WorldWideScience

Sample records for pre-magellan derived mars

  1. Pratt & Whitney ESCORT derivative for mars surface power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Gerald J.; Joyner, Russell

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the applicability of a common reactor system design from the Pratt & Whitney ESCORT nuclear thermal rocket engine concept to support current NASA mars surface-based power requirements. The ESCORT is a bimodal engine capable of supporting a wide range of propulsive thermal and vehicle electrical power requirements. The ESCORT engine is powered by a fast-spectrum beryllium-reflected CERMET-fueled nuclear reactor. In addition to an expander cycle propulsive mode, the ESCORT is capable of operating in an electrical power mode. In this mode, the reactor is used to heat a mixture of helium and xenon to drive a closed-loop Brayton cycle in order to generate electrical energy. Recent Design Reference Mission requirements (DRM) from NASA Johnson Space Center and NASA Lewis Research Center studies in 1997 and 1998 have detailed upgraded requirements for potential mars transfer missions. The current NASA DRM requires a nuclear thermal propulsion system capable of delivering total mission requirements of 200170 N (45000 lbf) thrust and 50 kWe of spacecraft electrical power. Additionally, these requirements detailed a surface power system capable of providing approximately 160 kW of electrical energy over an approximate 10 year period within a given weight and volume envelope. Current NASA studies use a SP-100 reactor (0.8 MT) and a NERVA derivative (1.6 MT) as baseline systems. A mobile power cart of approximate dimensions 1.7 m×4.5 m×4.4 m has been conceptualized to transport the reactor power system on the Mars Surface. The 63.25 cm diameter and 80.25 cm height of the ESCORT and its 1.3 MT of weight fit well within the current weight and volume target range of the NASA DRM requirements. The modifications required to the ESCORT reactor system to support this upgraded electrical power requirements along with operation in the Martian atmospheric conditions are addressed in this paper. Sufficient excess reactivity and burnup capability

  2. The Reflectivity of Mars at 1064 nm: Derivation from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Data and Application to Climatology and Meteorology

    CERN Document Server

    Heavens, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) made $\\gg 10^{8}$ measurements of the reflectivity of Mars at 1064 nm ($R_{1064}$) by both active sounding and passive radiometry. Past studies of $R_{1064}$ neglected the effects of atmospheric opacity and viewing geometry on both active and passive measurements and also identified a potential calibration issue with passive radiometry. Therefore, as yet, there exists no acceptable reference $R_{1064}$ to derive a column opacity product from surface returns during active sounding for the purposes of atmospheric studies. Here, such a reference $R_{1064}$ is derived by seeking $R^{M,N}_{1064}$: a Minnaert-corrected normal albedo under clear conditions and assuming minimal phase angle dependence. Over darker surfaces, $R^{M,N}_{1064}$ and the absolute level of atmospheric opacity were estimated from active sounding. Over all surfaces, the opacity derived from active sounding were used to filter out the cloudiest passive radiometry measur...

  3. Amazonian chemical weathering rate derived from stony meteorite finds at Meridiani Planum on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christian; Bland, Phil A.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Ashley, James W.; Warner, Nicholas H.; Grant, John A.

    2016-11-01

    Spacecraft exploring Mars such as the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, as well as the Mars Science Laboratory or Curiosity rover, have accumulated evidence for wet and habitable conditions on early Mars more than 3 billion years ago. Current conditions, by contrast, are cold, extremely arid and seemingly inhospitable. To evaluate exactly how dry today's environment is, it is important to understand the ongoing current weathering processes. Here we present chemical weathering rates determined for Mars. We use the oxidation of iron in stony meteorites investigated by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at Meridiani Planum. Their maximum exposure age is constrained by the formation of Victoria crater and their minimum age by erosion of the meteorites. The chemical weathering rates thus derived are ~1 to 4 orders of magnitude slower than that of similar meteorites found in Antarctica where the slowest rates are observed on Earth.

  4. Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    Mars exploration has never been more active, and our understanding of the planet is advancing rapidly. New discoveries reveal gullies carved by recent groundwater flow, thick ice deposits protected by rocks and soil even at the equator, and new evidence for lakes and seas in Mars' past. The Martian surface has some of the oldest planetary crust in the solar system, containing clues to conditions in early planets that cannot be obtained elsewhere.Beginning with a discussion of Mars as a planet in orbit, Mars, Revised Edition covers fundamental facts about this planet, including its mass and siz

  5. Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Day, Trevor

    2006-01-01

    Discusses the fundamental facts concerning this mysterious planet, including its mass, size, and atmosphere, as well as the various missions that helped planetary scientists document the geological history of Mars. This volume also describes Mars'' seasons with their surface effects on the planet and how they have changed over time.

  6. Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Payment, Simone

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, fun, and approachable book offers everything young readers need to know to begin their study of the Red Planet. They will learn about the fundamental aspects of the Mars, including its size, mass, surface features, interior, orbit, and spin. Further, they will learn about the history of the missions to Mars, including the Viking spacecraft and the Curiosity and MAVEN rovers. Finally, readers will learn about why scientists think there's a chance that Mars is or was suitable for life. With stunning imagery from NASA itself, readers will have a front seat-view of the missi

  7. Early Mars serpentinization-derived CH4 reservoirs, H2-induced warming and paleopressure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassefière, E.; Lasue, J.; Langlais, B.; Quesnel, Y.

    2016-11-01

    CH4 has been observed on Mars both by remote sensing and in situ during the past 15 yr. It could have been produced by early Mars serpentinization processes that could also explain the observed Martian remanent magnetic field. Assuming a cold early Mars, a cryosphere could trap such CH4 as clathrates in stable form at depth. The maximum storage capacity of such a clathrate cryosphere has been recently estimated to be 2 × 1019 to 2 × 1020 moles of methane. We estimate how large amounts of serpentinization-derived CH4 stored in the cryosphere have been released into the atmosphere during the Noachian and the early Hesperian. Due to rapid clathrate dissociation and photochemical conversion of CH4 to H2, these episodes of massive CH4 release may have resulted in transient H2-rich atmospheres, at typical levels of 10-20% in a background 1-2 bar CO2 atmosphere. The collision-induced heating effect of H2 present in such an atmosphere has been shown to raise the surface temperature above the water freezing point. We show how local and rapid destabilization of the cryosphere can be induced by large events (such as the Hellas Basin or Tharsis bulge formation) and lead to such releases. Our results show that the early Mars cryosphere had a sufficient CH4 storage capacity to have maintained H2-rich transient atmospheres during a total time period up to several million years or tens of million years, having potentially contributed to the formation of valley networks during the Noachian/early Hesperian.

  8. Using a scoop to derive soil mechanical parameters on the surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargl, Günter; Poganski, Joshua; Kömle, Norbert I.; Schweiger, Helmut; Macher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We will report on the possibility of using the scoop attached to the instrument deployment arm to perform soil mechanical experiments directly on the surface of Mars. The Phoenix mission flown 2009 had an instrument deployment arm which was also used to sample surface material indo instruments mounted on the lander deck. The flight spare of this arm will again be flown to Mars on board the InSight mission. Although, the primary purpose of the arm and the attached scoop was not soil mechanical investigations it was already demonstrated by the Phoenix mission that the arm can be used to perform auxiliary investigations of the surface materials. We will report on modelling efforts using a Discrete Element Software package to demonstrate that simple soil mechanical experiments can be used to derive essential material parameters like e.g. angle of repose and others. This is of particular interest since it would be possible to implement experiments using the hardware of the InSight mission. PIC Cross section cut through a trench dug out by the scoop and the pile of the deposed material which both can be used to derive soil mechanical parameters.

  9. Thermophysical properties along Curiosity's traverse in Gale crater, Mars, derived from the REMS ground temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Piqueux, Sylvain; Lewis, Kevin W.; Lemmon, Mark T.; Smith, Michael D.

