterns of the individual polypeptides. Trimethyllysine and uDMA formation in total cellular protein were inhibited in the presence of the drug while other methylated basic amino acids were unaffected. This inhibition was reversed within 60 min after removal of the drug from the medium. Monolayer HeLa cultures were incubated with [methyl- 3 H]-L-methoinine for 12 hours in the presence of 50 uM c 3 Ado. Purified particles were obtained by centrifugation of nuclear extracts on sucrose density gradients. The core proteins were isolated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, acid hydrolyzed and analyzed for radioactivity incorporated into methionine and methylated basic amino acids. The ratio of radioactivity incorporated into uDMA relative to that into methionine for the two major particle proteins with molecular weights of 31,000 (A 1 ) and 43,000 (A 2 ) was about 2.0 and 0.2 in control cultures. In the presence of c 3 Ado, these ratios were depressed 60 to 80%. Results of pulse-chase experiments suggested that A 1 and A 2 are metabolically stable proteins (t/sub 0.5/ > 75 hr), whether or not the proteins were undermethylated. Monomethyl-L-arginine may be a precursor in the formation of u-DMA

  7. Host factors that interact with the pestivirus N-terminal protease, Npro, are components of the ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Matthew; Donaszi-Ivanov, Andras; Pollen, Sean; Dalmay, Tamas; Saalbach, Gerhard; Powell, Penny P

    2014-09-01

    The viral N-terminal protease N(pro) of pestiviruses counteracts cellular antiviral defenses through inhibition of IRF3. Here we used mass spectrometry to identify a new role for N(pro) through its interaction with over 55 associated proteins, mainly ribosomal proteins and ribonucleoproteins, including RNA helicase A (DHX9), Y-box binding protein (YBX1), DDX3, DDX5, eIF3, IGF2BP1, multiple myeloma tumor protein 2, interleukin enhancer binding factor 3 (IEBP3), guanine nucleotide binding protein 3, and polyadenylate-binding protein 1 (PABP-1). These are components of the translation machinery, ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs), and stress granules. Significantly, we found that stress granule formation was inhibited in MDBK cells infected with a noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain, Kyle. However, ribonucleoproteins binding to N(pro) did not inhibit these proteins from aggregating into stress granules. N(pro) interacted with YBX1 though its TRASH domain, since the mutant C112R protein with an inactive TRASH domain no longer redistributed to stress granules. Interestingly, RNA helicase A and La autoantigen relocated from a nuclear location to form cytoplasmic granules with N(pro). To address a proviral role for N(pro) in RNP granules, we investigated whether N(pro) affected RNA interference (RNAi), since interacting proteins are involved in RISC function during RNA silencing. Using glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) silencing with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) followed by Northern blotting of GAPDH, expression of N(pro) had no effect on RNAi silencing activity, contrasting with other viral suppressors of interferon. We propose that N(pro) is involved with virus RNA translation in the cytoplasm for virus particle production, and when translation is inhibited following stress, it redistributes to the replication complex. Although the pestivirus N-terminal protease, N(pro), has been shown to have an important role in degrading IRF3 to

  8. An In Vitro RNA Synthesis Assay for Rabies Virus Defines Ribonucleoprotein Interactions Critical for Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Benjamin; Liang, Bo; Gardner, Erica; Ross, Robin A; Whelan, Sean P J

    2017-01-01

    We report an in vitro RNA synthesis assay for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) of rabies virus (RABV). We expressed RABV large polymerase protein (L) in insect cells from a recombinant baculovirus vector and the phosphoprotein cofactor (P) in Escherichia coli and purified the resulting proteins by affinity and size exclusion chromatography. Using chemically synthesized short RNA corresponding to the first 19 nucleotides (nt) of the rabies virus genome, we demonstrate that L alone initiates synthesis on naked RNA and that P serves to enhance the initiation and processivity of the RdRP. The L-P complex lacks full processivity, which we interpret to reflect the lack of the viral nucleocapsid protein (N) on the template. Using this assay, we define the requirements in P for stimulation of RdRP activity as residues 11 to 50 of P and formally demonstrate that ribavirin triphosphate (RTP) inhibits the RdRP. By comparing the properties of RABV RdRP with those of the related rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we demonstrate that both polymerases can copy the heterologous promoter sequence. The requirements for engagement of the N-RNA template of VSV by its polymerase are provided by the C-terminal domain (CTD) of P. A chimeric RABV P protein in which the oligomerization domain (OD) and the CTD were replaced by those of VSV P stimulated RABV RdRP activity on naked RNA but was insufficient to permit initiation on the VSV N-RNA template. This result implies that interactions between L and the template N are also required for initiation of RNA synthesis, extending our knowledge of ribonucleoprotein interactions that are critical for gene expression. The current understanding of the structural and functional significance of the components of the rabies virus replication machinery is incomplete. Although structures are available for the nucleocapsid protein in complex with RNA, and also for portions of P, information on both the structure and function of the L

  9. The 3.2 Angstrom Resolution Structure of the Polymorphic Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Ribonucleoprotein Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speir, Jeffrey Alan

    Structural studies of the polymorphic cowpea chlorotic mottle virus have resulted in high resolution structures for two distinct icosahedral ribonucleoprotein particle conformations dependent upon whether acidic or basic pH conditions prevail. CCMV is stable below pH 6.5, however metal-free particles maintain a 10% increase in hydrodynamic volume at pH >=q 7.5. Identification of this swollen' form of CCMV, which can easily be disrupted with 1M NaCl, led to the first reassembly of an icosahedral virus in vitro from purified viral protein and RNA to form infectious particles, and its assembly has been the subject of biochemical and biophysical investigations for over twenty-five years. Under well defined conditions of pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration, CCMV capsid protein or capsid protein and RNA will reassemble to form icosahedral particles of various sizes, sheets, tubes, rosettes, and a variety of laminar structures which resemble virion structures from non-related virus families. Analysis of native particles at 3.2A resolution and swollen particles at 28A resolution has suggested that the chemical basis for the formation of polymorphic icosahedral and anisometric structures is: (i) hexamers formed of beta-barrel subunits stabilized by an unusual hexameric parallel beta structure made up of their N-termini, (ii) the location of protein-RNA interactions, (iii) divalent metal cation binding sites that regulate quasi-symmetrical subunit associations, (iv) charge repulsion across the same interfaces when lacking divalent metal ions at basic pH, which induces the formation of sixty 20A diameter portals for RNA release, and (v) a novel, C-terminal-based, subunit dimer assembly unit. The use of C- and N-terminal arms in CCMV has not been observed in other icosahedral RNA virus structures determined at near atomic resolution, however, their detailed interactions and roles in stabilizing the quaternary organization of CCMV are related to that found

  10. Targeted Genome Editing Using DNA-Free RNA-Guided Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein for CHO Cell Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jongoh; Lee, Namil; Cho, Suhyung; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in the CRISPR/Cas9 system have dramatically facilitated genome engineering in various cell systems. Among the protocols, the direct delivery of the Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex into cells is an efficient approach to increase genome editing efficiency. This method uses purified Cas9 protein and in vitro transcribed sgRNA to edit the target gene without vector DNA. We have applied the RNP complex to CHO cell engineering to obtain desirable phenotypes and to reduce unintended insertional mutagenesis and off-target effects. Here, we describe our routine methods for RNP complex-mediated gene deletion including the protocols to prepare the purified Cas9 protein and the in vitro transcribed sgRNA. Subsequently, we also describe a protocol to confirm the edited genomic positions using the T7E1 enzymatic assay and next-generation sequencing.

  11. Systemic delivery of siRNA in pumpkin by a plant PHLOEM SMALL RNA-BINDING PROTEIN 1-ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Jia, Weitao; Leary, Julie A; Lucas, William J

    2014-11-01

    In plants, the vascular system, specifically the phloem, functions in delivery of small RNA (sRNA) to exert epigenetic control over developmental and defense-related processes. Although the importance of systemic sRNA delivery has been established, information is currently lacking concerning the nature of the protein machinery involved in this process. Here, we show that a PHLOEM SMALL-RNA BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PSRP1) serves as the basis for formation of an sRNA ribonucleoprotein complex (sRNPC) that delivers sRNA (primarily 24 nt) to sink organs. Assembly of this complex is facilitated through PSRP1 phosphorylation by a phloem-localized protein kinase, PSRPK1. During long-distance transport, PSRP1-sRNPC is stable against phloem phosphatase activity. Within target tissues, phosphatase activity results in disassembly of PSRP1-sRNPC, a process that is probably required for unloading cargo sRNA into surrounding cells. These findings provide an insight into the mechanism involved in delivery of sRNA associated with systemic gene silencing in plants. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cloning of the cDNA for U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, A. S.; Czernik, A. J.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a plant cDNA that encodes U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) 70K protein. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein cDNA is not full length and lacks the coding region for 68 amino acids in the amino-terminal region as compared to human U1 snRNP 70K protein. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the plant U1 snRNP 70K protein with the amino acid sequence of animal and yeast U1 snRNP 70K protein showed a high degree of homology. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein is more closely related to the human counter part than to the yeast 70K protein. The carboxy-terminal half is less well conserved but, like the vertebrate 70K proteins, is rich in charged amino acids. Northern analysis with the RNA isolated from different parts of the plant indicates that the snRNP 70K gene is expressed in all of the parts tested. Southern blotting of genomic DNA using the cDNA indicates that the U1 snRNP 70K protein is coded by a single gene.

  13. Highly efficient DNA-free gene disruption in the agricultural pest Ceratitis capitata by CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meccariello, Angela; Monti, Simona Maria; Romanelli, Alessandra; Colonna, Rita; Primo, Pasquale; Inghilterra, Maria Grazia; Del Corsano, Giuseppe; Ramaglia, Antonio; Iazzetti, Giovanni; Chiarore, Antonia; Patti, Francesco; Heinze, Svenia D; Salvemini, Marco; Lindsay, Helen; Chiavacci, Elena; Burger, Alexa; Robinson, Mark D; Mosimann, Christian; Bopp, Daniel; Saccone, Giuseppe

    2017-08-30

    The Mediterranean fruitfly Ceratitis capitata (medfly) is an invasive agricultural pest of high economic impact and has become an emerging model for developing new genetic control strategies as an alternative to insecticides. Here, we report the successful adaptation of CRISPR-Cas9-based gene disruption in the medfly by injecting in vitro pre-assembled, solubilized Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) loaded with gene-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNA) into early embryos. When targeting the eye pigmentation gene white eye (we), a high rate of somatic mosaicism in surviving G0 adults was observed. Germline transmission rate of mutated we alleles by G0 animals was on average above 52%, with individual cases achieving nearly 100%. We further recovered large deletions in the we gene when two sites were simultaneously targeted by two sgRNAs. CRISPR-Cas9 targeting of the Ceratitis ortholog of the Drosophila segmentation paired gene (Ccprd) caused segmental malformations in late embryos and in hatched larvae. Mutant phenotypes correlate with repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) lesions in the two targeted genes. This simple and highly effective Cas9 RNP-based gene editing to introduce mutations in C. capitata will significantly advance the design and development of new effective strategies for pest control management.

  14. The human 64-kDa polyadenylylation factor contains a ribonucleoprotein-type RNA binding domain and unusual auxiliary motifs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagaki, Yoshio; Manley, J.L.; MacDonald, C.C.; Shenk, T.

    1992-01-01

    Cleavage stimulation factor is one of the multiple factors required for 3'-end cleavage of mammalian pre-mRNAs. The authors have shown previously that this factor is composed of three subunits with estimated molecular masses of 77, 64, and 50 kDa and that the 64-kDa subunit can be UV-cross linked to RNA in a polyadenylylation signal (AAUAAA)-dependent manner. They have now isolated cDNAs encoding the 64-kDa subunit of human cleavage stimulation factor. The 64-kDa subunit contains a ribonucleoprotein-type RNA binding domain in the N-terminal region and a repeat structure in the C-terminal region in which a pentapeptide sequence (consensus MEARA/G) is repeated 12 times and the formation of a long α-helix stabilized by salt bridges is predicted. An ∼270-amino acid segment surrounding this repeat structure is highly enriched in proline and glycine residues (∼20% for each). When cloned 64-kDa subunit was expressed in Escherichia coli, an N-terminal fragment containing the RNA binding domain bound to RNAs in a polyadenylylation-signal-independent manner, suggesting that the RNA binding domain is directly involved in the binding of the 64-kDa subunit to pre-mRNAs

  15. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2005-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression

  16. A Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein, Pumpkin RBP50, Forms the Basis of a Phloem-Mobile Ribonucleoprotein Complex[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Brandom, Jeri L.; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Ringgold, Vanessa; Lough, Tony J.; Lucas, William J.

    2009-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are integral components of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and play a central role in RNA processing. In plants, some RBPs function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. The angiosperm phloem translocation stream contains a unique population of RBPs, but little is known regarding the nature of the proteins and mRNA species that constitute phloem-mobile RNP complexes. Here, we identified and characterized a 50-kD pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima cv Big Max) phloem RNA binding protein (RBP50) that is evolutionarily related to animal polypyrimidine tract binding proteins. In situ hybridization studies indicated a high level of RBP50 transcripts in companion cells, while immunolocalization experiments detected RBP50 in both companion cells and sieve elements. A comparison of the levels of RBP50 present in vascular bundles and phloem sap indicated that this protein is highly enriched in the phloem sap. Heterografting experiments confirmed that RBP50 is translocated from source to sink tissues. Collectively, these findings established that RBP50 functions as a non-cell-autonomous RBP. Protein overlay, coimmunoprecipitation, and cross-linking experiments identified the phloem proteins and mRNA species that constitute RBP50-based RNP complexes. Gel mobility-shift assays demonstrated that specificity, with respect to the bound mRNA, is established by the polypyrimidine tract binding motifs within such transcripts. We present a model for RBP50-based RNP complexes within the pumpkin phloem translocation stream. PMID:19122103

  17. Genome editing of bread wheat using biolistic delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 in vitro transcripts or ribonucleoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhen; Chen, Kunling; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Jinxing; Yin, Kangquan; Qiu, Jin-Long; Gao, Caixia

    2018-03-01

    This protocol is an extension to: Nat. Protoc. 9, 2395-2410 (2014); doi:10.1038/nprot.2014.157; published online 18 September 2014In recent years, CRISPR/Cas9 has emerged as a powerful tool for improving crop traits. Conventional plant genome editing mainly relies on plasmid-carrying cassettes delivered by Agrobacterium or particle bombardment. Here, we describe DNA-free editing of bread wheat by delivering in vitro transcripts (IVTs) or ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) of CRISPR/Cas9 by particle bombardment. This protocol serves as an extension of our previously published protocol on genome editing in bread wheat using CRISPR/Cas9 plasmids delivered by particle bombardment. The methods we describe not only eliminate random integration of CRISPR/Cas9 into genomic DNA, but also reduce off-target effects. In this protocol extension article, we present detailed protocols for preparation of IVTs and RNPs; validation by PCR/restriction enzyme (RE) and next-generation sequencing; delivery by biolistics; and recovery of mutants and identification of mutants by pooling methods and Sanger sequencing. To use these protocols, researchers should have basic skills and experience in molecular biology and biolistic transformation. By using these protocols, plants edited without the use of any foreign DNA can be generated and identified within 9-11 weeks.

  18. An analytical platform for mass spectrometry-based identification and chemical analysis of RNA in ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Masato; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Nobe, Yuko; Masaki, Shunpei; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hideaki; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2009-11-01

    We describe here a mass spectrometry (MS)-based analytical platform of RNA, which combines direct nano-flow reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) on a spray tip column and a high-resolution LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Operating RPLC under a very low flow rate with volatile solvents and MS in the negative mode, we could estimate highly accurate mass values sufficient to predict the nucleotide composition of a approximately 21-nucleotide small interfering RNA, detect post-transcriptional modifications in yeast tRNA, and perform collision-induced dissociation/tandem MS-based structural analysis of nucleolytic fragments of RNA at a sub-femtomole level. Importantly, the method allowed the identification and chemical analysis of small RNAs in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, such as the pre-spliceosomal RNP complex, which was pulled down from cultured cells with a tagged protein cofactor as bait. We have recently developed a unique genome-oriented database search engine, Ariadne, which allows tandem MS-based identification of RNAs in biological samples. Thus, the method presented here has broad potential for automated analysis of RNA; it complements conventional molecular biology-based techniques and is particularly suited for simultaneous analysis of the composition, structure, interaction, and dynamics of RNA and protein components in various cellular RNP complexes.

  19. Rapid, Selection-Free, High-Efficiency Genome Editing in Protozoan Parasites Using CRISPR-Cas9 Ribonucleoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Carolina Soares Medeiros

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids (order Kinetoplastida, including the human pathogens Trypanosoma cruzi (agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma brucei, (African sleeping sickness, and Leishmania (leishmaniasis, affect millions of people and animals globally. T. cruzi is considered one of the least studied and most poorly understood tropical disease-causing parasites, in part because of the relative lack of facile genetic engineering tools. This situation has improved recently through the application of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR-Cas9 technology, but a number of limitations remain, including the toxicity of continuous Cas9 expression and the long drug marker selection times. In this study, we show that the delivery of ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes composed of recombinant Cas9 from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9, but not from the more routinely used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9, and in vitro-transcribed single guide RNAs (sgRNAs results in rapid gene edits in T. cruzi and other kinetoplastids at frequencies approaching 100%. The highly efficient genome editing via SaCas9/sgRNA RNPs was obtained for both reporter and endogenous genes and observed in multiple parasite life cycle stages in various strains of T. cruzi, as well as in T. brucei and Leishmania major. RNP complex delivery was also used to successfully tag proteins at endogenous loci and to assess the biological functions of essential genes. Thus, the use of SaCas9 RNP complexes for gene editing in kinetoplastids provides a simple, rapid, and cloning- and selection-free method to assess gene function in these important human pathogens.

  20. Alterations in polyribosome and messenger ribonucleic acid metabolism and messenger ribonucleoprotein utilization in osmotically stressed plant seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    Polyribosome aggregation state in growing tissues of barley and wheat leaf of stems of pea and squash was studied in relation to seedling growth and water status of the growing tissue in plants at various levels of osmotic stress. It was found to be highly correlated with water potential and osmotic potential of the growing tissue and with leaf of stem elongation rate. Stress rapidly reduced polyribosome content and water status in growing tissues of barley leaves; changes were slow and slight in the non-growing leaf blade. Membrane-bound and free polyribosomes were equally sensitive to stress-induced disaggregation. Incorporation of 32 PO 4 3- into ribosomal RNA was rapidly inhibited by stress, but stability of poly(A) + RNA relative to ribosomal RNA was similar in stressed and unstressed tissues, with a half-life of about 12 hours. Stress also caused progressive loss of poly(A) + RNA from these tissues. Quantitation of poly(A) and in vitro messenger template activity in polysome gradient fractions showed a shift of activity from the polysomal region to the region of 20-60 S in stressed plants. Messenger RNA in the 20-60 S region coded for the same peptides as mRNA found in the polysomal fraction. Nonpolysomal and polysome-derived messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes (mRNP) were isolated, and characteristic proteins were found associated with either fraction. Polysomal mRNP from stressed or unstressed plants were translated with similar efficiency in a wheat germ cell-free system. It was concluded that no translational inhibitory activity was associated with nonpolysomal mRNP from barley prepared as described

  1. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui; Kurimoto, Akiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells

  2. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Kurimoto, Akiko [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Oncology Research Laboratories, Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd, 1-2-58, Hiromachi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, 140-8710 (Japan); Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Akiyama, Tetsu, E-mail: akiyama@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan)

    2015-03-27

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  3. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng-Hou [NO.3 People' s Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 201900 (China); The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Wu, Ying-Li [The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhao, Meng [Institute of Health Science, SJTU-SM/Shanghai Institutes for Biological Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Liu, Chuan-Xu; Wang, Li-Shun [The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Guo-Qiang, E-mail: chengq@shsmu.edu.cn [The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Institute of Health Science, SJTU-SM/Shanghai Institutes for Biological Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  4. ANTI-HETEROGENEOUS NUCLEAR RIBONUCLEOPROTEIN B1 (ANTI-RA33 ANTIBODIES IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Kuznetsova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (RNP autoantibodies (AAbs are encountered in many autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs. The potential diagnostic value of the RA33 AAb complex consisting of RNP A2 and alternative domains of the splicing proteins RNP B1 and RNP B2 is now of interest to rheumatologists. Subjects and methods. The authors studied the frequency of anti-RNP B1 AAbs in 300 patients with systemic ARDs, including those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc, and Sjö gren's syndrome (SS and in 53 people without ARDs, who constituted a control group. Serum anti-RNP B1 AAbs were assessed by enzyme immunoassay. Results and discussion. The frequency of anti-RNP B1 AAbs in patients with ARDs was much higher than that in the control group: 170/300 (56.6% and 8/53 (13% patients, respectively. Anti-RNP B1 AAbs were detected in 78.5% (113/144 of the patients with RA; 40.3% (23/57 of those with AS, in 67.5% (27/40 of those with SSc, in 36.4% (16/44 of those with SLE, and in 13.3% (2/15 of those with SS. The diagnostic sensitivity of the marker for RA was 78.5%, its diagnostic specificity was 84.9%; the likelihood ratio of positive and negative results was 5.24 and 0.24, respectively. In the patients with RA, the level of anti-RNP B1 AAbs significantly correlated with that of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, while in those with SSc the detection of anti-RNP B1 AAbs was related to the rigidity of the vascular wall and the presence of hypertension. The frequency of anti-RNP B1 AAbs among the RA patients seronegative for rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies was 15.4%. Conclusion. Anti-RNP B1 AAs are a useful laboratory marker (with the upper limit of the normal range being 3.3 U/ml, but are of limited value in the diagnosis of RA. Anti-RNP B1 AAbs may be regarded as an additional diagnostic marker for RA.

  5. Cytosolic and Nuclear Delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-ribonucleoprotein for Gene Editing Using Arginine Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mout, Rubul; Rotello, Vincent M

    2017-10-20

    In this protocol, engineered Cas9-ribonucleoprotein (Cas9 protein and sgRNA, together called Cas9-RNP) and gold nanoparticles are used to make nanoassemblies that are employed to deliver Cas9-RNP into cell cytoplasm and nucleus. Cas9 protein is engineered with an N-terminus glutamic acid tag (E-tag or En, where n = the number of glutamic acid in an E-tag and usually n = 15 or 20), C-terminus nuclear localizing signal (NLS), and a C-terminus 6xHis-tag. [Cas9En hereafter] To use this protocol, the first step is to generate the required materials (gold nanoparticles, recombinant Cas9En, and sgRNA). Laboratory-synthesis of gold nanoparticles can take up to a few weeks, but can be synthesized in large batches that can be used for many years without compromising the quality. Cas9En can be cloned from a regular SpCas9 gene (Addgene plasmid id = 47327), and expressed and purified using standard laboratory procedures which are not a part of this protocol. Similarly, sgRNA can be laboratory-synthesized using in vitro transcription from a template gene (Addgene plasmid id = 51765) or can be purchased from various sources. Once these materials are ready, it takes about ~30 min to make the Cas9En-RNP complex and 10 min to make the Cas9En-RNP/nanoparticles nanoassemblies, which are immediately used for delivery (Figure 1). Complete delivery (90-95% cytoplasmic and nuclear delivery) is achieved in less than 3 h. Follow-up editing experiments require additional time based on users' need. Synthesis of arginine functionalized gold nanoparticles (ArgNPs) (Yang et al ., 2011), expression of recombinant Cas9En, and in vitro synthesis of sgRNA is reported elsewhere (Mout et al ., 2017). We report here only the generation of the delivery vehicle i.e. , the fabrication of Cas9En-RNP/ArgNPs nanoassembly.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase 12 is induced by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K and promotes migration and invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, I-Che; Li, Hsin-Pai; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chen, Lih-Chyang; Chung, An-Ko; Chao, Mei; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Hsueh, Chuen; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Chang, Kai-Ping; Liang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), a DNA/RNA binding protein, is associated with metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, the mechanisms underlying hnRNP K-mediated metastasis is unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) in hnRNP K-mediated metastasis in NPC. We studied hnRNP K-regulated MMPs by analyzing the expression profiles of MMP family genes in NPC tissues and hnRNP K-knockdown NPC cells using Affymetrix microarray analysis and quantitative RT-PCR. The association of hnRNP K and MMP12 expression in 82 clinically proven NPC cases was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. The hnRNP K-mediated MMP12 regulation was determined by zymography and Western blot, as well as by promoter, DNA pull-down and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. The functional role of MMP12 in cell migration and invasion was demonstrated by MMP12-knockdown and the treatment of MMP12-specific inhibitor, PF-356231. MMP12 was overexpressed in NPC tissues, and this high level of expression was significantly correlated with high-level expression of hnRNP K (P = 0.026). The levels of mRNA, protein and enzyme activity of MMP12 were reduced in hnRNP K-knockdown NPC cells. HnRNP K interacting with the region spanning −42 to −33 bp of the transcription start site triggered transcriptional activation of the MMP12 promoter. Furthermore, inhibiting MMP12 by MMP12 knockdown and MMP12-specific inhibitor, PF-356231, significantly reduced the migration and invasion of NPC cells. Overexpression of MMP12 was significantly correlated with hnRNP K in NPC tissues. HnRNP K can induce MMP12 expression and enzyme activity through activating MMP12 promoter, which promotes cell migration and invasion in NPC cells. In vitro experiments suggest that NPC metastasis with high MMP12 expression may be treated with PF-356231. HnRNP K and MMP12 may be potential therapeutic markers for NPC, but

  7. Mechanistic and Structural Studies of Protein-Only RNase P Compared to Ribonucleoproteins Reveal the Two Faces of the Same Enzymatic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Schelcher

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RNase P, the essential activity that performs the 5′ maturation of tRNA precursors, can be achieved either by ribonucleoproteins containing a ribozyme present in the three domains of life or by protein-only enzymes called protein-only RNase P (PRORP that occur in eukaryote nuclei and organelles. A fast growing list of studies has investigated three-dimensional structures and mode of action of PRORP proteins. Results suggest that similar to ribozymes, PRORP proteins have two main domains. A clear functional analogy can be drawn between the specificity domain of the RNase P ribozyme and PRORP pentatricopeptide repeat domain, and between the ribozyme catalytic domain and PRORP N4BP1, YacP-like Nuclease domain. Moreover, both types of enzymes appear to dock with the acceptor arm of tRNA precursors and make specific contacts with the corner of pre-tRNAs. While some clear differences can still be delineated between PRORP and ribonucleoprotein (RNP RNase P, the two types of enzymes seem to use, fundamentally, the same catalytic mechanism involving two metal ions. The occurrence of PRORP and RNP RNase P represents a remarkable example of convergent evolution. It might be the unique witness of an ongoing replacement of catalytic RNAs by proteins for enzymatic activities.

  8. Vanillin inhibits translation and induces messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granule formation in saccharomyces cerevisiae: application and validation of high-content, image-based profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Aya; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Suga, Yohei; Izawa, Shingo; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin, generated by acid hydrolysis of lignocellulose, acts as a potent inhibitor of the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the cellular processes affected by vanillin using high-content, image-based profiling. Among 4,718 non-essential yeast deletion mutants, the morphology of those defective in the large ribosomal subunit showed significant similarity to that of vanillin-treated cells. The defects in these mutants were clustered in three domains of the ribosome: the mRNA tunnel entrance, exit and backbone required for small subunit attachment. To confirm that vanillin inhibited ribosomal function, we assessed polysome and messenger ribonucleoprotein granule formation after treatment with vanillin. Analysis of polysome profiles showed disassembly of the polysomes in the presence of vanillin. Processing bodies and stress granules, which are composed of non-translating mRNAs and various proteins, were formed after treatment with vanillin. These results suggest that vanillin represses translation in yeast cells.

  9. Cloning and expression of a nuclear encoded plastid specific 33 kDa ribonucleoprotein gene (33RNP) from pea that is light stimulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M K; Nair, S; Singh, B N; Mudgil, Y; Tewari, K K; Sopory, S K

    2001-01-24

    We report the cloning and sequencing of both cDNA and genomic DNA of a 33 kDa chloroplast ribonucleoprotein (33RNP) from pea. The analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of the cDNA clone revealed that the encoded protein contains two RNA binding domains, including the conserved consensus ribonucleoprotein sequences CS-RNP1 and CS-RNP2, on the C-terminus half and the presence of a putative transit peptide sequence in the N-terminus region. The phylogenetic and multiple sequence alignment analysis of pea chloroplast RNP along with RNPs reported from the other plant sources revealed that the pea 33RNP is very closely related to Nicotiana sylvestris 31RNP and 28RNP and also to 31RNP and 28RNP of Arabidopsis and spinach, respectively. The pea 33RNP was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The in vitro import of precursor protein into chloroplasts confirmed that the N-terminus putative transit peptide is a bona fide transit peptide and 33RNP is localized in the chloroplast. The nucleic acid-binding properties of the recombinant protein, as revealed by South-Western analysis, showed that 33RNP has higher binding affinity for poly (U) and oligo dT than for ssDNA and dsDNA. The steady state transcript level was higher in leaves than in roots and the expression of this gene is light stimulated. Sequence analysis of the genomic clone revealed that the gene contains four exons and three introns. We have also isolated and analyzed the 5' flanking region of the pea 33RNP gene.

  10. Non-canonical binding interactions of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of P34 protein modulate binding within the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamina, Anyango D; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    RNA binding proteins are involved in many aspects of RNA metabolism. In Trypanosoma brucei, our laboratory has identified two trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37 that are involved in the maturation of the 60S subunit during ribosome biogenesis. These proteins are part of the T. brucei 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) and P34 binds to 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein L5 through its N-terminus and its RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains. We generated truncated P34 proteins to determine these domains' interactions with 5S rRNA and L5. Our analyses demonstrate that RRM1 of P34 mediates the majority of binding with 5S rRNA and the N-terminus together with RRM1 contribute the most to binding with L5. We determined that the consensus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) 1 and 2 sequences, characteristic of canonical RRM domains, are not fully conserved in the RRM domains of P34. However, the aromatic amino acids previously described to mediate base stacking interactions with their RNA target are conserved in both of the RRM domains of P34. Surprisingly, mutation of these aromatic residues did not disrupt but instead enhanced 5S rRNA binding. However, we identified four arginine residues located in RRM1 of P34 that strongly impact L5 binding. These mutational analyses of P34 suggest that the binding site for 5S rRNA and L5 are near each other and specific residues within P34 regulate the formation of the 5S RNP. These studies show the unique way that the domains of P34 mediate binding with the T. brucei 5S RNP.

  11. A natural component from Euphorbia humifusa Willd displays novel, broad-spectrum anti-influenza activity by blocking nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, So Young; Park, Ji Hoon [Respiratory Viruses Research Laboratory, Discovery Biology Department, Institut Pasteur Korea, 16, Daewangpangyo-ro 712 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-400 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ho; Kang, Jong Seong [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Ji-Young, E-mail: jiyoung.min@ip-korea.org [Respiratory Viruses Research Laboratory, Discovery Biology Department, Institut Pasteur Korea, 16, Daewangpangyo-ro 712 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-400 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-04

    The need to develop anti-influenza drugs with novel antiviral mechanisms is urgent because of the rapid rate of antigenic mutation and the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. We identified a novel anti-influenza molecule by screening 861 plant-derived natural components using a high-throughput image-based assay that measures inhibition of the influenza virus infection. 1,3,4,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (TGBG) from Euphorbia humifusa Willd showed broad-spectrum anti-influenza activity against two seasonal influenza A strains, A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) and A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2), and seasonal influenza B strain B/Florida/04/2006. We investigated the mode of action of TGBG using neuraminidase activity inhibition and time-of-addition assays, which evaluate the viral release and entry steps, respectively. We found that TGBG exhibits a novel antiviral mechanism that differs from the FDA-approved anti-influenza drugs oseltamivir which inhibits viral release, and amantadine which inhibits viral entry. Immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that TGBG significantly inhibits nuclear export of influenza nucleoproteins (NP) during the early stages of infection causing NP to accumulate in the nucleus. In addition, influenza-induced activation of the Akt signaling pathway was suppressed by TGBG in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that a putative mode of action of TGBG involves inhibition of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm consequently disrupting the assembly of progeny virions. In summary, TGBG has potential as novel anti-influenza therapeutic with a novel mechanism of action. - Highlights: • The plant-derived natural product TGBG has broad-spectrum antiviral activity against seasonal influenza A and B viruses. • TGBG has a novel anti-viral mechanism of action that from differs from the currently available anti-influenza drugs. • TGBG hinders nuclear export of the influenza virus ribonucleoprotein (v

  12. A natural component from Euphorbia humifusa Willd displays novel, broad-spectrum anti-influenza activity by blocking nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, So Young; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Young Ho; Kang, Jong Seong; Min, Ji-Young

    2016-01-01

    The need to develop anti-influenza drugs with novel antiviral mechanisms is urgent because of the rapid rate of antigenic mutation and the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. We identified a novel anti-influenza molecule by screening 861 plant-derived natural components using a high-throughput image-based assay that measures inhibition of the influenza virus infection. 1,3,4,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (TGBG) from Euphorbia humifusa Willd showed broad-spectrum anti-influenza activity against two seasonal influenza A strains, A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) and A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2), and seasonal influenza B strain B/Florida/04/2006. We investigated the mode of action of TGBG using neuraminidase activity inhibition and time-of-addition assays, which evaluate the viral release and entry steps, respectively. We found that TGBG exhibits a novel antiviral mechanism that differs from the FDA-approved anti-influenza drugs oseltamivir which inhibits viral release, and amantadine which inhibits viral entry. Immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that TGBG significantly inhibits nuclear export of influenza nucleoproteins (NP) during the early stages of infection causing NP to accumulate in the nucleus. In addition, influenza-induced activation of the Akt signaling pathway was suppressed by TGBG in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that a putative mode of action of TGBG involves inhibition of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm consequently disrupting the assembly of progeny virions. In summary, TGBG has potential as novel anti-influenza therapeutic with a novel mechanism of action. - Highlights: • The plant-derived natural product TGBG has broad-spectrum antiviral activity against seasonal influenza A and B viruses. • TGBG has a novel anti-viral mechanism of action that from differs from the currently available anti-influenza drugs. • TGBG hinders nuclear export of the influenza virus ribonucleoprotein (v

  13. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H, H', and F are members of a ubiquitously expressed subfamily of related but distinct proteins encoded by genes mapping to different chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Rasmussen, H H; Vorum, H

    1995-01-01

    Molecular cDNA cloning, two-dimensional gel immunoblotting, and amino acid microsequencing identified three sequence-unique and distinct proteins that constitute a subfamily of ubiquitously expressed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins corresponding to hnRNPs H, H', and F. These proteins share...... epitopes and sequence identity with two other proteins, isoelectric focusing sample spot numbers 2222 (37.6 kDa; pI 6.5) and 2326 (39.5 kDa; pI 6.6), indicating that the subfamily may contain additional members. The identity between hnRNPs H and H' is 96%, between H and F 78%, and between H' and F 75......%, respectively. The three proteins contain three repeats, which we denote quasi-RRMs (qRRMs) since they have a remote similarity to the RNA recognition motif (RRM). The three qRRMs of hnRNP H, with a few additional NH2-terminal amino acids, were constructed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and used...

  14. CmRBP50 protein phosphorylation is essential for assembly of a stable phloem-mobile high-affinity ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pingfang; Ham, Byung-Kook; Lucas, William J

    2011-07-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that play crucial roles in RNA processing for gene regulation. The angiosperm sieve tube system contains a unique population of transcripts, some of which function as long-distance signaling agents involved in regulating organ development. These phloem-mobile mRNAs are translocated as RNP complexes. One such complex is based on a phloem RBP named Cucurbita maxima RNA-binding protein 50 (CmRBP50), a member of the polypyrimidine track binding protein family. The core of this RNP complex contains six additional phloem proteins. Here, requirements for assembly of this CmRBP50 RNP complex are reported. Phosphorylation sites on CmRBP50 were mapped, and then coimmunoprecipitation and protein overlay studies established that the phosphoserine residues, located at the C terminus of CmRBP50, are critical for RNP complex assembly. In vitro pull-down experiments revealed that three phloem proteins, C. maxima phloem protein 16, C. maxima GTP-binding protein, and C. maxima phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-like protein, bind directly with CmRBP50. This interaction required CmRBP50 phosphorylation. Gel mobility-shift assays demonstrated that assembly of the CmRBP50-based protein complex results in a system having enhanced binding affinity for phloem-mobile mRNAs carrying polypyrimidine track binding motifs. This property would be essential for effective long-distance translocation of bound mRNA to the target tissues.

  15. RNA-binding domain of the A protein component of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein analyzed by NMR spectroscopy is structurally similar to ribosomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.W.; Query, C.C.; Golden, B.L.; White, S.W.; Keene, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    An RNA recognition motif (RRM) of ∼80 amino acids constitutes the core of RNA-binding domains found in a large family of proteins involved in RNA processing. The U1 RNA-binding domain of the A protein component of the human U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which encompasses the RRM sequence, was analyzed by using NMR spectroscopy. The domain of the A protein is a highly stable monomer in solution consisting of four antiparallel β-strands and two α-helices. The highly conserved RNP1 and RNP2 consensus sequences, containing residues previously suggested to be involved in nucleic acid binding, are juxtaposed in adjacent β-strands. Conserved aromatic side chains that are critical for RNA binding are clustered on the surface to the molecule adjacent to a variable loop that influences recognition of specific RNA sequences. The secondary structure and topology of the RRM are similar to those of ribosomal proteins L12 and L30, suggesting a distant evolutionary relationship between these two types of RNA-associated proteins

  16. Purification of the spliced leader ribonucleoprotein particle from Leptomonas collosoma revealed the existence of an Sm protein in trypanosomes. Cloning the SmE homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, I; Palfi, Z; Bindereif, A; Michaeli, S

    1999-04-30

    Trans-splicing in trypanosomes involves the addition of a common spliced leader (SL) sequence, which is derived from a small RNA, the SL RNA, to all mRNA precursors. The SL RNA is present in the cell in the form of a ribonucleoprotein, the SL RNP. Using conventional chromatography and affinity selection with 2'-O-methylated RNA oligonucleotides at high ionic strength, five proteins of 70, 16, 13, 12, and 8 kDa were co-selected with the SL RNA from Leptomonas collosoma, representing the SL RNP core particle. Under conditions of lower ionic strength, additional proteins of 28 and 20 kDa were revealed. On the basis of peptide sequences, the gene coding for a protein with a predicted molecular weight of 11.9 kDa was cloned and identified as homologue of the cis-spliceosomal SmE. The protein carries the Sm motifs 1 and 2 characteristic of Sm antigens that bind to all known cis-spliceosomal uridylic acid-rich small nuclear RNAs (U snRNAs), suggesting the existence of Sm proteins in trypanosomes. This finding is of special interest because trypanosome snRNPs are the only snRNPs examined to date that are not recognized by anti-Sm antibodies. Because of the early divergence of trypanosomes from the eukaryotic lineage, the trypanosome SmE protein represents one of the primordial Sm proteins in nature.

  17. Activation of Akt is essential for the propagation of mitochondrial respiratory stress signaling and activation of the transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Manti; Fang, Ji-Kang; Monks, Robert; Birnbaum, Morris J; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2010-10-15

    Mitochondrial respiratory stress (also called mitochondrial retrograde signaling) activates a Ca(2+)/calcineurin-mediated signal that culminates in transcription activation/repression of a large number of nuclear genes. This signal is propagated through activation of the regulatory proteins NFκB c-Rel/p50, C/EBPδ, CREB, and NFAT. Additionally, the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNPA2) functions as a coactivator in up-regulating the transcription of Cathepsin L, RyR1, and Glut-4, the target genes of stress signaling. Activation of IGF1R, which causes a metabolic switch to glycolysis, cell invasiveness, and resistance to apoptosis, is a phenotypic hallmark of C2C12 myoblasts subjected to mitochondrial stress. In this study, we report that mitochondrial stress leads to increased expression, activation, and nuclear localization of Akt1. Mitochondrial respiratory stress also activates Akt1-gene expression, which involves hnRNPA2 as a coactivator, indicating a complex interdependency of these two factors. Using Akt1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts and Akt1 mRNA-silenced C2C12 cells, we show that Akt1-mediated phosphorylation is crucial for the activation and recruitment of hnRNPA2 to the enhanceosome complex. Akt1 mRNA silencing in mtDNA-depleted cells resulted in reversal of the invasive phenotype, accompanied by sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. These results show that Akt1 is an important regulator of the nuclear transcriptional response to mitochondrial stress.

  18. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein gene, AtRNP1, affects plant growth and reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Xiuyang; Wang, Bing; Liu, Erlong; Chen, Ni; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) participate in diverse regulations of plant growth and environmental stress responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis hnRNP of unknown function, AtRNP1, was investigated. We found that AtRNP1 gene is highly expressed in rosette and cauline leaves, and slightly induced under drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We performed homologous overexpression of AtRNP1 and found that the transgenic plants showed shortened root length and plant height, and accelerated flowering. In addition, the transgenic plants also showed reduced tolerance to drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. Further studies revealed that under both normal and stress conditions, the proline contents in the transgenic plants are markedly decreased, associated with reduced expression levels of a proline synthase gene and several stress-responsive genes. These results suggested that the overexpression of AtRNP1 negatively affects plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance. - Highlights: • AtRNP1 is a widely expressed gene and its expression is slightly induced under abiotic stresses. • AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 affects plant growth. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses. • AtRNP1 overexpression plants show decreased proline accumulation and stress-responsive gene expressions.

  19. The nuclear export protein of H5N1 influenza A viruses recruits Matrix 1 (M1) protein to the viral ribonucleoprotein to mediate nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunotte, Linda; Flies, Joe; Bolte, Hardin; Reuther, Peter; Vreede, Frank; Schwemmle, Martin

    2014-07-18

    In influenza A virus-infected cells, replication and transcription of the viral genome occurs in the nucleus. To be packaged into viral particles at the plasma membrane, encapsidated viral genomes must be exported from the nucleus. Intriguingly, the nuclear export protein (NEP) is involved in both processes. Although NEP stimulates viral RNA synthesis by binding to the viral polymerase, its function during nuclear export implicates interaction with viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP)-associated M1. The observation that both interactions are mediated by the C-terminal moiety of NEP raised the question whether these two features of NEP are linked functionally. Here we provide evidence that the interaction between M1 and the vRNP depends on the NEP C terminus and its polymerase activity-enhancing property for the nuclear export of vRNPs. This suggests that these features of NEP are linked functionally. Furthermore, our data suggest that the N-terminal domain of NEP interferes with the stability of the vRNP-M1-NEP nuclear export complex, probably mediated by its highly flexible intramolecular interaction with the NEP C terminus. On the basis of our data, we propose a new model for the assembly of the nuclear export complex of Influenza A vRNPs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Centromere Protein (CENP)-W Interacts with Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) U and May Contribute to Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment in Mitotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Younghwa; Kim, Raehyung; Lee, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U), a component of the hnRNP complex, contributes to stabilize the kinetochore-microtubule interaction during mitosis. CENP-W was identified as an inner centromere component that plays crucial roles in the formation of a functional kinetochore complex. Results We report that hnRNP U interacts with CENP-W, and the interaction between hnRNP U and CENP-W mutually increased each other’s protein stability by inhibiting the proteasome-mediated degradation. Further, their co-localization was observed chiefly in the nuclear matrix region and at the microtubule-kinetochore interface during interphase and mitosis, respectively. Both microtubule-stabilizing and microtubule-destabilizing agents significantly decreased the protein stability of CENP-W. Furthermore, loss of microtubules and defects in microtubule organization were observed in CENP-W-depleted cells. Conclusion Our data imply that CENP-W plays an important role in the attachment and interaction between microtubules and kinetochore during mitosis. PMID:26881882

  1. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein gene, AtRNP1, affects plant growth and reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhenyu, E-mail: wzy72609@163.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Zhao, Xiuyang, E-mail: xiuzh@psb.vib-ugent.be [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Wang, Bing, E-mail: wangbing@ibcas.ac.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Liu, Erlong, E-mail: liuel14@lzu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Chen, Ni, E-mail: 63710156@qq.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Zhang, Wei, E-mail: wzhang1216@yahoo.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Bio-Energy Crops, School of Life Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Liu, Heng, E-mail: hengliu@lzu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) participate in diverse regulations of plant growth and environmental stress responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis hnRNP of unknown function, AtRNP1, was investigated. We found that AtRNP1 gene is highly expressed in rosette and cauline leaves, and slightly induced under drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We performed homologous overexpression of AtRNP1 and found that the transgenic plants showed shortened root length and plant height, and accelerated flowering. In addition, the transgenic plants also showed reduced tolerance to drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. Further studies revealed that under both normal and stress conditions, the proline contents in the transgenic plants are markedly decreased, associated with reduced expression levels of a proline synthase gene and several stress-responsive genes. These results suggested that the overexpression of AtRNP1 negatively affects plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance. - Highlights: • AtRNP1 is a widely expressed gene and its expression is slightly induced under abiotic stresses. • AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 affects plant growth. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses. • AtRNP1 overexpression plants show decreased proline accumulation and stress-responsive gene expressions.

  2. Membranous glomerulonephritis in a patient with anti-u1 ribonucleoprotein (RNP antibody-positive mixed connective tissue disease: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Toriu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a 33-year-old Japanese man diagnosed with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD who developed nephrotic proteinuria. Both speckled antinuclear antibody (ANA and anti-U1 ribonucleoprotein (RNP antibody were positive, but anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA antibody and anti-Smith (Sm antibody were negative, while complement levels were normal. Renal biopsy revealed membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN with diffuse thickening of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM plus spike and bubble formation. Immunofluorescence demonstrated granular deposits of IgG and C3 along the GBM. Analysis of IgG subclasses showed predominant deposition of IgG1 and IgG4, unlike typical lupus nephritis in which there is predominant deposition of IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and C1q. Electron microscopy identified numerous large electron-dense deposits (EDD of various types in the subepithelial region of the GBM, but there were no EDD localized in the mesangium or subendothelium. Based on these findings, MGN was considered to be closely related to MCTD in this patient.

  3. Myosin Va associates with mRNA in ribonucleoprotein particles present in myelinated peripheral axons and in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calliari, Aldo; Farías, Joaquina; Puppo, Agostina; Canclini, Lucía; Mercer, John A; Munroe, David; Sotelo, José R; Sotelo-Silveira, José R

    2014-03-01

    Sorting of specific mRNAs to particular cellular locations and regulation of their translation is an essential mechanism underlying cell polarization. The transport of RNAs by kinesins and dyneins has been clearly established in several cell models, including neurons in culture. A similar role appears to exist in higher eukaryotes for the myosins. Myosin Va (Myo5a) has been described as a component of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) in the adult rat nervous system and associated to ZBP1 and ribosomes in ribosomal periaxoplasmic plaques (PARPs), making it a likely candidate for mediating some aspects of RNA transport in neurons. To test this hypothesis, we have characterized RNPs containing Myo5a in adult brains of rats and mice. Microarray analysis of RNAs co-immunoprecipitated with Myo5a indicates that this motor may associate with a specific subpopulation of neuronal mRNAs. We found mRNAs encoding α-synuclein and several proteins with functions in translation in these RNPs. Immunofluorescence analyses of RNPs showed apparent co-localization of Myo5a with ribosomes, mRNA and RNA-binding proteins in discrete structures present both in axons of neurons in culture and in myelinated fibers of medullary roots. Our data suggest that PARPs include RNPs bearing the mRNA coding for Myo5a and are equipped with kinesin and Myo5a molecular motors. In conclusion, we suggest that Myo5a is involved in mRNA trafficking both in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Concerted effects of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 to control vitamin D-directed gene transcription and RNA splicing in human bone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Park, Juw Won; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Zavala, Kathryn; Sea, Jessica L; Lu, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Xing, Yi; Hewison, Martin

    2017-01-25

    Traditionally recognized as an RNA splicing regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC1/C2) can also bind to double-stranded DNA and function in trans as a vitamin D response element (VDRE)-binding protein. As such, hnRNPC1/C2 may couple transcription induced by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D) with subsequent RNA splicing. In MG63 osteoblastic cells, increased expression of the 1,25(OH) 2 D target gene CYP24A1 involved immunoprecipitation of hnRNPC1/C2 with CYP24A1 chromatin and RNA. Knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 suppressed expression of CYP24A1, but also increased expression of an exon 10-skipped CYP24A1 splice variant; in a minigene model the latter was attenuated by a functional VDRE in the CYP24A1 promoter. In genome-wide analyses, knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 resulted in 3500 differentially expressed genes and 2232 differentially spliced genes, with significant commonality between groups. 1,25(OH) 2 D induced 324 differentially expressed genes, with 187 also observed following hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown, and a further 168 unique to hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown. However, 1,25(OH) 2 D induced only 10 differentially spliced genes, with no overlap with differentially expressed genes. These data indicate that hnRNPC1/C2 binds to both DNA and RNA and influences both gene expression and RNA splicing, but these actions do not appear to be linked through 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated induction of transcription. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Binding of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K to the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2 enhances viral LMP2A expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Gross

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV -encoded EBNA2 protein, which is essential for the in vitro transformation of B-lymphocytes, interferes with cellular processes by binding to proteins via conserved sequence motifs. Its Arginine-Glycine (RG repeat element contains either symmetrically or asymmetrically di-methylated arginine residues (SDMA and ADMA, respectively. EBNA2 binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to the survival motor neurons protein (SMN and via the ADMA-RG-repeat to the NP9 protein of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K (HML-2 Type 1. The hypothesis of this work was that the methylated RG-repeat mimics an epitope shared with cellular proteins that is used for interaction with target structures. With monoclonal antibodies against the modified RG-repeat, we indeed identified cellular homologues that apparently have the same surface structure as methylated EBNA2. With the SDMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the Sm protein D3 (SmD3 which, like EBNA2, binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to SMN. With the ADMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K. Specific binding of the ADMA- antibody to hnRNP K was demonstrated using E. coli expressed/ADMA-methylated hnRNP K. In addition, we show that EBNA2 and hnRNP K form a complex in EBV- infected B-cells. Finally, hnRNP K, when co-expressed with EBNA2, strongly enhances viral latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A expression by an unknown mechanism as we did not detect a direct association of hnRNP K with DNA-bound EBNA2 in gel shift experiments. Our data support the notion that the methylated surface of EBNA2 mimics the surface structure of cellular proteins to interfere with or co-opt their functional properties.

  6. Epitope mapping of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somarelli, J A; Mesa, A; Rodriguez, R; Avellan, R; Martinez, L; Zang, Y J; Greidinger, E L; Herrera, R J

    2011-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) are autoimmune illnesses characterized by the presence of high titers of autoantibodies directed against a wide range of 'self ' antigens. Proteins of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U1 snRNP) are among the most immunogenic molecules in patients with SLE and MCTD. The recent release of a crystallized U1 snRNP provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the effects of tertiary and quaternary structures on autoantigenicity within the U1 snRNP. In the present study, an epitope map was created using the U1 snRNP crystal structure. A total of 15 peptides were tested in a cohort of 68 patients with SLE, 29 with MCTD and 26 healthy individuals and mapped onto the U1 snRNP structure. Antigenic sites were detected in a variety of structures and appear to include RNA binding domains, but mostly exclude regions necessary for protein-protein interactions. These data suggest that while some autoantibodies may target U1 snRNP proteins as monomers or apoptosis-induced, protease-digested fragments, others may recognize epitopes on assembled protein subcomplexes of the U1 snRNP. Although nearly all of the peptides are strong predictors of autoimmune illness, none were successful at distinguishing between SLE and MCTD. The antigenicity of some peptides significantly correlated with several clinical symptoms. This investigation implicitly highlights the complexities of autoimmune epitopes, and autoimmune illnesses in general, and demonstrates the variability of antigens in patient populations, all of which contribute to difficult clinical diagnoses.

  7. Overexpression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F stimulates renal Ace-2 gene expression and prevents TGF-β1-induced kidney injury in a mouse model of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chao-Sheng; Shi, Yixuan; Chang, Shiao-Ying; Abdo, Shaaban; Chenier, Isabelle; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2015-10-01

    We investigated whether heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP F) stimulates renal ACE-2 expression and prevents TGF-β1 signalling, TGF-β1 inhibition of Ace-2 gene expression and induction of tubulo-fibrosis in an Akita mouse model of type 1 diabetes. Adult male Akita transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing specifically hnRNP F in their renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) were studied. Non-Akita littermates and Akita mice served as controls. Immortalised rat RPTCs stably transfected with plasmid containing either rat Hnrnpf cDNA or rat Ace-2 gene promoter were also studied. Overexpression of hnRNP F attenuated systemic hypertension, glomerular filtration rate, albumin/creatinine ratio, urinary angiotensinogen (AGT) and angiotensin (Ang) II levels, renal fibrosis and profibrotic gene (Agt, Tgf-β1, TGF-β receptor II [Tgf-βrII]) expression, stimulated anti-profibrotic gene (Ace-2 and Ang 1-7 receptor [MasR]) expression, and normalised urinary Ang 1-7 level in Akita Hnrnpf-Tg mice as compared with Akita mice. In vitro, hnRNP F overexpression stimulated Ace-2 gene promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression, and attenuated Agt, Tgf-β1 and Tgf-βrII gene expression. Furthermore, hnRNP F overexpression prevented TGF-β1 signalling and TGF-β1 inhibition of Ace-2 gene expression. These data demonstrate that hnRNP F stimulates Ace-2 gene transcription, prevents TGF-β1 inhibition of Ace-2 gene transcription and induction of kidney injury in diabetes. HnRNP F may be a potential target for treating hypertension and renal fibrosis in diabetes.

  8. Site-directed mutagenesis in Petunia × hybrida protoplast system using direct delivery of purified recombinant Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subburaj, Saminathan; Chung, Sung Jin; Lee, Choongil; Ryu, Seuk-Min; Kim, Duk Hyoung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bae, Sangsu; Lee, Geung-Joo

    2016-07-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of nitrate reductase genes using direct delivery of purified Cas9 protein preassembled with guide RNA produces mutations efficiently in Petunia × hybrida protoplast system. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-CRISPR associated endonuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system has been recently announced as a powerful molecular breeding tool for site-directed mutagenesis in higher plants. Here, we report a site-directed mutagenesis method targeting Petunia nitrate reductase (NR) gene locus. This method could create mutations efficiently using direct delivery of purified Cas9 protein and single guide RNA (sgRNA) into protoplast cells. After transient introduction of RNA-guided endonuclease (RGEN) ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) with different sgRNAs targeting NR genes, mutagenesis at the targeted loci was detected by T7E1 assay and confirmed by targeted deep sequencing. T7E1 assay showed that RGEN RNPs induced site-specific mutations at frequencies ranging from 2.4 to 21 % at four different sites (NR1, 2, 4 and 6) in the PhNR gene locus with average mutation efficiency of 14.9 ± 2.2 %. Targeted deep DNA sequencing revealed mutation rates of 5.3-17.8 % with average mutation rate of 11.5 ± 2 % at the same NR gene target sites in DNA fragments of analyzed protoplast transfectants. Further analysis from targeted deep sequencing showed that the average ratio of deletion to insertion produced collectively by the four NR-RGEN target sites (NR1, 2, 4, and 6) was about 63:37. Our results demonstrated that direct delivery of RGEN RNPs into protoplast cells of Petunia can be exploited as an efficient tool for site-directed mutagenesis of genes or genome editing in plant systems.

  9. The heterodimeric structure of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 dictates 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-directed transcriptional events in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Vadivel, Kanagasabai; Bajaj, S Paul; Chun, Rene F; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) C plays a key role in RNA processing. More recently hnRNP C has also been shown to function as a DNA binding protein exerting a dominant-negative effect on transcriptional responses to the vitamin D hormone,1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D), via interaction in cis with vitamin D response elements (VDREs). The physiologically active form of human hnRNPC is a tetramer of hnRNPC1 (huC1) and C2 (huC2) subunits known to be critical for specific RNA binding activity in vivo , yet the requirement for heterodimerization of huC1 and C2 in DNA binding and downstream action is not well understood. While over-expression of either huC1 or huC2 alone in mouse osteoblastic cells did not suppress 1,25(OH) 2 D-induced transcription, over-expression of huC1 and huC2 in combination using a bone-specific polycistronic vector successfully suppressed 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated induction of osteoblast target gene expression. Over-expression of either huC1 or huC2 in human osteoblasts was sufficient to confer suppression of 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated transcription, indicating the ability of transfected huC1 and huC2 to successfully engage as heterodimerization partners with endogenously expressed huC1 and huC2. The failure of the chimeric combination of mouse and human hnRNPCs to impair 1,25(OH) 2 D-driven gene expression in mouse cells was structurally predicted, owing to the absence of the last helix in the leucine zipper (LZ) heterodimerization domain of hnRNPC gene product in lower species, including the mouse. These results confirm that species-specific heterodimerization of hnRNPC1 and hnRNPC2 is a necessary prerequisite for DNA binding and down-regulation of 1,25(OH) 2 D-VDR-VDRE-directed gene transactivation in osteoblasts.

  10. Structural analysis of respiratory syncytial virus reveals the position of M2-1 between the matrix protein and the ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Gabriella; Holl, Jens M; Williams, Grant M; Alonas, Eric; Vanover, Daryll; Lifland, Aaron W; Gudheti, Manasa; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C; Nair, Vinod; Yi, Hong; Graham, Barney S; Santangelo, Philip J; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2014-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of nonsegmented, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA genome viruses, is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants, young children, and the elderly or immunocompromised. There are many open questions regarding the processes that regulate human RSV (hRSV) assembly and budding. Here, using cryo-electron tomography, we identified virus particles that were spherical, filamentous, and asymmetric in structure, all within the same virus preparation. The three particle morphologies maintained a similar organization of the surface glycoproteins, matrix protein (M), M2-1, and the ribonucleoprotein (RNP). RNP filaments were traced in three dimensions (3D), and their total length was calculated. The measurements revealed the inclusion of multiple full-length genome copies per particle. RNP was associated with the membrane whenever the M layer was present. The amount of M coverage ranged from 24% to 86% in the different morphologies. Using fluorescence light microscopy (fLM), direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), and a proximity ligation assay (PLA), we provide evidence illustrating that M2-1 is located between RNP and M in isolated viral particles. In addition, regular spacing of the M2-1 densities was resolved when hRSV viruses were imaged using Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) cryo-electron tomography. Our studies provide a more complete characterization of the hRSV virion structure and substantiation that M and M2-1 regulate virus organization. hRSV is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children as well as elderly or immunocompromised individuals. We used cryo-electron tomography and Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron tomography to visualize populations of purified hRSV in 3D. We observed the three distinct morphologies, spherical, filamentous, and asymmetric, which maintained comparable organizational profiles

  11. The Clothes Make the mRNA: Past and Present Trends in mRNP Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Guramrit; Pratt, Gabriel; Yeo, Gene W; Moore, Melissa J

    2015-01-01

    Throughout their lifetimes, messenger RNAs (mRNAs) associate with proteins to form ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs). Since the discovery of the first mRNP component more than 40 years ago, what is known as the mRNA interactome now comprises >1,000 proteins. These proteins bind mRNAs in myriad ways with varying affinities and stoichiometries, with many assembling onto nascent RNAs in a highly ordered process during transcription and precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) processing. The nonrandom distribution of major mRNP proteins observed in transcriptome-wide studies leads us to propose that mRNPs are organized into three major domains loosely corresponding to 5' untranslated regions (UTRs), open reading frames, and 3' UTRs. Moving from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, mRNPs undergo extensive remodeling as they are first acted upon by the nuclear pore complex and then by the ribosome. When not being actively translated, cytoplasmic mRNPs can assemble into large multi-mRNP assemblies or be permanently disassembled and degraded. In this review, we aim to give the reader a thorough understanding of past and current eukaryotic mRNP research.

  12. Discontinuous movement of mRNP particles in nucleoplasmic regions devoid of chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebrasse, Jan Peter; Veith, Roman; Dobay, Akos; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Daneholt, Bertil; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) move randomly within nucleoplasm before they exit from the nucleus. To further understand mRNP trafficking, we have studied the intranuclear movement of a specific mRNP, the BR2 mRNP, in salivary gland cells in Chironomus tentans. Their polytene nuclei harbor giant chromosomes separated by vast regions of nucleoplasm, which allows us to study mRNP mobility without interference of chromatin. The particles were fluorescently labeled with microinjected oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) complementary to BR2 mRNA or with the RNA-binding protein hrp36, the C. tentans homologue of hnRNP A1. Using high-speed laser microscopy, we followed the intranuclear trajectories of single mRNPs and characterized their motion within the nucleoplasm. The Balbiani ring (BR) mRNPs moved randomly, but unexpectedly, in a discontinuous manner. When mobile, they diffused with a diffusion coefficient corresponding to their size. Between mobile phases, the mRNPs were slowed down 10-to 250-fold but were never completely immobile. Earlier electron microscopy work has indicated that BR particles can attach to thin nonchromatin fibers, which are sometimes connected to discrete fibrogranular clusters. We propose that the observed discontinuous movement reflects transient interactions between freely diffusing BR particles and these submicroscopic structures. PMID:19074261

  13. A Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A/B-Related Protein Binds to Single-Stranded DNA near the 5′ End or within the Genome of Feline Parvovirus and Can Modify Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dai; Parrish, Colin R.

