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Sample records for pre-main-sequence evolutionary models

  1. THE QUADRUPLE PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE SYSTEM LkCa 3: IMPLICATIONS FOR STELLAR EVOLUTION MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Guillermo; Latham, David W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ruiz-Rodriguez, Dary; Prato, L.; Wasserman, Lawrence H. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Badenas, Mariona [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Schaefer, G. H. [CHARA Array of Georgia State University, Mount Wilson Observatory, Mount Wilson, CA 91023 (United States); Mathieu, Robert D., E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    We report the discovery that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) object LkCa 3 in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region is a hierarchical quadruple system of M stars. It was previously known to be a close ({approx}0.''5) visual pair, with one component being a moderately eccentric 12.94 day single-lined spectroscopic binary. A re-analysis of archival optical spectra complemented by new near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy shows both visual components to be double lined; the second one has a period of 4.06 days and a circular orbit. In addition to the orbital elements, we determine optical and NIR flux ratios, effective temperatures, and projected rotational velocities for all four stars. Using existing photometric monitoring observations of the system that had previously revealed the rotational period of the primary in the longer-period binary, we also detect the rotational signal of the primary in the 4.06 day binary, which is synchronized with the orbital motion. With only the assumption of coevality, a comparison of all of these constraints with current stellar evolution models from the Dartmouth series points to an age of 1.4 Myr and a distance of 133 pc, consistent with previous estimates for the region and suggesting that the system is on the near side of the Taurus complex. Similar comparisons of the properties of LkCa 3 and the well-known quadruple PMS system GG Tau with the widely used models from the Lyon series for a mixing length parameter of {alpha}{sub ML} = 1.0 strongly favor the Dartmouth models.

  2. The quadruple pre-main sequence system LkCa3: Implications for stellar evolution models

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Guillermo; Badenas, Mariona; Prato, L; Schaefer, G H; Wasserman, Lawrence H; Mathieu, Robert D; Latham, David W

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery that the pre-main sequence object LkCa3 in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region is a hierarchical quadruple system of M stars. It was previously known to be a close (~0.5 arc sec) visual pair, with one component being a moderately eccentric 12.94-day single-lined spectroscopic binary. A re-analysis of archival optical spectra complemented with new near-infrared spectroscopy shows both visual components to be double-lined, the second one having a period of 4.06 days and a circular orbit. In addition to the orbital elements, we determine optical and near-infrared flux ratios, effective temperatures, and projected rotational velocities for all four stars. Using existing photometric monitoring observations of the system that had previously revealed the rotational period of the primary in the longer-period binary, we detect also the rotational signal of the primary in the 4.06-day binary, which is synchronized with the orbital motion. With only the assumption of coevality, a comparison of ...

  3. Empirical Tests of Pre-Main-Sequence Stellar Evolution Models with Eclipsing Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Stassun, Keivan G; Torres, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    We examine the performance of standard PMS stellar evolution models against the accurately measured properties of a benchmark sample of 26 PMS stars in 13 EB systems. We provide a definitive compilation of all fundamental properties for the EBs. We also provide a definitive compilation of the various PMS model sets. In the H-R diagram, the masses inferred for the individual stars by the models are accurate to better than 10% above 1 Msun, but below 1 Msun they are discrepant by 50-100%. We find evidence that the failure of the models to match the data is linked to the triples in the EB sample; at least half of the EBs possess tertiary companions. Excluding the triples, the models reproduce the stellar masses to better than ~10% in the H-R diagram, down to 0.5 Msun, below which the current sample is fully contaminated by tertiaries. We consider several mechanisms by which a tertiary might cause changes in the EB properties and thus corrupt the agreement with stellar model predictions. We show that the energies...

  4. THE HABITABLE ZONES OF PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa [Institute for Pale Blue Dots, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We calculate the pre-main-sequence habitable zone (HZ) for stars of spectral classes F-M. The spatial distribution of liquid water and its change during the pre-main-sequence phase of protoplanetary systems is important for understanding how planets become habitable. Such worlds are interesting targets for future missions because the coolest stars could provide habitable conditions for up to 2.5 billion years post-accretion. Moreover, for a given star type, planetary systems are more easily resolved because of higher pre-main-sequence stellar luminosities, resulting in larger planet-star separation for cool stars than is the case for the traditional main-sequence (MS) HZ. We use one-dimensional radiative-convective climate and stellar evolutionary models to calculate pre-main-sequence HZ distances for F1-M8 stellar types. We also show that accreting planets that are later located in the traditional MS HZ orbiting stars cooler than a K5 (including the full range of M stars) receive stellar fluxes that exceed the runaway greenhouse threshold, and thus may lose substantial amounts of water initially delivered to them. We predict that M-star planets need to initially accrete more water than Earth did, or, alternatively, have additional water delivered later during the long pre-MS phase to remain habitable. Our findings are also consistent with recent claims that Venus lost its water during accretion.

  5. The Habitable Zones of Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez, Ramses M

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the pre-main-sequence HZ for stars of spectral classes F to M. The spatial distribution of liquid water and its change during the pre-main-sequence phase of protoplanetary systems is important in understanding how planets become habitable. Such worlds are interesting targets for future missions because the coolest stars could provide habitable conditions for up to 2.5 billion years post-accretion. Moreover, for a given star type, planetary systems are more easily resolved because of higher pre-main-sequence stellar luminosities, resulting in larger planet to star separation for cool stars than is the case for the traditional main-sequence (MS) habitable zone (HZ). We use 1D radiative-convective climate and stellar evolutionary models to calculate pre-main-sequence HZ distances for F1 to M8 stellar types. We also show that accreting planets that are later located in the traditional MS HZ orbiting stars cooler than a K5 (including the full range of M-stars) receive stellar fluxes that exceed the ru...

  6. Dust disks around old Pre Main-Sequence stars HST\\/NICMOS2 scattered light images and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Augereau, J C; Mouillet, D; Ménard, F

    2000-01-01

    We present recent near-infrared detections of circumstellar disks around the two old PMS Herbig stars HD 141569 and HD 100546 obtained with the HST/NICMOS2 camera. They reveal extended structures larger than 350-400 AU in radius. While the HD 100546 disk appears as a continuous disk down to 40 AU, the HD 141569 environment seems more complex, splitted at least into two dust populations. As a convincing example, the full modeling of the disk surrounding HR 4796, another old PMS star, is detailed and confronted with more recent observations.

  7. High-Precision Radio and Infrared Astrometry of LSPM J1314+1320AB - II: Testing Pre--Main-Sequence Models at the Lithium Depletion Boundary with Dynamical Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Dupuy, Trent J; Rizzuto, Aaron; Mann, Andrew W; Aller, Kimberly; Liu, Michael C; Kraus, Adam L; Berger, Edo

    2016-01-01

    We present novel tests of pre$-$main-sequence models based on individual dynamical masses for the M7 binary LSPM J1314+1320AB. Joint analysis of our Keck adaptive optics astrometric monitoring along with Very Long Baseline Array radio data from a companion paper yield component masses of $0.0885\\pm0.0006$ $M_{\\odot}$ and $0.0875\\pm0.0010$ $M_{\\odot}$ and a parallactic distance of $17.249\\pm0.013$ pc. We also derive component luminosities that are consistent with the system being coeval at an age of $80.8\\pm2.5$ Myr, according to BHAC15 evolutionary models. The presence of lithium is consistent with model predictions, marking the first time the theoretical lithium depletion boundary has been tested with ultracool dwarfs of known mass. However, we find that the average evolutionary model-derived effective temperature ($2950\\pm5$ K) is 180 K hotter than we derive from a spectral type$-$$T_{\\rm eff}$ relation based on BT-Settl models ($2770\\pm100$ K). We suggest that the dominant source of this discrepancy is mod...

  8. High-precision Radio and Infrared Astrometry of LSPM J1314+1320AB. II. Testing Pre-main-sequence Models at the Lithium Depletion Boundary with Dynamical Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Forbrich, Jan; Rizzuto, Aaron; Mann, Andrew W.; Aller, Kimberly; Liu, Michael C.; Kraus, Adam L.; Berger, Edo

    2016-08-01

    We present novel tests of pre-main-sequence models based on individual dynamical masses for the M7 binary LSPM J1314+1320AB. Joint analysis of Keck adaptive optics astrometric monitoring along with Very Long Baseline Array radio data from a companion paper yield component masses of 92.8 ± 0.6 M Jup (0.0885 ± 0.0006 M ⊙) and 91.7 ± 1.0 M Jup (0.0875 ± 0.0010 M ⊙) and a parallactic distance of 17.249 ± 0.013 pc. We find component luminosities consistent with the system being coeval at 80.8 ± 2.5 Myr, according to BHAC15 evolutionary models. The presence of lithium is consistent with model predictions, marking the first test of the theoretical lithium depletion boundary using ultracool dwarfs of known mass. However, we find that the evolutionary model-derived average effective temperature (2950 ± 5 K) is 180 K hotter than that given by a spectral type-{T}{eff} relation based on BT-Settl models (2770 ± 100 K). We suggest that the dominant source of this discrepancy is model radii being too small by ≈13%. In a test mimicking the typical application of models by observers, we derive masses on the H-R diagram using luminosity and BT-Settl temperature. The estimated masses are lower by {46}-19+16 % (2.0σ) than we measure dynamically and would imply that this is a system of ≈50 M Jup brown dwarfs, highlighting the large systematic errors possible in H-R diagram properties. This is the first time masses have been measured for ultracool (≥M6) dwarfs displaying spectral signatures of low gravity. Based on features in the infrared, LSPM J1314+1320AB appears to have higher gravity than typical Pleiades and AB Dor members, opposite the expectation given its younger age. The components of LSPM J1314+1320AB are now the nearest, lowest mass pre-main-sequence stars with direct mass measurements. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the

  9. Impact of initial models and variable accretion rates on the pre-main-sequence evolution of massive and intermediate-mass stars and the early evolution of H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerlé, Lionel; Peters, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Massive star formation requires the accretion of gas at high rate while the star is already bright. Its actual luminosity depends sensitively on the stellar structure. We compute pre-main-sequence tracks for massive and intermediate-mass stars with variable accretion rates and study the evolution of stellar radius, effective temperature and ionizing luminosity, starting at 2 M⊙ with convective or radiative structures. The radiative case shows a much stronger swelling of the protostar for high accretion rates than the convective case. For radiative structures, the star is very sensitive to the accretion rate and reacts quickly to accretion bursts, leading to considerable changes in photospheric properties on time-scales as short as 100-1000 yr. The evolution for convective structures is much less influenced by the instantaneous accretion rate, and produces a monotonically increasing ionizing flux that can be many orders of magnitude smaller than in the radiative case. For massive stars, it results in a delay of the H II region expansion by up to 10 000 yr. In the radiative case, the H II region can potentially be engulfed by the star during the swelling, which never happens in the convective case. We conclude that the early stellar structure has a large impact on the radiative feedback during the pre-main-sequence evolution of massive protostars and introduces an important uncertainty that should be taken into account. Because of their lower effective temperatures, our convective models may hint at a solution to an observed discrepancy between the luminosity distribution functions of massive young stellar objects and compact H II regions.

  10. Pre-main-sequence isochrones -- I. The Pleiades benchmark

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Cameron P M; Mayne, N J; Jeffries, R D; Littlefair, S P

    2012-01-01

    We present a critical assessment of commonly used pre-main-sequence isochrones by comparing their predictions to a set of well-calibrated colour-magnitude diagrams of the Pleiades in the wavelength range 0.4 to 2.5 microns. Our analysis shows that for temperatures less than 4000 K the models systematically overestimate the flux by a factor two at 0.5 microns, though this decreases with wavelength, becoming negligible at 2.2 microns. In optical colours this will result in the ages for stars younger than 10 Myr being underestimated by factors between two and three. We show that using observations of standard stars to transform the data into a standard system can introduce significant errors in the positioning of pre-main-sequences in colour-magnitude diagrams. Therefore we have compared the models to the data in the natural photometric system in which the observations were taken. Thus we have constructed and tested a model of the system responses for the Wide-Field Camera on the Isaac Newton Telescope. As a ben...

  11. Are pre-main-sequence stars older than we thought?

    CERN Document Server

    Naylor, Tim

    2009-01-01

    We fit the colour-magnitude diagrams of stars between the zero-age main-sequence and terminal-age main sequence in young clusters and associations. The ages we derive are a factor 1.5 to 2 longer than the commonly used ages for these regions, which are derived from the positions of pre-main-sequence stars in colour-magnitude diagrams. From an examination of the uncertainties in the main-sequence and pre-main-sequence models, we conclude that the longer age scale is probably the correct one, which implies we must revise upwards the commonly used ages for young clusters and associations. Such a revision would explain the discrepancy between the observational lifetimes of proto-planetary discs and theoretical calculations of the time to form planets. It would also explain the absence of clusters with ages between 5 and 30Myr. We use the $\\tau^2$ statistic to fit the main-sequence data, but find that we must make significant modifications if we are to fit sequences which have vertical segments in the colour-magni...

  12. Lithium Depletion in Fully Convective Pre-Main Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bildsten, L; Matzner, C D; Ushomirsky, G; Bildsten, Lars; Brown, Edward F.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Ushomirsky, Greg

    1996-01-01

    We present an analytic calculation of the thermonuclear depletion of lithium in contracting, fully convective, pre-main sequence stars of mass M 0.08 M_sun) and for constraining the masses of lithium depleted stars.

  13. Massive pre-main-sequence stars in M17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Tannus, M. C.; Kaper, L.; de Koter, A.; Tramper, F.; Bik, A.; Ellerbroek, L. E.; Ochsendorf, B. B.; Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.

    2017-08-01

    The formation process of massive stars is still poorly understood. Massive young stellar objects (mYSOs) are deeply embedded in their parental clouds; these objects are rare, and thus typically distant, and their reddened spectra usually preclude the determination of their photospheric parameters. M17 is one of the best-studied H ii regions in the sky, is relatively nearby, and hosts a young stellar population. We have obtained optical to near-infrared spectra of previously identified candidate mYSOs and a few OB stars in this region with X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope. The large wavelength coverage enables a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the photospheres and circumstellar disks of these candidate mYSOs. We confirm the pre-main-sequence (PMS) nature of six of the stars and characterise the O stars. The PMS stars have radii that are consistent with being contracting towards the main sequence and are surrounded by a remnant accretion disk. The observed infrared excess and the double-peaked emission lines provide an opportunity to measure structured velocity profiles in the disks. We compare the observed properties of this unique sample of young massive stars with evolutionary tracks of massive protostars and propose that these mYSOs near the western edge of the H ii region are on their way to become main-sequence stars ( 6-20 M⊙) after having undergone high mass accretion rates (Ṁacc 10-4-10-3M⊙yr-1). Their spin distribution upon arrival at the zero age main-sequence is consistent with that observed for young B stars, assuming conservation of angular momentum and homologous contraction. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 60.A-9404(A), 085.D-0741, 089.C-0874(A), and 091.C-0934(B)).The full normalised X-shooter spectra are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A78

  14. Impact of initial models and variable accretion rates on the pre-main-sequence evolution of massive and intermediate-mass stars and the early evolution of HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Haemmerlé, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Massive star formation requires the accretion of gas at high rate while the star is already bright. Its actual luminosity depends sensitively on the stellar structure. We compute pre-main-sequence tracks for massive and intermediate-mass stars with variable accretion rates and study the evolution of stellar radius, effective temperature and ionizing luminosity, starting at $2\\,M_\\odot$ with convective or radiative structures. The radiative case shows a much stronger swelling of the protostar for high accretion rates than the convective case. For radiative structures, the star is very sensitive to the accretion rate and reacts quickly to accretion bursts, leading to considerable changes in photospheric properties on timescales as short as 100 - 1000 yr. The evolution for convective structures is much less influenced by the instantaneous accretion rate, and produces a monotonically increasing ionizing flux that can be many orders of magnitude smaller than in the radiative case. For massive stars, it results in ...

  15. Theoretical seismic properties of pre-main sequence gamma Doradus pulsators

    CERN Document Server

    Bouabid, M -P; Miglio, A; Dupret, M -A; Grigahcene, A; Noels, A

    2011-01-01

    Context. gamma Doradus (gamma Dor) are late A and F-type stars pulsating with high order gravity modes (g-modes). The existence of different evolutionary phases crossing the gamma Dor instability strip raises the question of the existence of pre-main sequence (PMS) gamma Dor stars. Aims. We intend to study the differences between the asteroseismic behaviour of PMS and main sequence (MS) gamma Dor pulsators as it is predicted by the current theory of stellar evolution and stability. Methods. We explore the adiabatic and non-adiabatic properties of high order g-modes in a grid of PMS and MS models covering the mass range 1.2 Msun < Mstar < 2.5 Msun. Results. We derive the theoretical instability strip (IS) for the PMS gamma Dor pulsators. This IS covers the same effective temperature range as the MS gamma Dor one. Nevertheless, the frequency domain of unstable modes in PMS models with a fully radiative core is larger than in MS models, even if they present the same number of unstable modes. Moreover, the ...

  16. Structure and Evolution of Pre-Main Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, Norbert S; Bautz, Mark W; Canizares, Claude C; Davis, John; Dewey, Dan; Huenemoerder, David P; Heilmann, Ralf; Houck, John; Marshall, Herman L; Nowak, Mike; Schattenburg, Mark; Audard, Marc; Drake, Jeremy; Gagne, Marc; Kastner, Joel; Kallman, Tim; Lautenegger, Maurice; Lee, Julia; Miller, Jon; Montmerle, Thierry; Mukai, Koji; Osten, Rachel; Parerels, Frits; Pollock, Andy; Preibisch, Thomas; Raymond, John; Reale, Fabio; Smith, Randall; Testa, Paola; Weintraub, David

    2009-01-01

    Low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars are strong and variable X-ray emitters, as has been well established by EINSTEIN and ROSAT observatories. It was originally believed that this emission was of thermal nature and primarily originated from coronal activity (magnetically confined loops, in analogy with Solar activity) on contracting young stars. Broadband spectral analysis showed that the emission was not isothermal and that elemental abundances were non-Solar. The resolving power of the Chandra and XMM X-ray gratings spectrometers have provided the first, tantalizing details concerning the physical conditions such as temperatures, densities, and abundances that characterize the X-ray emitting regions of young star. These existing high resolution spectrometers, however, simply do not have the effective area to measure diagnostic lines for a large number of PMS stars over required to answer global questions such as: how does magnetic activity in PMS stars differ from that of main sequence stars, how do they ...

  17. Thermohaline instability and rotation-induced mixing. III - Grid of stellar models and asymptotic asteroseismic quantities from the pre-main sequence up to the AGB for low- and intermediate-mass stars at various metallicities

    CERN Document Server

    Lagarde, N; Charbonnel, C; Eggenberger, P; Ekström, S; Palacios, A

    2012-01-01

    The availability of asteroseismic constraints for a large sample of stars from the missions CoRoT and Kepler paves the way for various statistical studies of the seismic properties of stellar populations. In this paper, we evaluate the impact of rotation-induced mixing and thermohaline instability on the global asteroseismic parameters at different stages of the stellar evolution from the Zero Age Main Sequence to the Thermally Pulsating Asymptotic Giant Branch to distinguish stellar populations. We present a grid of stellar evolutionary models for four metallicities (Z = 0.0001, 0.002, 0.004, and 0.014) in the mass range between 0.85 to 6.0 Msun. The models are computed either with standard prescriptions or including both thermohaline convection and rotation-induced mixing. For the whole grid we provide the usual stellar parameters (luminosity, effective temperature, lifetimes, ...), together with the global seismic parameters, i.e. the large frequency separation and asymptotic relations, the frequency corre...

  18. The coronal evolution of pre-main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Scott G; Davies, Claire L

    2016-01-01

    The bulk of X-ray emission from pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars is coronal in origin. We demonstrate herein that stars on Henyey tracks in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram have lower $\\log(L_X/L_\\ast)$, on average, than stars on Hayashi tracks. This effect is driven by the decay of $L_X$ once stars develop radiative cores. $L_X$ decays faster with age for intermediate mass PMS stars, the progenitors of main sequence A-type stars, compared to those of lower mass. As almost all main sequence A-type stars show no detectable X-ray emission, we may already be observing the loss of their coronae during their PMS evolution. Although there is no direct link between the size or mass of the radiative core and $L_X$, the longer stars have spent with partially convective interiors, the weaker their X-ray emission becomes. This conference paper is a synopsis of Gregory, Adams and Davies (2016).

  19. ACCRETION RATES ON PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS IN THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6530

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, Jose; Del Valle, Luciano; Ruiz, Maria Teresa, E-mail: gallardo@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: ldelvall@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: mtruiz@das.uchile.cl [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-01-15

    It is well accepted that during the star formation process, material from a protoplanetary disk is accreted onto the central object during the first {approx}1-5 Myr. Different authors have published measurements of accretion rates for young low- and intermediate-mass stars in several nearby star-forming regions (SFRs). Due to its somewhat larger distance, the SFR M8 (the Lagoon Nebula) has not been studied to the same extent, despite its abundant population of young stellar objects. We have obtained optical band low-resolution spectra of a sample of pre-main-sequence stars in the open cluster NGC 6530 located in the aforementioned nebulae using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph at Gemini-South in multi-object mode. Spectra cover the H{sub {alpha}} emission line used to measure the accretion rate, following the method presented by Natta et al. The observed spectral characteristics are fully consistent with pre-main-sequence stars, showing lithium absorption lines, which are very common in young stellar objects, as well as prominent and broad H{sub {alpha}} emission lines, indicating a T Tauri evolutionary stage. This work presents the first determinations of mass accretion rates of young stellar objects in the open cluster NGC 6530, confirming that they are classical T Tauri stars going through the accretion phase. These observations contribute to a better understanding of the stellar content and evolutionary phase of the very active Lagoon Nebula SFR.

  20. The first magnetic maps of a pre-main sequence binary star system - HD 155555

    OpenAIRE

    Dunstone, N. J.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Cameron, A. Collier; Marsden, S. C.; Jardine, M.; Stempels, H. C.; Vlex, J. C. Ramirez; Donati, J. -F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first maps of the surface magnetic fields of a pre-main sequence binary system. Spectropolarimetric observations of the young, 18 Myr, HD 155555 (V824 Ara, G5IV + K0IV) system were obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope in 2004 and 2007. Both datasets are analysed using a new binary Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) code. This allows us to simultaneously model the contribution of each component to the observed circularly polarised spectra. Stellar brightness maps are also produc...

  1. The potential of space observations for pulsating pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Zwintz, Konstanze

    2016-01-01

    The first asteroseismic studies of pre-main sequence (pre-MS) pulsators have been conducted based on data from the space telescopes MOST and CoRoT with typical time bases of less than 40 days. With these data, a relation between the pulsational properties of pre-MS delta Scuti stars and their relative evolutionary phase on their way from the birthline to the zero-age main sequence was revealed. But it is evident from comparison with the more evolved pulsators in their main sequence or post-main sequence stages observed by the main Kepler mission, that many more questions could be addressed with significantly longer time bases and ultra-high precision. Here, I will discuss the observational status of pre-MS asteroseismology and the potential of future space observations for this research field.

  2. Pre-main sequence spectroscopic binaries suitable for VLTI observations

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, E W; Mundt, R; Covino, E; Alcalá, J M; Cusano, F; Stecklum, B

    2007-01-01

    A severe problem of the research in star-formation is that the masses of young stars are almost always estimated only from evolutionary tracks. Since the tracks published by different groups differ, it is often only possible to give a rough estimate of the masses of young stars. It is thus crucial to test and calibrate the tracks. Up to now, only a few tests of the tracks could be carried out. However, with the VLTI it is now possible to set constrains on the tracks by determining the masses of many young binary stars precisely. In order to use the VLTI efficiently, a first step is to find suitable targets, which is the purpose of this work. Given the distance of nearby star-forming regions, suitable VLTI targets are binaries with orbital periods between at least 50 days, and few years. Although a number of surveys for detecting spectroscopic binaries have been carried out, most of the binaries found so far have periods which are too short. We thus surveyed the Chamaeleon, Corona Australis, Lupus, Sco-Cen, rh...

  3. Theoretical study of $\\gamma$ Doradus pulsations in pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bouabid, M -P; Miglio, A; Dupret, M -A; Grigahcène, A; Noels, A

    2010-01-01

    The question of the existence of pre-main sequence (PMS) $\\gamma$~Doradus ($\\gamma$~Dor) has been raised by the observations of young clusters such as NGC~884 hosting $\\gamma$~Dor members. We have explored the properties of $\\gamma$~Dor type pulsations in a grid of PMS models covering the mass range $1.2 M_\\odot < M_* < 2.5 M_\\odot$ and we derive the theoretical instability strip (IS) for the PMS $\\gamma$~Dor pulsators. We explore the possibility of distinguishing between PMS and MS $\\gamma$~Dor by the behaviour of the period spacing of their high order $gravity$-modes ($g$-modes).

  4. KH 15D: Gradual Occultation of a Pre-Main-Sequence Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Winn, J N; Johnson, J A; Stanek, K Z; Garnavich, P M; Winn, Joshua N.; Holman, Matthew J.; Johnson, John A.; Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Garnavich, Peter M.

    2004-01-01

    We propose that the extraordinary "winking star" KH 15D is an eccentric pre-main-sequence binary that is gradually being occulted by an opaque screen. This model accounts for the periodicity, depth, duration, and rate of growth of the modern eclipses; the historical light curve from photographic plates; and the existing radial velocity measurements. It also explains the re-brightening events that were previously observed during mid-eclipse, and the subsequent disappearance of these events. We predict the future evolution of the system and its full radial velocity curve. Given the small velocity of the occulting screen relative to the center of mass of the binary, the screen is probably associated with the binary, and may be the edge of a precessing circumbinary disk.

  5. Orbital Parameters for a Pre-Main Sequence Binary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnath, Nicole; Prato, L.; Wasserman, L.

    2011-01-01

    The young system VSB 111 was originally classified as a single-lined spectroscopic binary in the star forming region of NGC 2264. Using the Keck II telescope we measured radial velocities for both the primary and secondary components in the infrared. By combining these data with previous visible light observations of the primary star, we derived the period, eccentricity, and other orbital parameters, as well as the mass ratio of the system. With additional information gained from further observations, for example the inclination derived from the angularly resolved orbit, we will eventually obtain the individual stellar masses, necessary to help to calibrate models of young star evolution. Furthermore, by compiling dozens or even hundreds of mass ratios for young binaries we can use mass ratio distributions to improve our understanding of binary star formation. No infrared excess or any other indication of a circumstellar disk is in evidence for VSB 111, indicating that either the accretion rate has dropped to an undetectable value or that this system has aged enough that its disk has dissipated, if originally present. Given the approximately 900 day period of this system, and its relatively high eccentricity, 0.8, the action of the companion could have been responsible for early dissipation of any disk material.

  6. Measuring the mass of a pre-main sequence binary star through the orbit of TWA5A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacky, Q; Ghez, A; Duchene, G; McCabe, C; Macintosh, B

    2007-01-18

    We present the results of a five year monitoring campaign of the close binary TWA 5Aab in the TW Hydrae association, using speckle and adaptive optics on the W.M. Keck 10 m telescopes. These measurements were taken as part of our ongoing monitoring of pre-main sequence (PMS) binaries in an effort to increase the number of dynamically determined PMS masses and thereby calibrate the theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks. Our observations have allowed us to obtain the first determination of this system's astrometric orbit. We find an orbital period of 5.94 {+-} 0.09 years and a semi-major axis of 0.''066 {+-} 0.''005. Combining these results with a kinematic distance, we calculate a total mass of 0.71 {+-} 0.14 M{sub {circle_dot}} (D/44 pc){sup 3}. for this system. This mass measurement, as well as the estimated age of this system, are consistent to within 2{sigma} of all theoretical models considered. In this analysis, we properly account for correlated uncertainties, and show that while these correlations are generally ignored, they increase the formal uncertainties by up to a factor of five and therefore are important to incorporate. With only a few more years of observation, this type of measurement will allow the theoretical models to be distinguished.

  7. The magnetic field of the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae star HD 190073

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catala, C.; Alecian, E.; Donati, J.-F.; Wade, G. A.; Landstreet, J. D.; Böhm, T.; Bouret, J.-C.; Bagnulo, S.; Folsom, C.; Silvester, J.

    2007-01-01

    Context: The general context of this paper is the study of magnetic fields in the pre-main sequence intermediate mass Herbig Ae/Be stars. Magnetic fields are likely to play an important role in pre-main sequence evolution at these masses, in particular in controlling the gains and losses of stellar angular momentum. Aims: The particular aim of this paper is to announce the detection of a structured magnetic field in the Herbig Ae star HD 190073, and to discuss various scenarii for the geometry of the star, its environment and its magnetic field. Methods: We have used the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at CFHT in 2005 and 2006 to obtain high-resolution, high signal-to-noise circular polarization spectra which demonstrate unambiguously the presence of a magnetic field in the photosphere of this star. Results: Nine circular polarization spectra were obtained, each one showing a clear Zeeman signature. This signature is suggestive of a magnetic field structured on large scales. The signature, which corresponds to a longitudinal magnetic field of 74± 10 G, does not vary detectably on a one-year timeframe, indicating either an azimuthally symmetric field, a zero inclination angle between the rotation axis and the line of sight, or a very long rotation period. The optical spectrum of HD 190073 exhibits a large number of emission lines. We discuss the formation of these emission lines in the framework of a model involving a turbulent heated region at the base of the stellar wind, possibly powered by magnetic accretion. Conclusions: .This magnetic detection contributes an important new observational discovery which will aid our understanding of stellar magnetism at intermediate masses. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  8. An Internet server for update pre-main sequence tracks of low- and intermediate-mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Siess, L; Forestini, M

    2000-01-01

    We present new grids of pre-main sequence (PMS) tracks for stars in the mass range 0.1 to 7.0 Msun. The computations were performed for four different metallicities (Z=0.01, 0.02, 0.03 and 0.04). A fifth table has been computed for the solar composition (Z=0.02), including a moderate overshooting. We describe the update in the physics of the Grenoble stellar evolution code which concerns mostly changes in the equation of state (EOS) adopting the formalism proposed by Pols et al. (1995) and in the treatment of the boundary condition. Comparisons of our models with other grids demonstrate the validity of this EOS in the domain of very low-mass stars. Finally, we present a new server dedicated to PMS stellar evolution which allows the determination of stellar parameters from observational data, the calculation of isochrones, the retrieval of evolutionary files and the possibility to generate graphic outputs. WWW site : http://www-laog.obs.ujf-grenoble.fr/activites/starevol/evol.html

  9. The Effect of Pre-Main Sequence Stars on Star Cluster Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wiersma, R; Zwart, S P

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the addition of pre-main sequence evolution to star cluster simulations. We allowed stars to follow pre-main sequence tracks that begin at the deuterium burning birthline and end at the zero age main sequence. We compared our simulations to ones in which the stars began their lives at the zero age main sequence, and also investigated the effects of particular choices for initial binary orbital parameters. We find that the inclusion of the pre-main sequence phase results in a slightly higher core concentration, lower binary fraction, and fewer hard binary systems. In general, the global properties of star clusters remain almost unchanged, but the properties of the binary star population in the cluster can be dramatically modified by the correct treatment of the pre-main sequence stage.

  10. Low-mass pre--main-sequence stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    [Abridged] The stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF) suggests that sub-solar stars form in very large numbers. Most attractive places for catching low-mass star formation in the act are young stellar clusters and associations, still (half-)embedded in star-forming regions. The low-mass stars in such regions are still in their pre--main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary phase. The peculiar nature of these objects and the contamination of their samples by the evolved populations of the Galactic disk impose demanding observational techniques for the detection of complete numbers of PMS stars in the Milky Way. The Magellanic Clouds, the companion galaxies to our own, demonstrate an exceptional star formation activity. The low extinction and stellar field contamination in star-forming regions of these galaxies imply a more efficient detection of low-mass PMS stars than in the Milky Way, but their distance from us make the application of special detection techniques unfeasible. Nonetheless, imaging with the Hubble Space Te...

  11. A probable pre-main sequence chemically peculiar star in the open cluster Stock 16

    CERN Document Server

    Netopil, M; Paunzen, E; Zwintz, K; Pintado, O I; Bagnulo, S

    2014-01-01

    We used the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph of the ESO-Very Large Telescope to obtain a high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectrum of Stock 16-12, an early-type star which previous Delta-a photometric observations suggest being a chemically peculiar (CP) star. We used spectral synthesis to perform a detailed abundance analysis obtaining an effective temperature of 8400 +/- 400 K, a surface gravity of 4.1 +/- 0.4, a microturbulence velocity of 3.4 +0.7/-0.3 km/s, and a projected rotational velocity of 68 +/- 4 km/s. We provide photometric and spectroscopic evidence showing the star is most likely a member of the young Stock 16 open cluster (age 3-8 Myr). The probable cluster membership, the star's position in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, and the found infrared excess strongly suggest the star is still in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. We used PMS evolutionary tracks to determine the stellar mass, which ranges between 1.95 and 2.3 Msun, depending upon the adopted spectroscopic o...

  12. The Interior Structure Constants as an Age Diagnostic for Low-Mass, Pre-Main Sequence Detached Eclipsing Binary Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Feiden, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel method for determining the ages of low-mass, pre-main sequence stellar systems using the apsidal motion of low-mass detached eclipsing binaries. The apsidal motion of a binary system with an eccentric orbit provides information regarding the interior structure constants of the individual stars. These constants are related to the normalized stellar interior density distribution and can be extracted from the predictions of stellar evolution models. We demonstrate that low-mass, pre-main sequence stars undergoing radiative core contraction display rapidly changing interior structure constants (greater than 5% per 10 Myr) that, when combined with observational determinations of the interior structure constants (with 5 -- 10% precision), allow for a robust age estimate. This age estimate, unlike those based on surface quantities, is largely insensitive to the surface layer where effects of magnetic activity are likely to be most pronounced. On the main sequence, where age sensitivity is minimal,...

  13. The Effect of Screening Factors and Thermonuclear Reaction Rates in the Pre-main Sequence Evolution of Low Mass Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    İ. Küçük; Ş. Çalışkan

    2010-09-01

    In understanding the nucleosynthesis of the elements in stars, one of the most important quantities is the reaction rate and it must be evaluated in terms of the stellar temperature , and its determination involves the knowledge of the excitation function () of the specific nuclear reaction leading to the final nucleus. In this paper, the effect of thermonuclear reaction rates to the pre-main sequence evolution of low mass stars having masses 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 and 1 M⊙ are studied by using our modified Stellar Evolutionary Program.

  14. Pre-main-sequence isochrones -- III. The Cluster Collaboration isochrone server

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Cameron P M; Naylor, Tim; Mayne, N J; Jeffries, R D; Mamajek, Eric E; Rowe, John

    2014-01-01

    We present an isochrone server for semi-empirical pre-main-sequence model isochrones in the following systems: Johnson-Cousins, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Two-Micron All-Sky Survey, Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) Wide-Field Camera, and INT Photometric H$\\alpha$ Survey (IPHAS)/UV-Excess Survey (UVEX). The server can be accessed via the Cluster Collaboration webpage {http://www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/timn/isochrones/}. To achieve this we have used the observed colours of member stars in young clusters with well-established age, distance and reddening to create fiducial loci in the colour-magnitude diagram. These empirical sequences have been used to quantify the discrepancy between the models and data arising from uncertainties in both the interior and atmospheric models, resulting in tables of semi-empirical bolometric corrections (BCs) in the various photometric systems. The model isochrones made available through the server are based on existing stellar interior models coupled with our newly derived semi-empiric...

  15. The effect of starspots on the radii of low-mass pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, R J

    2014-01-01

    A polytropic model is used to investigate the effects of dark photospheric spots on the evolution and radii of magnetically active, low-mass (M<0.5Msun), pre-main sequence (PMS) stars. Spots slow the contraction along Hayashi tracks and inflate the radii of PMS stars by a factor of (1-beta)^{-N} compared to unspotted stars of the same luminosity, where beta is the equivalent covering fraction of dark starspots and N \\simeq 0.45+/-0.05. This is a much stronger inflation than predicted by the models of Spruit & Weiss (1986) for main sequence stars with the same beta, where N \\sim 0.2 to 0.3. These models have been compared to radii determined for very magnetically active K- and M-dwarfs in the young Pleiades and NGC 2516 clusters, and the radii of tidally-locked, low-mass eclipsing binary components. The binary components and ZAMS K-dwarfs have radii inflated by \\sim 10 per cent compared to an empirical radius-luminosity relation that is defined by magnetically inactive field dwarfs with interferometrica...

  16. Constraints on the height of the inner disk rim in pre-main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vinković, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inner region of protoplanetary disks around young pre-main-sequence stars is still poorly understood. This part of the disk is shaped by various forces influencing dust and gas dynamics and by dust sublimation, which creates abrupt drops in the dust density. This region also emits a strong near-infrared excess that cannot be explained by classical accretion disk models, which suggests the existence of some unusual dust distribution or disk shape. The most prevalent explanation to date is the puffed-up inner disk rim model, where the disk exhibits an optically thin cavity around the star up to the distance of dust sublimation. The critical parameter in this model is the inner disk rim height $z_{\\rm max}$ relative to the rim's distance from the star $R_{\\rm in}$. Observations often require $z_{\\rm max}/R_{\\rm in}\\gtrsim0.2$ to reproduce the near-infrared excess in the spectra. In this paper we put together a comprehensive list of processes that can shape the inner disk rim and combined them to...

  17. Pulsation of Pre-Main Sequence Stars in Young Open Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwintz, Konstanze; Weiss, Werner W.

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this proposal is to determine observationally the parameter space of the pre-main sequence instability strip. For that purpose we intend to obtain photometric timeseries with high time resolution and low noise level of the stars in young open clusters (IC 4996, NGC 6910 and NGC 6383) and to identify pre-main sequence pulsators. Several cluster members have the spectral types of interest (A-F) and lie between the birthline and the zero-age main sequence. Up to now the number of pre-main sequence pulsators is absolutely inadequate to determine reliably the hot and cool border of the according instability region. Its definition is indispensable for a better understanding of the internal structure and evolution of such stars.

  18. Pre-main-sequence isochrones -- II. Revising star and planet formation timescales

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Cameron P M; Mayne, N J; Jeffries, R D; Littlefair, S P

    2013-01-01

    We have derived ages for 13 young (<30 Myr) star-forming regions and find they are up to a factor two older than the ages typically adopted in the literature. This result has wide-ranging implications, including that circumstellar discs survive longer (~10-12 Myr) and that the average Class I lifetime is greater (~1 Myr) than currently believed. For each star-forming region we derived two ages from colour-magnitude diagrams. First we fitted models of the evolution between the zero-age main-sequence and terminal-age main-sequence to derive a homogeneous set of main-sequence ages, distances and reddenings with statistically meaningful uncertainties. Our second age for each star-forming region was derived by fitting pre-main-sequence stars to new semi-empirical model isochrones. For the first time (for a set of clusters younger than 50 Myr) we find broad agreement between these two ages, and since these are derived from two distinct mass regimes that rely on different aspects of stellar physics, it gives us c...

  19. Older and Colder: The impact of starspots on pre-main sequence stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Somers, Garrett

    2015-01-01

    We assess the impact of starspots on the evolution of late-type stars during the pre-main sequence (pre-MS) using a modified stellar evolution code. We find that heavily spotted models of mass 0.1-1.2\\msun\\ are inflated by up to $10$% during the pre-MS, and up to 4% and 9% for fully- and partially-convective stars at the zero-age MS, consistent with measurements from active eclipsing binary systems. Spots similarly decrease stellar luminosity and $T_{\\rm eff}$, causing isochrone-derived masses to be under-estimated by up to a factor of $2 \\times$, and ages to be under-estimated by a factor of 2-10$\\times$, at 3 Myr. Consequently, pre-MS clusters and their active stars are systematically older and more massive than often reported. Cluster ages derived with the lithium depletion boundary technique are erroneously young by $\\sim 15$% and $10$% at $30$ and $100$ Myr respectively, if 50% spotted stars are interpreted with un-spotted models. Finally, lithium depletion is suppressed in spotted stars with radiative c...

  20. The first magnetic maps of a pre-main sequence binary star system - HD 155555

    CERN Document Server

    Dunstone, N J; Cameron, A Collier; Marsden, S C; Jardine, M; Stempels, H C; Vlex, J C Ramirez; Donati, J -F

    2008-01-01

    We present the first maps of the surface magnetic fields of a pre-main sequence binary system. Spectropolarimetric observations of the young, 18 Myr, HD 155555 (V824 Ara, G5IV + K0IV) system were obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope in 2004 and 2007. Both datasets are analysed using a new binary Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) code. This allows us to simultaneously model the contribution of each component to the observed circularly polarised spectra. Stellar brightness maps are also produced for HD 155555 and compared to previous Doppler images. Our radial magnetic maps reveal a complex surface magnetic topology with mixed polarities at all latitudes. We find rings of azimuthal field on both stars, most of which are found to be non-axisymmetric with the stellar rotational axis. We also examine the field strength and the relative fraction of magnetic energy stored in the radial and azimuthal field components at both epochs. A marked weakening of the field strength of the secondary star is observed between t...

  1. Tracing the potential planet-forming regions around seven pre-main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Schegerer, A A; Hummel, C A; Quanz, S P; Richichi, A

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the innermost regions of seven circumstellar disks around pre-main-sequence stars. Our object sample contains disks apparently at various stages of their evolution. Both single stars and spatially resolved binaries are considered. In particular, we search for inner disk gaps as proposed for several young stellar objects. When analyzing the underlying dust population in the atmosphere of circumstellar disks, the shape of the 10um feature is investigated. We performed interferometric observations in N band 8-13um with MIDI using baseline lengths of between 54m and 127m. The data analysis is based on radiative-transfer simulations using the Monte Carlo code MC3D by modeling simultaneously the SED, N band spectra, and interferometric visibilities. Correlated and uncorrelated N band spectra are compared to investigate the radial distribution of the dust composition of the disk atmosphere. Spatially resolved mid-infrared emission was detected in all objects. For four objects, the observ...

  2. Deep near-IR variability survey of pre-main-sequence stars in Rho Ophiuchi

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Catarina Alves

    2008-01-01

    Variability is a common characteristic of pre-main-sequence stars (PMS). Near-IR variability surveys of young stellar objects (YSOs) can probe stellar and circumstellar environments and provide information about the dynamics of the on going magnetic and accretion processes. Furthermore, variability can be used as a tool to uncover new cluster members in star formation regions. We hope to achieve the deepest near-IR variability study of YSOs targeting the Rho Ophiuchi cluster. Fourteen epochs of observations were obtained with the Wide Field Camera (WFCAM) at the UKIRT telescope scheduled in a manner that allowed the study of variability on timescales of days, months, and years. Statistical tools, such as the multi-band cross correlation index and the reduced chi-square, were used to disentangle signals of variability from noise. Variability characteristics are compared to existing models of YSOs in order to relate them to physical processes, and then used to select new candidate members of this star-forming r...

  3. Pulsating pre-main sequence stars in IC 4996 and NGC 6530

    CERN Document Server

    Zwintz, K; Zwintz, Konstanze; Weiss, Werner W.

    2006-01-01

    Asteroseismology of pulsating pre-main sequence (PMS) stars has the potential of testing the validity of current models of PMS structure and evolution. As a first step, a sufficiently large sample of pulsating PMS stars has to be established, which allows to select candidates optimally suited for a detailed asteroseismological analysis based on photometry from space or ground based network data. A search for pulsating PMS members in the young open clusters IC 4996 and NGC 6530 has been performed to improve the sample of known PMS pulsators. As both clusters are younger than 10 million years, all members with spectral types later than A0 have not reached the zero-age main sequence yet. Hence, IC 4996 and NGC 6530 are most suitable to search for PMS pulsation among their A- and F-type cluster stars. CCD time series photometry in Johnson B and V filters has been obtained for IC 4996 and NGC 6530. The resulting light curves for 113 stars in IC 4996 and 194 stars in NGC 6530 have been subject to detailed frequency...

  4. The Recurrent Eclipse of an Unusual Pre--Main-Sequence Star in IC 348

    CERN Document Server

    Nordhagen, S; Williams, E C; Semkov, E

    2006-01-01

    The recurrence of a previously documented eclipse of a solar-like pre--main-sequence star in the young cluster IC 348 has been observed. The recurrence interval is 4.7 $\\pm 0.1$ yr and portions of 4 cycles have now been seen. The duration of each eclipse is at least 3.5 years, or $\\sim 75$% of a cycle, verifying that this is not an eclipse by a stellar companion. The light curve is generally symmetric and approximately flat-bottomed. Brightness at maximum and minimum have been rather stable over the years but the light curve is not perfectly repetitive or smooth and small variations exist at all phases. We confirm that the star is redder when fainter. Models are discussed and it is proposed that this could be a system similar to KH 15D in NGC 2264. Specifically, it may be an eccentric binary in which a portion of the orbit of one member is currently occulted during some binary phases by a circumbinary disk. The star deserves sustained observational attention for what it may reveal about the circumstellar envi...

  5. Fundamental properties of pre-main sequence stars in young, southern star forming regions: metallicities

    CERN Document Server

    James, D J; Santos, N C; Bouvier, J; James, David J.; Melo, Claudio; Santos, Nuno C.; Bouvier, Jerome

    2005-01-01

    Aims: The primary motivation for this project is to search for metal-rich star forming regions, in which, stars of super-solar metallicity will be created, as hopefully, will be extra-solar planets orbiting them ! Results: We find (pre-main sequence) model-dependent isochronal ages of the Lupus, Chamaeleon and CrA targets to be $9.1 \\pm 2.1$ Myr, $4.5 \\pm 1.6$ Myr and $9.0 \\pm 3.9$ Myr respectively. The majority of the stars have Li I 6707.8A equivalent widths similar to, or above those of, their similar mass Pleiades counterparts, confirming their youthfulness. Most stars are kinematic members, either single or binary, of their regions. We find a mean radial velocity for objects in the Lupus cloud to be ${\\bar {RV}}=+2.6 \\pm 1.8$ km s$^{-1}$, for the Chamaeleon I & II clouds, ${\\bar {RV}}=+12.8 \\pm 3.6$ km s$^{-1}$ whereas for the CrA cloud, we find ${\\bar {RV}}=-1.1 \\pm 0.5$ km s$^{-1}$. All stars are coronally and chromospherically active, exhibiting X-ray and H$\\alpha$ emission levels marginally less,...

  6. Pre-main sequence stars older than 8 Myr in the Eagle Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    De Marchi, Guido; Guarcello, M G; Bonito, Rosaria

    2013-01-01

    Attention is given to a population of 110 stars in the NGC 6611 cluster of the Eagle Nebula that have prominent near-infrared (NIR) excess and optical colours typical of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars older than 8 Myr. At least half of those for which spectroscopy exists have a Halpha emission line profile revealing active accretion. In principle, the V-I colours of all these stars would be consistent with those of young PMS objects (< 1 Myr) whose radiation is heavily obscured by a circumstellar disc seen at high inclination and in small part scattered towards the observer by the back side of the disc. However, using theoretical models it is shown here that objects of this type can only account for a few percent of this population. In fact, the spatial distribution of these objects, their X-ray luminosities, their optical brightness, their positions in the colour-magnitude diagram and the weak Li absorption lines of the stars studied spectroscopically suggest that most of them are at least 8 times older th...

  7. Revisiting the pre-main-sequence evolution of stars. I. Importance of accretion efficiency and deuterium abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitomo, Masanobu; Guillot, Tristan; Takeuchi, Taku; Ida, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    Context. Protostars grow from the first formation of a small seed and subsequent accretion of material. Recent theoretical work has shown that the pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolution of stars is much more complex than previously envisioned. Instead of the traditional steady, one-dimensional solution, accretion may be episodic and not necessarily symmetrical, thereby affecting the energy deposited inside the star and its interior structure. Aims: Given this new framework, we want to understand what controls the evolution of accreting stars. Methods: We use the MESA stellar evolution code with various sets of conditions. In particular, we account for the (unknown) efficiency of accretion in burying gravitational energy into the protostar through a parameter, ξ, and we vary the amount of deuterium present. Results: We confirm the findings of previous works that, in terms of evolutionary tracks on an Hertzprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, the evolution changes significantly with the amount of energy that is lost during accretion. We find that deuterium burning also regulates the PMS evolution. In the low-entropy accretion scenario, the evolutionary tracks in the H-R diagram are significantly different from the classical tracks and are sensitive to the deuterium content. A comparison of theoretical evolutionary tracks and observations allows us to exclude some cold accretion models (ξ 0) with low deuterium abundances. Conclusions: We confirm that the luminosity spread seen in clusters can be explained by models with a somewhat inefficient injection of accretion heat. The resulting evolutionary tracks then become sensitive to the accretion heat efficiency, initial core entropy, and deuterium content. In this context, we predict that clusters with a higher D/H ratio should have less scatter in luminosity than clusters with a smaller D/H. Future work on this issue should include radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to determine the efficiency of accretion heating and further

  8. YSOVAR: SIX PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE ECLIPSING BINARIES IN THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Calderon, M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Rebull, L. M. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stassun, K. G. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vrba, F. J. [U. S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 W. Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001-8521 (United States); Prato, L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Hillenbrand, L. A.; Carpenter, J. M. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Terebey, S.; Angione, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Covey, K. R. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, 226 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Terndrup, D. M. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Gutermuth, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Song, I. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Plavchan, P. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Marchis, F. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 N San Bernado Av, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Garcia, E. V. [Department of Physics, Fisk University, 1000 17th Ave. N, Nashville, TN 37208 (United States); Margheim, S. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Luhman, K. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Irwin, J. M., E-mail: mariamc@cab.inta-csic.es [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-10

    Eclipsing binaries (EBs) provide critical laboratories for empirically testing predictions of theoretical models of stellar structure and evolution. Pre-main-sequence (PMS) EBs are particularly valuable, both due to their rarity and the highly dynamic nature of PMS evolution, such that a dense grid of PMS EBs is required to properly calibrate theoretical PMS models. Analyzing multi-epoch, multi-color light curves for {approx}2400 candidate Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) members from our Warm Spitzer Exploration Science Program YSOVAR, we have identified 12 stars whose light curves show eclipse features. Four of these 12 EBs are previously known. Supplementing our light curves with follow-up optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, we establish two of the candidates as likely field EBs lying behind the ONC. We confirm the remaining six candidate systems, however, as newly identified ONC PMS EBs. These systems increase the number of known PMS EBs by over 50% and include the highest mass ({theta}{sup 1} Ori E, for which we provide a complete set of well-determined parameters including component masses of 2.807 and 2.797 M{sub Sun }) and longest-period (ISOY J053505.71-052354.1, P {approx} 20 days) PMS EBs currently known. In two cases ({theta}{sup 1} Ori E and ISOY J053526.88-044730.7), enough photometric and spectroscopic data exist to attempt an orbit solution and derive the system parameters. For the remaining systems, we combine our data with literature information to provide a preliminary characterization sufficient to guide follow-up investigations of these rare, benchmark systems.

  9. EXPORT optical photometry and polarimetry of Vega-type and pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Oudmaijer, R D; Eiroa, C

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents optical UBVRI broadband photo-polarimetry of the EXPORT sample obtained at the 2.5m Nordic Optical Telescope. The database consists of multi-epoch photo-polarimetry of 68 pre-main-sequence and main-sequence stars. An investigation of the polarization variability indicates that 22 objects are variable at the 3sigma level in our data. All these objects are pre-main sequence stars, consisting of both T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be objects while the main sequence, Vega type and post-T Tauri type objects are not variable. The polarization properties of the variable sources are mostly indicative of the UXOR-type behaviour; the objects show highest polarization when the brightness is at minimum. We add seven new objects to the class of UXOR variables (BH Cep, VX Cas, DK Tau, HK Ori, LkHa 234, KK Oph and RY Ori). The main reason for their discovery is the fact that our data-set is the largest in its kind, indicating that many more young UXOR-type pre-main sequence stars remain to be discovered. The set ...

  10. A Wide-Field Survey for Transiting Hot Jupiters and Eclipsing Pre-Main-Sequence Binaries in Young Stellar Associations

    CERN Document Server

    Oelkers, Ryan J; Marshall, Jennifer L; DePoy, Darren L; Lambas, Diego G; Colazo, Carlos; Stringer, Katelyn

    2016-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a significant advancement in the detection, classification and understanding of exoplanets and binaries. This is due, in large part, to the increase in use of small-aperture telescopes (< 20 cm) to survey large areas of the sky to milli-mag precision with rapid cadence. The vast majority of the planetary and binary systems studied to date consist of main-sequence or evolved objects, leading to a dearth of knowledge of properties at early times (< 50 Myr). Only a dozen binaries and one candidate transiting Hot Jupiter are known among pre-main sequence objects, yet these are the systems that can provide the best constraints on stellar formation and planetary migration models. The deficiency in the number of well-characterized systems is driven by the inherent and aperiodic variability found in pre-main-sequence objects, which can mask and mimic eclipse signals. Hence, a dramatic increase in the number of young systems with high-quality observations is highly desirable to gui...

  11. A statistical analysis of X-ray variability in pre-main sequence objects of the Taurus Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, B; Briggs, K; Micela, G; Scelsi, L; Audard, M; Pillitteri, I; Güdel, M

    2006-01-01

    This work is part of a systematic X-ray survey of the Taurus star forming complex with XMM-Newton. We study the time series of all X-ray sources associated with Taurus members, to statistically characterize their X-ray variability, and compare the results to those for pre-main sequence stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster and to expectations arising from a model where all the X-ray emission is the result of a large number of stochastically occurring flares. We find that roughly half of the detected X-ray sources show variability above our sensitivity limit, and in ~ 26 % of the cases this variability is recognized as flares. Variability is more frequently detected at hard than at soft energies. The variability statistics of cTTS and wTTS are undistinguishable, suggesting a common (coronal) origin for their X-ray emission. We have for the first time applied a rigorous maximum likelihood method in the analysis of the number distribution of flare energies on pre-main sequence stars. In its differential form this di...

  12. The Mdot - M* relation of pre-main sequence stars: a consequence of X-ray driven disc evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ercolano, B; Owen, J E; Rosotti, G; Manara, C F

    2013-01-01

    We analyse current measurements of accretion rates onto pre-main sequence stars as a function of stellar mass, and conclude that the steep dependance of accretion rates on stellar mass is real and not driven by selection/detection threshold, as has been previously feared. These conclusions are reached by means of statistical tests including a survival analysis which can account for upper limits. The power-law slope of the Mdot-M* relation is found to be in the range of 1.6-1.9 for young stars with masses lower than 1 Msun. The measured slopes and distributions can be easily reproduced by means of a simple disc model which includes viscous accretion and X-ray photoevaporation. We conclude that the Mdot-M* relation in pre-main sequence stars bears the signature of disc dispersal by X-ray photoevaporation, suggesting that the relation is a straight- forward consequence of disc physics rather than an imprint of initial conditions.

  13. A Critical Assessment of Ages Derived Using Pre-Main-Sequence Isochrones in Colour-Magnitude Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Cameron P. M.

    2012-11-01

    In this thesis a critical assessment of the ages derived using theoretical pre-main-sequence (pre-MS) stellar evolutionary models is presented by comparing the predictions to the low-mass pre-MS population of 14 young star-forming regions (SFRs) in colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). Deriving pre-MS ages requires precise distances and estimates of the reddening. Therefore, the main-sequence (MS) members of the SFRs have been used to derive a self-consistent set of statistically robust ages, distances and reddenings with associated uncertainties using a maximum-likelihood fitting statistic and MS evolutionary models. A photometric method for de-reddening individual stars - known as the Q-method - in regions where the extinction is spatially variable has been updated and is presented. The effects of both the model dependency and the SFR composition on these derived parameters are also discussed. The problem of calibrating photometric observations of red pre-MS stars is examined and it is shown that using observations of MS stars to transform the data into a standard photometric system can introduce significant errors in the position of the pre-MS locus in CMD space. Hence, it is crucial that precise photometric studies - especially of pre-MS objects - be carried out in the natural photometric system of the observations. This therefore requires a robust model of the system responses for the instrument used, and thus the calculated responses for the Wide-Field Camera on the Isaac Newton Telescope are presented. These system responses have been tested using standard star observations and have been shown to be a good representation of the photometric system. A benchmark test for the pre-MS evolutionary models is performed by comparing them to a set of well-calibrated CMDs of the Pleiades in the wavelength regime 0.4-2.5 μm. The masses predicted by these models are also tested against dynamical masses using a sample of MS binaries by calculating the system magnitude in a

  14. X-ray Emission Properties of Intermediate-Mass, Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Binder, Breanna; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.

    2017-08-01

    Intermediate-mass (2-8 M⊙) main-sequence stars with A to mid-B spectral types occupy an X-ray "desert" of weak intrinsic emission between low- and high-mass stars. Lacking the wind-shock driven emission of massive, O and early B stars or the convectively-driven magnetic reconnection flaring activity of later-type stars, X-ray detections of (non-peculiar) main-sequence AB stars are typically ascribed to the presence of unresolved, lower-mass binary companions. There is mounting evidence, however, that intermediate-mass, pre-main sequence stars (IMPS) with GK spectral types produce intrinsic X-ray emission that rapidly decays with time following the development of a radiative zone as IMPS approach the ZAMS as AB stars. This suggests that X-ray emission from IMPS may be a more luminous analog of the well-studied coronal X-ray emission from lower-mass, T Tauri stars. Statistical studies of young IMPS have been hampered by their scarcety in nearby, unobscured star-forming regions. We present the first results from a spectral-fitting study to measure absorption-corrected X-ray luminosities and plasma temperatures for hundreds of candidate X-ray emitting IMPS found in the MYStIX and MAGiX surveys of massive Galactic star forming regions. Candidate IMPS are placed on the HR diagram via a novel infrared spectral energy distribution modeling technique designed for highly-obscured, young massive star-forming regions. The rapid decay of X-ray emission from these objects has the potential to provide an independent chronometer to constrain star formation rates, and may produce an age-dependent bias in the relationship between the stellar X-ray luminosity function and mass function in distant (>2 kpc) regions observed with relatively shallow X-ray observations.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant CAREER-1454334 and by NASA through Chandra Award 18200040.

  15. Differential rotation on both components of the pre main-sequence binary system HD 155555

    OpenAIRE

    Dunstone, N. J.; Hussain, G A J; Cameron, A. Collier; Marsden, S. C.; Jardine, M.; Barnes, J. R.; Vlex, J. C. Ramirez; Donati, J.-F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurements of surface differential rotation on a pre-main sequence binary system. Using intensity (Stokes I) and circularly polarised (Stokes V) timeseries spectra, taken over eleven nights at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT), we incorporate a solar-like differential rotation law into the surface imaging process. We find that both components of the young, 18 Myr, HD 155555 (V824 Ara, G5IV + K0IV) binary system show significant differential rotation. The equator-pole...

  16. Active phenomena in the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae star HD 163296

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catala, C.; Praderie, F.; Simon, T.; Talavera, A.; The, P. S.

    1989-01-01

    Observations by IUE of the short-term variability of the Mg II and Ca II resonance lines in the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 are presented. Evidence that these lines show a phenomenon of rotational modulation, similar to the one observed in AB Aur, another Herbig Ae star is found. The variations in the spectrum of HD 163296 are even more conspicuous than in the spectrum of AB Aur. Magnetically structured winds may thus be a widespread phenomenon among the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  17. Pre-main sequence variable stars in young open cluster NGC 1893

    OpenAIRE

    Lata, Sneh; Pandey, A.K.(Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IIT), Mumbai, India); Chen, W. P.; Maheswar, G.; Chauhan, Neelam

    2012-01-01

    We present results of multi-epoch (fourteen nights during 2007-2010) $V$-band photometry of the cluster NGC 1893 region to identify photometric variable stars in the cluster. The study identified a total of 53 stars showing photometric variability. The members associated with the region are identified on the basis of spectral energy distribution, $J-H/H-K$ two colour diagram and $V/V-I$ colour-magnitude diagram. The ages and masses of the majority of pre-main-sequence sources are found to be ...

  18. Kinematic Distances of Pre-main Sequence Stars in the Lupus Star-Forming Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.; Bertout, C.

    2014-06-01

    The problem of the determination of distances has always played a central role in astronomy. However, little recent progress has been made in the distance determination of faint young stellar objects such as pre-main sequence (PMS) stars. Many of the PMS stars were neither observed by the Hipparcos satellite due to their magnitude nor have any trigonometric parallax measured from the ground due to their distance. Here we investigate the kinematic properties of the Lupus moving group with the primary objective of deriving individual parallaxes for each group member of this star-forming region.

  19. Differential rotation on both components of the pre main-sequence binary system HD 155555

    OpenAIRE

    Dunstone, N. J.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Cameron, A. Collier; Marsden, S. C.; Jardine, M.; Barnes, J.R.; Vlex, J. C. Ramirez; Donati, J. -F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurements of surface differential rotation on a pre-main sequence binary system. Using intensity (Stokes I) and circularly polarised (Stokes V) timeseries spectra, taken over eleven nights at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT), we incorporate a solar-like differential rotation law into the surface imaging process. We find that both components of the young, 18 Myr, HD 155555 (V824 Ara, G5IV + K0IV) binary system show significant differential rotation. The equator-pole...

  20. Pre main sequence stars as UV sources for the World Space Observatory-UV mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez de Castro, Ana I.; Lamzin, Sergei A.

    2011-09-01

    Pre-main sequence stars are bright UV (UV) sources compared with their main sequence analogues. The source of this excess is the high energy processes associated with the physics of accretion/outflow during early stellar evolution. In this review, the main sources of UV excess are described as well as the most significant "unknowns" in the field. Special emphasis is made on the results from the last observations carried out with the Hubble Space Telescope and on the relevance of future dedicated monitoring programs with the World Space Observatory-UV.