    2017-03-01

    The REMS instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, has measured ground temperature nearly continuously at hourly intervals for two Mars years. Coverage of the entire diurnal cycle at 1 Hz is available every few martian days. We compare these measurements with predictions of surface-atmosphere thermal models to derive the apparent thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo along the rover's traverse after accounting for the radiative effects of atmospheric water ice during fall and winter, as is necessary to match the measured seasonal trend. The REMS measurements can distinguish between active sand, other loose materials, mudstone, and sandstone based on their thermophysical properties. However, the apparent thermal inertias of bedrock-dominated surfaces (∼350-550 J m-2 K-1 s-½) are lower than expected. We use rover imagery and the detailed shape of the diurnal ground temperature curve to explore whether lateral or vertical heterogeneity in the surface materials within the sensor footprint might explain the low inertias. We find that the bedrock component of the surface can have a thermal inertia as high as 650-1700 J m-2 K-1 s-½ for mudstone sites and ∼700 J m-2 K-1 s-½ for sandstone sites in models runs that include lateral and vertical mixing. Although the results of our forward modeling approach may be non-unique, they demonstrate the potential to extract information about lateral and vertical variations in thermophysical properties from temporally resolved measurements of ground temperature.

  10. Analysis of Dark Slope Streaks on Mars based on Multitemporal Imagery and Digital Elevation Model derived from HRSC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Bjoern Peter; Walter, Sebastian; Muller, Jan-Peter; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-10-01

    Recurring slope lineae (RSL) on Mars are dark and narrow downhill oriented surface features found in equatorial regions (1) associated with water or hydrated salt flows (2). On the other hand there are Dark Slope Streaks which seem to be dry avalanches on dust covered slopes (3). The origin of both ist still under discussion. We found linear features in eastern Noctis Labyrinthus region (6°S, 265°E) with lengths of up to several kilometres and lateral extensions of 20-30 metres. RSL fade andrecur in the same location over multiple Mars years (4). Similarily, Dark Slope Streaks form on at least annual to decade-long timescales (5). During 10 years of HRSC observation time (2005-2015) several linear features in Noctis Labyrinthus changed in visibility. Slopeparameters and seasonal illumination conditions are investigated based ona DTM derived from HRSC data. Also particle flow along streaks has been modelled. Feature and change identification is presented involving spatial filtering and DTM analysis.The research leading to these results has received funding from theEuropean Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under iMars grant agreement n° 607379.(1) McEwen, A.S., et al. (2014): Recurring slope lineae in equatorialregions of Mars. Nat. Geosci 7: 53-58.(2) Ojha, L. et al. (2015): Spectral evidence for hydrated salts inrecurring slope linear on Mars. Nat. Geosci, DOI:10.1038/NGEO2 546.(3) Sullivan, R. et al. (2001). Mass Movement Slope Streaks Imaged by theMars Orbiter Camera. J. Geophys. Res., 106(E10), 23,607-23,633.(4) McEwen, A.S., et al. (2011): Seasonal Flows on Warm Martian Slopes.Science, Vol. 333, Issue 6043, pp. 740-743.(5) Malin, M.C.; Edgett, K.S. (2001). Mars Global Surveyor Mars OrbiterCamera: Interplanetary cruise through primary mission. J. Geophys. Res., 106(E10), 23,429-23,570.

  11. Persistence of a wild type Escherichia coli and its multiple antibiotic-resistant (MAR) derivatives in the abattoir and on chilled pig carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsol, Anne A; Halfhide, Deborah E; Bagnall, Mary C; Randall, Luke P; Enne, Virve I; Woodward, Martin J; Roe, John M

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of an Escherichia coli with the multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) phenotype to withstand the stresses of slaughter compared to an isogenic progenitor strain. A wild type E. coli isolate (345-2RifC) of porcine origin was used to derive 3 isogenic MAR mutants. Escherichia coli 345-2RifC and its MAR derivatives were inoculated into separate groups of pigs. Once colonisation was established, the pigs were slaughtered and persistence of the E. coli strains in the abattoir environment and on the pig carcasses was monitored and compared. No significant difference (P>0.05) was detected between the shedding of the different E. coli strains from the live pigs. Both the parent strain and its MAR derivatives persisted in the abattoir environment, however the parent strain was recovered from 6 of the 13 locations sampled while the MAR derivatives were recovered from 11 of 13 and the number of MAR E. coli recovered was 10-fold higher than the parent strain at half of the locations. The parent strain was not recovered from any of the 6 chilled carcasses whereas the MAR derivatives were recovered from 3 out of 5 (PMAR in 345-2RifC increased its ability to survive the stresses of the slaughter and chilling processes. Therefore in E. coli, MAR can give a selective advantage, compared to non-MAR strains, for persistence on chilled carcasses thereby facilitating transit of these strains through the food chain.

  12. A model composition for Mars derived from the oxygen isotopic ratios of martian/SNC meteorites. [Abstract only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen is the most abundant element in most meteorites, yet the ratios of its isotopes are seldom used to constrain the compositional history of achondrites. The two major achondrite groups have O isotope signatures that differ from any plausible chondritic precursors and lie between the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite domains. If the assumption is made that the present global sampling of chondritic meteorites reflects the variability of O reservoirs at the time of planetessimal/planet aggregation in the early nebula, then the O in these groups must reflect mixing between known chondritic reservoirs. This approach, in combination with constraints based on Fe-Mn-Mg systematics, has been used previously to model the composition of the basaltic achondrite parent body (BAP) and provides a model precursor composition that is generally consistent with previous eucrite parent body (EPB) estimates. The same approach is applied to Mars exploiting the assumption that the SNC and related meteorites sample the martian lithosphere. Model planet and planetesimal compositions can be derived by mixing of known chondritic components using O isotope ratios as the fundamental compositional constraint. The major- and minor-element composition for Mars derived here and that derived previously for the basaltic achondrite parent body are, in many respects, compatible with model compositions generated using completely independent constraints. The role of volatile elements and alkalis in particular remains a major difficulty in applying such models.

  13. Cosmic ray exposure of SNC meteorites and constraints on their derivation from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Johnson, P.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    There is chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic evidence that several rare meteorites originated from the planet Mars. The eight specimens (4 sphergottites, 3 nakhlites, and 1 chassignite) possess a variety of characteristics that suggest a mutual relationship. It can be predicted with reasonable confidence that these SNC meteorites were exposed to cosmic rays at relatively shallow depths for three distinct periods of time during the past approximately 10 million years. Within the context of a Martian origin, this implies that either relatively large objects were ejected from Mars at a common time and underwent three disruptive events in space or that three ejection events occurred within the past approximately 10 million years on restricted segments of Martian terrain with 1300 million year-old rocks. If mechanisms can be identified which satisfy the geochemical properties of SNC meteorites, as well as their cosmic ray exposure, and dynamical problems associated with ejection out of a large gravity field, then the case for the SNC meteorites being samples of Mars can become stronger.

  14. Analysis of Viking infrared thermal mapping data of Mars. The effects of non-ideal surfaces on the derived thermal properties of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal interia of the surface of Mars varies spatially by a factor of eight. This is attributable to changes in the average particle size of the fine material, the surface elevation, the atmospheric opacity due to dust, and the fraction of the surface covered by rocks and fine material. The effects of these non-ideal properties on the surface temperatures and derived thermal inertias are modeled, along with the the effects of slopes, CO2 condensed onto the surface, and layering of fine material upon solid rock. The non-ideal models are capable of producing thermal behavior similar to that observed by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper, including a morning delay in the post-dawn temperature rise and an enhanced cooling in the afternoon relative to any ideal, homogeneous model. The enhanced afternoon cooling observed at the Viking-1 landing site is reproduced by the non-ideal models while that atop Arsia Mons volcano is not, but may be attributed to the observing geometry.

  15. Physical properties of the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites as inferred from Mini-TES-derived thermal inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergason, R.L.; Christensen, P.R.; Bell, J.F.; Golombek, M.P.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Kieffer, H.H.