    1999-01-01

    Phage display of cDNA clones prepared from feline cells was used to identify host cell proteins that bound to DNA-containing feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) capsids but not to empty capsids. One gene found in several clones encoded a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP)-related protein (DBP40) that was very similar in sequence to the A/B-type hnRNP proteins. DBP40 bound specifically to oligonucleotides representing a sequence near the 5′ end of the genome which is exposed on the outside of the full capsid but did not bind most other terminal sequences. Adding purified DBP40 to an in vitro fill-in reaction using viral DNA as a template inhibited the production of the second strand after nucleotide (nt) 289 but prior to nt 469. DBP40 bound to various regions of the viral genome, including a region between nt 295 and 330 of the viral genome which has been associated with transcriptional attenuation of the parvovirus minute virus of mice, which is mediated by a stem-loop structure of the DNA and cellular proteins. Overexpression of the protein in feline cells from a plasmid vector made them largely resistant to FPV infection. Mutagenesis of the protein binding site within the 5′ end viral genome did not affect replication of the virus. PMID:10438866

  14. Engineering of blood vessel patterns by angio-morphogens [angiotropins]: non-mitogenic copper-ribonucleoprotein cytokins [CuRNP ribokines] with their metalloregulated constituents of RAGE-binding S100-EF-hand proteins and extracellular RNA bioaptamers in vascular remodeling of tissue and angiogenesis in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissler, J.H. [ARCONS Applied Research, Bad Nauheim (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    Tissue vascularization is requisite to successful cell-based therapies, biomaterial design and implant integration. Thus, known problems in ossointegration of avascular implants in connection with the generation of bone tissue reflect arrays of general problems of socio-economic relevance existing in reparative medicine still waiting for to be solved. For this purpose, morphogenesis and remodeling of endothelial angio-architectures in tissue and in vitro by isolated non-mitogenic angio-morphogens [angiotropins] are considered in terms of their structure, function and action mechanisms. Extracellular angiotropins are secreted by activated leukocytes/monocytes/macrophages. They are a family of cytokines with morphogen bioactivity selectively directed to endothelial cells. Their structure was deciphered as metalloregulated copper-ribonucleoproteins [CuRNP ribokines]. They are built up of angiotropin-related S100-EF-hand protein [ARP] and highly modified and edited 5'end-phosphorylated RNA [ARNA], complexed together by copper ions. Oxidant-sensitive ARNA and their precursors represent novel types in a RNA world: They are the first isolated and sequenced forms of extracellular RNA [eRNA], may act as cytokine and bioaptamer, contain isoguanosine [crotonoside] as modified nucleoside and show up copper as RNA-structuring transition metal ion. By metalloregulated bioaptamer functions, ARNA impart novel biofunctions to RAGE-binding S100-EF-hand proteins. Angiotropin morphogens were shown suitable for neointiation and remodeling of blood vessel patterns in different, adult, embryonal and artificial tissues. These neovascular patterns manifest regulated hemodynamics for preventing tissue necrosis, supporting tissue functions and promoting wound healing. As evaluated in skin and muscle vascularization, the neovascular patterns are integrated into homeostatic control mechanisms of tissue. Thus, the morphogens show up beneficial perspectives and are suggested useful tools

  15. Structural and biochemical analyses of the DEAD-box ATPase Sub2 in association with THO or Yra1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, United States; Schmiege, Philip [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, United States; Blobel, Günter [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, United States

    2017-01-06

    mRNA is cotranscrptionally processed and packaged into messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in the nucleus. Prior to export through the nuclear pore, mRNPs undergo several obligatory remodeling reactions. In yeast, one of these reactions involves loading of the mRNA-binding protein Yra1 by the DEAD-box ATPase Sub2 as assisted by the hetero-pentameric THO complex. To obtain molecular insights into reaction mechanisms, we determined crystal structures of two relevant complexes: a THO hetero-pentamer bound to Sub2 at 6.0 Å resolution; and Sub2 associated with an ATP analogue, RNA, and a C-terminal fragment of Yra1 (Yra1-C) at 2.6 Å resolution. We found that the 25 nm long THO clamps Sub2 in a half-open configuration; in contrast, when bound to the ATP analogue, RNA and Yra1-C, Sub2 assumes a closed conformation. Both THO and Yra1-C stimulated Sub2’s intrinsic ATPase activity. We propose that THO surveys common landmarks in each nuclear mRNP to localize Sub2 for targeted loading of Yra1.

  16. Structural and biochemical analyses of the DEAD-box ATPase Sub2 in association with THO or Yra1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi; Schmiege, Philip; Blobel, Günter

    2017-01-06

    mRNA is cotranscrptionally processed and packaged into messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in the nucleus. Prior to export through the nuclear pore, mRNPs undergo several obligatory remodeling reactions. In yeast, one of these reactions involves loading of the mRNA-binding protein Yra1 by the DEAD-box ATPase Sub2 as assisted by the hetero-pentameric THO complex. To obtain molecular insights into reaction mechanisms, we determined crystal structures of two relevant complexes: a THO hetero-pentamer bound to Sub2 at 6.0 Å resolution; and Sub2 associated with an ATP analogue, RNA, and a C-terminal fragment of Yra1 (Yra1-C) at 2.6 Å resolution. We found that the 25 nm long THO clamps Sub2 in a half-open configuration; in contrast, when bound to the ATP analogue, RNA and Yra1-C, Sub2 assumes a closed conformation. Both THO and Yra1-C stimulated Sub2's intrinsic ATPase activity. We propose that THO surveys common landmarks in each nuclear mRNP to localize Sub2 for targeted loading of Yra1.

  17. Genome Editing in Penicillium chrysogenum Using Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, Carsten; Mózsik, László; Driessen, Arnold J M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Nygård, Yvonne I; Braman, Jeffrey Carl

    Several CRISPR/Cas9 tools have been recently established for precise genome editing in a wide range of filamentous fungi. This genome editing platform offers high flexibility in target selection and the possibility of introducing genetic deletions without the introduction of transgenic sequences .

  18. Novel monoclonal autoantibody specificity associated with ribonucleoprotein complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, A.; Watson-McKown, R.; Wise, K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors describe an IgG/sub 2a/, kappa monoclonal autoantibody (mAb) F78 derived from a 6-month old MRL-Mp lpr/lpr mouse that recognizes a novel epitope associated with small nuclear ribonuclear protein complexes (snRNP). Indirect immunofluorescent staining of HEp-2 cells with F78 showed a nonnucleolar speckled nuclear pattern characteristic of anti-RNP and anti-Sm mAbs which could be abrogated by pretreating fixed cells with 0.1M HCl prior to staining. Immunoblots of whole cell extracts (dissociated in SDS, urea and mercaptan at 4 0 C then subjected to SDS-PAGE) showed that F78 selectively bound to a component of M/sub r/ = 100,000 clearly distinct from components recognized by two mAbs described by Billings et al that detected, respectively, proteins of M/sub r/ = 70,000 associated with RNP and M/sub r/ = 13,000 associated with Sm. Incubation of extracts at 100 0 C prior to SDS-PAGE eliminated subsequent binding of F78 but not of the other nAbs. F78 as well as the other mAbs selectively immunoprecipitated characteristic patterns of small nuclear RNAs (U 1 , U 2 , U 4 , U 5 , U 6 ) from extracts of 32 P-phosphate labeled HeLa cells. These results suggest a new specificity associated with snRNP that is recognized in the MRL autoimmune response

  19. DDX6 regulates sequestered nuclear CUG-expanded DMPK-mRNA in dystrophia myotonica type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersson, Olof Joakim; Aagaard, Lars; Andrejeva, Diana

    2014-01-01

    RNA to ‘sponge’ splicing factors of the muscleblind family. Although nuclear aggregation of CUG-containing mRNPs in distinct foci is a hallmark of DM1, the mechanisms of their homeostasis have not been completely elucidated. Here we show that a DEAD-box helicase, DDX6, interacts with CUG triplet-repeat m......RNA in primary fibroblasts from DM1 patients and with CUG–RNA in vitro. DDX6 overexpression relieves DM1 mis-splicing, and causes a significant reduction in nuclear DMPK-mRNA foci. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous DDX6 leads to a significant increase in DMPK-mRNA foci count and to increased sequestration...... in vitro in an adenosinetriphosphate-dependent manner, suggesting that DDX6 can remodel and release nuclear DMPK messenger ribonucleoprotein foci, leading to normalization of pathogenic alternative splicing events...

  20. Physical change in cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleoproteins in cells treated with inhibitors of mRNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyfuss, G.; Adam, S.A.; Choi, Y.D.

    1984-01-01

    Exposure of intact cells to UV light brings about cross-linking of polyadenylated mRNA to a set of cytoplasmic proteins which are in direct contact with the mRNA in vivo. Substantial amounts of an additional protein of molecular weight 38,000 become cross-linked to the mRNA when cells are treated with inhibitors of mRNA synthesis (actinomycin D, camptothecin, and 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl benzimidazole) or after infection with vesicular stomatitis virus. Cordycepin, which inhibits polyadenylation but not mRNA synthesis, has no such effect. Inhibitors of protein synthesis and of rRNA synthesis are also without effect on 38K cross-linking to mRNA. The onset of the effect of inhibitors of mRNA synthesis on the UV cross-linkable interaction between mRNA and 38K is rapid and reaches a maximal level in less than 60 min, and it is completely and rapidly reversible. In cells treated with actinomycin D, the amount of 38K which becomes cross-linked to mRNA is proportional to the extent of inhibition of mRNA synthesis. The association of 38K with mRNA during transcriptional arrest does not require protein synthesis because simultaneous treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor emetine does not interfere with it. The effectors which promote the interaction of 38K with mRNA do not affect the proteins which are in contact with polyadenylated heterogeneous nuclear RNA and do not markedly affect protein synthesis in the cell. The 38K protein can be isolated with the polyribosomal polyadenylated fraction from which it was purified, and monoclonal antibodies against it were prepared

  1. Autoantibody to Th ribonucleoprotein (nucleolar 7-2 RNA protein particle) in patients with systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Y.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    We studied sera of 371 consecutive new patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) who were first evaluated during 1984-1988. All sera were tested for antinuclear antibodies by immunofluorescence staining using HEp-2 cells as substrate. We excluded 219 sera showing dark nucleoli and screened for antibodies to Th in the remaining 152 sera by immunoprecipitation of a 32P-labeled HeLa cell extract. Fifteen (4.0%) of 371 sera were anti-Th+. Anti-Th antibodies were present in 14 (8.4%) of 167 SSc patients with limited cutaneous involvement, in 1 of 167 with diffuse cutaneous involvement, and in 0 of 37 with SSc overlap syndrome. Among 244 controls with other connective tissue diseases, anti-Th was detected in only 3 patients, all having primary Raynaud's phenomenon of less than 2 years duration. In the subgroup with SSc with limited cutaneous involvement, the 14 anti-Th+ patients had a significantly greater frequency of puffy fingers, small bowel involvement, and hypothyroidism, and a significantly lower frequency of arthralgia and/or arthritis. Their cumulative survival rate from the time of onset of symptoms was lower than that for anti-Th- patients (78% versus 91% at 10 years), primarily due to 3 deaths from pulmonary arterial hypertension (2 from primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 from pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary interstitial fibrosis). Serum anti-Th antibodies are present almost exclusively in patients with SSc with limited cutaneous involvement or in those with primary Raynaud's phenomenon whose disease may evolve to SSc with limited cutaneous involvement, and these antibodies may identify those patients who are at greater risk for reduced survival

  2. The Thoc1 Ribonucleoprotein as a Novel Biomarker for Prostate Cancer Treatment Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    successfully developed (PI Goodrich). A sandwich ELISA assay has been developed for detecting Thoc1 protein in serum samples. Recombinant Thoc1... protein was produced in E.coli and purified by affinity chromatography. This control 5 protein was used to develop the sandwich ELISA assay , and a...standard curve using the assay is shown in figure 4. An indirect ELISA assay was developed for detecting autoantibodies against Thoc1 protein in serum

  3. The Thoc1 Ribonucleoprotein as a Novel Biomarker for Prostate Cancer Treatment Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    INVESTIGATOR: James L. Mohler, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Health Research, Inc., Roswell Park Division Buffalo, NY 14263-0001 REPORT DATE...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Health Research, Inc. Buffalo,NY 14263 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM...support for cancer clinical trials. Specific Aims: 1. Facilities: Physical facilities dedicated to the conduct of cancer focused research, and to

  4. Hepatoma-derived growth factor and nucleolin exist in the same ribonucleoprotein complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bremer Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF is a protein which is highly expressed in a variety of tumours. HDGF has mitogenic, angiogenic, neurotrophic and antiapoptotic activity but the molecular mechanisms by which it exerts these activities are largely unknown nor has its biological function in tumours been elucidated. Mass spectrometry was performed to analyse the HDGFStrep-tag interactome. By Pull–down-experiments using different protein and nucleic acid constructs the interaction of HDGF and nucleolin was investigated further. Results A number of HDGFStrep-tag copurifying proteins were identified which interact with RNA or are involved in the cellular DNA repair machinery. The most abundant protein, however, copurifying with HDGF in this approach was nucleolin. Therefore we focus on the characterization of the interaction of HDGF and nucleolin in this study. We show that expression of a cytosolic variant of HDGF causes a redistribution of nucleolin into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, formation of HDGF/nucleolin complexes depends on bcl-2 mRNA. Overexpression of full length bcl-2 mRNA increases the number of HDGF/nucleolin complexes whereas expression of only the bcl-2 coding sequence abolishes interaction completely. Further examination reveals that the coding sequence of bcl-2 mRNA together with either the 5′ or 3′ UTR is sufficient for formation of HDGF/nucleolin complexes. When bcl-2 coding sequence within the full length cDNA is replaced by a sequence coding for secretory alkaline phosphatase complex formation is not enhanced. Conclusion The results provide evidence for the existence of HDGF and nucleolin containing nucleoprotein complexes which formation depends on the presence of specific mRNAs. The nature of these RNAs and other components of the complexes should be investigated in future.

  5. Characterization of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles in dormant sporangiospores of the fungus Mucor racemosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    Extracts of sporangiospores of Mucor racemosus contained RNA that readily hybridized with [ 3 H]polyuridylic acid. Prior to germination, this RNA was in a form sedimenting at 31 P-orthophosphate or L-[ 32 S]methionine, absorbance at 280 nm, or hybridization of [ 3 H]polyuridylic acid. mRNP's from the first two fractions were analyzed. A bimodal population of particles was detected in sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation. Particles eluted at low ionic strength demonstrated a sedimentation coefficient distribution of 20S-to-80S. Particles eluted in formamide demonstrated a sedimentation coefficient distribution of 20S-to-60S. Particles eluted at low ionic strength displayed two peaks in CsCl centrifugation, with buoyant densities of 1.37 gm/cc and 1.59 gm/cc. Particles eluted in formamide displayed a single peak with a buoyant density of 1.61 gm/cc. Particles eluted at low ionic strength and centrifuged in metrizamide solution formed two bands having buoyant densities of 1.15 gm/cc and 1.30 gm/cc; formamide-eluted particles banded only at the higher density. Mucor 40S ribosomal subunits banded at 1.56 gm/cc and 1.28 gm/cc in CsCl and metrizamide solution respectively

  6. Targeted gene knockin in porcine somatic cells using CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    The domestic pig is an ideal large animal model for genetic engineering applications. A relatively short gestation interval and large litter size makes the pig a conducive model for generating and propagating genetic modifications. The domestic pig also shares close similarity in anatomy, physiolo...

  7. Targeted gene knock-in by CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in porcine zygotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The domestic pig is an important “dual purpose” animal model for agricultural and biomedical applications. There is an emerging consensus in the biomedical community that even though mouse is a powerhouse genetic model, there is a requirement for large animal models such as pigs that can either ser...

  8. The Thoc1 Ribonucleoprotein as a Novel Biomarker for ProstateCancer Treatment Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    intervention on treatment seeking, anxiety and coronary heart disease in prostate cancer patients treated with EM. No Cost Extension Title...changes in intention to quit smoking. Prior pending, now active funding Title: Targeting ß- Adrenergic Signaling to Control GVH and GVL Responses (1

  9. Transient oligomerization of the SARS-CoV N protein--implication for virus ribonucleoprotein packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-ke; Chen, Chia-Min Michael; Chiang, Ming-hui; Hsu, Yen-lan; Huang, Tai-huang

    2013-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. The N protein consists of two structural domains interspersed between intrinsically disordered regions and dimerizes through the C-terminal structural domain (CTD). A key activity of the protein is the ability to oligomerize during capsid formation by utilizing the dimer as a building block, but the structural and mechanistic bases of this activity are not well understood. By disulfide trapping technique we measured the amount of transient oligomers of N protein mutants with strategically located cysteine residues and showed that CTD acts as a primary transient oligomerization domain in solution. The data is consistent with the helical oligomer packing model of N protein observed in crystal. A systematic study of the oligomerization behavior revealed that altering the intermolecular electrostatic repulsion through changes in solution salt concentration or phosphorylation-mimicking mutations affects oligomerization propensity. We propose a biophysical mechanism where electrostatic repulsion acts as a switch to regulate N protein oligomerization.

  10. Transient oligomerization of the SARS-CoV N protein--implication for virus ribonucleoprotein packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-ke Chang

    Full Text Available The nucleocapsid (N phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. The N protein consists of two structural domains interspersed between intrinsically disordered regions and dimerizes through the C-terminal structural domain (CTD. A key activity of the protein is the ability to oligomerize during capsid formation by utilizing the dimer as a building block, but the structural and mechanistic bases of this activity are not well understood. By disulfide trapping technique we measured the amount of transient oligomers of N protein mutants with strategically located cysteine residues and showed that CTD acts as a primary transient oligomerization domain in solution. The data is consistent with the helical oligomer packing model of N protein observed in crystal. A systematic study of the oligomerization behavior revealed that altering the intermolecular electrostatic repulsion through changes in solution salt concentration or phosphorylation-mimicking mutations affects oligomerization propensity. We propose a biophysical mechanism where electrostatic repulsion acts as a switch to regulate N protein oligomerization.

  11. Isolation and characterization of the heterogeneous nuclear RNA-ribonucleoprotein complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.D.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure of cells to UV light of sufficient intensity brings about crosslinking of RNA to proteins which are in direct contact with it in vivo. The major [ 35 S]methionine-labeled proteins which become crosslinked to poly(A) + hnRNA in HeLa cells are of 120K, 68K, 53K, 43K, 41K, 38K, and 36K (K = kilodaltons). By immunizing mice with UV crosslinked complexes two monoclonal antibodies (2B12 and 4F4) against the C proteins (41K and 43K) and one (3G6) against the 120K protein of the hnRNP complex were obtained. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrates that the C proteins and 120K are segregated to the nucleus and are not associated with nucleoli or chromatin. The two C proteins are highly related to each other antigenically. Monoclonal antibody 4F4 identifies the C proteins of the hnRNP complex in widely divergent species from human to lizard. The C proteins are phosphorylated and are in contact with hnRNA in vivo. The hnRNP complex was isolated from vertebrate cell nuclei by immunoprecipitation with these monoclonal antibodies. This complex contains proteins and hnRNA of up to ∼10 kb. The major steady state labeled [ 35 S]methionine labeled proteins of the isolated complex from HeLa cells are of 34K, 36K, 36K (A1 and A2), 37K, 38K (B1 and B2), 41K, 43K (C1 and C2) and doublets at 68K and at 120K. These proteins are organized into a 30S particle. Large hnRNP complexes are composed of multiples of 30S particles which are connected by highly nuclease sensitive stretches of hnRNA. It it concluded that the hnRNP structure is an integral component of the mRNA formation pathway in the eukaryotic cell

  12. Inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 plays a prominent role in mammalian mRNA export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Noegel, Angelika A

    2015-11-16

    Nuclear export of messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) can be roughly classified into two forms: bulk and specific export, involving an nuclear RNA export factor 1 (NXF1)-dependent pathway and chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent pathway, respectively. SUN proteins constitute the inner nuclear envelope component of the l I: nker of N: ucleoskeleton and C: ytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Here, we show that mammalian cells require SUN1 for efficient nuclear mRNP export. The results indicate that both SUN1 and SUN2 interact with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) F/H and hnRNP K/J. SUN1 depletion inhibits the mRNP export, with accumulations of both hnRNPs and poly(A)+RNA in the nucleus. Leptomycin B treatment indicates that SUN1 functions in mammalian mRNA export involving the NXF1-dependent pathway. SUN1 mediates mRNA export through its association with mRNP complexes via a direct interaction with NXF1. Additionally, SUN1 associates with the NPC through a direct interaction with Nup153, a nuclear pore component involved in mRNA export. Taken together, our results reveal that the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 has additional functions aside from being a central component of the LINC complex and that it is an integral component of the mammalian mRNA export pathway suggesting a model whereby SUN1 recruits NXF1-containing mRNP onto the nuclear envelope and hands it over to Nup153. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Poly-dipeptides encoded by the C9orf72 repeats bind nucleoli, impede RNA biogenesis, and kill cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ilmin; Xiang, Siheng; Kato, Masato; Wu, Leeju; Theodoropoulos, Pano; Wang, Tao; Kim, Jiwoong; Yun, Jonghyun; Xie, Yang; McKnight, Steven L

    2014-09-05

    Many RNA regulatory proteins controlling pre-messenger RNA splicing contain serine:arginine (SR) repeats. Here, we found that these SR domains bound hydrogel droplets composed of fibrous polymers of the low-complexity domain of heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNPA2). Hydrogel binding was reversed upon phosphorylation of the SR domain by CDC2-like kinases 1 and 2 (CLK1/2). Mutated variants of the SR domains changing serine to glycine (SR-to-GR variants) also bound to hnRNPA2 hydrogels but were not affected by CLK1/2. When expressed in mammalian cells, these variants bound nucleoli. The translation products of the sense and antisense transcripts of the expansion repeats associated with the C9orf72 gene altered in neurodegenerative disease encode GRn and PRn repeat polypeptides. Both peptides bound to hnRNPA2 hydrogels independent of CLK1/2 activity. When applied to cultured cells, both peptides entered cells, migrated to the nucleus, bound nucleoli, and poisoned RNA biogenesis, which caused cell death. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. High-resolution crystal structure reveals a HEPN domain at the C-terminal region of S. cerevisiae RNA endonuclease Swt1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Shuxia; Zhou, Ke; Wang, Wenjia; Gao, Zengqiang; Dong, Yuhui; Liu, Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 was determined at 2.3 Å. • Structure of the CT domain was identified as HEPN domain superfamily member. • Low-resolution envelope of Swt1 full-length in solution was analyzed by SAXS. • The middle and CT domains gave good fit to SAXS structural model. - Abstract: Swt1 is an RNA endonuclease that plays an important role in quality control of nuclear messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in eukaryotes; however, its structural details remain to be elucidated. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which shares common characteristics of higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide binding (HEPN) domain superfamily. To study in detail the full-length protein structure, we analyzed the low-resolution architecture of Swt1 in solution using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. Both the CT domain and middle domain exhibited a good fit upon superimposing onto the molecular envelope of Swt1. Our study provides the necessary structural information for detailed analysis of the functional role of Swt1, and its importance in the process of nuclear mRNP surveillance

  15. The exosome associates cotranscriptionally with the nascent pre-mRNP through interactions with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessle, Viktoria; Björk, Petra; Sokolowski, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved quality control mechanisms to degrade aberrant mRNA molecules and prevent the synthesis of defective proteins that could be deleterious for the cell. The exosome, a protein complex with ribonuclease activity, is a key player in quality control. An early quality check...

  16. Effects of gamma radiation immunogenicity of ribonucleoprotein (RNPs) of rabies virus and purification of anti-RNPs antibodies for diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Ana Elena Boamorte da

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organization recommends the direct immunofluorescence test for laboratory diagnosis and serological evaluation of rabies. To achieve this test, fluorescent anti-ribo nucleoproteins (RNPs) conjugates, produced from purified IgGs of RNP-immunized animals are employed. The aims of the present study were: investigate the effects of gamma radiation on the immunogenicity of RNPs, as well as to compare two chromatographic methodologies for the purification of anti-RNPs immunoglobulins. Sera from animals immunized with either native or irradiated RNPs were compared by direct immunofluorescence and immuno enzymatic assays. Our results indicate that the animals immunized with irradiated antigen requested a lower number of doses to reach high antibody titers. The immunofluorescence assays indicated that the conjugates produced with the anti-irradiated RNPs IgGs showed similar specificity to its anti-native counterpart, but with a higher definition of the virus inclusions. The purification methods were compared by Bradford and electrophoresis assays. According to the results, we concluded that the affinity-based process resulted in higher yields, lower execution time, and higher purity of the antibodies. (author)

  17. Structure, dynamics and RNA binding of the multi-domain splicing factor TIA-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Iren; Hennig, Janosch; Jagtap, Pravin Kumar Ankush; Sonntag, Miriam; Valcárcel, Juan; Sattler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Alternative pre-messenger ribonucleic acid (pre-mRNA) splicing is an essential process in eukaryotic gene regulation. The T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is an apoptosis-promoting factor that modulates alternative splicing of transcripts, including the pre-mRNA encoding the membrane receptor Fas. TIA-1 is a multi-domain ribonucleic acid (RNA) binding protein that recognizes poly-uridine tract RNA sequences to facilitate 5′ splice site recognition by the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP). Here, we characterize the RNA interaction and conformational dynamics of TIA-1 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our NMR-derived solution structure of TIA-1 RRM2–RRM3 (RRM2,3) reveals that RRM2 adopts a canonical RNA recognition motif (RRM) fold, while RRM3 is preceded by an non-canonical helix α0. NMR and SAXS data show that all three RRMs are largely independent structural modules in the absence of RNA, while RNA binding induces a compact arrangement. RRM2,3 binds to pyrimidine-rich FAS pre-mRNA or poly-uridine (U9) RNA with nanomolar affinities. RRM1 has little intrinsic RNA binding affinity and does not strongly contribute to RNA binding in the context of RRM1,2,3. Our data unravel the role of binding avidity and the contributions of the TIA-1 RRMs for recognition of pyrimidine-rich RNAs. PMID:24682828

  18. Genome-based identification of spliceosomal proteins in the silk moth Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somarelli, Jason A; Mesa, Annia; Fuller, Myron E; Torres, Jacqueline O; Rodriguez, Carol E; Ferrer, Christina M; Herrera, Rene J

    2010-12-01

    Pre-messenger RNA splicing is a highly conserved eukaryotic cellular function that takes place by way of a large, RNA-protein assembly known as the spliceosome. In the mammalian system, nearly 300 proteins associate with uridine-rich small nuclear (sn)RNAs to form this complex. Some of these splicing factors are ubiquitously present in the spliceosome, whereas others are involved only in the processing of specific transcripts. Several proteomics analyses have delineated the proteins of the spliceosome in several species. In this study, we mine multiple sequence data sets of the silk moth Bombyx mori in an attempt to identify the entire set of known spliceosomal proteins. Five data sets were utilized, including the 3X, 6X, and Build 2.0 genomic contigs as well as the expressed sequence tag and protein libraries. While homologs for 88% of vertebrate splicing factors were delineated in the Bombyx mori genome, there appear to be several spliceosomal polypeptides absent in Bombyx mori and seven additional insect species. This apparent increase in spliceosomal complexity in vertebrates may reflect the tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing requirements in vertebrates. Phylogenetic analyses of 15 eukaryotic taxa using the core splicing factors suggest that the essential functional units of the pre-mRNA processing machinery have remained highly conserved from yeast to humans. The Sm and LSm proteins are the most conserved, whereas proteins of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle are the most divergent. These data highlight both the differential conservation and relative phylogenetic signals of the essential spliceosomal components throughout evolution. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Interactions between the HIV-1 Unspliced mRNA and Host mRNA Decay Machineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Toro-Ascuy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 unspliced transcript is used both as mRNA for the synthesis of structural proteins and as the packaged genome. Given the presence of retained introns and instability AU-rich sequences, this viral transcript is normally retained and degraded in the nucleus of host cells unless the viral protein REV is present. As such, the stability of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA must be particularly controlled in the nucleus and the cytoplasm in order to ensure proper levels of this viral mRNA for translation and viral particle formation. During its journey, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA assembles into highly specific messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs containing many different host proteins, amongst which are well-known regulators of cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathways such as up-frameshift suppressor 1 homolog (UPF1, Staufen double-stranded RNA binding protein 1/2 (STAU1/2, or components of miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC and processing bodies (PBs. More recently, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA was shown to contain N6-methyladenosine (m6A, allowing the recruitment of YTH N6-methyladenosine RNA binding protein 2 (YTHDF2, an m6A reader host protein involved in mRNA decay. Interestingly, these host proteins involved in mRNA decay were shown to play positive roles in viral gene expression and viral particle assembly, suggesting that HIV-1 interacts with mRNA decay components to successfully accomplish viral replication. This review summarizes the state of the art in terms of the interactions between HIV-1 unspliced mRNA and components of different host mRNA decay machineries.

  20. Integration of mRNP formation and export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Petra; Wieslander, Lars

    2017-08-01

    Expression of protein-coding genes in eukaryotes relies on the coordinated action of many sophisticated molecular machineries. Transcription produces precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs) and the active gene provides an environment in which the pre-mRNAs are processed, folded, and assembled into RNA-protein (RNP) complexes. The dynamic pre-mRNPs incorporate the growing transcript, proteins, and the processing machineries, as well as the specific protein marks left after processing that are essential for export and the cytoplasmic fate of the mRNPs. After release from the gene, the mRNPs move by diffusion within the interchromatin compartment, making up pools of mRNPs. Here, splicing and polyadenylation can be completed and the mRNPs recruit the major export receptor NXF1. Export competent mRNPs interact with the nuclear pore complex, leading to export, concomitant with compositional and conformational changes of the mRNPs. We summarize the integrated nuclear processes involved in the formation and export of mRNPs.

  1. High-Resolution Imaging Reveals New Features of Nuclear Export of mRNA through the Nuclear Pore Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Kelich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear envelope (NE of eukaryotic cells provides a physical barrier for messenger RNA (mRNA and the associated proteins (mRNPs traveling from sites of transcription in the nucleus to locations of translation processing in the cytoplasm. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs embedded in the NE serve as a dominant gateway for nuclear export of mRNA. However, the fundamental characterization of export dynamics of mRNPs through the NPC has been hindered by several technical limits. First, the size of NPC that is barely below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy requires a super-resolution microscopy imaging approach. Next, the fast transit of mRNPs through the NPC further demands a high temporal resolution by the imaging approach. Finally, the inherent three-dimensional (3D movements of mRNPs through the NPC demand the method to provide a 3D mapping of both transport kinetics and transport pathways of mRNPs. This review will highlight the recently developed super-resolution imaging techniques advanced from 1D to 3D for nuclear export of mRNPs and summarize the new features in the dynamic nuclear export process of mRNPs revealed from these technical advances.

  2. Appearance of newly formed mRNA and rRNA as ribonucleoprotein-particles in the cytoplasmic subribosomal fraction of pea embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Noribumi; Takaiwa, Fumio; Fukuei, Keisuke; Sakamaki, Tadashi; Tanifuji, Shigeyuki

    1977-01-01

    Incorporation studies with 3 H-uridine or 3 H-adenosine showed that germinating pea embryos synthesize all types of poly A(+) RNA, rRNA and 4-5S RNA at the early stage of germination. After the pulse labeling for 30 min, only heterodisperse RNA and 4-5S RNA appeared in the cytoplasm as labeled RNA species. At this time the radioactivity was associated with cytoplasmic structures heavier than 80S and RNP particles of 68-70S, 52-55S, 36-38S and 20-22S which are presumed to be free mRNP particles in plants. When the pulse-labeled embryos were incubated for a further 60 min in an isotope-free medium, the labeled 17S and 25S rRNA emerged in the cytoplasm, together with labeled heterodisperse and 4-5S RNAs. More radioactivity accumulated in the regions of the polysome, 62-65S and 38-42S particles. The results of analysis of RNAs extracted from the whole cytoplasm, polysome or subribosomal fractions indicated that small subunits of newly formed ribosomes appear more rapidly in the cytoplasm than new large subunits, which accumulate for a while as free particles in the cytoplasm than are incorporated into polysomes. The actinomycin treatment which caused preferential inhibition of rRNA synthesis reduced the accumulation of free, newly formed ribosome subunits and partially permitted detection of the presumed mRNP particles in the subribosomal region even after the chase treatment. (auth.)

  3. Expression of anti-heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (anti-hnRNP in limited systemic sclerosis patients: Relation to radiographic findings of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Fathi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Joint affection in SSc is more frequent than expected. Anti-hnRNP A1 and anti hnRNP A2 antigens may be useful markers for SSc patient although no significant relation was found with radiologic findings.

  4. Quantitative proteomics identifies Gemin5, a scaffolding protein involved in ribonucleoprotein assembly, as a novel partner for eukaryotic initiation factor 4E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fierro-Monti, Ivo; Mohammed, Shabaz; Matthiesen, Rune

    2006-01-01

    Protein complexes are dynamic entities; identification and quantitation of their components is critical in elucidating functional roles under specific cellular conditions. We report the first quantitative proteomic analysis of the human cap-binding protein complex. Components and proteins......-starved tumorigenic human mesenchymal stromal cells, attested to their activated translational states. The WD-repeat, scaffolding-protein Gemin5 was identified as a novel eIF4E binding partner, which interacted directly with eIF4E through a motif (YXXXXLPhi) present in a number of eIF4E-interacting partners. Elevated...... levels of Gemin5:eIF4E complexes were found in phorbol ester treated HEK293 cells. Gemin5 and eIF4E co-localized to cytoplasmic P-bodies in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Interaction between eIF4E and Gemin5 and their co-localization to the P-bodies, may serve to recruit capped mRNAs to these RNP...

  5. Ovarian carcinoma CDK12 mutations misregulate expression of DNA repair genes via deficient formation and function of the Cdk12/CycK complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ekumi, K.M.; Paculova, H.; Lenasi, T.; Pospíchalová, V.; Boesken, C.A.; Rybaříková, J.; Bryja, Vítězslav; Geyer, M.; Blažek, D.; Barboric, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2015), s. 2575-2589 ISSN 0305-1048 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : RNA-POLYMERASE-II * PRE-MESSENGER-RNA * MAINTAINS GENOMIC STABILITY Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.202, year: 2015

  6. Functional organization of the Sm core in the crystal structure of human U1 snRNP.

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, G.; Trowitzsch, S.; Kastner, B.; Lührmann, R.; Wahl, M.

    2010-01-01

    The U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein initiates the assembly of the spliceosome. Here, the structure of the natively purified U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle reveals the core Sm protein ring and its interactions with the Sm site in the small nuclear RNA.

  7. Effects of gamma radiation immunogenicity of ribonucleoprotein (RNPs) of rabies virus and purification of anti-RNPs antibodies for diagnosis; Efeitos da radiacao gama na imunogenicidade das ribonucleoproteinas (RNPs) do virus da raiva e purificacao de anticorpos anti-RNPs para diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Ana Elena Boamorte da

    2010-07-01

    The World Health Organization recommends the direct immunofluorescence test for laboratory diagnosis and serological evaluation of rabies. To achieve this test, fluorescent anti-ribo nucleoproteins (RNPs) conjugates, produced from purified IgGs of RNP-immunized animals are employed. The aims of the present study were: investigate the effects of gamma radiation on the immunogenicity of RNPs, as well as to compare two chromatographic methodologies for the purification of anti-RNPs immunoglobulins. Sera from animals immunized with either native or irradiated RNPs were compared by direct immunofluorescence and immuno enzymatic assays. Our results indicate that the animals immunized with irradiated antigen requested a lower number of doses to reach high antibody titers. The immunofluorescence assays indicated that the conjugates produced with the anti-irradiated RNPs IgGs showed similar specificity to its anti-native counterpart, but with a higher definition of the virus inclusions. The purification methods were compared by Bradford and electrophoresis assays. According to the results, we concluded that the affinity-based process resulted in higher yields, lower execution time, and higher purity of the antibodies. (author)

  8. Alternative Polyadenylation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Rehfeld, Anders; Plass, Mireya; Døssing, Kristina; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas; Krogh, Anders; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation (APA) with proliferation, cell transformation, and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-messenger RNA is cleaved at a polyA site and a polyA tail is added. Genes with two or more polyA sites can undergo APA. This produces two or more distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3′ untranslated regions. Additionally, APA can also pro...

  9. Alternative RNA splicing and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sali; Cheng, Chonghui

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism by which a gene can give rise to multiple distinct mRNA transcripts, yielding protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions. With the recognition that alternative splicing occurs in nearly all human genes, its relationship with cancer-associated pathways has emerged as a rapidly growing field. In this review, we summarize recent findings that have implicated the critical role of alternative splicing in cancer and discuss current understandings of the mechanisms underlying dysregulated alternative splicing in cancer cells. PMID:23765697

  10. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Meyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance.

  11. Role of Nab2 in RNA metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olszewski, Pawel

    RNP assembly generates errors, which are tracked down by nuclear surveillance mechanisms. Thus, not surprisingly, protein components of mRNPs have multiple functions in the biogenesis of the particle but also interact with the surveillance machinery. An example of such a multifunctional factor is the S......RNP components showed changes in the Nab2 interactome in the absence of Rrp6, and also suggested that Nab2 binds to multiple sites on the mRNA. Wide-range proteomic analysis of Nab2 immunoprecipitates revealed association with C/D box snoRNP components. These novel interactions were supported by the presence...

  12. CRISPR/Cas9 mediated high efficiency knockout of the eye color gene vermillion in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among various genome editing tools available for functional genomic studies, reagents based on clustered regularly interspersed palindromic repeats (CRISPR) have gained popularity due to ease and versatility. CRISPR reagents consists of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes formed by combining guide RNA...

  13. Structural basis for CRISPR RNA-guided DNA recognition by Cascade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jore, M.M.; Lundgren, N.M.J.; Duijn, van E.; Bultema, J.B.; Westra, E.R.; Oost, van der J.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Beijer, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) immune system in prokaryotes uses small guide RNAs to neutralize invading viruses and plasmids. In Escherichia coli, immunity depends on a ribonucleoprotein complex called Cascade. Here we present the composition and

  14. Structural basis for CRISPR RNA-guided DNA recognition by Cascade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jore, Matthijs M.; Lundgren, Magnus; van Duijn, Esther; Bultema, Jelle B.; Westra, Edze R.; Waghmare, Sakharam P.; Wiedenheft, Blake; Pul, Uemit; Wurm, Reinhild; Wagner, Rolf; Beijer, Marieke R.; Barendregt, Arjan; Zhou, Kaihong; Snijders, Ambrosius P. L.; Dickman, Mark J.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Heck, Albert J. R.; van der Oost, John; Brouns, Stan J. J.; Pul, Ümit

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) immune system in prokaryotes uses small guide RNAs to neutralize invading viruses and plasmids. In Escherichia coli, immunity depends on a ribonucleoprotein complex called Cascade. Here we present the composition and

  15. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCHU

    Two component system. The Kdp-ATPase ... Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D/AUF1 interacts ... Alexe G. Analysis of breast cancer progression using principal compo- ... netic trees of homologous proteins: Inferences on protein.

  16. Prion-like domains in RNA binding proteins are essential for building subnuclear paraspeckles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennig, Sven; Kong, Geraldine; Mannen, Taro; Sadowska, Agata; Kobelke, Simon; Blythe, Amanda; Knott, Gavin J; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Ho, Diwei; Newcombe, Estella A; Hosoki, Kana; Goshima, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Tetsuya; Hatters, Danny; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Hirose, Tetsuro; Bond, Charles S; Fox, Archa H

    2015-01-01

    Prion-like domains (PLDs) are low complexity sequences found in RNA binding proteins associated with the neurodegenerative disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Recently, PLDs have been implicated in mediating gene regulation via liquid-phase transitions that drive ribonucleoprotein granule

  17. ORF Sequence: NC_001134 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ivery of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins to the nucleoplasm, binds rg-nucl... NC_001134 gi|6319491 >gi|6319491|ref|NP_009573.1| Transportin, cytosolic karyopherin beta 2 involved in del

  18. Alternative polyadenylation of tumor suppressor genes in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders Aagaard; Plass, Mireya; Døssing, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation (APA) with proliferation, cell transformation, and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-messenger RNA is cleaved at a polyA site...... and a polyA tail is added. Genes with two or more polyA sites can undergo APA. This produces two or more distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3' untranslated regions. Additionally, APA can also produce mRNAs containing different 3'-terminal coding regions. Therefore, APA alters both the repertoire...... and the expression level of proteins. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing data to map polyA sites and characterize polyadenylation genome-wide in three SI-NETs and a reference sample. In the tumors, 16 genes showed significant changes of APA pattern, which lead to either the 3' truncation of mRNA coding regions...

  19. B-CELL EPITOPE ON THE U1 SNRNP-C AUTOANTIGEN CONTAINS A SEQUENCE SIMILAR TO THAT OF THE HERPES-SIMPLEX VIRUS PROTEIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MISAKI, Y; YAMAMOTO, K; YANAGI, K; MIURA, H; ICHIJO, H; KATO, T; MATO, T; WELLINGWESTER, S; NISHIOKA, K; ITO, K

    The mechanism of autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases is not well understood. In the present study we performed the B cell epitope mapping of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP)-C, one of the target molecules of anti-nRNP autoantibody to investigate how B cells respond to the

  20. Complete cDNA sequence coding for human docking protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hortsch, M; Labeit, S; Meyer, D I

    1988-01-11

    Docking protein (DP, or SRP receptor) is a rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein essential for the targeting and translocation of nascent polypeptides across this membrane. It specifically interacts with a cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complex, the signal recognition particle (SRP). The nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding the entire human DP and its deduced amino acid sequence are given.

  1. Sequence Classification: 893543 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rich protein with a role in preribosome assembly or transport; may function as a chaperone of small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein parti...cles (snoRNPs); immunologically and structurally to rat Nopp140; Srp40p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6322945 ...

  2. Transmission and pathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) is caused by the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), a negative single stranded RNA arthropod-borne virus member of the Family Rhabdoviridae. The virion is composed of the host derived plasma membrane, the envelope, and an internal ribonucleoprotein core. The envelope contain...

  3. Unimpaired dendritic cell functions in MVP/LRP knockout mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mossink, MH; Groot, de J.; Zon, van A; Franzel-Luiten, E; Schoester, M.; Scheffer, G.L.; Sonneveld, P.; Scheper, R.J.; Wiemer, EA

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) act as mobile sentinels of the immune system. By stimulating T lymphocytes, DCs are pivotal for the initiation of both T- and B-cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, ribonucleoprotein particles (vaults) were found to be involved in the development and/or function of human

  4. Disruption of the murine major vault protein (MVP/LRP) gene does not induce hypersensitivity to cytostatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Mossink (Marieke); A. van Zon (Arend); A.A. Fränzel-Luiten (Erna); M. Schoester (Martijn); V.A. Kickhoefer; G.L. Scheffer (George); R.J. Scheper (Rik); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); E.A.C. Wiemer (Erik)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractVaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a distinct structure and a high degree of conservation between species. Although no function has been assigned to the complex yet, there is some evidence for a role of vaults in multidrug resistance. To confirm a direct

  5. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AUTOIMMUNE ANTIBODIES AND HCG TREATMENT 1N HABITUAL ABORTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANGPei-Zhong; WUJin-Zhi; BAOChun-De; CHENShun-Le

    1989-01-01

    The antibodies to cardiolipin (aCL), double stranded DNA (aDNA) and to nuclear axttigcns(Sm, SSA, SSB, Ribonucleoprotein) were prospe, ctivcly investigated in 86 patients of habitual abortion without abilormaiity in their reprodutive system and karyotypes. All

  6. Protein composition of catalytically active human telomerase from immortal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Scott B; Graham, Mark E; Lovrecz, George O

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex that adds 5'-TTAGGG-3' repeats onto the ends of human chromosomes, providing a telomere maintenance mechanism for approximately 90% of human cancers. We have purified human telomerase approximately 10(8)-fold, with the final elution dependent on th...

  7. Autoradiographic study of the nucleolar RNA metabolism during the oogenesis of Lineus ruber Mueller (Heteronemertes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rue, Gerard; Gontcharoff, Marie

    1975-01-01

    During Lineus ruber oogenesis, there is a very high uridine uptake by the oocyte before the yolk formation. At the end of this stage, the nucleolus shows a special structure that seems to be related to a decrease of the ribosomal RNA synthesis. During the yolk formation, the nucleolus scatters in the nucleus, allowing ribonucleoprotein granules to go towards the cytoplasm [fr

  8. A glimpse at mRNA dynamics reveals cellular domains and rapid trafficking through granules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemert, Alice Myriam Christi van

    2011-01-01

    mRNA transport and targeting are essential to gene expression regulation. Specific mRNA sequences can bind several proteins and together form RiboNucleoProtein particles (RNP). The various proteins within the RNP determine mRNA fate: translation, transport or decay. RNP composition varies with

  9. Dissecting mechanisms of nuclear mRNA surveillance in THO/sub2 complex mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougemaille, Mathieu; Gudipati, Rajani Kanth; Olesen, Jens Raabjerg

    2007-01-01

    by appending oligo(A)-tails onto structured substrates. Another role of the nuclear exosome is that of mRNA surveillance. In strains harboring a mutated THO/Sub2p system, involved in messenger ribonucleoprotein particle biogenesis and nuclear export, the exosome-associated 3' 5' exonuclease Rrp6p is required...

  10. Structural organizations of yeast RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes as revealed by UV-crosslinking studies of RNA–protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanova, Elena; Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in the metabolism of various RNA molecules including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. While evolutionarily related to bacterial RNase P, eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family are much more complex. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and nine essential proteins; yeast RNase MRP has an RNA component resembling that in RNase P and 10 essential proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNases P/MRP are not clear. Here we present the results of RNA–protein UV crosslinking studies performed on RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes isolated from yeast. The results indicate locations of specific protein-binding sites in the RNA components of RNase P and RNase MRP and shed light on the structural organizations of these large ribonucleoprotein complexes. PMID:22332141

  11. Structural organizations of yeast RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes as revealed by UV-crosslinking studies of RNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanova, Elena; Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in the metabolism of various RNA molecules including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. While evolutionarily related to bacterial RNase P, eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family are much more complex. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and nine essential proteins; yeast RNase MRP has an RNA component resembling that in RNase P and 10 essential proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNases P/MRP are not clear. Here we present the results of RNA-protein UV crosslinking studies performed on RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes isolated from yeast. The results indicate locations of specific protein-binding sites in the RNA components of RNase P and RNase MRP and shed light on the structural organizations of these large ribonucleoprotein complexes.

  12. Functional requirements of AID's higher order structures and their interaction with RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Samiran; Begum, Nasim A; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku

    2016-03-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes. Although both the N and C termini of AID have unique functions in DNA cleavage and recombination, respectively, during SHM and CSR, their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay combined with glycerol gradient fractionation, we revealed that the AID C terminus is required for a stable dimer formation. Furthermore, AID monomers and dimers form complexes with distinct heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). AID monomers associate with DNA cleavage cofactor hnRNP K whereas AID dimers associate with recombination cofactors hnRNP L, hnRNP U, and Serpine mRNA-binding protein 1. All of these AID/ribonucleoprotein associations are RNA-dependent. We propose that AID's structure-specific cofactor complex formations differentially contribute to its DNA-cleavage and recombination functions.

  13. Circular chromatin complexes in human lymphocytes high-resolution autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becak, M.L.; Fukuda-Pizzocaro, K.; Santos, R. de C.S. dos; Brunner, O.

    1985-01-01

    Transcriptionally active chromatin fibers were observed in chromosomes presenting the loops/scaffold configuration. The active fibers showed altered nucleosomes and presented multiforked aspects which led to the formation of ring complexes. The ribonucleoprotein transcripts (RNP) appeared as networks of 0.1 μm or multiples tandemly disposed along the fiber. It is suggested that the ring complexes belong to the human genome. The possibility that these circular structures come from a prokaryote is also considered. (author) [pt

  14. Nucleocapsid-Independent Specific Viral RNA Packaging via Viral Envelope Protein and Viral RNA Signal

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Krishna; Chen, Chun-Jen; Maeda, Junko; Makino, Shinji

    2003-01-01

    For any of the enveloped RNA viruses studied to date, recognition of a specific RNA packaging signal by the virus's nucleocapsid (N) protein is the first step described in the process of viral RNA packaging. In the murine coronavirus a selective interaction between the viral transmembrane envelope protein M and the viral ribonucleoprotein complex, composed of N protein and viral RNA containing a short cis-acting RNA element, the packaging signal, determines the selective RNA packaging into vi...

  15. Telomere Shortening in Neurological Disorders: An Abundance of Unanswered Questions

    OpenAIRE

    Eitan, Erez; Hutchison, Emmette R.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres, ribonucleoprotein complexes that cap eukaryotic chromosomes, typically shorten in leukocytes with aging. Aging is a primary risk factor for neurodegenerative disease (ND), and a common assumption has arisen that leukocyte telomere length (LTL) can serve as a predictor of neurological disease. However, the evidence for shorter LTL in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients is inconsistent. The diverse causes of telomere shortening may explain variability in LTL between studies and indi...

  16. Differential Binding of Mitochondrial Transcripts by MRB8170 and MRB4160 Regulates Distinct Editing Fates of Mitochondrial mRNA in Trypanosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dixit, Sameer; Mueller-McNicoll, M.; David, Vojtěch; Zarnack, K.; Ule, J.; Hashimi, Hassan; Lukeš, Julius

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2017), č. článku e02288-16. ISSN 2150-7511 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21974S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : guide RNA * ribonucleoprotein complexes * nucleotide resolution * proteins * DNA * replication * tbrgg2 * subcomplexes * translation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 6.956, year: 2016

  17. Ultrastructure of hepatocyte nuclei in irradiated, adrenalectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orkisz, S.; Bartel, H.; Kmiec, B. (Military Medical Academy, Lodz (Poland))

    1984-01-01

    A cytochemical study of hepatocyte nuclei of adrenalectomized and irradiated rats was performed. After irradiation alone, the behaviour of the ribonucleoprotein components was studied according to Bernhard. The findings suggest that a delay occurs in the synthesis of preribosomal RNA in the nucleoli and in the transport of messenger RNA to the cytoplasm. The indirect effect of ionizing radiation on nuclear RNA synthesis is assumed to occur through the influence of cortical steroid hormones on the transcription process.

  18. Predictions of RNA-binding ability and aggregation propensity of proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Agostini, Federico, 1985-

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control the fate of a multitude of coding and non-coding transcripts. Formation of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes fine-tunes regulation of post-transcriptional events and influences gene expression. Recently, it has been observed that non-canonical proteins with RNA-binding ability are enriched in structurally disordered and low-complexity regions that are generally involved in functional and dysfunctional associations. Therefore, it is possible that interaction...

  19. In vivo kinetics of U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP formation in Cajal bodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Ivan; Blažíková, Michaela; Staněk, David; Heřman, P.; Malínský, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2011), s. 513-523 ISSN 1059-1524 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/07/0133; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : small nuclear ribonucleoprotein * body components * dynamics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor : 4.942, year: 2011

  20. Linked biogenesis and degradation of human non-coding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Refsing

    2012-01-01

    funktionelle roller majoriteten af disse transkripter spiller. De molekylære mekanismer bag dannelsen og nedbrydningen af både de nye klasser af ikke-kodende RNA transkripter og af flere etablerede klasser af ikke-kodende RNA transkripter er relativt ukendte i humane celler. Vi har undersøgt flere aspekter af......-5’ exoribonukleaseaktivitet i organismer så forskel¬lige som gær og mennesker. Gennem dette arbejde har vi vist at de fleste små RNAs molekyler, der oprinder fra humane protein-kodende gener (fraregnet mikroRNAer og introniske snoRNAer) repræsenterer RNA-nedbrydningssignaturer af specifikke molekylære processeringshændelser...... i dannelsen af pre-messenger RNA. Endvidere har vi fundet at 3’-forlængede humane introniske snoRNA-transkripter er substrater for RNA exosomet, men at produktionen af modne introniske snoRNAer ikke er afhængig af RNA exosomet, hvilket er ulig mekanismerne i gær, som man ellers have regnet med ville...

  1. Transcript specificity in yeast pre-mRNA splicing revealed by mutations in core spliceosomal components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Pleiss

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate expression of most eukaryotic genes requires the removal of introns from their pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs, a process catalyzed by the spliceosome. In higher eukaryotes a large family of auxiliary factors known as SR proteins can improve the splicing efficiency of transcripts containing suboptimal splice sites by interacting with distinct sequences present in those pre-mRNAs. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks functional equivalents of most of these factors; thus, it has been unclear whether the spliceosome could effectively distinguish among transcripts. To address this question, we have used a microarray-based approach to examine the effects of mutations in 18 highly conserved core components of the spliceosomal machinery. The kinetic profiles reveal clear differences in the splicing defects of particular pre-mRNA substrates. Most notably, the behaviors of ribosomal protein gene transcripts are generally distinct from other intron-containing transcripts in response to several spliceosomal mutations. However, dramatically different behaviors can be seen for some pairs of transcripts encoding ribosomal protein gene paralogs, suggesting that the spliceosome can readily distinguish between otherwise highly similar pre-mRNAs. The ability of the spliceosome to distinguish among its different substrates may therefore offer an important opportunity for yeast to regulate gene expression in a transcript-dependent fashion. Given the high level of conservation of core spliceosomal components across eukaryotes, we expect that these results will significantly impact our understanding of how regulated splicing is controlled in higher eukaryotes as well.

  2. Messenger RNA 3' end formation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A G

    2008-01-01

    Messenger RNA 3' end formation is an integral step in the process that gives rise to mature, translated messenger RNAs in eukaryotes. With this step, a pre-messenger RNA is processed and polyadenylated, giving rise to a mature mRNA bearing the characteristic poly(A) tract. The poly(A) tract is a fundamental feature of mRNAs, participating in the process of translation initiation and being the focus of control mechanisms that define the lifetime of mRNAs. Thus messenger RNA 3' end formation impacts two steps in mRNA biogenesis and function. Moreover, mRNA 3' end formation is something of a bridge that integrates numerous other steps in mRNA biogenesis and function. While the process is essential for the expression of most genes, it is also one that is subject to various forms of regulation, such that both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression may be modulated via the polyadenylation complex. In this review, the current status of understanding of mRNA 3' end formation in plants is discussed. In particular, the nature of mRNA 3' ends in plants is reviewed, as are recent studies that are beginning to yield insight into the functioning and regulation of plant polyadenylation factor subunits.

  3. Nuclear surveillance of mRNP formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    Proper formation of mRNP requires co-transcriptional loading of proteins onto nascent transcripts. Mutations in several genes involved in mRNA processing, mRNP assembly and nuclear export lead to production of aberrant mRNPs that are retained in transcription site-associated foci. Retention...... and degradation of transcripts depend on the nuclear exosome of 3’-5’ exonucleases.We have studied connections between mRNP assembly and quality control in the yeast S. cerevisiae using mutants of the THO complex. THO is implicated in co-transcriptional mRNP assembly, but its precise role is not known. Genetic...... and biochemical data now show that a defective THO complex negatively impacts mRNA 3’-end processing. We are currently trying to understand the relationship between this phenomenon and mRNP quality control. Retention of mRNP in THO mutants is dependent on the nuclear exosome component Rrp6p. Using the solved...

  4. High-resolution NMR structures of the domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tho1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Julian O. B.; Allen, Mark D.; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Bycroft, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and the C-terminal RNA-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tho1 have been determined. THO is a multi-protein complex involved in the formation of messenger ribonuclear particles (mRNPs) by coupling transcription with mRNA processing and export. THO is thought to be formed from five subunits, Tho2p, Hpr1p, Tex1p, Mft1p and Thp2p, and recent work has determined a low-resolution structure of the complex [Poulsen et al. (2014 ▸), PLoS One, 9, e103470]. A number of additional proteins are thought to be involved in the formation of mRNP in yeast, including Tho1, which has been shown to bind RNA in vitro and is recruited to actively transcribed chromatin in vivo in a THO-complex and RNA-dependent manner. Tho1 is known to contain a SAP domain at the N-terminus, but the ability to suppress the expression defects of the hpr1Δ mutant of THO was shown to reside in the RNA-binding C-terminal region. In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and C-terminal RNA-binding domain have been determined

  5. A FYVE zinc finger domain protein specifically links mRNA transport to endosome trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Thomas; Baumann, Sebastian; Haag, Carl; Albrecht, Mario; Feldbrügge, Michael

    2015-01-01

    An emerging theme in cellular logistics is the close connection between mRNA and membrane trafficking. A prominent example is the microtubule-dependent transport of mRNAs and associated ribosomes on endosomes. This coordinated process is crucial for correct septin filamentation and efficient growth of polarised cells, such as fungal hyphae. Despite detailed knowledge on the key RNA-binding protein and the molecular motors involved, it is unclear how mRNAs are connected to membranes during transport. Here, we identify a novel factor containing a FYVE zinc finger domain for interaction with endosomal lipids and a new PAM2-like domain required for interaction with the MLLE domain of the key RNA-binding protein. Consistently, loss of this FYVE domain protein leads to specific defects in mRNA, ribosome, and septin transport without affecting general functions of endosomes or their movement. Hence, this is the first endosomal component specific for mRNP trafficking uncovering a new mechanism to couple mRNPs to endosomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06041.001 PMID:25985087

  6. The fragile X mental retardation protein has nucleic acid chaperone properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabus, Caroline; Mazroui, Rachid; Tremblay, Sandra; Khandjian, Edouard W; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation resulting from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP contains two K-homology (KH) domains and one RGG box that are landmarks characteristic of RNA-binding proteins. In agreement with this, FMRP associates with messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) within actively translating ribosomes, and is thought to regulate translation of target mRNAs, including its own transcript. To investigate whether FMRP might chaperone nucleic acid folding and hybridization, we analysed the annealing and strand exchange activities of DNA oligonucleotides and the enhancement of ribozyme-directed RNA substrate cleavage by FMRP and deleted variants relative to canonical nucleic acid chaperones, such as the cellular YB-1/p50 protein and the retroviral nucleocapsid protein HIV-1 NCp7. FMRP was found to possess all the properties of a potent nucleic acid chaperone, requiring the KH motifs and RGG box for optimal activity. These findings suggest that FMRP may regulate translation by acting on RNA-RNA interactions and thus on the structural status of mRNAs.

  7. High-resolution NMR structures of the domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tho1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Julian O. B.; Allen, Mark D.; Freund, Stefan M. V.; Bycroft, Mark, E-mail: mxb@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-23

    In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and the C-terminal RNA-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tho1 have been determined. THO is a multi-protein complex involved in the formation of messenger ribonuclear particles (mRNPs) by coupling transcription with mRNA processing and export. THO is thought to be formed from five subunits, Tho2p, Hpr1p, Tex1p, Mft1p and Thp2p, and recent work has determined a low-resolution structure of the complex [Poulsen et al. (2014 ▸), PLoS One, 9, e103470]. A number of additional proteins are thought to be involved in the formation of mRNP in yeast, including Tho1, which has been shown to bind RNA in vitro and is recruited to actively transcribed chromatin in vivo in a THO-complex and RNA-dependent manner. Tho1 is known to contain a SAP domain at the N-terminus, but the ability to suppress the expression defects of the hpr1Δ mutant of THO was shown to reside in the RNA-binding C-terminal region. In this study, high-resolution structures of both the N-terminal DNA-binding SAP domain and C-terminal RNA-binding domain have been determined.

  8. A FYVE zinc finger domain protein specifically links mRNA transport to endosome trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Thomas; Baumann, Sebastian; Haag, Carl; Albrecht, Mario; Feldbrügge, Michael

    2015-05-18

    An emerging theme in cellular logistics is the close connection between mRNA and membrane trafficking. A prominent example is the microtubule-dependent transport of mRNAs and associated ribosomes on endosomes. This coordinated process is crucial for correct septin filamentation and efficient growth of polarised cells, such as fungal hyphae. Despite detailed knowledge on the key RNA-binding protein and the molecular motors involved, it is unclear how mRNAs are connected to membranes during transport. Here, we identify a novel factor containing a FYVE zinc finger domain for interaction with endosomal lipids and a new PAM2-like domain required for interaction with the MLLE domain of the key RNA-binding protein. Consistently, loss of this FYVE domain protein leads to specific defects in mRNA, ribosome, and septin transport without affecting general functions of endosomes or their movement. Hence, this is the first endosomal component specific for mRNP trafficking uncovering a new mechanism to couple mRNPs to endosomes.

  9. Nusinersen versus Sham Control in Later-Onset Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Eugenio; Darras, Basil T; Chiriboga, Claudia A; Day, John W; Campbell, Craig; Connolly, Anne M; Iannaccone, Susan T; Kirschner, Janbernd; Kuntz, Nancy L; Saito, Kayoko; Shieh, Perry B; Tulinius, Már; Mazzone, Elena S; Montes, Jacqueline; Bishop, Kathie M; Yang, Qingqing; Foster, Richard; Gheuens, Sarah; Bennett, C Frank; Farwell, Wildon; Schneider, Eugene; De Vivo, Darryl C; Finkel, Richard S

    2018-02-15

    Nusinersen is an antisense oligonucleotide drug that modulates pre-messenger RNA splicing of the survival motor neuron 2 ( SMN2) gene. It has been developed for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). We conducted a multicenter, double-blind, sham-controlled, phase 3 trial of nusinersen in 126 children with SMA who had symptom onset after 6 months of age. The children were randomly assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, to undergo intrathecal administration of nusinersen at a dose of 12 mg (nusinersen group) or a sham procedure (control group) on days 1, 29, 85, and 274. The primary end point was the least-squares mean change from baseline in the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale-Expanded (HFMSE) score at 15 months of treatment; HFMSE scores range from 0 to 66, with higher scores indicating better motor function. Secondary end points included the percentage of children with a clinically meaningful increase from baseline in the HFMSE score (≥3 points), an outcome that indicates improvement in at least two motor skills. In the prespecified interim analysis, there was a least-squares mean increase from baseline to month 15 in the HFMSE score in the nusinersen group (by 4.0 points) and a least-squares mean decrease in the control group (by -1.9 points), with a significant between-group difference favoring nusinersen (least-squares mean difference in change, 5.9 points; 95% confidence interval, 3.7 to 8.1; PCHERISH ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02292537 .).