  1. Evidence of accretion triggered oscillations in the pre-main-sequence interacting binary AK Sco

    CERN Document Server

    de Castro, Ana I Gomez; Talavera, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Pre-main sequence (PMS) binaries are surrounded by circumbinary disks from which matter falls onto both components. The material dragged from the circumbinary disk flows onto each star through independent streams channelled by the variable gravitational field. The action of the bar-like potential is most prominent in high eccentricity systems made of two equal mass stars. AK Sco is a unique PMS system composed of two F5 stars in an orbit with e=0.47. Henceforth, it is an ideal laboratory to study matter infall in binaries and its role in orbit circularization. In this letter, we report the detection of a 1.3mHz ultra low frequency oscillation in the ultraviolet light curve at periastron passage. This oscillation last 7 ks being most likely fed by the gravitational energy released when the streams tails spiralling onto each star get in contact at periastron passage enhancing the accretion flow; this unveils a new mechanism for angular momentum loss during pre-main sequence evolution and a new type of interacti...

  2. An Unusual Eclipse of a Pre-Main Sequence Star in IC 348

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, R E; Williams, E C

    2003-01-01

    A solar-like pre-main sequence star (TJ 108 = H 187 = LRLL 35 = HMW 15) in the extremely young cluster IC 348 has been found, which apparently experienced an eclipse lasting ~3.5 years, much longer than has ever been detected for any normal eclipsing binary. The light curve is flat-bottomed and rather symmetric, with a depth of 0.66 mag in Cousins I. During eclipse, the system reddened by \\~0.17 mag in R-I. We argue that the eclipsing body is not a star because of the small probability of detecting an eclipse in what would be a very widely separated binary. Instead, it appears that the eclipse was caused by a circumstellar or circumbinary cloud or disk feature which occulted the star, or one of its components, if it is a binary system. We emphasize the importance of more detailed study of this object, which appears to be a new member of a small class of pre-main sequence stars whose variability can be firmly linked to occultation by circumstellar (or circumbinary) matter.

  3. Pre-main sequence stars in the stellar association N11 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Vallenari, Antonella; Sordo, Rosanna

    2009-01-01

    Magellanic Clouds are of extreme importance to the study of the star formation process in low metallicity environments. In this paper we report on the discovery of pre-main sequence candidates and young embedded stellar objects in N11 located in the Large Magellanic Cloud to cast light on the star formation scenario. We would like to remind that this comparison is complicated by the presence of a large age dispersion detected in the fields. Deep archive HST/ACS photometry is used to derive color-magnitude diagrams of the associations in N~11 and of the foreground field population. These data are complemented by archive IR Spitzer data which allow the detection of young embedded stellar objects. The spatial distribution of the pre-main sequence candidates and young embedded stellar objects is compared with literature data observed at different wavelengths, such as H$_{\\alpha}$ and CO maps, and with the distribution of OB and Herbig Ae/Be stars. The degree of clustering is derived using the Minimal Spanning Tre...

  4. CoRoT 223992193: A new, low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary with evidence of a circumbinary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, Edward; McQuillan, Amy; Bouvier, Jerome; Hodgkin, Simon; Alencar, Silvia H P; Terquem, Caroline; Southworth, John; Gibson, Neale P; Cody, Ann Marie; Lendl, Monika; Morales-Calderón, Maria; Favata, Fabio; Stauffer, John; Micela, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of CoRoT 223992193, a double-lined, detached eclipsing binary, comprising two pre-main sequence M dwarfs, discovered by the CoRoT space mission during a 23-day observation of the 3 Myr old NGC 2264 star-forming region. Using multi-epoch optical and near-IR follow-up spectroscopy with FLAMES on the Very Large Telescope and ISIS on the William Herschel Telescope we obtain a full orbital solution and derive the fundamental parameters of both stars by modelling the light curve and radial velocity data. The orbit is circular and has a period of $3.8745745 \\pm 0.0000014$ days. The masses and radii of the two stars are $0.67 \\pm 0.01$ and $0.495 \\pm 0.007$ $M_{\\odot}$ and $1.30 \\pm 0.04$ and $1.11 ~^{+0.04}_{-0.05}$ $R_{\\odot}$, respectively. This system is a useful test of evolutionary models of young low-mass stars, as it lies in a region of parameter space where observational constraints are scarce; comparison with these models indicates an apparent age of $\\sim$3.5-6 Myr. The systemic ve...

  5. Hunting for millimeter flares from magnetic reconnection in pre-main sequence spectroscopic binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kóspál, Á.; Salter, D. M.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Moór, A.; Blake, G. A.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Recent observations of the low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS), eccentric spectroscopic binaries DQ Tau and V773 Tau A reveal that their millimeter spectrum is occasionally dominated by flares from non-thermal emission processes. The transient activity is believed to be synchrotron in nature, resulting from powerful magnetic reconnection events when the separate magnetic structures of the binary components are briefly capable of interacting and forced to reorganize, typically near periastron. Aims: We conducted the first systematic study of the millimeter variability toward a sample of 12 PMS spectroscopic binaries with the aim to characterize the proliferation of flares amongst sources likely to experience similar interbinary reconnection events. The source sample consists entirely of short-period, close-separation binaries that possess either a high orbital eccentricity (e > 0.1) or a circular orbit (e ≈ 0). Methods: Using the MAMBO2 array on the IRAM 30 m telescope, we carried out continuous monitoring at 1.25 mm (240 GHz) over a 4-night period during which all of the high-eccentricity binaries approached periastron. We also obtained simultaneous optical VRI measurements, since a strong link is often observed between stellar reconnection events (traced via X-rays) and optical brightenings. Results: UZ Tau E is the only source to be detected at millimeter wavelengths, and it exhibited significant variation (F1.25mm = 87-179 mJy); it is also the only source to undergo strong simultaneous optical variability (ΔR ≈ 0.9 mag). The binary possesses the largest orbital eccentricity in the current sample, a predicted factor in star-star magnetic interaction events. With orbital parameters and variable accretion activity similar to DQ Tau, the millimeter behavior of UZ Tau E draws many parallels to the DQ Tau model for colliding magnetospheres. However, on the basis of our observations alone, we cannot determine whether the variability is repetitive, or if it

  6. Searching for young Jupiter analogs around AP Col: L-band high-contrast imaging of the closest pre-main sequence star

    CERN Document Server

    Quanz, Sascha P; Janson, Markus; Avenhaus, Henning; Meyer, Michael R; Hillenbrand, Lynne A

    2012-01-01

    The nearby M-dwarf AP Col was recently identified by Riedel et al. 2011 as a pre-main sequence star (age 12 - 50 Myr) situated only 8.4 pc from the Sun. The combination of its youth, distance, and intrinsically low luminosity make it an ideal target to search for extrasolar planets using direct imaging. We report deep adaptive optics observations of AP Col taken with VLT/NACO and Keck/NIRC2 in the L-band. Using aggressive speckle suppression and background subtraction techniques, we are able to rule out companions with mass m >= 0.5 - 1M_Jup for projected separations a>4.5 AU, and m >= 2 M_Jup for projected separations as small as 3 AU, assuming an age of 40 Myr using the COND theoretical evolutionary models. Using a different set of models the mass limits increase by a factor of ~2. The observations presented here are the deepest mass-sensitivity limits yet achieved within 20 AU on a star with direct imaging. While Doppler radial velocity surveys have shown that Jovian bodies with close-in orbits are rare ar...

  7. Gaia-ESO Survey: The analysis of pre-main sequence stellar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzafame, A C; Damiani, F; Franciosini, E; Cottaar, M; Sousa, S G; Tabernero, H M; Klutsch, A; Spina, L; Biazzo, K; Prisinzano, L; Sacco, G G; Randich, S; Brugaletta, E; Mena, E Delgado; Adibekyan, V; Montes, D; Bonito, R; Gameiro, J F; Alcalá, J M; Hernández, J I González; Jeffries, R; Messina, S; Meyer, M; Gilmore, G; Asplund, M; Binney, J; Bonifacio, P; Drew, J E; Feltzing, S; Ferguson, A M N; Micela, G; Negueruela, I; Prusti, T; Rix, H-W; Vallenari, A; Alfaro, E J; Prieto, C Allende; Babusiaux, C; Bensby, T; Blomme, R; Bragaglia, A; Flaccomio, E; Francois, P; Hambly, N; Irwin, M; Koposov, S E; Korn, A J; Smiljanic, R; Van Eck, S; Walton, N; Bayo, A; Bergemann, M; Carraro, G; Costado, M T; Edvardsson, B; Heiter, U; Hill, V; Hourihane, A; Jackson, R J; Jofré, P; Lardo, C; Lewis, J; Lind, K; Magrini, L; Marconi, G; Martayan, C; Masseron, T; Monaco, L; Morbidelli, L; Sbordone, L; Worley, C C; Zaggia, S

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of UVES and GIRAFFE spectra acquired by the Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey in the fields of young clusters whose population includes pre-main sequence (PMS) stars. Both methods that have been extensively used in the past and new ones developed in the contest of the Gaia-ESO survey enterprise are available and used. The internal precision of these quantities is estimated by inter-comparing the results obtained by such different methods, while the accuracy is estimated by comparison with independent external data, like effective temperature and surface gravity derived from angular diameter measurements, on a sample of benchmarks stars. Specific strategies are implemented to deal with fast rotation, accretion signatures, chromospheric activity, and veiling. The analysis carried out on spectra acquired in young clusters' fields during the first 18 months of observations, up to June 2013, is presented in preparation of the first release of advanced data products. Stellar par...

  8. New radio detections of early-type pre-main-sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Brown, Alexander; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of VLA radio continuum observations of 13 early-type pre-main-sequence stars selected from the 1984 catalog of Finkenzeller and Mundt are presented. The stars HD 259431 and MWC 1080 were detected at 3.6 cm, while HD 200775 and TY CrA were detected at both 3.6 and 6 cm. The flux density of HD 200775 has a frequency dependence consistent with the behavior expected for free-free emission originating in a fully ionized wind. However, an observation in A configuration suggests that the source geometry may not be spherically symmetric. In contrast, the spectral index of TY CrA is negative with a flux behavior implying nonthermal emission. The physical mechanism responsible for the nonthermal emission has not yet been identified, although gyrosynchrotron and synchrotron processes cannot be ruled out.

  9. A constraint on the formation timescale of the young open cluster NGC 2264: Lithium abundance of pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Beomdu; Kim, Jinyoung S; Bessell, Michael S; Hwang, Narae; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-01-01

    The timescale of cluster formation is an essential parameter in order to understand the formation process of star clusters. Pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in nearby young open clusters reveal a large spread in brightness. If the spread were considered as a result of a real spread in age, the corresponding cluster formation timescale would be about 5 -- 20 Myr. Hence it could be interpreted that star formation in an open cluster is prolonged for up to a few tens of Myr. However, difficulties in reddening correction, observational errors, and systematic uncertainties introduced by imperfect evolutionary models for PMS stars, can result in an artificial age spread. Alternatively, we can utilize Li abundance as a relative age indicator of PMS star to determine the cluster formation timescale. The optical spectra of 134 PMS stars in NGC 2264 have been obtained with MMT/Hectochelle. The equivalent widths have been measured for 86 PMS stars with a detectable Li line (3500 < T_eff [K] <= 6500). Li abundance unde...

  10. A New Method for the Assessment of Age and Age-Spread of Pre-Main Sequence Stars in Young Stellar Associations of the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rio, Nicola; Gennaro, Mario

    2010-01-01

    We present a new method for the evaluation of the age and age-spread among pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars in star-forming regions in the Magellanic Clouds, accounting simultaneously for photometric errors, unresolved binarity, differential extinction, stellar variability, accretion and crowding. The application of the method is performed with the statistical construction of synthetic color-magnitude diagrams using PMS evolutionary models. We convert each isochrone into 2D probability distributions of artificial PMS stars in the CMD by applying the aforementioned biases that dislocate these stars from their original CMD positions. A maximum-likelihood technique is then applied to derive the probability for each observed star to have a certain age, as well as the best age for the entire cluster. We apply our method to the photometric catalog of ~2000 PMS stars in the young association LH 95 in the LMC, based on the deepest HST/ACS imaging ever performed toward this galaxy, with a detection limit of V~28, corresp...

  11. Angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves. IV - Wave generation by surface convection zone, from the pre-main sequence to the early-AGB in intermediate mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Talon, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of papers that deal with angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves in stellar interiors. Here, we want to examine the potential role of waves in other evolutionary phases than the main sequence. We study the evolution of a 3Msun Population I model from the pre-main sequence to the early-AGB phase and examine whether waves can lead to angular momentum redistribution and/or element diffusion at the external convection zone boundary. We find that, although waves produced by the surface convection zone can be ignored safely for such a star during the main sequence, it is not the case for later evolutionary stages. In particular, angular momentum transport by internal waves could be quite important at the end of the sub-giant branch and during the early-AGB phase. Wave-induced mixing of chemicals is expected during the early-AGB phase.

  12. Pre-main-sequence binaries with tidally disrupted discs: the Br gamma in HD 104237

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, P J V; Dougados, C; Bacciotti, F; Clausse, J -M; Massi, F; Mérand, A; Petrov, R; Weigelt, G

    2013-01-01

    Active pre-main-sequence binaries with separations of around ten stellar radii present a wealth of phenomena unobserved in common systems. The study of these objects is extended from Classical T Tauri stars to the Herbig Ae star HD 104237. Spectro-interferometry with the VLTI/AMBER is presented. It is found that the K-band continuum squared visibilities are compatible with a circumbinary disc with a radius of ~0.5 AU. However, a significant fraction (~50 per cent) of the flux is unresolved and not fully accounted by the stellar photospheres. The stars probably don't hold circumstellar discs, in addition to the circumbinary disk, due to the combined effects of inner magnetospheric truncation and outer tidal truncation. This unresolved flux likely arises in compact structures inside the tidally disrupted circumbinary disc. Most ($\\gtrsim 90$ per cent) of the Br gamma line emission is unresolved. The line-to-continuum spectro-astrometry shifts in time, along the direction of the Ly alpha jet known to be driven b...

  13. Differential rotation on both components of the pre main-sequence binary system HD 155555

    CERN Document Server

    Dunstone, N J; Cameron, A Collier; Marsden, S C; Jardine, M; Barnes, J R; Vlex, J C Ramirez; Donati, J -F

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurements of surface differential rotation on a pre-main sequence binary system. Using intensity (Stokes I) and circularly polarised (Stokes V) timeseries spectra, taken over eleven nights at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT), we incorporate a solar-like differential rotation law into the surface imaging process. We find that both components of the young, 18 Myr, HD 155555 (V824 Ara, G5IV + K0IV) binary system show significant differential rotation. The equator-pole laptimes as determined from the intensity spectra are 80 days for the primary star and 163 days for the secondary. Similarly for the magnetic spectra we obtain equator-pole laptimes of 44 and 71 days respectively, showing that the shearing timescale of magnetic regions is approximately half that found for stellar spots. Both components are therefore found to have rates of differential rotation similar to those of the same spectral type main sequence single stars. The results for HD 155555 are therefore in contrast to tho...

  14. Exploring pre-main sequence variables of ONC: The new variables

    CERN Document Server

    Parihar, Padmakar; Distefano, Elisa; Shantikumar N S; Medhi, Biman J

    2009-01-01

    Since 2004, we have been engaged in a long-term observing program to monitor young stellar objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster. We have collected about two thousands frames in V, R, and I broad-band filters on more than two hundred nights distributed over five consecutive observing seasons. The high-quality and time-extended photometric data give us an opportunity to address various phenomena associated with young stars. The prime motivations of this project are i) to explore various manifestations of stellar magnetic activity in very young low-mass stars; ii) to search for new pre-main sequence eclipsing binaries; and iii) to look for any EXor and FUor like transient activities associated with YSOs. Since this is the first paper on this program, we give a detailed description of the science drivers, the observation and the data reduction strategies as well. In addition to these, we also present a large number of new periodic variables detected from our first five years of time-series photometric data. Our st...

  15. V4046 Sgr: Touchstone to Investigate Spectral Type Discrepancies for Pre-main Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Joel H; Sargent, Benjamin; Smith, C T; Rayner, John

    2014-01-01

    Determinations of the fundamental properties (e.g., masses and ages) of late-type, pre-main sequence (pre-MS) stars are complicated by the potential for significant discrepancies between the spectral types of such stars as ascertained via optical vs. near-infrared observations. To address this problem, we have obtained near-IR spectroscopy of the nearby, close binary T Tauri system V4046 Sgr AB with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) SPEX spectrometer. The V4046 Sgr close binary (and circumbinary disk) system provides an important test case for spectral type determination thanks to the stringent observational constraints on its component stellar masses (i.e., ~0.9 Msun each) as well as on its age (12-21 Myr) and distance (73 pc). Analysis of the IRTF data indicates that the composite near-IR spectral type for V4046 Sgr AB lies in the range M0-M1, i.e., significantly later than the K5+K7 composite type previously determined from optical spectroscopy. However, the K5+K7 composite type is in better agre...

  16. Hunting for millimeter flares from magnetic reconnection in pre-main sequence spectroscopic binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Kóspál, Á; Hogerheijde, M R; Moór, A; Blake, G A

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations of the low-mass pre-main sequence, eccentric spectroscopic binaries DQ Tau and V773 Tau A reveal that their millimeter spectrum is occasionally dominated by flares from non-thermal emission processes. The transient activity is believed to be synchrotron in nature, resulting from powerful magnetic reconnection events when the separate magnetic structures of the binary components are capable of interacting and forced to reorganize, typically near periastron. We conducted the first systematic study of the millimeter variability toward a sample of 12 PMS spectroscopic binaries with the aim to characterize the proliferation of flares amongst sources likely to experience similar interbinary reconnection events. The source sample consists of short-period, close-separation binaries that possess either a high orbital eccentricity or a circular orbit. Using the MAMBO2 array on the IRAM 30m telescope, we carried out continuous monitoring at 1.25 mm over a 4-night period during which all of the high-e...

  17. RX J0942.7-7726AB: an isolated pre-main sequence wide binary

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Simon J; Bessell, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of two young M-dwarfs, RX J0942.7-7726 (M1) and 2MASS J09424157-7727130 (M4.5), that were found only 42 arcsec apart in a survey for pre-main sequence stars surrounding the open cluster eta Chamaeleontis. Both stars have congruent proper motions and near-infrared photometry. Medium-resolution spectroscopy reveals that they are coeval (age 8-12 Myr), codistant (100-150 pc) and thus almost certainly form a true wide binary with a projected separation of 4000-6000 AU. The system appears too old and dynamically fragile to have originated in eta Cha and a traceback analysis argues for its birth in or near the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association. RX J0942.7-7726AB joins a growing group of wide binaries kinematically linked to Sco-Cen, suggesting that such fragile systems can survive the turbulent environment of their natal molecular clouds while still being dispersed with large velocities. Conversely, the small radial velocity difference between the stars (2.7 \\pm 1.0 km/s) could mean the syst...

  18. Magnetic Activity of Pre-main Sequence Stars near the Stellar-Substellar Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Principe, David A; Rodriguez, David

    2015-01-01

    X-ray observations of pre-main sequence (pre-MS) stars of M-type probe coronal emission and offer a means to investigate magnetic activity at the stellar-substellar boundary. Recent observations of main sequence (MS) stars at this boundary display a decrease in fractional X-ray luminosity ($L_{X}$/$L_{bol}$) by almost two orders of magnitude for spectral types M7 and later. We investigate magnetic activity and search for a decrease in X-ray emission in the pre-MS progenitors of these MS stars. We present XMM-Newton X-ray observations and preliminary results for ~10 nearby (30-70 pc), very low mass pre-MS stars in the relatively unexplored age range of 10-30 Myr. We compare the fractional X-ray luminosities of these 10-30 Myr old stars to younger (1-3 Myr) pre-MS brown dwarfs and find no dependence on spectral type or age suggesting that X-ray activity declines at an age later than ~30 Myr in these very low-mass stars.

  19. Magnetic Activity of Pre-main Sequence Stars near the Stellar-Substellar Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, David; Kastner, Joel. H.; Rodriguez, David

    2016-01-01

    X-ray observations of pre-main sequence (pre-MS) stars of M-type probe coronal emission and offer a means to investigate magnetic activity at the stellar-substellar boundary. Recent observations of main sequence (MS) stars at this boundary display a decrease in fractional X-ray luminosity (L X /L bol ) by almost two orders of magnitude for spectral types M7 and later. We investigate magnetic activity and search for a decrease in X-ray emission in the pre-MS progenitors of these MS stars. We present XMM-Newton X-ray observations and preliminary results for ~10 nearby (30-70 pc), very low mass pre-MS stars in the relatively unexplored age range of 10-30 Myr. We compare the fractional X-ray luminosities of these 10-30 Myr old stars to younger (1-3 Myr) pre-MS brown dwarfs and find no dependence on spectral type or age suggesting that X-ray activity declines at an age later than ~30 Myr in these very low-mass stars.

  20. An extensive VLT/X-shooter library of photospheric templates of pre-main sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, C. F.; Frasca, A.; Alcalá, J. M.; Natta, A.; Stelzer, B.; Testi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Studies of the formation and evolution of young stars and their disks rely on knowledge of the stellar parameters of the young stars. The derivation of these parameters is commonly based on comparison with photospheric template spectra. Furthermore, chromospheric emission in young active stars impacts the measurement of mass accretion rates, a key quantity for studying disk evolution. Aims: Here we derive stellar properties of low-mass (M⋆≲ 2 M⊙) pre-main sequence stars without disks, which represent ideal photospheric templates for studies of young stars. We also use these spectra to constrain the impact of chromospheric emission on the measurements of mass accretion rates. The spectra are reduced, flux-calibrated, and corrected for telluric absorption, and are made available to the community. Methods: We derive the spectral type for our targets by analyzing the photospheric molecular features present in their VLT/X-shooter spectra by means of spectral indices and comparison of the relative strength of photospheric absorption features. We also measure effective temperature, gravity, projected rotational velocity, and radial velocity from our spectra by fitting them with synthetic spectra with the ROTFIT tool. The targets have negligible extinction (AVhttp://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/605/A86

  1. Exploring pre-main-sequence variables of the ONC: the new variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Padmakar; Messina, Sergio; Distefano, Elisa; Shantikumar, N. S.; Medhi, Biman J.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2004, we have been engaged in a long-term observing programme to monitor young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). We have collected about 2000 frames in V, R and I broad-band filters on more than 200 nights distributed over five consecutive observing seasons. The high-quality and time-extended photometric data give us an opportunity to address various phenomena associated with young stars. The prime motivations of this project are (i) to explore various manifestations of stellar magnetic activity in very young low-mass stars, (ii) to search for new pre-main-sequence eclipsing binaries and (iii) to look for any EXor and FUor-like transient activities associated with YSOs. Since this is the first paper on this programme, we give a detailed description of the science drivers, the observation and the data reduction strategies as well. In addition to these, we also present a large number of new periodic variables detected from our first 5 yr of time-series photometric data. Our study reveals that about 72 per cent of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) in our field of view are periodic, whereas only 32 per cent of weak-lined T Tauri stars (WTTS) are periodic. This indicates that inhomogeneity patterns on the surface of CTTS of the ONC stars are much more stable than on WTTS. From our multiyear monitoring campaign, we found that the photometric surveys based on single season are incapable of identifying all periodic variables. And any study on evolution of angular momentum based on single-season surveys must be carried out with caution.

  2. Impact of internal gravity waves on the rotation profile inside pre-main sequence low-mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Charbonnel, C; Amard, L; Palacios, A; Talon, S

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of internal gravity waves (IGW), meridional circulation, shear turbulence, and stellar contraction on the internal rotation profile and surface velocity evolution of solar metallicity low-mass pre-main sequence stars. We compute a grid of rotating stellar evolution models with masses between 0.6 and 2.0Msun taking these processes into account for the transport of angular momentum, as soon as the radiative core appears and assuming no more disk-locking from that moment on.IGW generation along the PMS is computed taking Reynolds-stress and buoyancy into account in the bulk of the stellar convective envelope and convective core (when present). Redistribution of angular momentum within the radiative layers accounts for damping of prograde and retrograde IGW by thermal diffusivity and viscosity in corotation resonance. Over the whole mass range considered, IGW are found to be efficiently generated by the convective envelope and to slow down the stellar core early on the PMS. In stars more massi...

  3. Analysis of flares in the chromosphere and corona of main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Chacón, I.

    2015-11-01

    This Ph.D. Thesis revolves around flares on main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars. We use observations in different wavelength ranges with the aim of analysing the effects of flares at different layers of stellar atmospheres. In particular, optical and X-ray observations are used so that we can study how flares affect, respectively, the chromosphere and the corona of stars. In the optical range we carry out a high temporal resolution spectroscopic monitoring of UV Ceti-type stars aimed at detecting non-white-light flares (the most typical kind of solar flares) in stars other than the Sun. With these data we confirm that non-white-light flares are a frequent phenomenon in UV Ceti-type stars, as observed in the Sun. We study and interpret the behaviour of different chromospheric lines during the flares detected on AD Leo. By using a simplified slab model of flares (Jevremović et al. 1998), we are able to determine the physical parameters of the chromospheric flaring plasma (electron density and electron temperature), the temperature of the underlying source, and the surface area covered by the flaring plasma. We also search for possible relationships between the physical parameters of the flaring plasma and other properties such as the flare duration, area, maximum flux and released energy. This work considerably extends the existing sample of stellar flares analysed with good quality spectroscopy in the optical range. In X-rays we take advantage of the great sensitivity, wide energy range, high energy resolution, and continuous time coverage of the EPIC detectors - on-board the XMMNewton satellite - in order to perform time-resolved spectral analysis of coronal flares. In particular, in the UV Ceti-type star CC Eri we study two flares that are weaker than those typically reported in the literature (allowing us to speculate about the role of flares as heating agents of stellar atmospheres); while in the pre-main-sequence M-type star TWA 11B (with no signatures of

  4. Effect of accretion on the pre-main-sequence evolution of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Elbakyan, Vardan; Hosokawa, Takashi; Sakurai, Yuya; Guedel, Manuel; Yorke, Harold

    2017-09-01

    Aims: The pre-main-sequence evolution of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs is studied numerically starting from the formation of a protostellar or proto-brown dwarf seed and taking into account the mass accretion onto the central object during the initial several Myr of evolution. Methods: The stellar evolution was computed using the STELLAR evolution code with recent modifications. The mass accretion rates were taken from numerical hydrodynamics models by computing the circumstellar disk evolution starting from the gravitational collapse of prestellar cloud cores of various mass and angular momentum. The resulting stellar evolution tracks were compared with the isochrones and isomasses calculated using non-accreting models. Results: We find that mass accretion in the initial several Myr of protostellar evolution can have a strong effect on the subsequent evolution of young stars and brown dwarfs. The disagreement between accreting and non-accreting models in terms of the total stellar luminosity L∗, stellar radius R∗, and effective temperature Teff depends on the thermal efficiency of accretion, that is, on the fraction of accretion energy that is absorbed by the central object. The largest mismatch is found for the cold accretion case, in which essentially all accretion energy is radiated away. The relative deviations in L∗ and R∗ in this case can reach 50% for objects 1.0 Myr old, and they remain notable even for objects 10 Myr old. In the hot and hybrid accretion cases, in which a constant fraction of accretion energy is absorbed, the disagreement between accreting and non-accreting models becomes less pronounced, but still remains notable for objects 1.0 Myr old. These disagreements may lead to an incorrect age estimate for objects of (sub-)solar mass when using the isochrones that are based on non-accreting models, as has also been noted previously. We find that objects with strong luminosity bursts exhibit notable excursions in the L∗-Teff diagram

  5. THE CLUSTERED NATURE OF STAR FORMATION. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CLUSTERS IN THE STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 602/N90 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Gennaro, Mario [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schmeja, Stefan [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, P.O. Box 11337, Tucson, AZ 85734 (United States); Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Enrico Fermi' , Universita di Pisa, largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa I-56127 (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 is characterized by the H II nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre-main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main-sequence stars NGC 602, located in the central area of the ring. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster low-mass PMS stars are congregated in 13 additional small, compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC 602, identified in terms of their higher stellar density with respect to the average background density derived from star counts. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction ({approx}60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the intercluster area, covering the whole central part of the region. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age difference of {approx}2.5 Myr between NGC 602 and the compact sub-clusters, which appear younger, on the basis of comparison of the brighter PMS stars with evolutionary models, which we accurately calculated for the metal abundance of the SMC. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC 602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally concentrated. When the complete PMS stellar sample, including both clustered and diffused stars, is considered in our cluster analysis, it appears as a single centrally concentrated stellar agglomeration, covering the whole central area of the region. Considering also the hot massive stars of the system, we find evidence that this agglomeration is hierarchically structured. Based on our findings, we propose a scenario according to which the region NGC 602/N90 experiences an active clustered star formation for the last {approx}5 Myr. The central cluster NGC 602 was

  6. The Structure of the Accretion Flow on pre-main-sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Nuria

    1999-07-01

    We propose to test an essential prediction of the magnetospheric accretion model for T Tauri stars. STIS echelle spectra will be used to search for the relatively narrow high-temperature emission lines that must result from the magnetospheric accretion shock, but are not expected in the previous, alternative boundary layer model. By combining the results from high temperature {10^5 K} lines, accessible only with HST, with optical lines and optical-UV continuum emission, we will develop physically self-consistent models of accretion shock structure. The geometrically distribution of the emitting gas as derived from our results will test theories of mass-loading of magnetic field lines at the magnetosphere-disk interface. Analysis of the UV emission lines will also provide improved calibrations between ultraviolet continuum emission and accretion luminosities, and thus improve estimates of mass accretion rates for T Tauri stars.

  7. Active Phenomena in the Pre-main Sequence Star AB AUR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praderie, F.; Simon, T.; Boesgaard, A. M.; Felenbok, P.; Catala, C.; Czarny, J.; Talavera, A.

    1985-01-01

    The Herbig Ae star AB Aur presents short time scale variability in the Mg II and Ca II resonance lines. A qualitative model of the expanding envelope, involving fast and slow streams in a co-rotating structure, is proposed to explain the Mg II spectral variability.

  8. YSOVAR: Six Pre-main-sequence Eclipsing Binaries in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    includes background subtraction, cosmic -hit removal, flat-fielding, and wavelength calibration. 23 http://www2.keck.hawaii.edu/inst/nirspec-old/redspec...Inclination and combined radius are highly degenerated; inclination and temperature ratio are less so, but also provide weaker constraints. (A color version of...example, the model isochrones of Siess et al. (2000) predict a radius sum of 11.1–14.5R for ages in the range of 0.3–2 Myr. 5.2. ISOY J0535−0447 ISOY

  9. Old pre-main-sequence Stars: Disc reformation by Bondi-Hoyle accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Scicluna, P; Dale, J E; Testi, L

    2014-01-01

    Young stars show evidence of accretion discs which evolve quickly and disperse with an e-folding time of $\\sim$ 3Myr. This is in striking contrast with recent observations that suggest evidence for numerous $>30$ Myr old stars with an accretion disc in large star-forming complexes. We consider whether these observations of apparently old accretors could be explained by invoking Bondi-Hoyle accretion to rebuild a new disc around these stars during passage through a clumpy molecular cloud. We combine a simple Monte Carlo model to explore the capture of mass by such systems with a viscous evolution model to infer the levels of accretion that would be observed. We find that a significant fraction of stars may capture enough material via the Bondi-Hoyle mechanism to rebuild a disc of mass $\\gtrsim$ 1 minimum-mass solar nebula, and $\\lesssim 10\\%$ accrete at observable levels at any given time. A significant fraction of the observed old accretors may be explained with our proposed mechanism. Such accretion may prov...

  10. Pre-main sequence stars with disks in the Eagle Nebula observed in scattered light

    CERN Document Server

    Guarcello, M G; Micela, G; Peres, G; Prisinzano, L; Sciortino, S

    2010-01-01

    NGC6611 and its parental cloud, the Eagle Nebula (M16), are well-studied star-forming regions, thanks to their large content of both OB stars and stars with disks and the observed ongoing star formation. We identified 834 disk-bearing stars associated with the cloud, after detecting their excesses in NIR bands from J band to 8.0 micron. In this paper, we study in detail the nature of a subsample of disk-bearing stars that show peculiar characteristics. They appear older than the other members in the V vs. V-I diagram, and/or they have one or more IRAC colors at pure photospheric values, despite showing NIR excesses, when optical and infrared colors are compared. We confirm the membership of these stars to M16 by a spectroscopic analysis. The physical properties of these stars with disks are studied by comparing their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with the SEDs predicted by models of T-Tauri stars with disks and envelopes. We show that the age of these stars estimated from the V vs. V-I diagram is unrel...

  11. Extreme value statistics for two-dimensional convective penetration in a pre-main sequence star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J.; Baraffe, I.; Goffrey, T.; Constantino, T.; Viallet, M.; Popov, M. V.; Walder, R.; Folini, D.

    2017-08-01

    Context. In the interior of stars, a convectively unstable zone typically borders a zone that is stable to convection. Convective motions can penetrate the boundary between these zones, creating a layer characterized by intermittent convective mixing, and gradual erosion of the density and temperature stratification. Aims: We examine a penetration layer formed between a central radiative zone and a large convection zone in the deep interior of a young low-mass star. Using the Multidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC) to simulate two-dimensional compressible stellar convection in a spherical geometry over long times, we produce statistics that characterize the extent and impact of convective penetration in this layer. Methods: We apply extreme value theory to the maximal extent of convective penetration at any time. We compare statistical results from simulations which treat non-local convection, throughout a large portion of the stellar radius, with simulations designed to treat local convection in a small region surrounding the penetration layer. For each of these situations, we compare simulations of different resolution, which have different velocity magnitudes. We also compare statistical results between simulations that radiate energy at a constant rate to those that allow energy to radiate from the stellar surface according to the local surface temperature. Results: Based on the frequency and depth of penetrating convective structures, we observe two distinct layers that form between the convection zone and the stable radiative zone. We show that the probability density function of the maximal depth of convective penetration at any time corresponds closely in space with the radial position where internal waves are excited. We find that the maximal penetration depth can be modeled by a Weibull distribution with a small shape parameter. Using these results, and building on established scalings for diffusion enhanced by large-scale convective motions, we

  12. Pre-Main sequence Turn-On as a chronometer for young clusters: NGC346 as a benchmark

    CERN Document Server

    Cignoni, M; Sabbi, E; Nota, A; Degl'Innocenti, S; Moroni, P G Prada; Gallagher, J S

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel approach to derive the age of very young star clusters, by using the Turn-On (TOn). The TOn is the point in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) where the pre-main sequence (PMS) joins the main sequence (MS). In the MS luminosity function (LF) of the cluster, the TOn is identified as a peak followed by a dip. We propose that by combining the CMD analysis with the monitoring of the spatial distribution of MS stars it is possible to reliably identify the TOn in extragalactic star forming regions. Compared to alternative methods, this technique is complementary to the turn-off dating and avoids the systematic biases affecting the PMS phase. We describe the method and its uncertainties, and apply it to the star forming region NGC346, which has been extensively imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This study extends the LF approach in crowded extragalactic regions and opens the way for future studies with HST/WFC3, JWST and from the ground with adaptive optics.

  13. Pre-main sequence accretion in the low metallicity Galactic star-forming region Sh 2-284

    CERN Document Server

    Kalari, V M

    2014-01-01

    We present optical spectra of pre-main sequence (PMS) candidates around the H$\\alpha$ region taken with the Southern African Large Telescope, SALT, in the low metallicity ($Z$) Galactic region Sh 2-284, which includes the open cluster Dolidze 25 with an atypical low metallicity of $Z$ $\\sim$ 1/5 $Z_{\\odot}$. It has been suggested on the basis of both theory and observations that PMS mass-accretion rates, $\\dot M_{\\rm{acc}}$, are a function of $Z$. We present the first sample of spectroscopic estimates of mass-accretion rates for PMS stars in any low-$Z$ star-forming region. Our data-set was enlarged with literature data of H$\\alpha$ emission in intermediate-resolution R-band spectroscopy. Our total sample includes 24 objects spanning a mass range between 1 - 2 $M_{\\odot}$ and with a median age of approximately 3.5 Myr. The vast majority (21 out of 24) show evidence for a circumstellar disk on the basis of 2MASS and Spitzer infrared photometry. We find $\\dot M_{\\rm{acc}}$ in the 1 - 2 $M_{\\odot}$ interval to d...

  14. Magnetic fields and differential rotation on the pre-main sequence III: The early-G star HD 106506

    CERN Document Server

    Waite, I A; Carter, B D; Hart, R; Donati, J -F; Vélez, J C Ramírez; Semel, M; Dunstone, N

    2011-01-01

    We present photometry and spectropolarimetry of the pre-main sequence star HD 106506. A photometric rotational period of ~1.416 +/- 0.133 days has been derived using observations at Mount Kent Observatory (MKO). Spectropolarimetric data taken at the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) were used to derive spot occupancy and magnetic maps of the star through the technique of Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI). The resulting brightness maps indicate that HD 106506 displays photospheric spots at all latitudes including a predominant polar spot. Azimuthal and radial magnetic images of this star have been derived, and a significant azimuthal magnetic field is indicated, in line with other active young stars. A solar-like differential rotation law was incorporated into the imaging process. Using Stokes I information the equatorial rotation rate, $\\Omega_{eq}$, was found to be 4.54 +/- 0.01 rad/d, with a photospheric shear $\\delta\\Omega$ of $0.21_{-0.03}^{+0.02}$ rad/d. This equates to an equatorial rotation period of ~...

  15. On the origin of the correlations between the accretion luminosity and emission line luminosities in pre-main-sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendigutía, I.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Rigliaco, E.; Fairlamb, J. R.; Calvet, N.; Muzerolle, J.; Cunningham, N.; Lumsden, S. L.

    2015-09-01

    Correlations between the accretion luminosity and emission line luminosities (Lacc and Lline) of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars have been published for many different spectral lines, which are used to estimate accretion rates. Despite the origin of those correlations is unknown, this could be attributed to direct or indirect physical relations between the emission line formation and the accretion mechanism. This work shows that all (near-UV/optical/near-IR) Lacc-Lline correlations are the result of the fact that the accretion luminosity and the stellar luminosity (L*) are correlated, and are not necessarily related with the physical origin of the line. Synthetic and observational data are used to illustrate how the Lacc-Lline correlations depend on the Lacc-L* relationship. We conclude that because PMS stars show the Lacc-L* correlation immediately implies that Lacc also correlates with the luminosity of all emission lines, for which the Lacc-Lline correlations alone do not prove any physical connection with accretion but can only be used with practical purposes to roughly estimate accretion rates. When looking for correlations with possible physical meaning, we suggest that Lacc/L* and Lline/L* should be used instead of Lacc and Lline. Finally, the finding that Lacc has a steeper dependence on L* for T Tauri stars than for intermediate-mass Herbig Ae/Be stars is also discussed. That is explained from the magnetospheric accretion scenario and the different photospheric properties in the near-UV.

  16. On the origin of the correlations between the accretion luminosity and emission line luminosities in pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mendigutía, I; Rigliaco, E; Fairlamb, J R; Calvet, N; Muzerolle, J; Cunningham, N; Lumsden, S L

    2015-01-01

    Correlations between the accretion luminosity and emission line luminosities (L_acc and L_line) of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars have been published for many different spectral lines, which are used to estimate accretion rates. Despite the origin of those correlations is unknown, this could be attributed to direct or indirect physical relations between the emission line formation and the accretion mechanism. This work shows that all (near-UV/optical/near-IR) L_acc-L_line correlations are the result of the fact that the accretion luminosity and the stellar luminosity (L_star) are correlated, and are not necessarily related with the physical origin of the line. Synthetic and observational data are used to illustrate how the L_acc-L_line correlations depend on the L_acc-L_star relationship. We conclude that because PMS stars show the L_acc-L_star correlation immediately implies that L_acc also correlates with the luminosity of all emission lines, for which the L_acc-L_line correlations alone do not prove any phy...

  17. Photometric determination of the mass accretion rate of pre-main sequence stars. IV. Recent star formation in NGC 602

    CERN Document Server

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the young stellar populations in NGC 602, in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using a novel method that we have developed to combine Hubble Space Telescope photometry in the V, I, and Halpha bands. We have identified about 300 pre-main sequence (PMS) stars, all of which are still undergoing active mass accretion, and have determined their physical parameters (effective temperature, luminosity, age, mass and mass accretion rate). Our analysis shows that star formation has been present in this field over the last 60 Myr. In addition, we can recognise at least two clear, distinct, and prominent episodes in the recent past: one about 2 Myr ago, but still ongoing in regions of higher nebulosity, and one (or more) older than 30 Myr, encompassing both stars dispersed in the field and two smaller clusters located about 100 arcsec north of the centre of NGC 602. The relative locations of younger and older PMS stars do not imply a causal effect or triggering of one generation on the other. The strength of th...

  18. The influence of radiative core growth on coronal X-ray emission from pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Scott G; Davies, Claire L

    2016-01-01

    Pre-main sequence (PMS) stars of mass $\\gtrsim0.35\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$ transition from hosting fully convective interiors to configurations with a radiative core and outer convective envelope during their gravitational contraction. This stellar structure change influences the external magnetic field topology and, as we demonstrate herein, affects the coronal X-ray emission as a stellar analog of the solar tachocline develops. We have combined archival X-ray, spectroscopic, and photometric data for $\\sim$1000 PMS stars from five of the best studied star forming regions; the ONC, NGC 2264, IC 348, NGC 2362, and NGC 6530. Using a modern, PMS calibrated, spectral type-to-effective temperature and intrinsic colour scale, we deredden the photometry using colours appropriate for each spectral type, and determine the stellar mass, age, and internal structure consistently for the entire sample. We find that PMS stars on Henyey tracks have, on average, lower fractional X-ray luminosities ($L_{\\rm X}/L_\\ast$) than those on ...

  19. The Solar Neighborhood. XXVI. AP Col: The Closest (8.4 pc) Pre-Main-Sequence Star

    CERN Document Server

    Riedel, Adric R; Henry, Todd J; Melis, Carl; Jao, Wei-Chun; Subasavage, John P; 10.1088/0004-6256/142/4/104

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a multi-technique investigation of the M4.5Ve flare star AP Col, which we discover to be the nearest pre-main-sequence star. These include astrometric data from the CTIO 0.9m, from which we derive a proper motion of 342.0+/-0.5 mas yr^-1, a trigonometric parallax of 119.21+/-0.98 mas (8.39+/-0.07 pc), and photometry and photometric variability at optical wavelengths. We also provide spectroscopic data, including radial velocity (22.4+/-0.3 km s^-1), lithium Equivalent Width (EW) (0.28+/-0.02 A), H-alpha EW (-6.0 to -35 A), {\\it vsini} (11+/-1 km s^-1), and gravity indicators from the Siding Spring 2.3-m WiFeS, Lick 3-m Hamilton echelle, and Keck-I HIRES echelle spectrographs. The combined observations demonstrate that AP Col is the closer of only two known systems within 10 pc of the Sun younger than 100 Myr. Given its space motion and apparent age of 12-50 Myr, AP Col is likely a member of the recently proposed ~40 Myr old Argus/IC 2391 association.

  20. Mid-IR spectra of Pre-Main Sequence Herbig stars: an explanation for the non-detections of water lines

    CERN Document Server

    Antonellini, S; Lahuis, F; Woitke, P; Thi, W -F; Meijerink, R; Aresu, G; Spaans, M; Güdel, M; Liebhart, A

    2016-01-01

    The mid-IR detection rate of water lines in disks around Herbig stars disks is about 5\\%, while it is around 50\\% for disks around TTauri stars. The reason for this is still unclear. In this study, we want to find an explanation for the different detection rates between low mass and high mass pre-main-sequence stars (PMSs) in the mid-IR regime. We run disk models with stellar parameters adjusted to spectral types B9 through M2, using the radiation thermo-chemical disk modeling code ProDiMo. We produce convolved spectra at the resolution of Spitzer IRS, JWST MIRI and VLT VISIR spectrographs. We apply random noise derived from typical Spitzer spectra for a direct comparison with observations. The strength of the mid-IR water lines correlates directly with the luminosity of the central star. We explored a small parameter space around a standard disk model, considering dust-to-gas mass ratio, disk gas mass, mixing coefficient for dust settling, flaring index, dust maximum size and size power law distribution inde...

  1. The Gaia-ESO Survey: lithium depletion in the Gamma Velorum cluster and inflated radii in low-mass pre-main-sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, R. D.; Jackson, R. J.; Franciosini, E.; Randich, S.; Barrado, D.; Frasca, A.; Klutsch, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Prisinzano, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Gilmore, G.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Koposov, S. E.; Pancino, E.; Bayo, A.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hourihane, A.; Lewis, J.; Jofre, P.; Magrini, L.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.; Zwitter, T.

    2017-01-01

    We show that non-magnetic models for the evolution of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars cannot simultaneously describe the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) and the pattern of lithium depletion seen in the cluster of young, low-mass stars surrounding γ2 Velorum. The age of 7.5 ± 1 Myr inferred from the CMD is much younger than that implied by the strong Li depletion seen in the cluster M-dwarfs, and the Li depletion occurs at much redder colours than predicted. The epoch at which a star of a given mass depletes its Li and the surface temperature of that star are both dependent on its radius. We demonstrate that if the low-mass stars have radii ˜10 per cent larger at a given mass and age, then both the CMD and the Li-depletion pattern of the Gamma Velorum cluster are explained at a common age of ≃18-21 Myr. This radius inflation could be produced by some combination of magnetic suppression of convection and extensive cool starspots. Models that incorporate radius inflation suggest that PMS stars, similar to those in the Gamma Velorum cluster, in the range 0.2 30 per cent) than inferred from conventional, non-magnetic models in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Systematic changes of this size may be of great importance in understanding the evolution of young stars, disc lifetimes and the formation of planetary systems.

  2. The pre-main-sequence star V1184 Tauri (CB 34V) at the end of prolonged eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkov, E. H.; Peneva, S. P.; Ibryamov, S. I.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: V1184 Tau (CB 34V) lies in the field of the Bok globule CB 34 and was discovered as a large amplitude variable in 1993. According to the first hypothesis of the variability of the star, it is a FU Orionis candidate erupted between 1951 and 1993. During subsequent observations, the star manifests large amplitude variability interpreted as obscuration from circumstellar clouds of dust. We included V1184 Tau (CB 34V) in our target list of highly variable pre-main-sequence stars to determine the reasons for the variations in the brightness of this object. Methods: Data from BVRI photometric observations of the young stellar object V1184 Tau, obtained in the period 2008-2015, are presented in the paper. These data are a continuation of our optical photometric monitoring of the star began in 2000 and continuing to date. The photometric observations of V1184 Tau were performed in two observatories with two medium-sized and two small telescopes. Results: Our results indicate that during periods of maximum light the star shows characteristics typical of T Tauri stars. During the observed deep minimum in brightness, however, V1184 Tau is rather similar to UX Orionis objects. The deep drop in brightness began in 2003 ended in 2015 as the star has returned to maximum light. The light curve during the drop is obviously asymmetric as the decrease in brightness lasts two times longer than the rise. The observed colour reverse on the colour-magnitude diagrams is also confirmation of obscuration from circumstellar clouds of dust as a reason for the large amplitude variability in the brightness. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. An IUE Atlas of Pre-Main-Sequence Stars. II. Far-Ultraviolet Accretion Diagnostics in T Tauri Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2000-08-01

    We use our ultraviolet (UV) atlas of pre-main-sequence stars constructed from all useful, short-wavelength, low-resolution spectra in the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite Final Archive to analyze the short-wavelength UV properties of 49 T Tauri stars (TTSs). We compare the line and continuum fluxes in these TTSs with each other and with previously published parameters of these systems, including rotation rate, infrared excess, and mass accretion rate. The short-wavelength continuum in the classical TTSs (CTTSs) appears to originate in a ~10,000 K optically thick plasma, while in the naked TTSs (NTTSs-stars without dusty disks) the continuum appears to originate in the stellar atmosphere. We show that all of the TTSs in our sample lie in the regime of ``saturated'' magnetic activity due to their small Rossby numbers. However, while some of the TTSs show emission line surface fluxes consistent with this saturation level, many CTTSs show significantly stronger emission than predicted by saturation. In these stars, the emission line luminosity in the high ionization lines present in the spectrum between 1200 and 2000 Å correlates well with the mass accretion rate. Therefore, we conclude that the bulk of the short-wavelength emission seen in CTTSs results from accretion related processes and not from dynamo-driven magnetic activity. Using CTTSs with known mass accretion rates, we calibrate the relationship between M and LC IV to derive the mass accretion rate for some CTTSs which for various reasons have never had their mass accretion rates measured. Finally, several of the CTTSs show strong emission from molecular hydrogen. While emission from H2 cannot form in gas at a temperature of ~105 K, the strength of the molecular hydrogen emission is nevertheless well correlated with all the other emissions displayed in the IUE short-wavelength bandpass. This suggests that the H2 emission is in fact fluorescent emission pumped by the emission (likely Ly

  4. CoRoT 223992193: Investigating the variability in a low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary with evidence of a circumbinary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, Edward; Terquem, Caroline; Bouvier, Jerome; Alencar, Silvia H P; Gandolfi, Davide; Stauffer, John; Cody, Ann Marie; Venuti, Laura; Almeida, Pedro Viana; Micela, Giuseppina; Favata, Fabio; Deeg, Hans J

    2016-01-01

    CoRoT 223992193 is the only known low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary that shows evidence of a circumbinary disk. The system displays complex photometric and spectroscopic variability over a range of timescales and wavelengths. Using two optical CoRoT runs, and infrared Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m observations (simultaneous with the second CoRoT run), we model the out-of-eclipse light curves. The large scale structure in both CoRoT light curves is consistent with the constructive and destructive interference of starspot signals at two slightly different periods. Using the stellar $v\\sin i$ 's, we infer different rotation periods: the primary is consistent with synchronisation and the secondary is slightly supersynchronous. Comparison of the raw data to the residuals of our spot model in colour-magnitude space indicates additional contributions consistent with variable dust emission and obscuration. We also identify short-duration flux dips preceding secondary eclipse in all three CoRoT and Spitzer ban...

  5. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Lithium depletion in the Gamma Velorum cluster and inflated radii in low-mass pre-main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffries, R D; Franciosini, E; Randich, S; Barrado, D; Frasca, A; Klutsch, A; Lanzafame, A C; Prisinzano, L; Sacco, G G; Gilmore, G; Vallenari, A; Alfaro, E J; Koposov, S E; Pancino, E; Bayo, A; Casey, A R; Costado, M T; Damiani, F; Hourihane, A; Lewis, J; Jofre, P; Magrini, L; Monaco, L; Morbidelli, L; Worley, C C; Zaggia, S; Zwitter, T

    2016-01-01

    We show that non-magnetic models for the evolution of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars *cannot* simultaneously describe the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) and the pattern of lithium depletion seen in the cluster of young, low-mass stars surrounding $\\gamma^2$ Velorum. The age of 7.5+/-1 Myr inferred from the CMD is much younger than that implied by the strong Li depletion seen in the cluster M-dwarfs and the Li depletion occurs at much redder colours than predicted. The epoch at which a star of a given mass depletes its Li and the surface temperature of that star are both dependent on its radius. We demonstrate that if the low-mass stars have radii ~10 per cent larger at a given mass and age, then both the CMD and Li depletion pattern of the Gamma Vel cluster are explained at a common age of 18-21 Myr. This radius inflation could be produced by some combination of magnetic suppression of convection and extensive cool starspots. Models that incorporate radius inflation suggest that PMS stars similar to those in t...

  6. Extended Magnetospheres in Pre-main-sequence Evolution: From T Tauri Stars to the Brown Dwarf Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez de Castro, Ana I.; Marcos-Arenal, Pablo

    2012-04-01

    Low-mass pre-main-sequence stars, i.e., T Tauri stars (TTSs), strongly radiate at high energies, from X-rays to the ultraviolet (UV). This excess radiation with respect to main-sequence cool stars (MSCSs) is associated with the accretion process, i.e., it is produced in the extended magnetospheres, in the accretion shocks on the stellar surface, and in the outflows. Although evidence of accretion shocks and outflow contribution to the high-energy excess have been recently addressed, there is not an updated revision of the magnetospheric contribution. This article addresses this issue. The UV observations of the TTSs in the well-known Taurus region have been analyzed together with the XMM-Newton observations compiled in the XEST survey. For the first time the high sensitivity of the Hubble Space Telescope UV instrumentation has allowed measurement of the UV line fluxes of TTSs to M8 type. UV- and X-ray-normalized fluxes have been determined to study the extent and properties of the TTS magnetospheres as a class. They have been compared with the atmospheres of the MSCSs. The main results from this analysis are (1) the normalized fluxes of all the tracers are correlated; this correlation is independent of the broad mass range and the hardness of the X-ray radiation field; (2) the TTS correlations are different than the MSCS correlations; (3) there is a very significant excess emission in O I in the TTSs compared with MSCSs that seems to be caused by recombination radiation from the disk atmosphere after photoionization by extreme UV radiation; the Fe II/Mg II recombination continuum has also been detected in several TTSs and most prominently in AA Tau; and (4) the normalized flux of the UV tracers anticorrelates with the strength of the X-ray flux, i.e., the stronger the X-ray surface flux is, the weaker the observed UV flux. This last behavior is counterintuitive within the framework of stellar dynamo theory and suggests that UV emission can be produced in the

  7. Dynamo action and magnetic activity during the pre-main sequence: Influence of rotation and structural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeriau-Viard, Constance; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2017-10-01

    During the PMS, structure and rotation rate of stars evolve significantly. We wish to assess the consequences of these drastic changes on stellar dynamo, internal magnetic field topology and activity level by mean of HPC simulations with the ASH code. To answer this question, we develop 3D MHD simulations that represent specific stages of stellar evolution along the PMS. We choose five different models characterized by the radius of their radiative zone following an evolutionary track, from 1 Myr to 50 Myr, computed by a 1D stellar evolution code. We introduce a seed magnetic field in the youngest model and then we spread it through all simulations. First of all, we study the consequences that the increase of rotation rate and the change of geometry of the convective zone have on the dynamo field that exists in the convective envelop. The magnetic energy increases, the topology of the magnetic field becomes more complex and the axisymmetric magnetic field becomes less predominant as the star ages. The computation of the fully convective MHD model shows that a strong dynamo develops with a ratio of magnetic to kinetic energy reaching equipartition and even super-equipartition states in the faster rotating cases. Magnetic fields resulting from our MHD simulations possess a mixed poloidal-toroidal topology with no obvious dominant component. We also study the relaxation of the vestige dynamo magnetic field within the radiative core and found that it satisfies stability criteria. Hence it does not experience a global reconfiguration and instead slowly relaxes by retaining its mixed poloidal-toroidal topology.

  8. MML 53: a new low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary in the Upper Centarus-Lupus Region discovered by SuperWASP

    CERN Document Server

    Hebb, L; Aigrain, S; Collier-Cameron, A; Hodgkin, S T; Irwin, J M; Maxted, P F L; Pollacco, D; Street, R A; Wilson, D M; Stassun, K G

    2010-01-01

    We announce the discovery of a new low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary, MML 53. Previous observations of MML 53 found it to be a pre-main sequence spectroscopic multiple associated with the 15-22 Myr Upper Centaurus Lupus cluster. We identify the object as an eclipsing binary for the first time through the analysis of multiple seasons of time series photometry from the SuperWASP transiting planet survey. Re-analysis of a single archive spectrum shows MML 53 to be a spatially unresolved triple system of young stars which all exhibit significant lithium absorption. Two of the components comprise an eclipsing binary with period, P = 2.097891(6) +- 0.000005 and mass ratio, q~0.8. Here, we present the analysis of the discovery data.

  9. MEASUREMENT OF SPIN-ORBIT MISALIGNMENT AND NODAL PRECESSION FOR THE PLANET AROUND PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR PTFO 8-8695 FROM GRAVITY DARKENING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Jason W. [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-0903 (United States); Van Eyken, Julian C. [Department of Physics, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Jackson, Brian K. [Carnegie Institution of Washington, DTM, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW Washington, DC 20015-1305 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Caltech M/S 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J., E-mail: jwbarnes@uidaho.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    PTFO 8-8695b represents the first transiting exoplanet candidate orbiting a pre-main-sequence star (van Eyken et al. 2012, ApJ, 755, 42). We find that the unusual lightcurve shapes of PTFO 8-8695 can be explained by transits of a planet across an oblate, gravity-darkened stellar disk. We develop a theoretical framework for understanding precession of a planetary orbit's ascending node for the case when the stellar rotational angular momentum and the planetary orbital angular momentum are comparable in magnitude. We then implement those ideas to simultaneously and self-consistently fit two separate lightcurves observed in 2009 December and 2010 December. Our two self-consistent fits yield M{sub p} = 3.0 M{sub Jup} and M{sub p} = 3.6 M{sub Jup} for assumed stellar masses of M{sub *} = 0.34 M{sub Sun} and M{sub *} = 0.44 M{sub Sun} respectively. The two fits have precession periods of 293 days and 581 days. These mass determinations (consistent with previous upper limits) along with the strength of the gravity-darkened precessing model together validate PTFO 8-8695b as just the second hot Jupiter known to orbit an M-dwarf. Our fits show a high degree of spin-orbit misalignment in the PTFO 8-8695 system: 69 Degree-Sign {+-} 2 Degree-Sign or 73. Degree-Sign 1 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 5, in the two cases. The large misalignment is consistent with the hypothesis that planets become hot Jupiters with random orbital plane alignments early in a system's lifetime. We predict that as a result of the highly misaligned, precessing system, the transits should disappear for months at a time over the course of the system's precession period. The precessing, gravity-darkened model also predicts other observable effects: changing orbit inclination that could be detected by radial velocity observations, changing stellar inclination that would manifest as varying vsin i, changing projected spin-orbit alignment that could be seen by the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, changing

  10. Investigation of the magnetic field characteristics of Herbig Ae/Be stars: Discovery of the pre-main sequence progenitors of the magnetic Ap/Bp stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, G A; Bagnulo, S; Landstreet, J D; Mason, E; Silvester, J; Alecian, E; Böhm, T; Bouret, J C; Catala, C; Donati, J F; Folsom, C; Bale, K

    2006-01-01

    We are investigating the magnetic characteristics of pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars, with the aim of (1) understanding the origin and evolution of magnetism in intermediate-mass stars, and (2) exploring the influence of magnetic fields on accretion, rotation and mass-loss at the early stages of evolution of A, B and O stars. We have begun by conducting 2 large surveys of Herbig Ae/Be stars, searching for direct evidence of photospheric magnetic fields via the longitudinal Zeeman effect. From observations obtained using FORS1 at the ESO-VLT and ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we report the confirmed detection of magnetic fields in 4 pre-main sequence A- and B-type stars, and the apparent (but as yet unconfirmed) detection of fields in 2 other such stars. We do not confirm the detection of magnetic fields in several stars reported by other authors to be magnetic: HD 139614, HD 144432 or HD 31649. One of the most evolved stars in the detected sample, HD 72106A, shows clear evidence of stron...

  11. Magnetic fields and differential rotation on the pre-main sequence I: The early-G star HD 141943 - brightness and magnetic topologies

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, S C; Vélez, J C Ramírez; Alecian, E; Brown, C J; Carter, B D; Donati, J F; Dunstone, N; Hart, R; Semel, M; Waite, I A

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric observations of the pre-main sequence early-G star HD 141943 were obtained at four observing epochs (in 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010). The observations were undertaken at the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope using the UCLES echelle spectrograph and the SEMPOL spectropolarimeter visitor instrument. Brightness and surface magnetic field topologies were reconstructed for the star using the technique of least-squares deconvolution to increase the signal-to-noise of the data. The reconstructed brightness maps show that HD 141943 had a weak polar spot and a significant amount of low latitude features, with little change in the latitude distribution of the spots over the 4 years of observations. The surface magnetic field was reconstructed at three of the epochs from a high order (l <= 30) spherical harmonic expansion of the spectropolarimetric observations. The reconstructed magnetic topologies show that in 2007 and 2010 the surface magnetic field was reasonably balanced betwee...

  12. Can we predict the global magnetic topology of a pre-main sequence star from its position in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram?

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, S G; Morin, J; Hussain, G A J; Mayne, N J; Hillenbrand, L A; Jardine, M

    2012-01-01

    ZDI studies have shown that the magnetic fields of T Tauri stars can be significantly more complex than a simple dipole and can vary markedly between sources. We collect and summarize the magnetic field topology information obtained to date and present Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams for the stars in the sample. Intriguingly, the large scale field topology of a given pre-main sequence (PMS) star is strongly dependent upon the stellar internal structure, with the strength of the dipole component of its multipolar magnetic field decaying rapidly with the development of a radiative core. Using the observational data as a basis, we argue that the general characteristics of the global magnetic field of a PMS star can be determined from its position in the HR diagram. Moving from hotter and more luminous to cooler and less luminous stars across the PMS of the HR diagram, we present evidence for four distinct magnetic topology regimes. Stars with large radiative cores, empirically estimated to be those with a core...

  13. The clustered nature of star formation. Pre--main-sequence clusters in the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Dolphin, Andrew E; Gennaro, Mario; Tognelli, Emanuele; Moroni, Pier Giorgio Prada

    2012-01-01

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC602/N90 is characterized by the HII nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre--main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main sequence stars NGC602. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with HST/ACS camera in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster, low-mass PMS stars are congregated in thirteen additional small compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC602. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction (~60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the inter-cluster area. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age-difference of ~2.5Myr between NGC602 and the compact sub-clusters which appear younger. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally conc...

  14. Planetary Construction Zones in Occultation: Eclipses by Circumsecondary and Circumplanetary Disks and a Candidate Eclipse of a Pre-Main Sequence Star in Sco-Cen

    CERN Document Server

    Mamajek, Eric E; Pecaut, Mark; Moolekamp, Fred; Scott, Erin L; Kenworthy, Matthew; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Parley, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The large relative sizes of circumstellar and circumplanetary disks imply that they might be seen in eclipse in stellar light curves. We present photometric and spectroscopic data for a pre-main sequence K5 star (1SWASP J140747.93-394542.6 = ASAS J140748-3945.7), a newly discovered ~0.9 Msun member of the ~16 Myr-old Upper Centaurus-Lupus subgroup of Sco-Cen at a distance of 128+-13 pc. This star exhibited a remarkably long, deep, and complex eclipse event centered on 29 April 2007 (as discovered in SuperWASP photometry, and with portions of the dimming confirmed by ASAS data). At least 5 multi-day dimming events of >0.5 mag are identified, with a >3.3 mag deep eclipse bracketed by two pairs of ~1 mag eclipses symmetrically occurring +-12 days and +-26 days before and after. Hence, significant dimming of the star was taking place on and off over at least a ~54 day period in 2007, and a strong >1 mag dimming event occurring over a ~12 day span. We place a firm lower limit on the period of 850 days (i.e. the o...