    2006-01-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) on board the two Mars Exploration Rovers provides the first opportunity to observe thermal properties from the Martian surface, relate these properties to orbital data, and perform soil conductivity experiments under Martian conditions. The thermal inertias of soils, bedforms, and rock at each landing site were derived to quantify the physical properties of these features and understand geologic processes occurring at these localities. The thermal inertia for the. Gusev plains rock target Bonneville Beacon (???1200 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2) is consistent with a dense, basaltic rock, but the rocks at the Columbia Hills have a lower thermal inertia (???620 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2), suggesting that they have a volcaniclasic origin. Bedforms on the floors of craters at both landing sites have thermal inertias of 200 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2, consistent with a particle diameter of ???160 ??m. This diameter is comparable to the most easily moved grain size in the current atmosphere on Mars, suggesting that these bedforms may have formed under current atmospheric conditions. Along the Meridiani plains, the thermal inertia is lower than that derived from TES and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) orbital data. This discrepancy is not well understood. Mini-TES-derived thermal inertias at Gusev along a ???2.5 km traverse follow trends in thermal inertia measured from orbit with TES and THEMIS. However, along the traverse, there are variability and mixing of particle sizes that are not resolved in the orbital thermal inertia data due to meter-scale processes that are not identifiable at larger scales. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Mars Atmospheric History Derived from Upper-Atmospheric Structure of 38Ar/36Ar Measured From MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce; Slipski, Marek; Benna, Mehdi; Mahaffy, Paul; Elrod, Meredith K.; Yelle, Roger; Stone, Shane; Alsaeed, Noora

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the structure of the Martian upper atmosphere made from MAVEN observations allow us to derive homopause and exobase altitudes in the Mars upper atmosphere and to determine the isotopic fractionation that occurs between them. Fractionation in the ratio of 38Ar/36Ar occurs between the homopause and exobase due to diffusive separation. This fractionation, combined with measurements of the bulk atmospheric ratio, is used to determine the total amount of argon lost to space by pick-up-ion sputtering. Our analysis is based on Rayleigh distillation, modified by replenishment of gas to the atmosphere by outgassing, impact, and crustal weathering. Approximately 80 % of the 36Ar that was ever in the atmosphere has been removed through time. This high value requires that a major fraction of Mars atmospheric gas has been lost to space. It points strongly to loss to space as having been the dominant mechanism driving the transition in Martian climate from an early, warm, wet environment to today's cold, dry, thin atmosphere.

  17. Soil Analysis Micro-Mission Concepts Derived from the MSP 2001 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, M. H.; Meloy, T. P.; Anderson, M. S.; Buehler, M. G.; Frant, M. A.; Grannan, S. M.; Fuerstenau, S. D.; Keller, H. U.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Marshall, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will evaluate the Martian environment for soil and dust-related hazards to human exploration as part of the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. The integrated MECA payload contains a wet-chemistry laboratory, a microscopy station, an electrometer to characterize the electrostatic environment, and arrays of material patches to study abrasion and adhesion. Heritage will be all-important for low cost micro-missions, and adaptations of instruments developed for the Pathfinder, '98 and '01 Landers should be strong contenders for '03 flights. This talk has three objectives: (1) Familiarize the audience with MECA instrument capabilities; (2) present concepts for stand-alone and/or mobile versions of MECA instruments; and (3) broaden the context of the MECA instruments from human exploration to a comprehensive scientific survey of Mars. Due to time limitations, emphasis will be on the chemistry and microscopy experiments. Ion-selective electrodes and related sensors in MECA's wet-chemistry laboratory will evaluate total dissolved solids, redox potential, pH, and the concentration of many soluble ions and gases in wet Martian soil. These electrodes can detect potentially dangerous heavy-metal ions, emitted pathogenic gases, and the soil's corrosive potential, and experiments will include cyclic voltammetry and anodic stripping. For experiments beyond 2001, enhancements could allow multiple use of the cells (for mobile experiments) and reagent addition (for quantitative mineralogical and exobiological analysis). MECA's microscopy station combines optical and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) in an actively focused, controlled illumination environment to image particles from millimeters to nanometers in size. Careful selection of substrates allows controlled experiments in adhesion, abrasion, hardness, aggregation, magnetic and other properties. Special tools allow primitive manipulation (brushing and scraping) of samples

  18. Topographically Derived Maps of Valley Networks and Drainage Density in the Mare Tyrrhenum Quadrangle on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W.; Stepinski, T. F.

    2006-12-01

    A novel, automated technique for delineating Martian valley networks from digital terrain data is applied to the Mare Tyrrhenum quadrangle on Mars, yielding a detailed map for the entire quadrangle. The resultant average value of drainage density for the Noachian part of the quadrangle is D ~ 0.05 km-1, an order of magnitude higher than the value inferred from a global map based on Viking images, and comparable to the values inferred from the precision mapping of selected focus sites. Valleys are omnipresent in Noachian terrain even outside the "highly dissected" Npld unit. This suggests fluvial erosion throughout the Noachian, implying widespread precipitation. The map of continuous drainage density is constructed to study spatial variations of D. This map reveals significant variations in degree of dissection in Noachian on scale of > 100 km. These variations do not correlate with any terrain parameter and their origin requires further study.

  19. Distinct Chlorine Isotopic Reservoirs on Mars: Implications for Character, Extent and Relative Timing of Crustal Interaction with Mantle-Derived Magmas, Evolution of the Martian Atmosphere, and the Building Blocks of an Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, C. K.; Messenger, S.; Sharp, Z. D.; Burger, P. V.; Nguyen, N.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    The style, magnitude, timing, and mixing components involved in the interaction between mantle derived Martian magmas and Martian crust have long been a point of debate. Understanding this process is fundamental to deciphering the composition of the Martian crust and its interaction with the atmosphere, the compositional diversity and oxygen fugacity variations in the Martian mantle, the bulk composition of Mars and the materials from which it accreted, and the noble gas composition of Mars and the Sun. Recent studies of the chlorine isotopic composition of Martian meteorites imply that although the variation in delta (sup 37) Cl is limited (total range of approximately14 per mille), there appears to be distinct signatures for the Martian crust and mantle. However, there are potential issues with this interpretation. New Cl isotope data from the SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) instrument on the Mars Science Lab indicate a very wide range of Cl isotopic compositions on the Martian surface. Recent measurements by [10] duplicated the results of [7,8], but placed them within the context of SAM surface data. In addition, Martian meteorite Chassigny contains trapped noble gases with isotopic ratios similar to solar abundance, and has long been considered a pristine, mantle derived sample. However, previous studies of apatite in Chassigny indicate that crustal fluids have interacted with regions interstitial to the cumulus olivine. The initial Cl isotope measurements of apatite in Chassigny suggest an addition of crustal component to this lithology, apparently contradicting the rare gas data. Here, we examine the Cl isotopic composition of multiple generations and textures of apatite in Chassigny to extricate the crustal and mantle components in this meteorite and to reveal the style and timing of the addition of crustal components to mantle-derived magmas. These data reveal distinct Martian Cl sources whose signatures have their origins linked to both the early Solar

  20. Biotoxicity of Mars soils: 2. Survival of Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis in aqueous extracts derived from six Mars analog soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Ming, Doug W.; Golden, D. C.

    2017-07-01

    The search for an extant microbiota on Mars depends on exploring sites that contain transient or permanent liquid water near the surface. Examples of possible sites for liquid water may be active recurring slope lineae (RSL) and fluid inclusions in ice or salt deposits. The presence of saline fluids on Mars will act to depress the freezing points of liquid water to as low as ‒60 °C, potentially permitting the metabolism and growth of halophilic microorganisms to temperatures significantly below the freezing point of pure water at 0 °C. In order to predict the potential risks of forward contamination by Earth microorganisms to subsurface sites on Mars with liquid brines, experiments were designed to characterize the short-term survival of two bacteria in aqueous soil solutions from six analog soils. The term ''soil'' is used here to denote any loose, unconsolidated matrix with no implications for the presence or absence of organics or biology. The analog soils were previously described (Schuerger et al., 2012, Planetary Space Sci., 72, 91-101), and represented crushed Basalt (benign control), Salt, Acid, Alkaline, Aeolian, and Phoenix analogs on Mars. The survival rates of spores of Bacillus subtilis and vegetative cells of Enterococcus faecalis were tested in soil solutions from each analog at 24, 0, or ‒70 °C for time periods up to 28 d. Survival of dormant spores of B. subtilis were mostly unaffected by incubation in the aqueous extracts of all six Mars analogs. In contrast, survival rates of E. faecalis cells were suppressed by all soil solutions when incubated at 24 °C but improved at 0 and ‒70 °C, except for assays in the Salt and Acid soil solutions in which most cells were killed. Results suggest that Earth microorganisms that form spores may persist in liquid brines on Mars better than non-spore forming species, and thus, spore-forming species may pose a potential forward contamination risk to sites with liquid brines.

  1. Improved Large-Scale Slope Analysis on Mars Based on Correlation of Slopes Derived with Different Baselines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Wu, B.