  10. Identification of a Peptide for Systemic Brain Delivery of a Morpholino Oligonucleotide in Mouse Models of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Hammond, Suzan M; Abendroth, Frank; Hazell, Gareth; Wood, Matthew J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides are emerging treatments for neuromuscular diseases, with several splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) currently undergoing clinical trials such as for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). However, the development of systemically delivered antisense therapeutics has been hampered by poor tissue penetration and cellular uptake, including crossing of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) to reach targets in the central nervous system (CNS). For SMA application, we have investigated the ability of various BBB-crossing peptides for CNS delivery of a splice-switching phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) targeting survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) exon 7 inclusion. We identified a branched derivative of the well-known ApoE (141–150) peptide, which as a PMO conjugate was capable of exon inclusion in the CNS following systemic administration, leading to an increase in the level of full-length SMN2 transcript. Treatment of newborn SMA mice with this peptide-PMO (P-PMO) conjugate resulted in a significant increase in the average lifespan and gains in weight, muscle strength, and righting reflexes. Systemic treatment of adult SMA mice with this newly identified P-PMO also resulted in small but significant increases in the levels of SMN2 pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) exon inclusion in the CNS and peripheral tissues. This work provides proof of principle for the ability to select new peptide paradigms to enhance CNS delivery and activity of a PMO SSO through use of a peptide-based delivery platform for the treatment of SMA potentially extending to other neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28118087

  11. Identification of a transformer homolog in the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, and analysis of its activity in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masataka G; Tochigi, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Honami; Aoki, Fugaku; Miyamoto, Norio

    2015-06-01

    The transformer (tra) gene is an intermediate component of the sex determination hierarchy in many insect species. The homolog of tra is also found in two branchiopod crustacean species but is not known outside arthropods. We have isolated a tra homolog in the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, which is a hemichordate belonging to the deuterostome superphylum. The full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of the S. kowalevskii tra homolog (Sktra) has a 3786-bp open reading frame that encodes a 1261-amino acid sequence including a TRA-CAM domain and an arginine/serine (RS)-rich domain, both of which are characteristic of TRA orthologs. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analyses demonstrated that Sktra showed no differences in expression patterns between testes and ovaries, but its expression level was approximately 7.5-fold higher in the testes than in the ovaries. TRA, together with the protein product of the transformer-2 (tra-2) gene, assembles on doublesex (dsx) pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) via the cis-regulatory element, enhancing female-specific splicing of dsx in Drosophila. To understand functional conservation of the SkTRA protein as a dsx-splicing activator, we investigated whether SkTRA is capable of inducing female-specific splicing of the Drosophila dsx. Ectopic expression of Sktra cDNA in insect cultured cells did not induce the female-specific splicing of dsx. On the other hand, forced expression of Sktra-2 (a tra-2 homolog of S. kowalevskii) was able to induce the female-specific dsx splicing. These results demonstrate that the function as a dsx-splicing activator is not conserved in SkTRA even though SkTRA-2 is capable of functionally replacing the Drosophila TRA-2. We have also found a tra homolog in an echinoderm genome. This study provides the first evidence that that tra is conserved not only in arthropods but also in basal species of deuterostoms.

  12. Alternative polyadenylation of tumor suppressor genes in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeld, Anders; Plass, Mireya; Døssing, Kristina; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas; Krogh, Anders; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation (APA) with proliferation, cell transformation, and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-messenger RNA is cleaved at a polyA site and a polyA tail is added. Genes with two or more polyA sites can undergo APA. This produces two or more distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3' untranslated regions. Additionally, APA can also produce mRNAs containing different 3'-terminal coding regions. Therefore, APA alters both the repertoire and the expression level of proteins. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing data to map polyA sites and characterize polyadenylation genome-wide in three SI-NETs and a reference sample. In the tumors, 16 genes showed significant changes of APA pattern, which lead to either the 3' truncation of mRNA coding regions or 3' untranslated regions. Among these, 11 genes had been previously associated with cancer, with 4 genes being known tumor suppressors: DCC, PDZD2, MAGI1, and DACT2. We validated the APA in three out of three cases with quantitative real-time-PCR. Our findings suggest that changes of APA pattern in these 16 genes could be involved in the tumorigenesis of SI-NETs. Furthermore, they also point to APA as a new target for both diagnostic and treatment of SI-NETs. The identified genes with APA specific to the SI-NETs could be further tested as diagnostic markers and drug targets for disease prevention and treatment.

  13. Poliovirus infection induces the co-localization of cellular protein SRp20 with TIA-1, a cytoplasmic stress granule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kerry D; Semler, Bert L

    2013-09-01

    Different types of environmental stress cause mammalian cells to form cytoplasmic foci, termed stress granules, which contain mRNPs that are translationally silenced. These foci are transient and dynamic, and contain components of the cellular translation machinery as well as certain mRNAs and RNA binding proteins. Stress granules are known to be induced by conditions such as hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and oxidative stress, and a number of cellular factors have been identified that are commonly associated with these foci. More recently it was discovered that poliovirus infection also induces the formation of stress granules, although these cytoplasmic foci appear to be somewhat compositionally unique. Work described here examined the punctate pattern of SRp20 (a host cell mRNA splicing protein) localization in the cytoplasm of poliovirus-infected cells, demonstrating the partial co-localization of SRp20 with the stress granule marker protein TIA-1. We determined that SRp20 does not co-localize with TIA-1, however, under conditions of oxidative stress, indicating that the close association of these two proteins during poliovirus infection is not representative of a general response to cellular stress. We confirmed that the expression of a dominant negative version of TIA-1 (TIA-1-PRD) results in the dissociation of stress granules. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of wild type TIA-1 or dominant negative TIA-1-PRD in cells during poliovirus infection does not dramatically affect viral translation. Taken together, these studies provide a new example of the unique cytoplasmic foci that form during poliovirus infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The decapping activator Edc3 and the Q/N-rich domain of Lsm4 function together to enhance mRNA stability and alter mRNA decay pathway dependence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Huch

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The rate and regulation of mRNA decay are major elements in the proper control of gene expression. Edc3 and Lsm4 are two decapping activator proteins that have previously been shown to function in the assembly of RNA granules termed P bodies. Here, we show that deletion of edc3, when combined with a removal of the glutamine/asparagine rich region of Lsm4 (edc3Δ lsm4ΔC reduces mRNA stability and alters pathways of mRNA degradation. Multiple tested mRNAs exhibited reduced stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant. The destabilization was linked to an increased dependence on Ccr4-mediated deadenylation and mRNA decapping. Unlike characterized mutations in decapping factors that either are neutral or are able to stabilize mRNA, the combined edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant reduced mRNA stability. We characterized the growth and activity of the major mRNA decay systems and translation in double mutant and wild-type yeast. In the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant, we observed alterations in the levels of specific mRNA decay factors as well as nuclear accumulation of the catalytic subunit of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. Hence, we suggest that the effects on mRNA stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant may originate from mRNA decay protein abundance or changes in mRNPs, or alternatively may imply a role for P bodies in mRNA stabilization.

  15. Poliovirus infection induces the co-localization of cellular protein SRp20 with TIA-1, a cytoplasmic stress granule protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kerry D.; Semler, Bert L.

    2013-01-01

    Different types of environmental stress cause mammalian cells to form cytoplasmic foci, termed stress granules, which contain mRNPs that are translationally silenced. These foci are transient and dynamic, and contain components of the cellular translation machinery as well as certain mRNAs and RNA binding proteins. Stress granules are known to be induced by conditions such as hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and oxidative stress, and a number of cellular factors have been identified that are commonly associated with these foci. More recently it was discovered that poliovirus infection also induces the formation of stress granules, although these cytoplasmic foci appear to be somewhat compositionally unique. Work described here examined the punctate pattern of SRp20 (a host cell mRNA splicing protein) localization in the cytoplasm of poliovirus-infected cells, demonstrating the partial co-localization of SRp20 with the stress granule marker protein TIA-1. We determined that SRp20 does not co-localize with TIA-1, however, under conditions of oxidative stress, indicating that the close association of these two proteins during poliovirus infection is not representative of a general response to cellular stress. We confirmed that the expression of a dominant negative version of TIA-1 (TIA-1-PRD) results in the dissociation of stress granules. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of wild type TIA-1 or dominant negative TIA-1-PRD in cells during poliovirus infection does not dramatically affect viral translation. Taken together, these studies provide a new example of the unique cytoplasmic foci that form during poliovirus infection. PMID:23830997

  16. Differential expression of THOC1 and ALY mRNP biogenesis/export factors in human cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domínguez-Sánchez, María S; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel A; Aguilera, Andrés; Luna, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    One key step in gene expression is the biogenesis of mRNA ribonucleoparticle complexes (mRNPs). Formation of the mRNP requires the participation of a number of conserved factors such as the THO complex. THO interacts physically and functionally with the Sub2/UAP56 RNA-dependent ATPase, and the Yra1/REF1/ALY RNA-binding protein linking transcription, mRNA export and genome integrity. Given the link between genome instability and cancer, we have performed a comparative analysis of the expression patterns of THOC1, a THO complex subunit, and ALY in tumor samples. The mRNA levels were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and hybridization of a tumor tissue cDNA array; and the protein levels and distribution by immunostaining of a custom tissue array containing a set of paraffin-embedded samples of different tumor and normal tissues followed by statistical analysis. We show that the expression of two mRNP factors, THOC1 and ALY are altered in several tumor tissues. THOC1 mRNA and protein levels are up-regulated in ovarian and lung tumors and down-regulated in those of testis and skin, whereas ALY is altered in a wide variety of tumors. In contrast to THOC1, ALY protein is highly detected in normal proliferative cells, but poorly in high-grade cancers. These results suggest a differential connection between tumorogenesis and the expression levels of human THO and ALY. This study opens the possibility of defining mRNP biogenesis factors as putative players in cell proliferation that could contribute to tumor development

  17. A role for complexes of survival of motor neurons (SMN) protein with gemins and profilin in neurite-like cytoplasmic extensions of cultured nerve cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Aarti; Lambrechts, Anja; Le thi Hao; Le, Thanh T.; Sewry, Caroline A.; Ampe, Christophe; Burghes, Arthur H.M.; Morris, Glenn E.

    2005-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of SMN (survival of motor neurons protein) and consequent loss of motor neurons. SMN is involved in snRNP transport and nuclear RNA splicing, but axonal transport of SMN has also been shown to occur in motor neurons. SMN also binds to the small actin-binding protein, profilin. We now show that SMN and profilin II co-localise in the cytoplasm of differentiating rat PC12 cells and in neurite-like extensions, especially at their growth cones. Many components of known SMN complexes were also found in these extensions, including gemin2 (SIP-1), gemin6, gemin7 and unrip (unr-interacting protein). Coilin p80 and Sm core protein immunoreactivity, however, were seen only in the nucleus. SMN is known to associate with β-actin mRNA and specific hnRNPs in axons and in neurite extensions of cultured nerve cells, and SMN also stimulates neurite outgrowth in cultures. Our results are therefore consistent with SMN complexes, rather than SMN alone, being involved in the transport of actin mRNPs along the axon as in the transport of snRNPs into the nucleus by similar SMN complexes. Antisense knockdown of profilin I and II isoforms inhibited neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells and caused accumulation of SMN and its associated proteins in cytoplasmic aggregates. BIAcore studies demonstrated a high affinity interaction of SMN with profilin IIa, the isoform present in developing neurons. Pathogenic missense mutations in SMN, or deletion of exons 5 and 7, prevented this interaction. The interaction is functional in that SMN can modulate actin polymerisation in vitro by reducing the inhibitory effect of profilin IIa. This suggests that reduced SMN in SMA might cause axonal pathfinding defects by disturbing the normal regulation of microfilament growth by profilins

  18. Rasputin, more promiscuous than ever: a review of G3BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Katharine; Stirling, Renee; Hume, David; Kennedy, Derek

    2004-12-01

    In this review, we highlight what G3BP's domain structure initially suggested; that G3BPs are "scaffolding" proteins linking signal transduction to RNA metabolism. Whilst it is most attractive to hypothesise about G3BP's role in signalling to mRNA metabolism, it is not known whether all G3BP functions impinge on their RNA-binding activities, so any theories are naturally subject to this qualification. It is hypothesised that, in coordination with an array of other proteins, G3BP, in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, is involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of a subset of mRNAs, at least some of which are in common with those regulated by Hu proteins. These transcripts, partially controlled at the post-transcriptional level by G3BPs, code for proteins important in transcription (e.g. c-Myc) and cytoskeletal arrangement (e.g. Tau), amongst other as yet undetermined pathways. The subtle differences between G3BP family members could dictate binding to a variety of signalling proteins, so each of the G3BPs may participate in different, though possibly related mRNPs, which are assembled in response to different stimuli. The combinatorial nature of the mRNP complex offers a powerful means of regulating gene expression, beyond that provided by a simple mRNA sequence. The ways in which mRNP flexibility and specificity may be harnessed to coordinate gene expression of functionally or structurally related mRNAs are not yet fully appreciated. Characterising mRNP composition and the function/s of mRNP components, such as the G3BPs, will aid in the understanding of how post-transcriptional mechanisms contribute to the global regulation of gene expression.

  19. Ribosomal protein L5 has a highly twisted concave surface and flexible arms responsible for rRNA binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashima, T; Yao, M; Kawamura, S; Iwasaki, K; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L5 is a 5S rRNA binding protein in the large subunit and plays an essential role in the promotion of a particular conformation of 5S rRNA. The crystal structure of the ribosomal protein L5 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined at 1.8 A resolution. The molecule consists of a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and four alpha-helices, which fold in a way that is topologically similar to the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) domain. The molecular shape and electrostatic ...

  20. Dynamic Changes in the Protein Localization in the Nuclear Environment in Pancreatic β-Cell after Brief Glucose Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Taewook; Jensen, Pia; Solovyeva, Vita

    2018-01-01

    , we identified 20 components of the nuclear organization processes, including nuclear pore organization, ribonucleoprotein complex, and pre-mRNA transcription. We found alteration of the nuclear pore complex, together with calcium/calmodulin-binding chaperones that facilitate protein and RNA import......Characterization of molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic β-cell function in relation to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is incomplete, especially with respect to global response in the nuclear environment. We focus on the characterization of proteins in the nuclear environment of β...... the nucleus and the cytoplasm is an important process, highly involved in the initial molecular mechanism underlying glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells....

  1. Conserved CPEs in the p53 3' untranslated region influence mRNA stability and protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken W; Vinther, Jeppe; Mittler, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    CaT skin and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were established. Quantitative PCR and an enzymatic assay were used to quantify the reporter mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Proteins binding to the CPEs were identified by RNA-immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectroscopy. RESULTS: The wild...... irradiation. Several proteins (including GAPDH, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) D and A/B) were identified from the MCF-7 cytoplasmic extracts that bound specifically to the CPEs. CONCLUSION: Two conserved CPEs in the p53 3'UTR regulate stability and translation of a reporter mRNA in non...

  2. Interactions between mRNA export commitment, 3'-end quality control, and nuclear degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libri, Domenico; Dower, Ken; Boulay, Jocelyne

    2002-01-01

    Several aspects of eukaryotic mRNA processing are linked to transcription. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, overexpression of the mRNA export factor Sub2p suppresses the growth defect of hpr1 null cells, yet the protein Hpr1p and the associated THO protein complex are implicated in transcriptional el...... results show that several classes of defective RNPs are subject to a quality control step that impedes release from transcription site foci and suggest that suboptimal messenger ribonucleoprotein assembly leads to RNA degradation by Rrp6p....

  3. Structural basis for the function of DEAH helicases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yangzi; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Nielsen, Klaus Hvid

    2010-01-01

    DEAH helicases participate in pre‐messenger RNA splicing and ribosome biogenesis. The structure of yeast Prp43p‐ADP reveals the homology of DEAH helicases to DNA helicases and the presence of an oligonucleotide‐binding motif. A β‐hairpin from the second RecA domain is wedged between two carboxy......‐terminal domains and blocks access to the occluded RNA binding site formed by the RecA domains and a C‐terminal domain. ATP binding and hydrolysis are likely to induce conformational changes in the hairpin that are important for RNA unwinding or ribonucleoprotein remodelling. The structure of Prp43p provides...

  4. The human cap-binding complex is functionally connected to the nuclear RNA exosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Refsing; Domanski, Michal; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear processing and quality control of eukaryotic RNA is mediated by the RNA exosome, which is regulated by accessory factors. However, the mechanism of exosome recruitment to its ribonucleoprotein (RNP) targets remains poorly understood. Here we report a physical link between the human exosome...... and the cap-binding complex (CBC). The CBC associates with the ARS2 protein to form CBC-ARS2 (CBCA) and then further connects, together with the ZC3H18 protein, to the nuclear exosome targeting (NEXT) complex, thus forming CBC-NEXT (CBCN). RNA immunoprecipitation using CBCN factors as well as the analysis...

  5. Who Regulates Whom? An Overview of RNA Granules and Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Poblete-Durán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After viral infection, host cells respond by mounting an anti-viral stress response in order to create a hostile atmosphere for viral replication, leading to the shut-off of mRNA translation (protein synthesis and the assembly of RNA granules. Two of these RNA granules have been well characterized in yeast and mammalian cells, stress granules (SGs, which are translationally silent sites of RNA triage and processing bodies (PBs, which are involved in mRNA degradation. This review discusses the role of these RNA granules in the evasion of anti-viral stress responses through virus-induced remodeling of cellular ribonucleoproteins (RNPs.

  6. The Cajal body and the nucleolus: “In a relationship” or “It's complicated”?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT From their initial identification as ‘nucleolar accessory bodies’ more than a century ago, the relationship between Cajal bodies and nucleoli has been a subject of interest and controversy. In this review, we seek to place recent developments in the understanding of the physical and functional relationships between the 2 structures in the context of historical observations. Biophysical models of nuclear body formation, the molecular nature of CB/nucleolus interactions and the increasing list of joint roles for CBs and nucleoli, predominantly in assembling ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, are discussed. PMID:27661468

  7. The Cajal body and the nucleolus: "In a relationship" or "It's complicated"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Sleeman, Judith E

    2017-06-03

    From their initial identification as 'nucleolar accessory bodies' more than a century ago, the relationship between Cajal bodies and nucleoli has been a subject of interest and controversy. In this review, we seek to place recent developments in the understanding of the physical and functional relationships between the 2 structures in the context of historical observations. Biophysical models of nuclear body formation, the molecular nature of CB/nucleolus interactions and the increasing list of joint roles for CBs and nucleoli, predominantly in assembling ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, are discussed.

  8. High-resolution autoradiography of nuclear modifications during and after heat treatment of neurospora crassa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ton-That, C.; Turian, G.

    1984-01-01

    The appearance of perinucleolar electron-dense spots in the nuclei of macroconidia of Neurospora crassa incubated at 46 0 C and their disaggregation after shift-down to 25 0 C have been investigated by high-resolution autoradiography after (5- 3 H) uridine pulses with or without chase periods. The RNA of these ribonucleoprotein-rich dense spots has been found to originate mainly from the heat-sensitive nucleolus; after return to 25 0 C, the nucleolar activity was recovered and the RNA material stored either in an unprocessed or a mature rRNA form in the dense spots was found to be progressively extruded into the cytoplasm. (Author)

  9. Nuclear localization of phosphorylated c-Myc protein in human tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Soldani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Using immunocytochemical techniques at light and electron microscopy, we analysed the distribution of phosphorylated c-Myc in actively proliferating human HeLa cells. The distribution pattern of c-Myc was also compared with those of other ribonucleoprotein (RNP-containing components (PANA, hnRNP-core proteins, fibrillarin or RNP-associated nuclear proteins (SC-35 splicing factor. Our results provide the first evidence that phosphorylated c-Myc accumulates in the nucleus of tumor cells, where it colocalizes with fibrillarin, both in the nucleolus and in extranucleolar structures.

  10. Rings in the neonate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hackett, C B

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE) is an uncommon disease of the neonate. It is believed to be caused by the transplacental passage of maternal autoantibodies to the ribonucleoproteins (Ro\\/SSA, La\\/SSB or rarely U RNP) as these are almost invariably present in NLE sera. The most common clinical manifestations include cutaneous lupus lesions and congenital complete heart block. Hepatobiliary and haematologic abnormalities are reported less frequently. We describe a patient with cutaneous NLE to illustrate and raise awareness of the characteristic annular eruption of this condition. We also emphasize the need for thorough investigation for concomitant organ involvement and for maternal education regarding risk in future pregnancies.

  11. Staufen- and FMRP-Containing Neuronal RNPs Are Structurally and Functionally Related to Somatic P Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Barbee, Scott A.; Estes, Patricia S.; Cziko, Anne-Marie; Hillebrand, Jens; Luedeman, Rene A.; Coller, Jeff M.; Johnson, Nick; Howlett, Iris C.; Geng, Cuiyun; Ueda, Ryu; Brand, Andrea H.; Newbury, Sarah F.; Wilhelm, James E.; Levine, Richard B.; Nakamura, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Local control of mRNA translation modulates neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and memory formation. A poorly understood aspect of this control is the role and composition of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that mediate transport and translation of neuronal RNAs. Here, we show that staufen- and FMRPcontaining RNPs in Drosophila neurons contain proteins also present in somatic “P bodies,” including the RNA-degradative enzymes Dcp1p and Xrn1p/Pacman and crucial components of miRNA (ar...

  12. Decoding ALS: From Genes to Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. Paul; Brown, Robert H.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2017-01-01

    Preface Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and uniformly fatal neurodegenerative disease. A plethora of genetic factors underlying ALS have now been identified that drive motor neuron degeneration, increase susceptibility to the disease, or influence the rate of progression. Emerging themes include dysfunction in RNA metabolism and protein homeostasis, with specific defects in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and impaired dynamics of ribonucleoprotein bodies such as RNA granules that assemble through the process of liquid-liquid phase separation. Extraordinary recent progress in understanding the biology of ALS provides new grounds for optimism that meaningful therapies for ALS will be identified. PMID:27830784

  13. Similarities between long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) reverse transcriptase and telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopera, Huira C; Moldovan, John B; Morrish, Tammy A; Garcia-Perez, Jose Luis; Moran, John V

    2011-12-20

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons encode two proteins (ORF1p and ORF2p) that contain activities required for conventional retrotransposition by a mechanism termed target-site primed reverse transcription. Previous experiments in XRCC4 or DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit-deficient CHO cell lines, which are defective for the nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair pathway, revealed an alternative endonuclease-independent (ENi) pathway for L1 retrotransposition. Interestingly, some ENi retrotransposition events in DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit-deficient cells are targeted to dysfunctional telomeres. Here we used an in vitro assay to detect L1 reverse transcriptase activity to demonstrate that wild-type or endonuclease-defective L1 ribonucleoprotein particles can use oligonucleotide adapters that mimic telomeric ends as primers to initiate the reverse transcription of L1 mRNA. Importantly, these ribonucleoprotein particles also contain a nuclease activity that can process the oligonucleotide adapters before the initiation of reverse transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that ORF1p is not strictly required for ENi retrotransposition at dysfunctional telomeres. Thus, these data further highlight similarities between the mechanism of ENi L1 retrotransposition and telomerase.

  14. Efficient Recreation of t(11;22) EWSR1-FLI1+ in Human Stem Cells Using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Ruiz, Raul; Martinez-Lage, Marta; Martin, Maria C; Garcia, Aida; Bueno, Clara; Castaño, Julio; Ramirez, Juan C; Menendez, Pablo; Cigudosa, Juan C; Rodriguez-Perales, Sandra

    2017-05-09

    Efficient methodologies for recreating cancer-associated chromosome translocations are in high demand as tools for investigating how such events initiate cancer. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been used to reconstruct the genetics of these complex rearrangements at native loci while maintaining the architecture and regulatory elements. However, the CRISPR system remains inefficient in human stem cells. Here, we compared three strategies aimed at enhancing the efficiency of the CRISPR-mediated t(11;22) translocation in human stem cells, including mesenchymal and induced pluripotent stem cells: (1) using end-joining DNA processing factors involved in repair mechanisms, or (2) ssODNs to guide the ligation of the double-strand break ends generated by CRISPR/Cas9; and (3) all-in-one plasmid or ribonucleoprotein complex-based approaches. We report that the generation of targeted t(11;22) is significantly increased by using a combination of ribonucleoprotein complexes and ssODNs. The CRISPR/Cas9-mediated generation of targeted t(11;22) in human stem cells opens up new avenues in modeling Ewing sarcoma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Knocking Down Snrnp200 Initiates Demorphogenesis of Rod Photoreceptors in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein 200 kDa (SNRNP200 gene is a fundamental component for precursor message RNA (pre-mRNA splicing and has been implicated in the etiology of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP. This study aims to determine the consequences of knocking down Snrnp200 in zebrafish. Methods. Expression of the Snrnp200 transcript in zebrafish was determined via whole mount in situ hybridization. Morpholino oligonucleotide (MO aiming to knock down the expression of Snrnp200 was injected into zebrafish embryos, followed by analyses of aberrant splicing and expression of the U4/U6-U5 tri-small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs components and retina-specific transcripts. Systemic changes and retinal phenotypes were further characterized by histological study and immunofluorescence staining. Results. Snrnp200 was ubiquitously expressed in zebrafish. Knocking down Snrnp200 in zebrafish triggered aberrant splicing of the cbln1 gene, upregulation of other U4/U6-U5 tri-snRNP components, and downregulation of a panel of retina-specific transcripts. Systemic defects were found correlated with knockdown of Snrnp200 in zebrafish. Only demorphogenesis of rod photoreceptors was detected in the initial stage, mimicking the disease characteristics of RP. Conclusions. We conclude that knocking down Snrnp200 in zebrafish could alter regular splicing and expression of a panel of genes, which may eventually trigger rod defects.

  16. Ribosomal history reveals origins of modern protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Harish

    Full Text Available The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17 and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world.

  17. Signal recognition particle assembly in relation to the function of amplified nucleoli of Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, John; Brumwell, Craig L; Politz, Joan C Ritland; Pederson, Thoru

    2005-03-15

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ribonucleoprotein machine that controls the translation and intracellular sorting of membrane and secreted proteins. The SRP contains a core RNA subunit with which six proteins are assembled. Recent work in both yeast and mammalian cells has identified the nucleolus as a possible initial site of SRP assembly. In the present study, SRP RNA and protein components were identified in the extrachromosomal, amplified nucleoli of Xenopus laevis oocytes. Fluorescent SRP RNA microinjected into the oocyte nucleus became specifically localized in the nucleoli, and endogenous SRP RNA was also detected in oocyte nucleoli by RNA in situ hybridization. An initial step in the assembly of SRP involves the binding of the SRP19 protein to SRP RNA. When green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged SRP19 protein was injected into the oocyte cytoplasm it was imported into the nucleus and became concentrated in the amplified nucleoli. After visiting the amplified nucleoli, GFP-tagged SRP19 protein was detected in the cytoplasm in a ribonucleoprotein complex, having a sedimentation coefficient characteristic of the SRP. These results suggest that the amplified nucleoli of Xenopus oocytes produce maternal stores not only of ribosomes, the classical product of nucleoli, but also of SRP, presumably as a global developmental strategy for stockpiling translational machinery for early embryogenesis.

  18. Efficient Recreation of t(11;22 EWSR1-FLI1+ in Human Stem Cells Using CRISPR/Cas9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Torres-Ruiz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficient methodologies for recreating cancer-associated chromosome translocations are in high demand as tools for investigating how such events initiate cancer. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been used to reconstruct the genetics of these complex rearrangements at native loci while maintaining the architecture and regulatory elements. However, the CRISPR system remains inefficient in human stem cells. Here, we compared three strategies aimed at enhancing the efficiency of the CRISPR-mediated t(11;22 translocation in human stem cells, including mesenchymal and induced pluripotent stem cells: (1 using end-joining DNA processing factors involved in repair mechanisms, or (2 ssODNs to guide the ligation of the double-strand break ends generated by CRISPR/Cas9; and (3 all-in-one plasmid or ribonucleoprotein complex-based approaches. We report that the generation of targeted t(11;22 is significantly increased by using a combination of ribonucleoprotein complexes and ssODNs. The CRISPR/Cas9-mediated generation of targeted t(11;22 in human stem cells opens up new avenues in modeling Ewing sarcoma.

  19. Usb1 controls U6 snRNP assembly through evolutionarily divergent cyclic phosphodiesterase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didychuk, Allison L; Montemayor, Eric J; Carrocci, Tucker J; DeLaitsch, Andrew T; Lucarelli, Stefani E; Westler, William M; Brow, David A; Hoskins, Aaron A; Butcher, Samuel E

    2017-09-08

    U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) biogenesis is essential for spliceosome assembly, but not well understood. Here, we report structures of the U6 RNA processing enzyme Usb1 from yeast and a substrate analog bound complex from humans. Unlike the human ortholog, we show that yeast Usb1 has cyclic phosphodiesterase activity that leaves a terminal 3' phosphate which prevents overprocessing. Usb1 processing of U6 RNA dramatically alters its affinity for cognate RNA-binding proteins. We reconstitute the post-transcriptional assembly of yeast U6 snRNP in vitro, which occurs through a complex series of handoffs involving 10 proteins (Lhp1, Prp24, Usb1 and Lsm2-8) and anti-cooperative interactions between Prp24 and Lhp1. We propose a model for U6 snRNP assembly that explains how evolutionarily divergent and seemingly antagonistic proteins cooperate to protect and chaperone the nascent snRNA during its journey to the spliceosome.The mechanism of U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) biogenesis is not well understood. Here the authors characterize the enzymatic activities and structures of yeast and human U6 RNA processing enzyme Usb1, reconstitute post-transcriptional assembly of yeast U6 snRNP in vitro, and propose a model for U6 snRNP assembly.

  20. APOBEC3DE Inhibits LINE-1 Retrotransposition by Interacting with ORF1p and Influencing LINE Reverse Transcriptase Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizi Liang

    Full Text Available Human long interspersed elements 1 (LINE-1 or L1 is the only autonomous non-LTR retroelement in humans and has been associated with genome instability, inherited genetic diseases, and the development of cancer. Certain human APOBEC3 family proteins are known to have LINE-1 restriction activity. The mechanisms by which APOBEC3 affects LINE-1 retrotransposition are not all well characterized; here, we confirm that both A3B and A3DE have a strong ability to inhibit LINE-1 retrotransposition. A3DE interacts with LINE-1 ORF1p to target LINE-1 ribonucleoprotein particles in an RNA-dependent manner. Moreover, A3DE binds to LINE-1 RNA and ORF1 protein in cell culture system. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that A3DE co-localizes with ORF1p in cytoplasm. Furthermore, A3DE inhibits LINE-1 reverse transcriptase activity in LINE-1 ribonucleoprotein particles in a cytidine deaminase-independent manner. In contrast, A3B has less inhibitory effects on LINE-1 reverse transcriptase activity despite its strong inhibition of LINE-1 retrotransposition. This study demonstrates that different A3 proteins have been evolved to inhibit LINE-1 activity through distinct mechanisms.

  1. Viral Impact in Autoimmune Diseases: Expanding the “X Chromosome–Nucleolus Nexus” Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wesley H.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are suspected of significant roles in autoimmune diseases but the mechanisms are unclear. We get some insight by considering demands a virus places on host cells. Viruses not only require production of their own proteins, RNA and/or DNA, but also production of additional cellular machinery, such as ribosomes, to handle the increased demands. Since the nucleolus is a major site of RNA processing and ribonucleoprotein assembly, nucleoli are targeted by viruses, directly when viral RNA and proteins enter the nucleolus and indirectly when viruses induce increased expression of cellular polyamine genes. Polyamines are at high levels in nucleoli to assist in RNA folding. The size and activity of nucleoli increase directly with increases in polyamines. Nucleolar expansion due to abnormal increases in polyamines could disrupt nearby chromatin, such as the inactive X chromosome, leading to expression of previously sequestered DNA. Sudden expression of a large concentration of Alu elements from the disrupted inactive X can compete with RNA transcripts containing intronic Alu sequences that normally maintain nucleolar structural integrity. Such disruption of nucleolar activity can lead to misfolded RNAs, misassembled ribonucleoprotein complexes, and fragmentation of the nucleolus. Many autoantigens in lupus are, at least transiently, components of the nucleolus. Considering these effects of viruses, the “X chromosome–nucleolus nexus” hypothesis, which proposed disruption of the inactive X by the nucleolus during stress, is now expanded here to propose subsequent disruption of the nucleolus by previously sequestered Alu elements, which can fragment the nucleolus, leading to generation of autoantigens. PMID:29234321

  2. An in vivo genetic screen for genes involved in spliced leader trans-splicing indicates a crucial role for continuous de novo spliced leader RNP assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Lucas; Pandarakalam, George C; Fasimoye, Rotimi; Harrison, Neale; Connolly, Bernadette; Pettitt, Jonathan; Müller, Berndt

    2017-08-21

    Spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing is a critical element of gene expression in a number of eukaryotic groups. This process is arguably best understood in nematodes, where biochemical and molecular studies in Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum have identified key steps and factors involved. Despite this, the precise details of SL trans-splicing have yet to be elucidated. In part, this is because the systematic identification of the molecules involved has not previously been possible due to the lack of a specific phenotype associated with defects in this process. We present here a novel GFP-based reporter assay that can monitor SL1 trans-splicing in living C. elegans. Using this assay, we have identified mutants in sna-1 that are defective in SL trans-splicing, and demonstrate that reducing function of SNA-1, SNA-2 and SUT-1, proteins that associate with SL1 RNA and related SmY RNAs, impairs SL trans-splicing. We further demonstrate that the Sm proteins and pICln, SMN and Gemin5, which are involved in small nuclear ribonucleoprotein assembly, have an important role in SL trans-splicing. Taken together these results provide the first in vivo evidence for proteins involved in SL trans-splicing, and indicate that continuous replacement of SL ribonucleoproteins consumed during trans-splicing reactions is essential for effective trans-splicing. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortín, Juan, E-mail: jortin@cnb.csic.es [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC) and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (ISCIII), Madrid (Spain); Martín-Benito, Jaime, E-mail: jmartinb@cnb.csic.es [Department of Macromolecular Structures, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  4. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortín, Juan; Martín-Benito, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes

  5. Assessment of small RNA sorting into different extracellular fractions revealed by high-throughput sequencing of breast cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosar, Juan Pablo; Gámbaro, Fabiana; Sanguinetti, Julia; Bonilla, Braulio; Witwer, Kenneth W.; Cayota, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular communication can be mediated by extracellular small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs). Circulating sRNAs are being intensively studied for their promising use as minimally invasive disease biomarkers. To date, most attention is centered on exosomes and microRNAs as the vectors and the secreted species, respectively. However, this field would benefit from an increased understanding of the plethora of sRNAs secreted by different cell types in different extracellular fractions. It is still not clear if specific sRNAs are selected for secretion, or if sRNA secretion is mostly passive. We sequenced the intracellular sRNA content (19–60 nt) of breast epithelial cell lines (MCF-7 and MCF-10A) and compared it with extracellular fractions enriched in microvesicles, exosomes and ribonucleoprotein complexes. Our results are consistent with a non-selective secretion model for most microRNAs, although a few showed secretion patterns consistent with preferential secretion. On the contrary, 5′ tRNA halves and 5′ RNA Y4-derived fragments of 31–33 were greatly and significantly enriched in the extracellular space (even in non-mammary cell lines), where tRNA halves were detected as part of ∼45 kDa ribonucleoprotein complexes. Overall, we show that different sRNA families have characteristic secretion patterns and open the question of the role of these sRNAs in the extracellular space. PMID:25940616

  6. Aberrant Splicing of Estrogen Receptor, HER2, and CD44 Genes in Breast Cancer

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    Kazushi Inoue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most common cause of cancer-related death among women under the age of 50 years. Established biomarkers, such as hormone receptors (estrogen receptor [ER]/progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, play significant roles in the selection of patients for endocrine and trastuzumab therapies. However, the initial treatment response is often followed by tumor relapse with intrinsic resistance to the first-line therapy, so it has been expected to identify novel molecular markers to improve the survival and quality of life of patients. Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNAs is a ubiquitous and flexible mechanism for the control of gene expression in mammalian cells. It provides cells with the opportunity to create protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions from a single genomic locus. Aberrant alternative splicing is very common in cancer where emerging tumor cells take advantage of this flexibility to produce proteins that promote cell growth and survival. While a number of splicing alterations have been reported in human cancers, we focus on aberrant splicing of ER , HER2 , and CD44 genes from the viewpoint of BC development. ERα36 , a splice variant from the ER1 locus, governs nongenomic membrane signaling pathways triggered by estrogen and confers 4-hydroxytamoxifen resistance in BC therapy. The alternative spliced isoform of HER2 lacking exon 20 (Δ16HER2 has been reported in human BC; this isoform is associated with transforming ability than the wild-type HER2 and recapitulates the phenotypes of endocrine therapy-resistant BC. Although both CD44 splice isoforms ( CD44s , CD44v play essential roles in BC development, CD44v is more associated with those with favorable prognosis, such as luminal A subtype, while CD44s is linked to those with poor prognosis, such as HER2 or basal cell subtypes that are often metastatic. Hence, the detection of splice variants from these loci

  7. A statistical method for predicting splice variants between two groups of samples using GeneChip® expression array data

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    Olson James M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA results in RNA variants with combinations of selected exons. It is one of the essential biological functions and regulatory components in higher eukaryotic cells. Some of these variants are detectable with the Affymetrix GeneChip® that uses multiple oligonucleotide probes (i.e. probe set, since the target sequences for the multiple probes are adjacent within each gene. Hybridization intensity from a probe correlates with abundance of the corresponding transcript. Although the multiple-probe feature in the current GeneChip® was designed to assess expression values of individual genes, it also measures transcriptional abundance for a sub-region of a gene sequence. This additional capacity motivated us to develop a method to predict alternative splicing, taking advance of extensive repositories of GeneChip® gene expression array data. Results We developed a two-step approach to predict alternative splicing from GeneChip® data. First, we clustered the probes from a probe set into pseudo-exons based on similarity of probe intensities and physical adjacency. A pseudo-exon is defined as a sequence in the gene within which multiple probes have comparable probe intensity values. Second, for each pseudo-exon, we assessed the statistical significance of the difference in probe intensity between two groups of samples. Differentially expressed pseudo-exons are predicted to be alternatively spliced. We applied our method to empirical data generated from GeneChip® Hu6800 arrays, which include 7129 probe sets and twenty probes per probe set. The dataset consists of sixty-nine medulloblastoma (27 metastatic and 42 non-metastatic samples and four cerebellum samples as normal controls. We predicted that 577 genes would be alternatively spliced when we compared normal cerebellum samples to medulloblastomas, and predicted that thirteen genes would be alternatively spliced when we compared metastatic

  8. Crater Degradation on Mercury: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinczyk, M. J.; Byrne, P. K.; Prockter, L. M.; Susorney, H. C. M.; Chapman, C. R.; Barnouin, O. S.

    2017-12-01

    On geologic timescales, initially fresh craters are subjected to many weathering mechanisms. Whereas water and wind are, or were, effective erosive mechanisms such as on Earth and Mars, micrometeorite bombardment and modification due to subsequent impacts are the dominant processes that degrade craters and crater rays on airless bodies like the Moon and Mercury. Classifying craters based on their state of degradation can help determine the relative ages of landforms proximal to, and crosscut by, these craters. However, this method is most effective when used together with statistical analysis of crater distributions. Pre-MESSENGER degradation classification schemes lacked sufficient detail to be consistently applied to craters of various sizes and morphological types—despite evidence suggesting that the ejecta deposits of large basins persist much longer than those of smaller craters, for instance—yet broad assumptions have been made regarding the correlation of crater class to the planet's time-stratigraphic sequence. Moreover, previous efforts to categorize craters by degradation state have either been restricted to regional study sites or applied only to a subset of crater age or size. As a result, numerous interpretations of crater degradation state persist for Mercury, challenging a complete understanding of this process on the innermost planet. We report on the first global survey of crater degradation on Mercury. By modifying an established 5-class scheme, we have systematically applied a rigorous set of criteria to all craters ≥40 km in diameter on the planet. These criteria include the state and morphology of crater deposits separately (e.g., rim, floor, wall, ejecta) and degradation classes were assigned as the collection of these individual attributes. This approach yields a consistent classification of craters of different sizes. Our results provide the first comprehensive assessment of how craters of various states of degradation are distributed

  9. RNA polyadenylation sites on the genomes of microorganisms, animals, and plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Qing Li

    Full Text Available Pre-messenger RNA (mRNA 3'-end cleavage and subsequent polyadenylation strongly regulate gene expression. In comparison with the upstream or downstream motifs, relatively little is known about the feature differences of polyadenylation [poly(A] sites among major kingdoms. We suspect that the precise poly(A sites are very selective, and we therefore mapped mRNA poly(A sites on complete and nearly complete genomes using mRNA sequences available in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI Nucleotide database. In this paper, we describe the mRNA nucleotide [i.e., the poly(A tail attachment position] that is directly in attachment with the poly(A tail and the pre-mRNA nucleotide [i.e., the poly(A tail starting position] that corresponds to the first adenosine of the poly(A tail in the 29 most-mapped species (2 fungi, 2 protists, 18 animals, and 7 plants. The most representative pre-mRNA dinucleotides covering these two positions were UA, CA, and GA in 17, 10, and 2 of the species, respectively. The pre-mRNA nucleotide at the poly(A tail starting position was typically an adenosine [i.e., A-type poly(A sites], sometimes a uridine, and occasionally a cytidine or guanosine. The order was U>C>G at the attachment position but A>>U>C≥G at the starting position. However, in comparison with the mRNA nucleotide composition (base composition, the poly(A tail attachment position selected C over U in plants and both C and G over U in animals, in both A-type and non-A-type poly(A sites. Animals, dicot plants, and monocot plants had clear differences in C/G ratios at the poly(A tail attachment position of the non-A-type poly(A sites. This study of poly(A site evolution indicated that the two positions within poly(A sites had distinct nucleotide compositions and were different among kingdoms.

  10. The serological response of young dogs to the Flury LEP strain of rabies virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghomo, H O; Oduye, O O; Rupprecht, C E

    1990-01-01

    The serological response of puppies from Nigeria to live Flury low egg passage (LEP) rabies vaccine was determined. Two sets of puppies were used: one set from rabies-vaccinated bitches and another set from non-vaccinated bitches. Puppies were vaccinated intramuscularly with Flury LEP strain rabies vaccine and serially bled from the 4th week to the 30th week. Serum rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) were measured by a modified rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Puppies from non-vaccinated bitches responded well to vaccination after the 4th week and through to the 10th week of age, showing a progressive increase in VNA. In contrast, puppies from vaccinated bitches responded well to rabies vaccination only at 10 weeks of age, although detectable maternal rabies VNA and rabies anti-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) antibodies had decreased by 6 weeks post partum.

  11. Telomerase in lung cancer diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovkarova, E.; Stefanovski, T.; Dimov, A.; Naumovski, J.

    2003-01-01

    Background. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that looks after the telomeric cap of the linear chromosomes maintaining its length. It is over expressed in tumour tissues, but not in normal somatic cells. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the telomerase activity in lung cancer patients as novel marker for lung cancer detection evaluating the influence of tissue/cell obtaining technique. Material and methods. Using the TRAP (telomeric repeat amplification protocol), telomerase activity was determined in material obtained from bronchobiopsy (60 lung cancer patients compared with 20 controls) and washings from transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy performed in 10 patients with peripheral lung tumours. Results. Telomerase activity was detected in 75% of the lung cancer bronchobyopsies, and in 100% in transthoracic needle washings. Conclusions. Measurement of telomerase activity can contribute in fulfilling the diagnosis of lung masses and nodules suspected for lung cancer. (author)

  12. Modular architecture of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP revealed by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Katharina; Galani, Kyriaki; Batisse, Claire; Prinz, Simone; Böttcher, Bettina

    2012-04-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein enzymes, which process RNA substrates including tRNA precursors for RNase P and 5.8 S rRNA precursors, as well as some mRNAs, for RNase MRP. The structures of RNase P and RNase MRP have not yet been solved, so it is unclear how the proteins contribute to the structure of the complexes and how substrate specificity is determined. Using electron microscopy and image processing we show that eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP have a modular architecture, where proteins stabilize the RNA fold and contribute to cavities, channels and chambers between the modules. Such features are located at strategic positions for substrate recognition by shape and coordination of the cleaved-off sequence. These are also the sites of greatest difference between RNase P and RNase MRP, highlighting the importance of the adaptation of this region to the different substrates.

  13. Interactions of a Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer with the catalytic domain of RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Khanova, Elena; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Esakova, Olga; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-10-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a multicomponent ribonucleoprotein complex closely related to RNase P. RNase MRP and eukaryotic RNase P share most of their protein components, as well as multiple features of their catalytic RNA moieties, but have distinct substrate specificities. While RNase P is practically universally found in all three domains of life, RNase MRP is essential in eukaryotes. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP are poorly understood. Here, we show that Pop5 and Rpp1, protein components found in both RNase P and RNase MRP, form a heterodimer that binds directly to the conserved area of the putative catalytic domain of RNase MRP RNA. The Pop5/Rpp1 binding site corresponds to the protein binding site in bacterial RNase P RNA. Structural and evolutionary roles of the Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer in RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  14. Conserved and variable domains of RNase MRP RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila López, Marcela; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Samuelsson, Tore

    2009-01-01

    Ribonuclease MRP is a eukaryotic ribonucleoprotein complex consisting of one RNA molecule and 7-10 protein subunits. One important function of MRP is to catalyze an endonucleolytic cleavage during processing of rRNA precursors. RNase MRP is evolutionary related to RNase P which is critical for tRNA processing. A large number of MRP RNA sequences that now are available have been used to identify conserved primary and secondary structure features of the molecule. MRP RNA has structural features in common with P RNA such as a conserved catalytic core, but it also has unique features and is characterized by a domain highly variable between species. Information regarding primary and secondary structure features is of interest not only in basic studies of the function of MRP RNA, but also because mutations in the RNA give rise to human genetic diseases such as cartilage-hair hypoplasia.

  15. The role of hnRPUL1 involved in DNA damage response is related to PARP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehui Hong

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1 (hnRPUL1 -also known as adenovirus early region 1B-associated proteins 5 (E1B-AP5 - plays a role in RNA metabolism. Recently, hnRPUL1 has also been shown to be involved in DNA damage response, but the function of hnRPUL1 in response to DNA damage remains unclear. Here, we have demonstrated that hnRPUL1 is associated with PARP1 and recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs sites in a PARP1-mediated poly (ADP-ribosyl ation dependent manner. In turn, hnRPUL1 knockdown enhances the recruitment of PARP1 to DSBs sites. Specifically, we showed that hnRPUL1 is also implicated in the transcriptional regulation of PARP1 gene. Thus, we propose hnRPUL1 as a new component related to PARP1 in DNA damage response and repair.

  16. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2015-12-22

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system.

  17. hnRNP-U is a specific DNA-dependent protein kinase substrate phosphorylated in response to DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, Fredrik M.; Clarke, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA damage are orchestrated by the large phosphoinositol-3-kinase related kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK. We have developed a cell-free system to dissect the biochemical mechanisms of these kinases. Using this system, we identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U), also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), as a specific substrate for DNA-PK. We show that hnRNP-U is phosphorylated at Ser59 by DNA-PK in vitro and in cells in response to DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of hnRNP-U suggests novel functions for DNA-PK in the response to DNA damage.

  18. RNA-Seq reveals spliceosome and proteasome genes as most consistent transcripts in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Macrae

    Full Text Available Accurate quantification of gene expression by qRT-PCR relies on normalization against a consistently expressed control gene. However, control genes in common use often vary greatly between samples, especially in cancer. The advent of Next Generation Sequencing technology offers the possibility to better select control genes with the least cell to cell variability in steady state transcript levels. Here we analyze the transcriptomes of 55 leukemia samples to identify the most consistent genes. This list is enriched for components of the proteasome (ex. PSMA1 and spliceosome (ex. SF3B2, and also includes the translation initiation factor EIF4H, and many heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein genes (ex. HNRNPL. We have validated the consistency of our new control genes in 1933 cancer and normal tissues using publically available RNA-seq data, and their usefulness in qRT-PCR analysis is clearly demonstrated.

  19. Activation of autoreactive B cells by endogenous TLR7 and TLR3 RNA ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nathaniel M; Moody, Krishna-Sulayman; Debatis, Michelle; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann

    2012-11-16

    The key step in the activation of autoreactive B cells is the internalization of nucleic acid containing ligands and delivery of these ligands to the Toll-like Receptor (TLR) containing endolysosomal compartment. Ribonucleoproteins represent a large fraction of autoantigens in systemic autoimmune diseases. Here we demonstrate that many uridine-rich mammalian RNA sequences associated with common autoantigens effectively activate autoreactive B cells. Priming with type I IFN increased the magnitude of activation, and the range of which RNAs were stimulatory. A subset of RNAs that contain a high degree of self-complementarity also activated B cells through TLR3. For the RNA sequences that activated predominantly through TLR7, the activation is proportional to uridine-content, and more precisely defined by the frequency of specific uridine-containing motifs. These results identify parameters that define specific mammalian RNAs as ligands for TLRs.

  20. Yeast endoribonuclease stimulated by Novikoff Hepatoma small nuclear RNAS U1 and U2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.

    1982-01-01

    Using [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp[ 14 C]RNA-poly(A) from yeast as a substrate, an endoribonuclease has been detected in enzyme fractions derived from a high salt wash of ribonucleoprotein particles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp[ 14 C]RNA-poly(A) seems to be a preferred substrate since other polyribonucleotides are hydrolyzed more slowly, if at all. The enzyme is inhibited by ethidium bromide, but fully double-stranded polyribonucleotides are not hydrolyzed. The hydrolysis of [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp[ 14 C]RNA-poly(A) is stimulated about 2.5-fold by the addition of small nuclear RNAs U1 and U2 of Novikoff hepatoma cells. Results show that the stimulation involves an interaction of the labeled RNA with the small nuclear RNA

  1. Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin is Required for the Assembly of Viral Components Including Bundled vRNPs at the Lipid Raft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Takizawa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The influenza glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA, which are associated with the lipid raft, have the potential to initiate virion budding. However, the role of these viral proteins in infectious virion assembly is still unclear. In addition, it is not known how the viral ribonucleoprotein complex (vRNP is tethered to the budding site. Here, we show that HA is necessary for the efficient progeny virion production and vRNP packaging in the virion. We also found that the level of HA does not affect the bundling of the eight vRNP segments, despite reduced virion production. Detergent solubilization and a subsequent membrane flotation analysis indicated that the accumulation of nucleoprotein, viral polymerases, NA, and matrix protein 1 (M1 in the lipid raft fraction was delayed without HA. Based on our results, we inferred that HA plays a role in the accumulation of viral components, including bundled vRNPs, at the lipid raft.

  2. Internal ribosomal entry site-mediated translation is important for rhythmic PERIOD1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ha Lee

    Full Text Available The mouse PERIOD1 (mPER1 plays an important role in the maintenance of circadian rhythm. Translation of mPer1 is directed by both a cap-dependent process and cap-independent translation mediated by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES in the 5' untranslated region (UTR. Here, we compared mPer1 IRES activity with other cellular IRESs. We also found critical region in mPer1 5'UTR for heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein Q (HNRNPQ binding. Deletion of HNRNPQ binding region markedly decreased IRES activity and disrupted rhythmicity. A mathematical model also suggests that rhythmic IRES-dependent translation is a key process in mPER1 oscillation. The IRES-mediated translation of mPer1 will help define the post-transcriptional regulation of the core clock genes.

  3. Hormone response element binding proteins: novel regulators of vitamin D and estrogen signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S

    2011-03-01

    Insights from vitamin D-resistant New World primates and their human homologues as models of natural and pathological insensitivity to sterol/steroid action have uncovered a family of novel intracellular vitamin D and estrogen regulatory proteins involved in hormone action. The proteins, known as "vitamin D or estrogen response element-binding proteins", behave as potent cis-acting, transdominant regulators to inhibit steroid receptor binding to DNA response elements and is responsible for vitamin D and estrogen resistances. This set of interactors belongs to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) family of previously known pre-mRNA-interacting proteins. This review provides new insights into the mechanism by which these novel regulators of signaling and metabolism can act to regulate responses to vitamin D and estrogen. In addition the review also describes other molecules that are known to influence nuclear receptor signaling through interaction with hormone response elements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. RNA and Proteins: Mutual Respect [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen B. Hall

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA are often found in ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs, where they function in cellular processes to synthesize proteins (the ribosome, chemically modify RNAs (small nucleolar RNPs, splice pre-mRNAs (the spliceosome, and, on a larger scale, sequester RNAs, degrade them, or process them (P bodies, Cajal bodies, and nucleoli. Each RNA–protein interaction is a story in itself, as both molecules can change conformation, compete for binding sites, and regulate cellular functions. Recent studies of Xist long non-coding RNP, the U4/5/6 tri-small nuclear RNP complex, and an activated state of a spliceosome reveal new features of RNA interactions with proteins, and, although their stories are incomplete, they are already fascinating.

  5. The mechanism of vault opening from the high resolution structure of the N-terminal repeats of MVP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol-Audí, Jordi; Casañas, Arnau; Usón, Isabel; Luque, Daniel; Castón, José R; Fita, Ignasi; Verdaguer, Nuria

    2009-11-04

    Vaults are ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in a diversity of cellular processes, including multidrug resistance, transport mechanisms and signal transmission. The vault particle shows a barrel-shaped structure organized in two identical moieties, each consisting of 39 copies of the major vault protein MVP. Earlier data indicated that vault halves can dissociate at acidic pH. The crystal structure of the vault particle solved at 8 A resolution, together with the 2.1-A structure of the seven N-terminal domains (R1-R7) of MVP, reveal the interactions governing vault association and provide an explanation for a reversible dissociation induced by low pH. The structural comparison with the recently published 3.5 A model shows major discrepancies, both in the main chain tracing and in the side chain assignment of the two terminal domains R1 and R2.

  6. Detection of the Mr 110,000 lung resistance-related protein LRP/MVP with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeijers, A B; Scheffer, G L; Reurs, A W; Pijnenborg, A C; Abbondanza, C; Wiemer, E A; Scheper, R J

    2001-11-01

    The Mr 110,000 lung resistance-related protein (LRP), also termed the major vault protein (MVP), constitutes >70% of subcellular ribonucleoprotein particles called vaults. Overexpression of LRP/MVP and vaults has been linked directly to MDR in cancer cells. Clinically, LRP/MVP expression can be of value to predict response to chemotherapy and prognosis. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against LRP/MVP have played a critical role in determining the relevance of this protein in clinical drug resistance. We compared the applicability of the previously described MAbs LRP-56, LMR-5, LRP, 1027, 1032, and newly isolated MAbs MVP-9, MVP-16, MVP-18, and MVP-37 for the immunodetection of LRP/MVP by immunoblotting analysis and by immunocyto- and histochemistry. The availability of a broader panel of reagents for the specific and sensitive immunodetection of LRP/MVP should greatly facilitate biological and clinical studies of vault-related MDR.

  7. CrRNA-Protospacer Recognition during CRISPR- Directed DNA Interference Sulfolobus islandicus REY 15A and Structural Studies of CRISPR Binding Proteins (CBP) of Crenarchaeon Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousaei, Marzieh

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and associated proteins) is one of the important known immune mechanisms in archaea and bacteria. This adaptive immune system degrades invading genetic elements and protects the cell. Amongst 3 main types I, II and III...... of CRISPR system, two types (I and III) are found in archaea. However, in Sulfolobus species, subtypes IA, I-D, and III-B, III-D and rarely III-A are found. The model organism used for interference and structural studies is S. islandicus REY15A which carries subtypes I-A and III-B (α and β). Besides CRISPR...... ribonucleoprotein complex which is involved directly in defense, there are some less- known parts of the system including CPBs (CRISPR repeat-binding proteins) which are suggested to play a role in transcription. In the first part of my thesis, I provide a brief introduction to archaea and viruses that infect...

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a U2AF65 variant in complex with a polypyrimidine-tract analogue by use of protein engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sickmier, E. Allen; Frato, Katherine E.; Kielkopf, Clara L.

    2006-01-01

    A complex of the essential splicing factor U2AF 65 and a deoxyuridine oligonucleotide has been crystallized by modification of an interdomain linker. The large subunit of the essential pre-mRNA splicing factor U2 auxiliary factor (U2AF 65 ) binds the polypyrimidine tract near the 3′ splice site of pre-mRNA introns and directs the association of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U2 snRNP) of the spliceosome with the pre-mRNA. Protein engineering, in which the flexible linker region connecting tandem RNA-recognition motifs (RRMs) within the U2AF 65 RNA-binding domain was partially deleted, allowed successful crystallization of the protein–nucleic acid complex. Cocrystals of a U2AF 65 variant with a deoxyuridine dodecamer diffract X-rays to 2.9 Å resolution and contain one complex per asymmetric unit

  9. Specific in vitro cleavage of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus capsid protein: evidence for a potential role of retroviral protease in early stages of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumlova, Michaela; Ruml, Tomas; Pohl, Jan; Pichova, Iva

    2003-01-01

    Processing of Gag polyproteins by viral protease (PR) leads to reorganization of immature retroviral particles and formation of a ribonucleoprotein core. In some retroviruses, such as HIV and RSV, cleavage of a spacer peptide separating capsid and nucleocapsid proteins is essential for the core formation. We show here that no similar spacer peptide is present in the capsid-nucleocapsid (CA-NC) region of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) and that the CA protein is cleaved in vitro by the PR within the major homology region (MHR) and the NC protein in several sites at the N-terminus. The CA cleavage product was also identified shortly after penetration of M-PMV into COS cells, suggesting that the protease-catalyzed cleavage is involved in core disintegration

  10. Proteomic analysis of ACTN4-interacting proteins reveals it's a putative involvement in mRNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotin, Mikhail; Turoverova, Lidia; Aksenova, Vasilisa; Barlev, Nikolai; Borutinskaite, Veronika Viktorija; Vener, Alexander; Bajenova, Olga; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Pinaev, George P.; Tentler, Dmitri

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-actinin 4 (ACTN4) is an actin-binding protein. In the cytoplasm, ACTN4 participates in structural organisation of the cytoskeleton via cross-linking of actin filaments. Nuclear localisation of ACTN4 has also been reported, but no clear role in the nucleus has been established. In this report, we describe the identification of proteins associated with ACTN4 in the nucleus. A combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE) and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry revealed a large number of ACTN4-bound proteins that are involved in various aspects of mRNA processing and transport. The association of ACTN4 with different ribonucleoproteins suggests that a major function of nuclear ACTN4 may be regulation of mRNA metabolism and signaling.

  11. Identification of a linear epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed to the heterogeneous nucleoriboprotein A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tronstrøm, Julie; Dragborg, Anette H.; Hansen, Paul Robert

    2014-01-01

    to as RA33. In the absence of citrulline antibodies, RA33 antibodies have been suggested to be associated with a milder disease course. In this study we screened the reactivity of a monoclonal antibody to RA33-derived peptides by modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Terminally truncated......Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disorder, characterized by progressive joint destruction and disability. Classical autoantibodies of RA are rheumatoid factors and citrulline antibodies. Patients positive for these autoantibodies are usually associated with a progressive disease...... course. A subgroup of RA patients does not express citrulline antibodies, instead are approximately 35% of these anti-citrulline-negative patients reported to express autoantibodies to the heterogeneous nucleoriboprotein A2, a ribonucleoprotein involved in RNA transport and processing also referred...

  12. A yeast endoribonuclease stimulated by Novikoff hepatoma small nuclear RNAs U1 and U2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.

    1982-01-01

    Using [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp[ 14 C]RNA-poly(A) from yeast as a substrate, an endoribonuclease has been detected in enzyme fractions derived from a high salt wash of ribonucleoprotein particles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp[ 14 C]RNA-poly(A) seems to be a preferred substrate since other polyribonucleotides are hydrolyzed more slowly, if at all. The enzyme is inhibited by ethidium bromide, but fully double-stranded polyribonucleotides are not hydrolyzed. The hydrolysis of [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp[ 14 C]RNA-poly(A) is stimulated about 2.5-fold by the addition of small nuclear RNAs U1 and U2 of Novikoff hepatoma cells. Results show that the stimulation involves an interaction of the labeled RNA with the small nuclear RNA

  13. Generation of Recombinant Ebola Viruses Using Reverse Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groseth, Allison

    2017-01-01

    Reverse genetics systems encompass a wide array of tools aimed at recapitulating some or all of the virus life cycle. In their most complete form, full-length clone systems allow us to use plasmid-encoded versions of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components to initiate the transcription and replication of a plasmid-encoded version of the complete viral genome, thereby initiating the complete virus life cycle and resulting in infectious virus. As such this approach is ideal for the generation of tailor-made recombinant filoviruses, which can be used to study virus biology. In addition, the generation of tagged and particularly fluorescent or luminescent viruses can be applied as tools for both diagnostic applications and for screening to identify novel countermeasures. Here we describe the generation and basic characterization of recombinant Ebola viruses rescued from cloned cDNA using a T7-driven system.