  15. XMM-Newton monitoring of the close pre-main-sequence binary AK Sco. Evidence of tide driven filling of the inner gap in the circumbinary disk

    CERN Document Server

    de Castro, Ana I Gomez; Talavera, Antonio; Sytov, A Yu; Bisikalo, D

    2013-01-01

    AK~Sco stands out among pre-main sequence binaries because of its prominent ultraviolet excess, the high eccentricity of its orbit and the strong tides driven by it. AK Sco consists of two F5 type stars that get as close as 11R$_*$ at periastron passage. The presence of a dense ($n_e \\sim 10^{11}$~cm$^{-3}$) extended envelope has been unveiled recently. In this article, we report the results from a XMM-Newton based monitoring of the system. We show that at periastron, X-ray and UV fluxes are enhanced by a factor of $\\sim 3$ with respect to the apastron values. The X-ray radiation is produced in an optically thin plasma with T$\\sim 6.4\\times 10^{6}$ K and it is found that the N$_H$ column density rises from 0.35$\\times 10^{21}$~cm$^{-2}$ at periastron to 1.11$\\times 10^{21}$~cm$^{-2}$ at apastron, in good agreement with previous polarimetric observations. The UV emission detected in the Optical Monitor band seems to be caused by the reprocessing of the high energy magnetospheric radiation on the circumstellar ...

  16. The multipolar magnetic fields of accreting pre-main-sequence stars: B at the inner disk, B along the accretion flow, and B at the accretion shock

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Scott G; Hussain, Gaitee A J

    2016-01-01

    Zeeman-Doppler imaging studies have revealed the complexity of the large-scale magnetic fields of accreting pre-main-sequence stars. All have multipolar magnetic fields with the octupole component being the dominant field mode for many of the stars studied thusfar. Young accreting stars with fully convective interiors often feature simple axisymmetric magnetic fields with dipole components of order a kilo-Gauss (at least those of mass $\\gtrsim0.5\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$), while those with substantially radiative interiors host more complex non-axisymmetric magnetic fields with dipole components of order a few 0.1 kilo-Gauss. Here, via several simple examples, we demonstrate that i). in most cases, the dipole component alone can be used to estimate the disk truncation radius (but little else); ii) due the presence of higher order magnetic field components, the field strength in the accretion spots is far in excess of that expected if a pure dipole magnetic field is assumed. (Fields of $\\sim$6$\\,{\\rm kG}$ have been mea...

  17. The Multiple Young Stellar Objects of HBC 515: An X-ray and Millimeter-wave Imaging Study in (Pre-main Sequence) Diversity

    CERN Document Server

    Principe, D A; Kastner, J H; Wilner, D; Stelzer, B; Micela, G

    2016-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray Observatory and Submillimeter Array (SMA) imaging of HBC 515, a system consisting of multiple young stellar objects (YSOs). The five members of HBC 515 represent a remarkably diverse array of YSOs, ranging from the low-mass Class I/II protostar HBC 515B, through Class II and transition disk objects (HBC 515D and C, respectively), to the "diskless", intermediate- mass, pre-main sequence binary HBC 515A. Our Chandra/ACIS imaging establishes that all five components are X-ray sources, with HBC 515A - a subarcsecond-separation binary that is partially resolved by Chandra - being the dominant X-ray source. We detect an X-ray flare associated with HBC 515B. In the SMA imaging, HBC 515B is detected as a strong 1.3 mm continuum emission source; a second, weaker mm continuum source is coincident with the position of the transition disk object HBC 515C. These results strongly support the protostellar nature of HBC 515B, and firmly establish HBC 515A as a member of the rare class of relatively m...

  18. A High-Resolution Multiband Survey of Westerlund 2 With the Hubble Space Telescope. II. Mass accretion in the Pre-Main Sequence Population

    CERN Document Server

    Zeidler, Peter; Nota, Antonella; Sabbi, Elena; Pasquali, Anna; Tosi, Monica; Bonanos, Alceste Z; Christian, Carol

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the pre-main-sequence (PMS) population of the young star cluster Westerlund~2 (Wd2), the central ionizing cluster of the HII region RCW 49, using data from a high resolution multi-band survey with the Hubble Space Telescope. The data were acquired with the Advanced Camera for Surveys in the F555W, F814W, and F658N filters and with the Wide Field Camera 3 in the F125W, F160W, and F128N filters. We find a mean age of the region of 1.04+-0.72 Myr. The combination of dereddened F555W and F814W photometry in combination with F658N photometry allows us to study and identify stars with H_alpha excess emission. With a careful selection of 240 bona-fide PMS H_alpha excess emitters we were able to determine their H_alpha luminosity, which has a mean value L(H_alpha)=1.67 x 10^{-31} erg s^{-1}. Using the PARSEC 1.2S isochrones to obtain the stellar parameters of the PMS stars we determined a mean mass accretion rate \\dot M_acc=4.43 x 10^{-8} M_sun yr^{-1} per star. A careful analysis of...

  19. Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time (ZEIT) III: A Neptune-sized planet orbiting a pre-main-sequence star in the Upper Scorpius OB Association

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Andrew W; Rizzuto, Aaron C; Irwin, Jonathan; Feiden, Gregory A; Gaidos, Eric; Mace, Gregory N; Kraus, Adam L; James, David J; Ansdell, Megan; Charbonneau, David; Covey, Kevin R; Ireland, Michael J; Jaffe, Daniel T; Johnson, Marshall C; Kidder, Benjamin; Vanderburg, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We confirm and characterize a close-in ($P_\\rm{orb}$ = 5.425 days), super-Neptune sized ($5.04^{+0.34}_{-0.37}$ Earth radii) planet transiting EPIC 205117205 (2MASS J16101473-1919095), a late-type (M3) pre-main sequence ($\\simeq$11 Myr-old) star in the Upper Scorpius subgroup of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association. The host star has the kinematics of a member of the Upper Scorpius OB association, and its spectrum contains lithium absorption, an unambiguous sign of youth (<20 Myr) in late-type dwarfs. We combine photometry from K2 and the ground-based MEarth project to refine the planet's properties and constrain the average stellar density. We determine EPIC 205117205's bolometric flux and effective temperature from moderate resolution spectra. By utilizing isochrones that include the effects of magnetic fields, we derive a precise (6-7%) radius and mass for the host star, and a stellar age consistent with the established value for Upper Scorpius. Follow-up high-resolution imaging and Doppler spectroscop...

  20. Pre-Main Sequence variables in the VMR-D : identification of T Tauri-like accreting protostars through Spitzer-IRAC variability

    CERN Document Server

    Giannini, T; Elia, D; Strafella, F; De Luca, M; Fazio, G; Marengo, M; Nisini, B; Smith, H A

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the infrared variability of young stellar objects by means of two Spitzer-IRAC images of the Vela Molecular Cloud D (VMR-D) obtained in observations separated in time by about six months. By using the same space-born IR instrumentation, this study eliminates all the unwanted effects usually unavoidable when comparing catalogs obtained from different instruments. The VMR-D map covers about 1.5 square deg. of a site where star formation is actively ongoing. We are interested in accreting pre-main sequence variables whose luminosity variations are due to intermittent events of disk accretion (i.e. active T Tauri stars and EXor type objects). The variable objects have been selected from a catalog of more than 170,000 sources detected at a S/N ratio > 5. We searched the sample of variables for ones whose photometric properties are close to those of known EXor's. These latter are monitored in a more systematic way than T Tauri stars and the mechanisms that regulate the observed phenomenology a...

  1. Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time (ZEIT). III. A Short-period Planet Orbiting a Pre-main-sequence Star in the Upper Scorpius OB Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Andrew W.; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rizzuto, Aaron C.; Irwin, Jonathan; Feiden, Gregory A.; Gaidos, Eric; Mace, Gregory N.; Kraus, Adam L.; James, David J.; Ansdell, Megan; Charbonneau, David; Covey, Kevin R.; Ireland, Michael J.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Johnson, Marshall C.; Kidder, Benjamin; Vanderburg, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    We confirm and characterize a close-in ({P}{{orb}} = 5.425 days), super-Neptune sized ({5.04}-0.37+0.34 {R}\\oplus ) planet transiting K2-33 (2MASS J16101473-1919095), a late-type (M3) pre-main-sequence (11 Myr old) star in the Upper Scorpius subgroup of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association. The host star has the kinematics of a member of the Upper Scorpius OB association, and its spectrum contains lithium absorption, an unambiguous sign of youth (\\lt 20 Myr) in late-type dwarfs. We combine photometry from K2 and the ground-based MEarth project to refine the planet’s properties and constrain the host star’s density. We determine K2-33’s bolometric flux and effective temperature from moderate-resolution spectra. By utilizing isochrones that include the effects of magnetic fields, we derive a precise radius (6%-7%) and mass (16%) for the host star, and a stellar age consistent with the established value for Upper Scorpius. Follow-up high-resolution imaging and Doppler spectroscopy confirm that the transiting object is not a stellar companion or a background eclipsing binary blended with the target. The shape of the transit, the constancy of the transit depth and periodicity over 1.5 yr, and the independence with wavelength rule out stellar variability or a dust cloud or debris disk partially occulting the star as the source of the signal; we conclude that it must instead be planetary in origin. The existence of K2-33b suggests that close-in planets can form in situ or migrate within ˜10 Myr, e.g., via interactions with a disk, and that long-timescale dynamical migration such as by Lidov-Kozai or planet-planet scattering is not responsible for all short-period planets.

  2. Photometric Determination of the Mass Accretion Rates of Pre-main-sequence Stars. V. Recent Star Formation in the 30 Dor Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino; Beccari, Giacomo

    2017-09-01

    We report on the properties of the low-mass stars that recently formed in the central ∼ 2\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 7× 2\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 7 of 30 Dor, including the R136 cluster. Using the photometric catalog of De Marchi et al., based on observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, and the most recent extinction law for this field, we identify 1035 bona fide pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars showing {{H}}α excess emission at the 4σ level with an {{H}}α equivalent width of 20 Å or more. We find a wide spread in age spanning the range ∼ 0.1{--}50 {Myr}. We also find that the older PMS objects are placed in front of the R136 cluster and are separated from it by a conspicuous amount of absorbing material, indicating that star formation has proceeded from the periphery into the interior of the region. We derive physical parameters for all PMS stars, including masses m, ages t, and mass accretion rates {\\dot{M}}{acc}. To identify reliable correlations between these parameters, which are intertwined, we use a multivariate linear regression fit of the type {log}{\\dot{M}}{acc}=a× {log}t+b× {log}m+c. The values of a and b for 30 Dor are compatible with those found in NGC 346 and NGC 602. We extend the fit to a uniform sample of 1307 PMS stars with 0.5contract NAS5-26555.

  3. XMM-NEWTON MONITORING OF THE CLOSE PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE BINARY AK SCO. EVIDENCE OF TIDE-DRIVEN FILLING OF THE INNER GAP IN THE CIRCUMBINARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez de Castro, Ana Ines [S. D. Astronomia y Geodesia and Instituto de Matematica Interdisciplinar, Fac. de CC Matematicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Lopez-Santiago, Javier [Departamento de Astrofisica, Fac de CC Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Talavera, Antonio [European Space Astronomy Center, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691, Madrid (Spain); Sytov, A. Yu.; Bisikalo, D. [Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pyatnitskaya St. 48, 109017 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-20

    AK Sco stands out among pre-main-sequence binaries because of its prominent ultraviolet excess, the high eccentricity of its orbit, and the strong tides driven by it. AK Sco consists of two F5-type stars that get as close as 11 R{sub *} at periastron passage. The presence of a dense (n{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) extended envelope has been unveiled recently. In this article, we report the results from an XMM-Newton-based monitoring of the system. We show that at periastron, X-ray and UV fluxes are enhanced by a factor of {approx}3 with respect to the apastron values. The X-ray radiation is produced in an optically thin plasma with T {approx} 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K and it is found that the N{sub H} column density rises from 0.35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} at periastron to 1.11 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} at apastron, in good agreement with previous polarimetric observations. The UV emission detected in the Optical Monitor band seems to be caused by the reprocessing of the high-energy magnetospheric radiation on the circumstellar material. Further evidence of the strong magnetospheric disturbances is provided by the detection of line broadening of 278.7 km s{sup -1} in the N V line with Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. Numerical simulations of the mass flow from the circumbinary disk to the components have been carried out. They provide a consistent scenario with which to interpret AK Sco observations. We show that the eccentric orbit acts like a gravitational piston. At apastron, matter is dragged efficiently from the inner disk border, filling the inner gap and producing accretion streams that end as ring-like structures around each component of the system. At periastron, the ring-like structures come into contact, leading to angular momentum loss, and thus producing an accretion outburst.

  4. First determination of s-process element abundances in pre-main sequence clusters. Y, Zr, La, and Ce in IC 2391, the Argus association, and IC 2602

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazi, V.; De Silva, G. M.; Melo, C. F. H.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Several high-resolution spectroscopic studies have provided compelling observational evidence that open clusters display a decreasing trend of their barium abundances as a function of the cluster's age. Young clusters (ages ≲ 200 Myr) exhibit significant enhancement in the [Ba/Fe] ratios, at variance with solar-age clusters where the Ba content has been found to be [Ba/Fe] 0 dex. Different viable solutions have been suggested in the literature; nevertheless, a conclusive interpretation of such a peculiar trend has not been found. Interestingly, it is debated whether the other species produced with Ba via s-process reactions follow the same trend with age. Aims: Pre-main sequence clusters (≈10-50 Myr) show the most extreme behaviour in this respect: their [Ba/Fe] ratios can reach 0.65 dex, which is higher than the solar value by a factor of four. Crucially, there are no investigations of the other s-process species for these young stellar populations. In this paper we present the first determination of Y, Zr, La, and Ce in clusters IC 2391, IC 2602, and the Argus association. The main objective of our work is to ascertain whether these elements reveal the same enhancement as Ba. Methods: We have exploited high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra in order to derive abundances for Y, Zr, La, and Ce via spectral synthesis calculations. Our sample includes only stars with very similar atmospheric parameters so that internal errors due to star-to-star inhomogeneity are negligible. The chemical analysis was carried out in a strictly differential way, as done in all our previous investigations, to minimise the impact of systematic uncertainties. Results: Our results indicate that, at variance with Ba, all the other s-process species exhibit a solar scaled pattern; these clusters confirm a similar trend discovered in the slightly older local associations (e.g. AB Doradus, Carina-Near), where only Ba exhibit enhanced value with all other s-process species

  5. A Tale of Two Anomalies: Depletion, Dispersion, and the Connection between the Stellar Lithium Spread and Inflated Radii on the Pre-main Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Garrett; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate lithium depletion in standard stellar models (SSMs) and main sequence (MS) open clusters, and explore the origin of the Li dispersion in young, cool stars of equal mass, age, and composition. We first demonstrate that SSMs accurately predict the Li abundances of solar analogs at the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) within theoretical uncertainties. We then measure the rate of MS Li depletion by removing the [Fe/H]-dependent ZAMS Li pattern from three well-studied clusters, and comparing the detrended data. MS depletion is found to be mass-dependent, in the sense of more depletion at low mass. A dispersion in Li abundance at fixed T eff is nearly universal, and sets in by ~200 Myr. We discuss mass and age dispersion trends, and the pattern is mixed. We argue that metallicity impacts the ZAMS Li pattern, in agreement with theoretical expectations but contrary to the findings of some previous studies, and suggest Li as a test of cluster metallicity. Finally, we argue that a radius dispersion in stars of fixed mass and age, during the epoch of pre-MS Li destruction, is responsible for the spread in Li abundances and the correlation between rotation and Li in young cool stars, most well known in the Pleiades. We calculate stellar models, inflated to match observed radius anomalies in magnetically active systems, and the resulting range of Li abundances reproduces the observed patterns of young clusters. We discuss ramifications for pre-MS evolutionary tracks and age measurements of young clusters, and suggest an observational test.

  6. A tale of two anomalies: Depletion, dispersion, and the connection between the stellar lithium spread and inflated radii on the pre-main sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, Garrett; Pinsonneault, Marc H., E-mail: somers@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: pinsono@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    We investigate lithium depletion in standard stellar models (SSMs) and main sequence (MS) open clusters, and explore the origin of the Li dispersion in young, cool stars of equal mass, age, and composition. We first demonstrate that SSMs accurately predict the Li abundances of solar analogs at the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) within theoretical uncertainties. We then measure the rate of MS Li depletion by removing the [Fe/H]-dependent ZAMS Li pattern from three well-studied clusters, and comparing the detrended data. MS depletion is found to be mass-dependent, in the sense of more depletion at low mass. A dispersion in Li abundance at fixed T{sub eff} is nearly universal, and sets in by ∼200 Myr. We discuss mass and age dispersion trends, and the pattern is mixed. We argue that metallicity impacts the ZAMS Li pattern, in agreement with theoretical expectations but contrary to the findings of some previous studies, and suggest Li as a test of cluster metallicity. Finally, we argue that a radius dispersion in stars of fixed mass and age, during the epoch of pre-MS Li destruction, is responsible for the spread in Li abundances and the correlation between rotation and Li in young cool stars, most well known in the Pleiades. We calculate stellar models, inflated to match observed radius anomalies in magnetically active systems, and the resulting range of Li abundances reproduces the observed patterns of young clusters. We discuss ramifications for pre-MS evolutionary tracks and age measurements of young clusters, and suggest an observational test.

  7. Evolutionary financial market models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzi, A.; Aizawa, Y.

    2000-12-01

    We study computer simulations of two financial market models, the second a simplified model of the first. The first is a model of the self-organized formation and breakup of crowds of traders, motivated by the dynamics of competitive evolving systems which shows interesting self-organized critical (SOC)-type behaviour without any fine tuning of control parameters. This SOC-type avalanching and stasis appear as realistic volatility clustering in the price returns time series. The market becomes highly ordered at ‘crashes’ but gradually loses this order through randomization during the intervening stasis periods. The second model is a model of stocks interacting through a competitive evolutionary dynamic in a common stock exchange. This model shows a self-organized ‘market-confidence’. When this is high the market is stable but when it gets low the market may become highly volatile. Volatile bursts rapidly increase the market confidence again. This model shows a phase transition as temperature parameter is varied. The price returns time series in the transition region is very realistic power-law truncated Levy distribution with clustered volatility and volatility superdiffusion. This model also shows generally positive stock cross-correlations as is observed in real markets. This model may shed some light on why such phenomena are observed.

  8. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-main Sequence and Related Stars. V. Changes in the Innermost Disk Structure of the Herbig AE Star HD 31648 = MWC 480

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rachel; Long, Zachary; Sitko, Michael L.; Grady, C. A.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2017-01-01

    We present five epochs of near IR observations of the protoplanetary disk around HD 31648 (MWC 480). A mass accretion rate of approximately 1.1×10-7 Msun/year was derived from Brγ and Paβ lines. The spectral energy distribution (SED) reveals a variability of about 30% between 1.5 and 10 microns. We present the theoretical modeling analysis of the disk in HD 31648 using Monte-Carlo Radiation Transfer Code (MRTC). We find that varying the height of the inner rim successfully produces a shift in the NIR flux.

  9. The Rotation Period Distributions of 4-10 Myr T Tauri Stars in Orion OB1: New Constraints on Pre-main-sequence Angular Momentum Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md Tanveer; Stassun, Keivan G.; Briceño, César; Vivas, A. Katherina; Raetz, Stefanie; Mateu, Cecilia; José Downes, Juan; Calvet, Nuria; Hernández, Jesús; Neuhäuser, Ralph; Mugrauer, Markus; Takahashi, Hidenori; Tachihara, Kengo; Chini, Rolf; Cruz-Dias, Gustavo A.; Aarnio, Alicia; James, David J.; Hackstein, Moritz

    2016-12-01

    Most existing studies of the angular momentum evolution of young stellar populations have focused on the youngest (≲1-3 Myr) T Tauri stars. In contrast, the angular momentum distributions of older T Tauri stars (˜4-10 Myr) have been less studied, even though they hold key insights to understanding stellar angular momentum evolution at a time when protoplanetary disks have largely dissipated and when models therefore predict changes in the rotational evolution that can in principle be tested. We present a study of photometric variability among 1974 confirmed T Tauri members of various subregions of the Orion OB1 association, and with ages spanning 4-10 Myr, using optical time series from three different surveys. For 564 of the stars (˜32% of the weak-lined T Tauri stars and ˜13% of the classical T Tauri stars in our sample) we detect statistically significant periodic variations, which we attribute to the stellar rotation periods, making this one of the largest samples of T Tauri star rotation periods yet published. We observe a clear change in the overall rotation period distributions over the age range 4-10 Myr, with the progressively older subpopulations exhibiting systematically faster rotation. This result is consistent with angular momentum evolution model predictions of an important qualitative change in the stellar rotation periods starting at ˜5 Myr, an age range for which very few observational constraints were previously available.

  10. The rotation period distributions of 4--10 Myr T Tauri stars in Orion OB1: New constraints on pre-main-sequence angular momentum evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Karim, Md Tanveer; Briceno, Cesar; Vivas, A Katherina; Raetz, Stefanie; Mateu, Cecilia; Downes, Juan Jose; Calvet, Nuria; Hernandez, Jesus; Neuhauser, Ralph; Mugrauer, Markus; Takahashi, Hidenori; Tachihara, Kengo; Chini, Rolf; Cruz-Dias, Gustavo A; Aarnio, Alicia; James, David J; Hackstein, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    Most existing studies of the angular momentum evolution of young stellar populations have focused on the youngest (1-3 Myr) T Tauri stars. In contrast, the angular momentum distributions of older T Tauri stars (4-10 Myr) have been less studied, even though they hold key insight to understanding stellar angular momentum evolution at a time when protoplanetary disks have largely dissipated and when models therefore predict changes in the rotational evolution that can in principle be tested. We present a study of photometric variability among 1,974 confirmed T Tauri members of various sub-regions of the Orion OB1 association, and with ages spanning 4-10 Myr, using optical time-series from three different surveys. For 564 of the stars (~32% of the weak-lined T Tauri stars and ~13% of the classical T Tauri stars in our sample) we detect statistically significant periodic variations which we attribute to the stellar rotation periods, making this one of the largest samples of T Tauri star rotation periods yet publis...

  11. A Tale of Two Anomalies: Depletion, Dispersion, and the Connection Between the Stellar Lithium Spread and Inflated Radii on the Pre-Main Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Somers, Garrett

    2014-01-01

    We investigate lithium depletion in standard stellar models (SSMs) and main sequence (MS) open clusters, and explore the origin of the Li dispersion in young, cool stars of equal mass, age and composition. We first demonstrate that SSMs accurately predict the Li abundances of solar analogs at the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) within theoretical uncertainties. We then measure the rate of MS Li depletion by removing the [Fe/H]-dependent ZAMS Li pattern from three well-studied clusters, and comparing the detrended data. MS depletion is found to be mass dependent, in the sense of more depletion at low mass. A dispersion in Li abundance at fixed $T_{\\rm eff}$ is nearly universal, and sets in by $\\sim$200 Myr. We discuss mass and age dispersion trends, and the pattern is mixed. We argue that metallicity impacts the ZAMS Li pattern, in agreement with theoretical expectations but contrary to the findings of some previous studies, and suggest Li as a test of cluster metallicity. Finally, we argue that a radius dispers...

  12. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-Main Sequence and Related Stars. III. Exploring Structural Changes in the Pre-transitional Disk in HD 169142

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Kevin R; Grady, Carol A; Whitney, Barbara A; Swearingen, Jeremy R; Champney, Elizabeth H; Johnson, Alexa N; Werren, Chelsea; Russell, Ray W; Schneider, Glenn H; Momose, Munetake; Muto, Takayuki; Inoue, Akio K; Lauroesch, James T; Brown, Alexander; Fukagawa, Misato; Currie, Thayne M; Hornbeck, Jeremy; Wisniewski, John P; Woodgate, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    We present near-IR and far-UV observations of the pre-transitional (gapped) disk in HD 169142 using NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility and Hubble Space Telescope. The combination of our data along with existing data sets into the broadband spectral energy distribution reveals variability of up to 45% between ~1.5-10 {\\mu}m over a maximum timescale of 10 years. All observations known to us separate into two distinct states corresponding to a high near-IR state in the pre-2000 epoch and a low state in the post-2000 epoch, indicating activity within the <1 AU region of the disk. Through analysis of the Pa {\\beta} and Br {\\gamma} lines in our data we derive a mass accretion rate in May 2013 of (1.5 - 2.7) x 10^-9 Msun/yr. We present a theoretical modeling analysis of the disk in HD 169142 using Monte-Carlo radiative transfer simulation software to explore the conditions and perhaps signs of planetary formation in our collection of 24 years of observations. We find that shifting the outer edge (r = 0.3 AU) of t...

  13. TIME-SERIES PHOTOMETRY OF STARS IN AND AROUND THE LAGOON NEBULA. I. ROTATION PERIODS OF 290 LOW-MASS PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS IN NGC 6530

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Calen B. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Stassun, Keivan G., E-mail: henderson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station B 1807, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We have conducted a long-term, wide-field, high-cadence photometric monitoring survey of {approx}50,000 stars in the Lagoon Nebula H II region. This first paper presents rotation periods for 290 low-mass stars in NGC 6530, the young cluster illuminating the nebula, and for which we assemble a catalog of infrared and spectroscopic disk indicators, estimated masses and ages, and X-ray luminosities. The distribution of rotation periods we measure is broadly uniform for 0.5 days < P < 10 days; the short-period cutoff corresponds to breakup. We observe no obvious bimodality in the period distribution, but we do find that stars with disk signatures rotate more slowly on average. The stars' X-ray luminosities are roughly flat with rotation period, at the saturation level (log L{sub X} /L{sub bol} Almost-Equal-To -3.3). However, we find a significant positive correlation between L{sub X} /L{sub bol} and corotation radius, suggesting that the observed X-ray luminosities are regulated by centrifugal stripping of the stellar coronae. The period-mass relationship in NGC 6530 is broadly similar to that of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), but the slope of the relationship among the slowest rotators differs from that in the ONC and other young clusters. We show that the slope of the period-mass relationship for the slowest rotators can be used as a proxy for the age of a young cluster, and we argue that NGC 6530 may be slightly younger than the ONC, making it a particularly important touchstone for models of angular momentum evolution in young, low-mass stars.

  14. LUMINOSITY DISCREPANCY IN THE EQUAL-MASS, PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE ECLIPSING BINARY PAR 1802: NON-COEVALITY OR TIDAL HEATING?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Stassun, Keivan G.; Hebb, Leslie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Prsa, Andrej [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Stempels, Eric [Department of Astronomy and Space Physics, Uppsala University, SE-752 67 Uppsala (Sweden); Barnes, Rory [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Heller, Rene [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Mathieu, Robert D., E-mail: yilen.gomez@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    Parenago 1802, a member of the {approx}1 Myr Orion Nebula Cluster, is a double-lined, detached eclipsing binary in a 4.674 day orbit, with equal-mass components (M{sub 2}/M{sub 1} = 0.985 {+-} 0.029). Here we present extensive VI{sub C} JHK{sub S} light curves (LCs) spanning {approx}15 yr, as well as a Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) optical spectrum. The LCs evince a third light source that is variable with a period of 0.73 days, and is also manifested in the high-resolution spectrum, strongly indicating the presence of a third star in the system, probably a rapidly rotating Classical T Tauri star. We incorporate this third light into our radial velocity and LC modeling of the eclipsing pair, measuring accurate masses (M{sub 1} = 0.391 {+-} 0.032 and M{sub 2} = 0.385 {+-} 0.032 M{sub Sun }), radii (R{sub 1} = 1.73 {+-} 0.02 and R{sub 2} = 1.62 {+-} 0.02 R{sub Sun }), and temperature ratio (T{sub eff,1}/T{sub eff,2} = 1.0924 {+-} 0.0017). Thus, the radii of the eclipsing stars differ by 6.9% {+-} 0.8%, the temperatures differ by 9.2% {+-} 0.2%, and consequently the luminosities differ by 62% {+-} 3%, despite having masses equal to within 3%. This could be indicative of an age difference of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} yr between the two eclipsing stars, perhaps a vestige of the binary formation history. We find that the eclipsing pair is in an orbit that has not yet fully circularized, e = 0.0166 {+-} 0.003. In addition, we measure the rotation rate of the eclipsing stars to be 4.629 {+-} 0.006 days; they rotate slightly faster than their 4.674 day orbit. The non-zero eccentricity and super-synchronous rotation suggest that the eclipsing pair should be tidally interacting, so we calculate the tidal history of the system according to different tidal evolution theories. We find that tidal heating effects can explain the observed luminosity difference of the eclipsing pair, providing an alternative to the previously suggested age

  15. Magnetic fields and differential rotation on the pre-main sequence II: The early-G star HD 141943 - coronal magnetic field, H-alpha emission and differential rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, S C; Vélez, J C Ramírez; Alecian, E; Brown, C J; Carter, B D; Donati, J F; Dunstone, N; Hart, R; Semel, M; Waite, I A

    2011-01-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations of the pre-main sequence early-G star HD 141943 were obtained at three observing epochs (2007, 2009 and 2010). The observations were obtained using the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian telescope with the UCLES echelle spectrograph and the SEMPOL spectropolarimeter visitor instrument. The brightness and surface magnetic field topologies (given in Paper I) were used to determine the star's surface differential rotation and reconstruct the coronal magnetic field of the star. The coronal magnetic field at the 3 epochs shows on the largest scales that the field structure is dominated by the dipole component with possible evidence for the tilt of the dipole axis shifting between observations. We find very high levels of differential rotation on HD 141943 (~8 times the solar value for the magnetic features and ~5 times solar for the brightness features) similar to that evidenced by another young early-G star, HD 171488. These results indicate that a significant increase in the level of differe...

  16. Evolutionary model of stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldasch, Joachim

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents an evolutionary economic model for the price evolution of stocks. Treating a stock market as a self-organized system governed by a fast purchase process and slow variations of demand and supply the model suggests that the short term price distribution has the form a logistic (Laplace) distribution. The long term return can be described by Laplace-Gaussian mixture distributions. The long term mean price evolution is governed by a Walrus equation, which can be transformed into a replicator equation. This allows quantifying the evolutionary price competition between stocks. The theory suggests that stock prices scaled by the price over all stocks can be used to investigate long-term trends in a Fisher-Pry plot. The price competition that follows from the model is illustrated by examining the empirical long-term price trends of two stocks.

  17. Evolutionary Industrial Physical Model Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascal, Alberto; Alberdi, Amaia

    Both complexity and lack of knowledge associated to physical processes makes physical models design an arduous task. Frequently, the only available information about the physical processes are the heuristic data obtained from experiments or at best a rough idea on what are the physical principles and laws that underlie considered physical processes. Then the problem is converted to find a mathematical expression which fits data. There exist traditional approaches to tackle the inductive model search process from data, such as regression, interpolation, finite element method, etc. Nevertheless, these methods either are only able to solve a reduced number of simple model typologies, or the given black-box solution does not contribute to clarify the analyzed physical process. In this paper a hybrid evolutionary approach to search complex physical models is proposed. Tests carried out on a real-world industrial physical process (abrasive water jet machining) demonstrate the validity of this approach.

  18. New evolutionary tracks of massive stars with PARSEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Bressan, Alessandro; Girardi, Leo; Marigo, Paola

    2015-08-01

    We present new evolutionary tracks of massive stars that complement the already published PARSEC database and supersede the old Padova evolutionary tracks of massive stars, which are more than 20 years old. We consider a broad range of metallicities, from Z=0.0001 to Z=0.04, and initial masses up to M=350 M⊙. The evolution is computed from the pre-main sequence phase up to the central carbon ignition. We supplement the new tracks with new tables of theoretical bolometric corrections in several photometric systems, obtained by homogenizing stellar atmosphere models of hot and cool stars, PoWR, WM-basic, ATLAS9 and Phoenix.The mass, age and metallicity grids are fully adequate to perform detailed investigations of the properties of very young stellar systems, in local and distant galaxies.

  19. Evolutionary models of human personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haysom, H.J.; Verweij, C.J.H.; Zietsch, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral genetic studies have shown that around a third to a half of the between-individual variation in personality traits can be accounted for by genetic differences between individuals. There is rapidly growing interest in understanding the evolutionary basis of this genetic variation. In this

  20. Evolutionary Phylogenetic Networks: Models and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhleh, Luay

    Phylogenetic networks are special graphs that generalize phylogenetic trees to allow for modeling of non-treelike evolutionary histories. The ability to sequence multiple genetic markers from a set of organisms and the conflicting evolutionary signals that these markers provide in many cases, have propelled research and interest in phylogenetic networks to the forefront in computational phylogenetics. Nonetheless, the term 'phylogenetic network' has been generically used to refer to a class of models whose core shared property is tree generalization. Several excellent surveys of the different flavors of phylogenetic networks and methods for their reconstruction have been written recently. However, unlike these surveys, this chapte focuses specifically on one type of phylogenetic networks, namely evolutionary phylogenetic networks, which explicitly model reticulate evolutionary events. Further, this chapter focuses less on surveying existing tools, and addresses in more detail issues that are central to the accurate reconstruction of phylogenetic networks.

  1. A Generic Design Model for Evolutionary Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Feng; Kang Li-shan; Chen Yu-ping

    2003-01-01

    A generic design model for evolutionary algo rithms is proposed in this paper. The model, which was described by UML in details, focuses on the key concepts and mechanisms in evolutionary algorithms. The model not only achieves separation of concerns and encapsulation of implementations by classification and abstraction of those concepts,it also has a flexible architecture due to the application of design patterns. As a result, the model is reusable, extendible,easy to understand, easy to use, and easy to test. A large number of experiments applying the model to solve many different problems adequately illustrate the generality and effectivity of the model.

  2. Evolutionary Models for Simple Biosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoli, Franco

    The concept of evolutionary development of structures constituted a real revolution in biology: it was possible to understand how the very complex structures of life can arise in an out-of-equilibrium system. The investigation of such systems has shown that indeed, systems under a flux of energy or matter can self-organize into complex patterns, think for instance to Rayleigh-Bernard convection, Liesegang rings, patterns formed by granular systems under shear. Following this line, one could characterize life as a state of matter, characterized by the slow, continuous process that we call evolution. In this paper we try to identify the organizational level of life, that spans several orders of magnitude from the elementary constituents to whole ecosystems. Although similar structures can be found in other contexts like ideas (memes) in neural systems and self-replicating elements (computer viruses, worms, etc.) in computer systems, we shall concentrate on biological evolutionary structure, and try to put into evidence the role and the emergence of network structure in such systems.

  3. Langley's CSI evolutionary model: Phase O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Elliott, Kenny B.; Horta, Lucas G.; Bailey, Jim P.; Bruner, Anne M.; Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Won, John; Ugoletti, Roberto M.

    1991-01-01

    A testbed for the development of Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) technology to improve space science platform pointing is described. The evolutionary nature of the testbed will permit the study of global line-of-sight pointing in phases 0 and 1, whereas, multipayload pointing systems will be studied beginning with phase 2. The design, capabilities, and typical dynamic behavior of the phase 0 version of the CSI evolutionary model (CEM) is documented for investigator both internal and external to NASA. The model description includes line-of-sight pointing measurement, testbed structure, actuators, sensors, and real time computers, as well as finite element and state space models of major components.

  4. Incorporating evolutionary processes into population viability models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Jennifer C; Beissinger, Steven R; Bragg, Jason G; Coates, David J; Oostermeijer, J Gerard B; Sunnucks, Paul; Schumaker, Nathan H; Trotter, Meredith V; Young, Andrew G

    2015-06-01

    We examined how ecological and evolutionary (eco-evo) processes in population dynamics could be better integrated into population viability analysis (PVA). Complementary advances in computation and population genomics can be combined into an eco-evo PVA to offer powerful new approaches to understand the influence of evolutionary processes on population persistence. We developed the mechanistic basis of an eco-evo PVA using individual-based models with individual-level genotype tracking and dynamic genotype-phenotype mapping to model emergent population-level effects, such as local adaptation and genetic rescue. We then outline how genomics can allow or improve parameter estimation for PVA models by providing genotypic information at large numbers of loci for neutral and functional genome regions. As climate change and other threatening processes increase in rate and scale, eco-evo PVAs will become essential research tools to evaluate the effects of adaptive potential, evolutionary rescue, and locally adapted traits on persistence.

  5. Context dependent DNA evolutionary models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ledet

    This paper is about stochastic models for the evolution of DNA. For a set of aligned DNA sequences, connected in a phylogenetic tree, the models should be able to explain - in probabilistic terms - the differences seen in the sequences. From the estimates of the parameters in the model one can...

  6. An Evolutionary Model of Spatial Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thorbjørn; Winter, Sidney G.

      This paper sets forth an evolutionary model in which diverse businesses, with diverse offerings, compete in a stylized physical space.  When a business firm attempts to expand its activity, so as to profit further from the capabilities it has developed, it necessarily does so in a "new location...

  7. Graphical model construction based on evolutionary algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youlong YANG; Yan WU; Sanyang LIU

    2006-01-01

    Using Bayesian networks to model promising solutions from the current population of the evolutionary algorithms can ensure efficiency and intelligence search for the optimum. However, to construct a Bayesian network that fits a given dataset is a NP-hard problem, and it also needs consuming mass computational resources. This paper develops a methodology for constructing a graphical model based on Bayesian Dirichlet metric. Our approach is derived from a set of propositions and theorems by researching the local metric relationship of networks matching dataset. This paper presents the algorithm to construct a tree model from a set of potential solutions using above approach. This method is important not only for evolutionary algorithms based on graphical models, but also for machine learning and data mining.The experimental results show that the exact theoretical results and the approximations match very well.

  8. Chemical analysis of 24 dusty (pre-)main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Acke, B; Acke, Bram; Waelkens, Christoffel

    2004-01-01

    We have analysed the chemical photospheric composition of 24 Herbig Ae/Be and Vega-type stars in search for the lambda Bootis phenomenon. We present the results of the elemental abundances of the sample stars. Some of the stars were never before studied spectroscopically at optical wavelengths. We have determined the projected rotational velocities of our sample stars. Furthermore, we discuss stars that depict a (selective) depletion pattern in detail. HD 4881 and HD 139614 seem to display an overall deficiency. AB Aur and possibly HD 126367 have subsolar values for the iron abundance, but are almost solar in silicon. HD 100546 is the only clear lambda Bootis star in our sample.

  9. Relevant phylogenetic invariants of evolutionary models

    CERN Document Server

    Casanellas, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Recently there have been several attempts to provide a whole set of generators of the ideal of the algebraic variety associated to a phylogenetic tree evolving under an algebraic model. These algebraic varieties have been proven to be useful in phylogenetics. In this paper we prove that, for phylogenetic reconstruction purposes, it is enough to consider generators coming from the edges of the tree, the so-called edge invariants. This is the algebraic analogous to Buneman's Splits Equivalence Theorem. The interest of this result relies on its potential applications in phylogenetics for the widely used evolutionary models such as Jukes-Cantor, Kimura 2 and 3 parameters, and General Markov models.

  10. A Simple General Model of Evolutionary Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Stefan

    Evolution is a process in which some variations that emerge within a population (of, e.g., biological species or industrial goods) get selected, survive, and proliferate, whereas others vanish. Survival probability, proliferation, or production rates are associated with the "fitness" of a particular variation. We argue that the notion of fitness is an a posteriori concept in the sense that one can assign higher fitness to species or goods that survive but one can generally not derive or predict fitness per se. Whereas proliferation rates can be measured, fitness landscapes, that is, the inter-dependence of proliferation rates, cannot. For this reason we think that in a physical theory of evolution such notions should be avoided. Here we review a recent quantitative formulation of evolutionary dynamics that provides a framework for the co-evolution of species and their fitness landscapes (Thurner et al., 2010, Physica A 389, 747; Thurner et al., 2010, New J. Phys. 12, 075029; Klimek et al., 2009, Phys. Rev. E 82, 011901 (2010). The corresponding model leads to a generic evolutionary dynamics characterized by phases of relative stability in terms of diversity, followed by phases of massive restructuring. These dynamical modes can be interpreted as punctuated equilibria in biology, or Schumpeterian business cycles (Schumpeter, 1939, Business Cycles, McGraw-Hill, London) in economics. We show that phase transitions that separate phases of high and low diversity can be approximated surprisingly well by mean-field methods. We demonstrate that the mathematical framework is suited to understand systemic properties of evolutionary systems, such as their proneness to collapse, or their potential for diversification. The framework suggests that evolutionary processes are naturally linked to self-organized criticality and to properties of production matrices, such as their eigenvalue spectra. Even though the model is phrased in general terms it is also practical in the sense

  11. Evolutionary algorithms in genetic regulatory networks model

    CERN Document Server

    Raza, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Genetic Regulatory Networks (GRNs) plays a vital role in the understanding of complex biological processes. Modeling GRNs is significantly important in order to reveal fundamental cellular processes, examine gene functions and understanding their complex relationships. Understanding the interactions between genes gives rise to develop better method for drug discovery and diagnosis of the disease since many diseases are characterized by abnormal behaviour of the genes. In this paper we have reviewed various evolutionary algorithms-based approach for modeling GRNs and discussed various opportunities and challenges.

  12. Evolutionary models of in-group favoritism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Fu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In-group favoritism is the tendency for individuals to cooperate with in-group members more strongly than with out-group members. Similar concepts have been described across different domains, including in-group bias, tag-based cooperation, parochial altruism, and ethnocentrism. Both humans and other animals show this behavior. Here, we review evolutionary mechanisms for explaining this phenomenon by covering recently developed mathematical models. In fact, in-group favoritism is not easily realized on its own in theory, although it can evolve under some conditions. We also discuss the implications of these modeling results in future empirical and theoretical research.

  13. Evolutionary model with intelligence and knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Q. H.; Yu, B. L.; He, M. F.

    2005-12-01

    An evolutionary model based on Bit-String with intelligence and learning is constructed. Each individual is represented by five bit strings. Four of them relate to genes and the other denotes the knowledge from learning. The four strings relative to genes will be divided into two parts — Bit-String A and Bit-String B. Bit-String A denotes the health of an individual, at the same time Bit-String B can describe intelligence. For an individual, the cross reproduction method is used in this model. After that we explain how knowledge is represented in our model. The probability of learning is affected by intelligence. In order to study how the accumulated knowledge influences the survival process by the effect of food and space restrictions, we modify the Verhulst factor. Then, we present the results of our simulations and discuss the evolution of population, intelligence and knowledge respectively. In addition, an equation to calculate the intelligence quotient is given based on intelligence and knowledge. We discuss the distribution of intelligence quotient.

  14. The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model (CGEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, George H.; DeRosa, M. L.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2013-07-01

    The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model, or CGEM, is a collaborative effort from the UC Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL), Stanford University, and Lockheed-Martin. In work that led up to the selection of this project, the team demonstrated its capability to use sequences of vector magnetograms and Dopplergrams from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument aboard the SDO to drive a magnetofrictional (MF) model of the coronal magnetic field in AR 11158, which produced an X2.2 flare. We will implement this MF model in spherical coordinates to enable real-time, long-term modeling of the non-potential coronal magnetic field, both globally and for individual active region (ARs). The model's Earth-facing hemisphere will be driven using electric fields derived from the observed evolution of photospheric line-of-sight magnetic fields and electric currents. Far-side data inputs will be from an existing flux transport code, combined with HMI far-side observations of new active regions, with empirical parametrizations of orientation and flux. Because this model includes large-scale coronal electric currents, it is a substantial improvement over existing real-time global coronal models, which assume potential fields. Data products available from the model will include: 1) the evolving photospheric electric field, Poynting flux, and helicity flux; 2) estimates of coronal free energy and non-potential geometry and topology; 3) initial and time-dependent boundary conditions for MHD modeling of active regions; and 4) time-dependent boundary conditions and flux tube expansion factors for MHD and empirical solar wind models. Unstable configurations found from MF models will be dynamically evolved with local and global MHD codes. Modules used to derive surface electric fields from magnetic evolution will be incorporated into the SDO/HMI data pipeline, and data products will be distributed through the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) and directly to space

  15. Parallel Evolutionary Modeling for Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a new parallel evolutionary algorithm in modeling dynamic systems by nonlinear higher-order ordinary differential equations (NHODEs). The NHODEs models are much more universal than the traditional linear models. In order to accelerate the modeling process, we propose and realize a parallel evolutionary algorithm using distributed CORBA object on the heterogeneous networking. Some numerical experiments show that the new algorithm is feasible and efficient.

  16. Incorporating evolutionary processes into population viability models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierson, J.C.; Beissinger, S.R.; Bragg, J.G.; Coates, D.J.; Oostermeijer, J.G.B.; Sunnucks, P.; Schumaker, N.H.; Trotter, M.V.; Young, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    We examined how ecological and evolutionary (eco-evo) processes in population dynamics could be better integrated into population viability analysis (PVA). Complementary advances in computation and population genomics can be combined into an eco-evo PVA to offer powerful new approaches to understand

  17. An evolutionary dynamics model adapted to eusocial insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise van Oudenhove

    Full Text Available This study aims to better understand the evolutionary processes allowing species coexistence in eusocial insect communities. We develop a mathematical model that applies adaptive dynamics theory to the evolutionary dynamics of eusocial insects, focusing on the colony as the unit of selection. The model links long-term evolutionary processes to ecological interactions among colonies and seasonal worker production within the colony. Colony population dynamics is defined by both worker production and colony reproduction. Random mutations occur in strategies, and mutant colonies enter the community. The interactions of colonies at the ecological timescale drive the evolution of strategies at the evolutionary timescale by natural selection. This model is used to study two specific traits in ants: worker body size and the degree of collective foraging. For both traits, trade-offs in competitive ability and other fitness components allows to determine conditions in which selection becomes disruptive. Our results illustrate that asymmetric competition underpins diversity in ant communities.

  18. How promotions work : SCAN*PRO-based evolutionary model building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heerde, H.J.; Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    We provide a rationale for evolutionary model building. The basic idea is that to enhance user acceptance it is important that one begins with a relatively simple model. Simplicity is desired so that managers understand models. As a manager uses the model and builds up experience with this decision

  19. Gillespie eco‐evolutionary models (GEMs) reveal the role of heritable trait variation in eco‐evolutionary dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    DeLong, John P.; Gibert, Jean P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heritable trait variation is a central and necessary ingredient of evolution. Trait variation also directly affects ecological processes, generating a clear link between evolutionary and ecological dynamics. Despite the changes in variation that occur through selection, drift, mutation, and recombination, current eco‐evolutionary models usually fail to track how variation changes through time. Moreover, eco‐evolutionary models assume fitness functions for each trait and each ecologic...

  20. Gillespie eco-evolutionary models (GEMs) reveal the role of heritable trait variation in eco-evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, John P; Gibert, Jean P

    2016-02-01

    Heritable trait variation is a central and necessary ingredient of evolution. Trait variation also directly affects ecological processes, generating a clear link between evolutionary and ecological dynamics. Despite the changes in variation that occur through selection, drift, mutation, and recombination, current eco-evolutionary models usually fail to track how variation changes through time. Moreover, eco-evolutionary models assume fitness functions for each trait and each ecological context, which often do not have empirical validation. We introduce a new type of model, Gillespie eco-evolutionary models (GEMs), that resolves these concerns by tracking distributions of traits through time as eco-evolutionary dynamics progress. This is done by allowing change to be driven by the direct fitness consequences of model parameters within the context of the underlying ecological model, without having to assume a particular fitness function. GEMs work by adding a trait distribution component to the standard Gillespie algorithm - an approach that models stochastic systems in nature that are typically approximated through ordinary differential equations. We illustrate GEMs with the Rosenzweig-MacArthur consumer-resource model. We show not only how heritable trait variation fuels trait evolution and influences eco-evolutionary dynamics, but also how the erosion of variation through time may hinder eco-evolutionary dynamics in the long run. GEMs can be developed for any parameter in any ordinary differential equation model and, furthermore, can enable modeling of multiple interacting traits at the same time. We expect GEMs will open the door to a new direction in eco-evolutionary and evolutionary modeling by removing long-standing modeling barriers, simplifying the link between traits, fitness, and dynamics, and expanding eco-evolutionary treatment of a greater diversity of ecological interactions. These factors make GEMs much more than a modeling advance, but an important

  1. Universal power law behaviors in genomic sequences and evolutionary models

    CERN Document Server

    Martignetti, L

    2007-01-01

    We study the length distribution of a particular class of DNA sequences known as 5'UTR exons. These exons belong to the messanger RNA of protein coding genes, but they are not coding (they are located upstream of the coding portion of the mRNA) and are thus less constrained from an evolutionary point of view. We show that both in mouse and in human these exons show a very clean power law decay in their length distribution and suggest a simple evolutionary model which may explain this finding. We conjecture that this power law behaviour could indeed be a general feature of higher eukaryotes.

  2. Preventing clonal evolutionary processes in cancer: Insights from mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Brenes, Ignacio A; Wodarz, Dominik

    2015-07-21

    Clonal evolutionary processes can drive pathogenesis in human diseases, with cancer being a prominent example. To prevent or treat cancer, mechanisms that can potentially interfere with clonal evolutionary processes need to be understood better. Mathematical modeling is an important research tool that plays an ever-increasing role in cancer research. This paper discusses how mathematical models can be useful to gain insights into mechanisms that can prevent disease initiation, help analyze treatment responses, and aid in the design of treatment strategies to combat the emergence of drug-resistant cells. The discussion will be done in the context of specific examples. Among defense mechanisms, we explore how replicative limits and cellular senescence induced by telomere shortening can influence the emergence and evolution of tumors. Among treatment approaches, we consider the targeted treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We illustrate how basic evolutionary mathematical models have the potential to make patient-specific predictions about disease and treatment outcome, and argue that evolutionary models could become important clinical tools in the field of personalized medicine.

  3. Evolutionary Population Synthesis Models of Primeval Galaxies a Critical Appraisal

    CERN Document Server

    Buzzoni, A

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical approach relying on evolutionary population synthesis models could help refining the search criteria in deep galaxy surveys on the basis of a better knowledge of the expected apparent photometric properties of high-redshift objects. The following is a brief discussion reviewing some relevant aspects of the question in order to allow a more critical appraisal to primeval galaxy recognition.

  4. Financial Data Modeling by Using Asynchronous Parallel Evolutionary Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chun; Li Qiao-yun

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the high-level knowledge of financial data modeled by ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is discovered in dynamic data by using an asynchronous parallel evolutionary modeling algorithm (APHEMA). A numerical example of Nasdaq index analysis is used to demonstrate the potential of APHEMA. The results show that the dynamic models automatically discovered in dynamic data by computer can be used to predict the financial trends.

  5. A stochastic evolutionary model for survival dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Trevor; Loizou, George

    2014-01-01

    The recent interest in human dynamics has led researchers to investigate the stochastic processes that explain human behaviour in different contexts. Here we propose a generative model to capture the essential dynamics of survival analysis, traditionally employed in clinical trials and reliability analysis in engineering. In our model, the only implicit assumption made is that the longer an actor has been in the system, the more likely it is to have failed. We derive a power-law distribution for the process and provide preliminary empirical evidence for the validity of the model from two well-known survival analysis data sets.

  6. An evolutionary model of social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, M.; Abell, P.

    2007-07-01

    Social networks in communities, markets, and societies self-organise through the interactions of many individuals. In this paper we use a well-known mechanism of social interactions — the balance of sentiment in triadic relations — to describe the development of social networks. Our model contrasts with many existing network models, in that people not only establish but also break up relations whilst the network evolves. The procedure generates several interesting network features such as a variety of degree distributions and degree correlations. The resulting network converges under certain conditions to a steady critical state where temporal disruptions in triangles follow a power-law distribution.

  7. New DA white dwarf evolutionary models and their pulsational properties

    CERN Document Server

    Corsico, A H; Benvenuto, O G; Serenelli, A M

    2001-01-01

    In this letter we investigate the pulsational properties of ZZ Ceti stars on the basis of new white dwarf evolutionary models calculated in a self-consistent way with the predictions of time dependent element diffusion and nuclear burning. In addition, full account is taken of the evolutionary stages prior to the white dwarf formation. Emphasis is placed on the trapping properties of such models. By means of adiabatic, non-radial pulsation calculations, we find, as a result of time dependent diffusion, a much weaker mode trapping effect, particularly for the high-period regime of the pulsation g-spectrum. This result is valid at least for models with massive hydrogen-rich envelopes. Thus, mode trapping would not be an effective mechanism to explain the fact that all the high periods expected from standard models of stratified white dwarfs are not observed in the ZZ Ceti stars.

  8. Evolutionary models of metabolism, behaviour and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Alasdair I

    2010-12-27

    I explore the relationship between metabolism and personality by establishing how selection acts on metabolic rate and risk-taking in the context of a trade-off between energy and predation. Using a simple time budget model, I show that a high resting metabolic rate is not necessarily associated with a high daily energy expenditure. The metabolic rate that minimizes the time spent foraging does not maximize the net gain rate while foraging, and it is not always advantageous for animals to have a higher metabolic rate when food availability is high. A model based on minimizing the ratio of mortality rate to net gain rate is used to determine how a willingness to take risks should be correlated with metabolic rate. My results establish that it is not always advantageous for animals to take greater risks when metabolic rate is high. When foraging intensity and metabolic rate coevolve, I show that in a particular case different combinations of foraging intensity and metabolic rate can have equal fitness.

  9. Asteroseismology of pulsating DA white dwarfs with fully evolutionary models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Althaus L.G.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new approach for asteroseismology of DA white dwarfs that consists in the employment of a large set of non-static, physically sound, fully evolutionary models representative of these stars. We already have applied this approach with success to pulsating PG1159 stars (GW Vir variables. Our white dwarf models, which cover a wide range of stellar masses, effective temperatures, and envelope thicknesses, are the result of fully evolutionary computations that take into account the complete history of the progenitor stars from the ZAMS. In particular, the models are characterized by self-consistent chemical structures from the centre to the surface, a crucial aspect of white dwarf asteroseismology. We apply this approach to an ensemble of 44 bright DAV (ZZ Ceti stars.

  10. Sequence alignments and pair hidden Markov models using evolutionary history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Bjarne; Miyamoto, Michael M

    2003-10-17

    This work presents a novel pairwise statistical alignment method based on an explicit evolutionary model of insertions and deletions (indels). Indel events of any length are possible according to a geometric distribution. The geometric distribution parameter, the indel rate, and the evolutionary time are all maximum likelihood estimated from the sequences being aligned. Probability calculations are done using a pair hidden Markov model (HMM) with transition probabilities calculated from the indel parameters. Equations for the transition probabilities make the pair HMM closely approximate the specified indel model. The method provides an optimal alignment, its likelihood, the likelihood of all possible alignments, and the reliability of individual alignment regions. Human alpha and beta-hemoglobin sequences are aligned, as an illustration of the potential utility of this pair HMM approach.

  11. A novel evolutionary drug scheduling model in cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yong; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Mok, Tony Shu Kam

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified optimal control model of drug scheduling in cancer chemotherapy and a new adaptive elitist-population-based genetic algorithm (AEGA) to solve it. Working closely with an oncologist, we first modify the existing model, because its equation for the cumulative drug toxicity is inconsistent with medical knowledge and clinical experience. To explore multiple efficient drug scheduling policies, we propose a novel variable representation--a cycle-wise representation, and modify the elitist genetic search operators in the AEGA. The simulation results obtained by the modified model match well with the clinical treatment experiences, and can provide multiple efficient solutions for oncologists to consider. Moreover, it has been shown that the evolutionary drug scheduling approach is simple, and capable of solving complex cancer chemotherapy problems by adapting multimodal versions of evolutionary algorithms.

  12. A Comparison of Evolutionary Computation Techniques for IIR Model Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Cuevas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available System identification is a complex optimization problem which has recently attracted the attention in the field of science and engineering. In particular, the use of infinite impulse response (IIR models for identification is preferred over their equivalent FIR (finite impulse response models since the former yield more accurate models of physical plants for real world applications. However, IIR structures tend to produce multimodal error surfaces whose cost functions are significantly difficult to minimize. Evolutionary computation techniques (ECT are used to estimate the solution to complex optimization problems. They are often designed to meet the requirements of particular problems because no single optimization algorithm can solve all problems competitively. Therefore, when new algorithms are proposed, their relative efficacies must be appropriately evaluated. Several comparisons among ECT have been reported in the literature. Nevertheless, they suffer from one limitation: their conclusions are based on the performance of popular evolutionary approaches over a set of synthetic functions with exact solutions and well-known behaviors, without considering the application context or including recent developments. This study presents the comparison of various evolutionary computation optimization techniques applied to IIR model identification. Results over several models are presented and statistically validated.

  13. Sticklebacks as model hosts in ecological and evolutionary parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Iain

    2013-11-01

    The three-spined stickleback is a small teleost fish, native to coastal regions of the Northern Hemisphere, which has emerged as a key model organism in evolutionary biology and ecology. Sticklebacks possess a well-documented and experimentally amenable parasite fauna, and are well suited to both laboratory and field parasitological investigation. As a consequence, sticklebacks have been extensively used as model hosts in studies of host-parasite interactions, and these studies have provided considerable insight into the roles of parasites in ecology and evolutionary biology. In this review, I discuss key advances in our understanding of host-parasite interactions that have arisen from studies involving stickleback hosts, highlight areas of current research activity, and identify potentially promising areas for future research.

  14. Evolutionary model of an anonymous consumer durable market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldasch, Joachim

    2011-07-01

    An analytic model is presented that considers the evolution of a market of durable goods. The model suggests that after introduction goods spread always according to a Bass diffusion. However, this phase will be followed by a diffusion process for durable consumer goods governed by a variation-selection-reproduction mechanism and the growth dynamics can be described by a replicator equation. The theory suggests that products play the role of species in biological evolutionary models. It implies that the evolution of man-made products can be arranged into an evolutionary tree. The model suggests that each product can be characterized by its product fitness. The fitness space contains elements of both sites of the market, supply and demand. The unit sales of products with a higher product fitness compared to the mean fitness increase. Durables with a constant fitness advantage replace other goods according to a logistic law. The model predicts in particular that the mean price exhibits an exponential decrease over a long time period for durable goods. The evolutionary diffusion process is directly related to this price decline and is governed by Gompertz equation. Therefore it is denoted as Gompertz diffusion. Describing the aggregate sales as the sum of first, multiple and replacement purchase the product life cycle can be derived. Replacement purchase causes periodic variations of the sales determined by the finite lifetime of the good (Juglar cycles). The model suggests that both, Bass- and Gompertz diffusion may contribute to the product life cycle of a consumer durable. The theory contains the standard equilibrium view of a market as a special case. It depends on the time scale, whether an equilibrium or evolutionary description is more appropriate. The evolutionary framework is used to derive also the size, growth rate and price distribution of manufacturing business units. It predicts that the size distribution of the business units (products) is lognormal

  15. Lyapunov stability in an evolutionary game theory model of the labour market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Azevedo Araujo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the existence and stability of equilibriums in an evolutionary game theory model of the labour market is studied by using the Lyapunov method. The model displays multiple equilibriums and it is shown that the Nash equilibriums of the static game are evolutionary stable equilibrium in the game theory evolutionary set up. A complete characterization of the dynamics of an evolutionary model of the labour market is provided.

  16. A sharp interface evolutionary model for shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knüpfer, Hans; Kružík, Martin

    2016-11-01

    We show the existence of an energetic solution to a quasistatic evolutionary model of shape memory alloys. Elastic behavior of each material phase/variant is described by polyconvex energy density. Additionally, to every phase boundary, there is an interface-polyconvex energy assigned, introduced by M. \\v{S}ilhav\\'{y}. The model considers internal variables describing the evolving spatial arrangement of the material phases and a deformation mapping with its first-order gradients. It allows for injectivity and orientation-preservation of deformations. Moreover, the resulting material microstructures have finite length scales.

  17. Exact solution of an evolutionary model without aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onody, Roberto N.; de Medeiros, Nazareno G. F.

    1999-09-01

    We introduce an age-structured asexual population model containing all the relevant features of evolutionary aging theories. Beneficial as well as deleterious mutations, heredity, and arbitrary fecundity are present and managed by natural selection. An exact solution without aging is found. We show that fertility is associated with generalized forms of the Fibonacci sequence, while mutations and natural selection are merged into an integral equation which is solved by Fourier series. Average survival probabilities and Malthusian growth exponents are calculated and indicate that the system may exhibit mutational meltdown. The relevance of the model in the context of fissile reproduction groups like many protozoa and coelenterates is discussed.

  18. Testing evolutionary models of senescence: traditional approaches and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Chloe; Conneely, Karen N

    2014-12-01

    From an evolutionary perspective, the existence of senescence is a paradox. Why has senescence not been more effectively selected against given its associated decreases in Darwinian fitness? Why does senescence exist and how has it evolved? Three major theories offer explanations: (1) the theory of mutation accumulation suggested by PB Medawar; (2) the theory of antagonistic pleiotropy suggested by GC Williams; and (3) the disposable soma theory suggested by TBL Kirkwood. These three theories differ in the underlying causes of aging that they propose but are not mutually exclusive. This paper compares the specific biological predictions of each theory and discusses the methods and results of previous empirical tests. Lifespan is found to be the most frequently used estimate of senescence in evolutionary investigations. This measurement acts as a proxy for an individual's rate of senescence, but provides no information on an individual's senescent state or "biological age" throughout life. In the future, use of alternative longitudinal measures of senescence may facilitate investigation of previously neglected aspects of evolutionary models, such as intra- and inter-individual heterogeneity in the process of aging. DNA methylation data are newly proposed to measure biological aging and are suggested to be particularly useful for such investigations.

  19. Yunnan-III models for evolutionary population synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Li, L.; Han, Z.; Zhuang, Y.; Kang, X.