    2017-07-01

    The surface slopes of planetary bodies are important factors for exploration missions, such as landing site selection and rover manoeuvre. Generally, high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) such as those generated from the HiRISE images on Mars are preferred to generate detailed slopes with a better fidelity of terrain features. Unfortunately, high-resolution datasets normally only cover small area and are not always available. While lower resolution datasets, such as MOLA, provide global coverage of the Martian surface. Slopes generated from the low-resolution DEM will be based on a large baseline and be smoothed from the real situation. In order to carry out slope analysis at large scale on Martian surface based low-resolution data such as MOLA data, while alleviating the smoothness problem of slopes due to its low resolution, this paper presents an amplifying function of slopes derived from low-resolution DEMs based on the relationships between DEM resolutions and slopes. First, slope maps are derived from the HiRISE DEM (meter-level resolution DEM generated from HiRISE images) and a series of down-sampled HiRISE DEMs. The latter are used to simulate low-resolution DEMs. Then the high-resolution slope map is down- sampled to the same resolution with the slope map from the lower-resolution DEMs. Thus, a comparison can be conducted pixel-wise. For each pixel on the slope map derived from the lower-resolution DEM, it can reach the same value with the down-sampled HiRISE slope by multiplying an amplifying factor. Seven sets of HiRISE images with representative terrain types are used for correlation analysis. It shows that the relationship between the amplifying factors and the original MOLA slopes can be described by the exponential function. Verifications using other datasets show that after applying the proposed amplifying function, the updated slope maps give better representations of slopes on Martian surface compared with the original slopes.

  2. Mars bevares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Hendricks, Elbert

    2009-01-01

    2009 er femåret for Mission Mars. I den anledning opridser de to kronikører, far og søn, hvorfor man bør lade planer om en bemandet tur til Mars forblive i skrivebordsskuffen......2009 er femåret for Mission Mars. I den anledning opridser de to kronikører, far og søn, hvorfor man bør lade planer om en bemandet tur til Mars forblive i skrivebordsskuffen...

  3. Mars Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    First of NASA's Discovery missions. Launched in December 1996 and arrived at Mars on 4 July 1997. Mainly intended as a technology demonstration mission. Used airbags to cushion the landing on Mars. The Carl Sagan Memorial station returned images of an ancient flood plain in Ares Vallis. The 10 kg Sojourner rover used an x-ray spectrometer to study the composition of rocks and travelled about 100 ...

  4. Exploring Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuil, Stéphanie

    2016-04-01

    Mars is our neighbour planet and has always fascinated humans as it has been seen as a potential abode for life. Knowledge about Mars is huge and was constructed step by step through numerous missions. It could be difficult to describe these missions, the associated technology, the results, the questions they raise, that's why an activity is proposed, that directly interests students. Their production is presented in the poster. Step 1: The main Mars feature and the first Mars explorations using telescope are presented to students. It should be really interesting to present "Mars Canals" from Percival Lowell as it should also warn students against flawed interpretation. Moreover, this study has raised the big question about extra-terrestrial life on Mars for the first time. Using Google Mars is then a good way to show the huge knowledge we have on the planet and to introduce modern missions. Step 2: Students have to choose and describe one of the Mars mission from ESA and NASA. They should work in pairs. Web sites from ESA and NASA are available and the teacher makes sure the main missions will be studied. Step 3: Students have to collect different pieces of information about the mission - When? Which technology? What were the main results? What type of questions does it raise? They prepare an oral presentation in the form they want (role play, academic presentation, using a poster, PowerPoint). They also have to produce playing cards about the mission that could be put on a timeline. Step 4: As a conclusion, the different cards concerning different missions are mixed. Groups of students receive cards and they have to put them on a timeline as fast as possible. It is also possible to play the game "timeline".

  5. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Guidance Improvements for Mars 2018 (DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Llama, Eduardo; Winski, Richard G.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Ivanov, Mark C.; Grover, Myron R.; Prakash, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will be launched in a mission to deliver the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. A follow on MSL-derived mission, referred to as Mars 2018, is planned for 2018. Mars 2018 goals include performance enhancements of the Entry, Descent and Landing over that of its predecessor MSL mission of 2011. This paper will discuss the main elements of the modified 2018 EDL preliminary design that will increase performance on the entry phase of the mission. In particular, these elements will increase the parachute deploy altitude to allow for more time margin during the subsequent descent and landing phases and reduce the delivery ellipse size at parachute deploy through modifications in the entry reference trajectory design, guidance trigger logic design, and the effect of additional navigation hardware.

  6. Mar Capeans

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Mar Capeans, CERN researcher, answers the question to "What can we do in the world of sciences and innovation to make visible the invisible?". This piece belongs to a series of videos made by the Spanish Aquae Foundation, a supporter of the CERN & Society Foundation.

  7. Mar adentro

    OpenAIRE

    Florián Guerrero, Mayra

    2014-01-01

    La bravura del mar destruyó primero las canchas de fútbol, luego se tragó casas y finalmente las playas. El otrora balneario exclusivo de Buenos Aires, donde se fundó el famoso restaurant Morillas en los años 40, es ahora un tímido recuerdo en medio del chocar incesante de las olas.

  8. Mars @ ASDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Francesco

    "Mars @ ASDC" is a project born with the goal of using the new web technologies to assist researches involved in the study of Mars. This project employs Mars map and javascript APIs provided by Google to visualize data acquired by space missions on the planet. So far, visualization of tracks acquired by MARSIS and regions observed by VIRTIS-Rosetta has been implemented. The main reason for the creation of this kind of tool is the difficulty in handling hundreds or thousands of acquisitions, like the ones from MARSIS, and the consequent difficulty in finding observations related to a particular region. This led to the development of a tool which allows to search for acquisitions either by defining the region of interest through a set of geometrical parameters or by manually selecting the region on the map through a few mouse clicks The system allows the visualization of tracks (acquired by MARSIS) or regions (acquired by VIRTIS-Rosetta) which intersect the user defined region. MARSIS tracks can be visualized both in Mercator and polar projections while the regions observed by VIRTIS can presently be visualized only in Mercator projection. The Mercator projection is the standard map provided by Google. The polar projections are provided by NASA and have been developed to be used in combination with APIs provided by Google The whole project has been developed following the "open source" philosophy: the client-side code which handles the functioning of the web page is written in javascript; the server-side code which executes the searches for tracks or regions is written in PHP and the DB which undergoes the system is MySQL.

  9. Mars Public Engagement Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Mars public engagement goal to understand and protect our home planet, explore the Universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers. Teacher workshops, robotics education, Mars student imaging and analysis programs, MARS Student Imaging Project (MSIP), Russian student participation, MARS museum visualization alliance, and commercialization concepts are all addressed in this project.

  10. Materials and Surface Processes at Gale Crater and the Moons of Mars Derived from High Spatial and Spectral Resolution Orbital Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraeman, Abigail Ann

    This thesis is a collection of studies that use orbital remote sensing data to investigate the composition and geologic histories of Mars' moons, Phobos and Deimos, and Mt. Sharp, the destination for the Curiosity Mars rover. A final chapter focuses on Curiosity data and terrestrial analog studies to supplement orbital predictions about Mt. Sharp. Disk-resolved hyperspectral observations of Phobos acquired at a range of lighting and viewing geometries are fit with a Hapke photometric function to solve for the single particle phase function and single scattering albedos of Phobos and also disk-resolved hyperspectral observations of Deimos. Fe2+ electronic absorptions diagnostic of olivine and pyroxene are not detected. A broad absorption centered on 0.65 microm within the red spectral units of both moons is seen, and this feature is also evident in telescopic, Pathfinder, and Phobos-2 observations of Phobos. A 2.8 μm metal-OH combination absorption on both moons is also detected, and this absorption is shallower in the Phobos blue unit than in the Phobos red unit and Deimos. The strength, position, and shape of both absorptions are similar to features seen on low-albedo primitive asteroids. Two end-member hypotheses could explain these spectral features: the presence of highly desiccated Fe-phyllosilicate minerals indigenous to the bodies, or Rayleigh scattering and absorption of small iron particles formed by exogenic space weathering processing, coupled with implantation of H from solar wind. Phobos' and Deimos' low reflectances, lack of mafic absorption features, and red spectral slopes are incompatible with even highly space weathered chondritic or basaltic compositions. These results, coupled with similarities to laboratory spectra of Tagish Lake (possible D-type asteroid analog) and CM carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, show that Phobos and Deimos have primitive compositions. If the moons formed in situ rather than by capture of primitive bodies, primitive