  14. Crystal Structure of a CRISPR RNA-guided Surveillance Complex Bound to a ssDNA Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulepati, Sabin [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Heroux, Annie; Bailey, Scott [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-09-19

    In prokaryotes, RNA derived from type I and type III CRISPR loci direct large ribonucleoprotein complexes to destroy invading bacteriophage and plasmids. In Escherichia coli, this 405-kilodalton complex is called Cascade. We report the crystal structure of Cascade bound to a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) target at a resolution of 3.03 angstroms. The structure reveals that the CRISPR RNA and target strands do not form a double helix but instead adopt an underwound ribbon-like structure. This noncanonical structure is facilitated by rotation of every sixth nucleotide out of the RNA-DNA hybrid and is stabilized by the highly interlocked organization of protein subunits. These studies provide insight into both the assembly and the activity of this complex and suggest a mechanism to enforce fidelity of target binding.

  15. Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin is Required for the Assembly of Viral Components Including Bundled vRNPs at the Lipid Raft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Naoki; Momose, Fumitaka; Morikawa, Yuko; Nomoto, Akio

    2016-09-10

    The influenza glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), which are associated with the lipid raft, have the potential to initiate virion budding. However, the role of these viral proteins in infectious virion assembly is still unclear. In addition, it is not known how the viral ribonucleoprotein complex (vRNP) is tethered to the budding site. Here, we show that HA is necessary for the efficient progeny virion production and vRNP packaging in the virion. We also found that the level of HA does not affect the bundling of the eight vRNP segments, despite reduced virion production. Detergent solubilization and a subsequent membrane flotation analysis indicated that the accumulation of nucleoprotein, viral polymerases, NA, and matrix protein 1 (M1) in the lipid raft fraction was delayed without HA. Based on our results, we inferred that HA plays a role in the accumulation of viral components, including bundled vRNPs, at the lipid raft.

  16. High-Frequency Promoter Firing Links THO Complex Function to Heavy Chromatin Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouaikel, John; Causse, Sébastien Z; Rougemaille, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    The THO complex is involved in transcription, genome stability, and messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) formation, but its precise molecular function remains enigmatic. Under heat shock conditions, THO mutants accumulate large protein-DNA complexes that alter the chromatin density of target genes...... (heavy chromatin), defining a specific biochemical facet of THO function and a powerful tool of analysis. Here, we show that heavy chromatin distribution is dictated by gene boundaries and that the gene promoter is necessary and sufficient to convey THO sensitivity in these conditions. Single......-molecule fluorescence insitu hybridization measurements show that heavy chromatin formation correlates with an unusually high firing pace of the promoter with more than 20 transcription events per minute. Heavy chromatin formation closely follows the modulation of promoter firing and strongly correlates with polymerase...

  17. High-resolution autoradiography of nuclear modifications during and after heat treatment of neurospora crassa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ton-That, C.; Turian, G. (Geneva Univ. (Switzerland))

    1984-01-01

    The appearance of perinucleolar electron-dense spots in the nuclei of macroconidia of Neurospora crassa incubated at 46/sup 0/C and their disaggregation after shift-down to 25/sup 0/C have been investigated by high-resolution autoradiography after (5-/sup 3/H) uridine pulses with or without chase periods. The RNA of these ribonucleoprotein-rich dense spots has been found to originate mainly from the heat-sensitive nucleolus; after return to 25/sup 0/C, the nucleolar activity was recovered and the RNA material stored either in an unprocessed or a mature rRNA form in the dense spots was found to be progressively extruded into the cytoplasm.

  18. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  19. The genome editing revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Montoya, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    -Cas system has become the main tool for genome editing in many laboratories. Currently the targeted genome editing technology has been used in many fields and may be a possible approach for human gene therapy. Furthermore, it can also be used to modifying the genomes of model organisms for studying human......In the last 10 years, we have witnessed a blooming of targeted genome editing systems and applications. The area was revolutionized by the discovery and characterization of the transcription activator-like effector proteins, which are easier to engineer to target new DNA sequences than...... sequence). This ribonucleoprotein complex protects bacteria from invading DNAs, and it was adapted to be used in genome editing. The CRISPR ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecule guides to the specific DNA site the Cas9 nuclease to cleave the DNA target. Two years and more than 1000 publications later, the CRISPR...

  20. Interaction of influenza virus proteins with nucleosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Robles, Inmaculada; Akarsu, Hatice; Mueller, Christoph W.; Ruigrok, Rob W.H.; Baudin, Florence

    2005-01-01

    During influenza virus infection, transcription and replication of the viral RNA take place in the cell nucleus. Directly after entry in the nucleus the viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs, the viral subunits containing vRNA, nucleoprotein and the viral polymerase) are tightly associated with the nuclear matrix. Here, we have analysed the binding of RNPs, M1 and NS2/NEP proteins to purified nucleosomes, reconstituted histone octamers and purified single histones. RNPs and M1 both bind to the chromatin components but at two different sites, RNP to the histone tails and M1 to the globular domain of the histone octamer. NS2/NEP did not bind to nucleosomes at all. The possible consequences of these findings for nuclear release of newly made RNPs and for other processes during the infection cycle are discussed

  1. Identification of an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that binds to tomato mosaic virus genomic RNA and inhibits its multiplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisaki, Koki; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    The genomic RNAs of positive-strand RNA viruses carry RNA elements that play positive, or in some cases, negative roles in virus multiplication by interacting with viral and cellular proteins. In this study, we purified Arabidopsis thaliana proteins that specifically bind to 5' or 3' terminal regions of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) genomic RNA, which contain important regulatory elements for translation and RNA replication, and identified these proteins by mass spectrometry analyses. One of these host proteins, named BTR1, harbored three heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K-homology RNA-binding domains and preferentially bound to RNA fragments that contained a sequence around the initiation codon of the 130K and 180K replication protein genes. The knockout and overexpression of BTR1 specifically enhanced and inhibited, respectively, ToMV multiplication in inoculated A. thaliana leaves, while such effect was hardly detectable in protoplasts. These results suggest that BTR1 negatively regulates the local spread of ToMV

  2. NEDDylation promotes stress granule assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, Aravinth Kumar; Sanchez, Anthony; Park, Ra Young; Yoon, Sang Pil; Kang, Gum-Yong; Baek, Je-Hyun; Anderson, Paul; Kee, Younghoon; Ohn, Takbum

    2016-07-06

    Stress granules (SGs) harbour translationally stalled messenger ribonucleoproteins and play important roles in regulating gene expression and cell fate. Here we show that neddylation promotes SG assembly in response to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. Inhibition or depletion of key components of the neddylation machinery concomitantly inhibits stress-induced polysome disassembly and SG assembly. Affinity purification and subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of Nedd8-conjugated proteins from translationally stalled ribosomal fractions identified ribosomal proteins, translation factors and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), including SRSF3, a previously known SG regulator. We show that SRSF3 is selectively neddylated at Lys85 in response to arsenite. A non-neddylatable SRSF3 (K85R) mutant do not prevent arsenite-induced polysome disassembly, but fails to support the SG assembly, suggesting that the neddylation pathway plays an important role in SG assembly.

  3. Computational Investigations of Post-Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Horskjær

    and miRNA regulation was studied by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) and RBP double knockdown experiments. A comprehensive analysis of 107 CLIP datasets of 49 RBPs demonstrated that RBPs modulate miRNA regulation. Results suggest it is mediated by RBP-binding hotspots that likely...... investigated using high-throughput data. Analysis of IMP RIP-seq, iCLIP and RNA-seq datasets identified transcripts associated with cytoplasmic IMP ribonucleoproteins. Many of these transcripts were functionally involved in actin cytoskeletal remodeling. Further analyses of this data permitted estimation...... of a bipartite motif, composed of an AU-rich and a CA-rich domain. In addition, a regulatory motif discovery method was developed and applied to identify motifs using differential expression data and CLIP-data in the above investigations. This thesis increased the understanding of the role of RBPs in mi...

  4. Optimization of the southern electrophoretic transfer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, M.A.; Fujimura, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of separating DNA fragments using agarose gel electrophoresis is essential in the analysis of nucleic acids. Further, after the method of transferring specific DNA fragments from those agarose gels to cellulose nitrate membranes was developed in 1975, a method was developed to transfer DNA, RNA, protein and ribonucleoprotein particles from various gels onto diazobenzyloxymethyl (DBM) paper using electrophoresis as well. This paper describes the optimum conditions for quantitative electrophoretic transfer of DNA onto nylon membranes. This method exemplifies the ability to hybridize the membrane more than once with specific RNA probes by providing sufficient retention of the DNA. Furthermore, the intrinsic properties of the nylon membrane allow for an increase in the efficiency and resolution of transfer while using somewhat harsh alkaline conditions. The use of alkaline conditions is of critical importance since we can now denature the DNA during transfer and thus only a short pre-treatment in acid is required for depurination. 9 refs., 7 figs

  5. Structure of the Hantavirus Nucleoprotein Provides Insights into the Mechanism of RNA Encapsidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are etiological agents of life-threatening hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. The nucleoprotein (N of hantavirus is essential for viral transcription and replication, thus representing an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. We have determined the crystal structure of hantavirus N to 3.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals a two-lobed, mostly α-helical structure that is distantly related to that of orthobunyavirus Ns. A basic RNA binding pocket is located at the intersection between the two lobes. We provide evidence that oligomerization is mediated by amino- and C-terminal arms that bind to the adjacent monomers. Based on these findings, we suggest a model for the oligomeric ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex. Our structure provides mechanistic insights into RNA encapsidation in the genus Hantavirus and constitutes a template for drug discovery efforts aimed at combating hantavirus infections.

  6. Making RISC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Tomoko; Tomari, Yukihide

    2010-07-01

    It is well established that 20- to 30-nt small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs, microRNAs and Piwi-interacting RNAs, play crucial roles in regulating gene expression and control a surprisingly diverse array of biological processes. These small RNAs cannot work alone: they must form effector ribonucleoprotein complexes - RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) - to exert their function. Thus, RISC assembly is a key process in small RNA-mediated silencing. Recent biochemical analyses of RISC assembly, together with new structural studies of Argonaute, the core protein component of RISC, suggest a revised view of how mature RISC, which contains single-stranded guide RNA, is built from small RNAs that are born double-stranded. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Human proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA and their responses to oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Fujikane, Aya; Ito, Riyoko; Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → We performed comprehensive survey for proteins that bind to oxidized RNA. → HNRNPD and HNRNPC proteins were identified as oxidized RNA binding proteins. → Knockdown of HNRNPD/C expression caused increased sensitivity to H 2 O 2 . → Amounts of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to H 2 O 2 . -- Abstract: Exposure of cells to oxygen radicals damage various biologically important molecules. Among the oxidized bases produced in nucleic acids, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoguanine) is particularly important since it causes base mispairing. To ensure accurate gene expression, organisms must have a mechanism to discriminate 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from normal transcripts. We searched for proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from human HeLa cell extracts, and the candidate proteins were identified using mass spectrometry. Among the identified candidates, splicing isoform 1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0 (HNRNPD) and splicing isoform C1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (HNRNPC) exhibited strong abilities to bind to oxidized RNA. The amount of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, an agent that enhances oxidative stress. Moreover, the suppression of HNRNPD expression by siRNA caused cells to exhibit an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. The application of siRNA against HNRNPC also caused an increase in sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Since no additive effect was observed with a combined addition of siRNAs for HNRNPD and HNRNPC, we concluded that the two proteins may function in the same mechanism for the accurate gene expression.

  8. Localization of SERBP1 in stress granules and nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Jen; Wei, Hung-Ming; Chen, Ling-Yun; Li, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    SERPINE1 mRNA-binding protein 1 (SERBP1) is an arginine-methylated RNA-binding protein whose modification affects protein interaction and intracellular localization. In the present study, we show that, under normal growth conditions without stress, SERBP1 interacts with arginine-methylated and stress granule-associated proteins such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1, fragile X mental retardation protein and fragile X mental retardation syndrome-related protein 1 in an RNA-dependent manner. We also show that, after arsenite treatment, a proportion of full-length SERBP1 protein co-localizes with the typical stress granule marker T-cell intracellular antigen-1 in the cytoplasmic stress granules. Truncated SERBP1 with an N-terminal, central RG or C-terminal deletion, or single-domain segments comprising the N-terminal, central or C-terminal region, were recruited to stress granules upon arsenite treatment but with reduced efficiency. In addition, upon arsenite treatment, the localization of SERBP1 changed from a diffuse cytoplasmic localization to nuclear-dominant (concentrated in the nucleolus) A similar distribution was observed when cells were treated with the methylation inhibitor adenosine periodate, and was also detected for N- or C-terminal domain deletions and all three single-domain fragments even without stress induction. We further demonstrate that adenosine periodate treatment delays the association/dissociation of SERBP1 with stress granules. Hypomethylation retains SERBP1 in the nucleus/nucleolus regardless of arsenite treatment. Our study indicates that arginine methylation is correlated with recruitment of SERBP to stress granules and nucleoli and its retention therein. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an RNA-binding protein that is shifted simultaneously to cytoplasmic stress granules and nucleoli, two ribonucleoprotein-enriched subcellular compartments, upon stress. © 2013 FEBS.

  9. Identification of Methylosome Components as Negative Regulators of Plant Immunity Using Chemical Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuai; Balgi, Aruna; Pan, Yaping; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaoran; Du, Lilin; Zhou, Ming; Roberge, Michel; Li, Xin

    2016-12-05

    Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins serve as immune receptors in both plants and animals. To identify components required for NLR-mediated immunity, we designed and carried out a chemical genetics screen to search for small molecules that can alter immune responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. From 13 600 compounds, we identified Ro 8-4304 that was able to specifically suppress the severe autoimmune phenotypes of chs3-2D (chilling sensitive 3, 2D), including the arrested growth morphology and heightened PR (Pathogenesis Related) gene expression. Further, six Ro 8-4304 insensitive mutants were uncovered from the Ro 8-4304-insensitive mutant (rim) screen using a mutagenized chs3-2D population. Positional cloning revealed that rim1 encodes an allele of AtICln (I, currents; Cl, chloride; n, nucleotide). Genetic and biochemical analysis demonstrated that AtICln is in the same protein complex with the methylosome components small nuclear ribonucleoprotein D3b (SmD3b) and protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), which are required for the biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) involved in mRNA splicing. Double mutant analysis revealed that SmD3b is also involved in the sensitivity to Ro 8-4304, and the prmt5-1 chs3-2D double mutant is lethal. Loss of AtICln, SmD3b, or PRMT5 function results in enhanced disease resistance against the virulent oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Noco2, suggesting that mRNA splicing plays a previously unknown negative role in plant immunity. The successful implementation of a high-throughput chemical genetic screen and the identification of a small-molecule compound affecting plant immunity indicate that chemical genetics is a powerful tool to study whole-organism plant defense pathways. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. RNA-Seq of the nucleolus reveals abundant SNORD44-derived small RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyan Bai

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs represent RNA species that are not translated to proteins, but which have diverse and broad functional activities in physiological and pathophysiological states. The knowledge of these small RNAs is rapidly expanding in part through the use of massive parallel (deep sequencing efforts. We present here the first deep sequencing of small RNomes in subcellular compartments with particular emphasis on small RNAs (sRNA associated with the nucleolus. The vast majority of the cellular, cytoplasmic and nuclear sRNAs were identified as miRNAs. In contrast, the nucleolar sRNAs had a unique size distribution consisting of 19-20 and 25 nt RNAs, which were predominantly composed of small snoRNA-derived box C/D RNAs (termed as sdRNA. Sequences from 47 sdRNAs were identified, which mapped to both 5' and 3' ends of the snoRNAs, and retained conserved box C or D motifs. SdRNA reads mapping to SNORD44 comprised 74% of all nucleolar sdRNAs, and were confirmed by Northern blotting as comprising both 20 and 25 nt RNAs. A novel 120 nt SNORD44 form was also identified. The expression of the SNORD44 sdRNA and 120 nt form was independent of Dicer/Drosha-mediated processing pathways but was dependent on the box C/D snoRNP proteins/sno-ribonucleoproteins fibrillarin and NOP58. The 120 nt SNORD44-derived RNA bound to fibrillarin suggesting that C/D sno-ribonucleoproteins are involved in regulating the stability or processing of SNORD44. This study reveals sRNA cell-compartment specific expression and the distinctive unique composition of the nucleolar sRNAs.

  11. Ribonucleocapsid Formation of SARS-COV Through Molecular Action of the N-Terminal Domain of N Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, K.S.; Joseph, J.S.; Subramanian, V.; Neuman, B.W.; Buchmeier, M.J.; Stevens, R.C.; Kuhn, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-12

    Conserved amongst all coronaviruses are four structural proteins, the matrix (M), small envelope (E) and spike (S) that are embedded in the viral membrane and the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), which exists in a ribonucleoprotein complex in their lumen. The N terminal domain of coronaviral N proteins (N-NTD) provides a scaffold for RNA binding while the C-terminal domain (N-CTD) mainly acts as oligomerization modules during assembly. The C-terminus of N protein anchors it to the viral membrane by associating with M protein. We characterized the structures of N-NTD from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in two crystal forms, at 1.17A (monoclinic) and 1.85 A (cubic) respectively, solved by molecular replacement using the homologous avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) structure. Flexible loops in the solution structure of SARS-CoV N-NTD are now shown to be well ordered around the beta-sheet core. The functionally important positively charged beta-hairpin protrudes out of the core and is oriented similar to that in the IBV N-NTD and is involved in crystal packing in the monoclinic form. In the cubic form, the monomers form trimeric units that stack in a helical array. Comparison of crystal packing of SARS-CoV and IBV N-NTDs suggest a common mode of RNA recognition, but probably associate differently in vivo during the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex. Electrostatic potential distribution on the surface of homology models of related coronaviral N-NTDs hints that they employ different modes of both RNA recognition as well as oligomeric assembly, perhaps explaining why their nucleocapsids have different morphologies.

  12. Plant RNA Regulatory Network and RNA Granules in Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina Mäkinen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression on mRNA level in eukaryotic cells includes translocation, translation, translational repression, storage, mRNA decay, RNA silencing, and nonsense-mediated decay. These processes are associated with various RNA-binding proteins and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes many of which are conserved across eukaryotes. Microscopically visible aggregations formed by ribonucleoprotein complexes are termed RNA granules. Stress granules where the translationally inactive mRNAs are stored and processing bodies where mRNA decay may occur present the most studied RNA granule types. Diverse RNP-granules are increasingly being assigned important roles in viral infections. Although the majority of the molecular level studies on the role of RNA granules in viral translation and replication have been conducted in mammalian systems, some studies link also plant virus infection to RNA granules. An increasing body of evidence indicates that plant viruses require components of stress granules and processing bodies for their replication and translation, but how extensively the cellular mRNA regulatory network is utilized by plant viruses has remained largely enigmatic. Antiviral RNA silencing, which is an important regulator of viral RNA stability and expression in plants, is commonly counteracted by viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Some of the RNA silencing suppressors localize to cellular RNA granules and have been proposed to carry out their suppression functions there. Moreover, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein-mediated virus resistance has been linked to enhanced processing body formation and translational repression of viral RNA. Many interesting questions relate to how the pathways of antiviral RNA silencing leading to viral RNA degradation and/or repression of translation, suppression of RNA silencing and viral RNA translation converge in plants and how different RNA granules and

  13. Structural and Functional Motifs in Influenza Virus RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Ferhadian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses (IAV are responsible for recurrent influenza epidemics and occasional devastating pandemics in humans and animals. They belong to the Orthomyxoviridae family and their genome consists of eight (- sense viral RNA (vRNA segments of different lengths coding for at least 11 viral proteins. A heterotrimeric polymerase complex is bound to the promoter consisting of the 13 5′-terminal and 12 3′-terminal nucleotides of each vRNA, while internal parts of the vRNAs are associated with multiple copies of the viral nucleoprotein (NP, thus forming ribonucleoproteins (vRNP. Transcription and replication of vRNAs result in viral mRNAs (vmRNAs and complementary RNAs (cRNAs, respectively. Complementary RNAs are the exact positive copies of vRNAs; they also form ribonucleoproteins (cRNPs and are intermediate templates in the vRNA amplification process. On the contrary, vmRNAs have a 5′ cap snatched from cellular mRNAs and a 3′ polyA tail, both gained by the viral polymerase complex. Hence, unlike vRNAs and cRNAs, vmRNAs do not have a terminal promoter able to recruit the viral polymerase. Furthermore, synthesis of at least two viral proteins requires vmRNA splicing. Except for extensive analysis of the viral promoter structure and function and a few, mostly bioinformatics, studies addressing the vRNA and vmRNA structure, structural studies of the influenza A vRNAs, cRNAs, and vmRNAs are still in their infancy. The recent crystal structures of the influenza polymerase heterotrimeric complex drastically improved our understanding of the replication and transcription processes. The vRNA structure has been mainly studied in vitro using RNA probing, but its structure has been very recently studied within native vRNPs using crosslinking and RNA probing coupled to next generation RNA sequencing. Concerning vmRNAs, most studies focused on the segment M and NS splice sites and several structures initially predicted by bioinformatics analysis

  14. Plant RNA Regulatory Network and RNA Granules in Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Kristiina; Lõhmus, Andres; Pollari, Maija

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression on mRNA level in eukaryotic cells includes translocation, translation, translational repression, storage, mRNA decay, RNA silencing, and nonsense-mediated decay. These processes are associated with various RNA-binding proteins and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes many of which are conserved across eukaryotes. Microscopically visible aggregations formed by ribonucleoprotein complexes are termed RNA granules. Stress granules where the translationally inactive mRNAs are stored and processing bodies where mRNA decay may occur present the most studied RNA granule types. Diverse RNP-granules are increasingly being assigned important roles in viral infections. Although the majority of the molecular level studies on the role of RNA granules in viral translation and replication have been conducted in mammalian systems, some studies link also plant virus infection to RNA granules. An increasing body of evidence indicates that plant viruses require components of stress granules and processing bodies for their replication and translation, but how extensively the cellular mRNA regulatory network is utilized by plant viruses has remained largely enigmatic. Antiviral RNA silencing, which is an important regulator of viral RNA stability and expression in plants, is commonly counteracted by viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Some of the RNA silencing suppressors localize to cellular RNA granules and have been proposed to carry out their suppression functions there. Moreover, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein-mediated virus resistance has been linked to enhanced processing body formation and translational repression of viral RNA. Many interesting questions relate to how the pathways of antiviral RNA silencing leading to viral RNA degradation and/or repression of translation, suppression of RNA silencing and viral RNA translation converge in plants and how different RNA granules and their individual

  15. Microvesicles derived from adult human bone marrow and tissue specific mesenchymal stem cells shuttle selected pattern of miRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Collino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs have been described as a new mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. MVs after internalization within target cells may deliver genetic information. Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and liver resident stem cells (HLSCs were shown to release MVs shuttling functional mRNAs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether MVs derived from MSCs and HLSCs contained selected micro-RNAs (miRNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MVs were isolated from MSCs and HLSCs. The presence in MVs of selected ribonucleoproteins involved in the traffic and stabilization of RNA was evaluated. We observed that MVs contained TIA, TIAR and HuR multifunctional proteins expressed in nuclei and stress granules, Stau1 and 2 implicated in the transport and stability of mRNA and Ago2 involved in miRNA transport and processing. RNA extracted from MVs and cells of origin was profiled for 365 known human mature miRNAs by real time PCR. Hierarchical clustering and similarity analysis of miRNAs showed 41 co-expressed miRNAs in MVs and cells. Some miRNAs were accumulated within MVs and absent in the cells after MV release; others were retained within the cells and not secreted in MVs. Gene ontology analysis of predicted and validated targets showed that the high expressed miRNAs in cells and MVs could be involved in multi-organ development, cell survival and differentiation. Few selected miRNAs shuttled by MVs were also associated with the immune system regulation. The highly expressed miRNAs in MVs were transferred to target cells after MV incorporation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that MVs contained ribonucleoproteins involved in the intracellular traffic of RNA and selected pattern of miRNAs, suggesting a dynamic regulation of RNA compartmentalization in MVs. The observation that MV-highly expressed miRNAs were transferred to target cells, rises the possibility that the biological effect of stem

  16. Influenza polymerase encoding mRNAs utilize atypical mRNA nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sean; Bui, Steven; Perez, Veronica; Mohammad, Adeba; Medina-Ramirez, Hilario; Newcomb, Laura L

    2014-08-28

    Influenza is a segmented negative strand RNA virus. Each RNA segment is encapsulated by influenza nucleoprotein and bound by the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) to form viral ribonucleoproteins responsible for RNA synthesis in the nucleus of the host cell. Influenza transcription results in spliced mRNAs (M2 and NS2), intron-containing mRNAs (M1 and NS1), and intron-less mRNAs (HA, NA, NP, PB1, PB2, and PA), all of which undergo nuclear export into the cytoplasm for translation. Most cellular mRNA nuclear export is Nxf1-mediated, while select mRNAs utilize Crm1. Here we inhibited Nxf1 and Crm1 nuclear export prior to infection with influenza A/Udorn/307/1972(H3N2) virus and analyzed influenza intron-less mRNAs using cellular fractionation and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We examined direct interaction between Nxf1 and influenza intron-less mRNAs using immuno purification of Nxf1 and RT-PCR of associated RNA. Inhibition of Nxf1 resulted in less influenza intron-less mRNA export into the cytoplasm for HA and NA influenza mRNAs in both human embryonic kidney cell line (293 T) and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A549). However, in 293 T cells no change was observed for mRNAs encoding the components of the viral ribonucleoproteins; NP, PA, PB1, and PB2, while in A549 cells, only PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs, encoding the RdRP, remained unaffected; NP mRNA was reduced in the cytoplasm. In A549 cells NP, NA, HA, mRNAs were found associated with Nxf1 but PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs were not. Crm1 inhibition also resulted in no significant difference in PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNA nuclear export. These results further confirm Nxf1-mediated nuclear export is functional during the influenza life cycle and hijacked for select influenza mRNA nuclear export. We reveal a cell type difference for Nxf1-mediated nuclear export of influenza NP mRNA, a reminder that cell type can influence molecular mechanisms. Importantly, we

  17. Solution Structure of Pfu RPP21, a Component of the Archaeal RNase P Holoenzyme, and Interactions with its RPP29 Protein Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amero, Carlos D; Boomershine, William P; Xu, Yiren; Foster, Mark

    2009-01-01

    RNase P is the ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein metalloenzyme responsible for cleaving the 5′-leader sequence of precursor tRNAs during their maturation. While the RNA subunit is catalytically active on its own at high monovalent and divalent ion concentration, four proteins subunits are associated with archaeal RNase P activity in vivo: RPP21, RPP29, RPP30 and POP5. These proteins have been shown to function in pairs: RPP21-RPP29 and POP5-RPP30. We have determined the solution structure of RPP21 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) using conventional and paramagnetic NMR techniques. Pfu RPP21 in solution consists of an unstructured N-terminus, two alpha helices, a zinc binding motif, and an unstructured C-terminus. Moreover, we have used chemical shift perturbations to characterize the interaction of RPP21 with Pfu RPP29. The data show that the primary contact with RPP29 is localized to the two helices of RPP21. This information represents a fundamental step towards understanding structure-function relationships of the archaeal RNase P holoenzyme. PMID:18922021

  18. Telomerase Activity in Chicken EmbryoFibroblast Cell Cultures Infected withMarek's Disease Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Tannock

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein, which adds telomeric repeats onto the 3’end of existing telomers at the end of chromosomes ineukaryotes. One hypothesis states that telomere length may function as a mitoticclock, therefore expression of telomerase activity in cancer cells may be a necessary and essential step for tumor development and progression.Methods:The detectability of telomerase activity in chicken embryofibroblast (CEF cells infected with different passages of Marek's disease virus(MDV was tested with the TRAPEZE® telomerase detection kit at passages14 (P14, P80/1 and P120 for the Woodland strain, and passage 9 (P9 for theMPF57 strain. Results:The results showed increased telomerase activity in MDV Woodlands strain at P14 and MPF57 strain at P9. Conclusion:Our results suggest that MDV-transformed cells at low passage are a suitable system for the study of telomerases in tumor developmentand for testing telomerase-inhibiting drugs.

  19. Nuclear targeting peptide scaffolds for lipofection of nondividing mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, A; Ranganathan, P; Diamond, S L

    1999-09-01

    Lipofection of nondividing cells is inefficient because much of the transfected DNA is retained in endosomes, and that which escapes to the cytoplasm enters the nucleus at low rates. To improve the final rate-limiting step of nuclear import, we conjugated a nonclassical nuclear localization signal (NLS) containing the M9 sequence of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1, to a cationic peptide scaffold derived from a scrambled sequence of the SV40 T-antigen consensus NLS (ScT). The ScT was added to improve DNA binding of the M9 sequence. Lipofection of confluent endothelium with plasmid complexed with the M9-ScT conjugate resulted in 83% transfection and a 63-fold increase in marker gene expression. The M9-ScT conjugate localized fluorescent plasmid into the nucleus of permeabilized cells, and addition of the nuclear pore blocker wheat germ agglutinin prevented nuclear import. This method of gene transfer may lead to viral- and lipid-free transfection of nondividing cells.

  20. Non-classical nuclear localization signal peptides for high efficiency lipofection of primary neurons and neuronal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H; Zhu, J; Maronski, M; Kotzbauer, P T; Lee, V M-Y; Dichter, M A; Diamond, S L

    2002-01-01

    Gene transfer into CNS is critical for potential therapeutic applications as well as for the study of the genetic basis of neural development and nerve function. Unfortunately, lipid-based gene transfer to CNS cells is extremely inefficient since the nucleus of these post-mitotic cells presents a significant barrier to transfection. We report the development of a simple and highly efficient lipofection method for primary embryonic rat hippocampal neurons (up to 25% transfection) that exploits the M9 sequence of the non-classical nuclear localization signal of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 for targeting beta(2)-karyopherin (transportin-1). M9-assistant lipofection resulted in 20-100-fold enhancement of transfection over lipofection alone for embryonic-derived retinal ganglion cells, rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, embryonic rat ventral mesencephalon neurons, as well as the clinically relevant human NT2 cells or retinoic acid-differentiated NT2 neurons. This technique can facilitate the implementation of promoter construct experiments in post-mitotic cells, stable transformant generation, and dominant-negative mutant expression techniques in CNS cells.

  1. quatre-quart1 is an indispensable U12 intron-containing gene that plays a crucial role in Arabidopsis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kyung Jin; Kim, Bo Mi; Lee, Kwanuk; Kang, Hunseung

    2017-05-17

    Despite increasing understanding of the importance of the splicing of U12-type introns in plant development, the key question of which U12 intron-containing genes are essential for plant development has not yet been explored. Here, we assessed the functional role of the quatre-quart1 (QQT1) gene, one of the ~230 U12 intron-containing genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of QQT1 in the U11/U12-31K small nuclear ribonucleoprotein mutant (31k) rescued the developmental-defect phenotypes of the 31k mutant, whereas the miRNA-mediated qqt1 knockdown mutants displayed severe defects in growth and development, including severely arrested stem growth, small size, and the formation of serrated leaves. The structures of the shoot apical meristems in the qqt1 mutants were abnormal and disordered. Identification of QQT1-interacting proteins via a yeast two-hybrid screening and a firefly luciferase complementation-imaging assay revealed that a variety of proteins, including many chloroplast-targeted proteins, interacted with QQT1. Importantly, the levels of chloroplast-targeted proteins in the chloroplast were reduced, and the chloroplast structure was abnormal in the qqt1 mutant. Collectively, these results provide clear evidence that QQT1 is an indispensable U12 intron-containing gene whose correct splicing is crucial for the normal development of Arabidopsis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  2. Characterization of MRP RNA-protein interactions within the perinucleolar compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Callie; Daily, Kelly; Nguyen, Van Trung; Wang, Chen; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Bensaude, Olivier; Huang, Sui

    2011-03-15

    The perinucleolar compartment (PNC) forms in cancer cells and is highly enriched with a subset of polymerase III RNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Here we report that PNC components mitochondrial RNA-processing (MRP) RNA, pyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), and CUG-binding protein (CUGBP) interact in vivo, as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down experiments. Glycerol gradient analyses show that this complex is large and sediments at a different fraction from known MRP RNA-containing complexes, the MRP ribonucleoprotein ribozyme and human telomerase reverse transcriptase. Tethering PNC components to a LacO locus recruits other PNC components, further confirming the in vivo interactions. These interactions are present both in PNC-containing and -lacking cells. High-resolution localization analyses demonstrate that MRP RNA, CUGBP, and PTB colocalize at the PNC as a reticulated network, intertwining with newly synthesized RNA. Furthermore, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-PTB and GFP-CUGBP show a slower rate of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching at the PNC than in the nucleoplasm, illustrating the different molecular interaction of the complexes associated with the PNC. These findings support a working model in which the MRP RNA-protein complex becomes nucleated at the PNC in cancer cells and may play a role in gene expression regulation at the DNA locus that associates with the PNC.

  3. RNase MRP cleaves pre-tRNASer-Met in the tRNA maturation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuichiro; Takeda, Jun; Adachi, Kousuke; Nobe, Yuko; Kobayashi, Junya; Hirota, Kouji; Oliveira, Douglas V; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) is a multifunctional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is involved in the maturation of various types of RNA including ribosomal RNA. RNase MRP consists of a potential catalytic RNA and several protein components, all of which are required for cell viability. We show here that the temperature-sensitive mutant of rmp1, the gene for a unique protein component of RNase MRP, accumulates the dimeric tRNA precursor, pre-tRNA(Ser-Met). To examine whether RNase MRP mediates tRNA maturation, we purified the RNase MRP holoenzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found that the enzyme directly and selectively cleaves pre-tRNA(Ser-Met), suggesting that RNase MRP participates in the maturation of specific tRNA in vivo. In addition, mass spectrometry-based ribonucleoproteomic analysis demonstrated that this RNase MRP consists of one RNA molecule and 11 protein components, including a previously unknown component Rpl701. Notably, limited nucleolysis of RNase MRP generated an active catalytic core consisting of partial mrp1 RNA fragments, which constitute "Domain 1" in the secondary structure of RNase MRP, and 8 proteins. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the structure and function of RNase MRP.

  4. Footprinting analysis of interactions between the largest eukaryotic RNase P/MRP protein Pop1 and RNase P/MRP RNA components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Robert D; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2015-09-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related catalytic ribonucleoproteins involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules, including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. The catalytic RNA component of eukaryotic RNase P retains the core elements of the bacterial RNase P ribozyme; however, the peripheral RNA elements responsible for the stabilization of the global architecture are largely absent in the eukaryotic enzyme. At the same time, the protein makeup of eukaryotic RNase P is considerably more complex than that of the bacterial RNase P. RNase MRP, an essential and ubiquitous eukaryotic enzyme, has a structural organization resembling that of eukaryotic RNase P, and the two enzymes share most of their protein components. Here, we present the results of the analysis of interactions between the largest protein component of yeast RNases P/MRP, Pop1, and the RNA moieties of the enzymes, discuss structural implications of the results, and suggest that Pop1 plays the role of a scaffold for the stabilization of the global architecture of eukaryotic RNase P RNA, substituting for the network of RNA-RNA tertiary interactions that maintain the global RNA structure in bacterial RNase P. © 2015 Fagerlund et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Targeted CRISPR disruption reveals a role for RNase MRP RNA in human preribosomal RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    MRP RNA is an abundant, essential noncoding RNA whose functions have been proposed in yeast but are incompletely understood in humans. Mutations in the genomic locus for MRP RNA cause pleiotropic human diseases, including cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH). Here we applied CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to disrupt the endogenous human MRP RNA locus, thereby attaining what has eluded RNAi and RNase H experiments: elimination of MRP RNA in the majority of cells. The resulting accumulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor-analyzed by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), Northern blots, and RNA sequencing-implicates MRP RNA in pre-rRNA processing. Amelioration of pre-rRNA imbalance is achieved through rescue of MRP RNA levels by ectopic expression. Furthermore, affinity-purified MRP ribonucleoprotein (RNP) from HeLa cells cleaves the human pre-rRNA in vitro at at least one site used in cells, while RNP isolated from cells with CRISPR-edited MRP loci loses this activity, and ectopic MRP RNA expression restores cleavage activity. Thus, a role for RNase MRP in human pre-rRNA processing is established. As demonstrated here, targeted CRISPR disruption is a valuable tool for functional studies of essential noncoding RNAs that are resistant to RNAi and RNase H-based degradation. © 2017 Goldfarb and Cech; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Characterization of MRP RNA–protein interactions within the perinucleolar compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Callie; Daily, Kelly; Nguyen, Van Trung; Wang, Chen; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Bensaude, Olivier; Huang, Sui

    2011-01-01

    The perinucleolar compartment (PNC) forms in cancer cells and is highly enriched with a subset of polymerase III RNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Here we report that PNC components mitochondrial RNA–processing (MRP) RNA, pyrimidine tract–binding protein (PTB), and CUG-binding protein (CUGBP) interact in vivo, as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down experiments. Glycerol gradient analyses show that this complex is large and sediments at a different fraction from known MRP RNA–containing complexes, the MRP ribonucleoprotein ribozyme and human telomerase reverse transcriptase. Tethering PNC components to a LacO locus recruits other PNC components, further confirming the in vivo interactions. These interactions are present both in PNC-containing and -lacking cells. High-resolution localization analyses demonstrate that MRP RNA, CUGBP, and PTB colocalize at the PNC as a reticulated network, intertwining with newly synthesized RNA. Furthermore, green fluorescent protein (GFP)–PTB and GFP-CUGBP show a slower rate of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching at the PNC than in the nucleoplasm, illustrating the different molecular interaction of the complexes associated with the PNC. These findings support a working model in which the MRP RNA–protein complex becomes nucleated at the PNC in cancer cells and may play a role in gene expression regulation at the DNA locus that associates with the PNC. PMID:21233287

  7. Long non-coding RNAs as regulators of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Marko; Lodish, Harvey F; Sun, Lei

    2015-03-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse group of RNAs that are often lineage-specific and that regulate multiple biological functions. Many are nuclear and are essential parts of ribonucleoprotein complexes that modify chromatin segments and establish active or repressive chromatin states; others are cytosolic and regulate the stability of mRNA or act as microRNA sponges. This Review summarizes the current knowledge of lncRNAs as regulators of the endocrine system, with a focus on the identification and mode of action of several endocrine-important lncRNAs. We highlight lncRNAs that have a role in the development and function of pancreatic β cells, white and brown adipose tissue, and other endocrine organs, and discuss the involvement of these molecules in endocrine dysfunction (for example, diabetes mellitus). We also address the associations of lncRNAs with nuclear receptors involved in major hormonal signalling pathways, such as estrogen and androgen receptors, and the relevance of these associations in certain endocrine cancers.

  8. Morphogenesis of the infectious HIV-1 virion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ichi eSakuragi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The virion of HIV-1 is spherical and viral glycoprotein spikes (gp120, gp41 protrude from its envelope. The characteristic cone-shaped core exists within the virion, caging the ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex, which is comprised of viral RNA, nucleocapsid (NC and viral enzymes. The HIV-1 virion is budded and released from the infected cell as an immature donut-shaped particle. During or immediately after release, viral protease (PR is activated and subsequently processes the viral structural protein Gag. Through this maturation process, virions acquire infectivity, but its mechanism and transition of morphology largely remain unclear. Recent technological advances in experimental devices and techniques have made it possible to closely dissect the viral production site on the cell, the exterior – or even the interior – of an individual virion, and many new aspects on virion morphology and maturation. In this manuscript, I review the morphogenesis of HIV-1 virions. I focus on several studies, including some of our recent findings, which examined virion formation and/or maturation processes. The story of novel compound, which inhibits virion maturation, and the importance of maturation research are also discussed.

  9. Differential requirement for the CD45 splicing regulator hnRNPLL for accumulation of NKT and conventional T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Yabas

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells represent an important regulatory T cell subset that develops in the thymus and contains immature (NK1.1(lo and mature (NK1.1(hi cell subsets. Here we show in mice that an inherited mutation in heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein L-like protein (hnRNPLL(thunder, that shortens the survival of conventional T cells, has no discernible effect on NKT cell development, homeostasis or effector function. Thus, Hnrpll deficiency effectively increases the NKT∶T cell ratio in the periphery. However, Hnrpll mutation disrupts CD45RA, RB and RC exon silencing of the Ptprc mRNA in both NKT and conventional T cells, and leads to a comparably dramatic shift to high molecular weight CD45 isoforms. In addition, Hnrpll mutation has a cell intrinsic effect on the expression of the developmentally regulated cell surface marker NK1.1 on NKT cells in the thymus and periphery but does not affect cell numbers. Therefore our results highlight both overlapping and divergent roles for hnRNPLL between conventional T cells and NKT cells. In both cell subsets it is required as a trans-acting factor to regulate alternative splicing of the Ptprc mRNA, but it is only required for survival of conventional T cells.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSB1 protein and its relationship to nucleolar RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, A Y; Clark, M W; Gilbert, M; Oehm, A; Campbell, J L

    1987-08-01

    To better define the function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSB1, an abundant single-stranded nucleic acid-binding protein, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the SSB1 gene and compared it with those of other proteins of known function. The amino acid sequence contains 293 amino acid residues and has an Mr of 32,853. There are several stretches of sequence characteristic of other eucaryotic single-stranded nucleic acid-binding proteins. At the amino terminus, residues 39 to 54 are highly homologous to a peptide in calf thymus UP1 and UP2 and a human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein. Residues 125 to 162 constitute a fivefold tandem repeat of the sequence RGGFRG, the composition of which suggests a nucleic acid-binding site. Near the C terminus, residues 233 to 245 are homologous to several RNA-binding proteins. Of 18 C-terminal residues, 10 are acidic, a characteristic of the procaryotic single-stranded DNA-binding proteins and eucaryotic DNA- and RNA-binding proteins. In addition, examination of the subcellular distribution of SSB1 by immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that SSB1 is a nuclear protein, predominantly located in the nucleolus. Sequence homologies and the nucleolar localization make it likely that SSB1 functions in RNA metabolism in vivo, although an additional role in DNA metabolism cannot be excluded.

  11. Depletion of TDP-43 affects Drosophila motoneurons terminal synapsis and locomotive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiguin, Fabian; Godena, Vinay K; Romano, Giulia; D'Ambrogio, Andrea; Klima, Raffaella; Baralle, Francisco E

    2009-05-19

    Pathological modifications in the highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein TDP-43 were recently associated to neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a late-onset disorder that affects predominantly motoneurons [Neumann, M. et al. (2006) Ubiquitinated TDP-43 in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Science 314, 130-133, Sreedharan, J. et al. (2008) TDP-43 mutations in familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Science 319, 1668-1672, Kabashi, E. et al. (2008) TARDBP mutations in individuals with sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Nat. Genet. 40, 572-574]. However, the function of TDP-43 in vivo is unknown and a possible direct role in neurodegeneration remains speculative. Here, we report that flies lacking Drosophila TDP-43 appeared externally normal but presented deficient locomotive behaviors, reduced life span and anatomical defects at the neuromuscular junctions. These phenotypes were rescued by expression of the human protein in a restricted group of neurons including motoneurons. Our results demonstrate the role of this protein in vivo and suggest an alternative explanation to ALS pathogenesis that may be more due to the lack of TDP 43 function than to the toxicity of the aggregates.

  12. Repercussion of mitochondria deformity induced by anti-Hsp90 drug 17AAG in human tumor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Vishal, Chaturvedi

    2011-06-07

    Inhibiting Hsp90 chaperone roles using 17AAG induces cytostasis or apoptosis in tumor cells through destabilization of several mutated cancer promoting proteins. Although mitochondria are central in deciding the fate of cells, 17AAG induced effects on tumor cell mitochondria were largely unknown. Here, we show that Hsp90 inhibition with 17AAG first affects mitochondrial integrity in different human tumor cells, neuroblastoma, cervical cancer and glial cells. Using human neuroblastoma tumor cells, we found the early effects associated with a change in mitochondrial membrane potential, elongation and engorgement of mitochondria because of an increased matrix vacuolization. These effects are specific to Hsp90 inhibition as other chemotherapeutic drugs did not induce similar mitochondrial deformity. Further, the effects are independent of oxidative damage and cytoarchitecture destabilization since cytoskeletal disruptors and mitochondrial metabolic inhibitors also do not induce similar deformity induced by 17AAG. The 1D PAGE LC MS/ MS mitochondrial proteome analysis of 17AAG treated human neuroblastoma cells showed a loss of 61% proteins from membrane, metabolic, chaperone and ribonucleoprotein families. About 31 unmapped protein IDs were identified from proteolytic processing map using Swiss-Prot accession number, and converted to the matching gene name searching the ExPASy proteomics server. Our studies display that Hsp90 inhibition effects at first embark on mitochondria of tumor cells and compromise mitochondrial integrity. the author(s), publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Ltd.

  13. DNA-PKcs phosphorylates hnRNP-A1 to facilitate the RPA-to-POT1 switch and telomere capping after replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jiangdong; Lin, Yu-Fen; Xu, Kangling; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Wang, Dong; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2015-07-13

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP-A1) has been implicated in telomere protection and telomerase activation. Recent evidence has further demonstrated that hnRNP-A1 plays a crucial role in maintaining newly replicated telomeric 3' overhangs and facilitating the switch from replication protein A (RPA) to protection of telomeres 1 (POT1). The role of hnRNP-A1 in telomere protection also involves DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), although the detailed regulation mechanism has not been clear. Here we report that hnRNP-A1 is phosphorylated by DNA-PKcs during the G2 and M phases and that DNA-PK-dependent hnRNP-A1 phosphorylation promotes the RPA-to-POT1 switch on telomeric single-stranded 3' overhangs. Consequently, in cells lacking hnRNP-A1 or DNA-PKcs-dependent hnRNP-A1 phosphorylation, impairment of the RPA-to-POT1 switch results in DNA damage response at telomeres during mitosis as well as induction of fragile telomeres. Taken together, our results indicate that DNA-PKcs-dependent hnRNP-A1 phosphorylation is critical for capping of the newly replicated telomeres and prevention of telomeric aberrations. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Production of Purified CasRNPs for Efficacious Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingeman, Emily; Jeans, Chris; Corn, Jacob E

    2017-10-02

    CRISPR-Cas systems have been harnessed as modular genome editing reagents for functional genomics and show promise to cure genetic diseases. Directed by a guide RNA, a Cas effector introduces a double stranded break in DNA and host cell DNA repair leads to the introduction of errors (e.g., to knockout a gene) or a programmed change. Introduction of a Cas effector and guide RNA as a purified Cas ribonucleoprotein complex (CasRNP) has recently emerged as a powerful approach to alter cell types and organisms. Not only does CasRNP editing exhibit increased efficacy and specificity, it avoids optimization and iteration of species-specific factors such as codon usage, promoters, and terminators. CasRNP editing has been rapidly adopted for research use in many contexts and is quickly becoming a popular method to edit primary cells for therapeutic application. This article describes how to make a Cas9 RNP and outlines its use for gene editing in human cells. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. An unusual presenting symptom of graves' disease: myalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, N; Perros, P

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old female patient presented with severe myalgia involving her proximal muscles for 3-4 weeks. She also reported mild thyrotoxic symptoms over the same time period. Examination revealed mild thyrotoxicosis, a moderate diffuse goiter and no eye signs. The clinical picture was dominated by muscle pain and tenderness involving mainly her proximal arms and legs, her calves and her fingers, requiring opiate analgesia. Muscle power and tendon reflexes were normal. Laboratory evaluation revealed undetectable serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with raised FT4, FT3 and positive TSH receptor antibodies. Treatment with carbimazole was started. Additional laboratory investigations were negative (inflammatory markers, creatine kinase and antibodies to antinuclear antibodies, gastric parietal cell, smooth muscle, mitochondrial, dsDNA, centromere, extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) ribonucleoprotein, ENA Sm, ENA Ro, ENA Anti-La, ENA Scl70, ENA Jo-1, anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor). Further assessment in the rheumatology clinic confirmed there was no small joint tenderness or loss of range of movement of her limbs, but widespread and profound muscle tenderness of the common extensors of the forearms, biceps, trapezius, calves and thighs. She was treated symptomatically with analgesic medication and continued on carbimazole. A month later she was euthyroid and her myalgia had resolved. Hyperthyroidism has a profound effect on skeletal muscle and often leads to myopathy. Severe myalgia in association with Graves' disease is rare and resolves with the restoration of euthyroidism.

  16. Assembly and breakdown of Cajal bodies in accessory nuclei of Hymenoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglarz, Mariusz K; Bilinski, Szczepan M; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2005-03-01

    In some species of insects, oocytes have vesicular organelles, termed accessory nuclei (ANs). The ANs form by budding off from the nuclear envelope of the oocyte and are filled with translucent matrix containing dense inclusions. One type of these inclusions contains coilin and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and is homologous to Cajal bodies. We describe the early events in the morphogenesis of Cajal bodies in the ANs (ANCBs) of the common wasp, Vespula germanica, and show that they contain survival of motor neurons (SMN) protein. We present evidence that in the wasp, ANCBs form by the gradual accumulation of aggregates composed of SMN and small nuclear RNAs. We also show that ANCBs break down and disperse within the ANs as the ANs, which initially surround the oocyte nucleus, localize to the oocyte cortex. The components of dispersed ANCBs are retained within ANs until the end of oogenesis, which suggests that their function may be required at the onset of embryonic development. Because the morphology and behavior of ANs and their Cajal body-like inclusions are conserved in two other hymenopteran species, these features might be characteristic of all hymenopterans.

  17. p53 inhibits CRISPR-Cas9 engineering in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihry, Robert J; Worringer, Kathleen A; Salick, Max R; Frias, Elizabeth; Ho, Daniel; Theriault, Kraig; Kommineni, Sravya; Chen, Julie; Sondey, Marie; Ye, Chaoyang; Randhawa, Ranjit; Kulkarni, Tripti; Yang, Zinger; McAllister, Gregory; Russ, Carsten; Reece-Hoyes, John; Forrester, William; Hoffman, Gregory R; Dolmetsch, Ricardo; Kaykas, Ajamete

    2018-06-11

    CRISPR/Cas9 has revolutionized our ability to engineer genomes and conduct genome-wide screens in human cells 1-3 . Whereas some cell types are amenable to genome engineering, genomes of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been difficult to engineer, with reduced efficiencies relative to tumour cell lines or mouse embryonic stem cells 3-13 . Here, using hPSC lines with stable integration of Cas9 or transient delivery of Cas9-ribonucleoproteins (RNPs), we achieved an average insertion or deletion (indel) efficiency greater than 80%. This high efficiency of indel generation revealed that double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by Cas9 are toxic and kill most hPSCs. In previous studies, the toxicity of Cas9 in hPSCs was less apparent because of low transfection efficiency and subsequently low DSB induction 3 . The toxic response to DSBs was P53/TP53-dependent, such that the efficiency of precise genome engineering in hPSCs with a wild-type P53 gene was severely reduced. Our results indicate that Cas9 toxicity creates an obstacle to the high-throughput use of CRISPR/Cas9 for genome engineering and screening in hPSCs. Moreover, as hPSCs can acquire P53 mutations 14 , cell replacement therapies using CRISPR/Cas9-enginereed hPSCs should proceed with caution, and such engineered hPSCs should be monitored for P53 function.

  18. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: ats-kawaguchi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Nagata, Kyosuke, E-mail: knagata@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2015-02-15

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network.

  19. Plasmid-free CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in Plasmodium falciparum confirms mutations conferring resistance to the dihydroisoquinolone clinical candidate SJ733.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily D Crawford

    Full Text Available Genetic manipulation of the deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum remains challenging, but the rise of CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing tools is increasing the feasibility of altering this parasite's genome in order to study its biology. Of particular interest is the investigation of drug targets and drug resistance mechanisms, which have major implications for fighting malaria. We present a new method for introducing drug resistance mutations in P. falciparum without the use of plasmids or the need for cloning homologous recombination templates. We demonstrate this method by introducing edits into the sodium efflux channel PfATP4 by transfection of a purified CRISPR/Cas9-guide RNA ribonucleoprotein complex and a 200-nucleotide single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (ssODN repair template. Analysis of whole genome sequencing data with the variant-finding program MinorityReport confirmed that only the intended edits were made, and growth inhibition assays confirmed that these mutations confer resistance to the antimalarial SJ733. The method described here is ideally suited for the introduction of mutations that confer a fitness advantage under selection conditions, and the novel finding that an ssODN can function as a repair template in P. falciparum could greatly simplify future editing attempts regardless of the nuclease used or the delivery method.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9 Based Genome Editing of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, C; Kiel, J A K W; Driessen, A J M; Bovenberg, R A L; Nygård, Y

    2016-07-15

    CRISPR/Cas9 based systems have emerged as versatile platforms for precision genome editing in a wide range of organisms. Here we have developed powerful CRISPR/Cas9 tools for marker-based and marker-free genome modifications in Penicillium chrysogenum, a model filamentous fungus and industrially relevant cell factory. The developed CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox is highly flexible and allows editing of new targets with minimal cloning efforts. The Cas9 protein and the sgRNA can be either delivered during transformation, as preassembled CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) or expressed from an AMA1 based plasmid within the cell. The direct delivery of the Cas9 protein with in vitro synthesized sgRNA to the cells allows for a transient method for genome engineering that may rapidly be applicable for other filamentous fungi. The expression of Cas9 from an AMA1 based vector was shown to be highly efficient for marker-free gene deletions.

  1. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network

  2. High-pressure applications in medicine and pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jerson L; Foguel, Debora; Suarez, Marisa; Gomes, Andre M O; Oliveira, Andrea C [Centro Nacional de Ressonancia Magnetica Nuclear, Departamento de Bioquimica Medica, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-590 (Brazil)

    2004-04-14

    High pressure has emerged as an important tool to tackle several problems in medicine and biotechnology. Misfolded proteins, aggregates and amyloids have been studied, which point toward the understanding of the protein misfolding diseases. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has also been used to dissociate non-amyloid aggregates and inclusion bodies. The diverse range of diseases that result from protein misfolding has made this theme an important research focus for pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The use of high pressure promises to contribute to identifying the mechanisms behind these defects and creating therapies against these diseases. High pressure has also been used to study viruses and other infectious agents for the purpose of sterilization and in the development of vaccines. Using pressure, we have detected the presence of a ribonucleoprotein intermediate, where the coat protein is partially unfolded but bound to RNA. These intermediates are potential targets for antiviral compounds. The ability of pressure to inactivate viruses, prions and bacteria has been evaluated with a view toward the applications of vaccine development and virus sterilization. Recent studies demonstrate that pressure causes virus inactivation while preserving the immunogenic properties. There is increasing evidence that a high-pressure cycle traps a virus in the 'fusion intermediate state', not infectious but highly immunogenic.

  3. Induction of a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease in mice by a common human anti-DNA idiotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendlovic, S.; Brocke, S.; Meshorer, A.; Mozes, E.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Bakimer, R.; Ben-Bassat, M.

    1988-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered to be the quintessential autoimmune disease. It has not been possible to induce SLE in animal models by DNA immunization or by challenge with anti-DNA antibodies. The authors report a murine model of SLE-like disease induced by immunization of C3H.SW female mice with a common human monoclonal anti-DNA idiotype (16/6 idiotype). Following a booster injection with the 16/6 idiotype, high levels of murine anti-16/6 and anti-anti-16/6 antibodies (associated with anti-DNA activity) were detected in the sera of the immunized mice. Elevated titers of autoantibodies reacting with DNA, poly(I), poly(dT), ribonucleoprotein, autoantigens [Sm, SS-A (Ro), and SS-B (La)], and cardiolipin were noted. The serological findings were associated with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, leukopenia, proteinuria, immune complex deposition in the glomerular mesangium, and sclerosis of the glomeruli. The immune complexes in the kidneys were shown to contain the 16/6 idiotype. This experimental SLE-like model may be used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying SLE

  4. [Polyadenylated RNA and mRNA export factors in extrachromosomal nuclear domains of vitellogenic oocytes of the insect Tenebrio molitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoliubov, D S; Kiselev, A M; Shabel'nikov, S V; Parfenov, V N

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus ofvitellogenic oocytes of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, contains a karyosphere that consists of the condensed chromatin embedded in an extrachromosomal fibrogranular material. Numerous nuclear bodies located freely in the nucleoplasm are also observed. Amongst these bodies, counterparts of nuclear speckles (= interchromatin granule clusters, IGCs) can be identified by the presence of the marker protein SC35. Microinjections of fluorescently tagged methyloligoribonucleotide probes 2'-O-Me(U)22, complementary to poly(A) tails of RNAs, revealed poly(A)+ RNA in the vast majority of IGCs. We found that all T. molitor oocyte IGCs contain heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) core protein Al that localizes to IGCs in an RNA-dependent manner. The extrachromosomal material of the karyosphere and a part of nucleoplasmic IGCs also contain the adapter protein Aly that is known to provide a link between pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA export. The essential mRNA export factor/receptor NXF1 was observed to colocalize with Aly. In nucleoplasmic IGCs, NXF1 was found to localize in an RNA-dependent manner whereas it is RNA-independently located in the extrachromosomal material of the karyosphere. We believe our data suggest on a role of the nucleoplasmic IGCs in mRNA biogenesis and retention in a road to nuclear export.

  5. Function and Regulation of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR / CRISPR Associated (Cas Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Fineran

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Phages are the most abundant biological entities on earth and pose a constant challenge to their bacterial hosts. Thus, bacteria have evolved numerous ‘innate’ mechanisms of defense against phage, such as abortive infection or restriction/modification systems. In contrast, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR systems provide acquired, yet heritable, sequence-specific ‘adaptive’ immunity against phage and other horizontally-acquired elements, such as plasmids. Resistance is acquired following viral infection or plasmid uptake when a short sequence of the foreign genome is added to the CRISPR array. CRISPRs are then transcribed and processed, generally by CRISPR associated (Cas proteins, into short interfering RNAs (crRNAs, which form part of a ribonucleoprotein complex. This complex guides the crRNA to the complementary invading nucleic acid and targets this for degradation. Recently, there have been rapid advances in our understanding of CRISPR/Cas systems. In this review, we will present the current model(s of the molecular events involved in both the acquisition of immunity and interference stages and will also address recent progress in our knowledge of the regulation of CRISPR/Cas systems.

  6. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Followed by CRIPSR/Cas9 Microinjection Results in Highly Efficient Genome Editing in Cloned Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Sheets

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The domestic pig is an ideal “dual purpose” animal model for agricultural and biomedical research. With the availability of genome editing tools such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR and associated nuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9, it is now possible to perform site-specific alterations with relative ease, and will likely help realize the potential of this valuable model. In this article, we investigated for the first time a combination of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT and direct injection of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoprotein complex targeting GRB10 into the reconstituted oocytes to generate GRB10 ablated Ossabaw fetuses. This strategy resulted in highly efficient (100% generation of biallelic modifications in cloned fetuses. By combining SCNT with CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection, genome edited animals can now be produced without the need to manage a founder herd, while simultaneously eliminating the need for laborious in vitro culture and screening. Our approach utilizes standard cloning techniques while simultaneously performing genome editing in the cloned zygotes of a large animal model for agriculture and biomedical applications.

  7. Directional R-Loop Formation by the CRISPR-Cas Surveillance Complex Cascade Provides Efficient Off-Target Site Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Rutkauskas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems provide bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity against foreign nucleic acids. In type I CRISPR-Cas systems, invading DNA is detected by a large ribonucleoprotein surveillance complex called Cascade. The crRNA component of Cascade is used to recognize target sites in foreign DNA (protospacers by formation of an R-loop driven by base-pairing complementarity. Using single-molecule supercoiling experiments with near base-pair resolution, we probe here the mechanism of R-loop formation and detect short-lived R-loop intermediates on off-target sites bearing single mismatches. We show that R-loops propagate directionally starting from the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM. Upon reaching a mismatch, R-loop propagation stalls and collapses in a length-dependent manner. This unambiguously demonstrates that directional zipping of the R-loop accomplishes efficient target recognition by rapidly rejecting binding to off-target sites with PAM-proximal mutations. R-loops that reach the protospacer end become locked to license DNA degradation by the auxiliary Cas3 nuclease/helicase without further target verification.

  8. Native tandem and ion mobility mass spectrometry highlight structural and modular similarities in clustered-regularly-interspaced shot-palindromic-repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein complexes from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Esther; Barbu, Ioana M; Barendregt, Arjan; Jore, Matthijs M; Wiedenheft, Blake; Lundgren, Magnus; Westra, Edze R; Brouns, Stan J J; Doudna, Jennifer A; van der Oost, John; Heck, Albert J R

    2012-11-01

    The CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) immune system of bacteria and archaea provides acquired resistance against viruses and plasmids, by a strategy analogous to RNA-interference. Key components of the defense system are ribonucleoprotein complexes, the composition of which appears highly variable in different CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Previous studies combined mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and small angle x-ray scattering to demonstrate that the E. coli Cascade complex (405 kDa) and the P. aeruginosa Csy-complex (350 kDa) are similar in that they share a central spiral-shaped hexameric structure, flanked by associating proteins and one CRISPR RNA. Recently, a cryo-electron microscopy structure of Cascade revealed that the CRISPR RNA molecule resides in a groove of the hexameric backbone. For both complexes we here describe the use of native mass spectrometry in combination with ion mobility mass spectrometry to assign a stable core surrounded by more loosely associated modules. Via computational modeling subcomplex structures were proposed that relate to the experimental IMMS data. Despite the absence of obvious sequence homology between several subunits, detailed analysis of sub-complexes strongly suggests analogy between subunits of the two complexes. Probing the specific association of E. coli Cascade/crRNA to its complementary DNA target reveals a conformational change. All together these findings provide relevant new information about the potential assembly process of the two CRISPR-associated complexes.