    2013-02-01

    We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the mesa stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1 Myr to 15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100 M⊙). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art mesa code. mesa code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars makes the V - K, V - J and V - R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr) ≳ 7.6 [the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr) ˜ 8.6, ˜0.5-0.2 mag for colours, approximately two times for K-band flux]. We also find that the colour-evolution trends of Model with-TPAGB at intermediate and large ages are similar to those from the starburst99 code, which employs the Padova-AGB stellar library, BaSeL spectral library and the Kroupa IMF. At last, we compare the colours with the other EPS models comprising TP-AGB stars (such as CB07, M05, V10 and POPSTAR), and find that the B - V colour agrees with each other but the V-K colour shows a larger discrepancy among these EPS models [˜1 mag when 8 ≲ log(t/yr) ≲ 9]. The stellar evolutionary tracks, isochrones, colours and ISEDs can be obtained on request from the first author or from our website (http://www1.ynao.ac.cn/~zhangfh/). Using the isochrones, you can build your EPS models. Now the format of stellar evolutionary tracks is the same as that in the starburst99 code; you can put them into the starburst99 code and get the SP's results. Moreover, the colours involving other passbands

  20. Information gating: an evolutionary model of personality function and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, W P

    1998-01-01

    Utilizing principles of evolutionary biology, a model is developed which defines the essential adaptive functions of personality as a whole, and describes how failure in those functions produces the maladaptations characteristic of personality disorders. In this model, personality is hypothesized to have evolved specifically to make human culture possible by managing the flow of information within the culture, especially by mediating teaching and learning, competition and cooperation, and leading and following. These essential culture-forming capacities of personality have at their root the more basic function of information gating, which is defined here as the continuous regulation by personality of its openness for the bidirectional flow of sensory, cognitive, emotional, and motor information between internal self and external social systems, to best meet the needs of both in various situations. The maladaptations characteristic of personality disorders are postulated to be due to their being chronically and frequently too open or too closed for expressing or assimilating social information, given their circumstances. The relationship of this model to other evolutionary models of personality is discussed, as are its clinical and research implications.

  1. Evolutionary optimization of a hierarchical object recognition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Georg; Wersing, Heiko; Sendhoff, Bernhard; Körner, Edgar

    2005-06-01

    A major problem in designing artificial neural networks is the proper choice of the network architecture. Especially for vision networks classifying three-dimensional (3-D) objects this problem is very challenging, as these networks are necessarily large and therefore the search space for defining the needed networks is of a very high dimensionality. This strongly increases the chances of obtaining only suboptimal structures from standard optimization algorithms. We tackle this problem in two ways. First, we use biologically inspired hierarchical vision models to narrow the space of possible architectures and to reduce the dimensionality of the search space. Second, we employ evolutionary optimization techniques to determine optimal features and nonlinearities of the visual hierarchy. Here, we especially focus on higher order complex features in higher hierarchical stages. We compare two different approaches to perform an evolutionary optimization of these features. In the first setting, we directly code the features into the genome. In the second setting, in analogy to an ontogenetical development process, we suggest the new method of an indirect coding of the features via an unsupervised learning process, which is embedded into the evolutionary optimization. In both cases the processing nonlinearities are encoded directly into the genome and are thus subject to optimization. The fitness of the individuals for the evolutionary selection process is computed by measuring the network classification performance on a benchmark image database. Here, we use a nearest-neighbor classification approach, based on the hierarchical feature output. We compare the found solutions with respect to their ability to generalize. We differentiate between a first- and a second-order generalization. The first-order generalization denotes how well the vision system, after evolutionary optimization of the features and nonlinearities using a database A, can classify previously unseen test

  2. Rotating models of young solar-type stars : Exploring braking laws and angular momentum transport processes

    CERN Document Server

    Amard, Louis; Charbonnel, Corinne; Gallet, Florian; Bouvier, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    We study the predicted rotational evolution of solar-type stars from the pre-main sequence to the solar age with 1D rotating evolutionary models including physical ingredients. We computed rotating evolution models of solar-type stars including an external stellar wind torque and internal transport of angular momentum following the method of Maeder and Zahn with the code STAREVOL. We explored different formalisms and prescriptions available from the literature. We tested the predictions of the models against recent rotational period data from extensive photometric surveys, lithium abundances of solar-mass stars in young clusters, and the helioseismic rotation profile of the Sun. We find a best-matching combination of prescriptions for both internal transport and surface extraction of angular momentum. This combination provides a very good fit to the observed evolution of rotational periods for solar-type stars from early evolution to the age of the Sun. Additionally, we show that fast rotators experience a st...

  3. A consensus opinion model based on the evolutionary game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han-Xin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a consensus opinion model based on the evolutionary game. In our model, both of the two connected agents receive a benefit if they have the same opinion, otherwise they both pay a cost. Agents update their opinions by comparing payoffs with neighbors. The opinion of an agent with higher payoff is more likely to be imitated. We apply this model in scale-free networks with tunable degree distribution. Interestingly, we find that there exists an optimal ratio of cost to benefit, leading to the shortest consensus time. Qualitative analysis is obtained by examining the evolution of the opinion clusters. Moreover, we find that the consensus time decreases as the average degree of the network increases, but increases with the noise introduced to permit irrational choices. The dependence of the consensus time on the network size is found to be a power-law form. For small or larger ratio of cost to benefit, the consensus time decreases as the degree exponent increases. However, for moderate ratio of cost to benefit, the consensus time increases with the degree exponent. Our results may provide new insights into opinion dynamics driven by the evolutionary game theory.

  4. Yunnan-III models for Evolutionary population synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, F; Han, Z; Zhuang, Y; Kang, X

    2012-01-01

    We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the MESA stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1Myr-15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100Msun). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art MESA code. MESA code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars make the V-K, V-J and V-R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr)>7.6 (the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr)~8.6, ~0.5-0.2mag for colours, ~2 times for K-band flux). The st...

  5. Comparison of evolutionary algorithms in gene regulatory network model inference.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The evolution of high throughput technologies that measure gene expression levels has created a data base for inferring GRNs (a process also known as reverse engineering of GRNs). However, the nature of these data has made this process very difficult. At the moment, several methods of discovering qualitative causal relationships between genes with high accuracy from microarray data exist, but large scale quantitative analysis on real biological datasets cannot be performed, to date, as existing approaches are not suitable for real microarray data which are noisy and insufficient. RESULTS: This paper performs an analysis of several existing evolutionary algorithms for quantitative gene regulatory network modelling. The aim is to present the techniques used and offer a comprehensive comparison of approaches, under a common framework. Algorithms are applied to both synthetic and real gene expression data from DNA microarrays, and ability to reproduce biological behaviour, scalability and robustness to noise are assessed and compared. CONCLUSIONS: Presented is a comparison framework for assessment of evolutionary algorithms, used to infer gene regulatory networks. Promising methods are identified and a platform for development of appropriate model formalisms is established.

  6. Evolutionary model on market ecology of investors and investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya-Chun; Cai, Shi-Min; Lü, Linyuan; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2013-08-01

    The interactions between investors and investments are of significant importance to understand the dynamics of financial markets. An evolutionary model is proposed to investigate the dynamic behaviors of investors and investments in a market ecology. The investors are divided into two groups, active ones and passive ones, distinguished by different selection capabilities based on the partial information, while the investments are simply categorized as good ones and bad ones. Without external influence, the system consisting of both investors and investments can self-organize to a quasi-stationary state according to their own strategies associating with the gains of market information. The model suggests that the partial information asymmetry of investors and various qualities of investments commonly give rise to a diverse dynamic behavior of the system by quantifying the fraction of active investors and of good investment at the quasi-stationary state.

  7. Characterizing Phase Transitions in a Model of Neutral Evolutionary Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Adam; King, Dawn; Bahar, Sonya

    2013-03-01

    An evolutionary model was recently introduced for sympatric, phenotypic evolution over a variable fitness landscape with assortative mating (Dees & Bahar 2010). Organisms in the model are described by coordinates in a two-dimensional phenotype space, born at random coordinates with limited variation from their parents as determined by a mutation parameter, mutability. The model has been extended to include both neutral evolution and asexual reproduction in Scott et al (submitted). It has been demonstrated that a second order, non-equilibrium phase transition occurs for the temporal dynamics as the mutability is varied, for both the original model and for neutral conditions. This transition likely belongs to the directed percolation universality class. In contrast, the spatial dynamics of the model shows characteristics of an ordinary percolation phase transition. Here, we characterize the phase transitions exhibited by this model by determining critical exponents for the relaxation times, characteristic lengths, and cluster (species) mass distributions. Missouri Research Board; J.S. McDonnell Foundation

  8. How altruism works: An evolutionary model of supply networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zehui; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Lü, Linyuan; Zhou, Tao; Xi, Ning

    2012-02-01

    Recently, supply networks have attracted increasing attention from the scientific community. However, it lacks serious consideration of social preference in Supply Chain Management. In this paper, we develop an evolutionary decision-making model to characterize the effects of suppliers' altruism in supply networks, and find that the performances of both suppliers and supply chains are improved by introducing the role of altruism. Furthermore, an interesting and reasonable phenomenon is discovered that the suppliers' and whole network's profits do not change monotonously with suppliers' altruistic preference, η, but reach the best at η=0.6 and η=0.4, respectively. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the effects of altruism for both research and commercial applications.

  9. Exogenous control of biological and ecological systems through evolutionary modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The controllability of network-like systems is a topical issue in ecology and biology. It relies on the ability to lead a system's behaviour towards the desired state through the appropriate handling of input variables. Up to now, controllability of networks is based on the permanent control of a set of driver nodes that can guide the system's dynamics. This assumption seems motivated by real-world networks observation, where a decentralized control is often applied only to part of the nodes. While in a previous paper I showed that ecological and biological networks can be efficaciously controlled from the inside, here I further introduce a new framework for network controllability based on the employment of exogenous controllers and evolutionary modelling, and provide an exemplification of its application.

  10. Evolutionary status of isolated B[e] stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chien-De; Liu, S Y

    2016-01-01

    Aims. We study a sample of eight B[e] stars with uncertain evolutionary status to shed light on the origin of their circumstellar dust. Methods. We performed a diagnostic analysis on the spectral energy distribution beyond infrared wavelengths, and conducted a census of neighboring region of each target to ascertain its evolutionary status. Results. In comparison to pre-main sequence Herbig stars, these B[e] stars show equally substantial excess emission in the near-infrared, indicative of existence of warm dust, but much reduced excess at longer wavelengths, so the dusty envelopes should be compact in size. Isolation from star-forming regions excludes the possibility of their pre-main sequence status. Six of our targets, including HD 50138, HD 45677, CD-245721, CD-49 3441, MWC 623, and HD 85567, have been previously considered as FS CMa stars, whereas HD 181615/6 and HD 98922 are added to the sample by this work. We argue that the circumstellar grains of these isolated B[e] stars, already evolved beyond the ...

  11. A Discrete Evolutionary Model for Chess Players' Ratings

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Trevor; Loizou, George

    2011-01-01

    The Elo system for rating chess players, also used in other games and sports, was adopted by the World Chess Federation over four decades ago. Although not without controversy, it is accepted as generally reliable and provides a method for assessing players' strengths and ranking them in official tournaments. It is generally accepted that the distribution of players' rating data is approximately normal but, to date, no stochastic model of how the distribution might have arisen has been proposed. We propose such an evolutionary stochastic model, which models the arrival of players into the rating pool, the games they play against each other, and how the results of these games affect their ratings. Using a continuous approximation to the discrete model, we derive the distribution for players' ratings at time $t$ as a normal distribution, where the variance increases in time as a logarithmic function of $t$. We validate the model using published rating data from 2007 to 2010, showing that the parameters obtained...

  12. Efficiency of Evolutionary Algorithms for Calibration of Watershed Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, M.; Arabi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Since the promulgation of the Clean Water Act in the U.S. and other similar legislations around the world over the past three decades, watershed management programs have focused on the nexus of pollution prevention and mitigation. In this context, hydrologic/water quality models have been increasingly embedded in the decision making process. Simulation models are now commonly used to investigate the hydrologic response of watershed systems under varying climatic and land use conditions, and also to study the fate and transport of contaminants at various spatiotemporal scales. Adequate calibration and corroboration of models for various outputs at varying scales is an essential component of watershed modeling. The parameter estimation process could be challenging when multiple objectives are important. For example, improving streamflow predictions of the model at a stream location may result in degradation of model predictions for sediments and/or nutrient at the same location or other outlets. This paper aims to evaluate the applicability and efficiency of single and multi objective evolutionary algorithms for parameter estimation of complex watershed models. To this end, the Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE-UA) algorithm, a single-objective genetic algorithm (GA), and a multi-objective genetic algorithm (i.e., NSGA-II) were reconciled with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to calibrate the model at various locations within the Wildcat Creek Watershed, Indiana. The efficiency of these methods were investigated using different error statistics including root mean square error, coefficient of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient for the output variables as well as the baseflow component of the stream discharge. A sensitivity analysis was carried out to screening model parameters that bear significant uncertainties. Results indicated that while flow processes can be reasonably ascertained, parameterization of nutrient and pesticide processes

  13. Accretion in the Rho-Oph pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Natta, A; Testi, L

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a measurement of the mass accretion rate in a large, complete sample of objects in the core of the star forming region Rho-Oph. The sample includes most of the objects (104 out of 111) with evidence of a circumstellar disk from mid-infrared photometry; it covers a stellar mass range from about 0.03 to 3 Msun and it is complete to a limiting mass of ~0.05 Msun. We used J and K-band spectra to derive the mass accretion rate of each object from the intensity of the hydrogen recombination lines, Pab or Brg. For comparison, we also obtained similar spectra of 35 diskless objects. The results show that emission in these lines is only seen in stars with disks, and can be used as an indicator of accretion. However, the converse does not hold, as about 50% of our disk objects do not have detectable line emission. The measured accretion rates show a strong correlation with the mass of the central object (Macc ~ Mstar^1.8+-0.2) and a large spread, of two orders of magnitude at least, ...

  14. An unusual very low-mass high-amplitude pre-main sequence periodic variable

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Ledesma, Maria V; Ibrahimov, Mansur; Messina, Sergio; Parihar, Padmakar; Hessman, Frederic; de Oliveira, Catarina Alves; Herbst, William

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the nature of the variability of CHS7797, an unusual periodic variable in the Orion Nebula Cluster. An extensive I-band photometric data set of CHS7797 was compiled between 2004-2010 using various telescopes. Further optical data have been collected in R and z' bands. In addition, simultaneous observations of the ONC region including CHS7797 were performed in the I, J, Ks and IRAC [3.6] and [4.5] bands over a time interval of about 40d. CHS7797 shows an unusual large-amplitude variation of about 1.7 mag in the R, I, and z' bands with a period 17.786. The amplitude of the brightness modulation decreases only slightly at longer wavelengths. The star is faint during 2/3 of the period and the shape of the phased light-curves for seven different observing seasons shows minor changes and small-amplitude variations. Interestingly, there are no significant colour-flux correlations for wavelengths smaller than 2microns, while the object becomes redder when fainter at longer wavelengths. CHS7797 ha...

  15. The pre-main sequence population of NGC 6530 in M8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Arias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos los resultados de una investigaci on de probables miembros d ebiles del c umulo abierto muy joven NGC 6530 en M8, basados en espectroscop a de resoluci on intermedia obtenida con el telescopio Magallanes I de 6.5 m del Observatorio Las Campanas. El an alisis de los espectros condujo al descubrimiento de 39 nuevas estrellas de pre-secuencia principal en la regi on. De acuerdo a los tipos espectrales, y a la presencia de l neas de emisi on y de l nea de absorci on de litio, identi camos 30 estrellas T-Tauri cl asicas, 7 estrellas T-Tauri d ebiles y dos objetos Herbig Ae/Be. Utilizando magnitudes infrarrojas de 2MASS y de nuestro trabajo previo, y las huellas evolutivas de Palla & Stahler (1999, estimamos las masas y edades de estas estrellas. Encontramos que casi todas las estrellas de nuestra muestra son m as j ovenes que 3 106 a~nos y abarcan un intervalo de masas de entre 0.8 y 2.0 M .

  16. Pre-main-sequence population in NGC 1893 region: X-ray properties

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, A K; Yadav, Ram Kesh; Richichi, Andrea; Lata, Sneh; Pandey, J C; Ojha, D K; Chen, W P

    2013-01-01

    Continuing the attempt to understand the properties of the stellar content in the young cluster NGC 1893 we have carried out a comprehensive multi-wavelength study of the region. The present study focuses on the X-ray properties of T-Tauri Stars (TTSs) in the NGC 1893 region. We found a correlation between the X-ray luminosity, $L_X$, and the stellar mass (in the range 0.2$-$2.0 \\msun) of TTSs in the NGC 1893 region, similar to those reported in some other young clusters, however the value of the power-law slope obtained in the present study ($\\sim$ 0.9) for NGC 1893 is smaller than those ($\\sim$1.4 - 3.6) reported in the case of TMC, ONC, IC 348 and Chameleon star forming regions. However, the slope in the case of Class III sources (Weak line TTSs) is found to be comparable to that reported in the case of NGC 6611 ($\\sim$ 1.1). It is found that the presence of circumstellar disks has no influence on the X-ray emission. The X-ray luminosity for both CTTSs and WTTSs is found to decrease systematically with age...

  17. The discovery of a low mass, pre-main-sequence stellar association around $\\gamma$ Velorum

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzo, M; Naylor, T; Totten, E J; Harmer, S; Kenyon, M E

    2000-01-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a population of low mass, pre-mainsequence stars (PMS) in the direction of the Wolf-Rayet/O-star binary systemgamma^{2} Vel and the Vela OB2 association. We argue that gamma^{2} Vel and thelow mass stars are truly associated, are approximately coeval and that both areat distances between 360-490 pc, disagreeing at the 2 sigma level with therecent Hipparcos parallax of gamma^{2} Vel, but consistent with older distanceestimates. Our results clearly have implications for the physical parameters ofthe gamma^{2} Vel system, but also offer an exciting opportunity to investigatethe influence of high mass stars on the mass function and circumstellar disclifetimes of their lower mass PMS siblings.

  18. A model for the evolutionary diversification of religions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebeli, Michael; Ispolatov, Iaroslav

    2010-12-21

    We address the problem of cultural diversification by studying selection on cultural ideas that colonize human hosts and using diversification of religions as a conceptual example. In analogy to studying the evolution of pathogens or symbionts colonizing animal hosts, we use models for host-pathogen dynamics known from theoretical epidemiology. In these models, religious content colonizes individual humans. Rates of transmission of ideas between humans, i.e., transmission of cultural content, and rates of loss of ideas (loss of belief) are determined by the phenotype of the cultural content, and by interactions between hosts carrying different ideas. In particular, based on the notion that cultural non-conformism can be negative frequency-dependent (for example, religion can lead to oppression of lower classes and emergence of non-conformism and dissent once a religious belief has reached dominance), we assume that the rate of loss of belief increases as the number of humans colonized by a particular religious phenotype increases. This generates frequency-dependent selection on cultural content, and we use evolutionary theory to show that this frequency dependence can lead to the emergence of coexisting clusters of different cultural types. The different clusters correspond to different cultural traditions, and hence our model describes the emergence of distinct descendant cultures from a single ancestral culture in the absence of any geographical isolation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Data-driven coronal evolutionary model of active region 11944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent availability of systematic measurements of vector magnetic fields and Doppler velocities has allowed us to utilize a data-driven approach for modeling observed active regions (AR), a crucial step for understanding the nature of solar flare initiation. We use a sequence of vector magnetograms and Dopplergrams from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the SDO to drive magnetofrictional (MF) model of the coronal magnetic field in the the vicinity of AR 11944, where an X1.2 flare on January 7 2014 occurred. To drive the coronal field we impose a time-dependent boundary condition based on temporal sequences of magnetic and electric fields at the bottom of the computational domain, i.e. the photosphere. To derive the electric fields we use a recently improved poloidal-toroidal decomposition (PTD), which we call the ``PTD-Doppler-FLCT-Ideal'' or PDFI technique. We investigate the results of the simulated coronal evolution, compare those with EUV observations from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and discuss what we could learn from them. This work is a a collaborative effort from the UC Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL), Stanford University, and Lockheed-Martin and is a part of Coronal Global Evolutionary (CGEM) Model, funded jointly by NASA and NSF.

  20. The Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray Sun in Time: High-Energy Evolutionary Tracks of a Solar-Like Star

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Lin; Güdel, Manuel; Lammer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We aim to describe the pre-main sequence and main-sequence evolution of X-ray and extreme-ultaviolet radiation of a solar mass star based on its rotational evolution starting with a realistic range of initial rotation rates. Methods. We derive evolutionary tracks of X-ray radiation based on a rotational evolution model for solar mass stars and the rotation-activity relation. We compare these tracks to X-ray luminosity distributions of stars in clusters with different ages. Results. We find agreement between the evolutionary tracks derived from rotation and the X-ray luminosity distributions from observations. Depending on the initial rotation rate, a star might remain at the X-ray saturation level for very different time periods, approximately from 10 Myr to 300 Myr for slow and fast rotators, respectively. Conclusions. Rotational evolution with a spread of initial conditions leads to a particularly wide distribution of possible X-ray luminosities in the age range of 20 to 500 Myrs, before rotational co...

  1. The extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Sun in Time: High-energy evolutionary tracks of a solar-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Lin; Johnstone, Colin P.; Güdel, Manuel; Lammer, Helmut

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We aim to describe the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence evolution of X-ray and extreme-ultaviolet radiation of a solar-mass star based on its rotational evolution starting with a realistic range of initial rotation rates. Methods: We derive evolutionary tracks of X-ray radiation based on a rotational evolution model for solar-mass stars and the rotation-activity relation. We compare these tracks to X-ray luminosity distributions of stars in clusters with different ages. Results: We find agreement between the evolutionary tracks derived from rotation and the X-ray luminosity distributions from observations. Depending on the initial rotation rate, a star might remain at the X-ray saturation level for very different time periods, from ≈10 Myr to ≈300 Myr for slow and fast rotators, respectively. Conclusions: Rotational evolution with a spread of initial conditions leads to a particularly wide distribution of possible X-ray luminosities in the age range of 20-500 Myr, before rotational convergence and therefore X-ray luminosity convergence sets in. This age range is crucial for the evolution of young planetary atmospheres and may thus lead to very different planetary evolution histories.

  2. System dynamics of behaviour-evolutionary mix-game models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Cheng-Ling; Gao, Jie-Ping; Chen, Fang

    2010-11-01

    In real financial markets there are two kinds of traders: one is fundamentalist, and the other is a trend-follower. The mix-game model is proposed to mimic such phenomena. In a mix-game model there are two groups of agents: Group 1 plays the majority game and Group 2 plays the minority game. In this paper, we investigate such a case that some traders in real financial markets could change their investment behaviours by assigning the evolutionary abilities to agents: if the winning rates of agents are smaller than a threshold, they will join the other group; and agents will repeat such an evolution at certain time intervals. Through the simulations, we obtain the following findings: (i) the volatilities of systems increase with the increase of the number of agents in Group 1 and the times of behavioural changes of all agents; (ii) the performances of agents in both groups and the stabilities of systems become better if all agents take more time to observe their new investment behaviours; (iii) there are two-phase zones of market and non-market and two-phase zones of evolution and non-evolution; (iv) parameter configurations located within the cross areas between the zones of markets and the zones of evolution are suited for simulating the financial markets.

  3. System dynamics of behaviour-evolutionary mix-game models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gou Cheng-Ling; Gao Jie-Ping; Chen Fang

    2010-01-01

    In real financial markets there are two kinds of traders:one is fundamentalist,and the other is a trend-follower.The mix-game model is proposed to mimic such phenomena.In a mix-game model there are two groups of agents:Group 1 plays the majority game and Group 2 plays the minority game.In this paper,we investigate such a case that some traders in real financial markets could change their investment behaviours by assigning the evolutionary abilities to agents:if the winning rates of agents are smaller than a threshold,they will join the other group;and agents will repeat such an evolution at certain time intervals.Through the simulations,we obtain the following findings:(i) the volatilities of systems increase with the increase of the number of agents in Group 1 and the times of behavioural changes of all agents;(ii) the performances of agents in both groups and the stabilities of systems become better if all agents take more time to observe their new investment behaviours;(iii) there are two-phase zones of market and non-market and two-phase zones of evolution and non-evolution;(iv) parameter configurations located within the cross areas between the zones of markets and the zones of evolution are suited for simulating the financial markets.

  4. Gnarled-trunk evolutionary model of influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihito Ito

    Full Text Available Human influenza A viruses undergo antigenic changes with gradual accumulation of amino acid substitutions on the hemagglutinin (HA molecule. A strong antigenic mismatch between vaccine and epidemic strains often requires the replacement of influenza vaccines worldwide. To establish a practical model enabling us to predict the future direction of the influenza virus evolution, relative distances of amino acid sequences among past epidemic strains were analyzed by multidimensional scaling (MDS. We found that human influenza viruses have evolved along a gnarled evolutionary pathway with an approximately constant curvature in the MDS-constructed 3D space. The gnarled pathway indicated that evolution on the trunk favored multiple substitutions at the same amino acid positions on HA. The constant curvature was reasonably explained by assuming that the rate of amino acid substitutions varied from one position to another according to a gamma distribution. Furthermore, we utilized the estimated parameters of the gamma distribution to predict the amino acid substitutions on HA in subsequent years. Retrospective prediction tests for 12 years from 1997 to 2009 showed that 70% of actual amino acid substitutions were correctly predicted, and that 45% of predicted amino acid substitutions have been actually observed. Although it remains unsolved how to predict the exact timing of antigenic changes, the present results suggest that our model may have the potential to recognize emerging epidemic strains.

  5. The Zipf Law revisited: An evolutionary model of emerging classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitin, L.B. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Schapiro, B. [TINA, Brandenburg (Germany); Perlovsky, L. [NRC, Wakefield, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Zipf`s Law is a remarkable rank-frequency relationship observed in linguistics (the frequencies of the use of words are approximately inversely proportional to their ranks in the decreasing frequency order) as well as in the behavior of many complex systems of surprisingly different nature. We suggest an evolutionary model of emerging classification of objects into classes corresponding to concepts and denoted by words. The evolution of the system is derived from two basic assumptions: first, the probability to recognize an object as belonging to a known class is proportional to the number of objects in this class already recognized, and, second, there exists a small probability to observe an object that requires creation of a new class ({open_quotes}mutation{close_quotes} that gives birth to a new {open_quotes}species{close_quotes}). It is shown that the populations of classes in such a system obey the Zipf Law provided that the rate of emergence of new classes is small. The model leads also to the emergence of a second-tier structure of {open_quotes}super-classes{close_quotes} - groups of classes with almost equal populations.

  6. Marmosets as model species in neuroscience and evolutionary anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Judith M; Finkenwirth, Christa

    2015-04-01

    Marmosets are increasingly used as model species by both neuroscientists and evolutionary anthropologists, but with a different rationale for doing so. Whereas neuroscientists stress that marmosets share many cognitive traits with humans due to common descent, anthropologists stress those traits shared with marmosets - and callitrichid monkeys in general - due to convergent evolution, as a consequence of the cooperative breeding system that characterizes both humans and callitrichids. Similarities in socio-cognitive abilities due to convergence, rather than homology, raise the question whether these similarities also extend to the proximate regulatory mechanisms, which is particularly relevant for neuroscientific investigations. In this review, we first provide an overview of the convergent adaptations to cooperative breeding at the psychological and cognitive level in primates, which bear important implications for our understanding of human cognitive evolution. In the second part, we zoom in on two of these convergent adaptations, proactive prosociality and social learning, and compare their proximate regulation in marmosets and humans with regard to oxytocin and cognitive top down regulation. Our analysis suggests considerable similarity in these regulatory mechanisms presumably because the convergent traits emerged due to small motivational changes that define how pre-existing cognitive mechanisms are quantitatively combined. This finding reconciles the prima facie contradictory rationale for using marmosets as high priority model species in neuroscience and anthropology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling Evolutionary Dynamics of Lurking in Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Javarone, Marco Alberto; Tagarelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Lurking is a complex user-behavioral phenomenon that occurs in all large-scale online communities and social networks. It generally refers to the behavior characterizing users that benefit from the information produced by others in the community without actively contributing back to the production of social content. The amount and evolution of lurkers may strongly affect an online social environment, therefore understanding the lurking dynamics and identifying strategies to curb this trend are relevant problems. In this regard, we introduce the Lurker Game, i.e., a model for analyzing the transitions from a lurking to a non-lurking (i.e., active) user role, and vice versa, in terms of evolutionary game theory. We evaluate the proposed Lurker Game by arranging agents on complex networks and analyzing the system evolution, seeking relations between the network topology and the final equilibrium of the game. Results suggest that the Lurker Game is suitable to model the lurking dynamics, showing how the adoption ...

  8. Modeling evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic mutations in hierarchically organized tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sottoriva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC concept is a highly debated topic in cancer research. While experimental evidence in favor of the cancer stem cell theory is apparently abundant, the results are often criticized as being difficult to interpret. An important reason for this is that most experimental data that support this model rely on transplantation studies. In this study we use a novel cellular Potts model to elucidate the dynamics of established malignancies that are driven by a small subset of CSCs. Our results demonstrate that epigenetic mutations that occur during mitosis display highly altered dynamics in CSC-driven malignancies compared to a classical, non-hierarchical model of growth. In particular, the heterogeneity observed in CSC-driven tumors is considerably higher. We speculate that this feature could be used in combination with epigenetic (methylation sequencing studies of human malignancies to prove or refute the CSC hypothesis in established tumors without the need for transplantation. Moreover our tumor growth simulations indicate that CSC-driven tumors display evolutionary features that can be considered beneficial during tumor progression. Besides an increased heterogeneity they also exhibit properties that allow the escape of clones from local fitness peaks. This leads to more aggressive phenotypes in the long run and makes the neoplasm more adaptable to stringent selective forces such as cancer treatment. Indeed when therapy is applied the clone landscape of the regrown tumor is more aggressive with respect to the primary tumor, whereas the classical model demonstrated similar patterns before and after therapy. Understanding these often counter-intuitive fundamental properties of (non-hierarchically organized malignancies is a crucial step in validating the CSC concept as well as providing insight into the therapeutical consequences of this model.

  9. An Evolutionary Modelling Approach To Understanding The Factors Behind Plant Invasiveness And Community Susceptibility To Invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, John; Topping, Christopher John; James, Penri

    2011-01-01

    Ecologists have had limited success in understanding which introduced species may become invasive. An evolutionary model is used to investigate which traits are associated with invasiveness. Translocation experiments were simulated in which species were moved into similar but evolutionary younger...... observed to be species and community combination specific. This evolutionary study represents a novel in silico attempt to tackle invasiveness in an experimental framework, and may provide a new methodology for tackling these issues....

  10. Invisible hand effect in an evolutionary minority game model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysi-Aho, Marko; Saramäki, Jari; Kaski, Kimmo

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we study the properties of a minority game with evolution realized by using genetic crossover to modify fixed-length decision-making strategies of agents. Although the agents in this evolutionary game act selfishly by trying to maximize their own performances only, it turns out that the whole society will eventually be rewarded optimally. This “invisible hand” effect is what Adam Smith over two centuries ago expected to take place in the context of free market mechanism. However, this behaviour of the society of agents is realized only under idealized conditions, where all agents are utilizing the same efficient evolutionary mechanism. If on the other hand part of the agents are adaptive, but not evolutionary, the system does not reach optimum performance, which is also the case if part of the evolutionary agents form a uniformly acting “cartel”.

  11. Towards an Evolutionary Model of Animal-Associated Microbiomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan A. White

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Second-generation sequencing technologies have granted us greater access to the diversity and genetics of microbial communities that naturally reside endo- and ecto-symbiotically with animal hosts. Substantial research has emerged describing the diversity and broader trends that exist within and between host species and their associated microbial ecosystems, yet the application of these data to our evolutionary understanding of microbiomes appears fragmented. For the most part biological perspectives are based on limited observations of oversimplified communities, while mathematical and/or computational modeling of these concepts often lack biological precedence. In recognition of this disconnect, both fields have attempted to incorporate ecological theories, although their applicability is currently a subject of debate because most ecological theories were developed based on observations of macro-organisms and their ecosystems. For the purposes of this review, we attempt to transcend the biological, ecological and computational realms, drawing on extensive literature, to forge a useful framework that can, at a minimum be built upon, but ideally will shape the hypotheses of each field as they move forward. In evaluating the top-down selection pressures that are exerted on a microbiome we find cause to warrant reconsideration of the much-maligned theory of multi-level selection and reason that complexity must be underscored by modularity.

  12. Effect of Spatial Dispersion on Evolutionary Stability: A Two-Phenotype and Two-Patch Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhang, Jiahua; Zhang, Boyu; Cressman, Ross; Tao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a simple two-phenotype and two-patch model that incorporates both spatial dispersion and density effects in the evolutionary game dynamics. The migration rates from one patch to another are considered to be patch-dependent but independent of individual's phenotype. Our main goal is to reveal the dynamical properties of the evolutionary game in a heterogeneous patchy environment. By analyzing the equilibria and their stabilities, we find that the dynamical behavior of the evolutionary game dynamics could be very complicated. Numerical analysis shows that the simple model can have twelve equilibria where four of them are stable. This implies that spatial dispersion can significantly complicate the evolutionary game, and the evolutionary outcome in a patchy environment should depend sensitively on the initial state of the patches.

  13. a Simple Evolutionary Model for Cancer Cell Population and its Implications on Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng; Wen, Shutang; Li, Baoshun; Li, Yuxiao

    We established a simple evolutionary model based on the cancer stem cell hypothesis. By taking cellular interactions into consideration, we introduced the evolutionary games theory into the quasispecies model. The fitness values are determined by both genotypes and cellular interactions. In the evolutionary model, a cancer cell population can evolve in different patterns. For single peak intrinsic fitness landscape, the evolution pattern can transit with increasing differentiation probability from malignant cells to benign cells in four different modes. For a large enough value of differentiation probability, the evolution is always the case that the malignant cells extinct ultimately, which might give some implications on cancer therapy.

  14. PARSEC evolutionary tracks of massive stars up to $350 M_\\odot$ at metallicities 0.0001$\\leq Z \\leq$0.04

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yang; Girardi, Léo; Marigo, Paola; Kong, Xu; Lanza, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We complement the PARSEC database of stellar evolutionary tracks with new models of massive stars, from the pre-main sequence phase to the central carbon ignition. We consider a broad range of metallicities, 0.0001$\\leq Z \\leq$0.04 and initial masses up to $M_{\\rm ini}=350\\,M_\\odot$. The main difference with respect to our previous models of massive stars is the adoption of a recent formalism accounting for the mass-loss enhancement when the ratio of the stellar to the Eddington luminosity, $\\Gamma_e$, approaches unity. With this new formalism, the models are able to reproduce the Humphreys-Davidson limit observed in the Galactic and LMC colour-magnitude diagrams, without an ad hoc mass-loss enhancement. We also follow the predictions of recent wind models indicating that the metallicity dependence of the mass-loss rates becomes shallower when $\\Gamma_e$ approaches unity. We thus find that the more massive stars may suffer from substantial mass-loss even at low metallicity. We also predict that the Humphreys-...

  15. MULTI-WORLD MECHANISM FOR MODELING EVOLUTIONARY DESIGN PROCESS FROM CONCEPTUAL DESIGN TO DETAILED DESIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A multi-world mechanism is developed for modeling evolutionary design process from conceptual design to detailed design. In this mechanism, the evolutionary design database is represented by a sequence of worlds corresponding to the design descriptions at different design stages. In each world, only the differences with its ancestor world are recorded. When the design descriptions in one world are changed, these changes are then propagated to its descendant worlds automatically. Case study is conducted to show the effectiveness of this evolutionary design database model.

  16. Model-based multiobjective evolutionary algorithm optimization for HCCI engines

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, He; Xu, Hongming; Wang, Jihong; Schnier, Thorsten; Neaves, Ben; Tan, Cheng; Wang, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Modern engines feature a considerable number of adjustable control parameters. With this increasing number of Degrees of Freedom (DoF) for engines, and the consequent considerable calibration effort required to optimize engine performance, traditional manual engine calibration or optimization methods are reaching their limits. An automated engine optimization approach is desired. In this paper, a self-learning evolutionary algorithm based multi-objective globally optimization approach for a H...

  17. Building v/s Exploring Models: Comparing Learning of Evolutionary Processes through Agent-based Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Aditi

    Two strands of work motivate the three studies in this dissertation. Evolutionary change can be viewed as a computational complex system in which a small set of rules operating at the individual level result in different population level outcomes under different conditions. Extensive research has documented students' difficulties with learning about evolutionary change (Rosengren et al., 2012), particularly in terms of levels slippage (Wilensky & Resnick, 1999). Second, though building and using computational models is becoming increasingly common in K-12 science education, we know little about how these two modalities compare. This dissertation adopts agent-based modeling as a representational system to compare these modalities in the conceptual context of micro-evolutionary processes. Drawing on interviews, Study 1 examines middle-school students' productive ways of reasoning about micro-evolutionary processes to find that the specific framing of traits plays a key role in whether slippage explanations are cued. Study 2, which was conducted in 2 schools with about 150 students, forms the crux of the dissertation. It compares learning processes and outcomes when students build their own models or explore a pre-built model. Analysis of Camtasia videos of student pairs reveals that builders' and explorers' ways of accessing rules, and sense-making of observed trends are of a different character. Builders notice rules through available blocks-based primitives, often bypassing their enactment while explorers attend to rules primarily through the enactment. Moreover, builders' sense-making of observed trends is more rule-driven while explorers' is more enactment-driven. Pre and posttests reveal that builders manifest a greater facility with accessing rules, providing explanations manifesting targeted assembly. Explorers use rules to construct explanations manifesting non-targeted assembly. Interviews reveal varying degrees of shifts away from slippage in both

  18. Prediction of stock markets by the evolutionary mix-game model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Gou, Chengling; Guo, Xiaoqian; Gao, Jieping

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents the efforts of using the evolutionary mix-game model, which is a modified form of the agent-based mix-game model, to predict financial time series. Here, we have carried out three methods to improve the original mix-game model by adding the abilities of strategy evolution to agents, and then applying the new model referred to as the evolutionary mix-game model to forecast the Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index. The results show that these modifications can improve the accuracy of prediction greatly when proper parameters are chosen.

  19. An experimentally informed evolutionary model improves phylogenetic fit to divergent lactamase homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jesse D

    2014-10-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of molecular data require a quantitative model for how sequences evolve. Traditionally, the details of the site-specific selection that governs sequence evolution are not known a priori, making it challenging to create evolutionary models that adequately capture the heterogeneity of selection at different sites. However, recent advances in high-throughput experiments have made it possible to quantify the effects of all single mutations on gene function. I have previously shown that such high-throughput experiments can be combined with knowledge of underlying mutation rates to create a parameter-free evolutionary model that describes the phylogeny of influenza nucleoprotein far better than commonly used existing models. Here, I extend this work by showing that published experimental data on TEM-1 beta-lactamase (Firnberg E, Labonte JW, Gray JJ, Ostermeier M. 2014. A comprehensive, high-resolution map of a gene's fitness landscape. Mol Biol Evol. 31:1581-1592) can be combined with a few mutation rate parameters to create an evolutionary model that describes beta-lactamase phylogenies much better than most common existing models. This experimentally informed evolutionary model is superior even for homologs that are substantially diverged (about 35% divergence at the protein level) from the TEM-1 parent that was the subject of the experimental study. These results suggest that experimental measurements can inform phylogenetic evolutionary models that are applicable to homologs that span a substantial range of sequence divergence.

  20. Adaptation of an Evolutionary Algorithm in Modeling Electric Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hájek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the influence of setting control parameters of a differential evolutionary algorithm (DE and the influence of adapting these parameters on the simulation of electric circuits and their components. Various DE algorithm strategies are investigated, and also the influence of adapting the controlling parameters (Cr, F during simulation and the effect of sample size. Optimizing an equivalent circuit diagram is chosen as a test task. Several strategies and settings of a DE algorithm are evaluated according to their convergence to the right solution. 

  1. Evolutionary ecology in silico: Does mathematical modelling help in understanding `generic' trends?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debashish Chowdhury; Dietrich Stauffer

    2005-03-01

    Motivated by the results of recent laboratory experiments, as well as many earlier field observations, that evolutionary changes can take place in ecosystems over relatively short ecological time scales, several ‘unified’ mathematical models of evolutionary ecology have been developed over the last few years with the aim of describing the statistical properties of data related to the evolution of ecosystems. Moreover, because of the availability of sufficiently fast computers, it has become possible to carry out detailed computer simulations of these models. For the sake of completeness and to put these recent developments in perspective, we begin with a brief summary of some older models of ecological phenomena and evolutionary processes. However, the main aim of this article is to review critically these ‘unified’ models, particularly those published in the physics literature, in simple language that makes the new theories accessible to a wider audience.

  2. Not just a theory--the utility of mathematical models in evolutionary biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria R Servedio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Progress in science often begins with verbal hypotheses meant to explain why certain biological phenomena exist. An important purpose of mathematical models in evolutionary research, as in many other fields, is to act as “proof-of-concept” tests of the logic in verbal explanations, paralleling the way in which empirical data are used to test hypotheses. Because not all subfields of biology use mathematics for this purpose, misunderstandings of the function of proof-of-concept modeling are common. In the hope of facilitating communication, we discuss the role of proof-of-concept modeling in evolutionary biology.

  3. PARSEC evolutionary tracks of massive stars up to 350 M⊙ at metallicities 0.0001 ≤ Z ≤ 0.04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Bressan, Alessandro; Girardi, Léo; Marigo, Paola; Kong, Xu; Lanza, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    We complement the PARSEC data base of stellar evolutionary tracks with new models of massive stars, from the pre-main-sequence phase to the central carbon ignition. We consider a broad range of metallicities, 0.0001 ≤ Z ≤ 0.04 and initial masses up to Mini = 350 M⊙. The main difference with respect to our previous models of massive stars is the adoption of a recent formalizm accounting for the mass-loss enhancement when the ratio of the stellar to the Eddington luminosity, Γe, approaches unity. With this new formalizm, the models are able to reproduce the Humphreys-Davidson limit observed in the Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud colour-magnitude diagrams, without an ad hoc mass-loss enhancement. We also follow the predictions of recent wind models indicating that the metallicity dependence of the mass-loss rates becomes shallower when Γe approaches unity. We thus find that the more massive stars may suffer from substantial mass-loss even at low metallicity. We also predict that the Humphreys-Davidson limit should become brighter at decreasing metallicity. We supplement the evolutionary tracks with new tables of theoretical bolometric corrections, useful to compare tracks and isochrones with the observations. For this purpose, we homogenize existing stellar atmosphere libraries of hot and cool stars (Potsdam Wolf-Rayet, ATLAS9 and PHOENIX) and we add, where needed, new atmosphere models computed with WM-BASIC. The mass, age and metallicity grids are fully adequate to perform detailed investigations of the properties of very young stellar systems, both in local and distant galaxies. The new tracks supersede the previous old PADOVA models of massive stars.

  4. Evolutionary Information Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Burgin

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary information theory is a constructive approach that studies information in the context of evolutionary processes, which are ubiquitous in nature and society. In this paper, we develop foundations of evolutionary information theory, building several measures of evolutionary information and obtaining their properties. These measures are based on mathematical models of evolutionary computations, machines and automata. To measure evolutionary information in an invariant form, we const...

  5. Pragmatic quality metrics for evolutionary software development models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce, Walker

    1990-01-01

    Due to the large number of product, project, and people parameters which impact large custom software development efforts, measurement of software product quality is a complex undertaking. Furthermore, the absolute perspective from which quality is measured (customer satisfaction) is intangible. While we probably can't say what the absolute quality of a software product is, we can determine the relative quality, the adequacy of this quality with respect to pragmatic considerations, and identify good and bad trends during development. While no two software engineers will ever agree on an optimum definition of software quality, they will agree that the most important perspective of software quality is its ease of change. We can call this flexibility, adaptability, or some other vague term, but the critical characteristic of software is that it is soft. The easier the product is to modify, the easier it is to achieve any other software quality perspective. This paper presents objective quality metrics derived from consistent lifecycle perspectives of rework which, when used in concert with an evolutionary development approach, can provide useful insight to produce better quality per unit cost/schedule or to achieve adequate quality more efficiently. The usefulness of these metrics is evaluated by applying them to a large, real world, Ada project.

  6. New Orbit Propagator to Be Used in Orbital Debris Evolutionary Models

    OpenAIRE

    Narumi, Tomohiro; Hanada, Toshiya

    2007-01-01

    An orbital environment debris evolutionary model for low Earth orbit has been developed at Kyushu University. A fast orbit propagator is essentially needed in such an evolutionary model because the number of space debris larger than 1 cm in low earth orbit is very large and it takes much time to compute long-term orbital changes of space debris. The effects of orbital perturbations are investigated for hundreds of years, and the rate of change in orbital elements were invented by earlier publ...

  7. A Hybrid Model for the Mid-Long Term Runoff Forecasting by Evolutionary Computaion Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zou Xiu-fen; Kang Li-shan; Cae Hong-qing; Wu Zhi-jian

    2003-01-01

    The mid-long term hydrology forecasting is one of most challenging problems in hydrological studies. This paper proposes an efficient dynamical system prediction model using evolutionary computation techniques. The new model overcomes some disadvantages of conventional hydrology fore casting ones. The observed data is divided into two parts: the slow "smooth and steady" data, and the fast "coarse and fluctuation" data. Under the divide and conquer strategy, the behavior of smooth data is modeled by ordinary differential equations based on evolutionary modeling, and that of the coarse data is modeled using gray correlative forecasting method. Our model is verified on the test data of the mid-long term hydrology forecast in tbe northeast region of China. The experimental results show that the model is superior to gray system prediction model (GSPM).

  8. Estimating the ratios of the stationary distribution values for Markov chains modeling evolutionary algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitavskiy, Boris; Cannings, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionary algorithm stochastic process is well-known to be Markovian. These have been under investigation in much of the theoretical evolutionary computing research. When the mutation rate is positive, the Markov chain modeling of an evolutionary algorithm is irreducible and, therefore, has a unique stationary distribution. Rather little is known about the stationary distribution. In fact, the only quantitative facts established so far tell us that the stationary distributions of Markov chains modeling evolutionary algorithms concentrate on uniform populations (i.e., those populations consisting of a repeated copy of the same individual). At the same time, knowing the stationary distribution may provide some information about the expected time it takes for the algorithm to reach a certain solution, assessment of the biases due to recombination and selection, and is of importance in population genetics to assess what is called a "genetic load" (see the introduction for more details). In the recent joint works of the first author, some bounds have been established on the rates at which the stationary distribution concentrates on the uniform populations. The primary tool used in these papers is the "quotient construction" method. It turns out that the quotient construction method can be exploited to derive much more informative bounds on ratios of the stationary distribution values of various subsets of the state space. In fact, some of the bounds obtained in the current work are expressed in terms of the parameters involved in all the three main stages of an evolutionary algorithm: namely, selection, recombination, and mutation.

  9. Computational Modeling of Teaching and Learning through Application of Evolutionary Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Lamb

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the mind, there are a myriad of ideas that make sense within the bounds of everyday experience, but are not reflective of how the world actually exists; this is particularly true in the domain of science. Classroom learning with teacher explanation are a bridge through which these naive understandings can be brought in line with scientific reality. The purpose of this paper is to examine how the application of a Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm (MOEA can work in concert with an existing computational-model to effectively model critical-thinking in the science classroom. An evolutionary algorithm is an algorithm that iteratively optimizes machine learning based computational models. The research question is, does the application of an evolutionary algorithm provide a means to optimize the Student Task and Cognition Model (STAC-M and does the optimized model sufficiently represent and predict teaching and learning outcomes in the science classroom? Within this computational study, the authors outline and simulate the effect of teaching on the ability of a “virtual” student to solve a Piagetian task. Using the Student Task and Cognition Model (STAC-M a computational model of student cognitive processing in science class developed in 2013, the authors complete a computational experiment which examines the role of cognitive retraining on student learning. Comparison of the STAC-M and the STAC-M with inclusion of the Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm shows greater success in solving the Piagetian science-tasks post cognitive retraining with the Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm. This illustrates the potential uses of cognitive and neuropsychological computational modeling in educational research. The authors also outline the limitations and assumptions of computational modeling.

  10. Performance of criteria for selecting evolutionary models in phylogenetics: a comprehensive study based on simulated datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Luo Arong; Qiao Huijie; Zhang Yanzhou; Shi Weifeng; Ho Simon YW; Xu Weijun; Zhang Aibing; Zhu Chaodong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Explicit evolutionary models are required in maximum-likelihood and Bayesian inference, the two methods that are overwhelmingly used in phylogenetic studies of DNA sequence data. Appropriate selection of nucleotide substitution models is important because the use of incorrect models can mislead phylogenetic inference. To better understand the performance of different model-selection criteria, we used 33,600 simulated data sets to analyse the accuracy, precision, dissimilar...

  11. Preference learning with evolutionary Multivariate Adaptive Regression Spline model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed; Shaker, Noor; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2015-01-01

    for human decision making. Learning models from pairwise preference data is however an NP-hard problem. Therefore, constructing models that can effectively learn such data is a challenging task. Models are usually constructed with accuracy being the most important factor. Another vitally important aspect...... that is usually given less attention is expressiveness, i.e. how easy it is to explain the relationship between the model input and output. Most machine learning techniques are focused either on performance or on expressiveness. This paper employ MARS models which have the advantage of being a powerful method...

  12. Linear approximation model network and its formation via evolutionary computation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yun Li; Kay Chen Tan

    2000-04-01

    To overcome the deficiency of `local model network' (LMN) techniques, an alternative `linear approximation model' (LAM) network approach is proposed. Such a network models a nonlinear or practical system with multiple linear models fitted along operating trajectories, where individual models are simply networked through output or parameter interpolation. The linear models are valid for the entire operating trajectory and hence overcome the local validity of LMN models, which impose the predetermination of a scheduling variable that predicts characteristic changes of the nonlinear system. LAMs can be evolved fromsampled step response data directly, eliminating the need forlocal linearisation upon a pre-model using derivatives of the nonlinear system. The structural difference between a LAM network and an LMN isthat the overall model of the latteris a parameter-varying system and hence nonlinear,while the formerremains linear time-invariant (LTI). Hence, existing LTI and transfer function theory applies to a LAM network, which is therefore easy to use for control system design. Validation results show that the proposed method offers a simple, transparent and accurate multivariable modelling technique for nonlinear systems.

  13. A stochastic evolutionary model generating a mixture of exponential distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Trevor; Loizou, George

    2015-01-01

    Recent interest in human dynamics has stimulated the investigation of the stochastic processes that explain human behaviour in various contexts, such as mobile phone networks and social media. In this paper, we extend the stochastic urn-based model proposed in \\cite{FENN15} so that it can generate mixture models,in particular, a mixture of exponential distributions. The model is designed to capture the dynamics of survival analysis, traditionally employed in clinical trials, reliability analysis in engineering, and more recently in the analysis of large data sets recording human dynamics. The mixture modelling approach, which is relatively simple and well understood, is very effective in capturing heterogeneity in data. We provide empirical evidence for the validity of the model, using a data set of popular search engine queries collected over a period of 114 months. We show that the survival function of these queries is closely matched by the exponential mixture solution for our model.

  14. Evolutionary Model to Traditional Culture and Program Organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-xiao; JIN Wei-xing; YANG De-qin

    2006-01-01

    To study the relationship between the evolutions of Chinese Traditional Culture (CTC) and program organization, an outline of the CTC is generalized by reviewing literature, and which is also compartmentalized into two aspects according to economic philosophy views: traditional philosophy aspect and value judgment. Based on three dimensions, which are the philosophy aspect (P), program organization model (P), and value judgment from economic philosophy views (V), and this evolution sequence, the CTC's influence on the program organization model in the evolution is discussed; then the cultural spatial evolution model for program organization based on the three dimensions (PPV) is constructed. From analyzing the plane matrix of P-P and empirical investigating on the organizational model of construction enterprises, it is found that the ancient Chinese government organizational model still has prevailing influence on the modern program organizational model in China.

  15. Evolutionary Stability of Minimal Mutation Rates in an Evo-epidemiological Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Michael; Bolker, Benjamin M

    2015-11-01

    We consider the evolution of mutation rate in a seasonally forced, deterministic, compartmental epidemiological model with a transmission-virulence trade-off. We model virulence as a quantitative genetic trait in a haploid population and mutation as continuous diffusion in the trait space. There is a mutation rate threshold above which the pathogen cannot invade a wholly susceptible population. The evolutionarily stable (ESS) mutation rate is the one which drives the lowest average density, over the course of one forcing period, of susceptible individuals at steady state. In contrast with earlier eco-evolutionary models in which higher mutation rates allow for better evolutionary tracking of a dynamic environment, numerical calculations suggest that in our model the minimum average susceptible population, and hence the ESS, is achieved by a pathogen strain with zero mutation. We discuss how this result arises within our model and how the model might be modified to obtain a nonzero optimum.

  16. Incorporating Eco-Evolutionary Processes into Population Models:Design and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-evolutionary population models are powerful new tools for exploring howevolutionary processes influence plant and animal population dynamics andvice-versa. The need to manage for climate change and other dynamicdisturbance regimes is creating a demand for the incorporation of...

  17. GALEV evolutionary synthesis models – I. Code, input physics and web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotulla, R.; Fritze, U.; Weilbacher, P.; Anders, P.

    2009-01-01

    GALEV (GALaxy EVolution) evolutionary synthesis models describe the evolution of stellar populations in general, of star clusters as well as of galaxies, both in terms of resolved stellar populations and of integrated light properties over cosmological time-scales of ≥13 Gyr from the onset of star f

  18. EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMIC MODEL OF POPULATION WITH NICHE CONSTRUCTION AND ITS APPLICATION RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theories and approaches in biomechanics, the mechanism and pattern of niche construction were discussed systematically. Through establishing the spatial pattern of niche and its measuring-fitness formula, and the dynamic system models of single- and two-population with niche construction, including corresponding theoretical analysis and numerical simulation on their evolutionary dynamics of population and the mechanism of competitive coexistence, the co-evolutionary relationship between organisms and their environments was revealed. The results indicate that population dynamics is governed by positive feedback between primary ecological factors and resource content.Niche construction generates an evolutionary effect in system by influencing the fitness of population. A threshold effect exists in single population dynamic system. In dynamic system of two competitive populations, niche construction can lead to alternative competitive consequences, which may be a potential mechanism to explain the competitive coexistence of species.

  19. Seeding Evolutionary Thinking by Engaging Children in Modeling Its Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Richard; Schauble, Leona

    2012-01-01

    Although the core work of science is oriented toward constructing, revising, applying, and defending models of the natural world, models appear only rarely in school science, and usually only as illustrations, rather than theory building tools. We describe the rationale and structure for a learning progression to understand the development of…

  20. A stochastic evolutionary model for capturing human dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Trevor; Loizou, George

    2015-01-01

    The recent interest in human dynamics has led researchers to investigate the stochastic processes that explain human behaviour in various contexts. Here we propose a generative model to capture the dynamics of survival analysis, traditionally employed in clinical trials and reliability analysis in engineering. We derive a general solution for the model in the form of a product, and then a continuous approximation to the solution via the renewal equation describing age-structured population dynamics. This enables us to model a wide rage of survival distributions, according to the choice of the mortality distribution. We provide empirical evidence for the validity of the model from a longitudinal data set of popular search engine queries over 114 months, showing that the survival function of these queries is closely matched by the solution for our model with power-law mortality.

  1. Evaluation of models generated via hybrid evolutionary algorithms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-02

    Apr 2, 2016 ... Cyanobacteria are responsible for many problems in drinking water treatment works ... events of high cyanobacterial cell concentrations in the source water is evident. ..... Improvement of the models was achieved by structure.

  2. A stochastic evolutionary model generating a mixture of exponential distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Trevor; Levene, Mark; Loizou, George

    2016-02-01

    Recent interest in human dynamics has stimulated the investigation of the stochastic processes that explain human behaviour in various contexts, such as mobile phone networks and social media. In this paper, we extend the stochastic urn-based model proposed in [T. Fenner, M. Levene, G. Loizou, J. Stat. Mech. 2015, P08015 (2015)] so that it can generate mixture models, in particular, a mixture of exponential distributions. The model is designed to capture the dynamics of survival analysis, traditionally employed in clinical trials, reliability analysis in engineering, and more recently in the analysis of large data sets recording human dynamics. The mixture modelling approach, which is relatively simple and well understood, is very effective in capturing heterogeneity in data. We provide empirical evidence for the validity of the model, using a data set of popular search engine queries collected over a period of 114 months. We show that the survival function of these queries is closely matched by the exponential mixture solution for our model.

  3. A Stochastic Evolutionary Growth Model for Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, T; Loizou, G; Roussos, G; Fenner, Trevor; Levene, Mark; Loizou, George; Roussos, George

    2006-01-01

    We present a stochastic model for a social network, where new actors may join the network, existing actors may become inactive and, at a later stage, reactivate themselves. Our model captures the evolution of the network, assuming that actors attain new relations or become active according to the preferential attachment rule. We derive the mean-field equations for this stochastic model and show that, asymptotically, the distribution of actors obeys a power-law distribution. In particular, the model applies to social networks such as wireless local area networks, where users connect to access-points, and peer-to-peer networks where users connect to each other. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the validity of our model empirically by analysing a public log containing traces from a wireless network at Dartmouth College over a period of three years. Analysing the data processed according to our model, we demonstrate that the distribution of user accesses is asymptotically a power-law distribution.

  4. Bipartite graphs as models of population structures in evolutionary multiplayer games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Peña

    Full Text Available By combining evolutionary game theory and graph theory, "games on graphs" study the evolutionary dynamics of frequency-dependent selection in population structures modeled as geographical or social networks. Networks are usually represented by means of unipartite graphs, and social interactions by two-person games such as the famous prisoner's dilemma. Unipartite graphs have also been used for modeling interactions going beyond pairwise interactions. In this paper, we argue that bipartite graphs are a better alternative to unipartite graphs for describing population structures in evolutionary multiplayer games. To illustrate this point, we make use of bipartite graphs to investigate, by means of computer simulations, the evolution of cooperation under the conventional and the distributed N-person prisoner's dilemma. We show that several implicit assumptions arising from the standard approach based on unipartite graphs (such as the definition of replacement neighborhoods, the intertwining of individual and group diversity, and the large overlap of interaction neighborhoods can have a large impact on the resulting evolutionary dynamics. Our work provides a clear example of the importance of construction procedures in games on graphs, of the suitability of bigraphs and hypergraphs for computational modeling, and of the importance of concepts from social network analysis such as centrality, centralization and bipartite clustering for the understanding of dynamical processes occurring on networked population structures.

  5. Hypermedia Genes An Evolutionary Perspective on Concepts, Models, and Architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Guimarães, Nuno

    2009-01-01

    The design space of information services evolved from seminal works through a set of prototypical hypermedia systems and matured in open and widely accessible web-based systems. The original concepts of hypermedia systems are now expressed in different forms and shapes. The first works on hypertext invented the term itself, laid out the foundational concept of association or link, and highlighted navigation as the core paradigm for the future information systems. The first engineered systems demonstrated architectural requirements and models and fostered the emergence of the conceptual model r

  6. Evolving the Topology of Hidden Markov Models using Evolutionary Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Réne

    2002-01-01

    Hidden Markov models (HMM) are widely used for speech recognition and have recently gained a lot of attention in the bioinformatics community, because of their ability to capture the information buried in biological sequences. Usually, heuristic algorithms such as Baum-Welch are used to estimate...

  7. Combining Diffusion and Grey Models Based on Evolutionary Optimization Algorithms to Forecast Motherboard Shipments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Kwun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important for executives to predict the future trends. Otherwise, their companies cannot make profitable decisions and investments. The Bass diffusion model can describe the empirical adoption curve for new products and technological innovations. The Grey model provides short-term forecasts using four data points. This study develops a combined model based on the rolling Grey model (RGM and the Bass diffusion model to forecast motherboard shipments. In addition, we investigate evolutionary optimization algorithms to determine the optimal parameters. Our results indicate that the combined model using a hybrid algorithm outperforms other methods for the fitting and forecasting processes in terms of mean absolute percentage error.

  8. A test of genetic models for the evolutionary maintenance of same-sex sexual behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Jessica L; Ritchie, Michael G; Bailey, Nathan W

    2015-06-22

    The evolutionary maintenance of same-sex sexual behaviour (SSB) has received increasing attention because it is perceived to be an evolutionary paradox. The genetic basis of SSB is almost wholly unknown in non-human animals, though this is key to understanding its persistence. Recent theoretical work has yielded broadly applicable predictions centred on two genetic models for SSB: overdominance and sexual antagonism. Using Drosophila melanogaster, we assayed natural genetic variation for male SSB and empirically tested predictions about the mode of inheritance and fitness consequences of alleles influencing its expression. We screened 50 inbred lines derived from a wild population for male-male courtship and copulation behaviour, and examined crosses between the lines for evidence of overdominance and antagonistic fecundity selection. Consistent variation among lines revealed heritable genetic variation for SSB, but the nature of the genetic variation was complex. Phenotypic and fitness variation was consistent with expectations under overdominance, although predictions of the sexual antagonism model were also supported. We found an unexpected and strong paternal effect on the expression of SSB, suggesting possible Y-linkage of the trait. Our results inform evolutionary genetic mechanisms that might maintain low but persistently observed levels of male SSB in D. melanogaster, but highlight a need for broader taxonomic representation in studies of its evolutionary causes. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. A Self-adaptive Dynamic Evaluation Model for Diabetes Mellitus, Based on Evolutionary Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Jiang Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate diabetes mellitus objectively and accurately, this paper builds a self-adaptive dynamic evaluation model for diabetes mellitus, based on evolutionary strategies. First of all, on the basis of a formalized description of the evolutionary process of diabetes syndromes, using a state transition function, it judges whether a disease is evolutionary, through an excitation parameter. It then, provides evidence for the rebuilding of the evaluation index system. After that, by abstracting and rebuilding the composition of evaluation indexes, it makes use of a heuristic algorithm to determine the composition of the evolved evaluation index set of diabetes mellitus, It then, calculates the weight of each index in the evolved evaluation index set of diabetes mellitus by building a dependency matrix and realizes the self-adaptive dynamic evaluation of diabetes mellitus under an evolutionary environment. Using this evaluation model, it is possible to, quantify all kinds of diagnoses and treatment experiences of diabetes and finally to adopt ideal diagnoses and treatment measures for different patients with diabetics.