  11. The H Corona of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Michael Scott

    The atmosphere of every planet is surrounded by a tenuous cloud of hydrogen gas, referred to as a hydrogen corona. At Mars, a substantial fraction of the H present in the corona is moving fast enough to escape the planet's gravity, permanently removing H from the Martian atmosphere. Because this H is ultimately derived from lower atmospheric water, loss of H from Mars is capable of drying and oxidizing the planet over geologic time. Understanding the processes that supply the H corona and control its escape is therefore essential for a complete understanding of the climate history of Mars and for assessing its habitability. In this thesis, I present the most complete analysis of the H corona ever attempted, surveying eight years of data gathered by the ultraviolet spectrograph SPICAM on Mars Express. Using a coupled radiative transfer and physical density model, I interpret brightness measurements of the corona in terms of escape rates of H from the planet, uncovering an order-of-magnitude variability in the H escape rate never before detected. These variations are interpreted using a completely new photochemical model of the atmosphere, demonstrating that newly discovered high altitude water vapor layers are sufficient to produce the observed variation. Finally, I present first results of the SPICAM successor instrument IUVS, an imaging ultraviolet spectrograph carried by NASA's MAVEN spacecraft. IUVS measurements are producing the most complete dataset ever gathered for the Martian H corona, enabling supply and loss processes to be assessed in more complete detail than ever before. This dataset will allow present-day loss rates to be extrapolated into the past, determining the absolute amount of water Mars has lost to space over the course of its history. Planets the size of Mars may be common throughout the universe; the work of this thesis is one step toward assessing the habitability of such planets in general.

  12. Rotorcrafts for Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaram, J.; Tokumaru, P. T.

    2014-06-01

    Rotorcraft mobility provides a number of useful capabilities to potential Mars missions. We present some recent results relating to the design and test of Mars rotorcraft mobility elements, and aspects of rotorcraft system and mission design.

  13. Mars Gashopper Airplane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Gas Hopper Airplane, or "gashopper" is a novel concept for propulsion of a robust Mars flight and surface exploration vehicle that utilizes indigenous CO2...

  14. High-resolution mapping of Martian water ice clouds using Mars Express OMEGA observations - Derivation of the diurnal cloud life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szantai, Andre; Audouard, Joachim; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Forget, Francois; Pottier, Alizée; Millour, Ehouarn; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The mapping in space and time of water ice clouds can help to explain the Martian water cycle and atmospheric circulation. For this purpose, an ice cloud index (ICI) corresponding to the depth of a water ice absorption band at 3.4 microns is derived from a series of OMEGA images (spectels) covering 5 Martian years. The ICI values for the corresponding pixels are then binned on a high-resolution regular grid (1° longitude x 1° latitude x 5° Ls x 1 h local time) and averaged. Inside each bin, the cloud cover is calculated by dividing the number of pixels considered as cloudy (after comparison to a threshold) to the number of all (valid) pixelsWe compare the maps of clouds obtained around local time 14:00 with collocated TES cloud observations (which were only obtained around this time of the day). A good agreement is found.Averaged ICI compared to the water ice column variable from the Martian Climate Database (MCD) show a correct correlation (~0.5) , which increases when values limited to the tropics only are compared.The number of gridpoints containing ICI values is small ( ~1%), but by taking several neighbor gridpoints and over longer periods, we can observe a cloud life cycle during daytime. An example in the the tropics, around the northern summer solstice, shows a decrease of cloudiness in the morning followed by an increase in the afternoon.

  15. Thermal emission spectrometer experiment - Mars Observer mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Anderson, Donald L.; Chase, Stillman C.; Clark, Roger N.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Malin, Michael C.; Pearl, John C.; Carpenter, James; Bandiera, Nuno; Brown, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the thermal emission spectrometer (TES) designed for the Mars Observer mission. The TES measurements of the surface and the atmosphere of Mars will be used to determine and map the composition of the surface rocks, minerals, and the condensates. Examples of information that will be obtained from TES data include mineral abundance maps, condensate properties and their distribution in time and space, aerosol properties and their distribution in time and space, the rock abundance, the polar energy balance, and properties of gaseous species. Where appropriate, these derived parameters will be distributed in the form of gridded map, to allow direct comparison with other derived data sets.

  16. Mars at Opposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    On January 29, Mars will reach opposition, a point along its orbit around the Sun where Mars will be directly opposite from the Sun in a two-planet and Sun line-up with the Earth in between. At this opposition, the Earth and Mars will be separated by nearly 100 million km. An opposition is similar to a full Moon in that the planet at opposition…

  17. Mars at Opposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    On January 29, Mars will reach opposition, a point along its orbit around the Sun where Mars will be directly opposite from the Sun in a two-planet and Sun line-up with the Earth in between. At this opposition, the Earth and Mars will be separated by nearly 100 million km. An opposition is similar to a full Moon in that the planet at opposition…

  18. Mars Museum Visualization Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohus, A. M.; Viotti, M. A.; de Jong, E. M.

    2004-11-01

    The Mars Museum Visualization Alliance is a collaborative effort funded by the Mars Public Engagement Office and supported by JPL's Informal Education staff and the Solar System Visualization Project to share the adventure of exploration and make Mars a real place. The effort started in 2002 with a small working group of museum professionals to learn how best to serve museum audiences through informal science educators. By the time the Mars Exploration Rovers landed on Mars in January 2004, over 100 organizations were partners in the Alliance, which has become a focused community of Mars educators. The Alliance provides guaranteed access to images, information, news, and resources for use by the informal science educators with their students, educators, and public audiences. Thousands of people have shared the adventure of exploring Mars and now see it as a real place through the efforts of the Mars Museum Visualization Alliance partners. The Alliance has been lauded for "providing just the right inside track for museums to do what they do best," be that webcasts, live presentations with the latest images and information, high-definition productions, planetarium shows, or hands-on educational activities. The Alliance is extending its mission component with Cassini, Genesis, Deep Impact, and Stardust. The Mars Exploration and Cassini Programs, as well as the Genesis, Deep Impact, and Stardust Projects, are managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California.

  19. Erosionsrinnen auf dem Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Reiß, Dennis Emil

    2010-01-01

    The work presented here analyses gullies on Mars using high resolution images (Mars Orbiter Camera – MOC) of the Mars Global Surveyor Mission (MGS). Gullies on Earth are formed by debris flows, a mass movement in which water is involved. It is assumed that gully features on Mars are young and therefore they could indicate the presence of liquid water in the recent past. The main focus of this work lies in a morphological analysis, a global mapping of their distribution and a determination of ...

  20. Digital cartography of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    A medium-resolution Digital Image Model (DIM) of Mars is being compiled. A DIM is a mosaic of radiometrically corrected, photometrically modelled spacecraft images displaying accurate reflectance properties at uniform resolution, and geometrically tied to the best available control. The Mars medium-resolution DIM contains approximately 4700 Viking Orbiter image frames that were used to compile the recently completed 1:2,000,000-scale controlled photomosaic series of Mars. This DIM provides a planimetric control base to which all other Mars maps will be registered. A similar control base of topographic elevations (Digital Terrain Model, or DTM) is also being compiled. These products are scheduled for completion in 1989.

  1. Combining meteorites and missions to explore Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Timothy J; Corrigan, Catherine M; Herd, Christopher D K

    2011-11-29

    Laboratory studies of meteorites and robotic exploration of Mars reveal scant atmosphere, no evidence of plate tectonics, past evidence for abundant water, and a protracted igneous evolution. Despite indirect hints, direct evidence of a martian origin came with the discovery of trapped atmospheric gases in one meteorite. Since then, the study of martian meteorites and findings from missions have been linked. Although the meteorite source locations are unknown, impact ejection modeling and spectral mapping of Mars suggest derivation from small craters in terrains of Amazonian to Hesperian age. Whereas most martian meteorites are young ( 4.5 Ga and formation of enriched and depleted reservoirs. However, the history inferred from martian meteorites conflicts with results from recent Mars missions, calling into doubt whether the igneous histor y inferred from the meteorites is applicable to Mars as a whole. Allan Hills 84001 dates to 4.09 Ga and contains fluid-deposited carbonates. Accompanying debate about the mechanism and temperature of origin of the carbonates came several features suggestive of past microbial life in the carbonates. Although highly disputed, the suggestion spurred interest in habitable extreme environments on Earth and throughout the Solar System. A flotilla of subsequent spacecraft has redefined Mars from a volcanic planet to a hydrologically active planet that may have harbored life. Understanding the history and habitability of Mars depends on understanding the coupling of the atmosphere, surface, and subsurface. Sample return that brings back direct evidence from these diverse reservoirs is essential.