  9. The role of CRISPR-Cas systems in virulence of pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwen, Rogier; Staals, Raymond H J; Endtz, Hubert P; van Baarlen, Peter; van der Oost, John

    2014-03-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) genes are present in many bacterial and archaeal genomes. Since the discovery of the typical CRISPR loci in the 1980s, well before their physiological role was revealed, their variable sequences have been used as a complementary typing tool in diagnostic, epidemiologic, and evolutionary analyses of prokaryotic strains. The discovery that CRISPR spacers are often identical to sequence fragments of mobile genetic elements was a major breakthrough that eventually led to the elucidation of CRISPR-Cas as an adaptive immunity system. Key elements of this unique prokaryotic defense system are small CRISPR RNAs that guide nucleases to complementary target nucleic acids of invading viruses and plasmids, generally followed by the degradation of the invader. In addition, several recent studies have pointed at direct links of CRISPR-Cas to regulation of a range of stress-related phenomena. An interesting example concerns a pathogenic bacterium that possesses a CRISPR-associated ribonucleoprotein complex that may play a dual role in defense and/or virulence. In this review, we describe recently reported cases of potential involvement of CRISPR-Cas systems in bacterial stress responses in general and bacterial virulence in particular.

  10. Ultrastructural alterations of atrial myocardium induced by adriamycin in chronically treated animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertenghi-Deliliers, G; Zanon, P L; Pozzoli, E F; Bellini, O; Praga, C

    1978-02-28

    The clinical use of adriamycin (AM) is limited by a possible dose-dependent myocardiopathy. Severe lesions of ventricular myocardium widely described by electron microscopy have been correlated to irreversible congestive heart failure. On the other hand, the atrial contractile elements which differ from the ventricular ones because of the presence of the so-called specific granules have rarely been considered. In the work described in this paper, adriamycin was injected into rabbits and mice according to schedules of chronic toxicity. At the end of the treatment the atrial myocells presented diffuse ultrastructural lesions of mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum and myofibrillar bundles. These alterations might be caused by the ribonucleoprotein synthesis inhibition, by a direct drug toxicity or by an energetic crisis due to early mitochondrial lesions. Besides, adriamycin produces a decrease of the specific atrial granules that play a hypothetic role in the metabolism of myocardial cells. However, lack of information about the contents and the exact function of atrial granules does not allow us to conclude that their decrease in treated animals has a pathogenetic significance in myocardiopathy induced by adriamycin.

  11. Gemin5: A Multitasking RNA-Binding Protein Involved in Translation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Piñeiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gemin5 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP that was first identified as a peripheral component of the survival of motor neurons (SMN complex. This predominantly cytoplasmic protein recognises the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs through its WD repeat domains, allowing assembly of the SMN complex into small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs. Additionally, the amino-terminal end of the protein has been reported to possess cap-binding capacity and to interact with the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. Gemin5 was also shown to downregulate translation, to be a substrate of the picornavirus L protease and to interact with viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements via a bipartite non-canonical RNA-binding site located at its carboxy-terminal end. These features link Gemin5 with translation control events. Thus, beyond its role in snRNPs biogenesis, Gemin5 appears to be a multitasking protein cooperating in various RNA-guided processes. In this review, we will summarise current knowledge of Gemin5 functions. We will discuss the involvement of the protein on translation control and propose a model to explain how the proteolysis fragments of this RBP in picornavirus-infected cells could modulate protein synthesis.

  12. How do SMA-linked mutations of SMN1 lead to structural/functional deficiency of the SMA protein?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease with dysfunctional α-motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. SMA is caused by loss (∼95% of SMA cases or mutation (∼5% of SMA cases of the survival motor neuron 1 gene SMN1. As the product of SMN1, SMN is a component of the SMN complex, and is also involved in the biosynthesis of the small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, which play critical roles in pre-mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of SMA. To investigate how SMA-linked mutations of SMN1 lead to structural/functional deficiency of SMN, a set of computational analysis of SMN-related structures were conducted and are described in this article. Of extraordinary interest, the structural analysis highlights three SMN residues (Asp44, Glu134 and Gln136 with SMA-linked missense mutations, which cause disruptions of electrostatic interactions for Asp44, Glu134 and Gln136, and result in three functionally deficient SMA-linked SMN mutants, Asp44Val, Glu134Lys and Gln136Glu. From the computational analysis, it is also possible that SMN's Lys45 and Asp36 act as two electrostatic clips at the SMN-Gemin2 complex structure interface.

  13. Synthesis of a posterior indicator protein in normal embryos and double abdomens of Smittia sp. (Chironomidae, Diptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckle, H; Kalthoff, K

    1980-01-01

    In embryos of the chironomid midge Smittia, synthesis of a posterior indicator protein designated PI1 (Mr approximately 50,000; pI approximately 5.5) forecasts development of an abdomen as opposed to head and thorax. The protein is synthesized several hours before germ anlage formation. In normal embryos at early blastoderm stages, synthesis of PI1 is restricted to posterior embryonic fragments but not to pole cells. In "double-abdomen" embryos, a mirror-image duplication of the abdomen is formed by cells that would otherwise develop into head and thorax. Embryos were programmed for double-abdomen development by UV irradiation of the anterior pole, and half of them were reprogrammed for normal development by subsequent exposure to visible light (photoreversal). Correspondingly, PI1 was synthesized in anterior fragments of UV-irradiated embryos but not after photoreversal. In a control experiment, UV irradiation of the posterior pole caused neither double-abdomen formation nor PI1 synthesis in anterior fragments. The identity of PI1 formed in anterior fragments of prospective double abdomens with the protein found in posterior fragments was revealed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and limited proteolysis. Suppression of PI1 synthesis in anterior fragments of normal embryos is ascribed to the activity of cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles thought to act as anterior determinants. Images PMID:6935679

  14. Repression of hTERT transcription by the introduction of chromosome 3 into human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Sachiyo; Ohira, Takahito; Sunamura, Naohiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ryoke, Kazuo; Kugoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that maintains telomere length. Telomerase activity is primarily attributed to the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). It has been reported that introduction of an intact human chromosome 3 into the human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line HSC3 suppresses the tumorigenicity of these cells. However, the mechanisms that regulate tumorigenicity have not been elucidated. To determine whether this reduction in tumorigenicity was accompanied by a reduction in telomerase activity, we investigated the transcriptional activation of TERT in HSC3 microcell hybrid clones with an introduced human chromosome 3 (HSC3#3). HSC#3 cells showed inhibition of hTERT transcription compared to that of the parental HSC3 cells. Furthermore, cell fusion experiments showed that hybrids of HSC3 cells and cells of the RCC23 renal carcinoma cell line, which also exhibits suppression of TERT transcription by the introduction of human chromosome 3, also displayed suppressed TERT transcription. These results suggested that human chromosome 3 may carry functionally distinct, additional TERT repressor genes. - Highlights: • hTERT mRNA expression level decreased in the chromosome 3 introduced HSC3 clones. • hTERT mRNA expression level was tend to suppressed in HSC3 and RCC23 hybrid cells. • We provide evidence that human chromosome 3 carries at least two distinct hTERT regulatory factors.

  15. The AAA+ proteins Pontin and Reptin enter adult age: from understanding their basic biology to the identification of selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Pedro M; Baek, Sung Hee; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Dutta, Anindya; Houry, Walid A; Llorca, Oscar; Rosenbaum, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Pontin and Reptin are related partner proteins belonging to the AAA+ (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) family. They are implicated in multiple and seemingly unrelated processes encompassing the regulation of gene transcription, the remodeling of chromatin, DNA damage sensing and repair, and the assembly of protein and ribonucleoprotein complexes, among others. The 2nd International Workshop on Pontin and Reptin took place at the Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier in Oeiras, Portugal on October 10-12, 2014, and reported significant new advances on the mechanisms of action of these two AAA+ ATPases. The major points under discussion were related to the mechanisms through which these proteins regulate gene transcription, their roles as co-chaperones, and their involvement in pathophysiology, especially in cancer and ciliary biology and disease. Finally, they may become anticancer drug targets since small chemical inhibitors were shown to produce anti-tumor effects in animal models.

  16. Identification of pyrrolo[3,2-c]pyridin-4-amine compounds as a new class of entry inhibitors against influenza viruses in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, So Young; Cruz, Deu John M.; Ko, Yoonae; Min, Ji-Young

    2016-01-01

    Various influenza virus entry inhibitors are being developed as therapeutic antiviral agents in ongoing preparation for emerging influenza viruses, particularly those that may possess drug resistance to the current FDA-approved neuraminidase inhibitors. In this study, small molecules having the pyrrolopyridinamine (PPA), aminothiadiazole (ATD), dihydrofuropyridine carboxamide (HPC), or imidazopyridinamine (IPA) moiety were selected from a target-focused chemical library for their inhibitory activity against influenza A virus by high-throughput screening using the PR8GFP assay. Activity was evaluated by measuring changes the proportion of GFP-expressing cells as a reflection of influenza virus infection. Among them, PPA showed broad-spectrum activity against multiple influenza A viruses and influenza B virus. PPA was found to block the early stages of influenza virus infection using a time-of-addition assay. Using additional phenotypic assays that dissect the virus entry process, it appears that the antiviral activity of PPA against influenza virus can be attributed to interference of the post-fusion process: namely, virus uncoating and nuclear import of viral nucleoprotein complexes. Based on these results, PPA is an attractive chemical moiety that can be used to develop new antiviral drug candidates against influenza viruses. - Highlights: • Four chemical classes are identified from target-focused chemical library by HTS. • PPA inhibits the infection of various influenza A viruses and influenza B virus. • PPA is identified to inhibit the early stages of influenza virus infection. • PPA compound disrupts virus uncoating and nuclear import of viral ribonucleoprotein.

  17. KPNB1 mediates PER/CRY nuclear translocation and circadian clock function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yool; Jang, A Reum; Francey, Lauren J; Sehgal, Amita; Hogenesch, John B

    2015-08-29

    Regulated nuclear translocation of the PER/CRY repressor complex is critical for negative feedback regulation of the circadian clock of mammals. However, the precise molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report that KPNB1, an importin β component of the ncRNA repressor of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NRON) ribonucleoprotein complex, mediates nuclear translocation and repressor function of the PER/CRY complex. RNAi depletion of KPNB1 traps the PER/CRY complex in the cytoplasm by blocking nuclear entry of PER proteins in human cells. KPNB1 interacts mainly with PER proteins and directs PER/CRY nuclear transport in a circadian fashion. Interestingly, KPNB1 regulates the PER/CRY nuclear entry and repressor function, independently of importin α, its classical partner. Moreover, inducible inhibition of the conserved Drosophila importin β in lateral neurons abolishes behavioral rhythms in flies. Collectively, these data show that KPNB1 is required for timely nuclear import of PER/CRY in the negative feedback regulation of the circadian clock.

  18. Generation of Recombinant Polioviruses Harboring RNA Affinity Tags in the 5′ and 3′ Noncoding Regions of Genomic RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flather, Dylan; Cathcart, Andrea L.; Cruz, Casey; Baggs, Eric; Ngo, Tuan; Gershon, Paul D.; Semler, Bert L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being intensely studied for more than 50 years, a complete understanding of the enterovirus replication cycle remains elusive. Specifically, only a handful of cellular proteins have been shown to be involved in the RNA replication cycle of these viruses. In an effort to isolate and identify additional cellular proteins that function in enteroviral RNA replication, we have generated multiple recombinant polioviruses containing RNA affinity tags within the 3′ or 5′ noncoding region of the genome. These recombinant viruses retained RNA affinity sequences within the genome while remaining viable and infectious over multiple passages in cell culture. Further characterization of these viruses demonstrated that viral protein production and growth kinetics were unchanged or only slightly altered relative to wild type poliovirus. However, attempts to isolate these genetically-tagged viral genomes from infected cells have been hindered by high levels of co-purification of nonspecific proteins and the limited matrix-binding efficiency of RNA affinity sequences. Regardless, these recombinant viruses represent a step toward more thorough characterization of enterovirus ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in RNA replication. PMID:26861382

  19. Iron induction of ferritin synthesis in soybean cell suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudhon, D; Briat, J F; Lescure, A M

    1989-06-01

    In animal cells specialized for iron storage, iron-induced accumulation of ferritin is known to result from a shift of stored mRNA from the ribonucleoprotein fraction to polysomes. Previous reports with bean leaves suggested that in plants iron induction of ferritin synthesis would result from a regulation at the transcriptional level (F van der Mark, F Bienfait, H van der Ende [1983] Biochem Biophys Res Commun 115:463-469). Soybean (Glycine max, cv Mandarin) cell suspension cultures have been used here to support these findings. Ferritin induction is obtained by addition of Fe-citrate to the culture medium. A good correlation is found between cellular iron content and the amount of ferritin accumulation. This protein accumulation corresponds to an increase of in vitro translatable ferritin mRNA. Addition of 4 micrograms actinomycin D per milliliter to the cultures inhibits completely in vivo RNA synthesis, whereas protein synthesis was poorly affected, at least for 24 hours. During the same time, this concentration of actinomycin D strongly inhibits the iron-induced synthesis of ferritin. These results show that in soybean cell cultures, the mechanism of regulation of ferritin synthesis in response to iron does not result from recruitment of preexisting mRNA. They confirm that in plant systems, ferritin synthesis results from increased transcription of the corresponding genes.

  20. Interactions between the nuclear matrix and an enhancer of the tryptophan oxygenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneoka, Hidenori [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Miyake, Katsuhide, E-mail: miyake@nubio.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Iijima, Shinji [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-10-02

    The gene for tryptophan oxygenase (TO) is expressed in adult hepatocytes in a tissue- and differentiation-specific manner. The TO promoter has two glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs), and its expression is regulated by glucocorticoid hormone in the liver. We found a novel GRE in close proximity to a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) that was located around -8.5 kb from the transcriptional start site of the TO gene by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A combination of nuclear fractionation and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the S/MAR was tethered to the nuclear matrix in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. ChIP assay showed that, in adult hepatocytes, the S/MAR-GRE and the promoter proximal regions interacted with lamin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U in a dexamethasone dependent manner, but this was not the case in fetal cells, suggesting that developmental stage-specific expression of the TO gene might rely on the binding of the enhancer (the -8.5 kb S/MAR-GRE) and the promoter to the inner nuclear matrix.

  1. The differentiation status of primary gonadal germ cell tumors correlates inversely with telomerase activity and the expression level of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of telomerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, Mark; Burger, Angelika M; Müller, Markus; Krause, Hans; Straub, Bernd; Schostak, Martin; Schulze, Wolfgang; Lauke, Heidrun; Miller, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    The activity of the ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase is detectable in germ, stem and tumor cells. One major component of telomerase is human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), which encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase. Here we investigate the correlation of telomerase activity and hTERT gene expression and the differentiation status of primary testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT). Telomerase activity (TA) was detected by a quantitative telomerase PCR ELISA, and hTERT mRNA expression was quantified by online RT-PCR in 42 primary testicular germ cell tumors. The control group consisted of benign testicular biopsies from infertile patients. High levels of telomerase activity and hTERT expression were detected in all examined undifferentiated TGCTs and in the benign testicular tissue specimens with germ cell content. In contrast, differentiated teratomas and testicular control tissue without germ cells (Sertoli-cell-only syndrome) showed no telomerase activity and only minimal hTERT expression. These findings demonstrate an inverse relationship between the level of telomerase activity and hTERT mRNA expression and the differentiation state of germ cell tumors. Quantification of telomerase activity and hTERT mRNA expression enables a new molecular-diagnostic subclassification of germ cell tumors that describes their proliferation potential and differentiation status

  2. The differentiation status of primary gonadal germ cell tumors correlates inversely with telomerase activity and the expression level of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of telomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze Wolfgang

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of the ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase is detectable in germ, stem and tumor cells. One major component of telomerase is human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, which encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase. Here we investigate the correlation of telomerase activity and hTERT gene expression and the differentiation status of primary testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT. Methods Telomerase activity (TA was detected by a quantitative telomerase PCR ELISA, and hTERT mRNA expression was quantified by online RT-PCR in 42 primary testicular germ cell tumors. The control group consisted of benign testicular biopsies from infertile patients. Results High levels of telomerase activity and hTERT expression were detected in all examined undifferentiated TGCTs and in the benign testicular tissue specimens with germ cell content. In contrast, differentiated teratomas and testicular control tissue without germ cells (Sertoli-cell-only syndrome showed no telomerase activity and only minimal hTERT expression. Conclusions These findings demonstrate an inverse relationship between the level of telomerase activity and hTERT mRNA expression and the differentiation state of germ cell tumors. Quantification of telomerase activity and hTERT mRNA expression enables a new molecular-diagnostic subclassification of germ cell tumors that describes their proliferation potential and differentiation status.

  3. The crystal structure and RNA-binding of an orthomyxovirus nucleoprotein.

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    Wenjie Zheng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome packaging for viruses with segmented genomes is often a complex problem. This is particularly true for influenza viruses and other orthomyxoviruses, whose genome consists of multiple negative-sense RNAs encapsidated as ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. To better understand the structural features of orthomyxovirus RNPs that allow them to be packaged, we determined the crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (NP of a fish orthomyxovirus, the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV (genus Isavirus. As the major protein component of the RNPs, ISAV-NP possesses a bi-lobular structure similar to the influenza virus NP. Because both RNA-free and RNA-bound ISAV NP forms stable dimers in solution, we were able to measure the NP RNA binding affinity as well as the stoichiometry using recombinant proteins and synthetic oligos. Our RNA binding analysis revealed that each ISAV-NP binds ~12 nts of RNA, shorter than the 24-28 nts originally estimated for the influenza A virus NP based on population average. The 12-nt stoichiometry was further confirmed by results from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Considering that RNPs of ISAV and the influenza viruses have similar morphologies and dimensions, our findings suggest that NP-free RNA may exist on orthomyxovirus RNPs, and selective RNP packaging may be accomplished through direct RNA-RNA interactions.

  4. Cross- and Co-Packaging of Retroviral RNAs and Their Consequences

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    Lizna M. Ali

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses belong to the family Retroviridae and are ribonucleoprotein (RNP particles that contain a dimeric RNA genome. Retroviral particle assembly is a complex process, and how the virus is able to recognize and specifically capture the genomic RNA (gRNA among millions of other cellular and spliced retroviral RNAs has been the subject of extensive investigation over the last two decades. The specificity towards RNA packaging requires higher order interactions of the retroviral gRNA with the structural Gag proteins. Moreover, several retroviruses have been shown to have the ability to cross-/co-package gRNA from other retroviruses, despite little sequence homology. This review will compare the determinants of gRNA encapsidation among different retroviruses, followed by an examination of our current understanding of the interaction between diverse viral genomes and heterologous proteins, leading to their cross-/co-packaging. Retroviruses are well-known serious animal and human pathogens, and such a cross-/co-packaging phenomenon could result in the generation of novel viral variants with unknown pathogenic potential. At the same time, however, an enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these specific interactions makes retroviruses an attractive target for anti-viral drugs, vaccines, and vectors for human gene therapy.

  5. Experimental Approaches to Study Genome Packaging of Influenza A Viruses

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    Catherine Isel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The genome of influenza A viruses (IAV consists of eight single-stranded negative sense viral RNAs (vRNAs encapsidated into viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs. It is now well established that genome packaging (i.e., the incorporation of a set of eight distinct vRNPs into budding viral particles, follows a specific pathway guided by segment-specific cis-acting packaging signals on each vRNA. However, the precise nature and function of the packaging signals, and the mechanisms underlying the assembly of vRNPs into sub-bundles in the cytoplasm and their selective packaging at the viral budding site, remain largely unknown. Here, we review the diverse and complementary methods currently being used to elucidate these aspects of the viral cycle. They range from conventional and competitive reverse genetics, single molecule imaging of vRNPs by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography of budding viral particles, to solely in vitro approaches to investigate vRNA-vRNA interactions at the molecular level.

  6. RNA Encapsidation and Packaging in the Phleboviruses

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    Katherine E. Hornak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae represents the largest family of segmented RNA viruses, which infect a staggering diversity of plants, animals, and insects. Within the family Bunyaviridae, the Phlebovirus genus includes several important human and animal pathogens, including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV, Uukuniemi virus (UUKV, and the sandfly fever viruses. The phleboviruses have small tripartite RNA genomes that encode a repertoire of 5–7 proteins. These few proteins accomplish the daunting task of recognizing and specifically packaging a tri-segment complement of viral genomic RNA in the midst of an abundance of host components. The critical nucleation events that eventually lead to virion production begin early on in the host cytoplasm as the first strands of nascent viral RNA (vRNA are synthesized. The interaction between the vRNA and the viral nucleocapsid (N protein effectively protects and masks the RNA from the host, and also forms the ribonucleoprotein (RNP architecture that mediates downstream interactions and drives virion formation. Although the mechanism by which all three genomic counterparts are selectively co-packaged is not completely understood, we are beginning to understand the hierarchy of interactions that begins with N-RNA packaging and culminates in RNP packaging into new virus particles. In this review we focus on recent progress that highlights the molecular basis of RNA genome packaging in the phleboviruses.

  7. The connection domain in reverse transcriptase facilitates the in vivo annealing of tRNALys3 to HIV-1 genomic RNA

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    Niu Meijuan

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The primer tRNA for reverse transcription in HIV-1, tRNALys3, is selectively packaged into the virus during its assembly, and annealed to the viral genomic RNA. The ribonucleoprotein complex that is involved in the packaging and annealing of tRNALys into HIV-1 consists of Gag, GagPol, tRNALys, lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS, and viral genomic RNA. Gag targets tRNALys for viral packaging through Gag's interaction with LysRS, a tRNALys-binding protein, while reverse transcriptase (RT sequences within GagPol (the thumb domain bind to tRNALys. The further annealing of tRNALys3 to viral RNA requires nucleocapsid (NC sequences in Gag, but not the NC sequences GagPol. In this report, we further show that while the RT connection domain in GagPol is not required for tRNALys3 packaging into the virus, it is required for tRNALys3 annealing to the viral RNA genome.

  8. Primordial dwarfism gene maintains Lin28 expression to safeguard embryonic stem cells from premature differentiation.

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    Dai, Qian; Luan, Guangxin; Deng, Li; Lei, Tingjun; Kang, Han; Song, Xu; Zhang, Yujun; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong; Li, Qintong

    2014-05-08

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is characterized by global growth failure, both during embryogenesis and postnatally. Loss-of-function germline mutations in La ribonucleoprotein domain family, member 7 (LAPR7) have recently been linked to PD. Paradoxically, LARP7 deficiency was previously assumed to be associated with increased cell growth and proliferation via activation of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Here, we show that Larp7 deficiency likely does not significantly increase P-TEFb activity. We further discover that Larp7 knockdown does not affect pluripotency but instead primes embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for differentiation via downregulation of Lin28, a positive regulator of organismal growth. Mechanistically, we show that Larp7 interacts with a poly(A) polymerase Star-PAP to maintain Lin28 mRNA stability. We propose that proper regulation of Lin28 and PTEFb is essential for embryonic cells to achieve a sufficient number of cell divisions prior to differentiation and ultimately to maintain proper organismal size. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fanconi anemia FANCD2 and FANCI proteins regulate the nuclear dynamics of splicing factors.

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    Moriel-Carretero, María; Ovejero, Sara; Gérus-Durand, Marie; Vryzas, Dimos; Constantinou, Angelos

    2017-12-04

    Proteins disabled in the cancer-prone disorder Fanconi anemia (FA) ensure the maintenance of chromosomal stability during DNA replication. FA proteins regulate replication dynamics, coordinate replication-coupled repair of interstrand DNA cross-links, and mitigate conflicts between replication and transcription. Here we show that FANCI and FANCD2 associate with splicing factor 3B1 (SF3B1), a key spliceosomal protein of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U2 snRNP). FANCI is in close proximity to SF3B1 in the nucleoplasm of interphase and mitotic cells. Furthermore, we find that DNA replication stress induces the release of SF3B1 from nuclear speckles in a manner that depends on FANCI and on the activity of the checkpoint kinase ATR. In chromatin, both FANCD2 and FANCI associate with SF3B1, prevent accumulation of postcatalytic intron lariats, and contribute to the timely eviction of splicing factors. We propose that FANCD2 and FANCI contribute to the organization of functional domains in chromatin, ensuring the coordination of DNA replication and cotranscriptional processes. © 2017 Moriel-Carretero et al.

  10. Association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to mixed connective tissue disease in Polish patients.

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    Paradowska-Gorycka, A; Stypińska, B; Olesińska, M; Felis-Giemza, A; Mańczak, M; Czuszynska, Z; Zdrojewski, Z; Wojciechowicz, J; Jurkowska, M

    2016-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease, originally defined as a connective tissue inflammatory syndrome with overlapping features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), characterized by the presence of antibodies against components of the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1snRNP). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of (high-resolution-typed) DRB1 alleles in a cohort of Polish patients with MCTD (n = 103). Identification of the variants potentially associated with risk and protection was carried out by comparison with the DKMS Polish Bone Marrow Donor Registry (41306 alleles). DRB1*15:01 (odds ratio (OR): 6.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55-8.06), DRB1*04 (OR: 3.69; 95% CI 2.69-5.01) and *09:01 (OR: 8.12; 95% CI 2.15-21.75) were identified as risk alleles for MCTD, while HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele was found to be protective (OR: 0.50; 95% CI 0.28-0.83). The carrier frequency of the DRB1*01 was higher in MCTD patients compared with controls, although the differences were not statistically significant. Our results confirm the modulating influence of HLA-DRB1 genotypes on development of connective tissue diseases such as MCTD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. U bodies respond to nutrient stress in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, Mickey; Liu, Ji-Long

    2011-01-01

    The neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by mutation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Cytoplasmic SMN protein-containing granules, known as U snRNP bodies (U bodies), are thought to be responsible for the assembly and storage of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) which are essential for pre-mRNA splicing. U bodies exhibit close association with cytoplasmic processing bodies (P bodies), which are involved in mRNA decay and translational repression. The close association of the U body and P body in Drosophila resemble that of the stress granule and P body in yeast and mammalian cells. However, it is unknown whether the U body is responsive to any stress. Using Drosophila oogenesis as a model, here we show that U bodies increase in size following nutritional deprivation. Despite nutritional stress, U bodies maintain their close association with P bodies. Our results show that U bodies are responsive to nutrition changes, presumably through the U body–P body pathway.

  12. RNA-binding properties and mapping of the RNA-binding domain from the movement protein of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus.

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    Herranz, M Carmen; Pallás, Vicente

    2004-03-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is involved in intercellular virus transport. In this study, putative RNA-binding properties of the PNRSV MP were studied. The PNRSV MP was produced in Escherichia coli using an expression vector. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) using DIG-labelled riboprobes demonstrated that PNRSV MP bound ssRNA cooperatively without sequence specificity. Two different ribonucleoprotein complexes were found to be formed depending on the molar MP : PNRSV RNA ratio. The different responses of the complexes to urea treatment strongly suggested that they have different structural properties. Deletion mutagenesis followed by Northwestern analysis allowed location of a nucleic acid binding domain to aa 56-88. This 33 aa RNA-binding motif is the smallest region delineated among members of the family Bromoviridae for which RNA-binding properties have been demonstrated. This domain is highly conserved within all phylogenetic subgroups previously described for PNRSV isolates. Interestingly, the RNA-binding domain described here and the one described for Alfamovirus are located at the N terminus of their corresponding MPs, whereas similar domains previously characterized in members of the genera Bromovirus and Cucumovirus are present at the C terminus, strongly reflecting their corresponding phylogenetic relationships. The evolutionary implications of this observation are discussed.

  13. Convergent evolution of germ granule nucleators: A hypothesis.

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    Kulkarni, Arpita; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2017-10-01

    Germ cells have been considered "the ultimate stem cell" because they alone, during normal development of sexually reproducing organisms, are able to give rise to all organismal cell types. Morphological descriptions of a specialized cytoplasm termed 'germ plasm' and associated electron dense ribonucleoprotein (RNP) structures called 'germ granules' within germ cells date back as early as the 1800s. Both germ plasm and germ granules are implicated in germ line specification across metazoans. However, at a molecular level, little is currently understood about the molecular mechanisms that assemble these entities in germ cells. The discovery that in some animals, the gene products of a small number of lineage-specific genes initiate the assembly (also termed nucleation) of germ granules and/or germ plasm is the first step towards facilitating a better understanding of these complex biological processes. Here, we draw on research spanning over 100years that supports the hypothesis that these nucleator genes may have evolved convergently, allowing them to perform analogous roles across animal lineages. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of polypyrimidine tract-binding proteins and other hnRNP proteins in plant splicing regulation

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    Andreas eWachter

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative precursor mRNA splicing is a widespread phenomenon in multicellular eukaryotes and represents a major means for functional expansion of the transcriptome. While several recent studies have revealed an important link between splicing regulation and fundamental biological processes in plants, many important aspects, such as the underlying splicing regulatory mechanisms, are so far not well understood. Splicing decisions are in general based on a splicing code that is determined by the dynamic interplay of splicing-controlling factors and cis-regulatory elements. Several members of the group of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP proteins are well-known regulators of splicing in animals and the comparatively few reports on some of their plant homologues revealed similar functions. This also applies to polypyrimidine tract-binding proteins (PTBs, a thoroughly investigated class of hnRNP proteins with splicing regulatory functions in both animals and plants. Further examples from plants are auto- and cross-regulatory splicing circuits of glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (GRPs and splicing enhancement by oligouridylatebinding proteins. Besides their role in defining splice site choice, hnRNP proteins are also involved in multiple other steps of nucleic acid metabolism, highlighting the functional versatility of this group of proteins in higher eukaryotes.

  15. Roles of Prolyl Isomerases in RNA-Mediated Gene Expression

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    Roopa Thapar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases that include immunophilins (cyclophilins and FKBPs and parvulins (Pin1, Par14, Par17 participate in cell signaling, transcription, pre-mRNA processing and mRNA decay. The human genome encodes 19 cyclophilins, 18 FKBPs and three parvulins. Immunophilins are receptors for the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A, FK506, and rapamycin that are used in organ transplantation. Pin1 has also been targeted in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, asthma, and a number of cancers. While these PPIases are characterized as molecular chaperones, they also act in a nonchaperone manner to promote protein-protein interactions using surfaces outside their active sites. The immunosuppressive drugs act by a gain-of-function mechanism by promoting protein-protein interactions in vivo. Several immunophilins have been identified as components of the spliceosome and are essential for alternative splicing. Pin1 plays roles in transcription and RNA processing by catalyzing conformational changes in the RNA Pol II C-terminal domain. Pin1 also binds several RNA binding proteins such as AUF1, KSRP, HuR, and SLBP that regulate mRNA decay by remodeling mRNP complexes. The functions of ribonucleoprotein associated PPIases are largely unknown. This review highlights PPIases that play roles in RNA-mediated gene expression, providing insight into their structures, functions and mechanisms of action in mRNP remodeling in vivo.

  16. The BEACH Domain Protein SPIRRIG Is Essential for Arabidopsis Salt Stress Tolerance and Functions as a Regulator of Transcript Stabilization and Localization.

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    Alexandra Steffens

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the highly conserved class of BEACH domain containing proteins (BDCPs have been established as broad facilitators of protein-protein interactions and membrane dynamics in the context of human diseases like albinism, bleeding diathesis, impaired cellular immunity, cancer predisposition, and neurological dysfunctions. Also, the Arabidopsis thaliana BDCP SPIRRIG (SPI is important for membrane integrity, as spi mutants exhibit split vacuoles. In this work, we report a novel molecular function of the BDCP SPI in ribonucleoprotein particle formation. We show that SPI interacts with the P-body core component DECAPPING PROTEIN 1 (DCP1, associates to mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies, and regulates their assembly upon salt stress. The finding that spi mutants exhibit salt hypersensitivity suggests that the local function of SPI at P-bodies is of biological relevance. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed qualitative differences in the salt stress-regulated transcriptional response of Col-0 and spi. We show that SPI regulates the salt stress-dependent post-transcriptional stabilization, cytoplasmic agglomeration, and localization to P-bodies of a subset of salt stress-regulated mRNAs. Finally, we show that the PH-BEACH domains of SPI and its human homolog FAN (Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase activation interact with DCP1 isoforms from plants, mammals, and yeast, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of an association of BDCPs and P-bodies.

  17. Phosphorylation of human respiratory syncytial virus P protein at serine 54 regulates viral uncoating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenjo, Ana; Gonzalez-Armas, Juan C.; Villanueva, Nieves

    2008-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) structural P protein, phosphorylated at serine (S) and threonine (T) residues, is a co-factor of viral RNA polymerase. The phosphorylation of S54 is controlled by the coordinated action of two cellular enzymes: a lithium-sensitive kinase, probably glycogen synthetase kinase (GSK-3) β and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Inhibition of lithium-sensitive kinase, soon after infection, blocks the viral growth cycle by inhibiting synthesis and/or accumulation of viral RNAs, proteins and extracellular particles. P protein phosphorylation at S54 is required to liberate viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) from M protein, during the uncoating process. Kinase inhibition, late in infection, produces a decrease in genomic RNA and infectious viral particles. LiCl, intranasally applied to mice infected with HRSV A2 strain, reduces the number of mice with virus in their lungs and the virus titre. Administration of LiCl to humans via aerosol should prevent HRSV infection, without secondary effects

  18. RNase-assisted RNA chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlewski, Gracjan; Cáceres, Javier F.

    2010-01-01

    RNA chromatography combined with mass spectrometry represents a widely used experimental approach to identify RNA-binding proteins that recognize specific RNA targets. An important drawback of most of these protocols is the high background due to direct or indirect nonspecific binding of cellular proteins to the beads. In many cases this can hamper the detection of individual proteins due to their low levels and/or comigration with contaminating proteins. Increasing the salt concentration during washing steps can reduce background, but at the cost of using less physiological salt concentrations and the likely loss of important RNA-binding proteins that are less stringently bound to a given RNA, as well as the disassembly of protein or ribonucleoprotein complexes. Here, we describe an improved RNA chromatography method that relies on the use of a cocktail of RNases in the elution step. This results in the release of proteins specifically associated with the RNA ligand and almost complete elimination of background noise, allowing a more sensitive and thorough detection of RNA-binding proteins recognizing a specific RNA transcript. PMID:20571124

  19. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligina, Elena V.; Bariakin, Dmitry N.; Kozlov, Vadim V.; Richter, Vladimir A.; Semenov, Dmitry V.

    2017-01-01

    Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs' fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches. PMID:28127559

  20. Specific RNP capture with antisense LNA/DNA mixmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogell, Birgit; Fischer, Bernd; Rettel, Mandy; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Castello, Alfredo; Hentze, Matthias W

    2017-08-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play essential roles in RNA biology, responding to cellular and environmental stimuli to regulate gene expression. Important advances have helped to determine the (near) complete repertoires of cellular RBPs. However, identification of RBPs associated with specific transcripts remains a challenge. Here, we describe "specific ribonucleoprotein (RNP) capture," a versatile method for the determination of the proteins bound to specific transcripts in vitro and in cellular systems. Specific RNP capture uses UV irradiation to covalently stabilize protein-RNA interactions taking place at "zero distance." Proteins bound to the target RNA are captured by hybridization with antisense locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA oligonucleotides covalently coupled to a magnetic resin. After stringent washing, interacting proteins are identified by quantitative mass spectrometry. Applied to in vitro extracts, specific RNP capture identifies the RBPs bound to a reporter mRNA containing the Sex-lethal (Sxl) binding motifs, revealing that the Sxl homolog sister of Sex lethal (Ssx) displays similar binding preferences. This method also revealed the repertoire of RBPs binding to 18S or 28S rRNAs in HeLa cells, including previously unknown rRNA-binding proteins. © 2017 Rogell et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Accurate placement of substrate RNA by Gar1 in H/ACA RNA-guided pseudouridylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2015-09-03

    H/ACA RNA-guided ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), the most complicated RNA pseudouridylase so far known, uses H/ACA guide RNA for substrate capture and four proteins (Cbf5, Nop10, L7Ae and Gar1) for pseudouridylation. Although it was shown that Gar1 not only facilitates the product release, but also enhances the catalytic activity, the chemical role that Gar1 plays in this complicated machinery is largely unknown. Kinetics measurement on Pyrococcus furiosus RNPs at different temperatures making use of fluorescence anisotropy showed that Gar1 reduces the catalytic barrier through affecting the activation entropy instead of enthalpy. Site-directed mutagenesis combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that V149 in the thumb loop of Cbf5 is critical in placing the target uridine to the right position toward catalytic D85 of Cbf5. The enzyme elegantly aligns the position of uridine in the catalytic site with the help of Gar1. In addition, conversion of uridine to pseudouridine results in a rigid syn configuration of the target nucleotide in the active site and causes Gar1 to pull out the thumb. Both factors guarantee the efficient release of the product. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Primary and secondary structure of U8 small nuclear RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, R.; Henning, D.; Busch, H.

    1985-01-01

    U8 small nuclear RNA is a new, capped, 140 nucleotides long RNA species found in Novikoff hepatoma cells. Its sequence is: m3GpppAmUmCGUCAGGA GGUUAAUCCU UACCUGUCCC UCCUUUCGGA GGGCAGAUAG AAAAUGAUGA UUGGAGCUUG CAUGAUCUGC UGAUUAUAGC AUUUCCGUGU AAUCAGGACC UGACAACAUC CUGAUUGCUU CUAUCUGAUUOH. This RNA is present in approximately 25,000 copies/cell, and it is enriched in nucleolar preparations. Like U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5 RNAs, U8 RNA was also present as a ribonucleoprotein associated with the Sm antigen. The rat U8 RNA was highly homologous (greater than 90%) to a recently characterized 5.4 S RNA from mouse cells infected with spleen focus-forming virus. In addition to the U8 RNA, three other U small nuclear RNAs were found in anti-Sm antibody immunoprecipitates from labeled rat and HeLa cells. Each of these contained a m3GpppAm cap structure; their apparent chain lengths were 60, 130, and 65 nucleotides. These U small nuclear RNAs are designated U7, U9, and U10 RNAs, respectively

  3. High-throughput sequencing of human plasma RNA by using thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yidan; Yao, Jun; Wu, Douglas C.; Nottingham, Ryan M.; Mohr, Sabine; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized transcriptome profiling, gene expression analysis, and RNA-based diagnostics. Here, we developed a new RNA-seq method that exploits thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases (TGIRTs) and used it to profile human plasma RNAs. TGIRTs have higher thermostability, processivity, and fidelity than conventional reverse transcriptases, plus a novel template-switching activity that can efficiently attach RNA-seq adapters to target RNA sequences without RNA ligation. The new TGIRT-seq method enabled construction of RNA-seq libraries from RNA in RNA in 1-mL plasma samples from a healthy individual revealed RNA fragments mapping to a diverse population of protein-coding gene and long ncRNAs, which are enriched in intron and antisense sequences, as well as nearly all known classes of small ncRNAs, some of which have never before been seen in plasma. Surprisingly, many of the small ncRNA species were present as full-length transcripts, suggesting that they are protected from plasma RNases in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and/or exosomes. This TGIRT-seq method is readily adaptable for profiling of whole-cell, exosomal, and miRNAs, and for related procedures, such as HITS-CLIP and ribosome profiling. PMID:26554030

  4. Exportin-5 mediates nuclear export of SRP RNA in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeiwa, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ichiro; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2015-04-01

    The signal recognition particle is a ribonucleoprotein complex that is essential for the translocation of nascent proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum. It has been shown that the RNA component (SRP RNA) is exported from the nucleus by CRM1 in the budding yeast. However, how SRP RNA is exported in higher species has been elusive. Here, we show that SRP RNA does not use the CRM1 pathway in Xenopus oocytes. Instead, SRP RNA uses the same export pathway as pre-miRNA and tRNA as showed by cross-competition experiments. Consistently, the recombinant Exportin-5 protein specifically stimulated export of SRP RNA as well as of pre-miRNA and tRNA, whereas an antibody raised against Exportin-5 specifically inhibited export of the same RNA species. Moreover, biotinylated SRP RNA can pull down Exportin-5 but not CRM1 from HeLa cell nuclear extracts in a RanGTP-dependent manner. These results, taken together, strongly suggest that the principal export receptor for SRP RNA in vertebrates is Exportin-5 unlike in the budding yeast. © 2015 The Authors. Genes to Cells published by Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. The role of PKA in the translational response to heat stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Carla E Barraza

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to stress stem from a variety of different mechanisms, including translation arrest and relocation of the translationally repressed mRNAs to ribonucleoprotein particles like stress granules (SGs and processing bodies (PBs. Here, we examine the role of PKA in the S. cerevisiae heat shock response. Under mild heat stress Tpk3 aggregates and promotes aggregation of eIF4G, Pab1 and eIF4E, whereas severe heat stress leads to the formation of PBs and SGs that contain both Tpk2 and Tpk3 and a larger 48S translation initiation complex. Deletion of TPK2 or TPK3 impacts upon the translational response to heat stress of several mRNAs including CYC1, HSP42, HSP30 and ENO2. TPK2 deletion leads to a robust translational arrest, an increase in SGs/PBs aggregation and translational hypersensitivity to heat stress, whereas TPK3 deletion represses SGs/PBs formation, translational arrest and response for the analyzed mRNAs. Therefore, this work provides evidence indicating that Tpk2 and Tpk3 have opposing roles in translational adaptation during heat stress, and highlight how the same signaling pathway can be regulated to generate strikingly distinct physiological outputs.

  6. Induction of the 5S RNP-Mdm2-p53 ribosomal stress pathway delays the initiation but fails to eradicate established murine acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaako, P; Ugale, A; Wahlestedt, M; Velasco-Hernandez, T; Cammenga, J; Lindström, M S; Bryder, D

    2017-01-01

    Mutations resulting in constitutive activation of signaling pathways that regulate ribosome biogenesis are among the most common genetic events in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, whether ribosome biogenesis presents as a therapeutic target to treat AML remains unexplored. Perturbations in ribosome biogenesis trigger the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP)-Mdm2-p53 ribosomal stress pathway, and induction of this pathway has been shown to have therapeutic efficacy in Myc-driven lymphoma. In the current study we address the physiological and therapeutic role of the 5S RNP-Mdm2-p53 pathway in AML. By utilizing mice that have defective ribosome biogenesis due to downregulation of ribosomal protein S19 (Rps19), we demonstrate that induction of the 5S RNP-Mdm2-p53 pathway significantly delays the initiation of AML. However, even a severe Rps19 deficiency that normally results in acute bone marrow failure has no consistent efficacy on already established disease. Finally, by using mice that harbor a mutation in the Mdm2 gene disrupting its binding to 5S RNP, we show that loss of the 5S RNP-Mdm2-p53 pathway is dispensable for development of AML. Our study suggests that induction of the 5S RNP-Mdm2-p53 ribosomal stress pathway holds limited potential as a single-agent therapy in the treatment of AML.

  7. Perturbation of ribosome biogenesis drives cells into senescence through 5S RNP-mediated p53 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kazuho; Kumazawa, Takuya; Kuroda, Takao; Katagiri, Naohiro; Tsuchiya, Mai; Goto, Natsuka; Furumai, Ryohei; Murayama, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Junn; Kimura, Keiji

    2015-03-03

    The 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) complex, consisting of RPL11, RPL5, and 5S rRNA, is implicated in p53 regulation under ribotoxic stress. Here, we show that the 5S RNP contributes to p53 activation and promotes cellular senescence in response to oncogenic or replicative stress. Oncogenic stress accelerates rRNA transcription and replicative stress delays rRNA processing, resulting in RPL11 and RPL5 accumulation in the ribosome-free fraction, where they bind MDM2. Experimental upregulation of rRNA transcription or downregulation of rRNA processing, mimicking the nucleolus under oncogenic or replicative stress, respectively, also induces RPL11-mediated p53 activation and cellular senescence. We demonstrate that exogenous expression of certain rRNA-processing factors rescues the processing defect, attenuates p53 accumulation, and increases replicative lifespan. To summarize, the nucleolar-5S RNP-p53 pathway functions as a senescence inducer in response to oncogenic and replicative stresses. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Disruption of the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction significantly improves the erythroid defect in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaako, P; Debnath, S; Olsson, K; Zhang, Y; Flygare, J; Lindström, M S; Bryder, D; Karlsson, S

    2015-11-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by haploinsufficiency of genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs). Perturbed ribosome biogenesis in DBA has been shown to induce a p53-mediated ribosomal stress response. However, the mechanisms of p53 activation and its relevance for the erythroid defect remain elusive. Previous studies have indicated that activation of p53 is caused by the inhibition of mouse double minute 2 (Mdm2), the main negative regulator of p53, by the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). Meanwhile, it is not clear whether this mechanism solely mediates the p53-dependent component found in DBA. To approach this question, we crossed our mouse model for RPS19-deficient DBA with Mdm2(C305F) knock-in mice that have a disrupted 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction. Upon induction of the Rps19 deficiency, Mdm2(C305F) reversed the p53 response and improved expansion of hematopoietic progenitors in vitro, and ameliorated the anemia in vivo. Unexpectedly, disruption of the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction also led to selective defect in erythropoiesis. Our findings highlight the sensitivity of erythroid progenitor cells to aberrations in p53 homeostasis mediated by the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction. Finally, we provide evidence indicating that physiological activation of the 5S RNP-Mdm2-p53 pathway may contribute to functional decline of the hematopoietic system in a cell-autonomous manner over time.

  9. The importance of ribosome production, and the 5S RNP-MDM2 pathway, in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelava, Andria; Schneider, Claudia; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2016-08-15

    Ribosomes are abundant, large RNA-protein complexes that are the source of all protein synthesis in the cell. The production of ribosomes is an extremely energetically expensive cellular process that has long been linked to human health and disease. More recently, it has been shown that ribosome biogenesis is intimately linked to multiple cellular signalling pathways and that defects in ribosome production can lead to a wide variety of human diseases. Furthermore, changes in ribosome production in response to nutrient levels in the diet lead to metabolic re-programming of the liver. Reduced or abnormal ribosome production in response to cellular stress or mutations in genes encoding factors critical for ribosome biogenesis causes the activation of the tumour suppressor p53, which leads to re-programming of cellular transcription. The ribosomal assembly intermediate 5S RNP (ribonucleoprotein particle), containing RPL5, RPL11 and the 5S rRNA, accumulates when ribosome biogenesis is blocked. The excess 5S RNP binds to murine double minute 2 (MDM2), the main p53-suppressor in the cell, inhibiting its function and leading to p53 activation. Here, we discuss the involvement of ribosome biogenesis in the homoeostasis of p53 in the cell and in human health and disease. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Perturbation of Ribosome Biogenesis Drives Cells into Senescence through 5S RNP-Mediated p53 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuho Nishimura

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP complex, consisting of RPL11, RPL5, and 5S rRNA, is implicated in p53 regulation under ribotoxic stress. Here, we show that the 5S RNP contributes to p53 activation and promotes cellular senescence in response to oncogenic or replicative stress. Oncogenic stress accelerates rRNA transcription and replicative stress delays rRNA processing, resulting in RPL11 and RPL5 accumulation in the ribosome-free fraction, where they bind MDM2. Experimental upregulation of rRNA transcription or downregulation of rRNA processing, mimicking the nucleolus under oncogenic or replicative stress, respectively, also induces RPL11-mediated p53 activation and cellular senescence. We demonstrate that exogenous expression of certain rRNA-processing factors rescues the processing defect, attenuates p53 accumulation, and increases replicative lifespan. To summarize, the nucleolar-5S RNP-p53 pathway functions as a senescence inducer in response to oncogenic and replicative stresses.

  11. The 5S RNP couples p53 homeostasis to ribosome biogenesis and nucleolar stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Katherine E; Bohnsack, Markus T; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2013-10-17

    Several proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors regulate the production of ribosomes. Ribosome biogenesis is a major consumer of cellular energy, and defects result in p53 activation via repression of mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) homolog by the ribosomal proteins RPL5 and RPL11. Here, we report that RPL5 and RPL11 regulate p53 from the context of a ribosomal subcomplex, the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). We provide evidence that the third component of this complex, the 5S rRNA, is critical for p53 regulation. In addition, we show that the 5S RNP is essential for the activation of p53 by p14(ARF), a protein that is activated by oncogene overexpression. Our data show that the abundance of the 5S RNP, and therefore p53 levels, is determined by factors regulating 5S complex formation and ribosome integration, including the tumor suppressor PICT1. The 5S RNP therefore emerges as the critical coordinator of signaling pathways that couple cell proliferation with ribosome production. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Synergistic antitumor cytotoxic actions of ascorbate and menadione on human prostate (DU145) cancer cells in vitro: nucleus and other injuries preceding cell death by autoschizis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilloteaux, Jacques; Jamison, James M; Neal, Deborah; Summers, Jack L

    2014-04-01

    Scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the cytotoxic effects of ascorbate (VC), menadione (VK3), or a VC:VK3 combination on a human prostate carcinoma cell line (DU145) following a 1-h vitamin treatment and a subsequent 24-h incubation in culture medium. Cell alterations examined by light and electron microscopy were treatment-dependent with VC + VK3 >VK3 > VC > Sham. Oxidative stress-induced damage was found in most organelles. This report describes injuries in the tumor cell nucleus (chromatin and nucleolus), mitochondria, endomembranes, lysosomal bodies (autophagocytoses) and inclusions. Morphologic alterations suggest that cytoskeleton damage is likely responsible for the superficial cytoplasmic changes, including major changes in cell shape and size and the self-excising phenomena. Unlike apoptotic bodies, the excised pieces contain ribonucleoproteins, but not organelles. These deleterious events cause a progressive, significant reduction in the tumor cell size. During nuclear alterations, the nuclei maintain their envelope during chromatolysis and karyolysis until cell death, while nucleoli undergo a characteristic segregation of their components. In addition, changes in fat and glycogen storage are consistent the cytotoxic and metabolic alterations caused by the respective treatments. All cellular ultrastructural changes are consistent with cell death by autoschizis and not apoptosis or other kinds of cell death.

  13. Downregulation of telomerase activity in human promyelocytic cell line using RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri-Moghaddam, E; Deezagi, A; Soheili, Z S

    2009-12-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex. It consists of two main components, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and human telomerase RNA. High telomerase activity is present in most malignant cells, but it is barely detectable in majority of somatic cells. The direct correlation between telomerase reactivation and carcinogens has made hTERT a key target for anticancer therapeutic studies. In this study, for the first time, we evaluated the ability of the new generation of short interfering RNA (siRNA) to regulate telomerase activity in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60). Transient transfection cell line by hTERT siRNAs resulted in statistically significant suppression of hTERT messenger RNAs which were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, while the expressed hTERT protein levels were measured by flow cytometry. The results of telomeric repeat amplification protocol showed that telomerase activity was significantly reduced upon transfection of the HL-60 cell line with hTERT siRNAs. The results of this study showed that telomerase activity and cell proliferation were efficiently inhibited in the hTERT siRNA-treated leukemic cell line.

  14. MVP and vaults: a role in the radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Pedro C; Pruschy, Martin; Zimmermann, Martina; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Vaults are evolutionary highly conserved ribonucleoproteins particles with a hollow barrel-like structure. The main component of vaults represents the 110 kDa major vault protein (MVP), whereas two minor vaults proteins comprise the 193 kDa vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (vPARP) and the 240 kDa telomerase-associated protein-1 (TEP-1). Additionally, at least one small and untranslated RNA is found as a constitutive component. MVP seems to play an important role in the development of multidrug resistance. This particle has also been implicated in the regulation of several cellular processes including transport mechanisms, signal transmission and immune responses. Vaults are considered a prognostic marker for different cancer types. The level of MVP expression predicts the clinical outcome after chemotherapy in different tumour types. Recently, new roles have been assigned to MVP and vaults including the association with the insulin-like growth factor-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, and the two major DNA double-strand break repair machineries: non-homologous endjoining and homologous recombination. Furthermore, MVP has been proposed as a useful prognostic factor associated with radiotherapy resistance. Here, we review these novel actions of vaults and discuss a putative role of MVP and vaults in the response to radiotherapy

  15. Identification of host factors potentially involved in RTM-mediated resistance during potyvirus long distance movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Luc; Cabanillas, Daniel Garcia; Gayral, Mathieu; Téplier, Rachèle; Pouzoulet, Jérôme; Ducousso, Marie; Dufin, Laurène; Bréhélin, Claire; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique; Revers, Frédéric

    2017-07-01

    The long distance movement of potyviruses is a poorly understood step of the viral cycle. Only factors inhibiting this process, referred to as "Restricted TEV Movement" (RTM), have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. On the virus side, the potyvirus coat protein (CP) displays determinants required for long-distance movement and for RTM-based resistance breaking. However, the potyvirus CP was previously shown not to interact with the RTM proteins. We undertook the identification of Arabidopsis factors which directly interact with either the RTM proteins or the CP of lettuce mosaic virus (LMV). An Arabidopsis cDNA library generated from companion cells was screened with LMV CP and RTM proteins using the yeast two-hybrid system. Fourteen interacting proteins were identified. Two of them were shown to interact with CP and the RTM proteins suggesting that a multiprotein complex could be formed between the RTM proteins and virions or viral ribonucleoprotein complexes. Co-localization experiments in Nicotiana benthamiana showed that most of the viral and cellular protein pairs co-localized at the periphery of chloroplasts which suggests a putative role for plastids in this process.

  16. The AAA+ proteins Pontin and Reptin enter adult age: from understanding their basic biology to the identification of selective inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Pedro M.; Baek, Sung Hee; Bandeiras, Tiago M.; Dutta, Anindya; Houry, Walid A.; Llorca, Oscar; Rosenbaum, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Pontin and Reptin are related partner proteins belonging to the AAA+ (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) family. They are implicated in multiple and seemingly unrelated processes encompassing the regulation of gene transcription, the remodeling of chromatin, DNA damage sensing and repair, and the assembly of protein and ribonucleoprotein complexes, among others. The 2nd International Workshop on Pontin and Reptin took place at the Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier in Oeiras, Portugal on October 10–12, 2014, and reported significant new advances on the mechanisms of action of these two AAA+ ATPases. The major points under discussion were related to the mechanisms through which these proteins regulate gene transcription, their roles as co-chaperones, and their involvement in pathophysiology, especially in cancer and ciliary biology and disease. Finally, they may become anticancer drug targets since small chemical inhibitors were shown to produce anti-tumor effects in animal models. PMID:25988184

  17. Striking similarities are exhibited by two small Epstein-Barr virus-encoded ribonucleic acids and the adenovirus-associated ribonucleic acids VAI and VAII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, M.D.; Gottlieb, E.; Lerner, M.R.; Steitz, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the region of the Epstein-Barr virus genome that specified two small ribonucleic acids (RNAs), EBER 1 and EBER 2, has been determined. Both of these RNAs are encoded by the right-hand 1,000 base pairs of the EcoRI J fragment of EBV deoxyribonucleic acid. EBER 1 is 166 (167) nucleotides long and EBER 2 is 172 +- 1 nucleotides long; the heterogeneity resides at the 3' termini. The EBER genes are separated by 161 base pairs and are transcribed from the same deoxyribonucleic acid strand. In vitro, both EBER genes can be transcribed by RNA polymerase III; sequences homologous to previously identified RNA polymerase III intragenic transcription control regions are present. Striking similarities are therefore apparent both between the EBERs and the two adenovirus-associated RNAs, VAI and VAII, and between the regions of the two viral genomes that specify these small RNAs. We have shown that VAII RNA as well as VAI RNA and the EBERs exist in ribonucleoprotein complexes which are precipitable by anti-La antibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally the authors have demonstrated that the binding of protein(s) from uninfected cells confers antigenicity on each of the four virus-encoded small RNAs.

  18. Early morphologic and quantitative changes in mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes after low dose gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitsov, L.; Byrneva, V.; Goranov, I.

    1979-01-01

    The study was undertaken in an effort to establish differences in the radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes, as a possible test for evaluation of early and discrete radiation injury. Sexually mature mice of BAIB/c line were X-irradiated with doses of 50 and 250 rad. The animals were sacrificed by blood letting 24 hours after irradiation, but 30 minutes before this each mouse was heparinized. Smears were prepared from the enriched pooled leucocyte suspensions, obtained by dextran sedimentation of the red cells. The preparations were stained with toluidin blue by the methods of Smetana and Pappenheim. Cell size, clasmatosis, nucleolar structure and degree of cytoplasmic metachromasia were determined. It was found that the lymphocytogram of animals irradiated with 50 rad was characterized by high percentage of small lymphocytes, most of them with dispersed nuclear ribonucleoproteins and minimal clasmatose activity. Irradiation with 100 rad induced a characteristical rise in lymphocyte clasmatose activity and decrease in the number of small lymphocytes. The nucleoli were bright and well delineated. The lymphocytogram of animals irradiated with higher doses (150 and 250 rad) was characterized by predomination of large lymphocytes and hyperbasophilic forms with well preserved bright nucleoli. The percentage of lymphocates with clasmatosis was below the control value. (A.B.)

  19. Colocalization of coilin and nucleolar proteins in Cajal body-like structures of micronucleated PtK2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.P. Silva

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Cajal bodies (CB are ubiquitous nuclear structures involved in the biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and show narrow association with the nucleolus. To identify possible relationships between CB and the nucleolus, the localization of coilin, a marker of CB, and of a set of nucleolar proteins was investigated in cultured PtK2 cells undergoing micronucleation. Nocodazol-induced micronucleated cells were examined by double indirect immunofluorescence with antibodies against coilin, fibrillarin, NOR-90/hUBF, RNA polymerase I, PM/Scl, and To/Th. Cells were imaged on a BioRad 1024-UV confocal system attached to a Zeiss Axiovert 100 microscope. Since PtK2 cells possess only one nucleolus organizer region, micronucleated cells presented only one or two micronuclei containing nucleolus. By confocal microscopy we showed that in most micronuclei lacking a typical nucleolus a variable number of round structures were stained by antibodies against fibrillarin, NOR-90/hUBF protein, and coilin. These bodies were regarded as CB-like structures and were not stained by anti-PM/Scl and anti-To/Th antibodies. Anti-RNA polymerase I antibodies also reacted with CB-like structures in some micronuclei lacking nucleolus. The demonstration that a set of proteins involved in RNA/RNP biogenesis, namely coilin, fibrillarin, NOR-90/hUBF, and RNA polymerase I gather in CB-like structures present in nucleoli-devoid micronuclei may contribute to shed some light into the understanding of CB function.

  20. Probing the stiffness of isolated nucleoli by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvet, Emilie; Yoshida, Aiko; Kumeta, Masahiro; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2014-04-01

    In eukaryotic cells, ribosome biogenesis occurs in the nucleolus, a membraneless nuclear compartment. Noticeably, the nucleolus is also involved in several nuclear functions, such as cell cycle regulation, non-ribosomal ribonucleoprotein complex assembly, aggresome formation and some virus assembly. The most intriguing question about the nucleolus is how such dynamics processes can occur in such a compact compartment. We hypothesized that its structure may be rather flexible. To investigate this, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) on isolated nucleoli. Surface topography imaging revealed the beaded structure of the nucleolar surface. With the AFM's ability to measure forces, we were able to determine the stiffness of isolated nucleoli. We could establish that the nucleolar stiffness varies upon drastic morphological changes induced by transcription and proteasome inhibition. Furthermore, upon ribosomal proteins and LaminB1 knockdowns, the nucleolar stiffness was increased. This led us to propose a model where the nucleolus has steady-state stiffness dependent on ribosome biogenesis activity and requires LaminB1 for its flexibility.

  1. Differential modulation of host genes in the kidney of brown trout Salmo trutta during sporogenesis of Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Myxozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Abd-Elfattah, Ahmed; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2014-10-04

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Myxozoa) is the causative agent of proliferative kidney disease in various species of salmonids in Europe and North America. In Europe, spores of T. bryosalmonae develop in the kidney of infected brown trout Salmo trutta and are released via urine to infect the freshwater bryozoan Fredericella sultana. The transcriptomes of kidneys of infected and non-infected brown trout were compared by suppressive subtractive hybridization. Differential screening and a subsequent NCBI BLAST analysis of expressed sequence tags revealed 21 transcripts with functions that included cell stress and cell growth, ribonucleoprotein, signal transduction, ion transporter, immune response, hemoglobin and calcium metabolisms. Quantitative real time PCR was used to verify the presence of these selected transcripts in brown trout kidney at sporogonic stages of T. bryosalmonae development. Expression of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A, prothymosin alpha, transforming protein RhoA, immunoglobulin light chain and major histocompatibility complex class I were up-regulated significantly in infected brown trout. Expression of both the hemoglobin subunit beta and stanniocalcin precursor were down-regulated significantly in infected brown trout. This study suggests that cell stress and cell growth processes, signal transduction activities, erythropoiesis and calcium homeostasis of the host are modulated during sporogonic stages of parasite development, which may support the sporogenesis of T. bryosalmonae in the kidney of brown trout.