  10. ISO LWS Spectroscopy of M82 A Unified Evolutionary Model

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, J W; Clegg, P E; Cox, P; Fischer, J; Lord, S D; Luhman, M L; Satyapal, S; Smith, H A; Spinoglio, L; Stacey, G J; Unger, S J

    1999-01-01

    We present the first complete far-infrared spectrum (43 to 197 um) of M82, the brightest infrared galaxy in the sky, taken with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). We detected seven fine structure emission lines, [OI] 63 and 145 um, [OIII] 52 and 88 um, [NII] 122 um, [NIII] 57 um and [CII] 158 um, and fit their ratios to a combination starburst and photo-dissociation region (PDR) model. The best fit is obtained with HII regions with n = 250 cm^{-3} and an ionization parameter of 10^{-3.5} and PDRs with n = 10^{3.3} cm^{-3} and a far-ultraviolet flux of G_o = 10^{2.8}. We applied both continuous and instantaneous starburst models, with our best fit being a 3-5 Myr old instantaneous burst model with a 100 M_o cut-off. We also detected the ground state rotational line of OH in absorption at 119.4 um. No excited level OH transitions are apparent, indicating that the OH is almost entirely in its ground state with a column density ~ 4x10^{14} cm^{-2}. The spectral energy distri...

  11. Structural Equation Modeling: Applications in ecological and evolutionary biology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugesek, Bruce H.; von Eye, Alexander; Tomer, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to the methodology of structural equation modeling, illustrates its use, and goes on to argue that it has revolutionary implications for the study of natural systems. A major theme of this book is that we have, up to this point, attempted to study systems primarily using methods (such as the univariate model) that were designed only for considering individual processes. Understanding systems requires the capacity to examine simultaneous influences and responses. Structural equation modeling (SEM) has such capabilities. It also possesses many other traits that add strength to its utility as a means of making scientific progress. In light of the capabilities of SEM, it can be argued that much of ecological theory is currently locked in an immature state that impairs its relevance. It is further argued that the principles of SEM are capable of leading to the development and evaluation of multivariate theories of the sort vitally needed for the conservation of natural systems. Supplementary information can be found at the authors website, http://www.jamesbgrace.com/. • Details why multivariate analyses should be used to study ecological systems • Exposes unappreciated weakness in many current popular analyses • Emphasizes the future methodological developments needed to advance our understanding of ecological systems.

  12. Evolutionary Sequential Monte Carlo Samplers for Change-Point Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Dufays

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC methods are widely used for non-linear filtering purposes. However, the SMC scope encompasses wider applications such as estimating static model parameters so much that it is becoming a serious alternative to Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC methods. Not only do SMC algorithms draw posterior distributions of static or dynamic parameters but additionally they provide an estimate of the marginal likelihood. The tempered and time (TNT algorithm, developed in this paper, combines (off-line tempered SMC inference with on-line SMC inference for drawing realizations from many sequential posterior distributions without experiencing a particle degeneracy problem. Furthermore, it introduces a new MCMC rejuvenation step that is generic, automated and well-suited for multi-modal distributions. As this update relies on the wide heuristic optimization literature, numerous extensions are readily available. The algorithm is notably appropriate for estimating change-point models. As an example, we compare several change-point GARCH models through their marginal log-likelihoods over time.

  13. Study on system dynamics of evolutionary mix-game models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Chengling; Guo, Xiaoqian; Chen, Fang

    2008-11-01

    Mix-game model is ameliorated from an agent-based MG model, which is used to simulate the real financial market. Different from MG, there are two groups of agents in Mix-game: Group 1 plays a majority game and Group 2 plays a minority game. These two groups of agents have different bounded abilities to deal with historical information and to count their own performance. In this paper, we modify Mix-game model by assigning the evolution abilities to agents: if the winning rates of agents are smaller than a threshold, they will copy the best strategies the other agent has; and agents will repeat such evolution at certain time intervals. Through simulations this paper finds: (1) the average winning rates of agents in Group 1 and the mean volatilities increase with the increases of the thresholds of Group 1; (2) the average winning rates of both groups decrease but the mean volatilities of system increase with the increase of the thresholds of Group 2; (3) the thresholds of Group 2 have greater impact on system dynamics than the thresholds of Group 1; (4) the characteristics of system dynamics under different time intervals of strategy change are similar to each other qualitatively, but they are different quantitatively; (5) As the time interval of strategy change increases from 1 to 20, the system behaves more and more stable and the performances of agents in both groups become better also.

  14. From Rock Scissor Paper to study and modeling of Chinese Five Elements: Evolutionary Game Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Shangdong

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we have developed a model to study the behavior of an extended version of evolutionary game "Rock-Scissor-Paper", that is "Five Elements". The origin of five elements are from "Chinese five elements" in which five different types of elements compete with each other in a similar way as in a SIR model. Elements are affecting each other in two different ways, either to compete with each other or to help some particular elements in resisting their sup...

  15. An evolutionary cascade model for sauropod dinosaur gigantism--overview, update and tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, P Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sauropod dinosaurs are a group of herbivorous dinosaurs which exceeded all other terrestrial vertebrates in mean and maximal body size. Sauropod dinosaurs were also the most successful and long-lived herbivorous tetrapod clade, but no abiological factors such as global environmental parameters conducive to their gigantism can be identified. These facts justify major efforts by evolutionary biologists and paleontologists to understand sauropods as living animals and to explain their evolutionary success and uniquely gigantic body size. Contributions to this research program have come from many fields and can be synthesized into a biological evolutionary cascade model of sauropod dinosaur gigantism (sauropod gigantism ECM). This review focuses on the sauropod gigantism ECM, providing an updated version based on the contributions to the PLoS ONE sauropod gigantism collection and on other very recent published evidence. The model consist of five separate evolutionary cascades ("Reproduction", "Feeding", "Head and neck", "Avian-style lung", and "Metabolism"). Each cascade starts with observed or inferred basal traits that either may be plesiomorphic or derived at the level of Sauropoda. Each trait confers hypothetical selective advantages which permit the evolution of the next trait. Feedback loops in the ECM consist of selective advantages originating from traits higher in the cascades but affecting lower traits. All cascades end in the trait "Very high body mass". Each cascade is linked to at least one other cascade. Important plesiomorphic traits of sauropod dinosaurs that entered the model were ovipary as well as no mastication of food. Important evolutionary innovations (derived traits) were an avian-style respiratory system and an elevated basal metabolic rate. Comparison with other tetrapod lineages identifies factors limiting body size.

  16. An evolutionary cascade model for sauropod dinosaur gigantism--overview, update and tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Martin Sander

    Full Text Available Sauropod dinosaurs are a group of herbivorous dinosaurs which exceeded all other terrestrial vertebrates in mean and maximal body size. Sauropod dinosaurs were also the most successful and long-lived herbivorous tetrapod clade, but no abiological factors such as global environmental parameters conducive to their gigantism can be identified. These facts justify major efforts by evolutionary biologists and paleontologists to understand sauropods as living animals and to explain their evolutionary success and uniquely gigantic body size. Contributions to this research program have come from many fields and can be synthesized into a biological evolutionary cascade model of sauropod dinosaur gigantism (sauropod gigantism ECM. This review focuses on the sauropod gigantism ECM, providing an updated version based on the contributions to the PLoS ONE sauropod gigantism collection and on other very recent published evidence. The model consist of five separate evolutionary cascades ("Reproduction", "Feeding", "Head and neck", "Avian-style lung", and "Metabolism". Each cascade starts with observed or inferred basal traits that either may be plesiomorphic or derived at the level of Sauropoda. Each trait confers hypothetical selective advantages which permit the evolution of the next trait. Feedback loops in the ECM consist of selective advantages originating from traits higher in the cascades but affecting lower traits. All cascades end in the trait "Very high body mass". Each cascade is linked to at least one other cascade. Important plesiomorphic traits of sauropod dinosaurs that entered the model were ovipary as well as no mastication of food. Important evolutionary innovations (derived traits were an avian-style respiratory system and an elevated basal metabolic rate. Comparison with other tetrapod lineages identifies factors limiting body size.

  17. The Tangled Nature Model of evolutionary dynamics reconsidered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Walther; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    . To bring out the structural and dynamical effects of trait inheritance , we introduce and numerically analyze a family of TNM models where a positive integer $K$ parametrises correlations between the interactions of an agent and those of its mutated offspring. For $K=1$ a single point mutation randomizes....../t_{\\rm w}$, similarity to the pure aging behaviour approximately describing glassy systems of physical origin. Increasing the value of $K$ decreases the numerical value of the decay exponent of the power law, which is a clear quantitative dynamical effect of trait inheritance....

  18. Evolutionary Synthesis Modelling of Young Star Clusters in Merging Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, P; De Grijs, R; Anders, Peter; Alvensleben, Uta Fritze - v.; Grijs, Richard de

    2003-01-01

    The observational properties of globular cluster systems (GCSs) are vital tools to investigate the violent star formation histories of their host galaxies. This violence is thought to have been triggered by galaxy interactions or mergers. The most basic properties of a GCS are its luminosity function (number of clusters per luminosity bin) and color distributions. A large number of observed GCS show bimodal color distributions, which can be translated into a bimodality in either metallicity and/or age. An additional uncertainty comes into play when one considers extinction. These effects can be disentangled either by obtaining spectroscopic data for the clusters or by imaging observations in at least four passbands. This allows us then to discriminate between various formation scenarios of GCSs, e.g. the merger scenario by Ashman & Zepf, and the multi-phase collapse model by Forbes et. al.. Young and metal-rich star cluster populations are seen to form in interacting and merging galaxies. We analyse multi...

  19. USING ECO-EVOLUTIONARY INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODELS TO INVESTIGATE SPATIALLY-DEPENDENT PROCESSES IN CONSERVATION GENETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-evolutionary population simulation models are powerful new forecasting tools for exploring management strategies for climate change and other dynamic disturbance regimes. Additionally, eco-evo individual-based models (IBMs) are useful for investigating theoretical feedbacks ...

  20. USING ECO-EVOLUTIONARY INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODELS TO INVESTIGATE SPATIALLY-DEPENDENT PROCESSES IN CONSERVATION GENETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-evolutionary population simulation models are powerful new forecasting tools for exploring management strategies for climate change and other dynamic disturbance regimes. Additionally, eco-evo individual-based models (IBMs) are useful for investigating theoretical feedbacks ...

  1. An Evolutionary Model for the Star Formation Efficiency in Gravitationally Collapsing Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Zamora-Aviles, Manuel Abelardo

    2011-01-01

    We present an idealized, semi-empirical model for the star formation efficiency (SFE) in a molecular cloud (MC) formed by the collision of warm neutral medium cylindrical streams. The cloud continuously accretes mass from the surrounding diffuse gas and begins to contract gravitationally as soon as it reaches its Jeans mass. We present two fiducial cases, one for an isolated cloud and one for a giant molecular cloud (GMC), which we compare against various observational results. The total evolutionary cycle of the model clouds lasts a few tens of Myr, depending on their mass. The low- and high-mass fiducial models achieve time-averaged SFEs of 0.5 and 3%, and terminal SFEs of 39 and 15%. The GMC model adheres very well to the evolutionary scenario recently inferred by Kawamura et al. (2009) for GMCs in the LMC. The individual cloud model's evolutionary track in the Kennicutt-Schmidt diagram passes through the locus of typical low- to intermediate-mass clouds like those studied by Evans et al. (2009) at interme...

  2. TOWARD A GLOBAL EVOLUTIONARY MODEL OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xue-Ning, E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-04-20

    A global picture of the evolution  of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is key to understanding almost every aspect of planet formation, where standard α-disk models have been continually employed for their simplicity. In the meantime, disk mass loss has been conventionally attributed to photoevaporation, which controls disk dispersal. However, a paradigm shift toward accretion driven by magnetized disk winds has taken place in recent years, thanks to studies of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects in PPDs. I present a framework of global PPD evolution aiming to incorporate these advances, highlighting the role of wind-driven accretion and wind mass loss. Disk evolution is found to be largely dominated by wind-driven processes, and viscous spreading is suppressed. The timescale of disk evolution is controlled primarily by the amount of external magnetic flux threading the disks, and how rapidly the disk loses the flux. Rapid disk dispersal can be achieved if the disk is able to hold most of its magnetic flux during the evolution. In addition, because wind launching requires a sufficient level of ionization at the disk surface (mainly via external far-UV (FUV) radiation), wind kinematics is also affected by the FUV penetration depth and disk geometry. For a typical disk lifetime of a few million years, the disk loses approximately the same amount of mass through the wind as through accretion onto the protostar, and most of the wind mass loss proceeds from the outer disk via a slow wind. Fractional wind mass loss increases with increasing disk lifetime. Significant wind mass loss likely substantially enhances the dust-to-gas mass ratio and promotes planet formation.

  3. Evolutionary Information Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Burgin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary information theory is a constructive approach that studies information in the context of evolutionary processes, which are ubiquitous in nature and society. In this paper, we develop foundations of evolutionary information theory, building several measures of evolutionary information and obtaining their properties. These measures are based on mathematical models of evolutionary computations, machines and automata. To measure evolutionary information in an invariant form, we construct and study universal evolutionary machines and automata, which form the base for evolutionary information theory. The first class of measures introduced and studied in this paper is evolutionary information size of symbolic objects relative to classes of automata or machines. In particular, it is proved that there is an invariant and optimal evolutionary information size relative to different classes of evolutionary machines. As a rule, different classes of algorithms or automata determine different information size for the same object. The more powerful classes of algorithms or automata decrease the information size of an object in comparison with the information size of an object relative to weaker4 classes of algorithms or machines. The second class of measures for evolutionary information in symbolic objects is studied by introduction of the quantity of evolutionary information about symbolic objects relative to a class of automata or machines. To give an example of applications, we briefly describe a possibility of modeling physical evolution with evolutionary machines to demonstrate applicability of evolutionary information theory to all material processes. At the end of the paper, directions for future research are suggested.

  4. The Evolutionary Modeling and Short-range Climatic Prediction for Meteorological Element Time Series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Kangqing; ZHOU Yuehua; YANG Jing'an; KANG Zhuo

    2005-01-01

    The time series of precipitation in flood season (May-September) at Wuhan Station, which is set as an example of the kind of time series with chaos characters, is split into two parts: One includes macro climatic timescale period waves that are affected by some relatively steady climatic factors such as astronomical factors (sunspot, etc.), some other known and/or unknown factors, and the other includes micro climatic timescale period waves superimposed on the macro one. The evolutionary modeling (EM), which develops from genetic programming (GP), is supposed to be adept at simulating the former part because it creates the nonlinear ordinary differential equation (NODE) based upon the data series. The natural fractals (NF)are used to simulate the latter part. The final prediction is the sum of results from both methods, thus the model can reflect multi-time scale effects of forcing factors in the climate system. The results of this example for 2002 and 2003 are satisfactory for climatic prediction operation. The NODE can suggest that the data vary with time, which is beneficial to think over short-range climatic analysis and prediction. Comparison in principle between evolutionary modeling and linear modeling indicates that the evolutionary one is a better way to simulate the complex time series with nonlinear characteristics.

  5. Predation and the phasing of sleep : an evolutionary individual-based model

    OpenAIRE

    Acerbi, Alberto; Nunn, Charles Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    All mammals thus far studied sleep, yet important questions remain concerning the ecological factors that influence sleep patterns. Here, we developed an evolutionary individual-based model to investigate the effect of predation pressure on prey sleep. We investigated three ecological conditions, including one that assumed a dynamic interaction between predator and prey behaviour. In condition 1, we found that monophasic predators (i.e. with one sleep bout per 24 h) select for monophasic prey...

  6. Global Solutions of the Evolutionary Faddeev Model with Small Initial Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen LEI; Fang Hua LIN; Yi ZHOU

    2011-01-01

    We consider the Cauchy problem for evolutionary Faddeev model corresponding to maps from the Minkowski space R1+n to the unit sphere S2, which obey a system of non-linear wave equations. The nonlinearity enjoys the null structure and contains semi-linear terms, quasi-linear terms and unknowns themselves. We prove that the Cauchy problem is globally well-posed for sufficiently small initial data in Sobolev space.

  7. Models of performance of evolutionary program induction algorithms based on indicators of problem difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Mario; Poli, Riccardo; Flores, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    Modeling the behavior of algorithms is the realm of evolutionary algorithm theory. From a practitioner's point of view, theory must provide some guidelines regarding which algorithm/parameters to use in order to solve a particular problem. Unfortunately, most theoretical models of evolutionary algorithms are difficult to apply to realistic situations. However, in recent work (Graff and Poli, 2008, 2010), where we developed a method to practically estimate the performance of evolutionary program-induction algorithms (EPAs), we started addressing this issue. The method was quite general; however, it suffered from some limitations: it required the identification of a set of reference problems, it required hand picking a distance measure in each particular domain, and the resulting models were opaque, typically being linear combinations of 100 features or more. In this paper, we propose a significant improvement of this technique that overcomes the three limitations of our previous method. We achieve this through the use of a novel set of features for assessing problem difficulty for EPAs which are very general, essentially based on the notion of finite difference. To show the capabilities or our technique and to compare it with our previous performance models, we create models for the same two important classes of problems-symbolic regression on rational functions and Boolean function induction-used in our previous work. We model a variety of EPAs. The comparison showed that for the majority of the algorithms and problem classes, the new method produced much simpler and more accurate models than before. To further illustrate the practicality of the technique and its generality (beyond EPAs), we have also used it to predict the performance of both autoregressive models and EPAs on the problem of wind speed forecasting, obtaining simpler and more accurate models that outperform in all cases our previous performance models.

  8. The evolutionary forces maintaining a wild polymorphism of Littorina saxatilis: model selection by computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Figueroa, A; Cruz, F; Carvajal-Rodríguez, A; Rolán-Alvarez, E; Caballero, A

    2005-01-01

    Two rocky shore ecotypes of Littorina saxatilis from north-west Spain live at different shore levels and habitats and have developed an incomplete reproductive isolation through size assortative mating. The system is regarded as an example of sympatric ecological speciation. Several experiments have indicated that different evolutionary forces (migration, assortative mating and habitat-dependent selection) play a role in maintaining the polymorphism. However, an assessment of the combined contributions of these forces supporting the observed pattern in the wild is absent. A model selection procedure using computer simulations was used to investigate the contribution of the different evolutionary forces towards the maintenance of the polymorphism. The agreement between alternative models and experimental estimates for a number of parameters was quantified by a least square method. The results of the analysis show that the fittest evolutionary model for the observed polymorphism is characterized by a high gene flow, intermediate-high reproductive isolation between ecotypes, and a moderate to strong selection against the nonresident ecotypes on each shore level. In addition, a substantial number of additive loci contributing to the selected trait and a narrow hybrid definition with respect to the phenotype are scenarios that better explain the polymorphism, whereas the ecotype fitnesses at the mid-shore, the level of phenotypic plasticity, and environmental effects are not key parameters.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Entropy Growth for a Nonlinear Evolutionary Model of Random Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Keshtkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this communication, the generalized continuous economic model for random markets is revisited. In this model for random markets, agents trade by pairs and exchange their money in a random and conservative way. They display the exponential wealth distribution as asymptotic equilibrium, independently of the effectiveness of the transactions and of the limitation of the total wealth. In the current work, entropy of mentioned model is defined and then some theorems on entropy growth of this evolutionary problem are given. Furthermore, the entropy increasing by simulation on some numerical examples is verified.

  10. An Evolutionary Model of Cooperation, Fairness and Altruistic Punishment in Public Good Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzer, Moritz; Sornette, Didier

    2013-01-01

    We identify and explain the mechanisms that account for the emergence of fairness preferences and altruistic punishment in voluntary contribution mechanisms by combining an evolutionary perspective together with an expected utility model. We aim at filling a gap between the literature on the theory of evolution applied to cooperation and punishment, and the empirical findings from experimental economics. The approach is motivated by previous findings on other-regarding behavior, the co-evolution of culture, genes and social norms, as well as bounded rationality. Our first result reveals the emergence of two distinct evolutionary regimes that force agents to converge either to a defection state or to a state of coordination, depending on the predominant set of self- or other-regarding preferences. Our second result indicates that subjects in laboratory experiments of public goods games with punishment coordinate and punish defectors as a result of an aversion against disadvantageous inequitable outcomes. Our third finding identifies disadvantageous inequity aversion as evolutionary dominant and stable in a heterogeneous population of agents endowed initially only with purely self-regarding preferences. We validate our model using previously obtained results from three independently conducted experiments of public goods games with punishment. PMID:24260101

  11. An evolutionary model of cooperation, fairness and altruistic punishment in public good games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Hetzer

    Full Text Available We identify and explain the mechanisms that account for the emergence of fairness preferences and altruistic punishment in voluntary contribution mechanisms by combining an evolutionary perspective together with an expected utility model. We aim at filling a gap between the literature on the theory of evolution applied to cooperation and punishment, and the empirical findings from experimental economics. The approach is motivated by previous findings on other-regarding behavior, the co-evolution of culture, genes and social norms, as well as bounded rationality. Our first result reveals the emergence of two distinct evolutionary regimes that force agents to converge either to a defection state or to a state of coordination, depending on the predominant set of self- or other-regarding preferences. Our second result indicates that subjects in laboratory experiments of public goods games with punishment coordinate and punish defectors as a result of an aversion against disadvantageous inequitable outcomes. Our third finding identifies disadvantageous inequity aversion as evolutionary dominant and stable in a heterogeneous population of agents endowed initially only with purely self-regarding preferences. We validate our model using previously obtained results from three independently conducted experiments of public goods games with punishment.

  12. Asteroseismology of the \\emph{Kepler} V777 Her variable white dwarf with fully evolutionary models

    CERN Document Server

    Córsico, Alejandro H; Bertolami, Marcelo M Miller; Bischoff-Kim, Agnès

    2011-01-01

    DBV stars are pulsating white dwarfs with atmospheres rich in He. Asteroseismology of DBV stars can provide valuable clues about the origin, structure and evolution of hydrogen-deficient white dwarfs, and may allow to study neutrino and axion physics. Recently, a new DBV star, KIC 8626021, has been discovered in the field of the \\emph{Kepler} spacecraft. It is expected that further monitoring of this star in the next years will enable astronomers to determine its detailed asteroseismic profile. We perform an asteroseismological analysis of KIC 8626021 on the basis of fully evolutionary DB white-dwarf models. We employ a complete set of evolutionary DB white-dwarf structures covering a wide range of effective temperatures and stellar masses. They have been obtained on the basis of a complete treatment of the evolutionary history of progenitors stars. We compute g-mode adiabatic pulsation periods for this set of models and compare them with the pulsation properties exhibited by KIC 8626021. On the basis of the ...

  13. Evolutionary synthesis models as a tool and guide towards the first galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schaerer, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the principles and fundamental ingredients of evolutionary synthesis models, which are stellar evolution, stellar atmospheres, the IMF, star-formation histories, nebular emission, and also attenuation from the ISM and IGM. The chapter focusses in particular on issues of importance for predictions of metal-poor and Population III dominated galaxies. We review recent predictions for the main physical properties and related observables of star-forming galaxies based on up-to-date inputs. The predicted metallicity dependence of these quantities and their physical causes are discussed. The predicted observables include in particular the restframe UV-to-optical domain with continuum emission from stars and the ionized ISM, as well as emission lines from H, He, and metals. Based on these predictions we summarize the main observational signatures (emission line strengths, colors etc.), which can be used to distinguish "normal" stellar populations from very metal-poor objects or even Pop III. Evolutionary...

  14. Eco-evolutionary Model of Rapid Phenotypic Diversification in Species-Rich Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa Martín, Paula; Rubio de Casas, Rafael; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary and ecosystem dynamics are often treated as different processes –operating at separate timescales– even if evidence reveals that rapid evolutionary changes can feed back into ecological interactions. A recent long-term field experiment has explicitly shown that communities of competing plant species can experience very fast phenotypic diversification, and that this gives rise to enhanced complementarity in resource exploitation and to enlarged ecosystem-level productivity. Here, we build on progress made in recent years in the integration of eco-evolutionary dynamics, and present a computational approach aimed at describing these empirical findings in detail. In particular we model a community of organisms of different but similar species evolving in time through mechanisms of birth, competition, sexual reproduction, descent with modification, and death. Based on simple rules, this model provides a rationalization for the emergence of rapid phenotypic diversification in species-rich communities. Furthermore, it also leads to non-trivial predictions about long-term phenotypic change and ecological interactions. Our results illustrate that the presence of highly specialized, non-competing species leads to very stable communities and reveals that phenotypically equivalent species occupying the same niche may emerge and coexist for very long times. Thus, the framework presented here provides a simple approach –complementing existing theories, but specifically devised to account for the specificities of the recent empirical findings for plant communities– to explain the collective emergence of diversification at a community level, and paves the way to further scrutinize the intimate entanglement of ecological and evolutionary processes, especially in species-rich communities. PMID:27736874

  15. The Gaia-ESO Survey: the first abundance determination of the pre-main-sequence cluster Gamma Velorum

    CERN Document Server

    Spina, L; Palla, F; Sacco, G G; Magrini, L; Franciosini, E; Morbidelli, L; Prisinzano, L; Alfaro, E J; Biazzo, K; Frasca, A; Hernandez, J I Gonzalez; Sousa, S G; Adibekyan, V; Delgado-Mena, E; Montes, D; Tabernero, H; Klutsch, A; Gilmore, G; Feltzing, S; Jeffries, R D; Micela, G; Vallenari, A; Bensby, T; Bragaglia, A; Flaccomio, E; Koposov, S; Lanzafame, A C; Pancino, E; Recio-Blanco, A; Smiljanic, R; Costado, M T; Damiani, F; Hill, V; Hourihane, A; Jofre, P; de Laverny, P; Masseron, T; Worley, C

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the abundance distribution of star forming regions and young clusters is critical to investigate a variety of issues, from triggered star formation and chemical enrichment by nearby supernova explosions to the ability to form planetary systems.In spite of this, detailed abundance studies are currently available for relatively few regions. In this context, we present the analysis of the metallicity of the Gamma Velorum cluster, based on the products distributed in the first internal release of the Gaia-ESO Survey. The Gamma Velorum candidate members have been observed with FLAMES, using both UVES and Giraffe, depending on the target brightness and spectral type. In order to derive a solid metallicity determination for the cluster, membership of the observed stars must be first assessed. To this aim, we use several membership criteria including radial velocities, surface gravity estimates, and the detection of the photospheric lithium line. Out of the 80 targets observed with UVES, we identify 14 h...

  16. The Gaia-ESO Survey: pre-main-sequence stars in the young open cluster NGC 3293

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, A. J.; Sampedro, L.; Alfaro, E. J.; Costado, M. T.; Yun, J. L.; Frasca, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Drew, J. E.; Eislöffel, J.; Blomme, R.; Morel, T.; Lobel, A.; Semaan, T.; Randich, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Micela, G.; Vallenari, A.; Kalari, V.; Gilmore, G.; Flaccomio, E.; Carraro, G.; Lardo, C.; Monaco, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Morbidelli, L.; Lewis, J.; Koposov, S.; Hourihane, A.; Worley, C.; Casey, A.; Franciosini, E.; Sacco, G.; Magrini, L.

    2016-08-01

    The young open cluster NGC3293 is included in the observing program of the Gaia-ESO survey (GES). The radial velocity values provided have been used to assign cluster membership probabilities by means of a single-variable parametric analysis. These membership probabilities are compared to the results of the photometric membership assignment of NGC3293, based on UBVRI photometry. The agreement of the photometric and kinematic member samples amounts to 65 per cent, and could increase to 70 per cent as suggested by the analysis of the differences between both samples. A number of photometric PMS candidate members of spectral type F are found, which are confirmed by the results from VPHAS photometry and SED fitting for the stars in common with VPHAS and GES data sets. Excesses at mid- and near-infrared wavelengths, and signs of Hα emission, are investigated for them. Marginal presence of Hα emission or infilling is detected for the candidate members. Several of them exhibit moderate signs of U excess and weak excesses at mid-IR wavelengths. We suggest that these features originate from accretion discs in their last stages of evolution.

  17. EXPORT : Spectral classification and projected rotational velocities of Vega-type and pre-main sequence stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mora, A; Merin, B; Solano, E; Montesinos, B; de Winter, D; Eiroa, C; Ferlet, R; Grady, CA; Miranda, LF; Oudmaijer, RD; Palacios, J; Quirrenbach, A; Harris, AW; Rauer, H; Cameron, A; Deeg, HJ; Garzon, F; Penny, A; Schneider, J; Tsapras, Y; Wesselius, PR

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present the first comprehensive results extracted from the spectroscopic campaigns carried out by the EXPORT (EXoPlanetary Observational Research Team) consortium. During 1998-1999, EXPORT carried out an intensive observational effort in the framework of the origin and evolution of

  18. The fate of the pre-main sequence-rich clusters Collinder197 and vdB92: dissolution?

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatto, Charles

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the nature and possible evolution of the young Galactic star clusters Collinder 197 (Cr 197) and vdB 92. The colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are basically characterised by a poorly-populated MS and a dominant fraction ($\\ga75%$) of PMS stars, and the combined MS and PMS CMD morphology in both clusters consistently constrains the age to within $5\\pm4$ Myr, with a $\\sim10$ Myr spread in the star formation process. The MS$ + $PMS stellar masses are $\\approx660^{+102}_{-59} \\ms$ (Cr 197) and $\\approx750^{+101}_{-51} \\ms$ (vdB 92). Cr 197 and vdB 92 appear to be abnormally large, when compared to clusters within the same age range. They have irregular stellar radial density distributions (RDPs) with a marked excess in the innermost region, a feature that, at less than 10 Myr, is more likely related to the star formation and/or molecular cloud fragmentation than to age-dependent dynamical effects. The velocity dispersion of both clusters, derived from proper motions, is in the range $\\sim15 - 22 \\km...

  19. Accretion and outflow activity on the late phases of pre-main-sequence evolution. The case of RZ Piscium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Mkrtichian, D. E.; Grinin, V. P.; Ilyin, I. V.; Shakhovskoy, D. N.

    2017-03-01

    RZ Psc is an isolated high-latitude post-T Tauri star that demonstrates a UX Ori-type photometric activity. The star shows very weak spectroscopic signatures of accretion, but at the same time possesses the unusual footprints of the wind in Na i D lines. In the present work we investigate new spectroscopic observations of RZ Psc obtained in 2014 during two observation runs. We found variable blueshifted absorption components (BACs) in lines of the other alcali metals, K i 7699 Å and Ca ii IR triplet. We also confirmed the presence of a weak emission component in the Hα line, which allowed us to estimate the mass accretion rate on the star as Ṁ ≤ 7 × 10-12M⊙ yr-1. We could not reveal any clear periodicity in the appearance of BACs in sodium lines. Nevertheless, the exact coincidence of the structure and velocities of the Na i D absorptions observed with the interval of about one year suggests that such a periodicity should exist.

  20. Stellar Activity on the Young Suns of Orion: COUP Observations of K5-7 Pre-Main Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wolk, S J; Micela, G; Favata, F; Glassgold, A E; Shang, H; Feigelson, E D

    2005-01-01

    In January 2003, the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) detected about 1400 young stars during a 13.2 day observation of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). This paper studies a well-defined sample of 28 solar-mass COUP sources to characterize the magnetic activity of analogs of the young Sun and thereby to improve understanding of the effects of solar X-rays on the solar nebula during the era of planet formation. We find that active young Suns spend 70% of their time in a characteristic state with relatively constant flux and magnetically confined plasma with temperatures kT_2 = 2.1 * kT_1. During characteristic periods, the 0.5-8 keV X-ray luminosity is about 0.03% of the bolometric luminosity. One or two powerful flares per week with peak luminosities logL_x ~ 30-32 erg/s are typically superposed on this characteristic emission accompanied by heating of the hot plasma component from ~2.4 keV to ~7 keV at the flare peak. The energy distribution of flares superposed on the characteristic emission level follo...

  1. Long-term BVRI light curves of 5 pre-main sequence stars in the field of "Gulf of Mexico"

    CERN Document Server

    Ibryamov, Sunay I; Peneva, Stoyanka P

    2014-01-01

    We present new data from BVRI photometric observations of five PMS stars during the period from April 2013 to July 2014. The stars are located in the field of NGC 7000/IC 5070 ("Gulf of Mexico") - a region with active star formation. The presented paper is a continuation of our long-term photometric investigations of the young stellar objects in this region. The long-term multicolor photometric observations of PMS stars are very important for their exact classification. Our results show that the studied stars exhibit different types of photometric variability in all bands. We tried to classify them using our data from the long-term photometry and data published by other authors.

  2. Long-term BVRI light curves of 5 pre-main sequence stars in the field of "Gulf of Mexico"

    OpenAIRE

    Ibryamov, Sunay I.; Semkov, Evgeni H.; Peneva, Stoyanka P.

    2014-01-01

    We present new data from BVRI photometric observations of five PMS stars during the period from April 2013 to July 2014. The stars are located in the field of NGC 7000/IC 5070 ("Gulf of Mexico") - a region with active star formation. The presented paper is a continuation of our long-term photometric investigations of the young stellar objects in this region. The long-term multicolor photometric observations of PMS stars are very important for their exact classification. Our results show that ...

  3. A New Definition and Calculation Model for Evolutionary Multi-Objective Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Ai-min; Kang Li-shan; Chen Yu-ping; Huang Yu-zhen

    2003-01-01

    We present a new definition (Evolving Solutions) for Multi objective Optimization Problem (MOP) to answer the basic question (what's multi-objective optimal solution?) and advance an asynchronous evolutionary model (MINT Model) to solve MOPs. The new theory is based on our understanding of the natural evolution and the analysis of the difference between natural evolution and MOP, thus it is not only different from the Converting Optimization but also different from Pareto Optimization.Some tests prove that our new theory may conquer disadvantages of the upper two methods to some extent.

  4. A cultural evolutionary programming approach to automatic analytical modeling of electrochemical phenomena through impedance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Arpaia, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    An approach to automatic analytical modeling of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data by evolutionary programming based on cultural algorithms is proposed. A solution-search strategy based on a cultural mechanism is exploited for defining the equivalent-circuit model automatically: information on search advance is transmitted to all potential solutions, rather than only to a small inheriting subset, such as in a traditional genetic approach. Moreover, with respect to the state of the art, also specific information related to constraints on the application physics knowledge is transferred. Experimental results of the proposed approach implementation in impedance spectroscopy for general-purpose electrochemical circuit analysis and for corrosion monitoring and diagnosing are presented.

  5. SIMULATING AN EVOLUTIONARY MULTI-AGENT BASED MODEL OF THE STOCK MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana MARICA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on artificial stock market simulations using a multi-agent model incorporating 2,000 heterogeneous agents interacting on the artificial market. The agents interaction is due to trading activity on the market through a call auction trading mechanism. The multi-agent model uses evolutionary techniques such as genetic programming in order to generate an adaptive and evolving population of agents. Each artificial agent is endowed with wealth and a genetic programming induced trading strategy. The trading strategy evolves and adapts to the new market conditions through a process called breeding, which implies that at each simulation step, new agents with better trading strategies are generated by the model, from recombining the best performing trading strategies and replacing the agents which have the worst performing trading strategies. The simulation model was build with the help of the simulation software Altreva Adaptive Modeler which offers a suitable platform for financial market simulations of evolutionary agent based models, the S&P500 composite index being used as a benchmark for the simulation results.

  6. The mechanism for the self-adaptation behavior in the evolutionary minority game model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yanbo; WANG Bing-Hong; YANG Weisong; WANG Weining

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we shall present our studies of a generalized evolutionary minority game model in which the agents are divided into several groups. The performance of the individual agent is averaged in each group. We find that there are three different effects in this generalized model, i.e.(1) group averaging effect, (2) left-right asymmetric effect,and (3) self-interaction effect. The former two effects favor the cautious agents, while the last one favors the extreme agents. In most cases, both the analytic results and the numerical simulations demonstrate that the group averaging effect is dominantly important and therefore the performance of the cautious agents is better than that of the extreme agents. However, when the number of groups is sufficiently large, the generalized model can be somehow reduced to the conventional evolutionary minority game model. As the parameters vary in the generalized model, the importance of the above three effects is exchangeable and different types of population distribution emerge.

  7. On the validity of evolutionary models with site-specific parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Scheffler

    Full Text Available Evolutionary models that make use of site-specific parameters have recently been criticized on the grounds that parameter estimates obtained under such models can be unreliable and lack theoretical guarantees of convergence. We present a simulation study providing empirical evidence that a simple version of the models in question does exhibit sensible convergence behavior and that additional taxa, despite not being independent of each other, lead to improved parameter estimates. Although it would be desirable to have theoretical guarantees of this, we argue that such guarantees would not be sufficient to justify the use of these models in practice. Instead, we emphasize the importance of taking the variance of parameter estimates into account rather than blindly trusting point estimates - this is standardly done by using the models to construct statistical hypothesis tests, which are then validated empirically via simulation studies.

  8. Kerf modelling in abrasive waterjet milling using evolutionary computation and ANOVA techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, A.; Rivero, A.; Carrascal, A.; Lamikiz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Many researchers demonstrated the capability of Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) technology for precision milling operations. However, the concurrence of several input parameters along with the stochastic nature of this technology leads to a complex process control, which requires a work focused in process modelling. This research work introduces a model to predict the kerf shape in AWJ slot milling in Aluminium 7075-T651 in terms of four important process parameters: the pressure, the abrasive flow rate, the stand-off distance and the traverse feed rate. A hybrid evolutionary approach was employed for kerf shape modelling. This technique allowed characterizing the profile through two parameters: the maximum cutting depth and the full width at half maximum. On the other hand, based on ANOVA and regression techniques, these two parameters were also modelled as a function of process parameters. Combination of both models resulted in an adequate strategy to predict the kerf shape for different machining conditions.

  9. Multiple phase transitions in an agent-based evolutionary model with neutral fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dawn M; Scott, Adam D; Bahar, Sonya

    2017-04-01

    Null models are crucial for understanding evolutionary processes such as speciation and adaptive radiation. We analyse an agent-based null model, considering a case without selection-neutral evolution-in which organisms are defined only by phenotype. Universal dynamics has previously been demonstrated in a related model on a neutral fitness landscape, showing that this system belongs to the directed percolation (DP) universality class. The traditional null condition of neutral fitness (where fitness is defined as the number of offspring each organism produces) is extended here to include equal probability of death among organisms. We identify two types of phase transition: (i) a non-equilibrium DP transition through generational time (i.e. survival), and (ii) an equilibrium ordinary percolation transition through the phenotype space (based on links between mating organisms). Owing to the dynamical rules of the DP reaction-diffusion process, organisms can only sparsely fill the phenotype space, resulting in significant phenotypic diversity within a cluster of mating organisms. This highlights the necessity of understanding hierarchical evolutionary relationships, rather than merely developing taxonomies based on phenotypic similarity, in order to develop models that can explain phylogenetic patterns found in the fossil record or to make hypotheses for the incomplete fossil record of deep time.

  10. A mathematical model for metabolic tradeoffs, minimal requirements, and evolutionary transitions. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempes, C.; Hoehler, T. M.; Follows, M. J.; Dutkiewicz, S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the minimal energy requirements for life is a difficult challenge because of the great variety of processes required for life. Our approach is to discover general trends applicable to diverse species in order to understand the average constraints faced by life. We then leverage these trends to predict minimal requirements for life. We have focused on broad trends in metabolism, growth, basic bioenergetics, and overall genomic structure and composition. We have developed a simple mathematical model of metabolic partitioning which is able to capture the growth of both single cells and populations of cells for diverse organisms spanning the three domains of life. This model also anticipates the observed interspecific trends in population growth rate and predicts the observed minimum size of a bacterium. Our model connects evolutionary limitations and transitions, including minimal life, to energetic constraints imposed by body architecture and the metabolism of a given species. This model can also be connected to genomic variation across species in order to describe the tradeoffs associated with various genes and their functionality. This forms the basis for a theory of the possibility space for minimal physiological function given evolutionary tradeoffs, general metabolic and biological architecture, and the energetic limitations of the environment.

  11. An IUR evolutionary game model on the patent cooperate of Shandong China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengmeng; Ma, Yinghong; Liu, Zhiyuan; You, Xuemei

    2017-06-01

    Organizations of industries and university & research institutes cooperate to meet their respective needs based on social contacts, trust and share complementary resources. From the perspective of complex network together with the patent data of Shandong province in China, a novel evolutionary game model on patent cooperation network is presented. Two sides in the game model are industries and universities & research institutes respectively. The cooperation is represented by a connection when a new patent is developed together by the two sides. The optimal strategy of the evolutionary game model is quantified by the average positive cooperation probability p ¯ and the average payoff U ¯ . The feasibility of this game model is simulated on the parameters such as the knowledge spillover, the punishment, the development cost and the distribution coefficient of the benefit. The numerical simulations show that the cooperative behaviors are affected by the variation of parameters. The knowledge spillover displays different behaviors when the punishment is larger than the development cost or less than it. Those results indicate that reasonable punishment would improve the positive cooperation. The appropriate punishment will be useful to enhance the big degree nodes positively cooperate with industries and universities & research institutes. And an equitable plan for the distribution of cooperative profits is half-and-half distribution strategy for the two sides in game.

  12. Differential Dynamic Evolutionary Model of Emergency Financial Service Supply Chain in Natural Disaster Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujian Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A government-market-public partnership (GMPP could be a feasible arrangement for providing insurance coverage for natural disaster. Firstly, we put forward GMPP management mode. Secondly, the emergency financial service supply chain for natural disaster risk is built from the view of supply chain. Finally, the objective of this paper is to obtain insights into the cooperative and competitive relationship in GMPP system. We establish the cooperative and competitive differential dynamic evolutionary models and prove the existence of equilibrium solutions in order to solve the coordination problems. In conclusion, the equilibrium solutions can be achieved among the insurers, the operating governments, and the public.

  13. The Evolutionary Population Synthesis Model for Helium-Enhanced Stellar Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chul; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of multiple stellar populations in the Milky Way globular clusters has stimulated a great deal of researches on the helium enhanced stellar populations. Here, we present the evolutionary population synthesis models for integrated spectro-photometric evolution of simple stellar populations (SSPs) with varied initial helium abundances. The integrated properties of helium-enhanced SSPs depend on metallicity and age as are the normal-helium SSPs, but the properties vary greatly with the initial helium abundance. We will discuss how helium-enhanced stellar populations explain many interesting observations of globular clusters and their host galaxies.

  14. Research on Preference Polyhedron Model Based Evolutionary Multiobjective Optimization Method for Multilink Transmission Mechanism Conceptual Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To make the optimal design of the multilink transmission mechanism applied in mechanical press, the intelligent optimization techniques are explored in this paper. A preference polyhedron model and new domination relationships evaluation methodology are proposed for the purpose of reaching balance among kinematic performance, dynamic performance, and other performances of the multilink transmission mechanism during the conceptual design phase. Based on the traditional evaluation index of single target of multicriteria design optimization, the robust metrics of the mechanism system and preference metrics of decision-maker are taken into consideration in this preference polyhedron model and reflected by geometrical characteristic of the model. At last, two optimized multilink transmission mechanisms are designed based on the proposed preference polyhedron model with different evolutionary algorithms, and the result verifies the validity of the proposed optimization method.

  15. Evolutionary demography of iteroparous plants: incorporating non-lethal costs of reproduction into integral projection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tom E X; Williams, Jennifer L; Jongejans, Eelke; Brys, Rein; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2012-07-22

    Understanding the selective forces that shape reproductive strategies is a central goal of evolutionary ecology. Selection on the timing of reproduction is well studied in semelparous organisms because the cost of reproduction (death) can be easily incorporated into demographic models. Iteroparous organisms also exhibit delayed reproduction and experience reproductive costs, although these are not necessarily lethal. How non-lethal costs shape iteroparous life histories remains unresolved. We analysed long-term demographic data for the iteroparous orchid Orchis purpurea from two habitat types (light and shade). In both the habitats, flowering plants had lower growth rates and this cost was greater for smaller plants. We detected an additional growth cost of fruit production in the light habitat. We incorporated these non-lethal costs into integral projection models to identify the flowering size that maximizes fitness. In both habitats, observed flowering sizes were well predicted by the models. We also estimated optimal parameters for size-dependent flowering effort, but found a strong mismatch with the observed flower production. Our study highlights the role of context-dependent non-lethal reproductive costs as selective forces in the evolution of iteroparous life histories, and provides a novel and broadly applicable approach to studying the evolutionary demography of iteroparous organisms.

  16. Evolutionary-Hierarchical Bases of the Formation of Cluster Model of Innovation Economic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Vladimirovna Dubrovskaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The functioning of a modern economic system is based on the interaction of objects of different hierarchical levels. Thus, the problem of the study of innovation processes taking into account the mutual influence of the activities of these economic actors becomes important. The paper dwells evolutionary basis for the formation of models of innovation development on the basis of micro and macroeconomic analysis. Most of the concepts recognized that despite a big number of diverse models, the coordination of the relations between economic agents is of crucial importance for the successful innovation development. According to the results of the evolutionary-hierarchical analysis, the authors reveal key phases of the development of forms of business cooperation, science and government in the domestic economy. It has become the starting point of the conception of the characteristics of the interaction in the cluster models of innovation development of the economy. Considerable expectancies on improvement of the national innovative system are connected with the development of cluster and network structures. The main objective of government authorities is the formation of mechanisms and institutions that will foster cooperation between members of the clusters. The article explains that the clusters cannot become the factors in the growth of the national economy, not being an effective tool for interaction between the actors of the regional innovative systems.

  17. Models of Metal Poor Stars with Gravitational Settling and Radiative Accelerations I. Evolution and Abundance Anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, O; Richer, J; Turcotte, S; Turck-Chièze, S; Van den Berg, D A; Berg, Don A. Vanden

    2002-01-01

    Evolutionary models have been calculated for Pop II stars of 0.5 to 1.0$M_\\odot$ from the pre-main-sequence to the lower part of the giant branch. Rosseland opacities and radiative accelerations were calculated taking into account the concentration variations of 28 chemical species, including all species contributing to Rosseland opacities in the OPAL tables. The effects of radiative accelerations, thermal diffusion and gravitational settling are included. While models were calculated both for Z=0.00017 and 0.0017, we concentrate on models with Z=0.00017 in this paper. These are the first Pop II models calculated taking radiative acceleration into account. It is shown that, at least in a 0.8$M_\\odot$ star, it is a better approximation not to let Fe diffuse than to calculate its gravitational settling without including the effects of $g_{rad}(Fe)$. In the absence of any turbulence outside of convection zones, the effects of atomic diffusion are large mainly for stars more massive than 0.7$M_\\odot$. Overabundan...

  18. Incorporating evolutionary adaptation in species distribution modelling reduces projected vulnerability to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Alex; Mokany, Karel; Catullo, Renee; Hoffmann, Ary; Kellermann, Vanessa; Sgrò, Carla; McEvey, Shane; Ferrier, Simon

    2016-12-01

    Based on the sensitivity of species to ongoing climate change, and numerous challenges they face tracking suitable conditions, there is growing interest in species' capacity to adapt to climatic stress. Here, we develop and apply a new generic modelling approach (AdaptR) that incorporates adaptive capacity through physiological limits, phenotypic plasticity, evolutionary adaptation and dispersal into a species distribution modelling framework. Using AdaptR to predict change in the distribution of 17 species of Australian fruit flies (Drosophilidae), we show that accounting for adaptive capacity reduces projected range losses by up to 33% by 2105. We identify where local adaptation is likely to occur and apply sensitivity analyses to identify the critical factors of interest when parameters are uncertain. Our study suggests some species could be less vulnerable than previously thought, and indicates that spatiotemporal adaptive models could help improve management interventions that support increased species' resilience to climate change. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  19. Evolutionary design of a generalized polynomial neural network for modelling sediment transport in clean pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebtehaj, Isa; Bonakdari, Hossein; Khoshbin, Fatemeh

    2016-10-01

    To determine the minimum velocity required to prevent sedimentation, six different models were proposed to estimate the densimetric Froude number (Fr). The dimensionless parameters of the models were applied along with a combination of the group method of data handling (GMDH) and the multi-target genetic algorithm. Therefore, an evolutionary design of the generalized GMDH was developed using a genetic algorithm with a specific coding scheme so as not to restrict connectivity configurations to abutting layers only. In addition, a new preserving mechanism by the multi-target genetic algorithm was utilized for the Pareto optimization of GMDH. The results indicated that the most accurate model was the one that used the volumetric concentration of sediment (CV), relative hydraulic radius (d/R), dimensionless particle number (Dgr) and overall sediment friction factor (λs) in estimating Fr. Furthermore, the comparison between the proposed method and traditional equations indicated that GMDH is more accurate than existing equations.

  20. An age-dependent model to analyse the evolutionary stability of bacterial quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mund, A; Kuttler, C; Pérez-Velázquez, J; Hense, B A

    2016-09-21

    Bacterial communication is enabled through the collective release and sensing of signalling molecules in a process called quorum sensing. Cooperative processes can easily be destabilized by the appearance of cheaters, who contribute little or nothing at all to the production of common goods. This especially applies for planktonic cultures. In this study, we analyse the dynamics of bacterial quorum sensing and its evolutionary stability under two levels of cooperation, namely signal and enzyme production. The model accounts for mutation rates and switches between planktonic and biofilm state of growth. We present a mathematical approach to model these dynamics using age-dependent colony models. We explore the conditions under which cooperation is stable and find that spatial structuring can lead to long-term scenarios such as coexistence or bistability, depending on the non-linear combination of different parameters like death rates and production costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The mode trapping properties of full DA white dwarf evolutionary models

    CERN Document Server

    Corsico, A H; Benvenuto, O G; Serenelli, A M

    2002-01-01

    An adiabatic, non-radial pulsation study of a 0.563 M_sun DA white dwarf model is presented on the basis of new evolutionary calculations performed in a self-consistent way with the predictions of time dependent element diffusion, nuclear burning and the history of the white dwarf progenitor. Emphasis is placed on the role played by the internal chemical stratification of these new models in the behaviour of the eigenmodes, and the expectations for the full g-spectrum of periods. The implications for the mode trapping properties are discussed at length. In this regard, we find that, for high periods, the viability of mode trapping as a mode selection mechanism is markedly weaker for our models, as compared with the situation in which the hydrogen-helium transition region is treated assuming equilibrium diffusion in the trace element approximation.

  2. Comparative Study of Lectin Domains in Model Species: New Insights into Evolutionary Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Van Holle

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are present throughout the plant kingdom and are reported to be involved in diverse biological processes. In this study, we provide a comparative analysis of the lectin families from model species in a phylogenetic framework. The analysis focuses on the different plant lectin domains identified in five representative core angiosperm genomes (Arabidopsis thaliana, Glycine max, Cucumis sativus, Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and Oryza sativa ssp. indica. The genomes were screened for genes encoding lectin domains using a combination of Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST, hidden Markov models, and InterProScan analysis. Additionally, phylogenetic relationships were investigated by constructing maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees. The results demonstrate that the majority of the lectin families are present in each of the species under study. Domain organization analysis showed that most identified proteins are multi-domain proteins, owing to the modular rearrangement of protein domains during evolution. Most of these multi-domain proteins are widespread, while others display a lineage-specific distribution. Furthermore, the phylogenetic analyses reveal that some lectin families evolved to be similar to the phylogeny of the plant species, while others share a closer evolutionary history based on the corresponding protein domain architecture. Our results yield insights into the evolutionary relationships and functional divergence of plant lectins.

  3. Evolutionary Network Control also holds for nonlinear networks: Ruling the Lotka-Volterra model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The proof of our understanding of ecological and biological systems is measured by our skill to rule them, i.e. to channelize them towards a desired state. Control is a cardinal issue in most complex systems, but because a general theory to apply it in a quantitative manner has been absent so far, little was known about how we can rule weighted, directed networks that represent the most common configuration of real systems. To this purpose, Evolutionary Network Control (ENC has been developed as a theoretical and methodological framework aimed to the control of ecological and biological networks by coupling network dynamics and evolutionary modelling. ENC is a tools to address controllability for arbitrary network topologies and sizes. ENC has proven to cover several topics of network control, e.g. a the global control from inside and b from outside, c the local (step-by-step control, and the computation of: d control success, e feasibility, and f degree of uncertainty. Taken together, these results indicate that many aspects of controllability can be explored exactly and analytically for arbitrary networks, opening new avenues to deepening our understanding of complex systems. As yet, I have applied ENC only to linear ecological and biological networks. In this work, I show that ENC also holds for any kind of nonlinear networks, and provide an applicative example based on the nonlinear, widely-used, Lotka-Volterra model.

  4. Evolutionary Synthesis Models as a Tool and Guide Towards the First Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaerer, Daniel

    We summarize the principles and fundamental ingredients of evolutionary synthesis models, which are stellar evolution, stellar atmospheres, the IMF, star-formation histories, nebular emission, and also attenuation from the ISM and IGM. The chapter focusses in particular on issues of importance for predictions of metal-poor and Population III dominated galaxies.We review recent predictions for the main physical properties and related observables of star-forming galaxies based on up-to-date inputs. The predicted metallicity dependence of these quantities and their physical causes are discussed. The predicted observables include in particular the restframe UV-to-optical domain with continuum emission from stars and the ionized ISM, as well as emission lines from H, He, and metals.Based on these predictions we summarize the main observational signatures (emission line strengths, colors etc.), which can be used to distinguish "normal" stellar populations from very metal-poor objects or even Pop III.Evolutionary synthesis models provide an important and fundamental tool for studies of galaxy formation and evolution, from the nearby Universe back to first galaxies. They are used in many applications to interpret existing observations, to predict and guide future missions/instruments, and to allow direct comparisons between state-of-the-art galaxy simulations and observations.

  5. The causal pie model: an epidemiological method applied to evolutionary biology and ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensink, Maarten; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Baudisch, Annette

    2014-05-01

    A general concept for thinking about causality facilitates swift comprehension of results, and the vocabulary that belongs to the concept is instrumental in cross-disciplinary communication. The causal pie model has fulfilled this role in epidemiology and could be of similar value in evolutionary biology and ecology. In the causal pie model, outcomes result from sufficient causes. Each sufficient cause is made up of a "causal pie" of "component causes". Several different causal pies may exist for the same outcome. If and only if all component causes of a sufficient cause are present, that is, a causal pie is complete, does the outcome occur. The effect of a component cause hence depends on the presence of the other component causes that constitute some causal pie. Because all component causes are equally and fully causative for the outcome, the sum of causes for some outcome exceeds 100%. The causal pie model provides a way of thinking that maps into a number of recurrent themes in evolutionary biology and ecology: It charts when component causes have an effect and are subject to natural selection, and how component causes affect selection on other component causes; which partitions of outcomes with respect to causes are feasible and useful; and how to view the composition of a(n apparently homogeneous) population. The diversity of specific results that is directly understood from the causal pie model is a test for both the validity and the applicability of the model. The causal pie model provides a common language in which results across disciplines can be communicated and serves as a template along which future causal analyses can be made.

  6. Performance of criteria for selecting evolutionary models in phylogenetics: a comprehensive study based on simulated datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Arong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Explicit evolutionary models are required in maximum-likelihood and Bayesian inference, the two methods that are overwhelmingly used in phylogenetic studies of DNA sequence data. Appropriate selection of nucleotide substitution models is important because the use of incorrect models can mislead phylogenetic inference. To better understand the performance of different model-selection criteria, we used 33,600 simulated data sets to analyse the accuracy, precision, dissimilarity, and biases of the hierarchical likelihood-ratio test, Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion, and decision theory. Results We demonstrate that the Bayesian information criterion and decision theory are the most appropriate model-selection criteria because of their high accuracy and precision. Our results also indicate that in some situations different models are selected by different criteria for the same dataset. Such dissimilarity was the highest between the hierarchical likelihood-ratio test and Akaike information criterion, and lowest between the Bayesian information criterion and decision theory. The hierarchical likelihood-ratio test performed poorly when the true model included a proportion of invariable sites, while the Bayesian information criterion and decision theory generally exhibited similar performance to each other. Conclusions Our results indicate that the Bayesian information criterion and decision theory should be preferred for model selection. Together with model-adequacy tests, accurate model selection will serve to improve the reliability of phylogenetic inference and related analyses.

  7. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Brandon Ogbunugafor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions-drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR to two related inhibitors-pyrimethamine and cycloguanil-across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis influence paths taken at evolutionary "forks in the road" that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with

  8. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C Brandon; Wylie, C Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M; Hartl, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions-drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) to two related inhibitors-pyrimethamine and cycloguanil-across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis) influence paths taken at evolutionary "forks in the road" that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with regards to their

  9. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C. Brandon; Wylie, C. Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions—drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) to two related inhibitors—pyrimethamine and cycloguanil—across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis) influence paths taken at evolutionary “forks in the road” that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with

  10. How effective and efficient are multiobjective evolutionary algorithms at hydrologic model calibration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a comprehensive assessment of state-of-the-art evolutionary multiobjective optimization (EMO tools' relative effectiveness in calibrating hydrologic models. The relative computational efficiency, accuracy, and ease-of-use of the following EMO algorithms are tested: Epsilon Dominance Nondominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm-II (ε-NSGAII, the Multiobjective Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis algorithm (MOSCEM-UA, and the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm 2 (SPEA2. This study uses three test cases to compare the algorithms' performances: (1 a standardized test function suite from the computer science literature, (2 a benchmark hydrologic calibration test case for the Leaf River near Collins, Mississippi, and (3 a computationally intensive integrated surface-subsurface model application in the Shale Hills watershed in Pennsylvania. One challenge and contribution of this work is the development of a methodology for comprehensively comparing EMO algorithms that have different search operators and randomization techniques. Overall, SPEA2 attained competitive to superior results for most of the problems tested in this study. The primary strengths of the SPEA2 algorithm lie in its search reliability and its diversity preservation operator. The biggest challenge in maximizing the performance of SPEA2 lies in specifying an effective archive size without a priori knowledge of the Pareto set. In practice, this would require significant trial-and-error analysis, which is problematic for more complex, computationally intensive calibration applications. ε-NSGAII appears to be superior to MOSCEM-UA and competitive with SPEA2 for hydrologic model calibration. ε-NSGAII's primary strength lies in its ease-of-use due to its dynamic population sizing and archiving which lead to rapid convergence to very high quality solutions with minimal user input. MOSCEM-UA is best suited for hydrologic model calibration applications that have small

  11. New Evolutionary Synthesis Tool for Modelling Young Star Clusters in Merging Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, P; Fritze von Alvensleben, U; Anders, Peter; Grijs, Richard de; Alvensleben, Uta Fritze - v.

    2002-01-01

    Globular cluster systems (GCSs) are vital tools for investigating the violent star formation histories of their host galaxies. This violence could e.g. have been triggered by galaxy interactions or mergers. The basic observational properties of a GCS are its luminosity function and color distributions (number of clusters per luminosity resp. color bin). A large number of observed GCSs show bimodal color distributions, which, by comparison with evolutionary synthesis (ES) models, can be translated into bimodality in metallicity and/or age. An additional uncertainty comes into play when one considers extinction within the host galaxy. These effects can be disentangled either by obtaining spectroscopic data for the clusters or by imaging observations in at least four passbands. This allows us then to discriminate between various formation scenarios of GCSs, e.g. the merger scenario by Ashman & Zepf and the multi-phase collapse model by Forbes et. al.. Young and metal-rich star cluster populations are seen to...

  12. Group analysis of evolutionary integro-differential equations describing nonlinear waves: the general model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibragimov, Nail H [Department of Mathematics and Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, SE-371 79 Karlskrona (Sweden); Meleshko, Sergey V [School of Mathematics, Institute of Science, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Rudenko, Oleg V, E-mail: nib@bth.se, E-mail: sergey@math.sut.ac.th, E-mail: rudenko@acs366.phys.msu.ru [Department of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-05

    The paper deals with an evolutionary integro-differential equation describing nonlinear waves. A particular choice of the kernel in the integral leads to well-known equations such as the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya equation, the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation and others. Since the solutions of these equations describe many physical phenomena, the analysis of the general model studied in this paper is important. One of the methods for obtaining solutions of differential equations is provided by the Lie group analysis. However, this method is not applicable to integro-differential equations. Therefore, we discuss new approaches developed in modern group analysis and apply them to the general model considered in this paper. Reduced equations and exact solutions are also presented.

  13. Evolutionary responses to a constructed niche: ancient Mesoamericans as a model of gene-culture coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tábita Hünemeier

    Full Text Available Culture and genetics rely on two distinct but not isolated transmission systems. Cultural processes may change the human selective environment and thereby affect which individuals survive and reproduce. Here, we evaluated whether the modes of subsistence in Native American populations and the frequencies of the ABCA1*Arg230Cys polymorphism were correlated. Further, we examined whether the evolutionary consequences of the agriculturally constructed niche in Mesoamerica could be considered as a gene-culture coevolution model. For this purpose, we genotyped 229 individuals affiliated with 19 Native American populations and added data for 41 other Native American groups (n = 1905 to the analysis. In combination with the SNP cluster of a neutral region, this dataset was then used to unravel the scenario involved in 230Cys evolutionary history. The estimated age of 230Cys is compatible with its origin occurring in the American continent. The correlation of its frequencies with the archeological data on Zea pollen in Mesoamerica/Central America, the neutral coalescent simulations, and the F(ST-based natural selection analysis suggest that maize domestication was the driving force in the increase in the frequencies of 230Cys in this region. These results may represent the first example of a gene-culture coevolution involving an autochthonous American allele.

  14. Rotating Massive Main-Sequence Stars I: Grids of Evolutionary Models and Isochrones

    CERN Document Server

    Brott, Ines; Cantiello, Matteo; Langer, Norbert; de Koter, Alex; Evans, Chris J; Hunter, Ian; Trundle, Carrie; Vink, Jorick S

    2011-01-01

    We present a dense grid of evolutionary tracks and isochrones of rotating massive main-sequence stars. We provide three grids with different initial compositions tailored to compare with early OB stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds and in the Galaxy. Each grid covers masses ranging from 5 to 60 Msun and initial rotation rates between 0 and about 600 km/s. To calibrate our models we used the results of the VLT-FLAMES Survey of Massive Stars. We determine the amount of convective overshooting by using the observed drop in rotation rates for stars with surface gravities log g < 3.2 to determine the width of the main sequence. We calibrate the efficiency of rotationally induced mixing using the nitrogen abundance determinations for B stars in the Large Magellanic cloud. We describe and provide evolutionary tracks and the evolution of the central and surface abundances. In particular, we discuss the occurrence of quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution, i.e. the severe effects of efficient mixing of t...