  2. Global, Computer-generated Map of Valley Networks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W.; Stepinski, T. F.

    2009-03-01

    The new, global map of valley networks on Mars has been created entirely by a computer algorithm parsing topographic data. Dependencies between dissection density and its potential controlling factors are derived and discussed.

  3. Dust deposits on Mars: The 'parna' analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Williams, Steven H.

    1994-07-01

    Parna is an Australian aboriginal word meaning 'sandy dust'. It has been applied to deposits of clay, silt, and sand which were initially transported by the wind as aggregates, or pellets, of sand size. Parna is distinguished by its silt and clay content, which in some cases exceeds 85% of the total volume of the deposit. Much of the fine-grained playa silt and clay is incorporated into the parna as sand-sized aggregates, which greatly facilitate their transportation and reworking by the wind. Rain following aggregate emplacement can cause their disintegration, rendering the parna immobile by the wind, yet some pellets can survive several wetting/drying episodes. Parna deposits on Earth occur both as dune forms and as sheet deposits which mantle older terrains. In both cases the deposits are typically derived from lacustrine (lake) beds, such as playas. There is substantial evidence to suggest that bodies of water existed on Mars in the past. Thus, the potential is high for lacustrine deposits and the formation of parna on Mars. Although no parna dunes have been identified, it is suggested that the deposits derived from White Rock (-8 deg, 335 deg W), near Mamers Valles (34 deg, 343 deg W), and elsewhere on Mars may represent sheet parna. Data obtained from Mars-94/96 missions and potential landed spacecraft may provide additional evidence for the existence of parna on Mars.

  4. Microscope on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  5. Microscope on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  6. MarsTwin: an M-mission to Mars with two geophysical laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehant, V. M.; Breuer, D.; Grott, M.; Spohn, T.; Lognonne, P.; Read, P. L.; Vennerstroem, S.; Banerdt, B.

    2010-12-01

    Mars-Twin - a mission proposed for the running ESA cosmic vision M call - if selected it will be the first European mission to focus on interior processes and the early evolution of Mars, providing essential constraints for models of the thermal, geochemical, and geologic evolution of Mars and for a better understanding of SNC meteorites and future samples from Mars. Our fundamental understanding of the interior of the Earth comes from geophysics, geodesy, geochemistry, geomagnetism, and petrology. For geophysics, seismology, geodesy, magnetic field measurements, and surface heat flow have revealed the basic internal layering of the Earth, its thermal structure, its gross compositional stratification, as well as significant lateral variations in these quantities. The landers will also provide meteorological stations to monitor the Martian meteorology and climate and to obtain new measurements in the Martian boundary layer. The Mars-Twin mission will fill a longstanding gap in the scientific exploration of the solar system by performing an in-situ investigation of the interior of an Earth-like planet other than our own. Mars-Twin will provide unique and critical information about the fundamental processes of terrestrial planet formation and evolution. This investigation has been ranked as a high priority in virtually every set of European, US and international high-level planetary science recommendations for the past 30 years, and the objectives for the Mars-Twin mission are derived directly from these recommendations. In addition to geophysics, the mission will provide important constraints for the Astrobiology of Mars by helping to understand why Mars fails to have a magnetic field, by helping to understand the evolution of the climate, and by providing a limit to the chemoautrophic biosphere through a measurement of the heat flow. The paper will also address the synergy between the lander instruments and the possible orbiter instruments.

  7. ExoMars 2016 arrives at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedhem, Hakan; Vago, Jorge L.; ExoMars Team

    2016-10-01

    The Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) and the Schiaparelli Entry, descent and landing Demonstrator Model (EDM) will arrive at Mars on 19 October 2016. The TGO and the EDM are part of the first step of the ExoMars Programme. They will be followed by a Rover and a long lived Surface Platform to be launched in 2020.The EDM is attached to the TGO for the full duration of the cruise to Mars and will be separated three days before arrival at Mars. After separation the TGO will perform a deflection manoeuvre and, on 19 October (during the EDM landing), enter into a highly elliptical near equatorial orbit. TGO will remain in this parking orbit until January 2017, when the orbital plane inclination will be changed to 74 degrees and aerobraking to the final 400 km near circular orbit will start. The final operational orbit is expected to be reached at the end of 2017.The TGO scientific payload consists of four instruments. These are: ACS and NOMAD, both infrared spectrometers for atmospheric measurements in solar occultation mode and in nadir mode, CASSIS, a multichannel camera with stereo imaging capability, and FREND, an epithermal neutron detector for search of subsurface hydrogen. The mass of the TGO is 3700 kg, including fuel. The EDM, with a mass of 600 kg, is mounted on top of the TGO as seen in its launch configuration. The main objective of the EDM is to demonstrate the capability of performing a safe entry, descent and landing on the surface, but it does carry a descent camera and a small battery powered meteorological package that may operate for a few days on the surface.The ExoMars programme is a joint activity by the European Space Agency(ESA) and ROSCOSMOS, Russia. ESA is providing the TGO spacecraft and Schiaparelli (EDM) and two of the TGO instruments and ROSCOSMOS is providing the launcher and the other two TGO instruments. After the arrival of the ExoMars 2020 mission at the surface of Mars, the TGO will handle the communication between the Earth and the Rover and

  8. MARS: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribble, R.E.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Liu, W. (Cyclotron Inst., Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA))

    1991-05-01

    We are building a momentum achromat recoil spectrometer (MARS) for use with the new K500 superconducting cyclotron at Texas A and M University. MARS uses a unique optical design utilizing two dispersive planes to combine a momemtum achromat with a recoil mass spectrometer. This configuration makes MARS applicable to a broad range of nuclear reaction studies utilizing inverse kinematics. It also leads to a system that is well matched to the range of secondary particle energies that will be produced in reactions with K500 beam. MARS will have a typical mass resolution of {delta}M/M{approx equal}1/300, with an energy acceptance of {+-}9% {Delta}E/E and a geometric solid angle of up to 9 msr. A beam swinger system will alow reaction products in the angular range 0deg to 30deg to be studied. MARS will be used to study both the excited states and decay properties of very proton- and neutron-rich nuclei. MARS will also be used to provide a reaction mechanism filter to assist investigations of the dynamics of heavy ion collisions and to produce secondary radioactive beams for reaction and spectroscopic studies of particular interest for nuclear astrophysics. We briefly describe the design of MARS, give a status report on its construction and an overview of the scientific program planned for it. (orig.).