  2. Identification of the functional domains of ANT-1, a novel coactivator of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Shuli; Goto, Kiminobu; Chen Guangchun; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Nomura, Masatoshi; Okabe, Taijiro; Nawata, Hajime; Yanase, Toshihiko

    2006-01-01

    Previously, we identified a transcriptional coactivator for the activation function-1 (AF-1) domain of the human androgen receptor (AR) and designated it androgen receptor N-terminal domain transactivating protein-1 (ANT-1). This coactivator, which contains multiple tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs from amino acid (aa) 294, is identical to a component of U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles and binds specifically to the AR or glucocorticoid receptor. Here, we identified four distinct functional domains. The AR-AF-1-binding domain, which bound to either aa 180-360 or 360-532 in AR-AF-1, clearly overlapped with TAU-1 and TAU-5. This domain and the subnuclear speckle formation domain in ANT-1 were assigned within the TPR motifs, while the transactivating and nuclear localization signal domains resided within the N-terminal sequence. The existence of these functional domains may further support the idea that ANT-1 can function as an AR-AF-1-specific coactivator while mediating a transcription-splicing coupling

  3. Interactions between the nuclear matrix and an enhancer of the tryptophan oxygenase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneoka, Hidenori; Miyake, Katsuhide; Iijima, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    The gene for tryptophan oxygenase (TO) is expressed in adult hepatocytes in a tissue- and differentiation-specific manner. The TO promoter has two glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs), and its expression is regulated by glucocorticoid hormone in the liver. We found a novel GRE in close proximity to a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) that was located around -8.5 kb from the transcriptional start site of the TO gene by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. A combination of nuclear fractionation and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the S/MAR was tethered to the nuclear matrix in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. ChIP assay showed that, in adult hepatocytes, the S/MAR-GRE and the promoter proximal regions interacted with lamin and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U in a dexamethasone dependent manner, but this was not the case in fetal cells, suggesting that developmental stage-specific expression of the TO gene might rely on the binding of the enhancer (the -8.5 kb S/MAR-GRE) and the promoter to the inner nuclear matrix.

  4. Identification of DNA-binding proteins that interact with the 5'-flanking region of the human D-amino acid oxidase gene by pull-down assay coupled with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Diem Hong; Shishido, Yuji; Chung, Seong Pil; Trinh, Huong Thi Thanh; Yorita, Kazuko; Sakai, Takashi; Fukui, Kiyoshi

    2015-12-10

    D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a flavoenzyme that metabolizes D-amino acids and is expected to be a promising therapeutic target of schizophrenia and glioblastoma. The study of DNA-binding proteins has yielded much information in the regulation of transcription and other biological processes. However, proteins interacting with DAO gene have not been elucidated. Our assessment of human DAO promoter activity using luciferase reporter system indicated the 5'-flanking region of this gene (-4289 bp from transcription initiation site) has a regulatory sequence for gene expression, which is regulated by multi-protein complexes interacting with this region. By using pull-down assay coupled with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we identified six proteins binding to the 5'-flanking region of the human DAO gene (zinc finger C2HC domain-containing protein 1A; histidine-tRNA ligase, cytoplasmic; molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein; 60S ribosomal protein L37; calponin-1; calmodulin binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1). These preliminary results will contribute to the advance in the understanding of the potential factors associated with the regulatory mechanism of DAO expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cup regulates oskar mRNA stability during oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyer, Risa M; Monfort, Elena; Wilhelm, James E

    2017-01-01

    The proper regulation of the localization, translation, and stability of maternally deposited transcripts is essential for embryonic development in many organisms. These different forms of regulation are mediated by the various protein subunits of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that assemble on maternal mRNAs. However, while many of the subunits that regulate the localization and translation of maternal transcripts have been identified, relatively little is known about how maternal mRNAs are stockpiled and stored in a stable form to support early development. One of the best characterized regulators of maternal transcripts is Cup - a broadly conserved component of the maternal RNP complex that in Drosophila acts as a translational repressor of the localized message oskar. In this study, we have found that loss of cup disrupts the localization of both the oskar mRNA and its associated proteins to the posterior pole of the developing oocyte. This defect is not due to a failure to specify the oocyte or to disruption of RNP transport. Rather, the localization defects are due to a drop in oskar mRNA levels in cup mutant egg chambers. Thus, in addition to its role in regulating oskar mRNA translation, Cup also plays a critical role in controlling the stability of the oskar transcript. This suggests that Cup is ideally positioned to coordinate the translational control function of the maternal RNP complex with its role in storing maternal transcripts in a stable form. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The genome editing revolution: A CRISPR-Cas TALE off-target story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Stefano; Montoya, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    In the last 10 years, we have witnessed a blooming of targeted genome editing systems and applications. The area was revolutionized by the discovery and characterization of the transcription activator-like effector proteins, which are easier to engineer to target new DNA sequences than the previously available DNA binding templates, zinc fingers and meganucleases. Recently, the area experimented a quantum leap because of the introduction of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic sequence). This ribonucleoprotein complex protects bacteria from invading DNAs, and it was adapted to be used in genome editing. The CRISPR ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecule guides to the specific DNA site the Cas9 nuclease to cleave the DNA target. Two years and more than 1000 publications later, the CRISPR-Cas system has become the main tool for genome editing in many laboratories. Currently the targeted genome editing technology has been used in many fields and may be a possible approach for human gene therapy. Furthermore, it can also be used to modifying the genomes of model organisms for studying human pathways or to improve key organisms for biotechnological applications, such as plants, livestock genome as well as yeasts and bacterial strains. © 2016 The Authors. BioEssays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Can a genetically-modified organism-containing diet influence embryo development? A preliminary study on pre-implantation mouse embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Cisterna

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, pre-mRNAs undergo several transformation steps to generate mature mRNAs. Recent studies have demonstrated that a diet containing a genetically modified (GM soybean can induce modifications of nuclear constituents involved in RNA processing in some tissues of young, adult and old mice. On this basis, we have investigated the ultrastructural and immunocytochemical features of pre-implantation embryos from mice fed either GM or non- GM soybean in order to verify whether the parental diet can affect the morpho-functional development of the embryonic ribonucleoprotein structural constituents involved in premRNA pathways. Morphological observations revealed that the general aspect of embryo nuclear components is similar in the two experimental groups. However, immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization results suggest a temporary decrease of pre-mRNA transcription and splicing in 2-cell embryos and a resumption in 4-8-cell embryos from mice fed GM soybean; moreover, pre-mRNA maturation seems to be less efficient in both 2-cell and 4-8-cell embryos from GM-fed mice than in controls. Although our results are still preliminary and limited to the pre-implantation phases, the results of this study encourage deepening on the effects of food components and/or contaminants on embryo development.

  8. Can a genetically-modified organism-containing diet influence embryo development? A preliminary study on pre-implantation mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisterna, B; Flach, F; Vecchio, L; Barabino, S M L; Battistelli, S; Martin, T E; Malatesta, M; Biggiogera, M

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, pre-mRNAs undergo several transformation steps to generate mature mRNAs. Recent studies have demonstrated that a diet containing a genetically modified (GM) soybean can induce modifications of nuclear constituents involved in RNA processing in some tissues of young, adult and old mice. On this basis, we have investigated the ultrastructural and immunocytochemical features of pre-implantation embryos from mice fed either GM or non- GM soybean in order to verify whether the parental diet can affect the morpho-functional development of the embryonic ribonucleoprotein structural constituents involved in pre-mRNA pathways. Morphological observations revealed that the general aspect of embryo nuclear components is similar in the two experimental groups. However, immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization results suggest a temporary decrease of pre-mRNA transcription and splicing in 2-cell embryos and a resumption in 4-8-cell embryos from mice fed GM soybean; moreover, pre-mRNA maturation seems to be less efficient in both 2-cell and 4-8-cell embryos from GM-fed mice than in controls. Although our results are still preliminary and limited to the pre-implantation phases, the results of this study encourage deepening on the effects of food components and/or contaminants on embryo development.

  9. vPARP Adjusts MVP Expression in Drug-resistant Cell Lines in Conjunction with MDR Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Karolina; Januchowski, Radoslaw; Nowicki, Michal; Zabel, Maciej

    2017-06-01

    The definition of vault (ribonucleoprotein particles) function remains highly complex. Vaults may cooperate with multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, supporting their role in drug resistance. This topic is the main theme of this publication. The cell viability was determined by an MTT assay. The protein expression was detected by western blot analysis. The proteins were knocked-down using siRNA. No major vault protein (MVP) in the LoVo/Dx and W1PR cell lines after tunicamycin treatment was shown. In W1PR cells with knocked-down MVP, a statistically significant decrease in cell viability was noted. In LoVo/Dx, W1TR and A2780TR cells were vault poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (vPARP) was knockdown, a decrease in cell viability was shown. Also, MVP silencing induced an increase in glycoprotein P (Pgp) expression in LoVo/Dx cells. MVP is important for the drug resistance of cancer cells, but it probably requires the presence of vPARP for full activation. Some correlations between MDR proteins and vaults exist. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Expression and proteasomal degradation of the major vault protein (MVP) in mammalian oocytes and zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutovsky, Peter; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Laurincik, Jozef; Letko, Juraj; Caamaño, Jose Nestor; Day, Billy N; Lai, Liangxue; Prather, Randall S; Sharpe-Timms, Kathy L; Zimmer, Randall; Sutovsky, Miriam

    2005-03-01

    Major vault protein (MVP), also called lung resistance-related protein is a ribonucleoprotein comprising a major part (>70%) of the vault particle. The function of vault particle is not known, although it appears to be involved in multi-drug resistance and cellular signaling. Here we show that MVP is expressed in mammalian, porcine, and human ova and in the porcine preimplantation embryo. MVP was identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) peptide sequencing and Western blotting as a protein accumulating in porcine zygotes cultured in the presence of specific proteasomal inhibitor MG132. MVP also accumulated in poor-quality human oocytes donated by infertile couples and porcine embryos that failed to develop normally after in vitro fertilization or somatic cell nuclear transfer. Normal porcine oocytes and embryos at various stages of preimplantation development showed mostly cytoplasmic labeling, with increased accumulation of vault particles around large cytoplasmic lipid inclusions and membrane vesicles. Occasionally, MVP was associated with the nuclear envelope and nucleolus precursor bodies. Nucleotide sequences with a high degree of homology to human MVP gene sequence were identified in porcine oocyte and endometrial cell cDNA libraries. We interpret these data as the evidence for the expression and ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent turnover of MVP in the mammalian ovum. Similar to carcinoma cells, MVP could fulfill a cell-protecting function during early embryonic development.

  11. MVP and vaults: a role in the radiation response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmermann Martina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vaults are evolutionary highly conserved ribonucleoproteins particles with a hollow barrel-like structure. The main component of vaults represents the 110 kDa major vault protein (MVP, whereas two minor vaults proteins comprise the 193 kDa vault poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (vPARP and the 240 kDa telomerase-associated protein-1 (TEP-1. Additionally, at least one small and untranslated RNA is found as a constitutive component. MVP seems to play an important role in the development of multidrug resistance. This particle has also been implicated in the regulation of several cellular processes including transport mechanisms, signal transmission and immune responses. Vaults are considered a prognostic marker for different cancer types. The level of MVP expression predicts the clinical outcome after chemotherapy in different tumour types. Recently, new roles have been assigned to MVP and vaults including the association with the insulin-like growth factor-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, and the two major DNA double-strand break repair machineries: non-homologous endjoining and homologous recombination. Furthermore, MVP has been proposed as a useful prognostic factor associated with radiotherapy resistance. Here, we review these novel actions of vaults and discuss a putative role of MVP and vaults in the response to radiotherapy.

  12. Analysis of MVP and VPARP promoters indicates a role for chromatin remodeling in the regulation of MVP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Nil; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H

    2004-04-16

    Multi-drug-resistant cancer cells frequently express elevated levels of ribonucleoprotein complexes termed vaults. The increased expression of vault proteins and their mRNAs has led to the suggestion that vaults may play a direct role in preventing drug toxicity. To further understand vault component up-regulation, the three proteins that comprise the vault, the major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP), and telomerase-associated protein-1 (TEP1), were examined with respect to gene amplification and drug-induced chromatin remodeling. Gene amplification was not responsible for increased vault component levels in multi-drug-resistant cancer cell lines. The TATA-less murine MVP and human VPARP promoters were identified and functionally characterized. There was no significant activation of either the MVP or VPARP promoters in drug-resistant cell lines in comparison to their parental, drug-sensitive counterparts. Treatment of various cell lines with sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC), led to an increase in vault component protein levels. Furthermore, treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a more specific inhibitor of HDAC, caused an increase in MVP protein, mRNA, and promoter activity. These results suggest that up-regulation of MVP in multi-drug resistance (MDR) may involve chromatin remodeling.

  13. Correlation between Expression of MVP, Index of p53 and AgNOR Value with Chemoradiotherapy Clinical Response of Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kurnia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer found in Indonesia. The primary treatment of cervical cancer at the locally advanced stage is usually performed by using radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The combination of the two techniques is often called chemoradioherapy. The response to chemoradiotherapy is influenced by biological and physical factors. Major vault protein (MVP is a ribonucleoprotein which contributes to drug resistance in some cancers. The purposes of this research were: (1 to determine the correlation between the expression of MVP and the index of p53, including AgNOR values and index of MIB-1; and (2 between MVP and chemoradiotherapy clinical response of cervical cancer. Twenty-one microscopic slides taken from biopsy tissues of cervical cancer patients before undergoing treatment were stained to identify MVP, p53, and MIB-1 by means of immunohistochemistry techniques and AgNORs staining. After undergoing chemoradiotherapy treatment, the patients’ clinical responses were observed by pelvic control method. Experimental results showed that there was a correlation between MVP and AgNOR value (P=0.05, but no correlation between MVP and index of p53 (P=0.729, including MIB-1 LI (P=0.63, in untreated cervical cancer. In addition, there was no association between MVP and chemoradioterapy response. In conclusion, MVP expression correlates with the process of cell proliferation before the G2 phase of cell cycle in untreated cancer cells. Those have no association with clinical responses after the completion of treatment.

  14. Expression profiles of vault components MVP, TEP1 and vPARP and their correlation to other multidrug resistance proteins in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Witold; Sujka-Kordowska, Patrycja; Pula, Bartosz; Jaszczyńska-Nowinka, Karolina; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Zawierucha, Piotr; Dziegiel, Piotr; Nowicki, Michał; Ivanov, Pavel; Zabel, Maciej

    2013-08-01

    Vaults are cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles composed of three proteins (MVP, TEP1, vPARP) and vault‑associated RNAs (vRNAs). Although the cellular functions of vaults remain unclear, vaults are strongly linked to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR), the major obstacle to the efficient treatment of cancers. Available published data suggest that vaults and their components are frequently upregulated in broad variety of multidrug-resistant cancer cell lines and tumors of different histological origin. Here, we provide detailed analysis of vault protein expression in post-surgery ovarian cancer samples from patients that were not exposed to chemotherapy. Our analysis suggests that vault proteins are expressed in the ovaries of healthy individuals but their expression in cancer patients is changed. Specifically, MVP, TEP1 and vPARP mRNA levels are significantly decreased in cancer samples with tendency of lower expression in higher-grade tumors. The pattern of vault protein mRNA expression is strongly correlated with the expression of other MDR-associated proteins such as MDR1, MRP1 and BCRP. Surprisingly, the protein levels of MVP, TEP1 and vPARP are actually increased in the higher‑grade tumors suggesting existence of post-transcriptional regulation of vault component production.

  15. Disruption of the murine major vault protein (MVP/LRP) gene does not induce hypersensitivity to cytostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossink, Marieke H; van Zon, Arend; Fränzel-Luiten, Erna; Schoester, Martijn; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2002-12-15

    Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a distinct structure and a high degree of conservation between species. Although no function has been assigned to the complex yet, there is some evidence for a role of vaults in multidrug resistance. To confirm a direct relation between vaults and multidrug resistance, and to investigate other possible functions of vaults, we have generated a major vault protein (MVP/lung resistance-related protein) knockout mouse model. The MVP(-/-) mice are viable, healthy, and show no obvious abnormalities. We investigated the sensitivity of MVP(-/-) embryonic stem cells and bone marrow cells derived from the MVP-deficient mice to various cytostatic agents with different mechanisms of action. Neither the MVP(-/-) embryonic stem cells nor the MVP(-/-) bone marrow cells showed an increased sensitivity to any of the drugs examined, as compared with wild-type cells. Furthermore, the activities of the ABC-transporters P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein and breast cancer resistance protein were unaltered on MVP deletion in these cells. In addition, MVP wild-type and deficient mice were treated with the anthracycline doxorubicin. Both groups of mice responded similarly to the doxorubicin treatment. Our results suggest that MVP/vaults are not directly involved in the resistance to cytostatic agents.

  16. MVP and vaults: a role in the radiation response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Pedro C; Pruschy, Martin; Zimmermann, Martina; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto

    2011-10-31

    Vaults are evolutionary highly conserved ribonucleoproteins particles with a hollow barrel-like structure. The main component of vaults represents the 110 kDa major vault protein (MVP), whereas two minor vaults proteins comprise the 193 kDa vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (vPARP) and the 240 kDa telomerase-associated protein-1 (TEP-1). Additionally, at least one small and untranslated RNA is found as a constitutive component. MVP seems to play an important role in the development of multidrug resistance. This particle has also been implicated in the regulation of several cellular processes including transport mechanisms, signal transmission and immune responses. Vaults are considered a prognostic marker for different cancer types. The level of MVP expression predicts the clinical outcome after chemotherapy in different tumour types. Recently, new roles have been assigned to MVP and vaults including the association with the insulin-like growth factor-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, and the two major DNA double-strand break repair machineries: non-homologous endjoining and homologous recombination. Furthermore, MVP has been proposed as a useful prognostic factor associated with radiotherapy resistance. Here, we review these novel actions of vaults and discuss a putative role of MVP and vaults in the response to radiotherapy.

  17. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is localized to subnuclear domains enriched in splicing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yi, E-mail: yihooyi@gmail.com; Ericsson, Ida, E-mail: ida.ericsson@ntnu.no; Doseth, Berit, E-mail: berit.doseth@ntnu.no; Liabakk, Nina B., E-mail: nina.beate.liabakk@ntnu.no; Krokan, Hans E., E-mail: hans.krokan@ntnu.no; Kavli, Bodil, E-mail: bodil.kavli@ntnu.no

    2014-03-10

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the mutator enzyme in adaptive immunity. AID initiates the antibody diversification processes in activated B cells by deaminating cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. To some extent other genes are also targeted, which may lead to genome instability and B cell malignancy. Thus, it is crucial to understand its targeting and regulation mechanisms. AID is regulated at several levels including subcellular compartmentalization. However, the complex nuclear distribution and trafficking of AID has not been studied in detail previously. In this work, we examined the subnuclear localization of AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 and found that they associate with spliceosome-associated structures including Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. Moreover, protein kinase A (PKA), which activates AID by phosphorylation at Ser38, is present together with AID in nuclear speckles. Importantly, we demonstrate that AID physically associates with the major spliceosome subunits (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, snRNPs), as well as other essential splicing components, in addition to the transcription machinery. Based on our findings and the literature, we suggest a transcription-coupled splicing-associated model for AID targeting and activation. - Highlights: • AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 localize to Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. • AID associates with its activating kinase PKA in nuclear speckles. • AID is linked to the splicing machinery in switching B-cells. • Our findings suggest a transcription-coupled splicing associated mechanism for AID targeting and activation.

  18. VRK1 regulates Cajal body dynamics and protects coilin from proteasomal degradation in cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, Lara; Sanz-García, Marta; Vinograd-Byk, Hadar; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Lazo, Pedro A

    2015-06-12

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear organelles associated with ribonucleoprotein functions and RNA maturation. CBs are assembled on coilin, its main scaffold protein, in a cell cycle dependent manner. The Ser-Thr VRK1 (vaccinia-related kinase 1) kinase, whose activity is also cell cycle regulated, interacts with and phosphorylates coilin regulating assembly of CBs. Coilin phosphorylation is not necessary for its interaction with VRK1, but it occurs in mitosis and regulates coilin stability. Knockdown of VRK1 or VRK1 inactivation by serum deprivation causes a loss of coilin phosphorylation in Ser184 and of CBs formation, which are rescued with an active VRK1, but not by kinase-dead VRK1. The phosphorylation of coilin in Ser184 occurs during mitosis before assembly of CBs. Loss of coilin phosphorylation results in disintegration of CBs, and of coilin degradation that is prevented by proteasome inhibitors. After depletion of VRK1, coilin is ubiquitinated in nuclei, which is partly mediated by mdm2, but its proteasomal degradation occurs in cytosol and is prevented by blocking its nuclear export. We conclude that VRK1 is a novel regulator of CBs dynamics and stability in cell cycle by protecting coilin from ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome, and propose a model of CB dynamics.

  19. The role of Cas8 in type I CRISPR interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Simon D B; Haas, Karina A; Stoll, Britta; Alkhnbashi, Omer S; Sharma, Kundan; Urlaub, Henning; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita; Bolt, Edward L

    2015-05-05

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) systems provide bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity to repel invasive genetic elements. Type I systems use 'cascade' [CRISPR-associated (Cas) complex for antiviral defence] ribonucleoprotein complexes to target invader DNA, by base pairing CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to protospacers. Cascade identifies PAMs (protospacer adjacent motifs) on invader DNA, triggering R-loop formation and subsequent DNA degradation by Cas3. Cas8 is a candidate PAM recognition factor in some cascades. We analysed Cas8 homologues from type IB CRISPR systems in archaea Haloferax volcanii (Hvo) and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (Mth). Cas8 was essential for CRISPR interference in Hvo and purified Mth Cas8 protein responded to PAM sequence when binding to nucleic acids. Cas8 interacted physically with Cas5-Cas7-crRNA complex, stimulating binding to PAM containing substrates. Mutation of conserved Cas8 amino acid residues abolished interference in vivo and altered catalytic activity of Cas8 protein in vitro. This is experimental evidence that Cas8 is important for targeting Cascade to invader DNA. © 2015 Authors.

  20. hnRNP L regulates differences in expression of mouse integrin alpha2beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheli, Yann; Kunicki, Thomas J

    2006-06-01

    There is a 2-fold variation in platelet integrin alpha2beta1 levels among inbred mouse strains. Decreased alpha2beta1 in 4 strains carrying Itga2 haplotype 2 results from decreased affinity of heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L) for a 6 CA repeat sequence (CA6) within intron 1. Seven strains bearing haplotype 1 and a 21 CA repeat sequence at this position (CA21) express twice the level of platelet alpha2beta1 and exhibit an equivalent gain of platelet function in vitro. By UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation, hnRNP L binds more avidly to CA21, relative to CA6. By cell-free, in vitro mRNA splicing, decreased binding of hnRNP L results in decreased splicing efficiency and an increased proportion of alternatively spliced product. The splicing enhancer activity of CA21 in vivo is abolished by prior treatment with hnRNP L-specific siRNA. Thus, decreased surface alpha2beta1 results from decreased Itga2 pre-mRNA splicing regulated by hnRNP L and depends on CA repeat length at a specific site in intron 1.

  1. hnRNP L regulates differences in expression of mouse integrin α2β1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheli, Yann; Kunicki, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    There is a 2-fold variation in platelet integrin α2β1 levels among inbred mouse strains. Decreased α2β1 in 4 strains carrying Itga2 haplotype 2 results from decreased affinity of heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L) for a 6 CA repeat sequence (CA6) within intron 1. Seven strains bearing haplotype 1 and a 21 CA repeat sequence at this position (CA21) express twice the level of platelet α2β1 and exhibit an equivalent gain of platelet function in vitro. By UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation, hnRNP L binds more avidly to CA21, relative to CA6. By cell-free, in vitro mRNA splicing, decreased binding of hnRNP L results in decreased splicing efficiency and an increased proportion of alternatively spliced product. The splicing enhancer activity of CA21 in vivo is abolished by prior treatment with hnRNP L–specific siRNA. Thus, decreased surface α2β1 results from decreased Itga2 pre-mRNA splicing regulated by hnRNP L and depends on CA repeat length at a specific site in intron 1. PMID:16455949

  2. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Katahira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex.

  3. Selective incorporation of vRNP into influenza A virions determined by its specific interaction with M1 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaimayo, Chutikarn [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Underwood, Andrew; Hodges, Erin [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Takimoto, Toru, E-mail: toru_takimoto@urmc.rochester.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Influenza A viruses contain eight single-stranded, negative-sense RNA segments as viral genomes in the form of viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). During genome replication in the nucleus, positive-sense complementary RNPs (cRNPs) are produced as replicative intermediates, which are not incorporated into progeny virions. To analyze the mechanism of selective vRNP incorporation into progeny virions, we quantified vRNPs and cRNPs in the nuclear and cytosolic fractions of infected cells, using a strand-specific qRT-PCR. Unexpectedly, we found that cRNPs were also exported to the cytoplasm. This export was chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-independent unlike that of vRNPs. Although both vRNPs and cRNPs were present in the cytosol, viral matrix (M1) protein, a key regulator for viral assembly, preferentially bound vRNPs over cRNPs. These results indicate that influenza A viruses selectively uptake cytosolic vRNPs through a specific interaction with M1 during viral assembly. - Highlights: •Influenza cRNPs are exported from the nucleus of an infected cell via a CRM1-independent pathway. •Influenza A viruses selectively incorporate cytosolic vRNPs through a specific interaction with M1 during viral assembly. •M1 dissociates from vRNP export complex after nuclear export, and is re-associated with vRNPs at the plasma membrane.

  4. Differential protein expression in alligator leukocytes in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Mark; Kinney, Clint; Sanders, Paige

    2009-12-01

    Blood was collected from three juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) before, and again 24h after, injection with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The leukocytes were collected from both samples, and the proteins were extracted. Each group of proteins was labeled with a different fluorescent dye and the differences in protein expression were analyzed by two dimensional differential in-gel expressions (2D-DIGE). The proteins which appeared to be increased or decreased by treatment with LPS were selected and analyzed by MALDI-TOF to determine mass and LC-MS/MS to acquire the partial protein sequences. The peptide sequences were compared to the NCBI protein sequence database to determine homology with other sequences from other species. Several proteins of interest appeared to be increased upon LPS stimulation. Proteins with homology to human transgelin-2, fish glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, amphibian α-enolase, alligator lactate dehydrogenase, fish ubiquitin-activating enzyme, and fungal β-tubulin were also increased after LPS injection. Proteins with homology to fish vimentin 4, murine heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A3, and avian calreticulin were found to be decreased in response to LPS. In addition, five proteins, four of which were up-regulated (827, 560, 512, and 650%) and one that exhibited repressed expression (307%), did not show homology to any protein in the database, and thus may represent newly discovered proteins. We are using this biochemical approach to isolate and characterize alligator proteins with potential relevant immune function.

  5. Proteomic analysis of polyribosomes identifies splicing factors as potential regulators of translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviner, Ranen; Hofmann, Sarah; Elman, Tamar; Shenoy, Anjana; Geiger, Tamar; Elkon, Ran; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2017-06-02

    Precise regulation of mRNA translation is critical for proper cell division, but little is known about the factors that mediate it. To identify mRNA-binding proteins that regulate translation during mitosis, we analyzed the composition of polysomes from interphase and mitotic cells using unbiased quantitative mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We found that mitotic polysomes are enriched with a subset of proteins involved in RNA processing, including alternative splicing and RNA export. To demonstrate that these may indeed be regulators of translation, we focused on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C) as a test case and confirmed that it is recruited to elongating ribosomes during mitosis. Then, using a combination of pulsed SILAC, metabolic labeling and ribosome profiling, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP C affects both global and transcript-specific translation rates and found that hnRNP C is specifically important for translation of mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. Taken together, our results demonstrate how proteomic analysis of polysomes can provide insight into translation regulation under various cellular conditions of interest and suggest that hnRNP C facilitates production of translation machinery components during mitosis to provide daughter cells with the ability to efficiently synthesize proteins as they enter G1 phase. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Modulation of LINE-1 and Alu/SVA Retrotransposition by Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome-Related SAMHD1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Long interspersed elements 1 (LINE-1 occupy at least 17% of the human genome and are its only active autonomous retrotransposons. However, the host factors that regulate LINE-1 retrotransposition are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the Aicardi-Goutières syndrome gene product SAMHD1, recently revealed to be an inhibitor of HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infectivity and neutralized by the viral Vpx protein, is also a potent regulator of LINE-1 and LINE-1-mediated Alu/SVA retrotransposition. We also found that mutant SAMHD1s of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome patients are defective in LINE-1 inhibition. Several domains of SAMHD1 are critical for LINE-1 regulation. SAMHD1 inhibits LINE-1 retrotransposition in dividing cells. An enzymatic active site mutant SAMHD1 maintained substantial anti-LINE-1 activity. SAMHD1 inhibits ORF2p-mediated LINE-1 reverse transcription in isolated LINE-1 ribonucleoproteins by reducing ORF2p level. Thus, SAMHD1 may be a cellular regulator of LINE-1 activity that is conserved in mammals.

  7. MOV10 RNA helicase is a potent inhibitor of retrotransposition in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L Goodier

    Full Text Available MOV10 protein, a putative RNA helicase and component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC, inhibits retrovirus replication. We show that MOV10 also severely restricts human LINE1 (L1, Alu, and SVA retrotransposons. MOV10 associates with the L1 ribonucleoprotein particle, along with other RNA helicases including DDX5, DHX9, DDX17, DDX21, and DDX39A. However, unlike MOV10, these other helicases do not strongly inhibit retrotransposition, an activity dependent upon intact helicase domains. MOV10 association with retrotransposons is further supported by its colocalization with L1 ORF1 protein in stress granules, by cytoplasmic structures associated with RNA silencing, and by the ability of MOV10 to reduce endogenous and ectopic L1 expression. The majority of the human genome is repetitive DNA, most of which is the detritus of millions of years of accumulated retrotransposition. Retrotransposons remain active mutagens, and their insertion can disrupt gene function. Therefore, the host has evolved defense mechanisms to protect against retrotransposition, an arsenal we are only beginning to understand. With homologs in other vertebrates, insects, and plants, MOV10 may represent an ancient and innate form of immunity against both infective viruses and endogenous retroelements.

  8. Ribosomal studies on the 70S ribosome of E.coli by means of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, N.

    1997-01-01

    Ribosomes are ribonucleo-protein complexes, which catalyse proteinbiosynthesis in all living organisms. Currently, most of the structural models of the prokaryotic 70S ribosome rely on electron microscopy and describe mainly the outer shape of the particle. Neutron scattering can provide information on the internal structure of the ribosome. Parts of the structure can be contrasted for neutrons by means of an isotopic exchange of the naturally occurring hydrogen ( 1 H) for deuterium ( 2 H), allowing direct measurements in situ. Specifically deuterium-labeled ribosomes (E. coli) were prepared and analysed with neutron scattering. The biochemical methods were established and combined to a generally applicable preparation system. This allows labeling of all ribosomal components in any combination. A systematic analysis of the protein and RNA phases resulted in the development of a new model for the 70S ribosome. This model describes not only the outer shape of the particle, but displays also an experimentally determined internal protein-RNA distribution and the border of subunits for the first time (four-phase model; resolution: 50A). Models of the 70S ribosome from other studies were evaluated and ranked according to consistency with the measured scattering data. Applying a new neutron scattering technique of particular sensitivity, the proton-spin contrast-variation, single proteins could be measured and localized. The positions of the proteins S6 and S10 were determined, providing the first coordinates of protein mass centers within the 70S ribosome. (orig.) [de

  9. Exogenous Expressions of FTO Wild-Type and R316Q Mutant Proteins Caused an Increase in HNRPK Levels in 3T3-L1 Cells as Demonstrated by DIGE Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nil Guzel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fat mass and obesity-associated protein is an enzyme that oxidatively demethylates DNA. Although there are numerous studies regarding the catalytic function of FTO, the overall existence or absence of FTO on cellular proteome has not been investigated. This study investigated the changes in the soluble proteome of 3T3-L1 cells upon expression of the WT and the mutant (R316Q FTO proteins. Protein extracts prepared from 3T3-L1 cells expressing either the WT or the mutant FTO proteins were used in DIGE experiments. Analysis of the data revealed the number of spots matched to every member and there were 350 ± 20 spots with 30.5% overall mean coefficient of variation. Eleven regulated protein spots were excised from the gels and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. One of the identified proteins was heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, which displayed more than 2.6- and 3.7-fold increases in its abundance in the WT and the mutant FTO expressing cells, respectively. Western blot analysis validated these observations. This is the first study revealing the presence of a parallel increase in expressions of FTO and HNRNPK proteins. This increase may codictate the metabolic changes occurring in the cell and may attribute a significance to HNRNPK in FTO-associated transformations.

  10. Assembly and dynamics of the U4/U6 di-snRNP by single-molecule FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, John W.; Warnasooriya, Chandani; Kondo, Yasushi; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    In large ribonucleoprotein machines, such as ribosomes and spliceosomes, RNA functions as an assembly scaffold as well as a critical catalytic component. Protein binding to the RNA scaffold can induce structural changes, which in turn modulate subsequent binding of other components. The spliceosomal U4/U6 di-snRNP contains extensively base paired U4 and U6 snRNAs, Snu13, Prp31, Prp3 and Prp4, seven Sm and seven LSm proteins. We have studied successive binding of all protein components to the snRNA duplex during di-snRNP assembly by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and accompanying conformational changes in the U4/U6 RNA 3-way junction by single-molecule FRET. Stems I and II of the duplex were found to co-axially stack in free RNA and function as a rigid scaffold during the entire assembly, but the U4 snRNA 5′ stem-loop adopts alternative orientations each stabilized by Prp31 and Prp3/4 binding accounting for altered Prp3/4 binding affinities in presence of Prp31. PMID:26503251

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Cmr2–Cmr3 subcomplex in the CRISPR–Cas RNA-silencing effector complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osawa, Takuo; Inanaga, Hideko; Numata, Tomoyuki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)

    2013-04-30

    The Cmr2–Cmr3 subcomplex from P. furiosus was co-crystallized with 3′-AMP. X-ray diffraction data for the crystals were collected to 2.6 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci, found in prokaryotes, are transcribed to produce CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs). The Cmr proteins (Cmr1–6) and crRNA form a ribonucleoprotein complex that degrades target RNAs derived from invading genetic elements. Cmr2dHD, a Cmr2 variant lacking the N-terminal putative HD nuclease domain, and Cmr3 were co-expressed in Escherichia coli cells and co-purified as a complex. The Cmr2dHD–Cmr3 complex was co-crystallized with 3′-AMP by the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.9, b = 136.7, c = 192.0 Å. The asymmetric unit of the crystals is expected to contain one Cmr2dHD–Cmr3 complex with a Matthews coefficient of 3.0 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 59%.

  12. Splicing regulatory factors, ageing and age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Eva; Harries, Lorna W

    2017-07-01

    Alternative splicing is a co-transcriptional process, which allows for the production of multiple transcripts from a single gene and is emerging as an important control point for gene expression. Alternatively expressed isoforms often have antagonistic function and differential temporal or spatial expression patterns, yielding enormous plasticity and adaptability to cells and increasing their ability to respond to environmental challenge. The regulation of alternative splicing is critical for numerous cellular functions in both pathological and physiological conditions, and deregulated alternative splicing is a key feature of common chronic diseases. Isoform choice is controlled by a battery of splicing regulatory proteins, which include the serine arginine rich (SRSF) proteins and the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) classes of genes. These important splicing regulators have been implicated in age-related disease, and in the ageing process itself. This review will outline the important contribution of splicing regulator proteins to ageing and age-related disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Coilin phosphorylation mediates interaction with SMN and SmB′

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Cory G.; Davis, Misty D.; Cosman, Angela M.; Hebert, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are subnuclear domains that participate in spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) biogenesis and play a part in the assembly of the spliceosomal complex. The CB marker protein, coilin, interacts with survival of motor neuron (SMN) and Sm proteins. Several coilin phosphoresidues have been identified by mass spectrometric analysis. Phosphorylation of coilin affects its self-interaction and localization in the nucleus. We hypothesize that coilin phosphorylation also impacts its binding to SMN and Sm proteins. In vitro binding studies with a C-terminal fragment of coilin and corresponding phosphomimics show that SMN binds preferentially to dephosphorylated analogs and that SmB′ binds preferentially to phosphomimetic constructs. Bacterially expressed full-length coilin binds more SMN and SmB′ than does the C-terminal fragment. Co-immunoprecipitation and phosphatase experiments show that SMN also binds dephosphorylated coilin in vivo. These data show that phosphorylation of coilin influences interaction with its target proteins and, thus, may be significant in managing the flow of snRNPs through the CB. PMID:19997741

  14. Coilin phosphorylation mediates interaction with SMN and SmB'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Cory G; Davis, Misty D; Cosman, Angela M; Hebert, Michael D

    2010-04-01

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are subnuclear domains that participate in spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) biogenesis and play a part in the assembly of the spliceosomal complex. The CB marker protein, coilin, interacts with survival of motor neuron (SMN) and Sm proteins. Several coilin phosphoresidues have been identified by mass spectrometric analysis. Phosphorylation of coilin affects its self-interaction and localization in the nucleus. We hypothesize that coilin phosphorylation also impacts its binding to SMN and Sm proteins. In vitro binding studies with a C-terminal fragment of coilin and corresponding phosphomimics show that SMN binds preferentially to dephosphorylated analogs and that SmB' binds preferentially to phosphomimetic constructs. Bacterially expressed full-length coilin binds more SMN and SmB' than does the C-terminal fragment. Co-immunoprecipitation and phosphatase experiments show that SMN also binds dephosphorylated coilin in vivo. These data show that phosphorylation of coilin influences interaction with its target proteins and, thus, may be significant in managing the flow of snRNPs through the CB.

  15. Structural basis of the non-coding RNA RsmZ acting as a protein sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duss, Olivier; Michel, Erich; Yulikov, Maxim; Schubert, Mario; Jeschke, Gunnar; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2014-05-29

    MicroRNA and protein sequestration by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has recently generated much interest. In the bacterial Csr/Rsm system, which is considered to be the most general global post-transcriptional regulatory system responsible for bacterial virulence, ncRNAs such as CsrB or RsmZ activate translation initiation by sequestering homodimeric CsrA-type proteins from the ribosome-binding site of a subset of messenger RNAs. However, the mechanism of ncRNA-mediated protein sequestration is not understood at the molecular level. Here we show for Pseudomonas fluorescens that RsmE protein dimers assemble sequentially, specifically and cooperatively onto the ncRNA RsmZ within a narrow affinity range. This assembly yields two different native ribonucleoprotein structures. Using a powerful combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy we elucidate these 70-kilodalton solution structures, thereby revealing the molecular mechanism of the sequestration process and how RsmE binding protects the ncRNA from RNase E degradation. Overall, our findings suggest that RsmZ is well-tuned to sequester, store and release RsmE and therefore can be viewed as an ideal protein 'sponge'.

  16. Immunoregulation by interference RNA (iRNA – mechanisms, role, perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Sikora

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The functioning of an organism depends on the precise control mechanisms, constantly adjusted to the actual state. Therefore, there is a need for efficient communication between both adjacent and distant cells, which may be executed by proteins such as hormones, neurotransmitters and cytokines. Recently another means of regulation has emerged – short regulatory RNAs (srRNAs. Although discovered only a couple of years ago, the mechanism of RNA interference has already become a topic of thousands of publications, defining its roles in both physiological and pathological processes, such as cancerogenesis and autoimmunization.RNAs regulating cell function may be coded in its genome (both exons and introns or be introduced from the external environment. In mammals microRNAs (miRNAs cooperate with proteins from the Ago/PIWI family to form effector ribonucleoprotein complexes, and owing to their complementarity to the target mRNA, control genes’ expression at the posttranscriptional level, either through the suppression of mRNA translation or through mRNA degradation.SrRNAs are crucial regulators throughout the development of immune cells, starting from hematopoietic stem cells, up to the effector cells of the adaptive immune response. Moreover, some of the regulatory cells perform their function by releasing miRNAs, which are then transported to the target cells, possibly enclosed in the exosomes.

  17. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kobayashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN. Cajal bodies (CBs, unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN proteins was reduced – a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs, also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG, and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy.

  18. A de novo frameshift in HNRNPK causing a Kabuki-like syndrome with nodular heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, L; Pagnamenta, A T; Lise, S; Clasper, S; Stewart, H; Akha, E S; Quaghebeur, G; Knight, S J L; Keays, D A; Taylor, J C; Kini, U

    2016-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a heterogeneous condition characterized by distinctive facial features, intellectual disability, growth retardation, skeletal abnormalities and a range of organ malformations. Although at least two major causative genes have been identified, these do not explain all cases. Here we describe a patient with a complex Kabuki-like syndrome that included nodular heterotopia, in whom testing for several single-gene disorders had proved negative. Exome sequencing uncovered a de novo c.931_932insTT variant in HNRNPK (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K). Although this variant was identified in March 2012, its clinical relevance could only be confirmed following the August 2015 publication of two cases with HNRNPK mutations and an overlapping phenotype that included intellectual disability, distinctive facial dysmorphism and skeletal/connective tissue abnormalities. Whilst we had attempted (unsuccessfully) to identify additional cases through existing collaborators, the two published cases were 'matched' using GeneMatcher, a web-based tool for connecting researchers and clinicians working on identical genes. Our report therefore exemplifies the importance of such online tools in clinical genetics research and the benefits of periodically reviewing cases with variants of unproven significance. Our study also suggests that loss of function variants in HNRNPK should be considered as a molecular basis for patients with Kabuki-like syndrome. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Deletions of a differentially methylated CpG island at SNRPN define a putative imprinting control region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutcliffe, J.S.,; Nakao, M.; Beaudet, A.L. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are associated with paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, of gene expression within human chromosome 15q11-q13, and are caused by deletion, uniparental disomy, or other mutations. Four transcripts designated PAR-5, PAR-7, PAR-1 and PAR-4 were isolated and localized to a region within 300 kb telomeric to the gene encoding small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N (SNRPN). Analysis of the transcripts in cultured fibroblasts and lymphoblasts from deletion patients demonstrated that SNRPN, PAR-5 and PAR-1 are expressed exclusively from the paternal chromosome, defining an imprinted domain that spans at least 200 kb. All three imprinted transcripts were absent in cells from three PWS patients (one pair of sibs and one sporadic case) with small deletions that involve a differentially methylated CpG island containing a previously undescribed 5{prime} untranslated exon ({alpha}) of SNRPN. Methylation of the CpG island is specific for the maternal chromosome consistent with paternal expression of the imprinted domain. One deletion, which is benign when maternally transmitted, extends upstream <30 kb from the CpG island, and is associated with altered methylation centromeric to SNRPN, and loss of transcription telomeric to SNRPN, implying the presence of an imprinting control region around the CpG island containing exon {alpha}.

  20. The imprinted SNRPN gene is associated with a polycistronic mRNA and an imprinting control element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, S.; Nicholls, R.D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Seip, J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated protein SmN (SNRPN) gene is located in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) critical region in chromosome 15q11-q13. We have previously shown that it is functionally imprinted in humans, being only expressed from the paternal allele and differentially methylated on parental alleles. Therefore, SNRPN may have a role in PWS, although genetic studies suggest that at least two genes may be necessary for the classical PWS phenotype. We have characterized the SNRPN genomic structure, and shown that it comprises ten exons. Surprisingly, we identified an open reading frame (ORF) in the first three exons, 190-bp 5{prime} to the SmN ORF. Notably, the majority of base substitutions bewteen human and rodents in the upstream ORF occurred in the wobble position of codons, suggesting selection for a protein coding function. This ORF, which we name SNURF (SNRPN upstream reading frame) encodes a putative polypeptide of 71 amino acids. By analogy to prokaryotic operons that encode proteins with related functions, it is possible that SNURF may have a role in pre-mRNA splicing.

  1. ANGUSTIFOLIA, a Plant Homolog of CtBP/BARS Localizes to Stress Granules and Regulates Their Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemal Bhasin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ANGUSTIFOLIA (AN gene in Arabidopsis is important for a plethora of morphological phenotypes. Recently, AN was also reported to be involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. It encodes a homolog of the animal C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs. In contrast to animal CtBPs, AN does not appear to function as a transcriptional co-repressor and instead functions outside nucleus where it might be involved in Golgi-associated membrane trafficking. In this study, we report a novel and unexplored role of AN as a component of stress granules (SGs. Interaction studies identified several RNA binding proteins that are associated with AN. AN co-localizes with several messenger ribonucleoprotein granule markers to SGs in a stress dependent manner. an mutants exhibit an altered SG formation. We provide evidence that the NAD(H binding domain of AN is relevant in this context as proteins carrying mutations in this domain localize to a much higher degree to SGs and strongly reduce AN dimerization and its interaction with one interactor but not the others. Finally, we show that AN is a negative regulator of salt and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis suggesting a functional relevance in SGs.

  2. miR-132 Regulates Dendritic Spine Structure by Direct Targeting of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasińska, Magdalena; Miłek, Jacek; Cymerman, Iwona A; Łęski, Szymon; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Dziembowska, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Mir-132 is a neuronal activity-regulated microRNA that controls the morphology of dendritic spines and neuronal transmission. Similar activities have recently been attributed to matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an extrasynaptic protease. In the present study, we provide evidence that miR-132 directly regulates MMP-9 mRNA in neurons to modulate synaptic plasticity. With the use of luciferase reporter system, we show that miR-132 binds to the 3'UTR of MMP-9 mRNA to regulate its expression in neurons. The overexpression of miR-132 in neurons reduces the level of endogenous MMP-9 protein secretion. In synaptoneurosomes, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-induced signaling stimulates the dissociation of miR-132 from polyribosomal fractions and shifts it towards the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP)-containing fraction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the overexpression of miR-132 in the cultured hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice that have increased synaptic MMP-9 level provokes enlargement of the dendritic spine heads, a process previously implicated in enhanced synaptic plasticity. We propose that activity-dependent miR-132 regulates structural plasticity of dendritic spines through matrix metalloproteinase 9.

  3. Role of Electrostatics in Protein-RNA Binding: The Global vs the Local Energy Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Zhaleh; Guzman, Irisbel; Gnutt, David; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Gruebele, Martin

    2017-09-14

    U1A protein-stem loop 2 RNA association is a basic step in the assembly of the spliceosomal U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein. Long-range electrostatic interactions due to the positive charge of U1A are thought to provide high binding affinity for the negatively charged RNA. Short range interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and contacts between RNA bases and protein side chains, favor a specific binding site. Here, we propose that electrostatic interactions are as important as local contacts in biasing the protein-RNA energy landscape toward a specific binding site. We show by using molecular dynamics simulations that deletion of two long-range electrostatic interactions (K22Q and K50Q) leads to mutant-specific alternative RNA bound states. One of these states preserves short-range interactions with aromatic residues in the original binding site, while the other one does not. We test the computational prediction with experimental temperature-jump kinetics using a tryptophan probe in the U1A-RNA binding site. The two mutants show the distinct predicted kinetic behaviors. Thus, the stem loop 2 RNA has multiple binding sites on a rough RNA-protein binding landscape. We speculate that the rough protein-RNA binding landscape, when biased to different local minima by electrostatics, could be one way that protein-RNA interactions evolve toward new binding sites and novel function.

  4. Human-like PB2 627K influenza virus polymerase activity is regulated by importin-α1 and -α7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Hudjetz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses may cross species barriers and transmit to humans with the potential to cause pandemics. Interplay of human- (PB2 627K and avian-like (PB2 627E influenza polymerase complexes with unknown host factors have been postulated to play a key role in interspecies transmission. Here, we have identified human importin-α isoforms (α1 and α7 as positive regulators of human- but not avian-like polymerase activity. Human-like polymerase activity correlated with efficient recruitment of α1 and α7 to viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs without affecting subcellular localization. We also observed that human-like influenza virus growth was impaired in α1 and α7 downregulated human lung cells. Mice lacking α7 were less susceptible to human- but not avian-like influenza virus infection. Thus, α1 and α7 are positive regulators of human-like polymerase activity and pathogenicity beyond their role in nuclear transport.

  5. Paralogs hnRNP L and hnRNP LL exhibit overlapping but distinct RNA binding constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Smith

    Full Text Available HnRNP (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein proteins are a large family of RNA-binding proteins that regulate numerous aspects of RNA processing. Interestingly, several paralogous pairs of hnRNPs exist that exhibit similar RNA-binding specificity to one another, yet have non-redundant functional targets in vivo. In this study we systematically investigate the possibility that the paralogs hnRNP L and hnRNP LL have distinct RNA binding determinants that may underlie their lack of functional redundancy. Using a combination of RNAcompete and native gel analysis we find that while both hnRNP L and hnRNP LL preferentially bind sequences that contain repeated CA dinucleotides, these proteins differ in their requirement for the spacing of the CAs. Specifically, hnRNP LL has a more stringent requirement for a two nucleotide space between CA repeats than does hnRNP L, resulting in hnRNP L binding more promiscuously than does hnRNP LL. Importantly, this differential requirement for the spacing of CA dinucleotides explains the previously observed differences in the sensitivity of hnRNP L and LL to mutations within the CD45 gene. We suggest that overlapping but divergent RNA-binding preferences, as we show here for hnRNP L and hnRNP LL, may be commonplace among other hnRNP paralogs.

  6. TCR Signal Strength Regulates Akt Substrate Specificity To Induce Alternate Murine Th and T Regulatory Cell Differentiation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawse, William F; Boggess, William C; Morel, Penelope A

    2017-07-15

    The Akt/mTOR pathway is a key driver of murine CD4 + T cell differentiation, and induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells results from low TCR signal strength and low Akt/mTOR signaling. However, strong TCR signals induce high Akt activity that promotes Th cell induction. Yet, it is unclear how Akt controls alternate T cell fate decisions. We find that the strength of the TCR signal results in differential Akt enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, the Akt substrate networks associated with T cell fate decisions are qualitatively different. Proteomic profiling of Akt signaling networks during Treg versus Th induction demonstrates that Akt differentially regulates RNA processing and splicing factors to drive T cell differentiation. Interestingly, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) L or hnRNP A1 are Akt substrates during Treg induction and have known roles in regulating the stability and splicing of key mRNAs that code for proteins in the canonical TCR signaling pathway, including CD3ζ and CD45. Functionally, inhibition of Akt enzymatic activity results in the dysregulation of splicing during T cell differentiation, and knockdown of hnRNP L or hnRNP A1 results in the lower induction of Treg cells. Together, this work suggests that a switch in substrate specificity coupled to the phosphorylation status of Akt may lead to alternative cell fates and demonstrates that proteins involved with alternative splicing are important factors in T cell fate decisions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. C9orf72 nucleotide repeat structures initiate molecular cascades of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Aaron R; Donnelly, Christopher J; Periz, Goran; Simko, Eric A J; Shaw, Patrick G; Kim, Min-Sik; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Troncoso, Juan C; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sattler, Rita; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Wang, Jiou

    2014-03-13

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion (HRE), (GGGGCC)n, in C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here we identify a molecular mechanism by which structural polymorphism of the HRE leads to ALS/FTD pathology and defects. The HRE forms DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes with distinct structures and promotes RNA•DNA hybrids (R-loops). The structural polymorphism causes a repeat-length-dependent accumulation of transcripts aborted in the HRE region. These transcribed repeats bind to ribonucleoproteins in a conformation-dependent manner. Specifically, nucleolin, an essential nucleolar protein, preferentially binds the HRE G-quadruplex, and patient cells show evidence of nucleolar stress. Our results demonstrate that distinct C9orf72 HRE structural polymorphism at both DNA and RNA levels initiates molecular cascades leading to ALS/FTD pathologies, and provide the basis for a mechanistic model for repeat-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Comparative proteomic analyses of macular and peripheral retina of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Haru; Umeda, Shinsuke; Nozawa, Takehiro; Suzuki, Michihiro T; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Etsuko T; Iwata, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The central region of the primate retina is called the macula. The fovea is located at the center of the macula, where the photoreceptors are concentrated to create a neural network adapted for high visual acuity. Damage to the fovea, e.g., by macular dystrophies and age-related macular degeneration, can reduce central visual acuity. The molecular mechanisms leading to these diseases are most likely dependent on the proteins in the macula which differ from those in the peripheral retina in expression level. To investigate whether the distribution of proteins in the macula is different from the peripheral retina, proteomic analyses of tissues from these two regions of cynomolgus monkeys were compared. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry identified 26 proteins that were present only in the macular gel spots. The expression levels of five proteins, cone photoreceptor specific arrestin-C, gamma-synuclein, epidermal fatty acid binding protein, tropomyosin 1alpha chain, and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, were significantly higher in the macula than in the peripheral retina. Immunostaining of macula sections by antibodies to each identified protein revealed unique localization in the retina, retinal pigment epithelial cells and the choroidal layer. Some of these proteins were located in cells with higher densities in the macula. We suggest that it will be important to study these proteins to determine their contribution to the pathogenesis and progression of macula diseases.

  9. RNA search engines empower the bacterial intranet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendooven, Tom; Luisi, Ben F

    2017-08-15

    RNA acts not only as an information bearer in the biogenesis of proteins from genes, but also as a regulator that participates in the control of gene expression. In bacteria, small RNA molecules (sRNAs) play controlling roles in numerous processes and help to orchestrate complex regulatory networks. Such processes include cell growth and development, response to stress and metabolic change, transcription termination, cell-to-cell communication, and the launching of programmes for host invasion. All these processes require recognition of target messenger RNAs by the sRNAs. This review summarizes recent results that have provided insights into how bacterial sRNAs are recruited into effector ribonucleoprotein complexes that can seek out and act upon target transcripts. The results hint at how sRNAs and their protein partners act as pattern-matching search engines that efficaciously regulate gene expression, by performing with specificity and speed while avoiding off-target effects. The requirements for efficient searches of RNA patterns appear to be common to all domains of life. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Human Splicing Finder: an online bioinformatics tool to predict splicing signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, François-Olivier; Hamroun, Dalil; Lalande, Marine; Collod-Béroud, Gwenaëlle; Claustres, Mireille; Béroud, Christophe

    2009-05-01

    Thousands of mutations are identified yearly. Although many directly affect protein expression, an increasing proportion of mutations is now believed to influence mRNA splicing. They mostly affect existing splice sites, but synonymous, non-synonymous or nonsense mutations can also create or disrupt splice sites or auxiliary cis-splicing sequences. To facilitate the analysis of the different mutations, we designed Human Splicing Finder (HSF), a tool to predict the effects of mutations on splicing signals or to identify splicing motifs in any human sequence. It contains all available matrices for auxiliary sequence prediction as well as new ones for binding sites of the 9G8 and Tra2-beta Serine-Arginine proteins and the hnRNP A1 ribonucleoprotein. We also developed new Position Weight Matrices to assess the strength of 5' and 3' splice sites and branch points. We evaluated HSF efficiency using a set of 83 intronic and 35 exonic mutations known to result in splicing defects. We showed that the mutation effect was correctly predicted in almost all cases. HSF could thus represent a valuable resource for research, diagnostic and therapeutic (e.g. therapeutic exon skipping) purposes as well as for global studies, such as the GEN2PHEN European Project or the Human Variome Project.

  11. In vitro culture and somatic cell nuclear transfer affect imprinting of SNRPN gene in pre- and post-implantation stages of development in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goff Alan K

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Embryo in vitro manipulations during early development are thought to increase mortality by altering the epigenetic regulation of some imprinted genes. Using a bovine interspecies model with a single nucleotide polymorphism, we assessed the imprinting status of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN gene in bovine embryos produced by artificial insemination (AI, in vitro culture (IVF and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT and correlated allelic expression with the DNA methylation patterns of a differentially methylated region (DMR located on the SNRPN promoter. Results In the AI group, SNRPN maternal expression is silenced at day 17 and 40 of development and a third of the alleles analyzed are methylated in the DMR. In the IVF group, maternal transcripts were identified at day 17 but methylation levels were similar to the AI group. However, day-40 fetuses in the IVF group showed significantly less methylation when compared to the AI group and SNRPN expression was mostly paternal in all fetal tissues studied, except in placenta. Finally, the SCNT group presented severe loss of DMR methylation in both day-17 embryos and 40 fetuses and biallelic expression was observed in all stages and tissues analyzed. Conclusion Together these results suggest that artificial reproductive techniques, such as prolonged in vitro culture and SCNT, lead to abnormal reprogramming of imprinting of SNRPN gene by altering methylation levels at this locus.

  12. Tetrahymena telomerase protein p65 induces conformational changes throughout telomerase RNA (TER) and rescues telomerase reverse transcriptase and TER assembly mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Andrea J; Gooding, Anne R; Cech, Thomas R

    2010-10-01

    The biogenesis of the Tetrahymena telomerase ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) is enhanced by p65, a La family protein. Single-molecule and biochemical studies have uncovered a hierarchical assembly of the RNP, wherein the binding of p65 to stems I and IV of telomerase RNA (TER) causes a conformational change that facilitates the subsequent binding of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) to TER. We used purified p65 and variants of TERT and TER to investigate the conformational rearrangements that occur during RNP assembly. Nuclease protection assays and mutational analysis revealed that p65 interacts with and stimulates conformational changes in regions of TER beyond stem IV. Several TER mutants exhibited telomerase activity only in the presence of p65, revealing the importance of p65 in promoting the correct RNP assembly pathway. In addition, p65 rescued TERT assembly mutants but not TERT activity mutants. Taken together, these results suggest that p65 stimulates telomerase assembly and activity in two ways. First, by sequestering stems I and IV, p65 limits the ensemble of structural conformations of TER, thereby presenting TERT with the active conformation of TER. Second, p65 acts as a molecular buttress within the assembled RNP, mutually stabilizing TER and TERT in catalytically active conformations.

  13. Regulation of the cytochrome P450 2A genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Ting; Ding Xinxin

    2004-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases of the CYP2A subfamily play important roles in xenobiotic disposition in the liver and in metabolic activation in extrahepatic tissues. Many of the CYP2A transcripts and enzymes are inducible by xenobiotic compounds, and the expression of at least some of the CYP2A genes is influenced by physiological status, such as circadian rhythm, and pathological conditions, such as inflammation, microbial infection, and tumorigenesis. Variability in the expression of the CYP2A genes, which differs by species, animal strain, gender, and organ, may alter the risks of chemical toxicity for numerous compounds that are CYP2A substrates. The mechanistic bases of these variabilities are generally not well understood. However, recent studies have yielded interesting findings in several areas, such as the role of nuclear factor 1 in the tissue-selective expression of CYP2A genes in the olfactory mucosa (OM); the roles of constitutive androstane receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), and possibly, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in transcriptional regulation of the Cyp2a5 gene; and the involvement of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 in pyrazole-induced stabilization of CYP2A5 mRNA. The aims of this minireview are to summarize current knowledge of the regulation of the CYP2A genes in rodents and humans, and to stimulate further mechanistic studies that will ultimately improve our ability to determine, and to understand, these variabilities in humans

  14. Stress granules at the intersection of autophagy and ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Zachary; Shewmaker, Frank; Pandey, Udai Bhan

    2016-10-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, fatal disease caused by loss of upper and lower motor neurons. The majority of ALS cases are classified as sporadic (80-90%), with the remaining considered familial based on patient history. The last decade has seen a surge in the identification of ALS-causing genes - including TARDBP (TDP-43), FUS, MATR3 (Matrin-3), C9ORF72 and several others - providing important insights into the molecular pathways involved in pathogenesis. Most of the protein products of ALS-linked genes fall into two functional categories: RNA-binding/homeostasis and protein-quality control (i.e. autophagy and proteasome). The RNA-binding proteins tend to be aggregation-prone with low-complexity domains similar to the prion-forming domains of yeast. Many also incorporate into stress granules (SGs), which are cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes that form in response to cellular stress. Mutant forms of TDP-43 and FUS perturb SG dynamics, lengthening their cytoplasmic persistence. Recent evidence suggests that SGs are regulated by the autophagy pathway, suggesting a unifying connection between many of the ALS-linked genes. Persistent SGs may give rise to intractable aggregates that disrupt neuronal homeostasis, thus failure to clear SGs by autophagic processes may promote ALS pathogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Autophagy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural analysis of the complex between influenza B nucleoprotein and human importin-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaronne, Alice; Milles, Sigrid; Donchet, Amélie; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Crépin, Thibaut

    2017-12-07

    Influenza viruses are negative strand RNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus of the cell. The viral nucleoprotein (NP) is the major component of the viral ribonucleoprotein. In this paper we show that the NP of influenza B has a long N-terminal tail of 70 residues with intrinsic flexibility. This tail contains the Nuclear Location Signal (NLS). The nuclear trafficking of the viral components mobilizes cellular import factors at different stages, making these host-pathogen interactions promising targets for new therapeutics. NP is imported into the nucleus by the importin-α/β pathway, through a direct interaction with importin-α isoforms. Here we provide a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and small-angle X-ray scattering (NMR/SAXS) analysis to describe the dynamics of the interaction between influenza B NP and the human importin-α. The NP of influenza B does not have a single NLS nor a bipartite NLS but our results suggest that the tail harbors several adjacent NLS sequences, located between residues 30 and 71.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Fetal Ovaries Reveals That Primordial Follicle Formation and Transition Are Differentially Regulated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primordial follicle formation represents a critical phase of the initiation of embryonic reproductive organ development, while the primordial follicle transition into primary follicle determines whether oestrus or ovulation will occur in female animals. To identify molecular mechanism of new proteins which are involved in ovarian development, we employed 2D-DIGE to compare the protein expression profiles of primordial follicles and primary follicles of fetal ovaries in pigs. Fetal ovaries were collected at distinct time-points of the gestation cycle (g55 and g90. The identified proteins at the g55 time-point are mainly involved in the development of anatomical structures [reticulocalbin-1 (RCN1, reticulocalbin-3 (RCN3], cell differentiation (actin, and stress response [heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (HNRNPK]. Meanwhile, at the g90 stage, the isolated proteins with altered expression levels were mainly associated with cell proliferation [major vault protein (MVP] and stress response [heat shock-related 70 kDa protein 2 (HSPA2]. In conclusion, our work revealed that primordial follicle formation is regulated by RCN1, RCN3, actin, and HNRNPK, while the primordial follicle transformation to primary follicle is regulated by MVP and HSPA2. Therefore, our results provide further information for the prospective understanding of the molecular mechanism(s involved in the regulation of the ovarian follicle development.