  15. Evolutionary Responses to a Constructed Niche: Ancient Mesoamericans as a Model of Gene-Culture Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hünemeier, Tábita; Amorim, Carlos Eduardo Guerra; Azevedo, Soledad; Contini, Veronica; Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Mazières, Stephane; Barrantes, Ramiro; Villarreal-Molina, María Teresa; Paixão-Côrtes, Vanessa Rodrigues; Salzano, Francisco M.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2012-01-01

    Culture and genetics rely on two distinct but not isolated transmission systems. Cultural processes may change the human selective environment and thereby affect which individuals survive and reproduce. Here, we evaluated whether the modes of subsistence in Native American populations and the frequencies of the ABCA1*Arg230Cys polymorphism were correlated. Further, we examined whether the evolutionary consequences of the agriculturally constructed niche in Mesoamerica could be considered as a gene-culture coevolution model. For this purpose, we genotyped 229 individuals affiliated with 19 Native American populations and added data for 41 other Native American groups (n = 1905) to the analysis. In combination with the SNP cluster of a neutral region, this dataset was then used to unravel the scenario involved in 230Cys evolutionary history. The estimated age of 230Cys is compatible with its origin occurring in the American continent. The correlation of its frequencies with the archeological data on Zea pollen in Mesoamerica/Central America, the neutral coalescent simulations, and the FST-based natural selection analysis suggest that maize domestication was the driving force in the increase in the frequencies of 230Cys in this region. These results may represent the first example of a gene-culture coevolution involving an autochthonous American allele. PMID:22768049

  16. Evolutionary Game Theory-Based Collaborative Sensing Model in Emergency CRAHNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasirekha GVK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Game theory has been a tool of choice for modeling dynamic interactions between autonomous systems. Cognitive radio ad hoc networks (CRAHNs constituted of autonomous wireless nodes are a natural fit for game theory-based modeling. The game theory-based model is particularly suitable for “collaborative spectrum sensing” where each cognitive radio senses the spectrum and shares the results with other nodes such that the targeted sensing accuracy is achieved. Spectrum sensing in CRAHNs, especially when used in emergency scenarios such as disaster management and military applications, needs to be not only accurate and resource efficient, but also adaptive to the changing number of users as well as signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, spectrum sensing mechanism must also be proactive, fair, and tolerant to security attacks. Existing work in collaborative spectrum sensing has mostly been confined to resource efficiency in static systems using request-based reactive sensing resulting in high latencies. In this paper, evolutionary game theory (EGT is used to model the behavior of the emergency CRAHNS, providing an efficient model for collaborative spectrum sensing. The resulting implementation model is adaptive to the changes in its environment such as signal-to-noise ratio and number of users in the network. The analytical and simulation models presented validate the system design and the desired performance.

  17. Evolutionary molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesse, Randolph M; Ganten, Detlev; Gregory, T Ryan; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2012-05-01

    Evolution has long provided a foundation for population genetics, but some major advances in evolutionary biology from the twentieth century that provide foundations for evolutionary medicine are only now being applied in molecular medicine. They include the need for both proximate and evolutionary explanations, kin selection, evolutionary models for cooperation, competition between alleles, co-evolution, and new strategies for tracing phylogenies and identifying signals of selection. Recent advances in genomics are transforming evolutionary biology in ways that create even more opportunities for progress at its interfaces with genetics, medicine, and public health. This article reviews 15 evolutionary principles and their applications in molecular medicine in hopes that readers will use them and related principles to speed the development of evolutionary molecular medicine.

  18. Millon's Evolutionary Model of Personality Assessment: A Case for Categorical/Dimensional Prototypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Seth D

    2015-01-01

    Theodore Millon (1928-2014) was arguably one of the most influential figures in conceptualizing and detailing personality styles and disorders in the latter 20th and early 21st centuries. A prominent member of the Axis II Work Group of DSM-III, III-R, and IV, Millon continued refining his evolutionary model long after his active involvement with these committees, and remained focused on the future of personality assessment until his death in 2014. This article is an exploration of his latter works, critiques of recent DSM-5 developments, and commentary on the usefulness of his deductive methodology as it continues to apply to the study, classification, and clinical application of personality assessment.

  19. The comet assay in higher terrestrial plant model: Review and evolutionary trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Caroline; Manier, Nicolas; Cuny, Damien; Deram, Annabelle

    2015-12-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive technique for the measurement of DNA damage in individual cells. Although it has been primarily applied to animal cells, its adaptation to higher plant tissues significantly extends the utility of plants for environmental genotoxicity research. The present review focuses on 101 key publications and discusses protocols and evolutionary trends specific to higher plants. General consensus validates the use of the percentage of DNA found in the tail, the alkaline version of the test and root study. The comet protocol has proved its effectiveness and its adaptability for cultivated plant models. Its transposition in wild plants thus appears as a logical evolution. However, certain aspects of the protocol can be improved, namely through the systematic use of positive controls and increasing the number of nuclei read. These optimizations will permit the increase in the performance of this test, namely when interpreting mechanistic and physiological phenomena.

  20. EVOLUTIONARY MODEL OF FREE ECONOMIC ZONES --Different Generations and Structural Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Guang-wen

    2005-01-01

    Free economic zone (FEZ) has a long history and plays a more and more important role in the world economy. Most studies, however, focused on the theoretical analysis of benefit and cost as well as the economic role of FEZ in the less developed countries and little attention has been paid to the evolution of FEZ. This paper will improve the above-mentioned studies and put forward the structural and spatial evolutionary model of FEZ by analyzing the development of objectives, preferential policy, governance structure, industrial sectors and location of FEZs based on the international economic and political development. FEZs develop towards: 1) more comprehensive and macro objectives, 2) more industry-oriented and multi-preferential policies, 3) more cross-national and combination zones with administrative areas, 4) more technology-intensive and multi-industries, 5) more flexible location and larger spatial dimensions, 6) more rapid evolution and typologies, and 7) more economic integration to the host economy.

  1. LQG optimal compensator transfer function for the NASA LaRC CSI Evolutionary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    Following the general form for LQG optimal compensators for flexible structures with collocated rate sensors we develop an explicit compensator transfer function for the NASA LaRC CSI Evolutionary model in the form: psi(i omega) = g i omega B(sub u)(sup *)(-M(sub b)omega(exp 2) + T(i omega) + i gamma omega B(sub u)Bu(sub u)(sup *))(exp -1)B(sub u) where T(i omega) is a 48 x 48 positive definite matrix whose derivation is the main result of this report. The undamped mode frequencies can be expressed in terms of T(i omega) as the zeros of Det (-omega(exp 2)M(sub b) + T(i omega)) while 'clamped-clamped' modes of the structure (with all nodes clamped) are the poles.

  2. Improving evolutionary models for mitochondrial protein data with site-class specific amino acid exchangeability matrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Dunn

    Full Text Available Adequate modeling of mitochondrial sequence evolution is an essential component of mitochondrial phylogenomics (comparative mitogenomics. There is wide recognition within the field that lineage-specific aspects of mitochondrial evolution should be accommodated through lineage-specific amino-acid exchangeability matrices (e.g., mtMam for mammalian data. However, such a matrix must be applied to all sites and this implies that all sites are subject to the same, or largely similar, evolutionary constraints. This assumption is unjustified. Indeed, substantial differences are expected to arise from three-dimensional structures that impose different physiochemical environments on individual amino acid residues. The objectives of this paper are (1 to investigate the extent to which amino acid evolution varies among sites of mitochondrial proteins, and (2 to assess the potential benefits of explicitly modeling such variability. To achieve this, we developed a novel method for partitioning sites based on amino acid physiochemical properties. We apply this method to two datasets derived from complete mitochondrial genomes of mammals and fish, and use maximum likelihood to estimate amino acid exchangeabilities for the different groups of sites. Using this approach we identified large groups of sites evolving under unique physiochemical constraints. Estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities differed significantly among such groups. Moreover, we found that joint estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities do not adequately represent the natural variability in evolutionary processes among sites of mitochondrial proteins. Significant improvements in likelihood are obtained when the new matrices are employed. We also find that maximum likelihood estimates of branch lengths can be strongly impacted. We provide sets of matrices suitable for groups of sites subject to similar physiochemical constraints, and discuss how they might be used to analyze real data. We

  3. Improving Evolutionary Models for Mitochondrial Protein Data with Site-Class Specific Amino Acid Exchangeability Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Katherine A.; Jiang, Wenyi; Field, Christopher; Bielawski, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Adequate modeling of mitochondrial sequence evolution is an essential component of mitochondrial phylogenomics (comparative mitogenomics). There is wide recognition within the field that lineage-specific aspects of mitochondrial evolution should be accommodated through lineage-specific amino-acid exchangeability matrices (e.g., mtMam for mammalian data). However, such a matrix must be applied to all sites and this implies that all sites are subject to the same, or largely similar, evolutionary constraints. This assumption is unjustified. Indeed, substantial differences are expected to arise from three-dimensional structures that impose different physiochemical environments on individual amino acid residues. The objectives of this paper are (1) to investigate the extent to which amino acid evolution varies among sites of mitochondrial proteins, and (2) to assess the potential benefits of explicitly modeling such variability. To achieve this, we developed a novel method for partitioning sites based on amino acid physiochemical properties. We apply this method to two datasets derived from complete mitochondrial genomes of mammals and fish, and use maximum likelihood to estimate amino acid exchangeabilities for the different groups of sites. Using this approach we identified large groups of sites evolving under unique physiochemical constraints. Estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities differed significantly among such groups. Moreover, we found that joint estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities do not adequately represent the natural variability in evolutionary processes among sites of mitochondrial proteins. Significant improvements in likelihood are obtained when the new matrices are employed. We also find that maximum likelihood estimates of branch lengths can be strongly impacted. We provide sets of matrices suitable for groups of sites subject to similar physiochemical constraints, and discuss how they might be used to analyze real data. We also discuss how

  4. Combining Interactive Infrastructure Modeling and Evolutionary Algorithm Optimization for Sustainable Water Resources Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.; Kasprzyk, J. R.; Zagona, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Population growth and climate change, combined with difficulties in building new infrastructure, motivate portfolio-based solutions to ensuring sufficient water supply. Powerful simulation models with graphical user interfaces (GUI) are often used to evaluate infrastructure portfolios; these GUI based models require manual modification of the system parameters, such as reservoir operation rules, water transfer schemes, or system capacities. Multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) based optimization can be employed to balance multiple objectives and automatically suggest designs for infrastructure systems, but MOEA based decision support typically uses a fixed problem formulation (i.e., a single set of objectives, decisions, and constraints). This presentation suggests a dynamic framework for linking GUI-based infrastructure models with MOEA search. The framework begins with an initial formulation which is solved using a MOEA. Then, stakeholders can interact with candidate solutions, viewing their properties in the GUI model. This is followed by changes in the formulation which represent users' evolving understanding of exigent system properties. Our case study is built using RiverWare, an object-oriented, data-centered model that facilitates the representation of a diverse array of water resources systems. Results suggest that assumptions within the initial MOEA search are violated after investigating tradeoffs and reveal how formulations should be modified to better capture stakeholders' preferences.

  5. Some Analytical Properties of the Model for Stochastic Evolutionary Games in Finite Populations with Non-uniform Interaction Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUAN Ji; WANG Xian-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Traditional evolutionary games assume uniform interaction rate,which means that the rate at which individuals meet and interact is independent of their strategies.But in some systems,especially biological systems,the players interact with each other discriminately.Taylor and Nowak (2006) were the first to establish the corresponding non-uniform interaction rate model by allowing the interaction rates to depend on strategies.Their model is based on replicator dynamics which assumes an infinite size population.But in reality,the number of individuals in the population is always finite,and there will be some random interference in the individuals' strategy selection process.Therefore,it is more practical to establish the corresponding stochastic evolutionary model in finite populations.In fact,the analysis of evolutionary games in a finite size population is more difficult.Just as Taylor and Nowak said in the outlook section of their paper,"The analysis of non-uniform interaction rates should be extended to stochastic game dynamics of finite populations." In this paper,we are exactly doing this work.We extend Taylor and Nowak's model from infinite to finite case,especially focusing on the influence of non-uniform connection characteristics on the evolutionary stable state of the system.We model the strategy evolutionary process of the population by a continuous ergodic Markov process.Based on the fimit distribution of the process,we can give the evolutionary stable state of the system.We make a complete classification of the symmetric 2 × 2 games.For each case game,the corresponding limit distribution of the Markov-based process is given when noise intensity is small enough.In contrast with most literatures in evolutionary games using the simulation method,all our results obtained are analytical.Especially,in the dominant-case game,coexistence of the two strategies may become evolutionary stable states in our model.This result can be used to explain the emergence of

  6. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks, adaptive dynamics and evolutionary rescue theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriere, Regis; Legendre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive dynamics theory has been devised to account for feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary processes. Doing so opens new dimensions to and raises new challenges about evolutionary rescue. Adaptive dynamics theory predicts that successive trait substitutions driven by eco-evolutionary feedbacks can gradually erode population size or growth rate, thus potentially raising the extinction risk. Even a single trait substitution can suffice to degrade population viability drastically at once and cause ‘evolutionary suicide’. In a changing environment, a population may track a viable evolutionary attractor that leads to evolutionary suicide, a phenomenon called ‘evolutionary trapping’. Evolutionary trapping and suicide are commonly observed in adaptive dynamics models in which the smooth variation of traits causes catastrophic changes in ecological state. In the face of trapping and suicide, evolutionary rescue requires that the population overcome evolutionary threats generated by the adaptive process itself. Evolutionary repellors play an important role in determining how variation in environmental conditions correlates with the occurrence of evolutionary trapping and suicide, and what evolutionary pathways rescue may follow. In contrast with standard predictions of evolutionary rescue theory, low genetic variation may attenuate the threat of evolutionary suicide and small population sizes may facilitate escape from evolutionary traps. PMID:23209163

  7. An Evolutionary Algorithm for Multiobjective Fuzzy Portfolio Selection Models with Transaction Cost and Liquidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The major issues for mean-variance-skewness models are the errors in estimations that cause corner solutions and low diversity in the portfolio. In this paper, a multiobjective fuzzy portfolio selection model with transaction cost and liquidity is proposed to maintain the diversity of portfolio. In addition, we have designed a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition of the objective space to maintain the diversity of obtained solutions. The algorithm is used to obtain a set of Pareto-optimal portfolios with good diversity and convergence. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model and algorithm, the performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with the classic MOEA/D and NSGA-II through some numerical examples based on the data of the Shanghai Stock Exchange Market. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm is able to obtain better diversity and more evenly distributed Pareto front than the other two algorithms and the proposed model can maintain quite well the diversity of portfolio. The purpose of this paper is to deal with portfolio problems in the weighted possibilistic mean-variance-skewness (MVS and possibilistic mean-variance-skewness-entropy (MVS-E frameworks with transaction cost and liquidity and to provide different Pareto-optimal investment strategies as diversified as possible for investors at a time, rather than one strategy for investors at a time.

  8. Modeling an aquatic ecosystem: application of an evolutionary algorithm with genetic doping to reduce prediction uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael; Buscema, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic ecosystem models can potentially be used to understand the influence of stresses on catchment resource quality. Given that catchment responses are functions of natural and anthropogenic stresses reflected in sparse and spatiotemporal biological, physical, and chemical measurements, an ecosystem is difficult to model using statistical or numerical methods. We propose an artificial adaptive systems approach to model ecosystems. First, an unsupervised machine-learning (ML) network is trained using the set of available sparse and disparate data variables. Second, an evolutionary algorithm with genetic doping is applied to reduce the number of ecosystem variables to an optimal set. Third, the optimal set of ecosystem variables is used to retrain the ML network. Fourth, a stochastic cross-validation approach is applied to quantify and compare the nonlinear uncertainty in selected predictions of the original and reduced models. Results are presented for aquatic ecosystems (tens of thousands of square kilometers) undergoing landscape change in the USA: Upper Illinois River Basin and Central Colorado Assessment Project Area, and Southland region, NZ.

  9. BIRDS AS A MODEL TO STUDY ADULT NEUROGENESIS: BRIDGING EVOLUTIONARY, COMPARATIVE AND NEUROETHOLOGICAL APPROCHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARNEA, ANAT; PRAVOSUDOV, VLADIMIR

    2011-01-01

    During the last few decades evidence has demonstrated that adult neurogenesis is a well-preserved feature throughout the animal kingdom. In birds, ongoing neuronal addition occurs rather broadly, to a number of brain regions. This review describes adult avian neurogenesis and neuronal recruitment, discusses factors that regulate these processes, and touches upon the question of their genetic control. Several attributes make birds an extremely advantageous model to study neurogenesis. First, song learning exhibits seasonal variation that is associated with seasonal variation in neuronal turnover in some song control brain nuclei, which seems to be regulated via adult neurogenesis. Second, food-caching birds naturally use memory-dependent behavior in learning locations of thousands of food caches scattered over their home ranges. In comparison with other birds, food-caching species have relatively enlarged hippocampi with more neurons and intense neurogenesis, which appears to be related to spatial learning. Finally, migratory behavior and naturally occurring social systems in birds also provide opportunities to investigate neurogenesis. Such diversity of naturally-occurring memory-based behaviors, combined with the fact that birds can be studied both in the wild and in the laboratory, make them ideal for investigation of neural processes underlying learning. This can be done by using various approaches, from evolutionary and comparative to neuroethological and molecular. Finally, we connect the avian arena to a broader view by providing a brief comparative and evolutionary overview of adult neurogenesis and by discussing the possible functional role of the new neurons. We conclude by indicating future directions and possible medical applications. PMID:21929623

  10. Grand challenges in evolutionary and population genetics: The importance of integrating epigenetics, genomics, modeling, and experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman

    2014-01-01

    This is a time of explosive growth in the fields of evolutionary and population genetics, with whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics driving a transformative paradigm shift (Morozova and Marra, 2008). At the same time, advances in epigenetics are thoroughly transforming our understanding of evolutionary processes and their implications for populations, species and...

  11. Advantages of a mechanistic codon substitution model for evolutionary analysis of protein-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanzo Miyazawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A mechanistic codon substitution model, in which each codon substitution rate is proportional to the product of a codon mutation rate and the average fixation probability depending on the type of amino acid replacement, has advantages over nucleotide, amino acid, and empirical codon substitution models in evolutionary analysis of protein-coding sequences. It can approximate a wide range of codon substitution processes. If no selection pressure on amino acids is taken into account, it will become equivalent to a nucleotide substitution model. If mutation rates are assumed not to depend on the codon type, then it will become essentially equivalent to an amino acid substitution model. Mutation at the nucleotide level and selection at the amino acid level can be separately evaluated. RESULTS: The present scheme for single nucleotide mutations is equivalent to the general time-reversible model, but multiple nucleotide changes in infinitesimal time are allowed. Selective constraints on the respective types of amino acid replacements are tailored to each gene in a linear function of a given estimate of selective constraints. Their good estimates are those calculated by maximizing the respective likelihoods of empirical amino acid or codon substitution frequency matrices. Akaike and Bayesian information criteria indicate that the present model performs far better than the other substitution models for all five phylogenetic trees of highly-divergent to highly-homologous sequences of chloroplast, mitochondrial, and nuclear genes. It is also shown that multiple nucleotide changes in infinitesimal time are significant in long branches, although they may be caused by compensatory substitutions or other mechanisms. The variation of selective constraint over sites fits the datasets significantly better than variable mutation rates, except for 10 slow-evolving nuclear genes of 10 mammals. An critical finding for phylogenetic analysis is that

  12. Multivariate dynamic linear models for estimating the effect of experimental interventions in an evolutionary operations setup in dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stygar, Anna Helena; Krogh, Mogens Agerbo; Kristensen, Troels

    2017-01-01

    . The objective of this study was to construct a tool to assess the intervention effect on milk production in an evolutionary operations setup. The method used for this purpose was a dynamic linear model (DLM) with Kalman filtering. The DLM consisted of parameters describing milk yield in a herd, individual cows...

  13. Existence, numerical convergence and evolutionary relaxation for a rate-independent phase-transformation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Sebastian; Mielke, Alexander

    2016-04-28

    We revisit the model for a two-well phase transformation in a linearly elastic body that was introduced and studied in Mielke et al. (2002 Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 162: , 137-177). This energetic rate-independent system is posed in terms of the elastic displacement and an internal variable that gives the phase portion of the second phase. We use a new approach based on mutual recovery sequences, which are adjusted to a suitable energy increment plus the associated dissipated energy and, thus, enable us to pass to the limit in the construction of energetic solutions. We give three distinct constructions of mutual recovery sequences which allow us (i) to generalize the existence result in Mielke et al. (2002), (ii) to establish the convergence of suitable numerical approximations via space-time discretization and (iii) to perform the evolutionary relaxation from the pure-state model to the relaxed-mixture model. All these results rely on weak converge and involve the H-measure as an essential tool.

  14. Integration of approaches in David Wake's model-taxon research platform for evolutionary morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesemer, James

    2013-12-01

    What gets integrated in integrative scientific practices has been a topic of much discussion. Traditional views focus on theories and explanations, with ideas of reduction and unification dominating the conversation. More recent ideas focus on disciplines, fields, or specialties; models, mechanisms, or methods; phenomena, problems. How integration works looks different on each of these views since the objects of integration are ontologically and epistemically various: statements, boundary conditions, practices, protocols, methods, variables, parameters, domains, laboratories, and questions all have their own structures, functions and logics. I focus on one particular kind of scientific practice, integration of "approaches" in the context of a research system operating on a special kind of "platform." Rather than trace a network of interactions among people, practices, and theoretical entities to be integrated, in this essay I focus on the work of a single investigator, David Wake. I describe Wake's practice of integrative evolutionary biology and how his integration of approaches among biological specialties worked in tandem with his development of the salamanders as a model taxon, which he used as a platform to solve, re-work and update problems that would not have been solved so well by non-integrative approaches. The larger goal of the project to which this paper contributes is a counter-narrative to the story of 20th century life sciences as the rise and march of the model organisms and decline of natural history.

  15. Phenotypic evolutionary models in stem cell biology: replacement, quiescence, and variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Mangel

    Full Text Available Phenotypic evolutionary models have been used with great success in many areas of biology, but thus far have not been applied to the study of stem cells except for investigations of cancer. We develop a framework that allows such modeling techniques to be applied to stem cells more generally. The fundamental modeling structure is the stochastic kinetics of stem cells in their niche and of transit amplifying and fully differentiated cells elsewhere in the organism, with positive and negative feedback. This formulation allows graded signals to be turned into all or nothing responses, and shows the importance of looking beyond the niche for understanding how stem cells behave. Using the deterministic version of this framework, we show how competition between different stem cell lines can be analyzed, and under what circumstances stem cells in a niche will be replaced by other stem cells with different phenotypic characteristics. Using the stochastic version of our framework and state dependent life history theory, we show that the optimal behavior of a focal stem cell will involve long periods of quiescence and that a population of identical stem cells will show great variability in the times at which activity occurs; we compare our results with classic ones on quiescence and variability in the hematopoietic system.

  16. Evolutionary transition from biological to social systems via generation of reflexive models of externality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2017-06-24

    Evolutionary transition from biological to social systems corresponds to the emergence of the structure of subject that incorporates the internal image of external world. This structure, established on the basis of referral of the subject (self) to its symbolic image, acquires a potential to rationally describe the external world through the semiotic structure of human language. It has been modelled in reflexive psychology using the algebra of simple relations (Lefebvre, V.A., J. Soc. Biol. Struct. 10, 129-175, 1987). The model introduces a substantial opposition of the two basic complementary types of reflexion defined as Western (W) and Eastern (E). These types generate opposite models of behavior and opposite organizations of societies. Development of human societies involves the interactions of W and E types not only between the societies but also within one society underlying its homeostasis and dynamics. Invention of new ideas and implementation of new technologies shift the probability pattern of reflexive choices, appearing as internal assessments of the individual agents within a society, and direct changes in the preference of reflexive types. The dynamics of societies and of interactions between societies is based on the interference of opposite reflexive structures and on the establishment of different patterns during such interference. At different times of the history of human civilization these changing patterns resulted in the formation and splitting of large empires, the development and spreading of new technologies, the consecutive periods of wellness and decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A sense of life: computational and experimental investigations with models of biochemical and evolutionary processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Bud; Daruwala, Raoul-Sam; Zhou, Yi; Ugel, Nadia; Policriti, Alberto; Antoniotti, Marco; Paxia, Salvatore; Rejali, Marc; Rudra, Archisman; Cherepinsky, Vera; Silver, Naomi; Casey, William; Piazza, Carla; Simeoni, Marta; Barbano, Paolo; Spivak, Marina; Feng, Jiawu; Gill, Ofer; Venkatesh, Mysore; Cheng, Fang; Sun, Bing; Ioniata, Iuliana; Anantharaman, Thomas; Hubbard, E Jane Albert; Pnueli, Amir; Harel, David; Chandru, Vijay; Hariharan, Ramesh; Wigler, Michael; Park, Frank; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Lazebnik, Yuri; Winkler, Franz; Cantor, Charles R; Carbone, Alessandra; Gromov, Mikhael

    2003-01-01

    We collaborate in a research program aimed at creating a rigorous framework, experimental infrastructure, and computational environment for understanding, experimenting with, manipulating, and modifying a diverse set of fundamental biological processes at multiple scales and spatio-temporal modes. The novelty of our research is based on an approach that (i) requires coevolution of experimental science and theoretical techniques and (ii) exploits a certain universality in biology guided by a parsimonious model of evolutionary mechanisms operating at the genomic level and manifesting at the proteomic, transcriptomic, phylogenic, and other higher levels. Our current program in "systems biology" endeavors to marry large-scale biological experiments with the tools to ponder and reason about large, complex, and subtle natural systems. To achieve this ambitious goal, ideas and concepts are combined from many different fields: biological experimentation, applied mathematical modeling, computational reasoning schemes, and large-scale numerical and symbolic simulations. From a biological viewpoint, the basic issues are many: (i) understanding common and shared structural motifs among biological processes; (ii) modeling biological noise due to interactions among a small number of key molecules or loss of synchrony; (iii) explaining the robustness of these systems in spite of such noise; and (iv) cataloging multistatic behavior and adaptation exhibited by many biological processes.

  18. A molecular phylogeny of nephilid spiders: evolutionary history of a model lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntner, Matjaž; Arnedo, Miquel A; Trontelj, Peter; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2013-12-01

    The pantropical orb web spider family Nephilidae is known for the most extreme sexual size dimorphism among terrestrial animals. Numerous studies have made Nephilidae, particularly Nephila, a model lineage in evolutionary research. However, a poorly understood phylogeny of this lineage, relying only on morphology, has prevented thorough evolutionary syntheses of nephilid biology. We here use three nuclear and five mitochondrial genes for 28 out of 40 nephilid species to provide a more robust nephilid phylogeny and infer clade ages in a fossil-calibrated Bayesian framework. We complement the molecular analyses with total evidence analysis including morphology. All analyses find strong support for nephilid monophyly and exclusivity and the monophyly of the genera Herennia and Clitaetra. The inferred phylogenetic structure within Nephilidae is novel and conflicts with morphological phylogeny and traditional taxonomy. Nephilengys species fall into two clades, one with Australasian species (true Nephilengys) as sister to Herennia, and another with Afrotropical species (Nephilingis Kuntner new genus) as sister to a clade containing Clitaetra plus most currently described Nephila. Surprisingly, Nephila is also diphyletic, with true Nephila containing N. pilipes+N. constricta, and the second clade with all other species sister to Clitaetra; this "Nephila" clade is further split into an Australasian clade that also contains the South American N. sexpunctata and the Eurasian N. clavata, and an African clade that also contains the Panamerican N. clavipes. An approximately unbiased test constraining the monophyly of Nephilengys, Nephila, and Nephilinae (Nephila, Nephilengys, Herennia), respectively, rejected Nephilengys monophyly, but not that of Nephila and Nephilinae. Further data are therefore necessary to robustly test these two new, but inconclusive findings, and also to further test the precise placement of Nephilidae within the Araneoidea. For divergence date estimation

  19. Evolutionary Computation:ao Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HeZhenya; WeiChengjian

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary computation is a field of simulating evolution on a computer.Both aspects of it ,the problem solving aspect and the aspect of modeling natural evolution,are important.Simulating evolution on a computer results in stochastic optimization techniques that can outperform classical methods of optimization when applied to difficult real-world problems.There are currently four main avenues of research in simulated evolution:genetic algorithms,evolutionary programming,evolution strategies,and genetic programming.This paper presents a brief overview of thd field on evolutionary computation,including some theoretical issues,adaptive mechanisms,improvements,constrained optimizqtion,constrained satisfaction,evolutionary neural networks,evolutionary fuzzy systems,hardware evolution,evolutionary robotics,parallel evolutionary computation,and co-evolutionary models.The applications of evolutionary computation for optimizing system and intelligent information processing in telecommunications are also introduced.

  20. An Evolutionary Model of the Environmental Conditions that Shape the Development of Prosociality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tumminelli O'Brien

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The current review presents a model for how prosocial development is driven by sociocognitive mechanisms that have been shaped by natural selection to translate critical environmental factors into locally adaptive levels of prosociality. This is done through a synthesis of two existing literatures. Evolutionary developmental psychologists have demonstrated a biological basis for the emergence of prosocial behavior early in youth, and work based on social learning theory has explored how social experiences can influence prosociality across development. The model forwarded organizes this latter literature in a way that is specific to how the biological mechanisms underpinning prosociality have evolved. This consists of two main psychological mechanisms. 1 A domain-specific program that is responsive to environmental factors that determine the relative success of different levels of prosociality. It uses the local prevalence of prosocial others (i.e., support and expectations for prosocial behavior (i.e., structure to guide prosocial development. 2 The domain-general process of cultural learning, by which youth adopt local social norms based on the examples of others. Implications and hypotheses are articulated for both the sociocognitive structure of the individual and the role of social contexts.

  1. Evolution of the habitable zone of low-mass stars. Detailed stellar models and analytical relationships for different masses and chemical compositions

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, G; Moroni, P G Prada; Degl'Innocenti, S

    2014-01-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the habitable zone (HZ) of low-mass stars - only due to stellar evolution - and evaluate the related uncertainties. These uncertainties are then compared with those due to the adoption of different climate models. We computed stellar evolutionary tracks from the pre-main sequence phase to the helium flash at the red-giant branch tip for stars with masses in the range [0.70 - 1.10] Msun, metallicity Z in the range [0.005 - 0.04], and various initial helium contents. We evaluated several characteristics of the HZ, such as the distance from the host star at which the habitability is longest, the duration of this habitability, the width of the zone for which the habitability lasts one half of the maximum, and the boundaries of the continuously habitable zone (CHZ) for which the habitability lasts at least 4 Gyr. We developed analytical models, accurate to the percent level or lower, which allowed to obtain these characteristics in dependence on the mass and the chemical composit...

  2. Exploring the evolutionary origin of floral organs of Erycina pusilla, an emerging orchid model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks-Mulder, Anita; Butôt, Roland; van Schaik, Peter; Wijnands, Jan Willem P M; van den Berg, Roel; Krol, Louie; Doebar, Sadhana; van Kooperen, Kelly; de Boer, Hugo; Kramer, Elena M; Smets, Erik F; Vos, Rutger A; Vrijdaghs, Alexander; Gravendeel, Barbara

    2017-03-23

    Thousands of flowering plant species attract pollinators without offering rewards, but the evolution of this deceit is poorly understood. Rewardless flowers of the orchid Erycina pusilla have an enlarged median sepal and incised median petal ('lip') to attract oil-collecting bees. These bees also forage on similar looking but rewarding Malpighiaceae flowers that have five unequally sized petals and gland-carrying sepals. The lip of E. pusilla has a 'callus' that, together with winged 'stelidia', mimics these glands. Different hypotheses exist about the evolutionary origin of the median sepal, callus and stelidia of orchid flowers. The evolutionary origin of these organs was investigated using a combination of morphological, molecular and phylogenetic techniques to a developmental series of floral buds of E. pusilla. The vascular bundle of the median sepal indicates it is a first whorl organ but its convex epidermal cells reflect convergence of petaloid features. Expression of AGL6 EpMADS4 and APETALA3 EpMADS14 is low in the median sepal, possibly correlating with its petaloid appearance. A vascular bundle indicating second whorl derivation leads to the lip. AGL6 EpMADS5 and APETALA3 EpMADS13 are most highly expressed in lip and callus, consistent with current models for lip identity. Six vascular bundles, indicating a stamen-derived origin, lead to the callus, stelidia and stamen. AGAMOUS is not expressed in the callus, consistent with its sterilization. Out of three copies of AGAMOUS and four copies of SEPALLATA, EpMADS22 and EpMADS6 are most highly expressed in the stamen. Another copy of AGAMOUS, EpMADS20, and the single copy of SEEDSTICK, EpMADS23, are most highly expressed in the stelidia, suggesting EpMADS22 may be required for fertile stamens. The median sepal, callus and stelidia of E. pusilla appear to be derived from a sepal, a stamen that gained petal identity, and stamens, respectively. Duplications, diversifying selection and changes in spatial

  3. SWISS-MODEL: modelling protein tertiary and quaternary structure using evolutionary information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasini, Marco; Bienert, Stefan; Waterhouse, Andrew; Arnold, Konstantin; Studer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Tobias; Kiefer, Florian; Gallo Cassarino, Tiziano; Bertoni, Martino; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2014-07-01

    Protein structure homology modelling has become a routine technique to generate 3D models for proteins when experimental structures are not available. Fully automated servers such as SWISS-MODEL with user-friendly web interfaces generate reliable models without the need for complex software packages or downloading large databases. Here, we describe the latest version of the SWISS-MODEL expert system for protein structure modelling. The SWISS-MODEL template library provides annotation of quaternary structure and essential ligands and co-factors to allow for building of complete structural models, including their oligomeric structure. The improved SWISS-MODEL pipeline makes extensive use of model quality estimation for selection of the most suitable templates and provides estimates of the expected accuracy of the resulting models. The accuracy of the models generated by SWISS-MODEL is continuously evaluated by the CAMEO system. The new web site allows users to interactively search for templates, cluster them by sequence similarity, structurally compare alternative templates and select the ones to be used for model building. In cases where multiple alternative template structures are available for a protein of interest, a user-guided template selection step allows building models in different functional states. SWISS-MODEL is available at http://swissmodel.expasy.org/.

  4. Sequential modeling of fecal coliform removals in a full-scale activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant using an evolutionary process model induction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Chang-Won; Lee, Joong-Won; Hong, Yoon-Seok Timothy; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2009-01-01

    We propose an evolutionary process model induction system that is based on the grammar-based genetic programming to automatically discover multivariate dynamic inference models that are able to predict fecal coliform bacteria removals using common process variables instead of directly measuring fecal coliform bacteria concentration in a full-scale municipal activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant. A sequential modeling paradigm is also proposed to derive multivariate dynamic models of fecal coliform removals in the evolutionary process model induction system. It is composed of two parts, the process estimator and the process predictor. The process estimator acts as an intelligent software sensor to achieve a good estimation of fecal coliform bacteria concentration in the influent. Then the process predictor yields sequential prediction of the effluent fecal coliform bacteria concentration based on the estimated fecal coliform bacteria concentration in the influent from the process estimator with other process variables. The results show that the evolutionary process model induction system with a sequential modeling paradigm has successfully evolved multivariate dynamic models of fecal coliform removals in the form of explicit mathematical formulas with high levels of accuracy and good generalization. The evolutionary process model induction system with sequential modeling paradigm proposed here provides a good alternative to develop cost-effective dynamic process models for a full-scale wastewater treatment plant and is readily applicable to a variety of other complex treatment processes.

  5. Computational Models of Financial Price Prediction: A Survey of Neural Networks, Kernel Machines and Evolutionary Computation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sandoval

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of the representative models of machine learning research applied to the foreign exchange rate and stock price prediction problem is conducted.  The article is organized as follows: The first section provides a context on the definitions and importance of foreign exchange rate and stock markets.  The second section reviews machine learning models for financial prediction focusing on neural networks, SVM and evolutionary methods. Lastly, the third section draws some conclusions.

  6. Effective hybrid evolutionary computational algorithms for global optimization and applied to construct prion AGAAAAGA fibril models

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms are parallel computing algorithms and simulated annealing algorithm is a sequential computing algorithm. This paper inserts simulated annealing into evolutionary computations and successful developed a hybrid Self-Adaptive Evolutionary Strategy $\\mu+\\lambda$ method and a hybrid Self-Adaptive Classical Evolutionary Programming method. Numerical results on more than 40 benchmark test problems of global optimization show that the hybrid methods presented in this paper are very effective. Lennard-Jones potential energy minimization is another benchmark for testing new global optimization algorithms. It is studied through the amyloid fibril constructions by this paper. To date, there is little molecular structural data available on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins.This region belongs to the N-terminal unstructured region (1-123) of prion proteins, the structure of which has proved hard to determine using NMR spectroscopy or X-ray crystallography ...

  7. NexGen PVAs: Incorporating Eco-Evolutionary Processes into Population Viability Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examine how the integration of evolutionary and ecological processes in population dynamics – an emerging framework in ecology – could be incorporated into population viability analysis (PVA). Driven by parallel, complementary advances in population genomics and computational ...

  8. Asteroseismological Study of Massive ZZ Ceti Stars with Fully Evolutionary Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, A. D.; Kepler, S. O.; Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.; Fraga, L.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first asteroseismological study for 42 massive ZZ Ceti stars based on a large set of fully evolutionary carbon-oxygen core DA white dwarf models characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. Our sample comprises all of the ZZ Ceti stars with spectroscopic stellar masses between 0.72 and 1.05 M ⊙ known to date. The asteroseismological analysis of a set of 42 stars enables study of the ensemble properties of the massive, pulsating white dwarf stars with carbon-oxygen cores, in particular the thickness of the hydrogen envelope and the stellar mass. A significant fraction of stars in our sample have stellar mass that is high enough to crystallize at the effective temperatures of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, which enables us to study the effects of crystallization on the pulsation properties of these stars. Our results show that the phase diagram presented in Horowitz et al. seems to be a good representation of the crystallization process inside white dwarf stars, in agreement with the results from white dwarf luminosity function in globular clusters.

  9. Asteroseismological study of massive ZZ Ceti stars with fully evolutionary models

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, A D; Córsico, A H; Althaus, L G; Fraga, L

    2013-01-01

    We present the first asteroseismological study for 42 massive ZZ Ceti stars based on a large set of fully evolutionary carbon$-$oxygen core DA white dwarf models characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. Our sample comprise all the ZZ Ceti stars with spectroscopic stellar masses between 0.72 and $1.05M_{\\odot}$ known to date. The asteroseismological analysis of a set of 42 stars gives the possibility to study the ensemble properties of the massive pulsating white dwarf stars with carbon$-$oxygen cores, in particular the thickness of the hydrogen envelope and the stellar mass. A significant fraction of stars in our sample have stellar mass high enough as to crystallize at the effective temperatures of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, which enables us to study the effects of crystallization on the pulsation properties of these stars. Our results show that the phase diagram presented in Horowitz et al. (2010) seems to be a good representation of the crystalliz...

  10. Asteroseismological study of massive ZZ Ceti stars with fully evolutionary models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, A. D.; Kepler, S. O. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil); Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Fraga, L., E-mail: alejandra.romero@ufrgs.br [Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-12-10

    We present the first asteroseismological study for 42 massive ZZ Ceti stars based on a large set of fully evolutionary carbon-oxygen core DA white dwarf models characterized by a detailed and consistent chemical inner profile for the core and the envelope. Our sample comprises all of the ZZ Ceti stars with spectroscopic stellar masses between 0.72 and 1.05 M {sub ☉} known to date. The asteroseismological analysis of a set of 42 stars enables study of the ensemble properties of the massive, pulsating white dwarf stars with carbon-oxygen cores, in particular the thickness of the hydrogen envelope and the stellar mass. A significant fraction of stars in our sample have stellar mass that is high enough to crystallize at the effective temperatures of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, which enables us to study the effects of crystallization on the pulsation properties of these stars. Our results show that the phase diagram presented in Horowitz et al. seems to be a good representation of the crystallization process inside white dwarf stars, in agreement with the results from white dwarf luminosity function in globular clusters.

  11. An evolutionary attractor model for sapwood cross section in relation to leaf area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westoby, Mark; Cornwell, William K; Falster, Daniel S

    2012-06-21

    Sapwood cross-sectional area per unit leaf area (SA:LA) is an influential trait that plants coordinate with physical environment and with other traits. We develop theory for SA:LA and also for root surface area per leaf area (RA:LA) on the premise that plants maximizing the surplus of revenue over costs should have competitive advantage. SA:LA is predicted to increase in water-relations environments that reduce photosynthetic revenue, including low soil water potential, high water vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and low atmospheric CO(2). Because sapwood has costs, SA:LA adjustment does not completely offset difficult water relations. Where sapwood costs are large, as in tall plants, optimal SA:LA may actually decline with (say) high VPD. Large soil-to-root resistance caps the benefits that can be obtained from increasing SA:LA. Where a plant can adjust water-absorbing surface area of root per leaf area (RA:LA) as well as SA:LA, optimal RA:SA is not affected by VPD, CO(2) or plant height. If selection favours increased height more so than increased revenue-minus-cost, then height is predicted to rise substantially under improved water-relations environments such as high-CO(2) atmospheres. Evolutionary-attractor theory for SA:LA and RA:LA complements models that take whole-plant conductivity per leaf area as a parameter. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stochastic eco-evolutionary model of a prey-predator community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Manon; Hauzy, Céline; Loeuille, Nicolas; Méléard, Sylvie

    2016-02-01

    We are interested in the impact of natural selection in a prey-predator community. We introduce an individual-based model of the community that takes into account both prey and predator phenotypes. Our aim is to understand the phenotypic coevolution of prey and predators. The community evolves as a multi-type birth and death process with mutations. We first consider the infinite particle approximation of the process without mutation. In this limit, the process can be approximated by a system of differential equations. We prove the existence of a unique globally asymptotically stable equilibrium under specific conditions on the interaction among prey individuals. When mutations are rare, the community evolves on the mutational scale according to a Markovian jump process. This process describes the successive equilibria of the prey-predator community and extends the polymorphic evolutionary sequence to a coevolutionary framework. We then assume that mutations have a small impact on phenotypes and consider the evolution of monomorphic prey and predator populations. The limit of small mutation steps leads to a system of two differential equations which is a version of the canonical equation of adaptive dynamics for the prey-predator coevolution. We illustrate these different limits with an example of prey-predator community that takes into account different prey defense mechanisms. We observe through simulations how these various prey strategies impact the community.

  13. Motion sickness: an evolutionary and genetic basis for the negative reinforcement model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Glenn W

    2014-01-01

    It has been theorized that motion sickness evolved as a negative reinforcement system which terminates motion involving postural instability and/or sensory conflict. A hypothetical example is provided by a "thought experiment" whereby protohominids are in a tree looking for food. Selection pressure results when the organisms that have an aversion to motion-producing sensory conflict do not venture out too far on the tree limbs and therefore tend to survive. In order to support an evolutionary model for motion sickness there must be evidence for genetic and/or heritable predisposition. The present study involves a retrospective literature review which reveals abundant evidence for genetic/heritable factors in motion sickness. Examples include genetic polymorphism of the alpha-2-adrenergic receptor, which has been shown to increase susceptibility to motion sickness, examination of family trees revealing heritable motion sickness susceptibility, evidence indicating that Asians are hyper-susceptible to motion sickness, and twin studies, just to mention a few. Thus, the theory of heritable negative reinforcement as a basis for motion sickness is supported by extensive evidence in the medical literature. This theory is compared and contrasted with other theories. Further areas for research are suggested.

  14. Homology modeling and evolutionary trace analysis of superoxide dismutase from extremophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The gene sod in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans may play a crucial role in its tolerance to the extremely acidic, toxic and oxidative environment of bioleaching. For insight into the anti-toxic mechanism of the bacteria, a three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of the protein encoded by this gene was built by homology modeling techniques, refined by molecular dynamics simulations, assessed by PROFILE-3D and PROSTAT programs and its key residues were further detected by evolutionary trace analysis. Through these procedures, some trace residues were identified and spatially clustered. Among them, the residues of Asn38, Gly103 and Glu161 are randomly scattered throughout the mapped structure; interestingly, the other residues are all distinctly clustered in a subgroup near Fe atom. From these results, this gene can be confirmed at 3D level to encode the Fe-depending superoxide dismutase and subsequently play an anti-toxic role. Furthermore, the detected key residues around Fe binding site can be conjectured to be directly responsible for Fe binding and catalytic function.

  15. Multimethod evolutionary search for the regional calibration of rainfall-runoff models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Laura; Castiglioni, Simone; Toth, Elena; Castellarin, Attilio; Montanari, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    The study focuses on regional calibration for a generic rainfall-runoff model. The maximum likelihood function in the spectral domain proposed by Whittle is approximated in the time domain by maximising the simultaneous fit (through a multiobjective optimisation) of selected statistics of streamflow values, with the aim to propose a calibration procedure that can be applied at regional scale. The method may in fact be applied without the availability of actual time series of streamflow observations, since it is based exclusively on the selected statistics, that are here obtained on the basis of the dominant climate and catchment characteristics, through regional regression relationships. The multiobjective optimisation was carried out by using a recently proposed multimethod evolutionary search algorithm (AMALGAM, Vrugt and Robinson, 2007), that runs simultaneously, for population evolution, a set of different optimisation methods (namely NSGA-II, Differential Evolution, Adaptive Metropolis Search and Particle Swarm Optimisation), resulting in a combination of the respective strengths by adaptively updating the weights of these individual methods based on their reproductive success. This ensures a fast, reliable and computationally efficient solution to multiobjective optimisation problems. The proposed technique is applied to the case study of some catchments located in central Italy, which are treated as ungauged and are located in a region where detailed hydrological and geomorfoclimatic information is available. The results obtained with the regional calibration are compared with those provided by a classical least squares calibration in the time domain. The outcomes of the analysis confirm the potentialities of the proposed methodology.

  16. Comparative and Evolutionary Analysis of Grass Pollen Allergens Using Brachypodium distachyon as a Model System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Akanksha; Sharma, Niharika; Bhalla, Prem; Singh, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Comparative genomics have facilitated the mining of biological information from a genome sequence, through the detection of similarities and differences with genomes of closely or more distantly related species. By using such comparative approaches, knowledge can be transferred from the model to non-model organisms and insights can be gained in the structural and evolutionary patterns of specific genes. In the absence of sequenced genomes for allergenic grasses, this study was aimed at understanding the structure, organisation and expression profiles of grass pollen allergens using the genomic data from Brachypodium distachyon as it is phylogenetically related to the allergenic grasses. Combining genomic data with the anther RNA-Seq dataset revealed 24 pollen allergen genes belonging to eight allergen groups mapping on the five chromosomes in B. distachyon. High levels of anther-specific expression profiles were observed for the 24 identified putative allergen-encoding genes in Brachypodium. The genomic evidence suggests that gene encoding the group 5 allergen, the most potent trigger of hay fever and allergic asthma originated as a pollen specific orphan gene in a common grass ancestor of Brachypodium and Triticiae clades. Gene structure analysis showed that the putative allergen-encoding genes in Brachypodium either lack or contain reduced number of introns. Promoter analysis of the identified Brachypodium genes revealed the presence of specific cis-regulatory sequences likely responsible for high anther/pollen-specific expression. With the identification of putative allergen-encoding genes in Brachypodium, this study has also described some important plant gene families (e.g. expansin superfamily, EF-Hand family, profilins etc) for the first time in the model plant Brachypodium. Altogether, the present study provides new insights into structural characterization and evolution of pollen allergens and will further serve as a base for their functional

  17. Development of a population of cancer cells: Observation and modeling by a Mixed Spatial Evolutionary Games approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świerniak, Andrzej; Krześlak, Michał; Student, Sebastian; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2016-09-21

    Living cells, like whole living organisms during evolution, communicate with their neighbors, interact with the environment, divide, change their phenotypes, and eventually die. The development of specific ways of communication (through signaling molecules and receptors) allows some cellular subpopulations to survive better, to coordinate their physiological status, and during embryonal development to create tissues and organs or in some conditions to become tumors. Populations of cells cultured in vitro interact similarly, also competing for space and nutrients and stimulating each other to better survive or to die. The results of these intercellular interactions of different types seem to be good examples of biological evolutionary games, and have been the subjects of simulations by the methods of evolutionary game theory where individual cells are treated as players. Here we present examples of intercellular contacts in a population of living human cancer HeLa cells cultured in vitro and propose an evolutionary game theory approach to model the development of such populations. We propose a new technique termed Mixed Spatial Evolutionary Games (MSEG) which are played on multiple lattices corresponding to the possible cellular phenotypes which gives the possibility of simulating and investigating the effects of heterogeneity at the cellular level in addition to the population level. Analyses performed with MSEG suggested different ways in which cellular populations develop in the case of cells communicating directly and through factors released to the environment.

  18. Violence in mental disorders and community sample: an evolutionary model related with dominance in social relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montañés-Rada, F; Ramírez, J M; De Lucas Taracena, M T

    2006-01-01

    The major risk determinants of violence are to be young and male, to have low socioeconomic status and suffering substance abuse. This is true whether it occurs in the context of a concurrent mental illness or not; i.e., mental disorders are neither necessary, nor sufficient causes for violence. Intense motivation is a facilitating factor for violence in clinical and non clinical samples. This explains why 'normal' people, are implicated in planned violence at higher rates than mentally ill (e.g. in criminal acts against property). However mentally ill patients are more easily implicated in impulsive violence or in violence without obvious cause due to veiled motivation fuelled by unidentified symptoms. Subjective or real awareness of competitive disadvantage increases motivation for violence (e.g. paranoid, narcissistic symptoms, etc.). Many psychiatric disorders as antisocial disorder, borderline, schizophrenia, have most of the factors that facilitate the appearance of violence. Antisocial disorder is a good model to study determinants of violence in normal samples as it is present in young males that do not have any psychotic symptom, have stable symptomatology, self control under scrutiny, and their motivations are similar to normal samples. Our evolutionary model suggests that there is a non random association of genetic factors (genes, pseudogenes, promoting areas, etc.), that is, a genetic cluster (cluster DO), whose phylogenetic function is to motivate to be the dominant in social relationships. To be the dominant is a major psychological feature present in many social groups of animals, included primates. DO cluster have sense from an evolutionary viewpoint: when expressed in no pathological way it increases inclusive fitness (transmission of the genes of a person genotype whether by oneself or by relatives reproduction). Features of cluster DO in humans are expressed differently according to sex, age, moral education, level of intelligence, etc. Cluster

  19. Testing Model Atmospheres for Young Very-low-mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in the Infrared: Evidence for Significantly Underestimated Dust Opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tottle, Jonathan; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2015-05-01

    We test state-of-the-art model atmospheres for young very-low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in the infrared, by comparing the predicted synthetic photometry over 1.2-24 μm to the observed photometry of M-type spectral templates in star-forming regions. We find that (1) in both early and late young M types, the model atmospheres imply effective temperatures ({{T}eff}) several hundred Kelvin lower than predicted by the standard pre-main sequence (PMS) spectral type-{{T}eff} conversion scale (based on theoretical evolutionary models). It is only in the mid-M types that the two temperature estimates agree. (2) The {{T}eff} discrepancy in the early M types (corresponding to stellar masses ≳ 0.4 {{M}⊙ } at ages of a few Myr) probably arises from remaining uncertainties in the treatment of atmospheric convection within the atmospheric models, whereas in the late M types it is likely due to an underestimation of dust opacity. (3) The empirical and model-atmosphere J-band bolometric corrections are both roughly flat, and similar to each other, over the M-type {{T}eff} range. Thus the model atmospheres yield reasonably accurate bolometric luminosities ({{L}bol}), but lead to underestimations of mass and age relative to evolutionary expectations (especially in the late M types) due to lower {{T}eff}. We demonstrate this for a large sample of young Cha I and Taurus sources. (4) The trends in the atmospheric model J-Ks colors, and their deviations from the data, are similar at PMS and main sequence ages, suggesting that the model dust opacity errors we postulate here for young ages also apply at field ages.

  20. Evolutionary Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    The concept of evolutionary expectations descends from cue learning psychology, synthesizing ideas on rational expectations with ideas on bounded rationality, to provide support for these ideas simultaneously. Evolutionary expectations are rational, but within cognitive bounds. Moreover...... cognitive bounds will perceive business opportunities identically. In addition, because cues provide information about latent causal structures of the environment, changes in causality must be accompanied by changes in cognitive representations if adaptation is to be maintained. The concept of evolutionary...

  1. Intention recognition, commitment and their roles in the evolution of cooperation from artificial intelligence techniques to evolutionary game theory models

    CERN Document Server

    Han, The Anh

    2013-01-01

    This original and timely monograph describes a unique self-contained excursion that reveals to the readers the roles of two basic cognitive abilities, i.e. intention recognition and arranging commitments, in the evolution of cooperative behavior. This book analyses intention recognition, an important ability that helps agents predict others’ behavior, in its artificial intelligence and evolutionary computational modeling aspects, and proposes a novel intention recognition method. Furthermore, the book presents a new framework for intention-based decision making and illustrates several ways in which an ability to recognize intentions of others can enhance a decision making process. By employing the new intention recognition method and the tools of evolutionary game theory, this book introduces computational models demonstrating that intention recognition promotes the emergence of cooperation within populations of self-regarding agents. Finally, the book describes how commitment provides a pathway to the evol...

  2. Simple parameter estimation for complex models — Testing evolutionary techniques on 3-dimensional biogeochemical ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Jann Paul; Edwards, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    Parameter estimation is an important part of numerical modeling and often required when a coupled physical-biogeochemical ocean model is first deployed. However, 3-dimensional ocean model simulations are computationally expensive and models typically contain upwards of 10 parameters suitable for estimation. Hence, manual parameter tuning can be lengthy and cumbersome. Here, we present four easy to implement and flexible parameter estimation techniques and apply them to two 3-dimensional biogeochemical models of different complexities. Based on a Monte Carlo experiment, we first develop a cost function measuring the model-observation misfit based on multiple data types. The parameter estimation techniques are then applied and yield a substantial cost reduction over ∼ 100 simulations. Based on the outcome of multiple replicate experiments, they perform on average better than random, uninformed parameter search but performance declines when more than 40 parameters are estimated together. Our results emphasize the complex cost function structure for biogeochemical parameters and highlight dependencies between different parameters as well as different cost function formulations.

  3. Depression as an evolutionary adaptation: implications for the development of preclinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrie, C A; Pickles, A R

    2009-03-01

    Several authors have suggested that rather than being a disease state, depression is an evolutionary adaptation to human social organization. Adaptations are produced in response to selection pressures and similar adaptations may easily have evolved in a range of other species. The current paper seeks to identify the social pressures that may lead to a species developing depression as an adaptation and the potential benefits that this may confer. It also examines whether rats and mice, the species most commonly used to model depression in the laboratory, have social organizations in which selection pressures towards the development of depression as an adaptation are likely to exist. It is proposed that depression is a useful adaptation in group-living animals, where there is competition for a social rank that gives reproductive advantage over others. The cluster of symptoms associated with depression include altered activity patterns, reduced sociability and appetite, and increased submissiveness. This combination strongly suggests that the function of depression is to reduce the likelihood of an individual being subject to further attack once they have lost social status and so increase their chances of survival in the period immediately following this. Successful transition from high to low status may provide further opportunities to reproduce. Hence, animals that become depressed during this critical period gain a reproductive advantage over those that do not, as these are either killed or expelled from the group. Wild mice do not have social hierarchies and are highly territorial. Wild rats do have social hierarchies however these only compete for reproductive advantage at the level of the sperm, and social status does not translate into significantly greater access to mates. Therefore, there are no selection pressures in these species towards the development of depression and so it is most unlikely that rats and mice have this adaptation. It is concluded that

  4. Obscured Supermassive Black Hole Growth - Connections to Host Galaxies and Evolutionary Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPompeo, Michael A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Myers, Adam D.

    2017-08-01

    A large fraction of the supermassive black hole growth in the Universe is hidden from view behind thick columns of dust. The most heavily obscured quasars can be challenging to detect even with current high energy X-ray observatories such as NuSTAR - however with infrared observations that can detect the hot nuclear dust in even the most enshrouded systems, we are now beginning to characterize large populations of these hidden monsters.With roughly half-a-million quasars selected with WISE, we have found via clustering and CMB lensing cross-correlation measurements that obscured quasars reside in dark matter halos 0.5 dex more massive than unobscured quasars. This implies that obscuration is directly linked to host galaxy properties, and not simply the dust geometry around the quasar. Using cross-correlations we accurately characterize the redshift distribution of the obscured quasar population, confirming that it peaks at z = 1, and using long-wavelength bands find that it has a similar bolometric luminosity distribution as unobscured quasars as well. Finally, using a simple model based on empirical relationships between halo, stellar, and black hole masses, we show that an evolutionary sequence from obscured to unobscured quasar, combined with a flux limit, can predict the observed halo mass differences.Studies of the most obscured quasars provide valuable insights on the rapid growth of the most massive black holes in the Universe, and motivates future work with the next generation high energy observatories such as eROSITA, Athena, and Lynx.

  5. Induction of diploid gynogenesis in an evolutionary model organism, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scharsack Jörn P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid advances in genomics have provided nearly complete genome sequences for many different species. However, no matter how the sequencing technology has improved, natural genetic polymorphism complicates the production of high quality reference genomes. To address this problem, researchers have tried using artificial modes of genome manipulation such as gynogenesis for fast production of inbred lines. Results Here, we present the first successful induction of diploid gynogenesis in an evolutionary model system, the three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus, using a combination of UV-irradiation of the sperm and heat shock (HS of the resulting embryo to inhibit the second meiotic division. Optimal UV irradiation of the sperm was established by exposing stickleback sperm to a UV- light source at various times. Heat shock parameters like temperature, duration, and time of initiation were tested by subjecting eggs fertilized with UV inactivated sperm 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, or 30 minutes post fertilization (mpf to 30°C, 34°C, or 38°C for 2, 4, 6 or 8 minutes. Gynogen yield was highest when stickleback eggs were activated with 2 minutes UV-irradiated sperm and received HS 5 mpf at 34°C for 4 minutes. Conclusions Diploid gynogenesis has been successfully performed in three-spined stickleback. This has been confirmed by microsatellite DNA analysis which revealed exclusively maternal inheritance in all gynogenetic fry tested. Ploidy verification by flow cytometry showed that gynogenetic embryos/larvae exhibiting abnormalities were haploids and those that developed normally were diploids, i.e., double haploids that can be raised until adult size.

  6. Bio-inspired evolutionary oral tract shape modeling for physical modeling vocal synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David M; Tyrrell, Andy M; Murphy, Damian T; Cooper, Crispin; Mullen, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Physical modeling using digital waveguide mesh (DWM) models is an audio synthesis method that has been shown to produce an acoustic output in music synthesis applications that is often described as being "organic," "warm," or "intimate." This paper describes work that takes its inspiration from physical modeling music synthesis and applies it to speech synthesis through a physical modeling mesh model of the human oral tract. Oral tract shapes are found using a computational technique based on the principles of biological evolution. Essential to successful speech synthesis using this method is accurate measurements of the cross-sectional area of the human oral tract, and these are usually derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, such images are nonideal, because of the lengthy exposure time (relative to the time of articulation of speech sounds) required, the local ambient acoustic noise associated with the MRI machine itself and the required supine position for the subject. An alternative method is described where a bio-inspired computing technique that simulates the process of evolution is used to evolve oral tract shapes. This technique is able to produce appropriate oral tract shapes for open vowels using acoustic and excitation data from two adult males and two adult females, but shapes for close vowels that are less appropriate. This technique has none of the drawbacks associated with MRI, because all it requires from the subject is an acoustic and electrolaryngograph (or electroglottograph) recording. Appropriate oral tract shapes do enable the model to produce excellent quality synthetic speech for vowel sounds, and sounds that involve dynamic oral tract shape changes, such as diphthongs, can also be synthesized using an impedance mapped technique. Efforts to improve performance by reducing mesh quantization for close vowels had little effect, and further work is required.

  7. Evolutionary Demography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levitis, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    of biological and cultural evolution. Demographic variation within and among human populations is influenced by our biology, and therefore by natural selection and our evolutionary background. Demographic methods are necessary for studying populations of other species, and for quantifying evolutionary fitness...

  8. Homological evolutionary vector fields in Korteweg-de Vries, Liouville, Maxwell, and several other models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiselev, Arthemy V.