  9. MOLA: The Future of Mars Global Cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, T. C.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Frey, H. V.; Garvin, J. B.; Head, J. W.; Muhleman, D. O.; Pettengill, G. H.; Phillips, R. J.; Solomon, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    The MGS Orbiter is carrying the high-precision Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) which, when combined with precision reconstructed orbital data and telemetered attitude data, provides a tie between inertial space and Mars-fixed coordinates to an accuracy of 100 m in latitude / longitude and 10 m in radius (1 sigma), orders of magnitude more accurate than previous global geodetic/ cartographic control data. Over the 2 year MGS mission lifetime, it is expected that over 30,000 MOLA Global Cartographic Control Points will be produced to form the basis for new and re-derived map and geodetic products, key to the analysis of existing and evolving MGS data as well as future Mars exploration. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Mars Express Bistatic Radar Observations 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andert, Tom; Simpson, Richard A.; Pätzold, Martin; Kahan, Daniel S.; Remus, Stefan; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2017-04-01

    One objective of the Mars Express Radio Science Experiment (MaRS) is to address the dielectric properties and surface roughness of Mars, which can be determined by means of a surface scattering experiment, also known as bistatic radar (BSR). The radio subsystem transmitter located on board the Mars Express spacecraft beams right circularly polarized (RCP) radio signals at two wavelengths - 3.6 cm (X-Band) and 13 cm (S-Band) - toward Mars' surface. Part of the impinging radiation is then scattered toward a receiver at a ground station on Earth and both the right and left circularly polarized echo components (RCP and LCP, respectively) are recorded. The dielectric constant can be derived in this configuration from the RCP-to-LCP power ratio. This approach eliminates the need for absolute end-to-end calibration in favor of relative calibration of the RCP and LCP ground receiver channels. Nonetheless, accurate relative calibration of the two receiving channels remains challenging. The most favorable configuration for bistatic radar experiments is around Earth-Mars opposition, which occurs approximately every two years. In 2016 the minimum distance of about 0.5 AU was reached on May 30th; eleven BSR experiments were successfully conducted between the end of April and mid-June. The specular point tracks during two experiments over the Syrtis Major region were very similar on April 27th and June 2nd, and the data were collected using the same Earth-based antenna. The separation in time and the different observing angles provide an opportunity to check reproducibility of the calibrations and analysis methods. The paper will illustrate the general spacecraft-to-ground BSR observation technique and describe in detail the calibration procedures at the ground station needed to perform the relative calibration of the two receiving channels. Results from the calibrations and the surface observations will be shown for the two MaRS experiments over Syrtis Major.

  11. Mars Observer's costly solitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, John

    1993-09-01

    An evaluation is presented of the ramifications of the loss of contact with the Mars Observer spacecraft in August, 1993; the Observer constituted the first NASA mission to Mars in 17 years. It is noted that most, if not all of the scientists involved with the mission will have to find alternative employment within 6 months. The loss of the Observer will leave major questions concerning the geologic history of Mars, and its turbulent atmospheric circulation, unanswered. A detailed account of the discovery of the loss of communications, the unsuccessful steps taken to rectify the problem, and the financial losses incurred through the failure of the mission, are also given.

  12. Ion flux profiles observed at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, C. M.; Andersson, L.; Lundin, R. N.; Frahm, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    How Mars lost it's water and atmosphere is still an important question. Many studies have investigated high-energy ion fluxes (>10 eV) surrounding the planet and derived ion outflow rates in order to determine atmospheric loss. These rates suggest that the outflow from high-energy ions is not the dominant escape path for atmospheric loss. Over the years increasing evidence has indicated that the loss of low-energy ions are more important than the high-energy ion loss. In this presentation ion observations (down to the spacecraft potential) from the Mars Express (MEX) mission (2010/11), are used to describe the ion altitude distribution at Mars. The focus of this study is below the altitude of ~1000 km. Within the Mars environment, using the MEX electron observations different plasma regions was identified. Supported by electron identification, different altitude profiles of ion fluxes have been analyzed from the different plasma regions. One of the results from this study is that the altitude profile of the ion flux observed below the photoelectron boundary is different when comparing the northern and the southern hemispheres. The ion distributions, resulting altitude profile, the influence of the crustal magnetic field at Mars, and the implications relating to plasma outflow will be discussed in this presentation.

  13. Mars' core and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  14. Mars Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA’s Mars Exploration Program (MEP) calls for a series of highly ambitious missions over the next decade and beyond. The overall goals of the MEP must be...

  15. Mars Rover Photos API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This API is designed to collect image data gathered by NASA's Curiosity, Opportunity, and Spirit rovers on Mars and make it more easily available to other...

  16. Internal constitution of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Models of the internal structure of Mars consistent with the mass, radius and moment of inertia of the planet are constructed. The models assume that the radius of the core is between 0.36 and 0.60 of the radius of the planet, that the zero-pressure density of the mantle is between 3.54 and 3.49 g/cu cm, and that the planet contains 25 to 28% iron. Meteorite models of Mars containing 25 wt % iron and 12 wt % core are also proposed. It is maintained that Mars in contrast to the earth is an incompletely differentiated planet with a core substantially richer in sulfur than the core of the earth. The absence of a magnetic field on Mars is possibly linked with lack of lunar precessional torque and the small size and high resistivity of the Martian core.

  17. Use of human MAR elements to improve retroviral vector production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buceta, M; Galbete, J L; Kostic, C; Arsenijevic, Y; Mermod, N

    2011-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have many favorable properties for gene therapies, but their use remains limited by safety concerns and/or by relatively lower titers for some of the safer self-inactivating (SIN) derivatives. In this study, we evaluated whether increased production of SIN retroviral vectors can be achieved from the use of matrix attachment region (MAR) epigenetic regulators. Two MAR elements of human origin were found to increase and to stabilize the expression of the green fluorescent protein transgene in stably transfected HEK-293 packaging cells. Introduction of one of these MAR elements in retroviral vector-producing plasmids yielded higher expression of the viral vector RNA. Consistently, viral titers obtained from transient transfection of MAR-containing plasmids were increased up to sixfold as compared with the parental construct, when evaluated in different packaging cell systems and transfection conditions. Thus, use of MAR elements opens new perspectives for the efficient generation of gene therapy vectors.

  18. A Mars 1984 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Mission objectives are developed for the next logical step in the investigation of the local physical and chemical environments and the search for organic compounds on Mars. The necessity of three vehicular elements: orbiter, penetrator, and rover for in situ investigations of atmospheric-lithospheric interactions is emphasized. A summary report and committee recommendations are included with the full report of the Mars Science Working Group.

  19. Mars Ice Age, Simulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    December 17, 2003This simulated view shows Mars as it might have appeared during the height of a possible ice age in geologically recent time.Of all Solar System planets, Mars has the climate most like that of Earth. Both are sensitive to small changes in orbit and tilt. During a period about 2.1 million to 400,000 years ago, increased tilt of Mars' rotational axis caused increased solar heating at the poles. A new study using observations from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey orbiters concludes that this polar warming caused mobilization of water vapor and dust into the atmosphere, and buildup of a surface deposit of ice and dust down to about 30 degrees latitude in both hemispheres. That is the equivalent of the southern Unites States or Saudi Arabia on Earth. Mars has been in an interglacial period characterized by less axial tilt for about the last 300,000 years. The ice-rich surface deposit has been degrading in the latitude zone of 30 degrees to 60 degrees as water-ice returns to the poles.In this illustration prepared for the December 18, 2003, cover of the journal Nature, the simulated surface deposit is superposed on a topography map based on altitude measurements by Global Surveyor and images from NASA's Viking orbiters of the 1970s.Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington.

  20. Status of MARS Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.V. Mokhov

    2003-04-09

    Status and recent developments of the MARS 14 Monte Carlo code system for simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades in shielding, accelerator and detector components in the energy range from a fraction of an electronvolt up to 100 TeV are described. these include physics models both in strong and electromagnetic interaction sectors, variance reduction techniques, residual dose, geometry, tracking, histograming. MAD-MARS Beam Line Build and Graphical-User Interface.

  1. Why exobiology on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, A.

    1996-11-01

    Processing of organic molecules by liquid water was probably an essential requirement towards the emergence of terrestrial primitive life. According to Oparin's hypothesis, organic building blocks required for early life were produced from simple organic molecules formed in a primitive reducing atmosphere. Geochemists favour now a less reducing atmosphere dominated by carbon dioxide. In such an atmosphere very few building blocks are formed. Import of extra-terrestrial organic molecules may represent an alternative supply. Experimental support for such an alternative scenario is examined in comets, meteorites and micrometeorites. The early histories of Mars and Earth clearly show similarities. Liquid water was once stable on the surface of Mars attesting the presence of an atmosphere capable of deccelerating C-rich micrometeorites. Therefore, primitive life may have developed on Mars as well. Liquid water disappeared from the surface of Mars very early, about 3.8 Ga ago. The Viking missions did not find, at the surface of the Martian soil, any organic molecules or clear-cut evidence for microbial activities such as photo-synthesis, respiration or nutrition. The results can be explained referring to an active photochemistry of Martian soil driven by the high influx of solar UV. These experiments do not exclude the existence of organic molecules and fossils of micro-organisms which developed on early Mars until liquid water disappeared. Mars may store below its surface some well preserved clues of a still hypothetical primitive life.