  17. How to find the optimal partner--studies of snurportin 1 interactions with U snRNA 5' TMG-cap analogues containing modified 2-amino group of 7-methylguanosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecyk, Karolina; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Ferenc-Mrozek, Aleksandra; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena

    2015-08-01

    Snurportin 1 is an adaptor protein that mediates the active nuclear import of uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U snRNA) by the importin-β receptor pathway. Its cellular activity influences the overall transport yield of small ribonucleoprotein complexes containing N(2),N(2),7-trimethylguanosine (TMG) capped U snRNA. So far little is still known about structural requirements related to molecular recognition of the trimethylguanosine moiety by snurportin in solution. Since these interactions are of a great biomedical importance, we synthesized a series of new 7-methylguanosine cap analogues with extended substituents at the exocyclic 2-amino group to gain a deeper insight into how the TMG-cap is adapted into the snurportin cap-binding pocket. Prepared chemical tools were applied in binding assays using emission spectroscopy. Surprisingly, our results revealed strict selectivity of snurportin towards the TMG-cap structure that relied mainly on its structural stiffness and compactness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumor-promoting function and prognostic significance of the RNA-binding protein T-cell intracellular antigen-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Junichi; Shoda, Katsutoshi; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Fujita, Yuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Miyakami, Yuko; Watanabe, Miki; Kudo, Yasusei; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Otsuji, Eigo; Imoto, Issei

    2016-03-29

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1) is an RNA-binding protein involved in many regulatory aspects of mRNA metabolism. Here, we report previously unknown tumor-promoting activity of TIA1, which seems to be associated with its isoform-specific molecular distribution and regulation of a set of cancer-related transcripts, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Immunohistochemical overexpression of TIA1 ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of tumor cells was an independent prognosticator for worse overall survival in a cohort of 143 ESCC patients. Knockdown of TIA1 inhibited proliferation of ESCC cells. By exogenously introducing each of two major isoforms, TIA1a and TIA1b, only TIA1a, which was localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm, promoted anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent ESCC cell proliferation. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation, followed by microarray analysis or massive-parallel sequencing, identified a set of TIA1-binding mRNAs, including SKP2 and CCNA2. TIA1 increased SKP2 and CCNA2 protein levels through the suppression of mRNA decay and translational induction, respectively. Our findings uncover a novel oncogenic function of TIA1 in esophageal tumorigenesis, and implicate its use as a marker for prognostic evaluation and as a therapeutic target in ESCC.

  19. Mutations in SNRPB, encoding components of the core splicing machinery, cause cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacrot, Séverine; Doyard, Mathilde; Huber, Céline; Alibeu, Olivier; Feldhahn, Niklas; Lehalle, Daphné; Lacombe, Didier; Marlin, Sandrine; Nitschke, Patrick; Petit, Florence; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2015-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a developmental disorder characterized by the association of Pierre Robin sequence and posterior rib defects. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in five unrelated CCMS patients revealed five heterozygous variants in the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptides B and B1 (SNRPB) gene. This gene includes three transcripts, namely transcripts 1 and 2, encoding components of the core spliceosomal machinery (SmB' and SmB) and transcript 3 undergoing nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. All variants were located in the premature termination codon (PTC)-introducing alternative exon of transcript 3. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in transcript 3 levels in leukocytes of CCMS individuals compared to controls. We conclude that CCMS is due to heterozygous mutations in SNRPB, enhancing inclusion of a SNRPB PTC-introducing alternative exon, and show that this developmental disease is caused by defects in the splicing machinery. Our finding confirms the report of SNRPB mutations in CCMS patients by Lynch et al. (2014) and further extends the clinical and molecular observations. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  20. In vitro reconstitution of the active T. castaneum telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Anthony P; Harkisheimer, Michael J; Skordalakes, Emmanuel

    2011-07-14

    Efforts to isolate the catalytic subunit of telomerase, TERT, in sufficient quantities for structural studies, have been met with limited success for more than a decade. Here, we present methods for the isolation of the recombinant Tribolium castaneum TERT (TcTERT) and the reconstitution of the active T. castaneum telomerase ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex in vitro. Telomerase is a specialized reverse transcriptase that adds short DNA repeats, called telomeres, to the 3' end of linear chromosomes that serve to protect them from end-to-end fusion and degradation. Following DNA replication, a short segment is lost at the end of the chromosome and without telomerase, cells continue dividing until eventually reaching their Hayflick Limit. Additionally, telomerase is dormant in most somatic cells in adults, but is active in cancer cells where it promotes cell immortality. The minimal telomerase enzyme consists of two core components: the protein subunit (TERT), which comprises the catalytic subunit of the enzyme and an integral RNA component (TER), which contains the template TERT uses to synthesize telomeres. Prior to 2008, only structures for individual telomerase domains had been solved. A major breakthrough in this field came from the determination of the crystal structure of the active, catalytic subunit of T. castaneum telomerase, TcTERT. Here, we present methods for producing large quantities of the active, soluble TcTERT for structural and biochemical studies, and the reconstitution of the telomerase RNP complex in vitro for telomerase activity assays. An overview of the experimental methods used is shown in Figure 1.

  1. Germ Plasm Anchoring Is a Dynamic State that Requires Persistent Trafficking

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    Kristina S. Sinsimer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Localized cytoplasmic determinants packaged as ribonucleoprotein (RNP particles direct embryonic patterning and cell fate specification in a wide range of organisms. Once established, the asymmetric distributions of such RNP particles must be maintained, often over considerable developmental time. A striking example is the Drosophila germ plasm, which contains RNP particles whose localization to the posterior of the egg during oogenesis results in their asymmetric inheritance and segregation of germline from somatic fates in the embryo. Although actin-based anchoring mechanisms have been implicated, high-resolution live imaging revealed persistent trafficking of germ plasm RNP particles at the posterior cortex of the Drosophila oocyte. This motility relies on cortical microtubules, is mediated by kinesin and dynein motors, and requires coordination between the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Finally, we show that RNP particle motility is required for long-term germ plasm retention. We propose that anchoring is a dynamic state that renders asymmetries robust to developmental time and environmental perturbations.

  2. Decreased function of survival motor neuron protein impairs endocytic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadi, Maria; Derdowski, Aaron; Kalloo, Geetika; Maginnis, Melissa S; O'Hern, Patrick; Bliska, Bryn; Sorkaç, Altar; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Cook, Steven J; Poulogiannis, George; Atwood, Walter J; Hall, David H; Hart, Anne C

    2016-07-26

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by depletion of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, with 1 in 40 Caucasians being heterozygous for a disease allele. SMN is critical for the assembly of numerous ribonucleoprotein complexes, yet it is still unclear how reduced SMN levels affect motor neuron function. Here, we examined the impact of SMN depletion in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that decreased function of the SMN ortholog SMN-1 perturbed endocytic pathways at motor neuron synapses and in other tissues. Diminished SMN-1 levels caused defects in C. elegans neuromuscular function, and smn-1 genetic interactions were consistent with an endocytic defect. Changes were observed in synaptic endocytic proteins when SMN-1 levels decreased. At the ultrastructural level, defects were observed in endosomal compartments, including significantly fewer docked synaptic vesicles. Finally, endocytosis-dependent infection by JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) was reduced in human cells with decreased SMN levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that SMN depletion causes defects in endosomal trafficking that impair synaptic function, even in the absence of motor neuron cell death.

  3. Nuclear labelling after prolonged 3H-uridine incorporation as visualized by high resolution autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakan, S.; Bernhard, W.

    1973-01-01

    Localization of radioactive labeling over the nuclei of BSC 1 cells is visualized after long periods of 3 H-5-uridine incubation followed or not followed by periods of postincubation in nonradioactive medium for up to several days, using high resolution autoradiography combined with a preferential staining method for ribonucleoproteins. It is shown that when cells are labeled for 1 or 6 h with 3 H-uridine and postincubated with a nonradioactive medium up to several days, there is always some radioactivity present in the nucleolus and nucleoplasm. When sections of cells fixed after 1 h of labeling followed by 24 h of postincubation are treated with RNase, part of the radioactivity found in the nucleus disappears almost completely only after a succeeding DNase digestion. The majority of interchromatin granules are weakly labeled after most incubation times, with the label localized rather at the periphery of clusters of granules, or are unlabeled. The results are discussed in the context of recent biochemical findings. It is proposed that interchromatin granules might represent a structure containing a limited quantity of slowly labeled nuclear RNA

  4. Repression of hTERT transcription by the introduction of chromosome 3 into human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Sachiyo [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Biopathological Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Department of Biomedical Science, Institute of Regenerative Medicine and Biofunction, Graduate School of Medical Science, Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Ohira, Takahito; Sunamura, Naohiro [Department of Biomedical Science, Institute of Regenerative Medicine and Biofunction, Graduate School of Medical Science, Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Oshimura, Mitsuo [Chromosome Engineering Research Center, Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Ryoke, Kazuo [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Biopathological Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Kugoh, Hiroyuki, E-mail: kugoh@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Science, Institute of Regenerative Medicine and Biofunction, Graduate School of Medical Science, Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Chromosome Engineering Research Center, Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan)

    2015-10-30

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that maintains telomere length. Telomerase activity is primarily attributed to the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). It has been reported that introduction of an intact human chromosome 3 into the human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line HSC3 suppresses the tumorigenicity of these cells. However, the mechanisms that regulate tumorigenicity have not been elucidated. To determine whether this reduction in tumorigenicity was accompanied by a reduction in telomerase activity, we investigated the transcriptional activation of TERT in HSC3 microcell hybrid clones with an introduced human chromosome 3 (HSC3#3). HSC#3 cells showed inhibition of hTERT transcription compared to that of the parental HSC3 cells. Furthermore, cell fusion experiments showed that hybrids of HSC3 cells and cells of the RCC23 renal carcinoma cell line, which also exhibits suppression of TERT transcription by the introduction of human chromosome 3, also displayed suppressed TERT transcription. These results suggested that human chromosome 3 may carry functionally distinct, additional TERT repressor genes. - Highlights: • hTERT mRNA expression level decreased in the chromosome 3 introduced HSC3 clones. • hTERT mRNA expression level was tend to suppressed in HSC3 and RCC23 hybrid cells. • We provide evidence that human chromosome 3 carries at least two distinct hTERT regulatory factors.

  5. Mobile Transcripts and Intercellular Communication in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saplaoura, E; Kragler, F

    2016-01-01

    Phloem serves as a highway for mobile signals in plants. Apart from sugars and hormones, proteins and RNAs are transported via the phloem and contribute to the intercellular communication coordinating growth and development. Different classes of RNAs have been found mobile and in the phloem exudate such as viral RNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs, transfer RNAs, and messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Their transport is considered to be mediated via ribonucleoprotein complexes formed between phloem RNA-binding proteins and mobile RNA molecules. Recent advances in the analysis of the mobile transcriptome indicate that thousands of transcripts move along the plant axis. Although potential RNA mobility motifs were identified, research is still in progress on the factors triggering siRNA and mRNA mobility. In this review, we discuss the approaches used to identify putative mobile mRNAs, the transport mechanism, and the significance of mRNA trafficking. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. PRMT5 regulates IRES-dependent translation via methylation of hnRNP A1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guozhen; Dhar, Surbhi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The type II arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 is responsible for the symmetric dimethylation of histone to generate the H3R8me2s and H4R3me2s marks, which correlate with the repression of transcription. However, the protein level of a number of genes (MEP50, CCND1, MYC, HIF1a, MTIF and CDKN1B) are reported to be downregulated by the loss of PRMT5, while their mRNA levels remain unchanged, which is counterintuitive for PRMT5's proposed role as a transcription repressor. We noticed that the majority of the genes regulated by PRMT5, at the posttranscriptional level, express mRNA containing an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Using an IRES-dependent reporter system, we established that PRMT5 facilitates the translation of a subset of IRES-containing genes. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, hnRNP A1, is an IRES transacting factor (ITAF) that regulates the IRES-dependent translation of Cyclin D1 and c-Myc. We showed that hnRNP A1 is methylated by PRMT5 on two residues, R218 and R225, and that this methylation facilitates the interaction of hnRNP A1 with IRES RNA to promote IRES-dependent translation. This study defines a new role for PRMT5 regulation of cellular protein levels, which goes beyond the known functions of PRMT5 as a transcription and splicing regulator. PMID:28115626

  7. Discovery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor, as a broad-spectrum antiviral against both influenza A and B viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanmei; Zhang, Jiantao; Musharrafieh, Rami Ghassan; Ma, Chunlong; Hau, Raymond; Wang, Jun

    2017-09-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant influenza viruses poses a persistent threat to public health. The current prophylaxis and therapeutic interventions for influenza virus infection have limited efficacy due to the continuous antigenic drift and antigenic shift of influenza viruses. As part of our ongoing effort to develop the next generation of influenza antivirals with broad-spectrum antiviral activity and a high genetic barrier to drug resistance, in this study we report the discovery of dapivirine, an FDA-approved HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, as a broad-spectrum antiviral against multiple strains of influenza A and B viruses with low micromolar efficacy. Mechanistic studies revealed that dapivirine inhibits the nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoproteins at the early stage of viral replication. As a result, viral RNA and protein synthesis were inhibited. Furthermore, dapivirine has a high in vitro genetic barrier to drug resistance, and its antiviral activity is synergistic with oseltamivir carboxylate. In summary, the in vitro antiviral results of dapivirine suggest it is a promising candidate for the development of the next generation of dual influenza and HIV antivirals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. AZT as a telomerase inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel E.; Armando, Romina G.; Alonso, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase is a highly specialized reverse transcriptase (RT) and the maintenance of telomeric length is determined by this specific enzyme. The human holoenzyme telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein composed by a catalytic subunit, hTERT, an RNA component, hTR, and a group of associated proteins. Telomerase is normally expressed in embryonic cells and is repressed during adulthood. The enzyme is reexpressed in around 85% of solid tumors. This observation makes it a potential target for developing drugs that could be developed for therapeutic purposes. The identification of the hTERT as a functional catalytic RT prompted studies of inhibiting telomerase with the HIV RT inhibitor azidothymidine (AZT). Previously, we have demonstrated that AZT binds preferentially to telomeres, inhibits telomerase and enhances tumor cell senescence, and apoptosis after AZT treatment in breast mammary adenocarcinoma cells. Since then, several studies have considered AZT for telomerase inhibition and have led to potential clinical strategies for anticancer therapy. This review covers present thinking of the inhibition of telomerase by AZT and future treatment protocols using the drug.

  9. A plant virus movement protein forms ringlike complexes with the major nucleolar protein, fibrillarin, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Kim, Sang Hyon; Kalinina, Natalia O; Shaw, Jane; Adya, Ashok K; Gillespie, Trudi; Brown, John W S; Taliansky, Michael

    2008-02-29

    Fibrillarin, one of the major proteins of the nucleolus, has methyltransferase activity directing 2'-O-ribose methylation of rRNA and snRNAs and is required for rRNA processing. The ability of the plant umbravirus, groundnut rosette virus, to move long distances through the phloem, the specialized plant vascular system, has been shown to strictly depend on the interaction of one of its proteins, the ORF3 protein (protein encoded by open reading frame 3), with fibrillarin. This interaction is essential for several stages in the groundnut rosette virus life cycle such as nucleolar import of the ORF3 protein via Cajal bodies, relocalization of some fibrillarin from the nucleolus to cytoplasm, and assembly of cytoplasmic umbraviral ribonucleoprotein particles that are themselves required for the long-distance spread of the virus and systemic infection. Here, using atomic force microscopy, we determine the architecture of these complexes as single-layered ringlike structures with a diameter of 18-22 nm and a height of 2.0+/-0.4 nm, which consist of several (n=6-8) distinct protein granules. We also estimate the molar ratio of fibrillarin to ORF3 protein in the complexes as approximately 1:1. Based on these data, we propose a model of the structural organization of fibrillarin-ORF3 protein complexes and discuss potential mechanistic and functional implications that may also apply to other viruses.

  10. Meeting report: discussions and preliminary findings on extracellular RNA measurement methods from laboratories in the NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise C. Laurent

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular RNAs (exRNAs have been identified in all tested biofluids and have been associated with a variety of extracellular vesicles, ribonucleoprotein complexes and lipoprotein complexes. Much of the interest in exRNAs lies in the fact that they may serve as signalling molecules between cells, their potential to serve as biomarkers for prediction and diagnosis of disease and the possibility that exRNAs or the extracellular particles that carry them might be used for therapeutic purposes. Among the most significant bottlenecks to progress in this field is the lack of robust and standardized methods for collection and processing of biofluids, separation of different types of exRNA-containing particles and isolation and analysis of exRNAs. The Sample and Assay Standards Working Group of the Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium is a group of laboratories funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health to develop such methods. In our first joint endeavour, we held a series of conference calls and in-person meetings to survey the methods used among our members, placed them in the context of the current literature and used our findings to identify areas in which the identification of robust methodologies would promote rapid advancements in the exRNA field.

  11. Preferential microRNA targeting revealed by in vivo competitive binding and differential Argonaute immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Stanislas; Leierseder, Simon; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Kuster, Bernhard; Engelhardt, Stefan

    2017-09-29

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been described to simultaneously inhibit hundreds of targets, albeit to a modest extent. It was recently proposed that there could exist more specific, exceptionally strong binding to a subgroup of targets. However, it is unknown, whether this is the case and how such targets can be identified. Using Argonaute2-ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation and in vivo competitive binding assays, we demonstrate for miRNAs-21, -199-3p and let-7 exceptional regulation of a subset of targets, which are characterized by preferential miRNA binding. We confirm this finding by analysis of independent quantitative proteome and transcriptome datasets obtained after miRNA silencing. Our data suggest that mammalian miRNA activity is guided by preferential binding of a small set of 3'-untranslated regions, thereby shaping a steep gradient of regulation between potential targets. Our approach can be applied for transcriptome-wide identification of such targets independently of the presence of seed complementary sequences or other predictors. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Immunohistochemical identification of messenger RNA-related proteins in basophilic inclusions of adult-onset atypical motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kengo; Ito, Hidefumi; Nakano, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Yoshimi; Wate, Reika; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2008-10-01

    This report concerns an immunohistochemical investigation on RNA-related proteins in the basophilic inclusions (BIs) from patients with adult-onset atypical motor neuron disease. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of the motor cortex and the lumbar spinal cord were examined. The BIs appeared blue in color with H&E and Nissl stain, and pink with methylgreen-pyronin stain. Ribonuclease pretreatment abolished the methylgreen-pyronin staining, suggesting that the BIs contained RNA. Immunohistochemically, the BIs were distinctly labeled with the antibodies against poly(A)-binding protein 1, T cell intracellular antigen 1, and ribosomal protein S6. These proteins are essential constituents of stress granules. In contrast, the BIs were not immunoreactive for ribosomal protein L28 and decapping enzyme 1, which are core components of transport ribonucleoprotein particles and processing bodies, respectively. Moreover, the BIs were not immunopositive for TDP-43. Our results imply that translation attenuation could be involved in the processes of BI formation in this disorder.

  13. THE NISSL SUBSTANCE OF LIVING AND FIXED SPINAL GANGLION CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitch, Arline D.; Moses, Montrose J.

    1957-01-01

    Living chick spinal ganglion neurons grown for 19 to 25 days in vitro were photographed with a color-translating ultraviolet microscope (UV-91) at 265, 287, and 310 mµ. This instrument was unique in permitting rapid accumulation of ultraviolet information with minimal damage to the cell. In the photographs taken at 265 mµ of the living neurons, discrete ultraviolet-absorbing cytoplasmic masses were observed which were found to be virtually unchanged in appearance after formalin fixation. These were identical with the Nissl bodies of the same cells seen after staining with basic dyes. The correlation of ultraviolet absorption, ribonuclease extraction, and staining experiments with acid and basic dyes confirmed the ribonucleoprotein nature of these Nissl bodies in the living and fixed cells. No change in distribution or concentration of ultraviolet-absorbing substance was observed in the first 12 ultraviolet photographs of a neuron, and it is concluded that the cells had not been subjected to significant ultraviolet damage during the period of photography. On the basis of these observations, as well as previous findings with phase contrast microscopy, it is concluded that Nissl bodies preexist in the living neuron as discrete aggregates containing high concentrations of nucleoprotein. PMID:13438929

  14. The relationship between the nucleolus and cancer: Current evidence and emerging paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolic, Ines; Jurada, Deana; Pullen, Nick; Oren, Moshe; Eliopoulos, Aristides G; Volarevic, Sinisa

    2016-06-01

    The nucleolus is the most prominent nuclear substructure assigned to produce ribosomes; molecular machines that are responsible for carrying out protein synthesis. To meet the increased demand for proteins during cell growth and proliferation the cell must increase protein synthetic capacity by upregulating ribosome biogenesis. While larger nucleolar size and number have been recognized as hallmark features of many tumor types, recent evidence has suggested that, in addition to overproduction of ribosomes, decreased ribosome biogenesis as well as qualitative changes in this process could also contribute to tumor initiation and cancer progression. Furthermore, the nucleolus has become the focus of intense attention for its involvement in processes that are clearly unrelated to ribosome biogenesis such as sensing and responding to endogenous and exogenous stressors, maintenance of genome stability, regulation of cell-cycle progression, cellular senescence, telomere function, chromatin structure, establishment of nuclear architecture, global regulation of gene expression and biogenesis of multiple ribonucleoprotein particles. The fact that dysregulation of many of these fundamental cellular processes may contribute to the malignant phenotype suggests that normal functioning of the nucleolus safeguards against the development of cancer and indicates its potential as a therapeutic approach. Here we review the recent advances made toward understanding these newly-recognized nucleolar functions and their roles in normal and cancer cells, and discuss possible future research directions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nucleolar proteins change in altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, M. A.; Kordyum, E. L.; Gonzalez-Camacho, F.; Medina, F. J.

    Discovery of gravisensitivity of cells no specified to gravity perception focused continuous attention on an elucidation of mechanisms involved in altered gravity effects at the different levels of cellular organization A nucleolus is the nuclear domain in which the major portion of ribosome biogenesis takes place This is a basic process for cell vitality beginning with the transcription of rDNA followed by processing newly synthesized pre-rRNA molecules A wide range of nucleolar proteins plays a highly significant role in all stages of biosynthesis of ribosomes Different steps of ribosome biogenesis should respond to various external factors affecting generally the cell metabolism Nevertheless a nucleolus remains not enough studied under the influence of altered environmental conditions For this reason we studied root apices from 2-day old Lepidium sativum seedlings germinated and grown under slow horizontal clinorotation and stationary conditions in darkness The extraction of cell nuclei followed by sequential fractionation of nuclear proteins according to their solubility in buffers of increasing ionic strength was carried out This procedure gave rise to 5 distinct fractions We analyzed nuclear subproteomes of the most soluble fraction called S2 It is actually a functionally significant fraction consisting of ribonucleoproteins actively engaged in pre-rRNA synthesis and processing 2D-electrophoresis of S2 fraction proteins was carried out The gels were silver stained and stained gels were scanned and analyzed

  16. The putative Leishmania telomerase RNA (LeishTER undergoes trans-splicing and contains a conserved template sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton J R Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available Telomerase RNAs (TERs are highly divergent between species, varying in size and sequence composition. Here, we identify a candidate for the telomerase RNA component of Leishmania genus, which includes species that cause leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease. Merging a thorough computational screening combined with RNA-seq evidence, we mapped a non-coding RNA gene localized in a syntenic locus on chromosome 25 of five Leishmania species that shares partial synteny with both Trypanosoma brucei TER locus and a putative TER candidate-containing locus of Crithidia fasciculata. Using target-driven molecular biology approaches, we detected a ∼2,100 nt transcript (LeishTER that contains a 5' spliced leader (SL cap, a putative 3' polyA tail and a predicted C/D box snoRNA domain. LeishTER is expressed at similar levels in the logarithmic and stationary growth phases of promastigote forms. A 5'SL capped LeishTER co-immunoprecipitated and co-localized with the telomerase protein component (TERT in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Prediction of its secondary structure strongly suggests the existence of a bona fide single-stranded template sequence and a conserved C[U/C]GUCA motif-containing helix II, representing the template boundary element. This study paves the way for further investigations on the biogenesis of parasite TERT ribonucleoproteins (RNPs and its role in parasite telomere biology.

  17. Mixed Connective Tissue Disease and Papillary Thyroid Cancer: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongpooswan, Supat; Tushabe, Rachel; Song, Jeffrey; Kim, Paul; Abrudescu, Adriana

    2015-08-06

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by high titers of distinct antibodies: U1 ribonucleoprotein with clinical features seen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis, and scleroderma. The association of SLE and DM with various cancers of the thyroid has been reported in the literature. However, there have been no reports associating MCTD with thyroid cancer. We present a 58-year-old woman diagnosed with MCTD with co-morbid interstitial lung disease that has remained stable for 10 years, who developed papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) 10 years after initial diagnosis. We theorize that: 1) MCTD may have been a primary diagnosis complicated by PTC, or 2) MCTD may have been an initial presentation of paraneoplastic syndrome of silent PTC, because her symptoms of MCTD significantly improved after total thyroidectomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report to associate MCTD with PTC. It highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for thyroid malignancy in MCTD patients.

  18. Functional organization of the Sm core in the crystal structure of human U1 snRNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gert; Trowitzsch, Simon; Kastner, Berthold; Lührmann, Reinhard; Wahl, Markus C

    2010-12-15

    U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) recognizes the 5'-splice site early during spliceosome assembly. It represents a prototype spliceosomal subunit containing a paradigmatic Sm core RNP. The crystal structure of human U1 snRNP obtained from natively purified material by in situ limited proteolysis at 4.4 Å resolution reveals how the seven Sm proteins, each recognize one nucleotide of the Sm site RNA using their Sm1 and Sm2 motifs. Proteins D1 and D2 guide the snRNA into and out of the Sm ring, and proteins F and E mediate a direct interaction between the Sm site termini. Terminal extensions of proteins D1, D2 and B/B', and extended internal loops in D2 and B/B' support a four-way RNA junction and a 3'-terminal stem-loop on opposite sides of the Sm core RNP, respectively. On a higher organizational level, the core RNP presents multiple attachment sites for the U1-specific 70K protein. The intricate, multi-layered interplay of proteins and RNA rationalizes the hierarchical assembly of U snRNPs in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Amino acid substitutions affecting aspartic acid 605 and valine 606 decrease the interaction strength between the influenza virus RNA polymerase PB2 '627' domain and the viral nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Ho-Pan; Yang, Yin-Hua; Szeto, Wun-Chung; Nilsson, Benjamin E; Lo, Chun-Yeung; Ng, Andy Ka-Leung; Fodor, Ervin; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2018-01-01

    The influenza virus RNA genome is transcribed and replicated in the context of the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex by the viral RNA polymerase. The nucleoprotein (NP) is the structural component of the vRNP providing a scaffold for the viral RNA. In the vRNP as well as during transcription and replication the viral polymerase interacts with NP but it is unclear which parts of the polymerase and NP mediate these interactions. Previously the C-terminal '627' domain (amino acids 538-693) of PB2 was shown to interact with NP. Here we report that a fragment encompassing amino acids 146-185 of NP is sufficient to mediate this interaction. Using NMR chemical shift perturbation assays we show that amino acid region 601 to 607 of the PB2 '627' domain interacts with this fragment of NP. Substitutions of these PB2 amino acids resulted in diminished RNP activity and surface plasmon resonance assays showed that amino acids D605 was essential for the interaction with NP and V606 may also play a partial role in the interaction. Collectively these results reveal a possible interaction surface between NP and the PB2 subunit of the RNA polymerase complex.

  20. IMP3 RNP Safe Houses Prevent miRNA-Directed HMGA2 mRNA Decay in Cancer and Development

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    Lars Jønson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The IMP3 RNA-binding protein is associated with metastasis and poor outcome in human cancer. Using solid cancer transcriptome data, we found that IMP3 correlates with HMGA2 mRNA expression. Cytoplasmic IMP3 granules contain HMGA2, and IMP3 dose-dependently increases HMGA2 mRNA. HMGA2 is regulated by let-7, and let-7 antagomiRs make HMGA2 refractory to IMP3. Removal of let-7 target sites eliminates IMP3-dependent stabilization, and IMP3-containing bodies are depleted of Ago1-4 and miRNAs. The relationship between Hmga2 mRNA and IMPs also exists in the developing limb bud, where IMP1-deficient embryos show dose-dependent Hmga2 mRNA downregulation. Finally, IMP3 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs contain other let-7 target mRNAs, including LIN28B, and a global gene set enrichment analysis demonstrates that miRNA-regulated transcripts in general are upregulated following IMP3 induction. We conclude that IMP3 RNPs may function as cytoplasmic safe houses and prevent miRNA-directed mRNA decay of oncogenes during tumor progression.

  1. Dual RNA Processing Roles of Pat1b via Cytoplasmic Lsm1-7 and Nuclear Lsm2-8 Complexes

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    Caroline Vindry

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pat1 RNA-binding proteins, enriched in processing bodies (P bodies, are key players in cytoplasmic 5′ to 3′ mRNA decay, activating decapping of mRNA in complex with the Lsm1-7 heptamer. Using co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence approaches coupled with RNAi, we provide evidence for a nuclear complex of Pat1b with the Lsm2-8 heptamer, which binds to the spliceosomal U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA. Furthermore, we establish the set of interactions connecting Pat1b/Lsm2-8/U6 snRNA/SART3 and additional U4/U6.U5 tri-small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (tri-snRNP components in Cajal bodies, the site of snRNP biogenesis. RNA sequencing following Pat1b depletion revealed the preferential upregulation of mRNAs normally found in P bodies and enriched in 3′ UTR AU-rich elements. Changes in >180 alternative splicing events were also observed, characterized by skipping of regulated exons with weak donor sites. Our data demonstrate the dual role of a decapping enhancer in pre-mRNA processing as well as in mRNA decay via distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic Lsm complexes.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of uncapped mRNAs under heat stress in Arabidopsis

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    Emilio Gutierrez-Beltran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we have showed that Tudor Staphylococcal Nuclease (TSN or Tudor-SN proteins (TSN1 and TSN2 are localized in cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP complexes called stress granules (SG and processing bodies (PB under heat stress in Arabidopsis. One of the primary functions of these mRNP complexes is mRNA decay, which generates uncapped mRNAs by the action of endonucleases and decapping enzymes (Thomas et al., 2011 [1]. In order to figure out whether TSN proteins could be implicated in mRNA decay, we isolated uncapped and total mRNAs of Wild type (WT; Col and Ler and TSN double knock-out (tsn1tsn2 seedlings grown under heat stress (39 °C for 40 min and control (23 °C conditions. Here, we provide the experimental procedure to reproduce the results (NCBI GEO accession number GSE63522 published by Gutierrez-Beltran et al. (2015 in The Plant Cell [2].

  3. USH2A Gene Editing Using the CRISPR System

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    Carla Fuster-García

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is a rare autosomal recessive disease and the most common inherited form of combined visual and hearing impairment. Up to 13 genes are associated with this disorder, with USH2A being the most prevalent, due partially to the recurrence rate of the c.2299delG mutation. Excluding hearing aids or cochlear implants for hearing impairment, there are no medical solutions available to treat USH patients. The repair of specific mutations by gene editing is, therefore, an interesting strategy that can be explored using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. In this study, this method of gene editing is used to target the c.2299delG mutation on fibroblasts from an USH patient carrying the mutation in homozygosis. Successful in vitro mutation repair was demonstrated using locus-specific RNA-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins with subsequent homologous recombination repair induced by an engineered template supply. Effects on predicted off-target sites in the CRISPR-treated cells were discarded after a targeted deep-sequencing screen. The proven effectiveness and specificity of these correction tools, applied to the c.2299delG pathogenic variant of USH2A, indicates that the CRISPR system should be considered to further explore a potential treatment of USH. Keywords: Usher syndrome, USH2A, c.2299delG, CRISPR, gene editing, RNPs

  4. Effective control of acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia progression by telomerase specific adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Sara; De Sanctis, Francesco; Lamolinara, Alessia; Boschi, Federico; Poffe, Ornella; Trovato, Rosalinda; Fiore, Alessandra; Sartori, Sara; Sbarbati, Andrea; Bondanza, Attilio; Cesaro, Simone; Krampera, Mauro; Scupoli, Maria T; Nishimura, Michael I; Iezzi, Manuela; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2017-10-20

    Telomerase (TERT) is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that preserves the molecular organization at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Since TERT deregulation is a common step in leukaemia, treatments targeting telomerase might be useful for the therapy of hematologic malignancies. Despite a large spectrum of potential drugs, their bench-to-bedside translation is quite limited, with only a therapeutic vaccine in the clinic and a telomerase inhibitor at late stage of preclinical validation. We recently demonstrated that the adoptive transfer of T cell transduced with an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR), which recognize human TERT with high avidity, controls human B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) progression without severe side-effects in humanized mice. In the present report, we show the ability of our approach to limit the progression of more aggressive leukemic pathologies, such as acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL). Together, our findings demonstrate that TERT-based adoptive cell therapy is a concrete platform of T cell-mediated immunotherapy for leukaemia treatment.

  5. Proteome analysis of schizophrenia patients Wernicke's area reveals an energy metabolism dysregulation

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    Marangoni Sérgio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is likely to be a consequence of DNA alterations that, together with environmental factors, will lead to protein expression differences and the ultimate establishment of the illness. The superior temporal gyrus is implicated in schizophrenia and executes functions such as the processing of speech, language skills and sound processing. Methods We performed an individual comparative proteome analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of 9 schizophrenia and 6 healthy control patients' left posterior superior temporal gyrus (Wernicke's area – BA22p identifying by mass spectrometry several protein expression alterations that could be related to the disease. Results Our analysis revealed 11 downregulated and 14 upregulated proteins, most of them related to energy metabolism. Whereas many of the identified proteins have been previously implicated in schizophrenia, such as fructose-bisphosphate aldolase C, creatine kinase and neuron-specific enolase, new putative disease markers were also identified such as dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, tropomyosin 3, breast cancer metastasis-suppressor 1, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 and phosphate carrier protein, mitochondrial precursor. Besides, the differential expression of peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP were confirmed by western blot in schizophrenia prefrontal cortex. Conclusion Our data supports a dysregulation of energy metabolism in schizophrenia as well as suggests new markers that may contribute to a better understanding of this complex disease.

  6. The brown algae Pl.LSU/2 group II intron-encoded protein has functional reverse transcriptase and maturase activities.

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    Madeleine Zerbato

    Full Text Available Group II introns are self-splicing mobile elements found in prokaryotes and eukaryotic organelles. These introns propagate by homing into precise genomic locations, following assembly of a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the intron-encoded protein (IEP and the spliced intron RNA. Engineered group II introns are now commonly used tools for targeted genomic modifications in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. We speculate that the catalytic activation of currently known group II introns is limited in eukaryotic cells. The brown algae Pylaiella littoralis Pl.LSU/2 group II intron is uniquely capable of in vitro ribozyme activity at physiological level of magnesium but this intron remains poorly characterized. We purified and characterized recombinant Pl.LSU/2 IEP. Unlike most IEPs, Pl.LSU/2 IEP displayed a reverse transcriptase activity without intronic RNA. The Pl.LSU/2 intron could be engineered to splice accurately in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and splicing efficiency was increased by the maturase activity of the IEP. However, spliced transcripts were not expressed. Furthermore, intron splicing was not detected in human cells. While further tool development is needed, these data provide the first functional characterization of the PI.LSU/2 IEP and the first evidence that the Pl.LSU/2 group II intron splicing occurs in vivo in eukaryotes in an IEP-dependent manner.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Cmr2–Cmr3 subcomplex in the CRISPR–Cas RNA-silencing effector complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Takuo; Inanaga, Hideko; Numata, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    The Cmr2–Cmr3 subcomplex from P. furiosus was co-crystallized with 3′-AMP. X-ray diffraction data for the crystals were collected to 2.6 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci, found in prokaryotes, are transcribed to produce CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs). The Cmr proteins (Cmr1–6) and crRNA form a ribonucleoprotein complex that degrades target RNAs derived from invading genetic elements. Cmr2dHD, a Cmr2 variant lacking the N-terminal putative HD nuclease domain, and Cmr3 were co-expressed in Escherichia coli cells and co-purified as a complex. The Cmr2dHD–Cmr3 complex was co-crystallized with 3′-AMP by the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.9, b = 136.7, c = 192.0 Å. The asymmetric unit of the crystals is expected to contain one Cmr2dHD–Cmr3 complex with a Matthews coefficient of 3.0 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 59%

  8. The Role of CRISPR-Cas Systems in Virulence of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staals, Raymond H. J.; Endtz, Hubert P.; van Baarlen, Peter; van der Oost, John

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) genes are present in many bacterial and archaeal genomes. Since the discovery of the typical CRISPR loci in the 1980s, well before their physiological role was revealed, their variable sequences have been used as a complementary typing tool in diagnostic, epidemiologic, and evolutionary analyses of prokaryotic strains. The discovery that CRISPR spacers are often identical to sequence fragments of mobile genetic elements was a major breakthrough that eventually led to the elucidation of CRISPR-Cas as an adaptive immunity system. Key elements of this unique prokaryotic defense system are small CRISPR RNAs that guide nucleases to complementary target nucleic acids of invading viruses and plasmids, generally followed by the degradation of the invader. In addition, several recent studies have pointed at direct links of CRISPR-Cas to regulation of a range of stress-related phenomena. An interesting example concerns a pathogenic bacterium that possesses a CRISPR-associated ribonucleoprotein complex that may play a dual role in defense and/or virulence. In this review, we describe recently reported cases of potential involvement of CRISPR-Cas systems in bacterial stress responses in general and bacterial virulence in particular. PMID:24600041

  9. Function and regulation of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) / CRISPR associated (Cas) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Corinna; Chang, James T; Fineran, Peter C

    2012-10-19

    Phages are the most abundant biological entities on earth and pose a constant challenge to their bacterial hosts. Thus, bacteria have evolved numerous 'innate' mechanisms of defense against phage, such as abortive infection or restriction/modification systems. In contrast, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) systems provide acquired, yet heritable, sequence-specific 'adaptive' immunity against phage and other horizontally-acquired elements, such as plasmids. Resistance is acquired following viral infection or plasmid uptake when a short sequence of the foreign genome is added to the CRISPR array. CRISPRs are then transcribed and processed, generally by CRISPR associated (Cas) proteins, into short interfering RNAs (crRNAs), which form part of a ribonucleoprotein complex. This complex guides the crRNA to the complementary invading nucleic acid and targets this for degradation. Recently, there have been rapid advances in our understanding of CRISPR/Cas systems. In this review, we will present the current model(s) of the molecular events involved in both the acquisition of immunity and interference stages and will also address recent progress in our knowledge of the regulation of CRISPR/Cas systems.

  10. Engineered CRISPR Systems for Next Generation Gene Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Michael; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Ebrahimkhani, Mo R; Kiani, Samira

    2017-09-15

    An ideal in vivo gene therapy platform provides safe, reprogrammable, and precise strategies which modulate cell and tissue gene regulatory networks with a high temporal and spatial resolution. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), a bacterial adoptive immune system, and its CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), have gained attention for the ability to target and modify DNA sequences on demand with unprecedented flexibility and precision. The precision and programmability of Cas9 is derived from its complexation with a guide-RNA (gRNA) that is complementary to a desired genomic sequence. CRISPR systems open-up widespread applications including genetic disease modeling, functional screens, and synthetic gene regulation. The plausibility of in vivo genetic engineering using CRISPR has garnered significant traction as a next generation in vivo therapeutic. However, there are hurdles that need to be addressed before CRISPR-based strategies are fully implemented. Some key issues center on the controllability of the CRISPR platform, including minimizing genomic-off target effects and maximizing in vivo gene editing efficiency, in vivo cellular delivery, and spatial-temporal regulation. The modifiable components of CRISPR systems: Cas9 protein, gRNA, delivery platform, and the form of CRISPR system delivered (DNA, RNA, or ribonucleoprotein) have recently been engineered independently to design a better genome engineering toolbox. This review focuses on evaluating CRISPR potential as a next generation in vivo gene therapy platform and discusses bioengineering advancements that can address challenges associated with clinical translation of this emerging technology.

  11. Structure of the vault, a ubiquitous celular component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L B; Siva, A C; Rome, L H; Stewart, P L

    1999-04-15

    The vault is a ubiquitous and highly conserved ribonucleoprotein particle of approximately 13 MDa. This particle has been shown to be upregulated in certain multidrug-resistant cancer cell lines and to share a protein component with the telomerase complex. Determination of the structure of the vault was undertaken to provide a first step towards understanding the role of this cellular component in normal metabolism and perhaps to shed some light on its role in mediating drug resistance. Over 1300 particle images were combined to calculate an approximately 31 A resolution structure of the vault. Rotational power spectra did not yield a clear symmetry peak, either because of the thin, smooth walls or inherent flexibility of the vault. Although cyclic eightfold (C8) symmetry was imposed, the resulting reconstruction may be partially cylindrically averaged about the eightfold axis. Our results reveal the vault to be a hollow, barrel-like structure with two protruding caps and an invaginated waist. Although the normal cellular function of the vault is as yet undetermined, the structure of the vault is consistent with either a role in subcellular transport, as previously suggested, or in sequestering macromolecular assemblies.

  12. Selective incorporation of vRNP into influenza A virions determined by its specific interaction with M1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaimayo, Chutikarn; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Underwood, Andrew; Hodges, Erin; Takimoto, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A viruses contain eight single-stranded, negative-sense RNA segments as viral genomes in the form of viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). During genome replication in the nucleus, positive-sense complementary RNPs (cRNPs) are produced as replicative intermediates, which are not incorporated into progeny virions. To analyze the mechanism of selective vRNP incorporation into progeny virions, we quantified vRNPs and cRNPs in the nuclear and cytosolic fractions of infected cells, using a strand-specific qRT-PCR. Unexpectedly, we found that cRNPs were also exported to the cytoplasm. This export was chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-independent unlike that of vRNPs. Although both vRNPs and cRNPs were present in the cytosol, viral matrix (M1) protein, a key regulator for viral assembly, preferentially bound vRNPs over cRNPs. These results indicate that influenza A viruses selectively uptake cytosolic vRNPs through a specific interaction with M1 during viral assembly. - Highlights: •Influenza cRNPs are exported from the nucleus of an infected cell via a CRM1-independent pathway. •Influenza A viruses selectively incorporate cytosolic vRNPs through a specific interaction with M1 during viral assembly. •M1 dissociates from vRNP export complex after nuclear export, and is re-associated with vRNPs at the plasma membrane.

  13. Large-scale label-free comparative proteomics analysis of polo-like kinase 1 inhibition via the small-molecule inhibitor BI 6727 (Volasertib) in BRAF(V600E) mutant melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Brian D; Pellitteri-Hahn, Molly C; Scarlett, Cameron O; Ahmad, Nihal

    2014-11-07

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a serine/threonine kinase that plays a key role during the cell cycle by regulating mitotic entry, progression, and exit. Plk1 is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers and is essential to sustained oncogenic proliferation, thus making Plk1 an attractive therapeutic target. However, the clinical efficacy of Plk1 inhibition has not emulated the preclinical success, stressing an urgent need for a better understanding of Plk1 signaling. This study addresses that need by utilizing a quantitative proteomics strategy to compare the proteome of BRAF(V600E) mutant melanoma cells following treatment with the Plk1-specific inhibitor BI 6727. Employing label-free nano-LC-MS/MS technology on a Q-exactive followed by SIEVE processing, we identified more than 20 proteins of interest, many of which have not been previously associated with Plk1 signaling. Here we report the down-regulation of multiple metabolic proteins with an associated decrease in cellular metabolism, as assessed by lactate and NAD levels. Furthermore, we have also identified the down-regulation of multiple proteasomal subunits, resulting in a significant decrease in 20S proteasome activity. Additionally, we have identified a novel association between Plk1 and p53 through heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC), thus providing valuable insight into Plk1's role in cancer cell survival.

  14. VHL genetic alteration in CCRCC does not determine de-regulation of HIF, CAIX, hnRNP A2/B1 and osteopontin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nyhan, Michelle J

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene inactivation is associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) development. The VHL protein (pVHL) has been proposed to regulate the expression of several proteins including Hypoxia Inducible Factor-alpha (HIF-alpha), carbonic anhydrase (CA)IX, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2\\/B1 and osteopontin. pVHL has been characterized in vitro, however, clinical studies are limited. We evaluated the impact of VHL genetic alterations on the expression of several pVHL protein targets in paired normal and tumor tissue. METHODS: The VHL gene was sequenced in 23 CCRCC patients and VHL transcript levels were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Expression of pVHL\\'s protein targets were determined by Western blotting in 17 paired patient samples. RESULTS: VHL genetic alterations were identified in 43.5% (10\\/23) of CCRCCs. HIF-1alpha, HIF-2alpha and CAIX were up-regulated in 88.2% (15\\/17), 100% (17\\/17) and 88.2% (15\\/17) of tumors respectively and their expression is independent of VHL status. hnRNP A2\\/B1 and osteopontin expression was variable in CCRCCs and had no association with VHL genetic status. CONCLUSION: As expression of these proposed pVHL targets can be achieved independently of VHL mutation (and possibly by hypoxia alone), these data suggests that other pVHL targets may be more crucial in renal carcinogenesis.

  15. Endogenous spar tin, mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia, has a complex subcellular localization suggesting diverse roles in neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robay, Dimitri; Patel, Heema; Simpson, Michael A.; Brown, Nigel A.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2006-01-01

    Mutation of spartin (SPG20) underlies a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia, a disorder principally defined by the degeneration of upper motor neurons. Using a polyclonal antibody against spartin to gain insight into the function of the endogenous molecule, we show that the endogenous molecule is present in two main isoforms of 85 kDa and 100 kDa, and 75 kDa and 85 kDa in human and murine, respectively, with restricted subcellular localization. Immunohistochemical studies on human and mouse embryo sections and in vitro cell studies indicate that spartin is likely to possess both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. The nuclear expression of spartin closely mirrors that of the snRNP (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein) marker α-Sm, a component of the spliceosome. Spartin is also enriched at the centrosome within mitotic structures. Notably we show that spartin protein undergoes dynamic positional changes in differentiating human SH-SY5Y cells. In undifferentiated non-neuronal cells, spartin displays a nuclear and diffuse cytosolic profile, whereas spartin transiently accumulates in the trans-Golgi network and subsequently decorates discrete puncta along neurites in terminally differentiated neuroblastic cells. Investigation of these spartin-positive vesicles reveals that a large proportion colocalizes with the synaptic vesicle marker synaptotagmin. Spartin is also enriched in synaptic-like structures and in synaptic vesicle-enriched fraction

  16. Hypothesis: A Role for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in Mediating and Relieving MicroRNA-Guided Translational Repression?

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    Isabelle Plante

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA-guided messenger RNA (mRNA translational repression is believed to be mediated by effector miRNA-containing ribonucleoprotein (miRNP complexes harboring fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. Recent studies documented the nucleic acid chaperone properties of FMRP and characterized its role and importance in RNA silencing in mammalian cells. We propose a model in which FMRP could facilitate miRNA assembly on target mRNAs in a process involving recognition of G quartet structures. Functioning within a duplex miRNP, FMRP may also mediate mRNA targeting through a strand exchange mechanism, in which the miRNA* of the duplex is swapped for the mRNA. Furthermore, FMRP may contribute to the relief of miRNA-guided mRNA repression through a reverse strand exchange reaction, possibly initiated by a specific cellular signal, that would liberate the mRNA for translation. Suboptimal utilization of miRNAs may thus account for some of themolecular defects in patients with the fragile X syndrome.

  17. Protein Alterations in Infiltrating Ductal Carcinomas of the Breast as Detected by Nonequilibrium pH Gradient Electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry

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    Maria Kabbage

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of breast-cancer detection through the identification of potential cancer biomarkers is considered as a promising strategy for effective assessment of the disease. The current study has used nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis with subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry to identify protein alterations in invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast from Tunisian women. We have identified multiple protein alterations in tumor tissues that were picked, processed, and unambiguously assigned identities by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF. The proteins identified span a wide range of functions and are believed to have potential clinical applications as cancer biomarkers. They include glycolytic enzymes, molecular chaperones, cytoskeletal-related proteins, antioxydant enzymes, and immunologic related proteins. Among these proteins, enolase 1, phosphoglycerate kinase 1, deoxyhemoglobin, Mn-superoxyde dismutase, α-B-crystallin, HSP27, Raf kinase inhibitor protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1, cofilin 1, and peptidylprolyl isomerase A were overexpressed in tumors compared with normal tissues. In contrast, the IGHG1 protein, the complement C3 component C3c, which are two newly identified protein markers, were downregulated in IDCA tissues.

  18. The Emerging Roles for Telomerase in the Central Nervous System

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    Meng-Ying Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase, a specialized ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex, maintains telomere length at the 3′ end of chromosomes, and functions importantly in stem cells, cancer and aging. Telomerase exists in neural stem cells (NSCs and neural progenitor cells (NPCs, at a high level in the developing and adult brains of humans and rodents. Increasing studies have demonstrated that telomerase in NSCs/NPCs plays important roles in cell proliferation, neuronal differentiation, neuronal survival and neuritogenesis. In addition, recent works have shown that telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT can protect newborn neurons from apoptosis and excitotoxicity. However, to date, the link between telomerase and diseases in the central nervous system (CNS is not well reviewed. Here, we analyze the evidence and summarize the important roles of telomerase in the CNS. Understanding the roles of telomerase in the nervous system is not only important to gain further insight into the process of the neural cell life cycle but would also provide novel therapeutic applications in CNS diseases such as neurodegenerative condition, mood disorders, aging and other ailments.

  19. U1 snRNP Alteration and Neuronal Cell Cycle Reentry in Alzheimer Disease

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    Bing Bai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aberrancy of U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP complex and RNA splicing has been demonstrated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Importantly, the U1 proteopathy is AD-specific, widespread and early-occurring, thus providing a very unique clue to the AD pathogenesis. The prominent feature of U1 histopathology is its nuclear depletion and redistribution in the neuronal cytoplasm. According to the preliminary data, the initial U1 cytoplasmic distribution pattern is similar to the subcellular translocation of the spliceosome in cells undergoing mitosis. This implies that the U1 mislocalization might reflect the neuronal cell cycle-reentry (CCR which has been extensively evidenced in AD brains. The CCR phenomenon explains the major molecular and cellular events in AD brains, such as Tau and amyloid precursor protein (APP phosphorylation, and the possible neuronal death through mitotic catastrophe (MC. Furthermore, the CCR might be mechanistically linked to inflammation, a critical factor in the AD etiology according to the genetic evidence. Therefore, the discovery of U1 aberrancy might strengthen the involvement of CCR in the AD neuronal degeneration.

  20. Native gel electrophoresis of human telomerase distinguishes active complexes with or without dyskerin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardano, Laura; Holland, Linda; Oulton, Rena; Le Bihan, Thierry; Harrington, Lea

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres, the ends of linear chromosomes, safeguard against genome instability. The enzyme responsible for extension of the telomere 3′ terminus is the ribonucleoprotein telomerase. Whereas telomerase activity can be reconstituted in vitro with only the telomerase RNA (hTR) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), additional components are required in vivo for enzyme assembly, stability and telomere extension activity. One such associated protein, dyskerin, promotes hTR stability in vivo and is the only component to co-purify with active, endogenous human telomerase. We used oligonucleotide-based affinity purification of hTR followed by native gel electrophoresis and in-gel telomerase activity detection to query the composition of telomerase at different purification stringencies. At low salt concentrations (0.1 M NaCl), affinity-purified telomerase was ‘supershifted’ with an anti-dyskerin antibody, however the association with dyskerin was lost after purification at 0.6 M NaCl, despite the retention of telomerase activity and a comparable yield of hTR. The interaction of purified hTR and dyskerin in vitro displayed a similar salt-sensitive interaction. These results demonstrate that endogenous human telomerase, once assembled and active, does not require dyskerin for catalytic activity. Native gel electrophoresis may prove useful in the characterization of telomerase complexes under various physiological conditions. PMID:22187156

  1. Evidence for ovarian granulosa stem cells: telomerase activity and localization of the telomerase ribonucleic acid component in bovine ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavranos, T C; Mathis, J M; Latham, S E; Kalionis, B; Shay, J W; Rodgers, R J

    1999-08-01

    We have previously postulated that granulosa cells of developing follicles arise from a population of stem cells. Stem cells and cancer cells can divide indefinitely partly because they express telomerase. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that repairs the ends of telomeres that otherwise shorten progressively upon each successive cell division. In this study we carried out cell cycle analyses and examined telomerase expression to examine our hypothesis. Preantral (60-100 microm) and small (1 mm) follicles, as well as granulosa cells from medium-sized (3 mm) and large (6-8 mm) follicles, were isolated. Cell cycle analyses and expression of Ki-67, a cell cycle-related protein, were undertaken on follicles of each size (n = 3) by flow cytometry; 12% to 16% of granulosa cells in all follicles were in the S phase, and less than 2% were in the G(2)/M phase. Telomerase activity (n = 3) was highest in the small preantral follicles, declining at the 1-mm stage and even further at the 3-mm stage. In situ hybridization histochemistry was carried out on bovine ovaries, and telomerase RNA was detected in the granulosa cells of growing follicles but not primordial follicles. Two major patterns of staining were observed in the membrana granulosa of antral follicles: staining in the middle and antral layers, and staining in the middle and basal layers. No staining was detected in oocytes. Our results strongly support our hypothesis that granulosa cells arise from a population of stem cells.

  2. Identification of Neuregulin-2 as a novel stress granule component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Ah; Jayabalan, Aravinth Kumar; Kothandan, Vinoth Kumar; Mariappan, Ramesh; Kee, Younghoon; Ohn, Takbum

    2016-08-01

    Stress Granules (SGs) are microscopically visible, phase dense aggregates of translationally stalled messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes formed in response to distinct stress conditions. It is generally considered that SG formation is induced to protect cells from conditions of stress. The precise constituents of SGs and the mechanism through which SGs are dynamically regulated in response to stress are not completely understood. Hence, it is important to identify proteins which regulate SG assembly and disassembly. In the present study, we report Neuregulin-2 (NRG2) as a novel component of SGs; furthermore, depletion of NRG2 potently inhibits SG formation. We also demonstrate that NRG2 specifically localizes to SGs under various stress conditions. Knockdown of NRG2 has no effect on stress-induced polysome disassembly, suggesting that the component does not influence early step of SG formation. It was also observed that reduced expression of NRG2 led to marginal increase in cell survival under arsenite-induced stress. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 449-454].

  3. Analysis of nuclear accumulation of influenza NP antigen in von Magnus virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, K; Aoki, H; Hamaguchi, M; Iinuma, M; Nagai, Y; Matsumoto, T; Takeura, S; Shibata, M

    1981-01-01

    When 1-5C-4 cells were infected with von Magnus virus derived from influenza A/RI/5+ virus by successive undiluted passages in chick embryos, virus-specific proteins were synthesized but production of infectious virus was inhibited. In these cells the synthesis of viral RNA was suppressed and the nucleoprotein (NP) antigen was found predominantly in the nucleus in contrast to standard virus-infected cells in which the antigen was distributed throughout the whole cell. The intracellular location and migration of NP were determined by isotope labeling and sucrose gradient centrifugation of subcellular fractions. In standard virus-infected cell NP polypeptide was present predominantly in the cytoplasm in the form of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) and intranuclear RNP was detected in reduced amounts. In contrast, in von Magnus virus-infected cells NP polypeptide was present predominantly in the nucleus in a nonassembled, soluble from and the amount of cytoplasmic RNP was considerably reduced. After short-pulse labeling NP was detected exclusively in the cytoplasm in a soluble form and after a chase a large proportion of such soluble NP was seen in the nucleus. It is suggested that a large proportion of the NP synthesized in von Magnus virus-infected cells in not assembled into cytoplasmic RNP because of the lack of available RNA and the NP migrated into the nucleus and remained there.

  4. Dynein-dependent transport of nanos RNA in Drosophila sensory neurons requires Rumpelstiltskin and the germ plasm organizer Oskar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Brechbiel, Jillian L; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2013-09-11

    Intracellular mRNA localization is a conserved mechanism for spatially regulating protein production in polarized cells, such as neurons. The mRNA encoding the translational repressor Nanos (Nos) forms ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that are dendritically localized in Drosophila larval class IV dendritic arborization (da) neurons. In nos mutants, class IV da neurons exhibit reduced dendritic branching complexity, which is rescued by transgenic expression of wild-type nos mRNA but not by a localization-compromised nos derivative. While localization is essential for nos function in dendrite morphogenesis, the mechanism underlying the transport of nos RNP particles was unknown. We investigated the mechanism of dendritic nos mRNA localization by analyzing requirements for nos RNP particle motility in class IV da neuron dendrites through live imaging of fluorescently labeled nos mRNA. We show that dynein motor machinery components mediate transport of nos mRNA in proximal dendrites. Two factors, the RNA-binding protein Rumpelstiltskin and the germ plasm protein Oskar, which are required for diffusion/entrapment-mediated localization of nos during oogenesis, also function in da neurons for formation and transport of nos RNP particles. Additionally, we show that nos regulates neuronal function, most likely independent of its dendritic localization and function in morphogenesis. Our results reveal adaptability of localization factors for regulation of a target transcript in different cellular contexts.

  5. Mechanisms underlying regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis by hnRNP B1 in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Juan; Tang, Feng-ming; Pu, Dan; Xu, Dan; Wang, Tao; Li, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 (hnRNP B1), a nuclear RNA binding protein, has been reported to occur in early-stage lung cancer and in premalignant lesions. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is known to be involved in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Reduced capacity to repair DNA has been associated with the risk of lung cancer. We investigated a link between hnRNP B1 and DNA-PK and their effects on proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. We found that hnRNP B1 and DNA-PK interact with each other in a complex fashion. Reducing hnRNP B1 expression in A549 cells with the use of RNAi led to upregulation of p53 activity through upregulation of DNA-PK activity but without inducing p53 expression. Further, suppression of hnRNP B1 in A549 cells slowed cell proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 stage. The presence of NU7026 reduced the arrest of cells at the G1 stage and reduced the apoptosis rate while promoting cell growth. Taken together, our results demonstrate that by regulating DNA-PK activity, hnRNP B1 can affect p53-mediated cell cycle progression and apoptosis, resulting in greater cell survival and subsequent proliferation.

  6. U bodies respond to nutrient stress in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckingham, Mickey; Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk

    2011-12-10

    The neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by mutation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Cytoplasmic SMN protein-containing granules, known as U snRNP bodies (U bodies), are thought to be responsible for the assembly and storage of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) which are essential for pre-mRNA splicing. U bodies exhibit close association with cytoplasmic processing bodies (P bodies), which are involved in mRNA decay and translational repression. The close association of the U body and P body in Drosophila resemble that of the stress granule and P body in yeast and mammalian cells. However, it is unknown whether the U body is responsive to any stress. Using Drosophila oogenesis as a model, here we show that U bodies increase in size following nutritional deprivation. Despite nutritional stress, U bodies maintain their close association with P bodies. Our results show that U bodies are responsive to nutrition changes, presumably through the U body-P body pathway.

  7. Vault mobility depends in part on microtubules and vaults can be recruited to the nuclear envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zon, Arend van; Mossink, Marieke H.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Schoester, Martijn; Scheffer, George L.; Scheper, Rik J.; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Vaults are ribonucleoproteins that may function in intracellular transport processes. We investigated the intracellular distribution and dynamics of vaults in non-small cell lung cancer cells in which vaults are labeled with the green fluorescent protein. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that vaults are dispersed throughout the cytoplasm; a small fraction is found in close proximity to microtubules. Immunoprecipitation experiments corroborated these results showing co-precipitation of MVP and β-tubulin. Using quantitative fluorescence-recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we demonstrated that vault mobility over longer distances in part depends on intact microtubules; vaults moving slower when microtubules are depolymerized by nocodazole. Biochemical fractionation indicated a small fraction of MVP associated with the nucleus, however, no GFP-tagged vaults could be observed inside the nucleus. We observed an accumulation of vaults at the nuclear envelope upon treatment of cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Analysis of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport using a fluorescent substrate containing a classical NLS and NES expressed in MVP +/+ and MVP -/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated no differences in nuclear import/export kinetics, suggesting no role for vaults in these processes. We hypothesize that a subset of vaults moves directionally via microtubules, possibly towards the nucleus

  8. Axon-Axon Interactions Regulate Topographic Optic Tract Sorting via CYFIP2-Dependent WAVE Complex Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioni, Jean-Michel; Wong, Hovy Ho-Wai; Bressan, Dario; Kodama, Lay; Harris, William A; Holt, Christine E

    2018-03-07

    The axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are topographically sorted before they arrive at the optic tectum. This pre-target sorting, typical of axon tracts throughout the brain, is poorly understood. Here, we show that cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting proteins (CYFIPs) fulfill non-redundant functions in RGCs, with CYFIP1 mediating axon growth and CYFIP2 specifically involved in axon sorting. We find that CYFIP2 mediates homotypic and heterotypic contact-triggered fasciculation and repulsion responses between dorsal and ventral axons. CYFIP2 associates with transporting ribonucleoprotein particles in axons and regulates translation. Axon-axon contact stimulates CYFIP2 to move into growth cones where it joins the actin nucleating WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) in the periphery and regulates actin remodeling and filopodial dynamics. CYFIP2's function in axon sorting is mediated by its binding to the WRC but not its translational regulation. Together, these findings uncover CYFIP2 as a key regulatory link between axon-axon interactions, filopodial dynamics, and optic tract sorting. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Telomere elongation in immortal human cells without detectable telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, T M; Englezou, A; Gupta, J; Bacchetti, S; Reddel, R R

    1995-09-01

    Immortalization of human cells is often associated with reactivation of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds TTAGGG repeats onto telomeres and compensates for their shortening. We examined whether telomerase activation is necessary for immortalization. All normal human fibroblasts tested were negative for telomerase activity. Thirteen out of 13 DNA tumor virus-transformed cell cultures were also negative in the pre-crisis (i.e. non-immortalized) stage. Of 35 immortalized cell lines, 20 had telomerase activity as expected, but 15 had no detectable telomerase. The 15 telomerase-negative immortalized cell lines all had very long and heterogeneous telomeres of up to 50 kb. Hybrids between telomerase-negative and telomerase-positive cells senesced. Two senescent hybrids demonstrated telomerase activity, indicating that activation of telomerase is not sufficient for immortalization. Some hybrid clones subsequently recommenced proliferation and became immortalized either with or without telomerase activity. Those without telomerase activity also had very long and heterogeneous telomeres. Taken together, these data suggest that the presence of lengthened or stabilized telomeres is necessary for immortalization, and that this may be achieved either by the reactivation of telomerase or by a novel and as yet unidentified mechanism.