    2012-01-01

    We review the construction of homological evolutionary vector fields on infinite jet spaces and partial differential equations. We describe the applications of this concept in three tightly inter-related domains: the variational Poisson formalism (e.g., for equations of Korteweg-de Vries type), geom

  9. Empirical Support for an Evolutionary Model of Self-Destructive Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. Michael; Brown, Stephanie L.; Johnson, Aron; Olsen, Berit; Melver, Kristen; Sullivan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We tested predictions generated from an evolutionary account of self-destructive motivation in two survey studies of 18-24-year-old university students. As hypothesized, hierarchical regressions showed that the positive relationship between perceived burden to family and suicide ideation was amplified for participants with low measured health and…

  10. Evolutionary modeling and correcting for observation error support a 3/5 brain-body allometry for primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Mark; Voje, Kjetil L; Hansen, Thomas F

    2016-05-01

    The tight brain-body allometry across mammals and primates has motivated and informed many hypotheses about brain evolution in humans and other taxa. While a 2/3 or a 3/4 scaling is often at the core of such research, such exponents are derived from estimates based on particular statistical and evolutionary assumptions without careful consideration of how either may influence findings. Here we quantify primate brain-body allometry using phylogenetic comparative methods based on models of both adaptive and constrained evolution, and estimate and account for observational error in both response and predictor variables. Our results supported an evolutionary model in which brain size is directly constrained to evolve in unison with body size, rather than adapting to changes in the latter. The effects of controlling for phylogeny and observation error were substantial, and our analysis yielded a novel 3/5 scaling exponent for primate brain-body evolutionary allometry. Using this exponent with the latest brain- and body-size estimates to calculate new encephalization quotients for apes, humans, and fossil hominins, we found early hominins were substantially more encephalized than previously thought. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Towards an Extended Evolutionary Game Theory with Survival Analysis and Agreement Algorithms for Modeling Uncertainty, Vulnerability, and Deception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhanshan (Sam)

    Competition, cooperation and communication are the three fundamental relationships upon which natural selection acts in the evolution of life. Evolutionary game theory (EGT) is a 'marriage' between game theory and Darwin's evolution theory; it gains additional modeling power and flexibility by adopting population dynamics theory. In EGT, natural selection acts as optimization agents and produces inherent strategies, which eliminates some essential assumptions in traditional game theory such as rationality and allows more realistic modeling of many problems. Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) and Sir Philip Sidney (SPS) games are two well-known examples of EGT, which are formulated to study cooperation and communication, respectively. Despite its huge success, EGT exposes a certain degree of weakness in dealing with time-, space- and covariate-dependent (i.e., dynamic) uncertainty, vulnerability and deception. In this paper, I propose to extend EGT in two ways to overcome the weakness. First, I introduce survival analysis modeling to describe the lifetime or fitness of game players. This extension allows more flexible and powerful modeling of the dynamic uncertainty and vulnerability (collectively equivalent to the dynamic frailty in survival analysis). Secondly, I introduce agreement algorithms, which can be the Agreement algorithms in distributed computing (e.g., Byzantine Generals Problem [6][8], Dynamic Hybrid Fault Models [12]) or any algorithms that set and enforce the rules for players to determine their consensus. The second extension is particularly useful for modeling dynamic deception (e.g., asymmetric faults in fault tolerance and deception in animal communication). From a computational perspective, the extended evolutionary game theory (EEGT) modeling, when implemented in simulation, is equivalent to an optimization methodology that is similar to evolutionary computing approaches such as Genetic algorithms with dynamic populations [15][17].

  12. Assessing variation in life-history tactics within a population using mixture regression models: a practical guide for evolutionary ecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Sandra; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2017-05-01

    Mixed models are now well-established methods in ecology and evolution because they allow accounting for and quantifying within- and between-individual variation. However, the required normal distribution of the random effects can often be violated by the presence of clusters among subjects, which leads to multi-modal distributions. In such cases, using what is known as mixture regression models might offer a more appropriate approach. These models are widely used in psychology, sociology, and medicine to describe the diversity of trajectories occurring within a population over time (e.g. psychological development, growth). In ecology and evolution, however, these models are seldom used even though understanding changes in individual trajectories is an active area of research in life-history studies. Our aim is to demonstrate the value of using mixture models to describe variation in individual life-history tactics within a population, and hence to promote the use of these models by ecologists and evolutionary ecologists. We first ran a set of simulations to determine whether and when a mixture model allows teasing apart latent clustering, and to contrast the precision and accuracy of estimates obtained from mixture models versus mixed models under a wide range of ecological contexts. We then used empirical data from long-term studies of large mammals to illustrate the potential of using mixture models for assessing within-population variation in life-history tactics. Mixture models performed well in most cases, except for variables following a Bernoulli distribution and when sample size was small. The four selection criteria we evaluated [Akaike information criterion (AIC), Bayesian information criterion (BIC), and two bootstrap methods] performed similarly well, selecting the right number of clusters in most ecological situations. We then showed that the normality of random effects implicitly assumed by evolutionary ecologists when using mixed models was often

  13. A system dynamics model based on evolutionary game theory for green supply chain management diffusion among Chinese manufacturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Yihui; Govindan, Kannan; Zhu, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a system dynamics (SD) model is developed to guide the subsidy policies to promote the diffusion of green supply chain management (GSCM) in China. The relationships of stakeholders such as government, enterprises and consumers are analyzed through evolutionary game theory. Finally......, the GSCM diffusion process is simulated by the model with a case study on Chinese automotive manufacturing industry. The results show that the subsidies for manufacturers are better than that for consumers to promote GSCM diffusion, and the environmental awareness is another influential key factor. © 2014...

  14. Restart Operator Meta-heuristics for a Problem-Oriented Evolutionary Strategies Algorithm in Inverse Mathematical MISO Modelling Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, I. S.; Semenkin, E. S.

    2017-02-01

    This study is focused on solving an inverse mathematical modelling problem for dynamical systems based on observation data and control inputs. The mathematical model is being searched in the form of a linear differential equation, which determines the system with multiple inputs and a single output, and a vector of the initial point coordinates. The described problem is complex and multimodal and for this reason the proposed evolutionary-based optimization technique, which is oriented on a dynamical system identification problem, was applied. To improve its performance an algorithm restart operator was implemented.

  15. The ecological stress theory of aging and hormesis: an energetic evolutionary model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Peter A

    2007-06-01

    Free-living organisms normally struggle to exist in harsh environments that are nutritionally and energetically inadequate, where evolutionary adaptation is challenged by internal stresses within organisms and external stresses from the environment. The incorporation of environmental variables into aging theories such as the free-radical and metabolic rate/oxidative stress theories, is the basis of the ecological stress theory of aging and hormesis. Environmental variation from optimum to lethal extremes gives a fitness-stress continuum, where energetic efficiency, or fitness, is inversely related to stress level; in the evolutionary context survival is a more direct measure of fitness for assessing aging than is lifespan. On this continuum, the hormetic zone is in the optimum region, while aging emphasizes survival towards lethal extremes. At the limits of survival, a convergence of physiological and genetical processes is expected under accumulating stress from Reactive Oxygen Species, ROS. Limited ecologically-oriented studies imply that major genes are important towards limits of survival compared with the hormetic zone. Future investigations could usefully explore outlier populations physiologically and genetically, since there is the likelihood that genetic variability may be lower in those cohorts managing to survive to extremely advanced ages as found in highly stressed ecological outlier populations. If so, an evolutionary explanation of the mortality-rate decline typical of cohorts of the extremely old emerges. In summary, an energetic evolutionary approach produces a general aging theory which automatically incorporates hormesis, since the theory is based on a fitness-stress continuum covering the whole range of possible abiotic environments of natural populations.

  16. Citizen science reveals unexpected continental-scale evolutionary change in a model organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvertown, Jonathan; Cook, Laurence; Cameron, Robert; Dodd, Mike; McConway, Kevin; Worthington, Jenny; Skelton, Peter; Anton, Christian; Bossdorf, Oliver; Baur, Bruno; Schilthuizen, Menno; Fontaine, Benoît; Sattmann, Helmut; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Correia, Maria; Oliveira, Cristina; Pokryszko, Beata; Ożgo, Małgorzata; Stalažs, Arturs; Gill, Eoin; Rammul, Üllar; Sólymos, Péter; Féher, Zoltan; Juan, Xavier

    2011-04-27

    Organisms provide some of the most sensitive indicators of climate change and evolutionary responses are becoming apparent in species with short generation times. Large datasets on genetic polymorphism that can provide an historical benchmark against which to test for recent evolutionary responses are very rare, but an exception is found in the brown-lipped banded snail (Cepaea nemoralis). This species is sensitive to its thermal environment and exhibits several polymorphisms of shell colour and banding pattern affecting shell albedo in the majority of populations within its native range in Europe. We tested for evolutionary changes in shell albedo that might have been driven by the warming of the climate in Europe over the last half century by compiling an historical dataset for 6,515 native populations of C. nemoralis and comparing this with new data on nearly 3,000 populations. The new data were sampled mainly in 2009 through the Evolution MegaLab, a citizen science project that engaged thousands of volunteers in 15 countries throughout Europe in the biggest such exercise ever undertaken. A known geographic cline in the frequency of the colour phenotype with the highest albedo (yellow) was shown to have persisted and a difference in colour frequency between woodland and more open habitats was confirmed, but there was no general increase in the frequency of yellow shells. This may have been because snails adapted to a warming climate through behavioural thermoregulation. By contrast, we detected an unexpected decrease in the frequency of Unbanded shells and an increase in the Mid-banded morph. Neither of these evolutionary changes appears to be a direct response to climate change, indicating that the influence of other selective agents, possibly related to changing predation pressure and habitat change with effects on micro-climate.

  17. Citizen science reveals unexpected continental-scale evolutionary change in a model organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Silvertown

    Full Text Available Organisms provide some of the most sensitive indicators of climate change and evolutionary responses are becoming apparent in species with short generation times. Large datasets on genetic polymorphism that can provide an historical benchmark against which to test for recent evolutionary responses are very rare, but an exception is found in the brown-lipped banded snail (Cepaea nemoralis. This species is sensitive to its thermal environment and exhibits several polymorphisms of shell colour and banding pattern affecting shell albedo in the majority of populations within its native range in Europe. We tested for evolutionary changes in shell albedo that might have been driven by the warming of the climate in Europe over the last half century by compiling an historical dataset for 6,515 native populations of C. nemoralis and comparing this with new data on nearly 3,000 populations. The new data were sampled mainly in 2009 through the Evolution MegaLab, a citizen science project that engaged thousands of volunteers in 15 countries throughout Europe in the biggest such exercise ever undertaken. A known geographic cline in the frequency of the colour phenotype with the highest albedo (yellow was shown to have persisted and a difference in colour frequency between woodland and more open habitats was confirmed, but there was no general increase in the frequency of yellow shells. This may have been because snails adapted to a warming climate through behavioural thermoregulation. By contrast, we detected an unexpected decrease in the frequency of Unbanded shells and an increase in the Mid-banded morph. Neither of these evolutionary changes appears to be a direct response to climate change, indicating that the influence of other selective agents, possibly related to changing predation pressure and habitat change with effects on micro-climate.

  18. Evolutionary Trees can be Learned in Polynomial-Time in the Two-State General Markov Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cryan, Mary; Goldberg, Leslie Ann; Goldberg, Paul Wilfred

    2001-01-01

    The j-state general Markov model of evolution (due to Steel) is a stochastic model concerned with the evolution of strings over an alphabet of size j. In particular, the two-state general Markov model of evolution generalizes the well-known Cavender-Farris-Neyman model of evolution by removing......--Farris--Neyman model provided that the target tree satisfies the additional restriction that all pairs of leaves have a sufficiently high probability of being the same. We show how to remove both restrictions and thereby obtain the first polynomial-time PAC-learning algorithm (in the sense of Kearns et al...... the symmetry restriction (which requires that the probability that a "0" turns into a "1" along an edge is the same as the probability that a "1" turns into a "0" along the edge). Farach and Kannan showed how to probably approximately correct (PAC)-learn Markov evolutionary trees in the Cavender...

  19. Evolutionary Trees can be Learned in Polynomial-Time in the Two-State General Markov Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cryan, Mary; Goldberg, Leslie Ann; Goldberg, Paul Wilfred

    2001-01-01

    The j-state general Markov model of evolution (due to Steel) is a stochastic model concerned with the evolution of strings over an alphabet of size j. In particular, the two-state general Markov model of evolution generalizes the well-known Cavender-Farris-Neyman model of evolution by removing...... the symmetry restriction (which requires that the probability that a "0" turns into a "1" along an edge is the same as the probability that a "1" turns into a "0" along the edge). Farach and Kannan showed how to probably approximately correct (PAC)-learn Markov evolutionary trees in the Cavender......--Farris--Neyman model provided that the target tree satisfies the additional restriction that all pairs of leaves have a sufficiently high probability of being the same. We show how to remove both restrictions and thereby obtain the first polynomial-time PAC-learning algorithm (in the sense of Kearns et al...

  20. An evolutionary-network model reveals stratified interactions in the V3 loop of the HIV-1 envelope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Art F Y Poon

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The third variable loop (V3 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope is a principal determinant of antibody neutralization and progression to AIDS. Although it is undoubtedly an important target for vaccine research, extensive genetic variation in V3 remains an obstacle to the development of an effective vaccine. Comparative methods that exploit the abundance of sequence data can detect interactions between residues of rapidly evolving proteins such as the HIV-1 envelope, revealing biological constraints on their variability. However, previous studies have relied implicitly on two biologically unrealistic assumptions: (1 that founder effects in the evolutionary history of the sequences can be ignored, and; (2 that statistical associations between residues occur exclusively in pairs. We show that comparative methods that neglect the evolutionary history of extant sequences are susceptible to a high rate of false positives (20%-40%. Therefore, we propose a new method to detect interactions that relaxes both of these assumptions. First, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of extant sequences by maximum likelihood, shifting focus from extant sequence variation to the underlying substitution events. Second, we analyze the joint distribution of substitution events among positions in the sequence as a Bayesian graphical model, in which each branch in the phylogeny is a unit of observation. We perform extensive validation of our models using both simulations and a control case of known interactions in HIV-1 protease, and apply this method to detect interactions within V3 from a sample of 1,154 HIV-1 envelope sequences. Our method greatly reduces the number of false positives due to founder effects, while capturing several higher-order interactions among V3 residues. By mapping these interactions to a structural model of the V3 loop, we find that the loop is stratified into distinct evolutionary clusters. We extend our model to

  1. Stellar models simulating the disk-locking mechanism and the evolutionary history of the Orion Nebula cluster and NGC2264

    CERN Document Server

    Landin, N R; Vaz, L P R; Alencar, S H P

    2015-01-01

    Rotational evolution in young stars is described by pMS evolutionary tracks including rotation, conservation of angular momentum (AM), and simulations of disk-locking (DL). By assuming that DL is the regulation mechanism for the stellar angular velocity during the early stages of pMS, we use our models and observational data to constrain disk lifetimes (Tdisk) of a sample of low-mass stars in the ONC and NGC2264. The period distributions of the ONC and NGC2264 are bimodal and depend on the stellar mass. To follow the rotational evolution of these two clusters' stars, we generated some sets of evolutionary tracks. We assumed that the evolution of fast rotators can be modeled by considering conservation of AM during all stages and of moderate rotators by considering conservation of angular velocity during the first stages of evolution. With these models we estimate a mass and an age for all stars. For the ONC, we assume that the secondary peak in the period distribution is due to high-mass objects locked in the...

  2. Evolutionary Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Gorelik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we advance the concept of “evolutionary awareness,” a metacognitive framework that examines human thought and emotion from a naturalistic, evolutionary perspective. We begin by discussing the evolution and current functioning of the moral foundations on which our framework rests. Next, we discuss the possible applications of such an evolutionarily-informed ethical framework to several domains of human behavior, namely: sexual maturation, mate attraction, intrasexual competition, culture, and the separation between various academic disciplines. Finally, we discuss ways in which an evolutionary awareness can inform our cross-generational activities—which we refer to as “intergenerational extended phenotypes”—by helping us to construct a better future for ourselves, for other sentient beings, and for our environment.

  3. Evolutionary macroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre F. Diniz-Filho

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Macroecology focuses on ecological questions at broad spatial and temporal scales, providing a statistical description of patterns in species abundance, distribution and diversity. More recently, historical components of these patterns have begun to be investigated more deeply. We tentatively refer to the practice of explicitly taking species history into account, both analytically and conceptually, as ‘evolutionary macroecology’. We discuss how the evolutionary dimension can be incorporated into macroecology through two orthogonal and complementary data types: fossils and phylogenies. Research traditions dealing with these data have developed more‐or‐less independently over the last 20–30 years, but merging them will help elucidate the historical components of diversity gradients and the evolutionary dynamics of species’ traits. Here we highlight conceptual and methodological advances in merging these two research traditions and review the viewpoints and toolboxes that can, in combination, help address patterns and unveil processes at temporal and spatial macro‐scales.

  4. Evolutionary awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, Gregory; Shackelford, Todd K

    2014-08-27

    In this article, we advance the concept of "evolutionary awareness," a metacognitive framework that examines human thought and emotion from a naturalistic, evolutionary perspective. We begin by discussing the evolution and current functioning of the moral foundations on which our framework rests. Next, we discuss the possible applications of such an evolutionarily-informed ethical framework to several domains of human behavior, namely: sexual maturation, mate attraction, intrasexual competition, culture, and the separation between various academic disciplines. Finally, we discuss ways in which an evolutionary awareness can inform our cross-generational activities-which we refer to as "intergenerational extended phenotypes"-by helping us to construct a better future for ourselves, for other sentient beings, and for our environment.

  5. Evolutionary Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    The concept of evolutionary expectations descends from cue learning psychology, synthesizing ideas on rational expectations with ideas on bounded rationality, to provide support for these ideas simultaneously. Evolutionary expectations are rational, but within cognitive bounds. Moreover......, they are correlated among people who share environments because these individuals satisfice within their cognitive bounds by using cues in order of validity, as opposed to using cues arbitrarily. Any difference in expectations thereby arise from differences in cognitive ability, because two individuals with identical...... expectations emphasizes not only that causal structure changes are common in social systems but also that causal structures in social systems, and expectations about them, develop together....

  6. Analysis of Urban Car Owners Commute Mode Choice Based on Evolutionary Game Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Gong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aggravation of the traffic congestion in the city, car owners will have to give up commuting with private cars and take the public transportation instead. The paper uses the replication dynamic mechanism to simulate the learning and adjustment mechanism of the automobile owners commuting mode selection. The evolutionary stable strategy is used to describe the long-term evolution of competition game trend. Finally we simulate equilibrium and stability of an evolution of the game under a payoff imbalance situation. The research shows that a certain proportion of car owners will choose public transit under the pressure of public transport development and heavy traffic, and the proportion will be closely related to the initial conditions and urban transportation development policy.

  7. Origin, development and evolutionary model of shelf desertization environment in late stage of Upper Pleistocene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵松龄; 于洪军; 刘敬圃

    1997-01-01

    Based on the study of palaeo-environmental evolution in the shelves of the Eastern China Seas, the concept of "shelf desertization" in the late stage of Upper Pleistocene is defined; the environmental background and evolutionary process of shelf desertization are analysed. Study on the records of subbottom profiling and the data of core samples from shelf areas revealed that during low sea-level stages, the sedimentary environment in the exposed shelf plains was dominated by aeolian depositional process under cold and dry climatic conditions, i.e. under the action of strong winter-monsoon winds. Parts of the exposed marine strata were disintegrated, and aeolian sand dunes were formed on the disintegrated marine deposits, from which the finer sediment grains were blown away by wind and deposited in the downwind areas to form the derivative loess deposits. Thus a desertization environmental system was formed in the exposed shelf plains of the Eastern China Seas.

  8. Evolutionary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swynghedauw, B

    2004-04-01

    Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution. Evolutionary, or darwinian, medicine takes the view that contemporary diseases result from incompatibility between the conditions under which the evolutionary pressure had modified our genetic endowment and the lifestyle and dietary habits in which we are currently living, including the enhanced lifespan, the changes in dietary habits and the lack of physical activity. An evolutionary trait express a genetic polymorphism which finally improve fitness, it needs million years to become functional. A limited genetic diversity is a necessary prerequisite for evolutionary medicine. Nevertheless, search for a genetic endowment would become nearly impossible if the human races were genetically different. From a genetic point of view, homo sapiens, is homogeneous, and the so-called human races have only a socio-economic definition. Historically, Heart Failure, HF, had an infectious origin and resulted from mechanical overload which triggered mechanoconversion by using phylogenically ancient pleiotropic pathways. Adaptation was mainly caused by negative inotropism. Recently, HF was caused by a complex remodelling caused by the trophic effects of mechanics, ischemia, senescence, diabetes and, neurohormones. The generally admitted hypothesis is that cancers were largely caused by a combination of modern reproductive and dietary lifestyles mismatched with genotypic traits, plus the longer time available for a confrontation. Such a concept is illustrated for skin and breast cancers, and also for the link between cancer risk and dietary habits.

  9. Understanding discs in binary YSOs - detailed modelling of VV CrA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicluna, P.; Wolf, S.; Ratzka, T.; Costigan, G.; Launhardt, R.; Leinert, C.; Ober, F.; Manara, C. F.; Testi, L.

    2016-05-01

    Given that a majority of stars form in multiple systems, in order to fully understand the star- and planet-formation processes we must seek to understand them in multiple stellar systems. With this in mind, we present an analysis of the enigmatic binary T-Tauri system VV Corona Australis, in which both components host discs, but only one is visible at optical wavelengths. We seek to understand the peculiarities of this system by searching for a model for the binary which explains all the available continuum observations of the system. We present new mid-infrared interferometry and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy along with archival millimetre-wave observations, which resolve the binary at 1.3 mm for the first time. We compute a grid of pre-main-sequence radiative transfer models and calculate their posterior probabilities given the observed spectral energy distributions and mid-infrared interferometric visibilities of the binary components, beginning with the assumption that the only differences between the two components are their inclination and position angles. Our best-fitting solution corresponds to a relatively low-luminosity T-tauri binary, with each component's disc having a large scaleheight and viewed at moderate inclination (˜50°), with the infrared companion inclined by ˜5° more than the primary. Comparing the results of our model to evolutionary models suggests stellar masses ˜1.7 M⊙ and an age for the system of 3.5 Myr, towards the upper end of previous estimates. Combining these results with accretion indicators from NIR spectroscopy, we determine an accretion rate of 4.0 × 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 for the primary. We suggest that future observations of VV Corona Australis and similar systems should prioritize high angular resolution sub-mm and NIR imaging of the discs and high-resolution optical/NIR spectroscopy of the central stars.

  10. Modelling the Evolutionary Dynamics of Viruses within Their Hosts: A Case Study Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoussi, Rachid; Simon, Vincent; Moury, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    Uncovering how natural selection and genetic drift shape the evolutionary dynamics of virus populations within their hosts can pave the way to a better understanding of virus emergence. Mathematical models already play a leading role in these studies and are intended to predict future emergences. Here, using high-throughput sequencing, we analyzed the within-host population dynamics of four Potato virus Y (PVY) variants differing at most by two substitutions involved in pathogenicity properties. Model selection procedures were used to compare experimental results to six hypotheses regarding competitiveness and intensity of genetic drift experienced by viruses during host plant colonization. Results indicated that the frequencies of variants were well described using Lotka-Volterra models where the competition coefficients βij exerted by variant j on variant i are equal to their fitness ratio, rj/ri. Statistical inference allowed the estimation of the effect of each mutation on fitness, revealing slight (s = −0.45%) and high (s = −13.2%) fitness costs and a negative epistasis between them. Results also indicated that only 1 to 4 infectious units initiated the population of one apical leaf. The between-host variances of the variant frequencies were described using Dirichlet-multinomial distributions whose scale parameters, closely related to the fixation index F ST, were shown to vary with time. The genetic differentiation of virus populations among plants increased from 0 to 10 days post-inoculation and then decreased until 35 days. Overall, this study showed that mathematical models can accurately describe both selection and genetic drift processes shaping the evolutionary dynamics of viruses within their hosts. PMID:22532800

  11. Evolutionary relationships of Aurora kinases: Implications for model organism studies and the development of anti-cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Denis R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As key regulators of mitotic chromosome segregation, the Aurora family of serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cell division. Abnormalities in Aurora kinases have been strongly linked with cancer, which has lead to the recent development of new classes of anti-cancer drugs that specifically target the ATP-binding domain of these kinases. From an evolutionary perspective, the species distribution of the Aurora kinase family is complex. Mammals uniquely have three Aurora kinases, Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, while for other metazoans, including the frog, fruitfly and nematode, only Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases are known. The fungi have a single Aurora-like homolog. Based on the tacit assumption of orthology to human counterparts, model organism studies have been central to the functional characterization of Aurora kinases. However, the ortholog and paralog relationships of these kinases across various species have not been rigorously examined. Here, we present comprehensive evolutionary analyses of the Aurora kinase family. Results Phylogenetic trees suggest that all three vertebrate Auroras evolved from a single urochordate ancestor. Specifically, Aurora-A is an orthologous lineage in cold-blooded vertebrates and mammals, while structurally similar Aurora-B and Aurora-C evolved more recently in mammals from a duplication of an ancestral Aurora-B/C gene found in cold-blooded vertebrates. All so-called Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases of non-chordates are ancestral to the clade of chordate Auroras and, therefore, are not strictly orthologous to vertebrate counterparts. Comparisons of human Aurora-B and Aurora-C sequences to the resolved 3D structure of human Aurora-A lends further support to the evolutionary scenario that vertebrate Aurora-B and Aurora-C are closely related paralogs. Of the 26 residues lining the ATP-binding active site, only three were variant and all were specific to Aurora-A. Conclusions In

  12. Evidence for Variable, Correlated X-ray and Optical/IR Extinction toward the Nearby, Pre-main Sequence Binary TWA 30

    CERN Document Server

    Principe, David A; Kastner, Joel H; Stelzer, Beate; Alcala, Juan

    2016-01-01

    We present contemporaneous XMM-Newton X-ray and ground-based optical/near-IR spectroscopic observations of the nearby ($D \\approx 42$ pc), low-mass (mid-M) binary system TWA 30A and 30B. The components of this wide (separation $\\sim$3400 AU) binary are notable for their nearly edge-on disk viewing geometries, high levels of variability, and evidence for collimated stellar outflows. We obtained XMM-Newton X-ray observations of TWA 30A and 30B in 2011 June and July, accompanied (respectively) by IRTF SpeX (near-IR) and VLT XSHOOTER (visible/near-IR) spectroscopy obtained within $\\sim$20 hours of the X-ray observations. TWA 30A was detected in both XMM-Newton observations at relatively faint intrinsic X-ray luminosities ($L_{X}$$\\sim$$8\\times10^{27}$ $erg$ $s^{-1}$) compared to stars of similar mass and age . The intrinsic (0.15-2.0 keV) X-ray luminosities measured in 2011 had decreased by a factor 20-100 relative to a 1990 (ROSAT) X-ray detection. TWA 30B was not detected, and we infer an upper limit of ($L_{X}...

  13. Optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources in the Taurus molecular cloud: discovery of ten new pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Scelsi, L; Affer, L; Argiroffi, C; Pillitteri, I; Maggio, A; Micela, G

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed optical spectra of 25 X-ray sources identified as potential new members of the Taurus molecular cloud (TMC), in order to confirm their membership in this SFR. Fifty-seven candidates were previously selected among the X-ray sources in the XEST survey, having a 2MASS counterpart compatible with a PMS star based on color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. We obtained high-resolution optical spectra for 7 of these candidates with the SARG spectrograph at the TNG telescope, which were used to search for Li absorption and to measure the Ha line and the radial and rotational velocities; 18 low-resolution optical spectra obtained with DOLORES for other candidate members were used for spectral classification, for Ha measurements, and to assess membership together with IR color-color and color-magnitude diagrams and additional information from the X-ray data. We found that 3 sources show Li absorption, with equivalent widths of ~500 mA, broad spectral line profiles, indicating v sin i ~20-40 km/s, rad...

  14. Time-Series Photometry of Stars in and around the Lagoon Nebula. I. Rotation Periods of 290 Low-Mass Pre-Main-Sequence Stars in NGC 6530

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Calen B

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted a long-term, wide-field, high-cadence photometric monitoring survey of ~50,000 stars in the Lagoon Nebula \\ion{H}{2} region. This first paper presents rotation periods for 290 low-mass stars in NGC 6530, the young cluster illuminating the nebula, and for which we assemble a catalog of infrared and spectroscopic disk indicators, estimated masses and ages, and X-ray luminosities. The distribution of rotation periods we measure is broadly uniform for 0.5 < P < 10 d; the short-period cutoff corresponds to breakup. We observe no obvious bimodality in the period distribution, but we do find that stars with disk signatures rotate more slowly on average. The stars' X-ray luminosities are roughly flat with rotation period, at the saturation level ($\\log L_X / L_{\\rm bol} \\approx -3.3$). However, we find a significant positive correlation between $L_X / L_{\\rm bol}$ and co-rotation radius, suggesting that the observed X-ray luminosities are regulated by centrifugal stripping of the stellar coron...

  15. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-Main Sequence and Related Stars. II. Variability in the Gas and Dust Emission of the Herbig Fe Star SAO 206462

    CERN Document Server

    Sitko, Michael L; Kimes, Robin L; Beerman, Lori C; Martus, Cameron; Lynch, David K; Russell, Ray W; Grady, Carol A; Schneider, Glenn; Lisse, Carey M; Nuth, Joseph A; Cure, Michel; Henden, Arne A; Kraus, Stefan; Motta, Veronica; Tamura, Motohide; Hornbeck, Jeremy; Williger, Gerard M; Fugazza, Dino

    2011-01-01

    We present thirteen epochs of near-infrared (0.8-5 micron) spectroscopic observations of the pre-transitional, "gapped" disk system in SAO 206462 (=HD 135344B). In all, six gas emission lines (including Br gamma, Pa beta, and the 0.8446 micron line of O I) along with continuum measurements made near the standard J, H, K, and L photometric bands were measured. A mass accretion rate of approximately 2 x 10^-8 solar masses per year was derived from the Br gamma and Pa beta lines. However, the fluxes of these lines varied by a factor of over two during the course of a few months. The continuum also varied, but by only ~30%, and even decreased at a time when the gas emission was increasing. The H I line at 1.083 microns was also found to vary in a manner inconsistent with that of either the hydrogen lines or the dust. Both the gas and dust variabilities indicate significant changes in the region of the inner gas and the inner dust belt that may be common to many young disk systems. If planets are responsible for d...

  16. Evidence for variable, correlated X-ray and optical/IR extinction towards the nearby, pre-main-sequence binary TWA 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, David A.; Sacco, G.; Kastner, J. H.; Stelzer, B.; Alcalá, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present contemporaneous XMM-Newton X-ray and ground-based optical/near-IR spectroscopic observations of the nearby (D ≈ 42 pc), low-mass (mid-M) binary system TWA 30A and 30B. The components of this wide (separation ˜3400 au) binary are notable for their nearly edge-on disc viewing geometries, high levels of variability, and evidence for collimated stellar outflows. We obtained XMM-Newton X-ray observations of TWA 30A and 30B in 2011 June and July, accompanied (respectively) by Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX (near-IR) and VLT XSHOOTER (visible/near-IR) spectroscopy obtained within ˜20 h of the X-ray observations. TWA 30A was detected in both XMM-Newton observations at relatively faint intrinsic X-ray luminosities (LX ˜ 8 × 1027 erg s-1) compared to stars of similar mass and age. The intrinsic (0.15-2.0 keV) X-ray luminosities measured in 2011 had decreased by a factor 20-100 relative to a 1990 (ROSAT) X-ray detection. TWA 30B was not detected, and we infer an upper limit on its X-ray Luminosity of LX ≲ 3.0 × 1027 erg s-1. We measured a decrease in visual extinction towards TWA 30A (from AV ≈ 14.9 to AV ≈ 4.7) between the two 2011 observing epochs, and we find evidence for a corresponding significant decrease in X-ray absorbing column (NH). The apparent correlated change in AV and NH is suggestive of variable obscuration of the stellar photosphere by disc material composed of both gas and dust. However, in both observations, the inferred NH to AV ratio is lower than that typical of the interstellar medium, suggesting that the disc is either depleted of gas or is deficient in metals in the gas phase.

  17. Circumstellar disks during various evolutionary stages

    CERN Document Server

    Oudmaijer, Rene D

    2013-01-01

    Disks are ubiquitous in stellar astronomy, and play a crucial role in the formation and evolution of stars. In this contribution we present an overview of the most recent results, with emphasis on high spatial and spectral resolution. We will start with a general discussion on direct versus indirect detection of disks, and then traverse the HR diagram starting with the pre-Main Sequence and ending with evolved stars.

  18. Evolving model-free scattering matrix via evolutionary algorithm: $^{16}$O-$^{16}$O elastic scattering at 350 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Korda, V Y; Korda, L P

    2005-01-01

    We present a new procedure which enables to extract a scattering matrix $S(l)$ as a complex function of angular momentum directly from the scattering data, without any a priori model assumptions implied. The key ingredient of the procedure is the evolutionary algorithm with diffused mutation which evolves the population of the scattering matrices, via their smooth deformations, from the primary arbitrary analytical $S(l)$ shapes to the final ones giving high quality fits to the data. Due to the automatic monitoring of the scattering matrix derivatives, the final $S(l)$ shapes are monotonic and do not have any distortions. For the $^{16}$O-$^{16}$O elastic scattering data at 350 MeV, we show the independence of the final results of the primary $S(l)$ shapes. Contrary to the other approaches, our procedure provides an excellent fit by the $S(l)$ shapes which support the ``rainbow'' interpretation of the data under analysis.

  19. Genetic hotels for the standard genetic code: evolutionary analysis based upon novel three-dimensional algebraic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Marco V; Morgado, Eberto R; Govezensky, Tzipe

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we rigorously develop novel 3-dimensional algebraic models called Genetic Hotels of the Standard Genetic Code (SGC). We start by considering the primeval RNA genetic code which consists of the 16 codons of type RNY (purine-any base-pyrimidine). Using simple algebraic operations, we show how the RNA code could have evolved toward the current SGC via two different intermediate evolutionary stages called Extended RNA code type I and II. By rotations or translations of the subset RNY, we arrive at the SGC via the former (type I) or via the latter (type II), respectively. Biologically, the Extended RNA code type I, consists of all codons of the type RNY plus codons obtained by considering the RNA code but in the second (NYR type) and third (YRN type) reading frames. The Extended RNA code type II, comprises all codons of the type RNY plus codons that arise from transversions of the RNA code in the first (YNY type) and third (RNR) nucleotide bases. Since the dimensions of remarkable subsets of the Genetic Hotels are not necessarily integer numbers, we also introduce the concept of algebraic fractal dimension. A general decoding function which maps each codon to its corresponding amino acid or the stop signals is also derived. The Phenotypic Hotel of amino acids is also illustrated. The proposed evolutionary paths are discussed in terms of the existing theories of the evolution of the SGC. The adoption of 3-dimensional models of the Genetic and Phenotypic Hotels will facilitate the understanding of the biological properties of the SGC.

  20. Evolutionary mysteries in meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenormand, Thomas; Engelstädter, Jan; Johnston, Susan E.; Wijnker, Erik; Haag, Christoph R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a key event of sexual life cycles in eukaryotes. Its mechanistic details have been uncovered in several model organisms, and most of its essential features have received various and often contradictory evolutionary interpretations. In this perspective, we present an overview of these

  1. Evolutionary mysteries in meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenormand, Thomas; Engelstädter, Jan; Johnston, Susan E.; Wijnker, Erik; Haag, Christoph R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a key event of sexual life cycles in eukaryotes. Its mechanistic details have been uncovered in several model organisms, and most of its essential features have received various and often contradictory evolutionary interpretations. In this perspective, we present an overview of these o

  2. Combining Diffusion and Grey Models Based on Evolutionary Optimization Algorithms to Forecast Motherboard Shipments

    OpenAIRE

    Fu-Kwun Wang; Yu-Yao Hsiao; Ku-Kuang Chang

    2012-01-01

    It is important for executives to predict the future trends. Otherwise, their companies cannot make profitable decisions and investments. The Bass diffusion model can describe the empirical adoption curve for new products and technological innovations. The Grey model provides short-term forecasts using four data points. This study develops a combined model based on the rolling Grey model (RGM) and the Bass diffusion model to forecast motherboard shipments. In addition, we investigate evolutio...

  3. Combining Diffusion and Grey Models Based on Evolutionary Optimization Algorithms to Forecast Motherboard Shipments

    OpenAIRE

    Fu-Kwun Wang; Yu-Yao Hsiao; Ku-Kuang Chang

    2012-01-01

    It is important for executives to predict the future trends. Otherwise, their companies cannot make profitable decisions and investments. The Bass diffusion model can describe the empirical adoption curve for new products and technological innovations. The Grey model provides short-term forecasts using four data points. This study develops a combined model based on the rolling Grey model (RGM) and the Bass diffusion model to forecast motherboard shipments. In addition, we investigate evolutio...

  4. Mitochondrial glutamate carriers from Drosophila melanogaster: biochemical, evolutionary and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetti, Paola; Cappello, Anna Rita; Marsano, René Massimiliano; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Carrisi, Chiara; Martello, Emanuela; Caggese, Corrado; Dolce, Vincenza; Capobianco, Loredana

    2013-10-01

    The mitochondrial carriers are members of a family of transport proteins that mediate solute transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Two isoforms of the glutamate carriers, GC1 and GC2 (encoded by the SLC25A22 and SLC25A18 genes, respectively), have been identified in humans. Two independent mutations in SLC25A22 are associated with severe epileptic encephalopathy. In the present study we show that two genes (CG18347 and CG12201) phylogenetically related to the human GC encoding genes are present in the D. melanogaster genome. We have functionally characterized the proteins encoded by CG18347 and CG12201, designated as DmGC1p and DmGC2p respectively, by overexpression in Escherichia coli and reconstitution into liposomes. Their transport properties demonstrate that DmGC1p and DmGC2p both catalyze the transport of glutamate across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Computational approaches have been used in order to highlight residues of DmGC1p and DmGC2p involved in substrate binding. Furthermore, gene expression analysis during development and in various adult tissues reveals that CG18347 is ubiquitously expressed in all examined D. melanogaster tissues, while the expression of CG12201 is strongly testis-biased. Finally, we identified mitochondrial glutamate carrier orthologs in 49 eukaryotic species in order to attempt the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the glutamate carrier function. Comparison of the exon/intron structure and other key features of the analyzed orthologs suggests that eukaryotic glutamate carrier genes descend from an intron-rich ancestral gene already present in the common ancestor of lineages that diverged as early as bilateria and radiata. © 2013.

  5. Implementation and comparative analysis of the optimisations produced by evolutionary algorithms for the parameter extraction of PSP MOSFET model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadia, Sarman K.; Thakker, R. A.; Bhatt, Kirit R.

    2016-05-01

    The study proposes an application of evolutionary algorithms, specifically an artificial bee colony (ABC), variant ABC and particle swarm optimisation (PSO), to extract the parameters of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) model. These algorithms are applied for the MOSFET parameter extraction problem using a Pennsylvania surface potential model. MOSFET parameter extraction procedures involve reducing the error between measured and modelled data. This study shows that ABC algorithm optimises the parameter values based on intelligent activities of honey bee swarms. Some modifications have also been applied to the basic ABC algorithm. Particle swarm optimisation is a population-based stochastic optimisation method that is based on bird flocking activities. The performances of these algorithms are compared with respect to the quality of the solutions. The simulation results of this study show that the PSO algorithm performs better than the variant ABC and basic ABC algorithm for the parameter extraction of the MOSFET model; also the implementation of the ABC algorithm is shown to be simpler than that of the PSO algorithm.

  6. Automated evolutionary optimization of ion channel conductances and kinetics in models of young and aged rhesus monkey pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbell, Timothy H; Draguljić, Danel; Yadav, Aniruddha; Hof, Patrick R; Luebke, Jennifer I; Weaver, Christina M

    2016-08-01

    Conductance-based compartment modeling requires tuning of many parameters to fit the neuron model to target electrophysiological data. Automated parameter optimization via evolutionary algorithms (EAs) is a common approach to accomplish this task, using error functions to quantify differences between model and target. We present a three-stage EA optimization protocol for tuning ion channel conductances and kinetics in a generic neuron model with minimal manual intervention. We use the technique of Latin hypercube sampling in a new way, to choose weights for error functions automatically so that each function influences the parameter search to a similar degree. This protocol requires no specialized physiological data collection and is applicable to commonly-collected current clamp data and either single- or multi-objective optimization. We applied the protocol to two representative pyramidal neurons from layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex of rhesus monkeys, in which action potential firing rates are significantly higher in aged compared to young animals. Using an idealized dendritic topology and models with either 4 or 8 ion channels (10 or 23 free parameters respectively), we produced populations of parameter combinations fitting the target datasets in less than 80 hours of optimization each. Passive parameter differences between young and aged models were consistent with our prior results using simpler models and hand tuning. We analyzed parameter values among fits to a single neuron to facilitate refinement of the underlying model, and across fits to multiple neurons to show how our protocol will lead to predictions of parameter differences with aging in these neurons.

  7. Evolutionary thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Tam

    2015-01-01

    Evolution as an idea has a lengthy history, even though the idea of evolution is generally associated with Darwin today. Rebecca Stott provides an engaging and thoughtful overview of this history of evolutionary thinking in her 2013 book, Darwin's Ghosts: The Secret History of Evolution. Since Darwin, the debate over evolution—both how it takes place and, in a long war of words with religiously-oriented thinkers, whether it takes place—has been sustained and heated. A growing share of this de...

  8. An Integrated Qualitative and Quantitative Biochemical Model Learning Framework Using Evolutionary Strategy and Simulated Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zujian; Pang, Wei; Coghill, George M

    2015-01-01

    Both qualitative and quantitative model learning frameworks for biochemical systems have been studied in computational systems biology. In this research, after introducing two forms of pre-defined component patterns to represent biochemical models, we propose an integrative qualitative and quantitative modelling framework for inferring biochemical systems. In the proposed framework, interactions between reactants in the candidate models for a target biochemical system are evolved and eventually identified by the application of a qualitative model learning approach with an evolution strategy. Kinetic rates of the models generated from qualitative model learning are then further optimised by employing a quantitative approach with simulated annealing. Experimental results indicate that our proposed integrative framework is feasible to learn the relationships between biochemical reactants qualitatively and to make the model replicate the behaviours of the target system by optimising the kinetic rates quantitatively. Moreover, potential reactants of a target biochemical system can be discovered by hypothesising complex reactants in the synthetic models. Based on the biochemical models learned from the proposed framework, biologists can further perform experimental study in wet laboratory. In this way, natural biochemical systems can be better understood.

  9. Evolutionary biology studies on the Iris pumila clonal plant: Advantages of a good model system, main findings and directions for further research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasjev A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary studies on the dwarf bearded iris, Iris pumila L., a perennial clonal monocot with hermaphroditic enthomophylous flowers, have been conducted during the last three decades on plants and populations from the Deliblato Sands in Serbia. In this review we discuss the main advantages of this model system that have enabled various studies of several important genetic, ecological, and evolutionary issues at different levels of biological organization (molecular, physiological, anatomical, morphological and population. Based on published research and its resonance in international scientific literature, we present the main findings obtained from these studies, and discuss possible directions for further research.

  10. Fast Quadratic Local Meta-Models for Evolutionary Optimization of Anguilliform Swimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Kern, Stefan; Hansen, Nikolaus; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-01-01

    International audience; We combine second order local regression meta-models with the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy in order to enhance its efficiency in the optimization of computationally expensive problems. Computationally intensive direct numerical simulations of an anguilliform swimmer provide the testbed for the optimization. We propose two concepts to reduce the computational cost of the meta-model building. The novel versions of the local meta-model assisted Evolutio...

  11. Eco-genetic model to explore fishing-induced ecological and evolutionary effects on growth and maturation schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Yu; Höök, Tomas O

    2009-08-01

    Eco-genetic individual-based models involve tracking the ecological dynamics of simulated individual organisms that are in part characterized by heritable parameters. We developed an eco-genetic individual-based model to explore ecological and evolutionary interactions of fish growth and maturation schedules. Our model is flexible and allows for exploration of the effects of heritable growth rates (based on von Bertalanffy and biphasic growth patterns), heritable maturation schedules (based on maturation reaction norm concepts), or both on individual- and population-level traits. In baseline simulations with rather simple ecological trade-offs and over a relatively short time period (<200 simulation years), simulated male and female fish evolve differential genetic growth and maturation. Further, resulting patterns of genetically determined growth and maturation are influenced by mortality rate and density-dependent processes, and maturation and growth parameters interact to mediate the evolution of one another. Subsequent to baseline simulations, we conducted experimental simulations to mimic fisheries harvest with two size-limits (targeting large or small fish), an array of fishing mortality rates, and assuming a deterministic or stochastic environment. Our results suggest that fishing with either size-limit may induce considerable changes in life-history trait expression (maturation schedules and growth rates), recruitment, and population abundance and structure. However, targeting large fish would cause more adverse genetic effects and may lead to a population less resilient to environmental stochasticity.

  12. Evolutionary models for metal-poor low-mass stars lower main sequence of globular clusters and halo field stars

    CERN Document Server

    Baraffe, I; Allard, F; Hauschildt, P H; Baraffe, Isabelle; Chabrier, Gilles; Allard, France; Hauschildt, Peter

    1997-01-01

    We have performed evolutionary calculations of very-low-mass stars from 0.08 to 0.8 $\\msol$ for different metallicites from [M/H]= -2.0 to -1.0 and we have tabulated the mechanical, thermal and photometric characteristics of these models. The calculations include the most recent interior physics and improved non-grey atmosphere models. The models reproduce the entire main sequences of the globular clusters observed with the Hubble Space Telescope over the afore-mentioned range of metallicity. Comparisons are made in the WFPC2 Flight system including the F555, F606 and F814 filters, and in the standard Johnson-Cousins system. We examine the effects of different physical parameters, mixing-length, $\\alpha$-enriched elements, helium fraction, as well as the accuracy of the photometric transformations of the HST data into standard systems. We derive mass-effective temperature and mass-magnitude relationships and we compare the results with the ones obtained with different grey-like approximations. These latter ar...

  13. The blue-edge problem of the V1093 Her instability strip revisited using evolutionary models with atomic diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Bloemen, S; Aerts, C; Dupret, M A; Østensen, R H; Degroote, P; Müller-Ringat, E; Rauch, T

    2014-01-01

    We have computed a new grid of evolutionary subdwarf B star (sdB) models from the start of central He burning, taking into account atomic diffusion due to radiative levitation, gravitational settling, concentration diffusion, and thermal diffusion. We have computed the non-adiabatic pulsation properties of the models and present the predicted p-mode and g-mode instability strips. In previous studies of the sdB instability strips, artificial abundance enhancements of Fe and Ni were introduced in the pulsation driving layers. In our models, the abundance enhancements of Fe and Ni occur naturally, eradicating the need to use artificial enhancements. We find that the abundance increases of Fe and Ni were previously underestimated and show that the instability strip predicted by our simulations solves the so-called blue edge problem of the subdwarf B star g-mode instability strip. The hottest known g-mode pulsator, KIC 10139564, now resides well within the instability strip {even when only modes with low spherical...

  14. When should we expect early bursts of trait evolution in comparative data? Predictions from an evolutionary food web model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, T; Harmon, L J; Shurin, J B

    2012-09-01

    Conceptual models of adaptive radiation predict that competitive interactions among species will result in an early burst of speciation and trait evolution followed by a slowdown in diversification rates. Empirical studies often show early accumulation of lineages in phylogenetic trees, but usually fail to detect early bursts of phenotypic evolution. We use an evolutionary simulation model to assemble food webs through adaptive radiation, and examine patterns in the resulting phylogenetic trees and species' traits (body size and trophic position). We find that when foraging trade-offs result in food webs where all species occupy integer trophic levels, lineage diversity and trait disparity are concentrated early in the tree, consistent with the early burst model. In contrast, in food webs in which many omnivorous species feed at multiple trophic levels, high levels of turnover of species' identities and traits tend to eliminate the early burst signal. These results suggest testable predictions about how the niche structure of ecological communities may be reflected by macroevolutionary patterns.

  15. Evolutionary considerations on complex emotions and music-induced emotions. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Bruno; Marin, Manuela M.

    2015-06-01

    Recent efforts to uncover the neural underpinnings of emotional experiences have provided a foundation for novel neurophysiological theories of emotions, adding to the existing body of psychophysiological, motivational, and evolutionary theories. Besides explicitly modeling human-specific emotions and considering the interactions between emotions and language, Koelsch et al.'s original contribution to this challenging endeavor is to identify four brain areas as distinct "affect systems" which differ in terms of emotional qualia and evolutionary pathways [1]. Here, we comment on some features of this promising Quartet Theory of Emotions, focusing particularly on evolutionary and biological aspects related to the four affect systems and their relation to prevailing emotion theories, as well as on the role of music-induced emotions.

  16. Testability of evolutionary game dynamics models based on experimental economics data

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yijia; Wang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand the dynamic processes of a real game system, we need an appropriate dynamics model, so to evaluate the validity of a model is not a trivial task. Here, we demonstrate an approach, considering the dynamic patterns of angular momentum and speed as the measurement variables, for evaluating the validity of various dynamics models. Using the data in real time Rock-Paper-Scissors (RPS) games experiments, we obtain the experimental patterns, and then derive the related theoretical patterns from a series of typical dynamics models respectively. By testing the goodness-of-fit between the experimental and theoretical patterns, the validity of the models can be evaluated. One of the results is that, among all the non-parametric models tested, the best-known Replicator dynamics model performs almost worst, while the Projection dynamics model performs best. Besides providing new empirical patterns of social dynamics, we demonstrate that the approach can be an effective and rigorous method to ...

  17. Evolutionary stellar population synthesis with MILES - II. Scaled-solar and \\alpha-enhanced models

    CERN Document Server

    Vazdekis, A; Cassisi, S; Ricciardelli, E; Falcón-Barroso, J; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; La Barbera, F; Beasley, M A; Pietrinferni, A

    2015-01-01

    We present models that predict spectra of old- and intermediate-aged stellar populations at 2.51\\AA\\ (FWHM) with varying [\\alpha/Fe] abundance. The models are based on the MILES library and on corrections from theoretical stellar spectra. The models employ recent [Mg/Fe] determinations for the MILES stars and BaSTI scaled-solar and \\alpha-enhanced isochrones. We compute models for a suite of IMF shapes and slopes, covering a wide age/metallicity range. Using BaSTI, we also compute "base models" matching The Galactic abundance pattern. We confirm that the \\alpha-enhanced models show a flux excess with respect to the scaled-solar models blue-ward $\\sim$4500\\AA, which increases with age and metallicity. We also confirm that both [MgFe] and [MgFe]' indices are [\\alpha/Fe]-insensitive. We show that the sensitivity of the higher order Balmer lines to [\\alpha/Fe] resides in their pseudo-continua, with narrower index definitions yielding lower sensitivity. We confirm that the \\alpha-enhanced models yield bluer (redde...

  18. Restructuring of workflows to minimise errors via stochastic model checking: An automated evolutionary approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert, Luke Thomas; Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a framework for the automated restructuring of stochastic workflows to reduce the impact of faults. The framework allows for the modelling of workflows by means of a formalised subset of the BPMN workflow language. We extend this modelling formalism to describe faults...

  19. Automated evolutionary restructuring of workflows to minimise errors via stochastic model checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert, Luke Thomas; Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Jacobsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for the automated restructuring of workflows that allows one to minimise the impact of errors on a production workflow. The framework allows for the modelling of workflows by means of a formalised subset of the Business Process Modelling and Notation (BPMN) language...

  20. Natural selection at work: an accelerated evolutionary computing approach to predictive model selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Akman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We implement genetic algorithm based predictive model building as an alternative to the traditional stepwise regression. We then employ the Information Complexity Measure (ICOMP as a measure of model fitness instead of the commonly used measure of R-square. Furthermore, we propose some modifications to the genetic algorithm to increase the overall efficiency.

  1. A hybrid evolutionary data driven model for river water quality early warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard-Levine, Alejandra; Liu, Shuming; Vince, Francois; Li, Mingming; Ostfeld, Avi

    2014-10-01

    China's fast pace industrialization and growing population has led to several accidental surface water pollution events in the last decades. The government of China, after the 2005 Songhua River incident, has pushed for the development of early warning systems (EWS) for drinking water source protection. However, there are still many weaknesses in EWS in China such as the lack of pollution monitoring and advanced water quality prediction models. The application of Data Driven Models (DDM) such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) has acquired recent attention as an alternative to physical models. For a case study in a south industrial city in China, a DDM based on genetic algorithm (GA) and ANN was tested to increase the response time of the city's EWS. The GA-ANN model was used to predict NH3-N, CODmn and TOC variables at station B 2 h ahead of time while showing the most sensitive input variables available at station A, 12 km upstream. For NH3-N, the most sensitive input variables were TOC, CODmn, TP, NH3-N and Turbidity with model performance giving a mean square error (MSE) of 0.0033, mean percent error (MPE) of 6% and regression (R) of 92%. For COD, the most sensitive input variables were Turbidity and CODmn with model performance giving a MSE of 0.201, MPE of 5% and R of 0.87. For TOC, the most sensitive input variables were Turbidity and CODmn with model performance giving a MSE of 0.101, MPE of 2% and R of 0.94. In addition, the GA-ANN model performed better for 8 h ahead of time. For future studies, the use of a GA-ANN modelling technique can be very useful for water quality prediction in Chinese monitoring stations which already measure and have immediately available water quality data.

  2. Why do we like to stay with our friends? Modelling the evolutionary dynamics of interpersonal commitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Back, Istvan; Flache, Andreas; Takahashi, S; Scallach, D; Rouchier, J

    2007-01-01

    Why are people inclined to build friendships and maintain durable, nonreproductive relationships? Previous computational modeling work on the evolution of commitment in repeated exchange showed that being largely unconditionally cooperative in committed relationships is more viable than conditional

  3. Application of crowd-sourced data to multi-scale evolutionary exposure and vulnerability models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittore, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    Seismic exposure, defined as the assets (population, buildings, infrastructure) exposed to earthquake hazard and susceptible to damage, is a critical -but often neglected- component of seismic risk assessment. This partly stems from the burden associated with the compilation of a useful and reliable model over wide spatial areas. While detailed engineering data have still to be collected in order to constrain exposure and vulnerability models, the availability of increasingly large crowd-sourced datasets (e. g. OpenStreetMap) opens up the exciting possibility to generate incrementally evolving models. Integrating crowd-sourced and authoritative data using statistical learning methodologies can reduce models uncertainties and also provide additional drive and motivation to volunteered geoinformation collection. A case study in Central Asia will be presented and discussed.

  4. Evolutionary Explanations of Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kardum

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews several most important evolutionary mechanisms that underlie eating disorders. The first part clarifies evolutionary foundations of mental disorders and various mechanisms leading to their development. In the second part selective pressures and evolved adaptations causing contemporary epidemic of obesity as well as differences in dietary regimes and life-style between modern humans and their ancestors are described. Concerning eating disorders, a number of current evolutionary explanations of anorexia nervosa are presented together with their main weaknesses. Evolutionary explanations of eating disorders based on the reproductive suppression hypothesis and its variants derived from kin selection theory and the model of parental manipulation were elaborated. The sexual competition hypothesis of eating disorder, adapted to flee famine hypothesis as well as explanation based on the concept of social attention holding power and the need to belonging were also explained. The importance of evolutionary theory in modern conceptualization and research of eating disorders is emphasized.

  5. An evolutionary model to predict the frequency of antibiotic resistance under seasonal antibiotic use, and an application to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquart, François; Lehtinen, Sonja; Fraser, Christophe

    2017-05-31

    The frequency of resistance to antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae has been stable over recent decades. For example, penicillin non-susceptibility in Europe has fluctuated between 12% and 16% without any major time trend. In spite of long-term stability, resistance fluctuates over short time scales, presumably in part due to seasonal fluctuations in antibiotic prescriptions. Here, we develop a model that describes the evolution of antibiotic resistance under selection by multiple antibiotics prescribed at seasonally changing rates. This model was inspired by, and fitted to, published data on monthly antibiotics prescriptions and frequency of resistance in two communities in Israel over 5 years. Seasonal fluctuations in antibiotic usage translate into small fluctuations of the frequency of resistance around the average value. We describe these dynamics using a perturbation approach that encapsulates all ecological and evolutionary forces into a generic model, whose parameters quantify a force stabilizing the frequency of resistance around the equilibrium and the sensitivity of the population to antibiotic selection. Fitting the model to the data revealed a strong stabilizing force, typically two to five times stronger than direct selection due to antibiotics. The strong stabilizing force explains that resistance fluctuates in phase with usage, as antibiotic selection alone would result in resistance fluctuating behind usage with a lag of three months when antibiotic use is seasonal. While most antibiotics selected for increased resistance, intriguingly, cephalosporins selected for decreased resistance to penicillins and macrolides, an effect consistent in the two communities. One extra monthly prescription of cephalosporins per 1000 children decreased the frequency of penicillin-resistant strains by 1.7%. This model emerges under minimal assumptions, quantifies the forces acting on resistance and explains up to 43% of the temporal variation in resistance.

  6. Evolutionary disarmament in interspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisdi, E; Geritz, S A

    2001-12-22

    Competitive asymmetry, which is the advantage of having a larger body or stronger weaponry than a contestant, drives spectacular evolutionary arms races in intraspecific competition. Similar asymmetries are well documented in interspecific competition, yet they seldom lead to exaggerated traits. Here we demonstrate that two species with substantially different size may undergo parallel coevolution towards a smaller size under the same ecological conditions where a single species would exhibit an evolutionary arms race. We show that disarmament occurs for a wide range of parameters in an ecologically explicit model of competition for a single shared resource; disarmament also occurs in a simple Lotka-Volterra competition model. A key property of both models is the interplay between evolutionary dynamics and population density. The mechanism does not rely on very specific features of the model. Thus, evolutionary disarmament may be widespread and may help to explain the lack of interspecific arms races.

  7. Application of an Evolutionary Algorithm for Parameter Optimization in a Gully Erosion Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rengers, Francis; Lunacek, Monte; Tucker, Gregory

    2016-06-01

    Herein we demonstrate how to use model optimization to determine a set of best-fit parameters for a landform model simulating gully incision and headcut retreat. To achieve this result we employed the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES), an iterative process in which samples are created based on a distribution of parameter values that evolve over time to better fit an objective function. CMA-ES efficiently finds optimal parameters, even with high-dimensional objective functions that are non-convex, multimodal, and non-separable. We ran model instances in parallel on a high-performance cluster, and from hundreds of model runs we obtained the best parameter choices. This method is far superior to brute-force search algorithms, and has great potential for many applications in earth science modeling. We found that parameters representing boundary conditions tended to converge toward an optimal single value, whereas parameters controlling geomorphic processes are defined by a range of optimal values.

  8. Application of evolutionary algorithms to optimize the model parameters of casting cooling process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kluska-Nawarecka

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most commonly used methods of numerical simulation is the finite element method (FEM. Its popularity is reflected in thenumber of tools supporting the preparation of simulation models. However, despite its usefulness, FEM is often very troublesome in use;the problem is the selection of the finite element mesh or shape function. In addition, MES assumes a complete knowledge of thesimulated process and of the parameters describing the investigated phenomena, including model geometry, boundary conditions, physicalparameters, and mathematical model describing these phenomena. A comparison of the data obtained from physical experiments andsimulations indicates an inaccuracy, which may result from the incorrectly chosen shape of element or geometry of the grid. Theapplication of computational intelligence methods, combined with knowledge of the manufacturing technology of metal products, shouldallow an efficient selection of parameters of the mathematical models and, as a consequence, more precise control of the process of thecasting solidification and cooling to ensure the required quality. The designed system has been integrated with the existing simulationenvironment, which will significantly facilitate the preparation and implementation of calculations of this type. Moreover, the use of adistributed model will significantly reduce the time complexity of calculations, requiring multiple repetition of complex simulations toestimate the quality of the different sets of parameters.

  9. Evolutionary Models of Super-Earths and Mini-Neptunes Incorporating Cooling and Mass Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, Alex R

    2015-01-01

    We construct models of the structural evolution of super-Earth- and mini-Neptune-type exoplanets with hydrogen-helium envelopes, incorporating radiative cooling and XUV-driven mass loss. We conduct a parameter study of these models, focusing on initial mass, radius, and envelope mass fractions, as well as orbital distance, metallicity, and the specific prescription for mass loss. From these calculations, we investigate how the observed masses and radii of exoplanets today relate to the distribution of their initial conditions. Orbital distance and initial envelope mass fraction are the most important factors determining planetary evolution, particular radius evolution. Initial mass also becomes important below a "turnoff mass," which varies with orbital distance, with mass-radius curves being approximately flat for higher masses. Initial radius is the least important parameter we study, with very little difference between the hot start and cold start limits after an age of 100 Myr. Model sets with no mass los...

  10. A 1-D evolutionary model for icy satellites, applied to Enceladus

    CERN Document Server

    Prialnik, Uri Malamud Dina

    2015-01-01

    We develop a long-term 1-D evolution model for icy satellites that couples multiple processes: water migration and differentiation, geochemical reactions and silicate phase transitions, compaction by self-gravity, and ablation. The model further considers the following energy sources and sinks: tidal heating, radiogenic heating, geochemical energy released by serpentinization or absorbed by mineral dehydration, gravitational energy and insolation, and heat transport by conduction, convection, and advection. We apply the model to Enceladus, by guessing the initial conditions that would render a structure compatible with present-day observations, assuming the initial structure to have been homogeneous. Assuming the satellite has been losing water continually along its evolution, we postulate that it was formed as a more massive, more icy and more porous satellite, and gradually transformed into its present day state due to sustained long-term tidal heating. We consider several initial compositions and evolution...

  11. Phylogeographic model selection leads to insight into the evolutionary history of four-eyed frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, Maria Tereza C.; Carstens, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogeographic research investigates biodiversity at the interface between populations and species, in a temporal and geographic context. Phylogeography has benefited from analytical approaches that allow empiricists to estimate parameters of interest from the genetic data (e.g., θ = 4Neμ, population divergence, gene flow), and the widespread availability of genomic data allow such parameters to be estimated with greater precision. However, the actual inferences made by phylogeographers remain dependent on qualitative interpretations derived from these parameters’ values and as such may be subject to overinterpretation and confirmation bias. Here we argue in favor of using an objective approach to phylogeographic inference that proceeds by calculating the probability of multiple demographic models given the data and the subsequent ranking of these models using information theory. We illustrate this approach by investigating the diversification of two sister species of four-eyed frogs of northeastern Brazil using single nucleotide polymorphisms obtained via restriction-associated digest sequencing. We estimate the composite likelihood of the observed data given nine demographic models and then rank these models using Akaike information criterion. We demonstrate that estimating parameters under a model that is a poor fit to the data is likely to produce values that lead to spurious phylogeographic inferences. Our results strongly imply that identifying which parameters to estimate from a given system is a key step in the process of phylogeographic inference and is at least as important as being able to generate precise estimates of these parameters. They also illustrate that the incorporation of model uncertainty should be a component of phylogeographic hypothesis tests. PMID:27432969

  12. Um modelo evolucionário Norte-Sul A North-South evolutionary model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Fernandes

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This work expands the classical Nelson and Winter model of Schumpeterian competition by including two sectors and a North-South dynamics, with a view to analyzing how different institutions and technological regimes affect the processes of convergence and divergence in the international economy. The results suggest that convergence may emerge out of the efforts for imitation in the South when the technological regime is cumulative. But when the regime is science-based, imitation is not enough for a successful catching-up. In this case convergence requires the South to invest in innovation as well. The work also analyses the robustness of the model results using Montecarlo techniques.