  10. Telomerase activation by the E6 gene product of human papillomavirus type 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhutz, A J; Foster, S A; McDougall, J K

    1996-03-07

    Activation of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex that synthesizes telomere repeat sequences, is linked to cell immortalization and is characteristic of most cell lines and tumours. Here we show that expression of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 protein activates telomerase in early-passage human keratinocytes and mammary epithelial cells. This activation was observed in cells pre-crisis, that is, before they became immortal, and occurred within one passage of retroviral infection with vectors expressing HPV-16 E6. Studies using HPV-16 E6 mutants showed that there was no correlation between the ability of the mutants to activate telomerase and their ability to target p53 for degradation, suggesting that telomerase activation by HPV-16 E6 is p53 independent. Keratinocytes expressing wild-type HPV-16 E6 have an extended lifespan, but do not become immortal, indicating that telomerase activation and E6-mediate degradation of p53 are insufficient for their immortalization. These results show that telomerase activation is an intrinsic, but insufficient, component of transformation by HPV.

  11. Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr.) Pers., a medicinal mushroom, activates peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kah-Hui; Kanagasabapathy, Gowri; Naidu, Murali; David, Pamela; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2016-10-01

    To study the ability of aqueous extract of Hericium erinaceus mushroom in the treatment of nerve injury following peroneal nerve crush in Sprague-Dawley rats. Aqueous extract of Hericium erinaceus was given by daily oral administration following peroneal nerve crush injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways; and c-Jun and c-Fos genes were studied in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) whereas the activity of protein synthesis was assessed in peroneal nerves by immunohistochemical method. Peripheral nerve injury leads to changes at the axonal site of injury and remotely located DRG containing cell bodies of sensory afferent neurons. Immunofluorescence studies showed that DRG neurons ipsilateral to the crush injury in rats of treated groups expressed higher immunoreactivities for Akt, MAPK, c-Jun and c-Fos as compared with negative control group (P <0.05). The intensity of nuclear ribonucleoprotein in the distal segments of crushed nerves of treated groups was significantly higher than in the negative control group (P <0.05). H. erinaceus is capable of promoting peripheral nerve regeneration after injury. Potential signaling pathways include Akt, MAPK, c-Jun, and c-Fos, and protein synthesis have been shown to be involved in its action.

  12. Karyopherin alpha2 is essential for rRNA transcription and protein synthesis in proliferative keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Umegaki-Arao

    Full Text Available Karyopherin proteins mediate nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and are critical for protein and RNA subcellular localization. Recent studies suggest KPNA2 expression is induced in tumor cells and is strongly associated with prognosis, although the precise roles and mechanisms of KPNA2 overexpression in proliferative disorders have not been defined. We found that KPNA2 expression is induced in various proliferative disorders of the skin such as psoriasis, Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma, Paget's disease, Merkel cell carcinoma, and mycosis fungoides. siRNA-mediated KPNA suppression revealed that KPNA2 is essential for significant suppression of HaCaT proliferation under starvation conditions. Ribosomal RNA transcription and protein synthesis were suppressed by starvation combined with knockdown of KPNA (including KPNA2 expression. KPNA2 localized to the nucleolus and interacted with proteins associated with mRNA processing, ribonucleoprotein complex biogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcription, as demonstrated by tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry. KPNA2 may be an important promoter of ribosomal RNA and protein synthesis in tumor cells.

  13. Thermus Thermophilus as a Model System for the Study of Ribosomal Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Steven T.

    2018-03-01

    Ribosomes are the intracellular ribonucleoprotein machines responsible for the translation of mRNA sequence into protein sequence. As an essential cell component, the ribosome is the target of numerous antibiotics that bind to critical functional sites to impair protein synthesis. Mutations causing resistance to antibiotics arise in antibiotic binding sites, and an understanding of the basis of resistance will be an essential component of efforts to develop new antibiotics by rational drug design. We have identified a number of antibiotic-resistance mutations in ribosomal genes of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus. This species offers two primary advantages for examining the structural basis of antibiotic-resistance, in particular, its potential for genetic manipulation and the suitability of its ribosomes for analysis by X-ray crystallography. Mutations we have identified in this organism are in many instances identical to those found in other bacterial species, including important pathogens, a result of the extreme conservation of ribosome functional sites. Here I summarize the advantages of this organism as a model system to study antibiotic-resistance mechanisms at the molecular level.

  14. Pumping RNA: nuclear bodybuilding along the RNP pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matera, A Gregory; Shpargel, Karl B

    2006-06-01

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear subdomains involved in the biogenesis of several classes of small ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). A number of recent advances highlight progress in the understanding of the organization and dynamics of CB components. For example, a class of small Cajal body-specific (sca) RNPs has been discovered. Localization of scaRNPs to CBs was shown to depend on a conserved RNA motif. Intriguingly, this motif is also present in mammalian telomerase RNA and the evidence suggests that assembly of the active form of telomerase RNP occurs in and around CBs during S phase. Important steps in the assembly and modification of spliceosomal RNPs have also been shown to take place in CBs. Additional experiments have revealed the existence of kinetically distinct subclasses of CB components. Finally, the recent identification of novel markers for CBs in both Drosophila and Arabidopsis not only lays to rest questions about the evolutionary conservation of these nuclear suborganelles, but also should enable forward genetic screens for the identification of new components and pathways involved in their assembly, maintenance and function.

  15. Signal Recognition Particle 54 kD Protein (SRP54 from the Marine Sponge Geodia cydonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Durajlija-Žinić

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the systematic search for phylogenetically conserved proteins in the simplest and most ancient extant metazoan phylum – Porifera, we have identified and analyzed a cDNA encoding the signal recognition particle 54 kD protein (SRP54 from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium (Demospongiae. The signal recognition particle (SRP is a universally conserved ribonucleoprotein complex of a very ancient origin, comprising SRP RNA and several proteins (six in mammals. The nucleotide sequence of the sponge cDNA predicts a protein of 499 amino acid residues with a calculated Mr of 55175. G. cydonium SRP54 displays unusually high overall similarity (90 % with human/mammalian SRP54 proteins, higher than with Drosophila melanogaster (88 %, or Caenorhabditis elegans (82 %. The same was found for the majority of known and phylogenetically conserved proteins from sponges, indicating that the molecular evolutionary rates in protein coding genes in Porifera as well as in highly developed mammals (vertebrates are slower, when compared with the rates in homologous genes from invertebrates (insects, nematodes. Therefore, genes/proteins from sponges might be the best candidates for the reconstruction of ancient structures of proteins and genome/proteome complexity in the ancestral organism, common to all multicellular animals.

  16. A Requirement for Mena, an Actin Regulator, in Local mRNA Translation in Developing Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidaki, Marina; Drees, Frauke; Saxena, Tanvi; Lanslots, Erwin; Taliaferro, Matthew J; Tatarakis, Antonios; Burge, Christopher B; Wang, Eric T; Gertler, Frank B

    2017-08-02

    During neuronal development, local mRNA translation is required for axon guidance and synaptogenesis, and dysregulation of this process contributes to multiple neurodevelopmental and cognitive disorders. However, regulation of local protein synthesis in developing axons remains poorly understood. Here, we uncover a novel role for the actin-regulatory protein Mena in the formation of a ribonucleoprotein complex that involves the RNA-binding proteins HnrnpK and PCBP1 and regulates local translation of specific mRNAs in developing axons. We find that translation of dyrk1a, a Down syndrome- and autism spectrum disorders-related gene, is dependent on Mena, both in steady-state conditions and upon BDNF stimulation. We identify hundreds of additional mRNAs that associate with the Mena complex, suggesting that it plays broader role(s) in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Our work establishes a dual role for Mena in neurons, providing a potential link between regulation of actin dynamics and local translation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High-pressure applications in medicine and pharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jerson L; Foguel, Debora; Suarez, Marisa; Gomes, Andre M O; Oliveira, Andrea C

    2004-01-01

    High pressure has emerged as an important tool to tackle several problems in medicine and biotechnology. Misfolded proteins, aggregates and amyloids have been studied, which point toward the understanding of the protein misfolding diseases. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has also been used to dissociate non-amyloid aggregates and inclusion bodies. The diverse range of diseases that result from protein misfolding has made this theme an important research focus for pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The use of high pressure promises to contribute to identifying the mechanisms behind these defects and creating therapies against these diseases. High pressure has also been used to study viruses and other infectious agents for the purpose of sterilization and in the development of vaccines. Using pressure, we have detected the presence of a ribonucleoprotein intermediate, where the coat protein is partially unfolded but bound to RNA. These intermediates are potential targets for antiviral compounds. The ability of pressure to inactivate viruses, prions and bacteria has been evaluated with a view toward the applications of vaccine development and virus sterilization. Recent studies demonstrate that pressure causes virus inactivation while preserving the immunogenic properties. There is increasing evidence that a high-pressure cycle traps a virus in the 'fusion intermediate state', not infectious but highly immunogenic

  18. Formation of virions is strictly required for turnip yellows virus long-distance movement in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipper, Clémence; Monsion, Baptiste; Bortolamiol-Bécet, Diane; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2014-02-01

    Viral genomic RNA of the Turnip yellows virus (TuYV; genus Polerovirus; family Luteoviridae) is protected in virions formed by the major capsid protein (CP) and the minor component, the readthrough (RT*) protein. Long-distance transport, used commonly by viruses to systemically infect host plants, occurs in phloem sieve elements and two viral forms of transport have been described: virions and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. With regard to poleroviruses, virions have always been presumed to be the long-distance transport form, but the potential role of RNP complexes has not been investigated. Here, we examined the requirement of virions for polerovirus systemic movement by analysing CP-targeted mutants that were unable to form viral particles. We confirmed that TuYV mutants that cannot encapsidate into virions are not able to reach systemic leaves. To completely discard the possibility that the introduced mutations in CP simply blocked the formation or the movement of RNP complexes, we tested in trans complementation of TuYV CP mutants by providing WT CP expressed in transgenic plants. WT CP was able to facilitate systemic movement of TuYV CP mutants and this observation was always correlated with the formation of virions. This demonstrated clearly that virus particles are essential for polerovirus systemic movement.

  19. CryoEM structures of two spliceosomal complexes: starter and dessert at the spliceosome feast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Hoang Duong; Galej, Wojciech P; Fica, Sebastian M; Lin, Pei-Chun; Newman, Andrew J; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The spliceosome is formed on pre-mRNA substrates from five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (U1, U2, U4/U6 and U5 snRNPs), and numerous non-snRNP factors. Saccharomyces cerevisiae U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP comprises U5 snRNA, U4/U6 snRNA duplex and approximately 30 proteins and represents a substantial part of the spliceosome before activation. Schizosaccharomyces pombe U2.U6.U5 spliceosomal complex is a post-catalytic intron lariat spliceosome containing U2 and U5 snRNPs, NTC (nineteen complex), NTC-related proteins (NTR), U6 snRNA, and an RNA intron lariat. Two recent papers describe near-complete atomic structures of these complexes based on cryoEM single-particle analysis. The U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP structure provides crucial insight into the activation mechanism of the spliceosome. The U2.U6.U5 complex reveals the striking architecture of NTC and NTR and important features of the group II intron-like catalytic RNA core remaining after spliced mRNA is released. These two structures greatly advance our understanding of the mechanism of pre-mRNA splicing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Aspergillus oryzae AoSO is a novel component of stress granules upon heat stress in filamentous fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Ting Huang

    Full Text Available Stress granules are a type of cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP granule formed in response to the inhibition of translation initiation, which typically occurs when cells are exposed to stress. Stress granules are conserved in eukaryotes; however, in filamentous fungi, including Aspergillus oryzae, stress granules have not yet been defined. For this reason, here we investigated the formation and localization of stress granules in A. oryzae cells exposed to various stresses using an EGFP fusion protein of AoPab1, a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pab1p, as a stress granule marker. Localization analysis showed that AoPab1 was evenly distributed throughout the cytoplasm under normal growth conditions, and accumulated as cytoplasmic foci mainly at the hyphal tip in response to stress. AoSO, a homolog of Neurospora crassa SO, which is necessary for hyphal fusion, colocalized with stress granules in cells exposed to heat stress. The formation of cytoplasmic foci of AoSO was blocked by treatment with cycloheximide, a known inhibitor of stress granule formation. Deletion of the Aoso gene had effects on the formation and localization of stress granules in response to heat stress. Our results suggest that AoSO is a novel component of stress granules specific to filamentous fungi. The authors would specially like to thank Hiroyuki Nakano and Kei Saeki for generously providing experimental and insightful opinions.

  1. The interactomes of influenza virus NS1 and NS2 proteins identify new host factors and provide insights for ADAR1 playing a supportive role in virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chassey, Benoît; Aublin-Gex, Anne; Ruggieri, Alessia; Meyniel-Schicklin, Laurène; Pradezynski, Fabrine; Davoust, Nathalie; Chantier, Thibault; Tafforeau, Lionel; Mangeot, Philippe-Emmanuel; Ciancia, Claire; Perrin-Cocon, Laure; Bartenschlager, Ralf; André, Patrice; Lotteau, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A NS1 and NS2 proteins are encoded by the RNA segment 8 of the viral genome. NS1 is a multifunctional protein and a virulence factor while NS2 is involved in nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein complexes. A yeast two-hybrid screening strategy was used to identify host factors supporting NS1 and NS2 functions. More than 560 interactions between 79 cellular proteins and NS1 and NS2 proteins from 9 different influenza virus strains have been identified. These interacting proteins are potentially involved in each step of the infectious process and their contribution to viral replication was tested by RNA interference. Validation of the relevance of these host cell proteins for the viral replication cycle revealed that 7 of the 79 NS1 and/or NS2-interacting proteins positively or negatively controlled virus replication. One of the main factors targeted by NS1 of all virus strains was double-stranded RNA binding domain protein family. In particular, adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) appeared as a pro-viral host factor whose expression is necessary for optimal viral protein synthesis and replication. Surprisingly, ADAR1 also appeared as a pro-viral host factor for dengue virus replication and directly interacted with the viral NS3 protein. ADAR1 editing activity was enhanced by both viruses through dengue virus NS3 and influenza virus NS1 proteins, suggesting a similar virus-host co-evolution.

  2. The interactomes of influenza virus NS1 and NS2 proteins identify new host factors and provide insights for ADAR1 playing a supportive role in virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît de Chassey

    Full Text Available Influenza A NS1 and NS2 proteins are encoded by the RNA segment 8 of the viral genome. NS1 is a multifunctional protein and a virulence factor while NS2 is involved in nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein complexes. A yeast two-hybrid screening strategy was used to identify host factors supporting NS1 and NS2 functions. More than 560 interactions between 79 cellular proteins and NS1 and NS2 proteins from 9 different influenza virus strains have been identified. These interacting proteins are potentially involved in each step of the infectious process and their contribution to viral replication was tested by RNA interference. Validation of the relevance of these host cell proteins for the viral replication cycle revealed that 7 of the 79 NS1 and/or NS2-interacting proteins positively or negatively controlled virus replication. One of the main factors targeted by NS1 of all virus strains was double-stranded RNA binding domain protein family. In particular, adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1 appeared as a pro-viral host factor whose expression is necessary for optimal viral protein synthesis and replication. Surprisingly, ADAR1 also appeared as a pro-viral host factor for dengue virus replication and directly interacted with the viral NS3 protein. ADAR1 editing activity was enhanced by both viruses through dengue virus NS3 and influenza virus NS1 proteins, suggesting a similar virus-host co-evolution.

  3. Identification of human hnRNP C1/C2 as a dengue virus NS1-interacting protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Sengsai, Suchada; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Chen, Shui-Tein; Puttikhunt, Chunya

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a key glycoprotein involved in the production of infectious virus and the pathogenesis of dengue diseases. Very little is known how NS1 interacts with host cellular proteins and functions in dengue virus-infected cells. This study aimed at identifying NS1-interacting host cellular proteins in dengue virus-infected cells by employing co-immunoprecipitation, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Using lysates of dengue virus-infected human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293T), immunoprecipitation with an anti-NS1 monoclonal antibody revealed eight isoforms of dengue virus NS1 and a 40-kDa protein, which was subsequently identified by quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS) as human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) C1/C2. Further investigation by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization confirmed the association of hnRNP C1/C2 and dengue virus NS1 proteins in dengue virus-infected cells. Their interaction may have implications in virus replication and/or cellular responses favorable to survival of the virus in host cells

  4. Evidence that C9ORF72 Dipeptide Repeat Proteins Associate with U2 snRNP to Cause Mis-splicing in ALS/FTD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shanye; Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Kunz, Ryan C; Gangopadhyay, Jaya; Borufka, Carl; Gygi, Steven P; Gao, Fen-Biao; Reed, Robin

    2017-06-13

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene results in production of dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins that may disrupt pre-mRNA splicing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients. At present, the mechanisms underlying this mis-splicing are not understood. Here, we show that addition of proline-arginine (PR) and glycine-arginine (GR) toxic DPR peptides to nuclear extracts blocks spliceosome assembly and splicing, but not other types of RNA processing. Proteomic and biochemical analyses identified the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) as a major interactor of PR and GR peptides. In addition, U2 snRNP, but not other splicing factors, mislocalizes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm both in C9ORF72 patient induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived motor neurons and in HeLa cells treated with the toxic peptides. Bioinformatic studies support a specific role for U2-snRNP-dependent mis-splicing in C9ORF72 patient brains. Together, our data indicate that DPR-mediated dysfunction of U2 snRNP could account for as much as ∼44% of the mis-spliced cassette exons in C9ORF72 patient brains. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence that C9ORF72 Dipeptide Repeat Proteins Associate with U2 snRNP to Cause Mis-splicing in ALS/FTD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanye Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene results in production of dipeptide repeat (DPR proteins that may disrupt pre-mRNA splicing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD patients. At present, the mechanisms underlying this mis-splicing are not understood. Here, we show that addition of proline-arginine (PR and glycine-arginine (GR toxic DPR peptides to nuclear extracts blocks spliceosome assembly and splicing, but not other types of RNA processing. Proteomic and biochemical analyses identified the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP as a major interactor of PR and GR peptides. In addition, U2 snRNP, but not other splicing factors, mislocalizes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm both in C9ORF72 patient induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived motor neurons and in HeLa cells treated with the toxic peptides. Bioinformatic studies support a specific role for U2-snRNP-dependent mis-splicing in C9ORF72 patient brains. Together, our data indicate that DPR-mediated dysfunction of U2 snRNP could account for as much as ∼44% of the mis-spliced cassette exons in C9ORF72 patient brains.

  6. Human Obesity Associated with an Intronic SNP in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyang Mou

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 BDNF SNPs. We observed that the minor C allele of rs12291063 is associated with lower human ventromedial hypothalamic BDNF expression (p < 0.001 and greater adiposity in both adult and pediatric cohorts (p values < 0.05. We further demonstrated that the major T allele for rs12291063 possesses a binding capacity for the transcriptional regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0B, knockdown of which disrupts transactivation by the T allele. Binding and transactivation functions are both disrupted by substituting C for T. These findings provide a rationale for BDNF augmentation as a targeted treatment for obesity in individuals who have the rs12291063 CC genotype.

  7. Correlation between expression of MVP, index of p53 and AgNOR value with chemoradiotherapy clinical response of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurnia, I.; Tetriana, D.; Siregar, B.; Ramli, I.; Andrijono, A.; Soetopo, S.; Kurjana, T.; Hernowo, B.S.; Tobing, M.D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer found in Indonesia. The primary treatment of cervical cancer at the locally advanced stage is usually performed by using radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The combination of the two techniques is often called chemoradiotherapy. The response to chemoradiotherapy is influenced by biological and physical factors. Major vault protein (MVP) is a ribonucleoprotein which contributes to drug resistance in some cancers. The purposes of this research were: (1) to determine the correlation between the expression of MVP and the index of p53, including AgNOR values and index of MIB-1; and (2) between MVP and chemoradiotherapy clinical response of cervical cancer. Twenty-one microscopic slides taken from biopsy tissues of cervical cancer patients before undergoing treatment were stained to identify MVP, p53, and MIB-1 by means of immunohistochemistry techniques and AgNORs staining. After undergoing chemoradiotherapy treatment, the patients’ clinical responses were observed by pelvic control method. Experimental results showed that there was a correlation between MVP and AgNOR value (P=0.05), but no correlation between MVP and index of p53 (P=0.729), including MIB-1 LI (P=0.63), in untreated cervical cancer. In addition, there was no association between MVP and chemoradiotherapy response. In conclusion, MVP expression correlates with the process of cell proliferation before the G2 phase of cell cycle in untreated cancer cells. Those have no association with clinical responses after the completion of treatment. (author)

  8. Global gene transcription patterns in in vitro-cultured fertilized embryos and diploid and haploid murine parthenotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xiangshun; Li Xingyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To gain insights into the roles the paternal genome and chromosome number play in pre-implantation development, we cultured fertilized embryos and diploid and haploid parthenotes (DPs and HPs, respectively), and compared their development and gene expression patterns. The DPs and fertilized embryos did not differ in developmental ability but HPs development was slower and characterized by impaired compaction and blastocoel formation. Microarray analysis revealed that fertilized blastocysts expressed several genes at higher levels than DP blastocysts; these included the Y-chromosome-specific gene eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2, subunit 3, structural gene Y-linked (Eif2s3y) and the imprinting gene U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein auxiliary factor 1, related sequence 1 (U2af1-rs1). We also found that when DPs and HPs were both harvested at 44 and 58 h of culture, they differed in the expression of 38 and 665 genes, respectively. However, when DPs and HPs were harvested at the midpoints of 4-cell stage (44 and 49 h, respectively), no differences in expression was observed. Similarly, when the DPs and HPs were harvested when they became blastocysts (102 and 138 h, respectively), only 15 genes showed disparate expression. These results suggest that while transcripts needed for early development are delayed in HPs, it does progress sufficiently for the generation of the various developmental stages despite the lack of genetic components

  9. RISC assembly: Coordination between small RNAs and Argonaute proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hotaka; Tomari, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs generally form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes with their partner proteins to exert their functions. Small RNAs, including microRNAs, small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs, assemble with Argonaute (Ago) family proteins into the effector complex called RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which mediates sequence-specific target gene silencing. RISC assembly is not a simple binding between a small RNA and Ago; rather, it follows an ordered multi-step pathway that requires specific accessory factors. Some steps of RISC assembly and RISC-mediated gene silencing are dependent on or facilitated by particular intracellular platforms, suggesting their spatial regulation. In this review, we summarize the currently known mechanisms for RISC assembly of each small RNA class and propose a revised model for the role of the chaperone machinery in the duplex-initiated RISC assembly pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Slicing-independent RISC activation requires the argonaute PAZ domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuo; Jin, Lan; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Feijie; Kay, Mark A

    2012-08-21

    Small RNAs regulate genetic networks through a ribonucleoprotein complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which, in mammals, contains at its center one of four Argonaute proteins (Ago1-Ago4). A key regulatory event in the RNA interference (RNAi) and microRNA (miRNA) pathways is Ago loading, wherein double-stranded small-RNA duplexes are incorporated into RISC (pre-RISC) and then become single-stranded (mature RISC), a process that is not well understood. The Agos contain an evolutionarily conserved PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain whose primary function is to bind the 3' end of small RNAs. We created multiple PAZ-domain-disrupted mutant Ago proteins and studied their biochemical properties and biological functionality in cells. We found that the PAZ domain is dispensable for Ago loading of slicing-competent RISC. In contrast, in the absence of slicer activity or slicer-substrate duplex RNAs, PAZ-disrupted Agos bound duplex small interfering RNAs, but were unable to unwind or eject the passenger strand and form functional RISC complexes. We have discovered that the highly conserved PAZ domain plays an important role in RISC activation, providing new mechanistic insights into how miRNAs regulate genes, as well as new insights for future design of miRNA- and RNAi-based therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A proteomic study of memory after imprinting in the domestic chick

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    Maia eMeparishvili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The intermediate and medial mesopallium (IMM of the domestic chick forebrain has previously been shown to be a memory system for visual imprinting. Learning-related changes occur in certain plasma membrane and mitochondrial proteins in the IMM. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/mass spectrometry has been employed to identify more comprehensively learning-related expression of proteins in the membrane-mitochondrial fraction of the IMM 24 h after training. We inquired whether amounts of these proteins in the IMM and a control region (posterior pole of the nidopallium, PPN are correlated with a behavioural estimate of memory for the imprinting stimulus. Learning-related increases in amounts of the following proteins were found in the left IMM, but not the right IMM or the left or right PPN: (i membrane cognin; (ii a protein resembling the P32 subunit of splicing factor SF2; (iii voltage-dependent anionic channel-1; (iv dynamin-1; (v heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1. Learning-related increases in some transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis were also found, without significant change in mitochondrial DNA copy number. The results indicate that the molecular processes involved in learning and memory underlying imprinting include protein stabilization, increased mRNA trafficking, synaptic vesicle recycling and specific changes in the mitochondrial proteome.

  12. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

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    Katahira, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex. PMID:25836925

  13. An Interaction between KSHV ORF57 and UIF Provides mRNA-Adaptor Redundancy in Herpesvirus Intronless mRNA Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian R.; Boyne, James R.; Noerenberg, Marko; Taylor, Adam; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Walsh, Matthew J.; Wheat, Rachel; Blackbourn, David J.; Wilson, Stuart A.; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The hTREX complex mediates cellular bulk mRNA nuclear export by recruiting the nuclear export factor, TAP, via a direct interaction with the export adaptor, Aly. Intriguingly however, depletion of Aly only leads to a modest reduction in cellular mRNA nuclear export, suggesting the existence of additional mRNA nuclear export adaptor proteins. In order to efficiently export Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) intronless mRNAs from the nucleus, the KSHV ORF57 protein recruits hTREX onto viral intronless mRNAs allowing access to the TAP-mediated export pathway. Similarly however, depletion of Aly only leads to a modest reduction in the nuclear export of KSHV intronless mRNAs. Herein, we identify a novel interaction between ORF57 and the cellular protein, UIF. We provide the first evidence that the ORF57-UIF interaction enables the recruitment of hTREX and TAP to KSHV intronless mRNAs in Aly-depleted cells. Strikingly, depletion of both Aly and UIF inhibits the formation of an ORF57-mediated nuclear export competent ribonucleoprotein particle and consequently prevents ORF57-mediated mRNA nuclear export and KSHV protein production. Importantly, these findings highlight that redundancy exists in the eukaryotic system for certain hTREX components involved in the mRNA nuclear export of intronless KSHV mRNAs. PMID:21814512

  14. Multiple RNA processing defects and impaired chloroplast function in plants deficient in the organellar protein-only RNase P enzyme.

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    Wenbin Zhou

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA precursors undergo endoribonucleolytic processing of their 5' and 3' ends. 5' cleavage of the precursor transcript is performed by ribonuclease P (RNase P. While in most organisms RNase P is a ribonucleoprotein that harbors a catalytically active RNA component, human mitochondria and the chloroplasts (plastids and mitochondria of seed plants possess protein-only RNase P enzymes (PRORPs. The plant organellar PRORP (PRORP1 has been characterized to some extent in vitro and by transient gene silencing, but the molecular, phenotypic and physiological consequences of its down-regulation in stable transgenic plants have not been assessed. Here we have addressed the function of the dually targeted organellar PRORP enzyme in vivo by generating stably transformed Arabidopsis plants in which expression of the PRORP1 gene was suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi. PRORP1 knock-down lines show defects in photosynthesis, while mitochondrial respiration is not appreciably affected. In both plastids and mitochondria, the effects of PRORP1 knock-down on the processing of individual tRNA species are highly variable. The drastic reduction in the levels of mature plastid tRNA-Phe(GAA and tRNA-Arg(ACG suggests that these two tRNA species limit plastid gene expression in the PRORP1 mutants and, hence, are causally responsible for the mutant phenotype.

  15. Mapping of Complete Set of Ribose and Base Modifications of Yeast rRNA by RP-HPLC and Mung Bean Nuclease Assay.

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    Jun Yang

    Full Text Available Ribosomes are large ribonucleoprotein complexes that are fundamental for protein synthesis. Ribosomes are ribozymes because their catalytic functions such as peptidyl transferase and peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis depend on the rRNA. rRNA is a heterogeneous biopolymer comprising of at least 112 chemically modified residues that are believed to expand its topological potential. In the present study, we established a comprehensive modification profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae's 18S and 25S rRNA using a high resolution Reversed-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC. A combination of mung bean nuclease assay, rDNA point mutants and snoRNA deletions allowed us to systematically map all ribose and base modifications on both rRNAs to a single nucleotide resolution. We also calculated approximate molar levels for each modification using their UV (254nm molar response factors, showing sub-stoichiometric amount of modifications at certain residues. The chemical nature, their precise location and identification of partial modification will facilitate understanding the precise role of these chemical modifications, and provide further evidence for ribosome heterogeneity in eukaryotes.

  16. The Ezrin Metastatic Phenotype Is Associated with the Initiation of Protein Translation

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    Joseph W. Briggs

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously associated the cytoskeleton linker protein, Ezrin, with the metastatic phenotype of pediatric sarcomas, including osteosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. These studies have suggested that Ezrin contributes to the survival of cancer cells after their arrival at secondary metastatic locations. To better understand this role in metastasis, we undertook two noncandidate analyses of Ezrin function including a microarray subtraction of high-and low-Ezrin-expressing cells and a proteomic approach to identify proteins that bound the N-terminus of Ezrin in tumor lysates. Functional analyses of these data led to a novel and unifying hypothesis that Ezrin contributes to the efficiency of metastasis through regulation of protein translation. In support of this hypothesis, we found Ezrin to be part of the ribonucleoprotein complex to facilitate the expression of complex messenger RNA in cells and to bind with poly A binding protein 1 (PABP1; PABPC1. The relevance of these findings was supported by our identification of Ezrin and components of the translational machinery in pseudopodia of highly metastatic cells during the process of cell invasion. Finally, two small molecule inhibitors recently shown to inhibit the Ezrin metastatic phenotype disrupted the Ezrin/PABP1 association. Taken together, these results provide a novel mechanistic basis by which Ezrin may contribute to metastasis.

  17. p53 and telomerase control rat myocardial tissue response to hypoxia and ageing

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    A. Cataldi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence implies loss of proliferative and tissue regenerative capability. Also hypoxia, producing Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS, can damage cellular components through the oxidation of DNA, proteins and lipids, thus influencing the shortening of telomeres. Since ribonucleoprotein Telomerase (TERT, catalyzing the replication of the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, promotes cardiac muscle cell proliferation, hypertrophy and survival, here we investigated its role in the events regulating apoptosis occurrence and life span in hearts deriving from young and old rats exposed to hypoxia. TUNEL (terminal-deoxinucleotidyl -transferase- mediated dUTP nick end-labeling analysis reveals an increased apoptotic cell number in both samples after hypoxia exposure, mainly in the young with respect to the old. TERT expression lowers either in the hypoxic young, either in the old in both experimental conditions, with respect to the normoxic young. These events are paralleled by p53 and HIF-1 ? expression dramatic increase and by p53/ HIF-1 ? co-immunoprecipitation in the hypoxic young, evidencing the young subject as the most stressed by such challenge. These effects could be explained by induction of damage to genomic DNA by ROS that accelerates cell senescence through p53 activation. Moreover, by preventing TERT enzyme down-regulation, cell cycle exit and apoptosis occurrence could be delayed and new possibilities for intervention against cell ageing and hypoxia could be opened.

  18. Two Distinct Approaches for CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Gene Editing in Cryptococcus neoformans and Related Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping

    2018-06-27

    Cryptococcus neoformans and related species are encapsulated basidiomycetous fungi that cause meningoencephalitis in individuals with immune deficiency. This pathogen has a tractable genetic system; however, gene disruption via electroporation remains difficult, while biolistic transformation is often limited by lack of multiple genetic markers and the high initial cost of equipment. The approach using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) has become the technology of choice for gene editing in many organisms due to its simplicity, efficiency, and versatility. The technique has been successfully demonstrated in C. neoformans and Cryptococcus deneoformans in which two DNA plasmids expressing either the Streptococcus pyogenes CAS9 gene or the guide RNA (gRNA) were employed. However, potential adverse effects due to constitutive expression and the time-consuming process of constructing vectors to express each gRNA remain as a primary barrier for wide adaptation. This report describes the delivery of preassembled CRISPR-Cas9-gRNA ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) via electroporation that is able to generate edited mutant alleles. RNP-mediated CRISPR-Cas9 was used to replace the wild-type GIB2 gene encoding a Gβ-like/RACK1 Gib2 protein with a gib2 :: NAT allele via homologous recombination in both C. neoformans and C. deneoformans In addition, a DNA plasmid (pCnCas9:U6-gRNA) that expresses both Cas9 and gRNA, allowing for convenient yet low-cost DNA-mediated gene editing, is described. pCnCas9:U6-gRNA contains an endogenous U6 promoter for gRNA expression and restriction sites for one-step insertion of a gRNA. These approaches and resources provide new opportunities to accelerate genetic studies of Cryptococcus species. IMPORTANCE For genetic studies of the Cryptococcus genus, generation of mutant strains is often hampered by a limited number of selectable genetic markers, the tedious process of vector

  19. Essential Assembly Factor Rpf2 Forms Novel Interactions within the 5S RNP in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamina, Anyango D; Jaremko, Daniel; Christen, Linda; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex and conserved cellular process that is responsible for making ribosomes. During this process, there are several assembly steps that function as regulators to ensure proper ribosome formation. One of these steps is the assembly of the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) in the central protuberance of the 60S ribosomal subunit. In eukaryotes, the 5S RNP is composed of 5S rRNA, ribosomal proteins L5 and L11, and assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1. Our laboratory previously showed that in Trypanosoma brucei , the 5S RNP is composed of 5S rRNA, L5, and trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37. In this study, we characterize an additional component of the 5S RNP, the T. brucei homolog of Rpf2. This is the first study to functionally characterize interactions mediated by Rpf2 in an organism other than fungi. T . brucei Rpf2 (TbRpf2) was identified from tandem affinity purification using extracts prepared from protein A-tobacco etch virus (TEV)-protein C (PTP)-tagged L5, P34, and P37 cell lines, followed by mass spectrometry analysis. We characterized the binding interactions between TbRpf2 and the previously characterized members of the T. brucei 5S RNP. Our studies show that TbRpf2 mediates conserved binding interactions with 5S rRNA and L5 and that TbRpf2 also interacts with trypanosome-specific proteins P34 and P37. We performed RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of TbRpf2 and showed that this protein is essential for the survival of the parasites and is critical for proper ribosome formation. These studies provide new insights into a critical checkpoint in the ribosome biogenesis pathway in T. brucei . IMPORTANCE Trypanosoma brucei is the parasitic protozoan that causes African sleeping sickness. Ribosome assembly is essential for the survival of this parasite through the different host environments it encounters during its life cycle. The assembly of the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) functions as one of

  20. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

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    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  1. Cooperative RNP assembly: Complementary rescue of structural defects by protein and RNA subunits of archaeal RNase P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Yi; Xu, Yiren; Cho, I-Ming; Oruganti, Sri Vidya; Foster, Mark P.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2011-01-01

    RNase P is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that utilizes a Mg2+-dependent RNA catalyst to cleave the 5′-leader of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs) and generate mature tRNAs. The bacterial RNase P protein (RPP) aids RNase P RNA (RPR) catalysis by promoting substrate binding, Mg2+ coordination, and product release. Archaeal RNase P comprises an RPR and at least four RPPs, which have eukaryal homologs and function as two binary complexes (POP5•RPP30 and RPP21•RPP29). In this study, we employed a previously characterized substrate-enzyme conjugate [pre-tRNATyr-Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (Mja) RPR] to investigate the functional role of a universally conserved uridine in a bulge-helix structure in archaeal RPRs. Deletion of this bulged uridine resulted in an 80-fold decrease in the self-cleavage rate of pre-tRNATyr-MjaΔU RPR compared to the wildtype, and this defect was partially ameliorated upon addition of either RPP pair. The catalytic defect in the archaeal mutant RPR mirrors that reported in a bacterial RPR and highlights a parallel in their active sites. Furthermore, an N-terminal deletion mutant of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RPP29 that is defective in assembling with its binary partner RPP21, as assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy, is functional when reconstituted with the cognate Pfu RPR. Collectively, these results indicate that archaeal RPPs are able to compensate for structural defects in their cognate RPR and vice-versa, and provide striking examples of the cooperative subunit interactions critical for driving archaeal RNase P towards its functional conformation. (236 words) PMID:21683084

  2. Structure of Pfu Pop5, an archaeal RNase P protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ross C; Bohlen, Christopher J; Foster, Mark P; Bell, Charles E

    2006-01-24

    We have used NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of PF1378 (Pfu Pop5), one of four protein subunits of archaeal RNase P that shares a homolog in the eukaryotic enzyme. RNase P is an essential and ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein enzyme required for maturation of tRNA. In bacteria, the enzyme's RNA subunit is responsible for cleaving the single-stranded 5' leader sequence of precursor tRNA molecules (pre-tRNA), whereas the protein subunit assists in substrate binding. Although in bacteria the RNase P holoenzyme consists of one large catalytic RNA and one small protein subunit, in archaea and eukarya the enzyme contains several (> or =4) protein subunits, each of which lacks sequence similarity to the bacterial protein. The functional role of the proteins is poorly understood, as is the increased complexity in comparison to the bacterial enzyme. Pfu Pop5 has been directly implicated in catalysis by the observation that it pairs with PF1914 (Pfu Rpp30) to functionally reconstitute the catalytic domain of the RNA subunit. The protein adopts an alpha-beta sandwich fold highly homologous to the single-stranded RNA binding RRM domain. Furthermore, the three-dimensional arrangement of Pfu Pop5's structural elements is remarkably similar to that of the bacterial protein subunit. NMR spectra have been used to map the interaction of Pop5 with Pfu Rpp30. The data presented permit tantalizing hypotheses regarding the role of this protein subunit shared by archaeal and eukaryotic RNase P.

  3. The L7Ae protein binds to two kink-turns in the Pyrococcus furiosus RNase P RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Stella M.; Lai, Lien B.; Foster, Mark P.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein L7Ae, known for its role in translation (as part of ribosomes) and RNA modification (as part of sn/oRNPs), has also been identified as a subunit of archaeal RNase P, a ribonucleoprotein complex that employs an RNA catalyst for the Mg2+-dependent 5′ maturation of tRNAs. To better understand the assembly and catalysis of archaeal RNase P, we used a site-specific hydroxyl radical-mediated footprinting strategy to pinpoint the binding sites of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) L7Ae on its cognate RNase P RNA (RPR). L7Ae derivatives with single-Cys substitutions at residues in the predicted RNA-binding interface (K42C/C71V, R46C/C71V, V95C/C71V) were modified with an iron complex of EDTA-2-aminoethyl 2-pyridyl disulfide. Upon addition of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbate, these L7Ae-tethered nucleases were expected to cleave the RPR at nucleotides proximal to the EDTA-Fe–modified residues. Indeed, footprinting experiments with an enzyme assembled with the Pfu RPR and five protein cofactors (POP5, RPP21, RPP29, RPP30 and L7Ae–EDTA-Fe) revealed specific RNA cleavages, localizing the binding sites of L7Ae to the RPR's catalytic and specificity domains. These results support the presence of two kink-turns, the structural motifs recognized by L7Ae, in distinct functional domains of the RPR and suggest testable mechanisms by which L7Ae contributes to RNase P catalysis. PMID:25361963

  4. Mouse embryonic stem cells efficiently lipofected with nuclear localization peptide result in a high yield of chimeric mice and retain germline transmission potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haiching; Liu, Qin; Diamond, Scott L; Pierce, Eric A

    2004-06-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are an important tool in developmental biology, genomics, and transgenic methods, as well as in potential clinical applications such as gene therapy or tissue engineering. Electroporation is the standard transfection method for mouse ES (mES) cells because lipofection is quite inefficient. It is also unclear if mES cells treated with cationic lipids maintain pluripotency. We have developed a simple lipofection method for high efficiency transfection and stable transgene expression by employing the nonclassical nuclear localization signal M9 derived from the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1. In contrast to using 20 microg DNA for 10 x 10(6) cells via electroporation which resulted in 10-20 positive cells/mm2, M9-assisted lipofection of 2 x 10(5) cells with 2 microg DNA resulted in > 150 positive cells/mm2. Electroporation produced only 0.16% EGFP positive cells with fluorescence intensity (FI) > 1000 by FACS assay, while M9-lipofection produced 36-fold more highly EGFP positive cells (5.75%) with FI > 1000. Using 2.5 x 10(6) ES cells and 6 microg linearized DNA followed by selection with G418, electroporation yielded 17 EGFP expressing colonies, while M9-assisted lipofection yielded 72 EGFP expressing colonies. The mES cells that stably expressed EGFP following M9-assisted lipofection yielded > 66% chimeric mice (8 of 12) and contributed efficiently to the germline. In an example of gene targeting, a knock-in mouse was produced from an ES clone screened from 200 G418-resistant colonies generated via M9-assisted lipofection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of generation of transgenic or knock-in mice obtained from lipofected mES cells and this method may facilitate large scale genomic studies of ES developmental biology or large scale generation of mouse models of human disease. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc.

  5. Differential association of protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welting, Tim J M; Kikkert, Bastiaan J; van Venrooij, Walther J; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2006-07-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in nucleolar and mitochondrial RNA processing events. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein particle, which is structurally related to RNase P, an endoribonuclease involved in pre-tRNA processing. Most of the protein components of RNase MRP have been reported to be associated with RNase P as well. In this study we determined the association of these protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P particles by glycerol gradient sedimentation and coimmunoprecipitation. In agreement with previous studies, RNase MRP sedimented at 12S and 60-80S. In contrast, only a single major peak was observed for RNase P at 12S. The analysis of individual protein subunits revealed that hPop4 (also known as Rpp29), Rpp21, Rpp20, and Rpp25 only sedimented in 12S fractions, whereas hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 were also found in 60-80S fractions. In agreement with their cosedimentation with RNase P RNA in the 12S peak, coimmunoprecipitation with VSV-epitope-tagged protein subunits revealed that hPop4, Rpp21, and in addition Rpp14 preferentially associate with RNase P. These data show that hPop4, Rpp21, and Rpp14 may not be associated with RNase MRP. Furthermore, Rpp20 and Rpp25 appear to be associated with only a subset of RNase MRP particles, in contrast to hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 (and possibly also hPop5), which are probably associated with all RNase MRP complexes. Our data are consistent with a transient association of Rpp20 and Rpp25 with RNase MRP, which may be inversely correlated to its involvement in pre-rRNA processing.

  6. Comparison of mitochondrial and nucleolar RNase MRP reveals identical RNA components with distinct enzymatic activities and protein components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiaosheng; Wierzbicki, Sara; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Schmitt, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein endoribonuclease found in three cellular locations where distinct substrates are processed: the mitochondria, the nucleolus, and the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic RNase MRP is the nucleolar enzyme that is transiently relocalized during mitosis. Nucleolar RNase MRP (NuMRP) was purified to homogeneity, and we extensively purified the mitochondrial RNase MRP (MtMRP) to a single RNA component identical to the NuMRP RNA. Although the protein components of the NuMRP were identified by mass spectrometry successfully, none of the known NuMRP proteins were found in the MtMRP preparation. Only trace amounts of the core NuMRP protein, Pop4, were detected in MtMRP by Western blot. In vitro activity of the two enzymes was compared. MtMRP cleaved only mitochondrial ORI5 substrate, while NuMRP cleaved all three substrates. However, the NuMRP enzyme cleaved the ORI5 substrate at sites different than the MtMRP enzyme. In addition, enzymatic differences in preferred ionic strength confirm these enzymes as distinct entities. Magnesium was found to be essential to both enzymes. We tested a number of reported inhibitors including puromycin, pentamidine, lithium, and pAp. Puromycin inhibition suggested that it binds directly to the MRP RNA, reaffirming the role of the RNA component in catalysis. In conclusion, our study confirms that the NuMRP and MtMRP enzymes are distinct entities with differing activities and protein components but a common RNA subunit, suggesting that the RNA must be playing a crucial role in catalytic activity.

  7. Ribosomal protein L5 has a highly twisted concave surface and flexible arms responsible for rRNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, T; Yao, M; Kawamura, S; Iwasaki, K; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    2001-05-01

    Ribosomal protein L5 is a 5S rRNA binding protein in the large subunit and plays an essential role in the promotion of a particular conformation of 5S rRNA. The crystal structure of the ribosomal protein L5 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined at 1.8 A resolution. The molecule consists of a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and four alpha-helices, which fold in a way that is topologically similar to the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) domain. The molecular shape and electrostatic representation suggest that the concave surface and loop regions are involved in 5S rRNA binding. To identify amino acid residues responsible for 5S rRNA binding, we made use of Ala-scanning mutagenesis of evolutionarily conserved amino acids occurring in the beta-strands and loop regions. The mutations of Asn37 at the beta1-strand and Gln63 at the loop between helix 2 and beta3-strand as well as that of Phe77 at the tip of the loop structure between the beta2- and beta3-strands caused a significant reduction in 5S rRNA binding. In addition, the mutations of Thr90 on the beta3-strand and Ile141 and Asp144 at the loop between beta4- and beta5-strands moderately reduced the 5S rRNA-binding affinity. Comparison of these results with the more recently analyzed structure of the 50S subunit from Haloarcula marismortui suggests that there are significant differences in the structure at N- and C-terminal regions and probably in the 5S rRNA binding.

  8. Drosophila SMN complex proteins Gemin2, Gemin3, and Gemin5 are components of U bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauchi, Ruben J.; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Liu, Ji-Long

    2010-01-01

    Uridine-rich small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (U snRNPs) play key roles in pre-mRNA processing in the nucleus. The assembly of most U snRNPs takes place in the cytoplasm and is facilitated by the survival motor neuron (SMN) complex. Discrete cytoplasmic RNA granules called U bodies have been proposed to be specific sites for snRNP assembly because they contain U snRNPs and SMN. U bodies invariably associate with P bodies, which are involved in mRNA decay and translational control. However, it remains unknown whether other SMN complex proteins also localise to U bodies. In Drosophila there are four SMN complex proteins, namely SMN, Gemin2/CG10419, Gemin3 and Gemin5/Rigor mortis. Drosophila Gemin3 was originally identified as the Drosophila orthologue of human and yeast Dhh1, a component of P bodies. Through an in silico analysis of the DEAD-box RNA helicases we confirmed that Gemin3 is the bona fide Drosophila orthologue of vertebrate Gemin3 whereas the Drosophila orthologue of Dhh1 is Me31B. We then made use of the Drosophila egg chamber as a model system to study the subcellular distribution of the Gemin proteins as well as Me31B. Our cytological investigations show that Gemin2, Gemin3 and Gemin5 colocalise with SMN in U bodies. Although they are excluded from P bodies, as components of U bodies, Gemin2, Gemin3 and Gemin5 are consistently found associated with P bodies, wherein Me31B resides. In addition to a role in snRNP biogenesis, SMN complexes residing in U bodies may also be involved in mRNP assembly and/or transport.

  9. Drosophila SMN complex proteins Gemin2, Gemin3, and Gemin5 are components of U bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cauchi, Ruben J.; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QX (United Kingdom); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Uridine-rich small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (U snRNPs) play key roles in pre-mRNA processing in the nucleus. The assembly of most U snRNPs takes place in the cytoplasm and is facilitated by the survival motor neuron (SMN) complex. Discrete cytoplasmic RNA granules called U bodies have been proposed to be specific sites for snRNP assembly because they contain U snRNPs and SMN. U bodies invariably associate with P bodies, which are involved in mRNA decay and translational control. However, it remains unknown whether other SMN complex proteins also localise to U bodies. In Drosophila there are four SMN complex proteins, namely SMN, Gemin2/CG10419, Gemin3 and Gemin5/Rigor mortis. Drosophila Gemin3 was originally identified as the Drosophila orthologue of human and yeast Dhh1, a component of P bodies. Through an in silico analysis of the DEAD-box RNA helicases we confirmed that Gemin3 is the bona fide Drosophila orthologue of vertebrate Gemin3 whereas the Drosophila orthologue of Dhh1 is Me31B. We then made use of the Drosophila egg chamber as a model system to study the subcellular distribution of the Gemin proteins as well as Me31B. Our cytological investigations show that Gemin2, Gemin3 and Gemin5 colocalise with SMN in U bodies. Although they are excluded from P bodies, as components of U bodies, Gemin2, Gemin3 and Gemin5 are consistently found associated with P bodies, wherein Me31B resides. In addition to a role in snRNP biogenesis, SMN complexes residing in U bodies may also be involved in mRNP assembly and/or transport.

  10. TERRA and hnRNPA1 orchestrate an RPA-to-POT1 switch on telomeric single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Rachel Litman; Centore, Richard C; O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Rai, Rekha; Tse, Alice; Songyang, Zhou; Chang, Sandy; Karlseder, Jan; Zou, Lee

    2011-03-24

    Maintenance of telomeres requires both DNA replication and telomere 'capping' by shelterin. These two processes use two single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins, replication protein A (RPA) and protection of telomeres 1 (POT1). Although RPA and POT1 each have a critical role at telomeres, how they function in concert is not clear. POT1 ablation leads to activation of the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) checkpoint kinase at telomeres, suggesting that POT1 antagonizes RPA binding to telomeric ssDNA. Unexpectedly, we found that purified POT1 and its functional partner TPP1 are unable to prevent RPA binding to telomeric ssDNA efficiently. In cell extracts, we identified a novel activity that specifically displaces RPA, but not POT1, from telomeric ssDNA. Using purified protein, here we show that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1) recapitulates the RPA displacing activity. The RPA displacing activity is inhibited by the telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) in early S phase, but is then unleashed in late S phase when TERRA levels decline at telomeres. Interestingly, TERRA also promotes POT1 binding to telomeric ssDNA by removing hnRNPA1, suggesting that the re-accumulation of TERRA after S phase helps to complete the RPA-to-POT1 switch on telomeric ssDNA. Together, our data suggest that hnRNPA1, TERRA and POT1 act in concert to displace RPA from telomeric ssDNA after DNA replication, and promote telomere capping to preserve genomic integrity.

  11. Long non-coding RNA discovery across the genus anopheles reveals conserved secondary structures within and beyond the Gambiae complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Adam M; Waterhouse, Robert M; Muskavitch, Marc A T

    2015-04-23

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been defined as mRNA-like transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides that lack significant protein-coding potential, and many of them constitute scaffolds for ribonucleoprotein complexes with critical roles in epigenetic regulation. Various lncRNAs have been implicated in the modulation of chromatin structure, transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation, and regulation of genomic stability in mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster. The purpose of this study is to identify the lncRNA landscape in the malaria vector An. gambiae and assess the evolutionary conservation of lncRNAs and their secondary structures across the Anopheles genus. Using deep RNA sequencing of multiple Anopheles gambiae life stages, we have identified 2,949 lncRNAs and more than 300 previously unannotated putative protein-coding genes. The lncRNAs exhibit differential expression profiles across life stages and adult genders. We find that across the genus Anopheles, lncRNAs display much lower sequence conservation than protein-coding genes. Additionally, we find that lncRNA secondary structure is highly conserved within the Gambiae complex, but diverges rapidly across the rest of the genus Anopheles. This study offers one of the first lncRNA secondary structure analyses in vector insects. Our description of lncRNAs in An. gambiae offers the most comprehensive genome-wide insights to date into lncRNAs in this vector mosquito, and defines a set of potential targets for the development of vector-based interventions that may further curb the human malaria burden in disease-endemic countries.

  12. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Gabriela Huelgas-Morales

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline—the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction—protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K; Lehtonen, Jukka Y A

    2016-04-20

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3'-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Mechanism of attenuation of a chimeric influenza A/B transfectant virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, G; Bergmann, M; Garcia-Sastre, A; Palese, P

    1992-08-01

    The ribonucleoprotein transfection system for influenza virus allowed us to construct an influenza A virus containing a chimeric neuraminidase (NA) gene in which the noncoding sequence is derived from the NS gene of influenza B virus (T. Muster, E. K. Subbarao, M. Enami, B. P. Murphy, and P. Palese, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88:5177-5181, 1991). This transfectant virus is attenuated in mice and grows to lower titers in tissue culture than wild-type virus. Since such a virus has characteristics desirable for a live attenuated vaccine strain, attempts were made to characterize this virus at the molecular level. Our analysis suggests that the attenuation of the virus is due to changes in the cis signal sequences, which resulted in a reduction of transcription and replication of the chimeric NA gene. The major finding concerns a sixfold reduction in NA-specific viral RNA in the virion, causing a reduction in the ratio of infectious particles to physical particles compared with the ratio in wild-type virus. Although the NA-specific mRNA level is also reduced in transfectant virus-infected cells, it does not appear to contribute to the attenuation characteristics of the virus. The levels of the other RNAs and their expression appear to be unchanged for the transfectant virus. It is suggested that downregulation of the synthesis of one viral RNA segment leads to the generation of defective viruses during each replication cycle. We believe that this represents a general principle for attenuation which may be applied to other segmented viruses containing either single-stranded or double-stranded RNA.

  15. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

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    Yujie Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days. However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6, is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP, 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25 and RNA helicase A (RHA, contribute to this process.

  16. UV cross-linking of polypeptides associated with 3'-terminal exons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolow, D.T.; Berget, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Association of nuclear proteins with chimeric vertebrate precursor RNAs containing both polyadenylation signals and an intron was examined by UV cross-linking. One major difference in cross-linking pattern was observed between this chimeric precursor RNA and precursors containing only polyadenylation or splicing signals. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) polypeptide C cross-linked strongly to sequences downstream of the A addition site in polyadenylation precursor RNA containing only the polyadenylation signal from the simian virus 40 (SV40) late transcription unit. In contrast, the hnRNP C polypeptide cross-linked to chimeric RNA containing the same SV40 late poly(A) cassette very poorly, at a level less than 5% of that observed with the precursor RNA containing just the poly(A) site. Observation that cross-linking of the hnRNP C polypeptide to elements within the SV40 late poly(A) site was altered by the presence of an upstream intron suggests differences in the way nuclear factors associate with poly(A) sites in the presence and absence of an upstream intron. Cross-linking of C polypeptide to chimeric RNA increased with RNAs mutated for splicing or polyadenylation consensus sequences and under reaction conditions (high magnesium) that inhibited polyadenylation. Furthermore, cross-linking of hnRNP C polypeptide to precursors containing just the SV40 late poly(A) site was eliminated in the presence of competing poly(U); polyadenylation, however, was unaffected. Correlation of loss of activity with high levels of hnRNP C polypeptide cross-linking raises questions about the specificity of the interaction between the hnRNP C polypeptide and polyadenylation precursor RNAs in vitro

  17. Waggawagga-CLI: A command-line tool for predicting stable single α-helices (SAH-domains, and the SAH-domain distribution across eukaryotes.

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    Dominic Simm

    Full Text Available Stable single-alpha helices (SAH-domains function as rigid connectors and constant force springs between structural domains, and can provide contact surfaces for protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. SAH-domains mainly consist of charged amino acids and are monomeric and stable in polar solutions, characteristics which distinguish them from coiled-coil domains and intrinsically disordered regions. Although the number of reported SAH-domains is steadily increasing, genome-wide analyses of SAH-domains in eukaryotic genomes are still missing. Here, we present Waggawagga-CLI, a command-line tool for predicting and analysing SAH-domains in protein sequence datasets. Using Waggawagga-CLI we predicted SAH-domains in 24 datasets from eukaryotes across the tree of life. SAH-domains were predicted in 0.5 to 3.5% of the protein-coding content per species. SAH-domains are particularly present in longer proteins supporting their function as structural building block in multi-domain proteins. In human, SAH-domains are mainly used as alternative building blocks not being present in all transcripts of a gene. Gene ontology analysis showed that yeast proteins with SAH-domains are particular enriched in macromolecular complex subunit organization, cellular component biogenesis and RNA metabolic processes, and that they have a strong nuclear and ribonucleoprotein complex localization and function in ribosome and nucleic acid binding. Human proteins with SAH-domains have roles in all types of RNA processing and cytoskeleton organization, and are predicted to function in RNA binding, protein binding involved in cell and cell-cell adhesion, and cytoskeletal protein binding. Waggawagga-CLI allows the user to adjust the stabilizing and destabilizing contribution of amino acid interactions in i,i+3 and i,i+4 spacings, and provides extensive flexibility for user-designed analyses.

  18. New paradigms in the repair of oxidative damage in human genome: mechanisms ensuring repair of mutagenic base lesions during replication and involvement of accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-05-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mispairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydroxyuracil, produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of the five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1's role in replicating template strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the 'cow-catcher' mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1's non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in reannealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U and Y-box-binding protein 1 as well as high mobility group box 1 protein, whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repairs cross-complementing protein 1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and other accessory

  19. Cytoplasmic assembly of snRNP particles from stored proteins and newly transcribed snRNA's in L929 mouse fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauterer, R.A.; Feeney, R.J.; Zieve, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Newly synthesized snRNAs appear transiently in the cytoplasm where they assemble into ribonucleoprotein particles, the snRNP particles, before returning permanently to the interphase nucleus. In this report, bona fide cytoplasmic fractions, prepared by cell enucleation, are used for a quantitative analysis of snRNP assembly in growing mouse fibroblasts. The half-lives and abundances of the snRNP precursors in the cytoplasm and the rates of snRNP assembly are calculated in L929 cells. With the exception of U6, the major snRNAs are stable RNA species; U1 is almost totally stable while U2 has a half-life of about two cell cycles. In contrast, the majority of newly synthesized U6 decays with a half-life of about 15 h. The relative abundances of the newly synthesized snRNA species U1, U2, U3, U4 and U6 in the cytoplasm are determined by Northern hybridization using cloned probes and are approximately 2% of their nuclear abundance. The half-lives of the two major snRNA precursors in the cytoplasm (U1 and U2) are approximately 20 min as determined by labeling to steady state. The relative abundance of the snRNP B protein in the cytoplasm is determined by Western blotting with the Sm class of autoantibodies and is approximately 25% of the nuclear abundance. Kinetic studies, using the Sm antiserum to immunoprecipitate the methionine-labeled snRNP proteins, suggest that the B protein has a half-life of 90 to 120 min in the cytoplasm. These data are discussed and suggest that there is a large pool of more stable snRNP proteins in the cytoplasm available for assembly with the less abundant but more rapidly turning-over snRNAs

  20. Identification of amino acid residues in protein SRP72 required for binding to a kinked 5e motif of the human signal recognition particle RNA

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    Zwieb Christian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cells depend critically on the signal recognition particle (SRP for the sorting and delivery of their proteins. The SRP is a ribonucleoprotein complex which binds to signal sequences of secretory polypeptides as they emerge from the ribosome. Among the six proteins of the eukaryotic SRP, the largest protein, SRP72, is essential for protein targeting and possesses a poorly characterized RNA binding domain. Results We delineated the minimal region of SRP72 capable of forming a stable complex with an SRP RNA fragment. The region encompassed residues 545 to 585 of the full-length human SRP72 and contained a lysine-rich cluster (KKKKKKKKGK at postions 552 to 561 as well as a conserved Pfam motif with the sequence PDPXRWLPXXER at positions 572 to 583. We demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis that both regions participated in the formation of a complex with the RNA. In agreement with biochemical data and results from chymotryptic digestion experiments, molecular modeling of SRP72 implied that the invariant W577 was located inside the predicted structure of an RNA binding domain. The 11-nucleotide 5e motif contained within the SRP RNA fragment was shown by comparative electrophoresis on native polyacrylamide gels to conform to an RNA kink-turn. The model of the complex suggested that the conserved A240 of the K-turn, previously identified as being essential for the binding to SRP72, could protrude into a groove of the SRP72 RNA binding domain, similar but not identical to how other K-turn recognizing proteins interact with RNA. Conclusions The results from the presented experiments provided insights into the molecular details of a functionally important and structurally interesting RNA-protein interaction. A model for how a ligand binding pocket of SRP72 can accommodate a new RNA K-turn in the 5e region of the eukaryotic SRP RNA is proposed.