  13. An evolutionary model for protein-coding regions with conserved RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Forsberg, Roald; Meyer, Irmtraud Margret

    2004-01-01

    components of traditional phylogenetic models. We applied this to a data set of full-genome sequences from the hepatitis C virus where five RNA structures are mapped within the coding region. This allowed us to partition the effects of selection on different structural elements and to test various hypotheses...... concerning the relation of these effects. Of particular interest, we found evidence of a functional role of loop and bulge regions, as these were shown to evolve according to a different and more constrained selective regime than the nonpairing regions outside the RNA structures. Other potential applications...... of the model include comparative RNA structure prediction in coding regions and RNA virus phylogenetics....

  14. An evolutionary computing approach for parameter estimation investigation of a model for cholera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Olcay; Schaefer, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of using time-series data to inform a corresponding deterministic model and introduce the concept of genetic algorithms (GA) as a tool for parameter estimation, providing instructions for an implementation of the method that does not require access to special toolboxes or software. We give as an example a model for cholera, a disease for which there is much mechanistic uncertainty in the literature. We use GA to find parameter sets using available time-series data from the introduction of cholera in Haiti and we discuss the value of comparing multiple parameter sets with similar performances in describing the data.

  15. Evolutionary View Planning for Optimized UAV Terrain Modeling in a Simulated Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Martin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates the use of genetic algorithms in optimized view planning for 3D reconstruction applications using small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs. The quality of UAV site models is currently highly dependent on manual pilot operations or grid-based automation solutions. When applied to 3D structures, these approaches can result in gaps in the total coverage or inconsistency in final model resolution. Genetic algorithms can effectively explore the search space to locate image positions that produce high quality models in terms of coverage and accuracy. A fitness function is defined, and optimization parameters are selected through semi-exhaustive search. A novel simulation environment for evaluating view plans is demonstrated using terrain generation software. The view planning algorithm is tested in two separate simulation cases: a water drainage structure and a reservoir levee, as representative samples of infrastructure monitoring. The optimized flight plan is compared against three alternate flight plans in each case. The optimized view plan is found to yield terrain models with up to 43% greater accuracy than a standard grid flight pattern, while maintaining comparable coverage and completeness.

  16. The triple-helix model of smart cities: a neo-evolutionary perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.; Deakin, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper sets out to demonstrate how the triple-helix model enables us to study the knowledge base of an urban economy in terms of its civil society's support for the evolution of the city as a key component of an innovation system. It argues that cities can be considered as densities in networks

  17. The triple-helix model of smart cities: a neo-evolutionary perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.; Deakin, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper sets out to demonstrate how the triple-helix model enables us to study the knowledge base of an urban economy in terms of its civil society's support for the evolution of the city as a key component of an innovation system. It argues that cities can be considered as densities in networks

  18. [Schizophrenia and evolutionary psychopathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Oguz; Kéri, Szabolcs

    2007-01-01

    Evolution can shape any characteristic appearing as a phenotype that is genetically rooted and possesses a long history. The stress-diathesis model suggests that psychiatric disorders have some genetic roots, and therefore the theory of evolution may be relevant for psychiatry. Schizophrenia is present in every human culture with approximately the same incidence. The great evolutionary paradox is: how can such illness persist despite fundamental reproductive disadvantages? Since the 1960s, several evolutionary explanations have been raised to explain the origins of schizophrenia. This article reviews all the major evolutionary theories about the possible origins of this disease. On the one hand, some researchers have proposed that schizophrenia is an evolutionary disadvantageous byproduct of human brain evolution (e.g. the evolution of hemispheric specialization, social brain or language skills). On the other hand, others have suggested that a compensatory advantage must exist either in the biological system of patients with schizophrenia (e.g. resistance against infectious diseases), or within the social domain (e.g. greater creativity of the relatives). According to some theories, shamanism and religion demonstrate some similarities to psychosis and provide clues regarding the origins of schizophrenia. At the end of this article we discuss this last theory in detail listing arguments for and against.

  19. Different phylogenomic approaches to resolve the evolutionary relationships among model fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrisolo, Enrico; Kuhl, Heiner; Forcato, Claudio; Vitulo, Nicola; Reinhardt, Richard; Patarnello, Tomaso; Bargelloni, Luca

    2010-12-01

    Comparative genomics holds the promise to magnify the information obtained from individual genome sequencing projects, revealing common features conserved across genomes and identifying lineage-specific characteristics. To implement such a comparative approach, a robust phylogenetic framework is required to accurately reconstruct evolution at the genome level. Among vertebrate taxa, teleosts represent the second best characterized group, with high-quality draft genome sequences for five model species (Danio rerio, Gasterosteus aculeatus, Oryzias latipes, Takifugu rubripes, and Tetraodon nigroviridis), and several others are in the finishing lane. However, the relationships among the acanthomorph teleost model fishes remain an unresolved taxonomic issue. Here, a genomic region spanning over 1.2 million base pairs was sequenced in the teleost fish Dicentrarchus labrax. Together with genomic data available for the above fish models, the new sequence was used to identify unique orthologous genomic regions shared across all target taxa. Different strategies were applied to produce robust multiple gene and genomic alignments spanning from 11,802 to 186,474 amino acid/nucleotide positions. Ten data sets were analyzed according to Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and neighbor joining methods. Extensive analyses were performed to explore the influence of several factors (e.g., alignment methodology, substitution model, data set partitions, and long-branch attraction) on the tree topology. Although a general consensus was observed for a closer relationship between G. aculeatus (Gasterosteidae) and Di. labrax (Moronidae) with the atherinomorph O. latipes (Beloniformes) sister taxon of this clade, with the tetraodontiform group Ta. rubripes and Te. nigroviridis (Tetraodontiformes) representing a more distantly related taxon among acanthomorph model fish species, conflicting results were obtained between data sets and methods, especially with respect

  20. 技术创新过程的自组织演化模型%Evolutionary Model of Self-organization in Technological Innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦雨生

    2011-01-01

    Industrial technological innovation is the essence of innovation economics and evolutionary economics. Only when the evolutionary law of technological innovation is recognized, will. it bring great fortune. This paper builds an evolutionary model of self - organization in technological innovation by referencing the species equation of biology and laser intensity equation of quantum mechan- ics, then analyzes the stability and bifurcation, mutation and gradient of this model, and reveals the mechanism and evolutionary process of self - organization from one state to another in technological innovation.%产业技术创新是创新经济学与演化经济学关注的核心问题。只有正确地认识技术创新活动的演变规律,才能真正拥有创新所带来的巨大财富。本文参照生物学中的物种方程和量子力学中的激光光强演化方程,构建了技术创新的自组织演化模型,分析了该模型的稳定性与分岔、突变及渐变,揭示了技术创新从一种状态结构演变为另一种状态结构的自组织机制及过程。

  1. A switching control law approach for cancer immunotherapy of an evolutionary tumor growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doban, Alina I; Lazar, Mircea

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach for tumor immunotherapy which is based on a switching control strategy defined on domains of attraction of equilibria of interest. For this, we consider a recently derived model which captures the effects of the tumor cells on the immune system and viceversa, through predator-prey competition terms. Additionally, it incorporates the immune system's mechanism for producing hunting immune cells, which makes the model suitable for immunotherapy strategies analysis and design. For computing domains of attraction for the tumor nonlinear dynamics, and thus, for deriving immunotherapeutic strategies we employ rational Lyapunov functions. Finally, we apply the switching control strategy to destabilize an invasive tumor equilibrium and steer the system trajectories to tumor dormancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using rules to adapt applications for business models with high evolutionary rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fuente, A. A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, business models are in permanent evolution since the requirements belongs to a rapidly evolving world. In a context where communications all around the world travel so fast the business models need to be adapted permanently to the information the managers receive. In such world, traditional software development, needed for adapting software to changes, do not work properly since business changes need to be in exploitation in shorter times. In that situation, it is needed to go quicker from the business idea to the exploitation environment. This issue can be solved accelerating the development speed: from the expert to the customer, with no –or few, technical intervention. This paper proposes an approach to empower domain experts in developing adaptability solutions by using automated sets of production rules in a friendly way. Furthermore, a use case that implements this kind of development was used in a real problem prototype.

  3. Evolutionary stability and resistance to cheating in an indirect reciprocity model based on reputation

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Vaquero, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Indirect reciprocity is one of the main mechanisms to explain the emergence and sustainment of altruism in societies. The standard approach to indirect reciprocity are reputation models. These are games in which players base their decisions on their opponent's reputation gained in past interactions with other players (moral assessment). The combination of actions and moral assessment leads to a large diversity of strategies, thus determining the stability of any of them against invasions by all the others is a difficult task. We use a variant of a previously introduced reputation-based model that let us systematically analyze all these invasions and determine which ones are successful. Accordingly we are able to identify the third-order strategies (those which, apart from the action, judge considering both the reputation of the donor and that of the recipient) that are evolutionarily stable. Our results reveal that if a strategy resists the invasion of any other one sharing its same moral assessment, it can r...

  4. Modeling the Integration of Open Systems and Evolutionary Acquisition in DoD Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-19

    Integration Production Readiness, LRIP & IOT &E Full Rate Production & Deployment 80% Solution FRP 80% Solution LRIP System Development...Demonstration System Demonstration System Integration Full Rate Production & Deployment Production & Deployment Production Readiness, LRIP & IOT ...3 A3 B3 DRR3 C3 FRP3 Time Periods Figure 4. Information Flows in a Three-block Acquisition Project - 15 - A Formal Simulation Model of an

  5. Low-metallicity massive single stars with rotation. Evolutionary models applicable to I Zwicky 18

    CERN Document Server

    Szécsi, D; Yoon, S -C; Sanyal, D; de Mink, S; Evans, C J; Dermine, T

    2015-01-01

    Massive rotating single stars with an initial metal composition appropriate for the dwarf galaxy I Zw 18 ([Fe/H]=$-$1.7) are modelled during hydrogen burning for initial masses of 9-300 M$_{\\odot}$ and rotational velocities of 0-900 km s$^{-1}$. Internal mixing processes in these models were calibrated based on an observed sample of OB-type stars in the Magellanic Clouds. Even moderately fast rotators, which may be abundant at this metallicity, are found to undergo efficient mixing induced by rotation resulting in quasi chemically-homogeneous evolution. These homogeneously-evolving models reach effective temperatures of up to 90 kK during core hydrogen burning. This, together with their moderate mass-loss rates, make them Transparent Wind Ultraviolet INtense stars (TWUIN star), and their expected numbers might explain the observed HeII ionizing photon flux in I Zw 18 and other low-metallicity HeII galaxies. Our slowly rotating stars above $\\sim$80 M$_{\\odot}$ evolve into late B- to M-type supergiants during c...

  6. Confidence limits of evolutionary synthesis models. IV An exact statistical formulation

    CERN Document Server

    Cerviño, M; Cervino-Luridiana, N

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we develop a new formalism for the theoretical study of stellar populations. This formalism is as accurate as large Monte Carlo simulations and as simple as standard synthesis models, being at the same time more powerful than either of them. Applying the formalism, we succeed in reproducing and explaining the features of Monte Carlo simulations without the need of performing them. We also derive the scale relations between the luminosity distributions of stellar populations of any size. We show that the distribution of stars in bins is a multinomial distribution, which takes into account the covariance effects introduced by the binning. On the other hand, the formalism do not need of any explicit assumption on the distribution of the number of stars in bins. We also show that there is a bias in the variance customarily computed by synthesis models. We provide mathematical tools to obtain exact confidence intervals of synthesis models. We suggest ways to estimate the shape of a distribution, as i...

  7. Electronic design automation of analog ICs combining gradient models with multi-objective evolutionary algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, Frederico AE; Lourenço, Nuno CC; Horta, Nuno CG

    2013-01-01

    This book applies to the scientific area of electronic design automation (EDA) and addresses the automatic sizing of analog integrated circuits (ICs). Particularly, this book presents an approach to enhance a state-of-the-art layout-aware circuit-level optimizer (GENOM-POF), by embedding statistical knowledge from an automatically generated gradient model into the multi-objective multi-constraint optimization kernel based on the NSGA-II algorithm. The results showed allow the designer to explore the different trade-offs of the solution space, both through the achieved device sizes, or the resp

  8. Active vibration absorber for the CSI evolutionary model - Design and experimental results. [Controls Structures Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstrations to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility has been developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The paper discusses the design of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. Experimental results in the presence of these factors are presented and discussed. The robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated.

  9. Testing three evolutionary models of the demographic transition: Patterns of fertility and age at marriage in urban South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, Mary K

    2009-01-01

    Over the last three decades many authors have addressed the demographic transition from the perspective of evolutionary theory. Some authors have emphasized parental investment factors such as the costs of raising children, others have emphasized the effects of mortality and other forms of risk, and others have emphasized the biased transmission of cultural norms from people of high status. Yet the literature says little about the relative strengths of each of these types of motivations or about which ones are more likely to serve as the primary impetus for large-scale demographic change. In this paper, I examine how each of these factors has influenced the demographic transition in urban South India during the course of the 20th century using two measures of fertility transition: number of surviving children and age at marriage. I find that investment-related, risk-related, and cultural transmission predictors all have significant individual effects on the outcome variables, which persist when they are entered in combination. When the three types of predictors are compared, however, investment-related models appear to provide more robust explanations for patterns in both fertility and age of marriage. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions.

  11. Method for determining the duration of construction basing on evolutionary modeling taking into account random organizational expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alekseytsev Anatoliy Viktorovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the problems of construction planning is failure to meet time constraints and increase of workflow duration. In the recent years informational technologies are efficiently used to solve the problem of estimation of construction period. The issue of optimal estimate of the duration of construction, taking into account the possible organizational expectations is considered in the article. In order to solve this problem the iteration scheme of evolutionary modeling, in which random values of organizational expectations are used as variable parameters is developed. Adjustable genetic operators are used to improve the efficiency of the search for solutions. The reliability of the proposed approach is illustrated by an example of formation of construction schedules of monolithic foundations for buildings, taking into account possible disruptions of supply of concrete and reinforcement cages. Application of the presented methodology enables automated acquisition of several alternative scheduling of construction in accordance with standard or directive duration. Application of this computational procedure has the prospects of taking into account of construction downtime due to weather, accidents related to construction machinery breakdowns or local emergency collapses of the structures being erected.

  12. Managing uncertainty, ambiguity and ignorance in impact assessment by embedding evolutionary resilience, participatory modelling and adaptive management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Alan; Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Gunn, Jill A E; Pope, Jenny; Retief, Francois

    2015-03-15

    In the context of continuing uncertainty, ambiguity and ignorance in impact assessment (IA) prediction, the case is made that existing IA processes are based on false 'normal' assumptions that science can solve problems and transfer knowledge into policy. Instead, a 'post-normal science' approach is needed that acknowledges the limits of current levels of scientific understanding. We argue that this can be achieved through embedding evolutionary resilience into IA; using participatory workshops; and emphasising adaptive management. The goal is an IA process capable of informing policy choices in the face of uncertain influences acting on socio-ecological systems. We propose a specific set of process steps to operationalise this post-normal science approach which draws on work undertaken by the Resilience Alliance. This process differs significantly from current models of IA, as it has a far greater focus on avoidance of, or adaptation to (through incorporating adaptive management subsequent to decisions), unwanted future scenarios rather than a focus on the identification of the implications of a single preferred vision. Implementing such a process would represent a culture change in IA practice as a lack of knowledge is assumed and explicit, and forms the basis of future planning activity, rather than being ignored.

  13. The ecology and evolutionary biology of cancer: a review of mathematical models of necrosis and tumor cell diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, John D

    2005-04-01

    Recent evidence elucidating the relationship between parenchyma cells and otherwise "healthy" cells in malignant neoplasms is forcing cancer biologists to expand beyond the genome-centered, "one-renegade-cell" theory of cancer. As it becomes more and more clear that malignant transformation is context dependent, the usefulness of an evolutionary ecology-based theory of malignant neoplasia becomes increasingly clear. This review attempts to synthesize various theoretical structures built by mathematical oncologists into potential explanations of necrosis and cellular diversity, including both total cell diversity within a tumor and cellular pleomorphism within the parenchyma. The role of natural selection in necrosis and pleomorphism is also examined. The major hypotheses suggested as explanations of these phenomena are outlined in the conclusions section of this review. In every case, mathematical oncologists have built potentially valuable models that yield insight into the causes of necrosis, cell diversity, and nearly every other aspect of malignancy; most make predictions ultimately testable in the lab or clinic. Unfortunately, these advances have gone largely unexploited by the empirical community. Possible reasons why are considered.

  14. Evolutionary modeling and prediction of non-coding RNAs in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    Full Text Available We performed benchmarks of phylogenetic grammar-based ncRNA gene prediction, experimenting with eight different models of structural evolution and two different programs for genome alignment. We evaluated our models using alignments of twelve Drosophila genomes. We find that ncRNA prediction performance can vary greatly between different gene predictors and subfamilies of ncRNA gene. Our estimates for false positive rates are based on simulations which preserve local islands of conservation; using these simulations, we predict a higher rate of false positives than previous computational ncRNA screens have reported. Using one of the tested prediction grammars, we provide an updated set of ncRNA predictions for D. melanogaster and compare them to previously-published predictions and experimental data. Many of our predictions show correlations with protein-coding genes. We found significant depletion of intergenic predictions near the 3' end of coding regions and furthermore depletion of predictions in the first intron of protein-coding genes. Some of our predictions are colocated with larger putative unannotated genes: for example, 17 of our predictions showing homology to the RFAM family snoR28 appear in a tandem array on the X chromosome; the 4.5 Kbp spanned by the predicted tandem array is contained within a FlyBase-annotated cDNA.

  15. Modelling and multi objective optimization of WEDM of commercially Monel super alloy using evolutionary algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varun, Sajja; Reddy, Kalakada Bhargav Bal; Vardhan Reddy, R. R. Vishnu

    2016-09-01

    In this research work, development of a multi response optimization technique has been undertaken, using traditional desirability analysis and non-traditional particle swarm optimization techniques (for different customer's priorities) in wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM). Monel 400 has been selected as work material for experimentation. The effect of key process parameters such as pulse on time (TON), pulse off time (TOFF), peak current (IP), wire feed (WF) were on material removal rate (MRR) and surface roughness(SR) in WEDM operation were investigated. Further, the responses such as MRR and SR were modelled empirically through regression analysis. The developed models can be used by the machinists to predict the MRR and SR over a wide range of input parameters. The optimization of multiple responses has been done for satisfying the priorities of multiple users by using Taguchi-desirability function method and particle swarm optimization technique. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) is also applied to investigate the effect of influential parameters. Finally, the confirmation experiments were conducted for the optimal set of machining parameters, and the betterment has been proved.

  16. Wind Farm Layout Optimization through a Crossover-Elitist Evolutionary Algorithm performed over a High Performing Analytical Wake Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner-Bossi, Nicolas; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Wind turbine wakes can significantly disrupt the performance of further downstream turbines in a wind farm, thus seriously limiting the overall wind farm power output. Such effect makes the layout design of a wind farm to play a crucial role on the whole performance of the project. An accurate definition of the wake interactions added to a computationally compromised layout optimization strategy can result in an efficient resource when addressing the problem. This work presents a novel soft-computing approach to optimize the wind farm layout by minimizing the overall wake effects that the installed turbines exert on one another. An evolutionary algorithm with an elitist sub-optimization crossover routine and an unconstrained (continuous) turbine positioning set up is developed and tested over an 80-turbine offshore wind farm over the North Sea off Denmark (Horns Rev I). Within every generation of the evolution, the wind power output (cost function) is computed through a recently developed and validated analytical wake model with a Gaussian profile velocity deficit [1], which has shown to outperform the traditionally employed wake models through different LES simulations and wind tunnel experiments. Two schemes with slightly different perimeter constraint conditions (full or partial) are tested. Results show, compared to the baseline, gridded layout, a wind power output increase between 5.5% and 7.7%. In addition, it is observed that the electric cable length at the facilities is reduced by up to 21%. [1] Bastankhah, Majid, and Fernando Porté-Agel. "A new analytical model for wind-turbine wakes." Renewable Energy 70 (2014): 116-123.

  17. Evolutionary theory of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attolini, Camille Stephan-Otto; Michor, Franziska

    2009-06-01

    As Theodosius Dobzhansky famously noted in 1973, "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution," and cancer is no exception to this rule. Our understanding of cancer initiation, progression, treatment, and resistance has advanced considerably by regarding cancer as the product of evolutionary processes. Here we review the literature of mathematical models of cancer evolution and provide a synthesis and discussion of the field.

  18. An Evolutionary Game Model of Multi-Topics Diffusion in Social Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jia-Hao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One major function of social networks is the dissemination of information such as news, comments, and rumors. The information passing from a sender to a receiver intrinsically involves both of them by considering their memory, reputation, and preference, which further determine their decisions of whether or not to diffuse the topic. To understand such human aspects of the topics dissemination, we propose a game theoretical model of the multi-topics diffusion mechanisms in a social network. Each individual in the network is considered as both sender and receiver, who transmits different topics taking into account their payoffs and personalities (including memories, reputation and preferences. Several cases were analyzed, and the results suggest that multi-topics dissemination is strongly affected by self-perceived, gregarious and information gain.

  19. Extinction phase transitions in a model of ecological and evolutionary dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghathi, Hatem; Tackkett, Skye; Vojta, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    We study the non-equilibrium phase transition between survival and extinction of spatially extended biological populations using an agent-based model. We especially focus on the effects of global temporal fluctuations of the environmental conditions, i.e., temporal disorder. Using large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations of up to 3 × 107 organisms and 105 generations, we find the extinction transition in time-independent environments to be in the well-known directed percolation universality class. In contrast, temporal disorder leads to a highly unusual extinction transition characterized by logarithmically slow population decay and enormous fluctuations even for large populations. The simulations provide strong evidence for this transition to be of exotic infinite-noise type, as recently predicted by a renormalization group theory. The transition is accompanied by temporal Griffiths phases featuring a power-law dependence of the life time on the population size.

  20. Statistical analysis of the inherent variability in the results of evolutionary debris models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidtke, Aleksander A.; Lewis, Hugh G.; Armellin, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    Space debris simulations, e.g. those performed by the Inter-Agency Debris Coordination Committee (Liou et al., 2013), showed that the number of objects in orbit is likely to increase. This study analyses the uncertainty in the results of space debris simulations performed using semi-stochastic models that necessitate the use of Monte Carlo simulations, which are often used by the Inter-Agency Debris Coordination Committee, amongst other studies. Statistics of the possible numbers of objects in orbit and collisions over the next 200 years are generated for the ;mitigation only; scenario using a sample of 25,000 Monte Carlo runs. Bootstraps on the mean, median, variance, skewness and kurtosis of these distributions are performed. It is shown that the distribution of the objects predicted to be on-orbit becomes log-normal as collisions occur, and that Monte Carlo samples larger than traditionally used are needed to capture the debris simulation uncertainty.

  1. Hydraulic Modeling and Evolutionary Optimization for Enhanced Real-Time Decision Support of Combined Sewer Overflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, A. L.; Minsker, B. S.; Schmidt, A. R.; Ostfeld, A.

    2011-12-01

    Real-time mitigation of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) requires evaluation of multiple operational strategies during rapidly changing rainfall events. Simulation models for hydraulically complex systems can effectively provide decision support for short time intervals when coupled with efficient optimization. This work seeks to reduce CSOs for a test case roughly based on the North Branch of the Chicago Tunnel and Reservoir Plan (TARP), which is operated by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC). The North Branch tunnel flows to a junction with the main TARP system. The Chicago combined sewer system alleviates potential CSOs by directing high interceptor flows through sluice gates and dropshafts to a deep tunnel. Decision variables to control CSOs consist of sluice gate positions that control water flow to the tunnel as well as a treatment plant pumping rate that lowers interceptor water levels. A physics-based numerical model is used to simulate the hydraulic effects of changes in the decision variables. The numerical model is step-wise steady and conserves water mass and momentum at each time step by iterating through a series of look-up tables. The look-up tables are constructed offline to avoid extensive real-time calculations, and describe conduit storage and water elevations as a function of flow. A genetic algorithm (GA) is used to minimize CSOs at each time interval within a moving horizon framework. Decision variables are coded at 15-minute increments and GA solutions are two hours in duration. At each 15-minute interval, the algorithm identifies a good solution for a two-hour rainfall forecast. Three GA modifications help reduce optimization time. The first adjustment reduces the search alphabet by eliminating sluice gate positions that do not influence overflow volume. The second GA retains knowledge of the best decision at the previous interval by shifting the genes in the best previous sequence to initialize search at

  2. Genome assembly and annotation of Arabidopsis halleri, a model for heavy metal hyperaccumulation and evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskine, Roman V; Paape, Timothy; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Akama, Satoru; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K

    2016-09-27

    The self-incompatible species Arabidopsis halleri is a close relative of the self-compatible model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The broad European and Asian distribution and heavy metal hyperaccumulation ability make A. halleri a useful model for ecological genomics studies. We used long-insert mate-pair libraries to improve the genome assembly of the A. halleri ssp. gemmifera Tada mine genotype (W302) collected from a site with high contamination by heavy metals in Japan. After five rounds of forced selfing, heterozygosity was reduced to 0.04%, which facilitated subsequent genome assembly. Our assembly now covers 196 Mb or 78% of the estimated genome size and achieved scaffold N50 length of 712 kb. To validate assembly and annotation, we used synteny of A. halleri Tada mine with a previously published high-quality reference assembly of a closely related species, Arabidopsis lyrata. Further validation of the assembly quality comes from synteny and phylogenetic analysis of the HEAVY METAL ATPASE4 (HMA4) and METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN1 (MTP1) regions using published sequences from European A. halleri for comparison. Three tandemly duplicated copies of HMA4, key gene involved in cadmium and zinc hyperaccumulation, were assembled on a single scaffold. The assembly will enhance the genomewide studies of A. halleri as well as the allopolyploid Arabidopsis kamchatica derived from A. lyrata and A. halleri. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Industrial Applications of Evolutionary Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Ernesto; Tonda, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This book is intended as a reference both for experienced users of evolutionary algorithms and for researchers that are beginning to approach these fascinating optimization techniques. Experienced users will find interesting details of real-world problems, and advice on solving issues related to fitness computation, modeling and setting appropriate parameters to reach optimal solutions. Beginners will find a thorough introduction to evolutionary computation, and a complete presentation of all evolutionary algorithms exploited to solve different problems. The book could fill the gap between the

  4. Asymmetric Evolutionary Games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex McAvoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary game theory is a powerful framework for studying evolution in populations of interacting individuals. A common assumption in evolutionary game theory is that interactions are symmetric, which means that the players are distinguished by only their strategies. In nature, however, the microscopic interactions between players are nearly always asymmetric due to environmental effects, differing baseline characteristics, and other possible sources of heterogeneity. To model these phenomena, we introduce into evolutionary game theory two broad classes of asymmetric interactions: ecological and genotypic. Ecological asymmetry results from variation in the environments of the players, while genotypic asymmetry is a consequence of the players having differing baseline genotypes. We develop a theory of these forms of asymmetry for games in structured populations and use the classical social dilemmas, the Prisoner's Dilemma and the Snowdrift Game, for illustrations. Interestingly, asymmetric games reveal essential differences between models of genetic evolution based on reproduction and models of cultural evolution based on imitation that are not apparent in symmetric games.

  5. Evolutionary developmental psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-01-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection...

  6. Mass loss from red giants - A simple evolutionary model for NGC 7027

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jura, M.

    1984-01-01

    NGC 7027 is a young planetary nebula with the remnants of a red giant circumstellar envelope surrounding the central, ionized region. By comparing the outer molecular envelope with the inner ionized material, it is argued that the mass loss rate has decreased by at least a factor of 3, and more probably by about a factor of 10, during the past 1000 years. From this result, it is argued that the luminosity of the central star has also decreased substantially during the same time, consistent with models for the rapid evolution of stars just after they evolve off the asymptotic giant branch. In this picture, the distance to NGC 7027 is less than 1300 pc. NGC 7027 was the last (and best) example of a star where apparently the momentum in the outflowing mass /M(dot)v/ is considerably greater than the momentum in the radiation field (L/c). With the above description of this object, the evidence is now strong that quite often the mass lost from late-type giants is ultimately driven to infinity by radiation pressure on grains. If M(dot)v is as large as L/c for asymptotic branch stars, then it is expected that the total amount of mass lost during this stage of evolution is of the same magnitude as the initial mass of the star, and therefore this mass loss can profoundly affect the star's ultimate fate.

  7. Evolutionary models for disk galaxies, a comparison with the observations up to intermediate redshifts (z<~1)

    CERN Document Server

    Firmani, C

    1998-01-01

    We present a scenario for the formation and evolution of disk galaxies within the framework of an inflationary CDM universe, and we compare the results with observations ranking from the present-day up to z~1. Galactic disks are built-up inside-out by gas infall with accretion rates driven by the cosmological mass aggregation history (MAH). We generate the MAHs for a Gaussian density fluctuation field, and we calculate the gravitational collapse and virialization of the dark halos. Assuming detailed angular momentum conservation, disks in centrifugal equilibrium are built-up within them. The disk galactic evolution is followed through a physically self-consistent approach. The main disk galaxy properties and their correlations are determined by the mass, the MAH, and the spin parameter. The models give exponential disk surface brightness (SB) profiles with realistic parameters (including LSB galaxies), nearly flat rotation curves, and negative gradients in the B-V radial profile. The main trends across the Hu...

  8. Tangled nature model of evolutionary dynamics reconsidered: Structural and dynamical effects of trait inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Christian Walther; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the stochastic dynamics of interacting agents which reproduce, mutate, and die, the tangled nature model (TNM) describes key emergent features of biological and cultural ecosystems' evolution. While trait inheritance is not included in many applications, i.e., the interactions of an agent and those of its mutated offspring are taken to be uncorrelated, in the family of TNMs introduced in this work correlations of varying strength are parametrized by a positive integer K . We first show that the interactions generated by our rule are nearly independent of K . Consequently, the structural and dynamical effects of trait inheritance can be studied independently of effects related to the form of the interactions. We then show that changing K strengthens the core structure of the ecology, leads to population abundance distributions better approximated by log-normal probability densities, and increases the probability that a species extant at time tw also survives at t >tw . Finally, survival probabilities of species are shown to decay as powers of the ratio t /tw , a so-called pure aging behavior usually seen in glassy systems of physical origin. We find a quantitative dynamical effect of trait inheritance, namely, that increasing the value of K numerically decreases the decay exponent of the species survival probability.

  9. Estimation of dual phase lag model parameters using the evolutionary algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mochnacki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Generalization of Fourier law, in particular the introduction of two ‘delay times’ (relaxation time q and thermalization time T leads to thenew form of energy equation called the dual-phase-lag model (DPLM. This equation should be applied in a case of microscale heat transfermodeling. In particular, DPLM constitutes a good approximation of thermal processes which are characterized by extremely short duration(e.g. ultrafast laser pulse, extreme temperature gradients and geometrical features of domain considered (e.g. thin metal film. The aim ofconsiderations presented in this paper is the identification of two above mentioned positive constants q, T. They correspond to the relaxationtime, which is the mean time for electrons to change their energy states and the thermalization time, which is the mean time required forc(TTl G(TT electrons and lattice to reach equilibrium. In this paper the DPlLMlequation ise appllied for analysis of thermal processes proceeding in a thint metal film subjected to a laser beam. At the stage of computations connected with the identification problem solution the evolutionaryalgorithms are used. To solve the problem the additional information concerning the transient temperature distribution on a metal film surface is assumed to be known.

  10. Mass loss from red giants - A simple evolutionary model for NGC 7027

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jura, M.

    1984-01-01

    NGC 7027 is a young planetary nebula with the remnants of a red giant circumstellar envelope surrounding the central, ionized region. By comparing the outer molecular envelope with the inner ionized material, it is argued that the mass loss rate has decreased by at least a factor of 3, and more probably by about a factor of 10, during the past 1000 years. From this result, it is argued that the luminosity of the central star has also decreased substantially during the same time, consistent with models for the rapid evolution of stars just after they evolve off the asymptotic giant branch. In this picture, the distance to NGC 7027 is less than 1300 pc. NGC 7027 was the last (and best) example of a star where apparently the momentum in the outflowing mass /M(dot)v/ is considerably greater than the momentum in the radiation field (L/c). With the above description of this object, the evidence is now strong that quite often the mass lost from late-type giants is ultimately driven to infinity by radiation pressure on grains. If M(dot)v is as large as L/c for asymptotic branch stars, then it is expected that the total amount of mass lost during this stage of evolution is of the same magnitude as the initial mass of the star, and therefore this mass loss can profoundly affect the star's ultimate fate.

  11. CCD Photometry, Roche Modeling and Evolutionary History of the WUMa-type Eclipsing Binary TYC01664-0110-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, K. B.; Stępień, K.

    2016-09-01

    TYC 01664-0110-1 (ASAS J212915+1604.9), a W UMa-type variable system (P=0.282962 d), was first detected over 17 years ago by the ROTSE-I telescope. Photometric data (B, V and Ic) collected at UnderOak Observatory (UO) resulted in five new times-of-minima for this variable star which were used to establish a revised linear ephemeris. No published radial velocity (RV) data are available for this system. However, since this W UMa binary undergoes a total eclipse, Roche modeling based on the Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code yielded a well-constrained photometric value for M2/M1 (q=0.356±0.001). There is a suggestion from ROTSE-I (1999) and ASAS survey data (2003, 2005, and 2008) that the secondary maximum is more variable than the primary one probably due to the so-called O'Connell effect. However, peak asymmetry in light curves (LC) from 2015 was barely evident during quadrature. Therefore, W-D model fits of these most recent data did not yield any substantive improvement with the addition of spot(s). Using the evolutionary model of cool close binaries we searched for a possible progenitor of TYC 01664-0110-1. The best fit is obtained if the initial binary has an orbital period between 3.3-3.8 d and component masses between 1.0-1.1 M⊙ and 0.30-0.35 M⊙. The model progenitor needs about 10 Gyr to attain the presently observed parameters of the variable. Its period slowly increases and the mass ratio decreases. According to the model predictions TYC 01664-0110-1 will go through the common envelope (CE) phase in the future, followed by merging of both components or formation of a double degenerate. Due to its apparent brightness (mV,max≍10.9 mag) and unique properties, the star is an excellent target for spectroscopic investigation of any possible deviations from a simple static model of a contact binary.

  12. Evolving evolutionary algorithms using linear genetic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltean, Mihai

    2005-01-01

    A new model for evolving Evolutionary Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The model is based on the Linear Genetic Programming (LGP) technique. Every LGP chromosome encodes an EA which is used for solving a particular problem. Several Evolutionary Algorithms for function optimization, the Traveling Salesman Problem and the Quadratic Assignment Problem are evolved by using the considered model. Numerical experiments show that the evolved Evolutionary Algorithms perform similarly and sometimes even better than standard approaches for several well-known benchmarking problems.

  13. Excitation of Solar-like Oscillations: From PMS to MS Stellar Models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Samadi; M.-J. Goupil; E. Alecian; F. Baudin; D. Georgobiani; R. Trampedach; R. Stein; Å. Nordlund

    2005-06-01

    The amplitude of solar-like oscillations results from a balance between excitation and damping. As in the sun, the excitation is attributed to turbulent motions that stochastically excite the modes in the uppermost part of the convective zone. We present here a model for the excitation mechanism. Comparisons between modeled amplitudes and helio and stellar seismic constraints are presented and the discrepancies discussed. Finally the possibility and the interest of detecting such stochastically excited modes in pre-main sequence stars are also discussed.

  14. The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model (CGEM): Using HMI Vector Magnetogram and Doppler Data to Model the Buildup of Free Magnetic Energy in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George H; Bercik, David J; Kazachenko, Maria D; Lynch, Benjamin J; Welsch, Brian T; Hoeksema, J Todd; Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Norton, Aimee A; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Sun, Xudong; DeRosa, Marc L; Cheung, Mark C M

    2015-01-01

    The most violent space weather events (eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections) are driven by the release of free magnetic energy stored in the solar corona. Energy can build up on timescales of hours to days, and then may be suddenly released in the form of a magnetic eruption, which then propagates through interplanetary space, possibly impacting the Earth's space environment. Can we use the observed evolution of the magnetic and velocity fields in the solar photosphere to model the evolution of the overlying solar coronal field, including the storage and release of magnetic energy in such eruptions? The objective of CGEM, the Coronal Global Evolutionary Model, funded by the NASA/NSF Space Weather Modeling program, is to develop and evaluate such a model for the evolution of the coronal magnetic field. The evolving coronal magnetic field can then be used as a starting point for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the corona, which can then be used to drive models of heliospheric evolution and predi...

  15. The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model: Using HMI Vector Magnetogram and Doppler Data to Model the Buildup of Free Magnetic Energy in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, G. H.; Abbett, W. P.; Bercik, D. J.; Kazachenko, M. D.; Lynch, B. J.; Welsch, B. T.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Hayashi, K.; Liu, Y.; Norton, A. A.; Dalda, A. Sainz; Sun, X.; DeRosa, M. L.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2015-06-01

    The most violent space weather events (eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections) are driven by the release of free magnetic energy stored in the solar corona. Energy can build up on timescales of hours to days, and then may be suddenly released in the form of a magnetic eruption, which then propagates through interplanetary space, possibly impacting the Earth's space environment. Can we use the observed evolution of the magnetic and velocity fields in the solar photosphere to model the evolution of the overlying solar coronal field, including the storage and release of magnetic energy in such eruptions? The objective of CGEM, the Coronal Global Evolutionary Model, funded by the NASA/NSF Space Weather Modeling program, is to develop and evaluate such a model for the evolution of the coronal magnetic field. The evolving coronal magnetic field can then be used as a starting point for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the corona, which can then be used to drive models of heliospheric evolution and predictions of magnetic field and plasma density conditions at 1AU.

  16. Social defense: an evolutionary-developmental model of children's strategies for coping with threat in the peer group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Meredith J; Davies, Patrick T; MacNeill, Leigha A

    2014-04-29

    Navigating the ubiquitous conflict, competition, and complex group dynamics of the peer group is a pivotal developmental task of childhood. Difficulty negotiating these challenges represents a substantial source of risk for psychopathology. Evolutionary developmental psychology offers a unique perspective with the potential to reorganize the way we think about the role of peer relationships in shaping how children cope with the everyday challenges of establishing a social niche. To address this gap, we utilize the ethological reformulation of the emotional security theory as a guide to developing an evolutionary framework for advancing an understanding of the defense strategies children use to manage antagonistic peer relationships and protect themselves from interpersonal threat (Davies and Sturge-Apple, 2007). In this way, we hope to illustrate the value of an evolutionary developmental lens in generating unique theoretical insight and novel research directions into the role of peer relationships in the development of psychopathology.

  17. Social Defense: An Evolutionary-Developmental Model of Children's Strategies for Coping with Threat in the Peer Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith J. Martin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Navigating the ubiquitous conflict, competition, and complex group dynamics of the peer group is a pivotal developmental task of childhood. Difficulty negotiating these challenges represents a substantial source of risk for psychopathology. Evolutionary developmental psychology offers a unique perspective with the potential to reorganize the way we think about the role of peer relationships in shaping how children cope with the everyday challenges of establishing a social niche. To address this gap, we utilize the ethological reformulation of the emotional security theory as a guide to developing an evolutionary framework for advancing an understanding of the defense strategies children use to manage antagonistic peer relationships and protect themselves from interpersonal threat (Davies and Sturge-Apple, 2007. In this way, we hope to illustrate the value of an evolutionary developmental lens in generating unique theoretical insight and novel research directions into the role of peer relationships in the development of psychopathology.

  18. Evolutionary history of the grey-faced Sengi, Rhynchocyon udzungwensis, from Tanzania: a molecular and species distribution modelling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda P Lawson

    Full Text Available Rhynchocyon udzungwensis is a recently described and poorly understood sengi (giant elephant-shrew endemic to two small montane forests in Southern Tanzania, and surrounded in lower forests by R. cirnei reichardi. In this study, we investigate the molecular genetic relationship between R. udzungwensis and R. c. reichardi, and the possible role that shifting species distributions in response to climate fluctuations may have played in shaping their evolutionary history. Rhynchocyon udzungwensis and R. c. reichardi individuals were sampled from five localities for genetic analyses. Three mitochondrial and two nuclear loci were used to construct species trees for delimitation and to determine whether introgression was detectable either from ancient or ongoing hybridization. All species-tree results show R. udzungwensis and R. c. reichardi as distinct lineages, though mtDNA shows evidence of introgression in some populations. Nuclear loci of each species were monophyletic, implying introgression is exclusively historical. Because we found evidence of introgression, we used distribution data and species distribution modelling for present, glacial, and interglacial climate cycles to predict how shifting species distributions may have facilitated hybridization in some populations. Though interpretations are affected by the limited range of these species, a likely scenario is that the mtDNA introgression found in eastern mid-elevation populations was facilitated by low numbers of R. udzungwensis that expanded into lowland heavily occupied R. c. reichardi areas during interglacial climate cycles. These results imply that relationships within the genus Rhynchocyon may be confounded by porous species boundaries and introgression, even if species are not currently sympatric.

  19. Systematic identification and evolutionary analysis of catalytically versatile cytochrome p450 monooxygenase families enriched in model basidiomycete fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khajamohiddin Syed

    material. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the identification and comparative-evolutionary analysis of P450 families enriched in model basidiomycetes.

  20. The Roles of Local Search, Model Building and Optimal Mixing in Evolutionary Algorithms from a BBO Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.N. Bosman (Peter); D. Thierens (Dirk); N. Krasnogor

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractThe inclusion of local search (LS) techniques in evolutionary algorithms (EAs) is known to be very important in order to obtain competitive results on combinatorial and real-world optimization problems. Often however, an important source of the added value of LS is an understanding of

  1. Modeling the milling tool wear by using an evolutionary SVM-based model from milling runs experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Paulino José García; García-Gonzalo, Esperanza; Vilán, José Antonio Vilán; Robleda, Abraham Segade

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this research work is to build a new practical hybrid regression model to predict the milling tool wear in a regular cut as well as entry cut and exit cut of a milling tool. The model was based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in combination with support vector machines (SVMs). This optimization mechanism involved kernel parameter setting in the SVM training procedure, which significantly influences the regression accuracy. Bearing this in mind, a PSO-SVM-based model, which is based on the statistical learning theory, was successfully used here to predict the milling tool flank wear (output variable) as a function of the following input variables: the time duration of experiment, depth of cut, feed, type of material, etc. To accomplish the objective of this study, the experimental dataset represents experiments from runs on a milling machine under various operating conditions. In this way, data sampled by three different types of sensors (acoustic emission sensor, vibration sensor and current sensor) were acquired at several positions. A second aim is to determine the factors with the greatest bearing on the milling tool flank wear with a view to proposing milling machine's improvements. Firstly, this hybrid PSO-SVM-based regression model captures the main perception of statistical learning theory in order to obtain a good prediction of the dependence among the flank wear (output variable) and input variables (time, depth of cut, feed, etc.). Indeed, regression with optimal hyperparameters was performed and a determination coefficient of 0.95 was obtained. The agreement of this model with experimental data confirmed its good performance. Secondly, the main advantages of this PSO-SVM-based model are its capacity to produce a simple, easy-to-interpret model, its ability to estimate the contributions of the input variables, and its computational efficiency. Finally, the main conclusions of this study are exposed.

  2. CCS Site Optimization by Applying a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm to Semi-Analytical Leakage Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, B. M.; Gonzalez-Nicolas, A.; Bau, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been proposed as a method of reducing global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Although CCS has the potential to greatly retard greenhouse gas loading to the atmosphere while cleaner, more sustainable energy solutions are developed, there is a possibility that sequestered CO2 may leak and intrude into and adversely affect groundwater resources. It has been reported [1] that, while CO2 intrusion typically does not directly threaten underground drinking water resources, it may cause secondary effects, such as the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in aquifer minerals and changes in pH values. These risks must be fully understood and minimized before CCS project implementation. Combined management of project resources and leakage risk is crucial for the implementation of CCS. In this work, we present a method of: (a) minimizing the total CCS cost, the summation of major project costs with the cost associated with CO2 leakage; and (b) maximizing the mass of injected CO2, for a given proposed sequestration site. Optimization decision variables include the number of CO2 injection wells, injection rates, and injection well locations. The capital and operational costs of injection wells are directly related to injection well depth, location, injection flow rate, and injection duration. The cost of leakage is directly related to the mass of CO2 leaked through weak areas, such as abandoned oil wells, in the cap rock layers overlying the injected formation. Additional constraints on fluid overpressure caused by CO2 injection are imposed to maintain predefined effective stress levels that prevent cap rock fracturing. Here, both mass leakage and fluid overpressure are estimated using two semi-analytical models based upon work by [2,3]. A multi-objective evolutionary algorithm coupled with these semi-analytical leakage flow models is used to determine Pareto-optimal trade-off sets giving minimum total cost vs. maximum mass

  3. Schizophrenia-an evolutionary enigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüne, Martin

    2004-03-01

    The term 'schizophrenia' refers to a group of disorders that have been described in every human culture. Two apparently well established findings have corroborated the need for an evolutionary explanation of these disorders: (1) cross-culturally stable incidence rates and (2) decreased fecundity of the affected individuals. The rationale behind this relates to the evolutionary paradox that susceptibility genes for schizophrenia are obviously preserved in the human genepool, despite fundamental reproductive disadvantages associated with the disorders. Some researchers have therefore proposed that a compensatory advantage must exist in people who are carriers of these genes or in their first-degree relatives. Such advantages were hypothesised to be outside the brain (e.g. greater resistance against toxins or infectious diseases), or within the social domain (e.g. schizotypal shamans, creativity). More specifically, T.J. Crow has suggested an evolutionary theory of schizophrenia that relates the disorders to an extreme of variation of hemispheric specialisation and the evolution of language due to a single gene mutation located on homologous regions of the sex chromosomes. None of the evolutionary scenarios does, however, fully account for the diversity of the symptomatology, nor does any one hypothesis acknowledge the objection that the mere prevalence of a disorder must not be confused with adaptation. In the present article, I therefore discuss the evolutionary hypotheses of schizophrenia, arguing that a symptom-based approach to psychotic disorders in evolutionary perspective may improve upon the existing models of schizophrenia.

  4. The evolutionary language game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, M A; Plotkin, J B; Krakauer, D C

    1999-09-21

    We explore how evolutionary game dynamics have to be modified to accomodate a mathematical framework for the evolution of language. In particular, we are interested in the evolution of vocabulary, that is associations between signals and objects. We assume that successful communication contributes to biological fitness: individuals who communicate well leave more offspring. Children inherit from their parents a strategy for language learning (a language acquisition device). We consider three mechanisms whereby language is passed from one generation to the next: (i) parental learning: children learn the language of their parents; (ii) role model learning: children learn the language of individuals with a high payoff; and (iii) random learning: children learn the language of randomly chosen individuals. We show that parental and role model learning outperform random learning. Then we introduce mistakes in language learning and study how this process changes language over time. Mistakes increase the overall efficacy of parental and role model learning: in a world with errors evolutionary adaptation is more efficient. Our model also provides a simple explanation why homonomy is common while synonymy is rare. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Integrating fossils, phylogenies, and niche models into biogeography to reveal ancient evolutionary history: the case of Hypericum (hypericaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Andrea S; Lobo, Jorge M; Ree, Richard; Beerling, David J; Sanmartín, Isabel

    2015-03-01

    In disciplines such as macroevolution that are not amenable to experimentation, scientists usually rely on current observations to test hypotheses about historical events, assuming that "the present is the key to the past." Biogeographers, for example, used this assumption to reconstruct ancestral ranges from the distribution of extant species. Yet, under scenarios of high extinction rates, the biodiversity we observe today might not be representative of the historical diversity and this could result in incorrect biogeographic reconstructions. Here, we introduce a new approach to incorporate into biogeographic inference the temporal, spatial, and environmental information provided by the fossil record, as a direct evidence of the extinct biodiversity fraction. First, inferences of ancestral ranges for those nodes in the phylogeny calibrated with the fossil record are constrained to include the geographic distribution of the fossil. Second, we use fossil distribution and past climate data to reconstruct the climatic preferences and potential distribution of ancestral lineages over time, and use this information to build a biogeographic model that takes into account "ecological connectivity" through time. To show the power of this approach, we reconstruct the biogeographic history of the large angiosperm genus Hypericum, which has a fossil record extending back to the Early Cenozoic. Unlike previous reconstructions based on extant species distributions, our results reveal that Hypericum stem lineages were already distributed in the Holarctic before diversification of its crown-group, and that the geographic distribution of the genus has been relatively stable throughout the climatic oscillations of the Cenozoic. Geographical movement was mediated by the existence of climatic corridors, like Beringia, whereas the equatorial tropical belt acted as a climatic barrier, preventing Hypericum lineages to reach the southern temperate regions. Our study shows that an

  6. An evolutionary model for the gamma-ray system PSR J1311-3430 and its companion

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G; Horvath, J E

    2013-01-01

    The most recent member of the millisecond pulsar with very low-mass companions and short orbital periods class, PSR J1311-3430 (Pletsch et al. 2012) is a remarkable object in various senses. Besides being the first discovered in gamma-rays, its measured features include the very low or absent hydrogen content. We show in this Letter that this important piece of information leads to a very restricted range of initial periods for a given donor mass. For that purpose, we calculate in detail the evolution of the binary system self-consistently, including mass transfer and evaporation, finding the features of the new evolutionary path leading to the observed configuration. It is also important to remark that the detailed evolutionary history of the system naturally leads to a high final pulsar mass, as it seems to be demanded by observations.

  7. The Conception of the New Agent-Based Platform for Modeling and Implementation of Parallel Evolutionary Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Sabba

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary algorithms (EAs are a range of problem-solving techniques based on mechanisms inspired by biological evolution. Nowadays, EAs have proven their ability and effectiveness to solve combinatorial problems. However, these methods require a considerable time of calculation. To overcome this problem, several parallelization strategies have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, we present a new parallel agent-based EC framework for solving numerical optimization problems in order to optimize computation time and solutions quality.

  8. Ancestor of the new archetypal biology: Goethe's dynamic typology as a model for contemporary evolutionary developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegner, Mark F

    2013-12-01

    As understood historically, typological thinking has no place in evolutionary biology since its conceptual framework is viewed as incompatible with population thinking. In this article, I propose that what I describe as dynamic typological thinking has been confused with, and has been overshadowed by, a static form of typological thinking. This conflation results from an inability to grasp dynamic typological thinking due to the overlooked requirement to engage our cognitive activity in an unfamiliar way. Thus, analytical thinking alone is unsuited to comprehend the nature of dynamic typological thinking. Over 200 years ago, J. W. von Goethe, in his Metamorphosis of Plants (1790) and other writings, introduced a dynamic form of typological thinking that has been traditionally misunderstood and misrepresented. I describe in detail Goethe's phenomenological methodology and its contemporary value in understanding morphological patterns in living organisms. Furthermore, contrary to the implications of static typological thinking, dynamic typological thinking is perfectly compatible with evolutionary dynamics and, if rightly understood, can contribute significantly to the still emerging field of evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo).

  9. Sciara as an experimental model for studies on the evolutionary relationships between the zygotic, maternal and environmental primary signals for sexual development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lucas Sánchez

    2010-09-01

    Sex determination refers to the developmental programme that commits the embryo to either the male or the female pathway. There are a plethora of mechanisms via which gender is decided. These mechanisms can be classified into three main categories depending on the origin of the primary, genetic, sex-determination signal, which can be zygotic, maternal or environmental. In the dipteran Sciara, the zygotic signal is a consequence of the maternal signal, and this in turn can be a consequence of the environmental signal. This makes Sciara a unique experimental model for studying the evolutionary relationships between the three primary signals triggering sexual development.

  10. Parameterizing complex reactive force fields using multiple objective evolutionary strategies (MOES): Part 2: transferability of ReaxFF models to C-H-N-O energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Betsy M; Larentzos, James P; Byrd, Edward F C; Weingarten, N Scott

    2015-02-10

    The Multiple Objective Evolutionary Strategies (MOES) algorithm was used to parametrize force fields having the form of the reactive models ReaxFF (van Duin, A. C. T.; Dasgupta, S.; Lorant, F.; Goddard, W. A. J. Phys. Chem. A 2001, 105, 9396) and ReaxFF-lg (Liu, L.; Liu, Y.; Zybin, S. V.; Sun, H.; Goddard, W. A. J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 11016) in an attempt to produce equal or superior ambient state crystallographic structural results for cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX). Promising candidates were then subjected to molecular dynamics simulations of five other well-known conventional energetic materials to assess the degree of transferability of the models. Two models generated through the MOES search were shown to have performance better than or as good as ReaxFF-lg in describing the six energetic systems modeled. This study shows that MOES is an effective and efficient method to develop complex force fields.

  11. A phylogenetic test of the size-advantage model: evolutionary changes in mating behavior influence the loss of sex change in a fish lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erisman, Brad E; Craig, Matthew T; Hastings, Philip A

    2009-09-01

    The size-advantage model asserts that mating behavior influences the incidence and direction of sex change in animals. Selection for protogyny (female to male sex change) occurs in mating systems in which large males monopolize and pair spawn with females; however, gonochorism (no sex change) is favored when adults spawn in groups and sperm competition is present. Despite widespread empirical and theoretical support for the model, these predictions have not been tested within a phylogenetic context. Here we show that the loss of sex change within a lineage of reef fishes is influenced by evolutionary changes in two traits related to their mating behavior: mating group structure and sperm competition intensity. Phylogenetic reconstructions of the reproductive evolution of groupers (Epinephelidae) indicate that protogyny and paired spawning are the ancestral conditions for the lineage; both gonochorism and group spawning evolved independently at least four times in three different genera. Evolutionary transformations from protogyny to gonochorism (loss of sex change) are associated with equivalent transformations in mating group structure from paired to group spawning, and sperm competition is considerably higher in gonochoric species than in protogynous species. These results provide explicit phylogenetic support for predictions of the size-advantage model, demonstrating that selection for protogynous sex change decreases as mating group size and sperm competition intensity increase.

  12. Modeling the Near-Infrared Luminosity Function of Young Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, A. A.; Lada, E. A.; Lada, C. J.

    1999-12-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments designed to evaluate the usefulness of near-infrared luminosity functions for constraining the Initial Mass Function (IMF) of young (0-10 Myr) stellar populations. Using Monte Carlo techniques, we create a suite of model luminosity functions systematically varying each of these basic underlying relations: the underlying IMF, cluster star forming history, and theoretical pre-main sequence mass-to-luminosity relations. Our modeling techniques also allow us to explore the effects of unresolved binaries, infrared excess emission from circumstellar disks, and interstellar extinction on the cluster luminosity function. From this numerical modeling, we find that the luminosity function of a young stellar population is considerably more sensitive to variations in the underlying initial mass function than to either variations in the star forming history or assumed pre-main-sequence (PMS) mass-to-luminosity relation. To illustrate the potential effectiveness of using the KLF of a young cluster to constrain its IMF, we model the observed K band luminosity function of the nearby Trapezium cluster. Our derived mass function for the Trapezium spans two orders of magnitude in stellar mass (5>Msun>0.02) and has a peak near the hydrogen burning limit. Below the hydrogen burning limit, the mass function steadily decreases with decreasing mass throughout the brown dwarf regime. We also test the hypothesis of a space varying IMF by performing model fits to the K band luminosity functions of several other young clusters.

  13. Democratizing evolutionary biology, lessons from insects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunn, Robert Roberdeau; Beasley, DeAnna E.

    2016-01-01

    The engagement of the public in the scientific process is an old practice. Yet with recent advances in technology, the role of the citizen scientist in studying evolutionary processes has increased. Insects provide ideal models for understanding these evolutionary processes at large scales...

  14. Evolutionary Dynamics of Biological Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Martin A.; Sigmund, Karl

    2004-02-01

    Darwinian dynamics based on mutation and selection form the core of mathematical models for adaptation and coevolution of biological populations. The evolutionary outcome is often not a fitness-maximizing equilibrium but can include oscillations and chaos. For studying frequency-dependent selection, game-theoretic arguments are more appropriate than optimization algorithms. Replicator and adaptive dynamics describe short- and long-term evolution in phenotype space and have found applications ranging from animal behavior and ecology to speciation, macroevolution, and human language. Evolutionary game theory is an essential component of a mathematical and computational approach to biology.

  15. Full evolutionary models for PG1159 stars. Implications for the helium-rich O(He) stars

    CERN Document Server

    Miller-Bertolami, M M

    2006-01-01

    We present full evolutionary calculations appropriate to post-AGB PG1159 stars for a wide range of stellar masses. We take into account the complete evolutionary stages of PG1159 progenitors starting from the Zero Age Main Sequence. We consider the two kinds of Born Again Scenarios, the very late thermal pulse (VLTP) and the late thermal pulse (LTP), that give rise to hydrogen-deficient compositions. The location of our PG1159 tracks in the effective temperature - gravity diagram and their comparison with previous calculations as well as the resulting surface compositions are discussed at some length. Our results reinforce the idea that the different abundances of $^{14}$N observed at the surface of those PG1159 stars with undetected hydrogen is an indication that the progenitors of these stars would have evolved through a VLTP episode, where most of the hydrogen content of the remnant is burnt, or LTP, where hydrogen is not burnt but instead diluted to very low surface abundances. We derive new values for sp...

  16. Bacterial competition and quorum-sensing signalling shape the eco-evolutionary outcomes of model in vitro phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Rachel; Friman, Ville-Petri

    2017-02-01

    The rapid rise of antibiotic resistance has renewed interest in phage therapy - the use of bacteria-specific viruses (phages) to treat bacterial infections. Even though phages are often pathogen-specific, little is known about the efficiency and eco-evolutionary outcomes of phage therapy in polymicrobial infections. We studied this experimentally by exposing both quorum-sensing (QS) signalling PAO1 and QS-deficient lasR Pseudomonas aeruginosa genotypes (differing in their ability to signal intraspecifically) to lytic PT7 phage in the presence and absence of two bacterial competitors: Staphylococcus aureus and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia-two bacteria commonly associated with P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial cystic fibrosis lung infections. Both the P. aeruginosa genotype and the presence of competitors had profound effects on bacteria and phage densities and bacterial resistance evolution. In general, competition reduced the P. aeruginosa frequencies leading to a lower rate of resistance evolution. This effect was clearer with QS signalling PAO1 strain due to lower bacteria and phage densities and relatively larger pleiotropic growth cost imposed by both phages and competitors. Unexpectedly, phage selection decreased the total bacterial densities in the QS-deficient lasR pathogen communities, while an increase was observed in the QS signalling PAO1 pathogen communities. Together these results suggest that bacterial competition can shape the eco-evolutionary outcomes of phage therapy.

  17. Statistical Methods for Evolutionary Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, A. W. F.

    2009-01-01

    In 1963 and 1964, L. L. Cavalli-Sforza and A. W. F. Edwards introduced novel methods for computing evolutionary trees from genetical data, initially for human populations from blood-group gene frequencies. The most important development was their introduction of statistical methods of estimation applied to stochastic models of evolution.

  18. Statistical methods for evolutionary trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, A W F

    2009-09-01

    In 1963 and 1964, L. L. Cavalli-Sforza and A. W. F. Edwards introduced novel methods for computing evolutionary trees from genetical data, initially for human populations from blood-group gene frequencies. The most important development was their introduction of statistical methods of estimation applied to stochastic models of evolution.

  19. Models for the a subunits of the Thermus thermophilus V/A-ATPase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae V-ATPase enzymes by cryo-EM and evolutionary covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schep, Daniel G; Zhao, Jianhua; Rubinstein, John L

    2016-03-22

    Rotary ATPases couple ATP synthesis or hydrolysis to proton translocation across a membrane. However, understanding proton translocation has been hampered by a lack of structural information for the membrane-embedded a subunit. The V/A-ATPase from the eubacterium Thermus thermophilus is similar in structure to the eukaryotic V-ATPase but has a simpler subunit composition and functions in vivo to synthesize ATP rather than pump protons. We determined the T. thermophilus V/A-ATPase structure by cryo-EM at 6.4 Å resolution. Evolutionary covariance analysis allowed tracing of the a subunit sequence within the map, providing a complete model of the rotary ATPase. Comparing the membrane-embedded regions of the T. thermophilus V/A-ATPase and eukaryotic V-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae allowed identification of the α-helices that belong to the a subunit and revealed the existence of previously unknown subunits in the eukaryotic enzyme. Subsequent evolutionary covariance analysis enabled construction of a model of the a subunit in the S. cerevisae V-ATPase that explains numerous biochemical studies of that enzyme. Comparing the two a subunit structures determined here with a structure of the distantly related a subunit from the bovine F-type ATP synthase revealed a conserved pattern of residues, suggesting a common mechanism for proton transport in all rotary ATPases.

  20. Grids of white dwarf evolutionary models with masses from M = 0.1 $M(solar)$ to M = 1.2 $M(solar)$

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G

    1999-01-01

    We present detailed evolutionary calculations for CO- and helium- core white dwarf (WD) models with masses ranging from M= 0.1 to M= 1.2 and for metallicities Z= 0.001 and Z= 0. The sequences cover a wide range of hydrogen envelopes as well. We employed a detailed WD evolutionary code. In particular, the energy transport by convection is treated within the formalism of the full spectrum turbulence theory. Convective mixing, crystallization, hydrogen burning and neutrino energy losses are considered. The set of models presented here is very detailed and should be valuable for the interpretation of the observational data about low mass WDs recently discovered in numerous binary configurations and also for the general problem of determining the theoretical luminosity function for WDs. In this context, we compare our cooling sequences to the observed WD luminosity function recently improved by Leggett, Ruiz and Bergeron (1998) and we obtain an age for the Galactic disk of approximately 8 Gyr. Finally, we applied ...