  2. Mars Rover RTG Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1989-11-27

    This report summarizes the results of a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) design study conducted by Fairchild Space Company at the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications, in support of the Mars Rover and Sample Return mission under investigation at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Presented at the 40th Congress of the IAF, Oct. 7-13, 1989 in Torremolinos, Malaga-Spain. The paper describes the design and analysis of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for powering the Mars Rover vehicle, which is a critical element of the unmanned Mars Rover and Sample Return mission (MRSR). The RTG design study was conducted by Fairchild Space for the U.S. DOE in support of the JPL MRSR Project. The paper briefly describes a reference mission scenario, an illustrative Rover design and activity pattern on Mars, and its power system requirements and environmental constraints, including the RTG cooling requirements during transit to Mars. It summarizes the baseline RTG's mass breakdown, and presents a detailed description of its thermal, thermoelectric, and electrical analysis. The results presented show the RTG performance achievable with current technology, and the performance improvements that would be achievable with various technology developments. It provides a basis for selecting the optimum strategy for meeting the Mars Rover design goals with minimal programmatic risk and cost. Cross Reference CID #7135 dated 10/1989. There is a duplicate copy. This document is not relevant to the OSTI Library. Do not send.

  3. Clouds over Mars!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This is the first color image ever taken from the surface of Mars of an overcast sky. Featured are pink stratus clouds coming from the northeast at about 15 miles per hour (6.7 meters/second) at an approximate height of ten miles (16 kilometers) above the surface. The clouds consist of water ice condensed on reddish dust particles suspended in the atmosphere. Clouds on Mars are sometimes localized and can sometimes cover entire regions, but have not yet been observed to cover the entire planet. The image was taken about an hour and forty minutes before sunrise by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 16 at about ten degrees up from the eastern Martian horizon.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages and Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  4. The MARS2013 Mars analog mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groemer, Gernot; Soucek, Alexander; Frischauf, Norbert; Stumptner, Willibald; Ragonig, Christoph; Sams, Sebastian; Bartenstein, Thomas; Häuplik-Meusburger, Sandra; Petrova, Polina; Evetts, Simon; Sivenesan, Chan; Bothe, Claudia; Boyd, Andrea; Dinkelaker, Aline; Dissertori, Markus; Fasching, David; Fischer, Monika; Föger, Daniel; Foresta, Luca; Fritsch, Lukas; Fuchs, Harald; Gautsch, Christoph; Gerard, Stephan; Goetzloff, Linda; Gołebiowska, Izabella; Gorur, Paavan; Groemer, Gerhard; Groll, Petra; Haider, Christian; Haider, Olivia; Hauth, Eva; Hauth, Stefan; Hettrich, Sebastian; Jais, Wolfgang; Jones, Natalie; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Karl, Alexander; Kauerhoff, Tilo; Khan, Muhammad Shadab; Kjeldsen, Andreas; Klauck, Jan; Losiak, Anna; Luger, Markus; Luger, Thomas; Luger, Ulrich; McArthur, Jane; Moser, Linda; Neuner, Julia; Orgel, Csilla; Ori, Gian Gabriele; Paternesi, Roberta; Peschier, Jarno; Pfeil, Isabella; Prock, Silvia; Radinger, Josef; Ramirez, Barbara; Ramo, Wissam; Rampey, Mike; Sams, Arnold; Sams, Elisabeth; Sandu, Oana; Sans, Alejandra; Sansone, Petra; Scheer, Daniela; Schildhammer, Daniel; Scornet, Quentin; Sejkora, Nina; Stadler, Andrea; Stummer, Florian; Taraba, Michael; Tlustos, Reinhard; Toferer, Ernst; Turetschek, Thomas; Winter, Egon; Zanella-Kux, Katja

    2014-05-01

    We report on the MARS2013 mission, a 4-week Mars analog field test in the northern Sahara. Nineteen experiments were conducted by a field crew in Morocco under simulated martian surface exploration conditions, supervised by a Mission Support Center in Innsbruck, Austria. A Remote Science Support team analyzed field data in near real time, providing planning input for the management of a complex system of field assets; two advanced space suit simulators, four robotic vehicles, an emergency shelter, and a stationary sensor platform in a realistic work flow were coordinated by a Flight Control Team. A dedicated flight planning group, external control centers for rover tele-operations, and a biomedical monitoring team supported the field operations. A 10 min satellite communication delay and other limitations pertinent to human planetary surface activities were introduced. The fields of research for the experiments were geology, human factors, astrobiology, robotics, tele-science, exploration, and operations research. This paper provides an overview of the geological context and environmental conditions of the test site and the mission architecture, in particular the communication infrastructure emulating the signal travel time between Earth and Mars. We report on the operational work flows and the experiments conducted, including a deployable shelter prototype for multiple-day extravehicular activities and contingency situations.

  5. Mars at Ls 357o

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    31 January 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 357o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 357o occurred in mid-January 2006. The picture shows the south polar region of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  6. Mars at Ls 324o

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    29 November 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 324o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 324o occurred in mid-November 2005. The picture shows the south polar region of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  7. A Water Rich Mars Surface Mission Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Andrews, Alida; Joosten, B. Kent; Watts, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    In an on-going effort to make human Mars missions more affordable and sustainable, NASA continues to investigate the innovative leveraging of technological advances in conjunction with the use of accessible Martian resources directly applicable to these missions. One of the resources with the broadest utility for human missions is water. Many past studies of human Mars missions assumed a complete lack of water derivable from local sources. However, recent advances in our understanding of the Martian environment provides growing evidence that Mars may be more "water rich" than previously suspected. This is based on data indicating that substantial quantities of water are mixed with surface regolith, bound in minerals located at or near the surface, and buried in large glacier-like forms. This paper describes an assessment of what could be done in a "water rich" human Mars mission scenario. A description of what is meant by "water rich" in this context is provided, including a quantification of the water that would be used by crews in this scenario. The different types of potential feedstock that could be used to generate these quantities of water are described, drawing on the most recently available assessments of data being returned from Mars. This paper specifically focuses on sources that appear to be buried quantities of water ice. (An assessment of other potential feedstock materials is documented in another paper.) Technologies and processes currently used in terrestrial Polar Regions are reviewed. One process with a long history of use on Earth and with potential application on Mars - the Rodriguez Well - is described and results of an analysis simulating the performance of such a well on Mars are presented. These results indicate that a Rodriguez Well capable of producing the quantities of water identified for a "water rich" human mission are within the capabilities assumed to be available on the Martian surface, as envisioned in other comparable Evolvable

  8. Citric acid cycle and the origin of MARS

    OpenAIRE

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M.; Fox, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex (MARS) is an assemblage of nine aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and three non-synthetase scaffold proteins, AIMP1 (aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex-interacting multifunctional protein-1), AIMP2, and AIMP3. The evolutionary origin of the MARS is unclear, as is the significance of the inclusion of only nine of twenty tRNA synthetases. Eight of the nine amino acids corresponding to ARSs of the MARS are derived from two citric acid cycle i...

  9. Trajectory Design for the Phobos and Deimos & Mars Environment Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Loucks, Michel E.; Yang, Fan Yang; Lee, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The presented trajectory design and analysis was performed for the Phobos and Deimos & Mars Environment (PADME) mission concept as part of a NASA proposal submission managed by NASA Ames Research Center in the 2014-2015 timeframe. The PADME spacecraft would be a derivative of the successfully flown Lunar Atmosphere & Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft. While LADEE was designed to enter low-lunar orbit, the PADME spacecraft would instead enter an elliptical Mars orbit of 2-week period. This Mars orbit would pass by Phobos near periapsis on successive orbits and then raise periapsis to yield close approaches of Deimos every orbit thereafter.

  10. Citric acid cycle and the origin of MARS

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeepa M Eswarappa; Paul L Fox

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex (MARS) is an assemblage of nine aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and three non-synthetase scaffold proteins, AIMP1 (aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex-interacting multifunctional protein-1), AIMP2, and AIMP3. The evolutionary origin of the MARS is unclear, as is the significance of the inclusion of only nine of twenty tRNA synthetases. Eight of the nine amino acids corresponding to ARSs of the MARS are derived from two citric acid cycle i...

  11. Guidelines for 2008 MARS exercise

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Full details of the Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS) are available via the HR Department’s homepage or directly on the Department’s MARS web page: https://cern.ch/hr-dept/ https://cern.ch/hr-eguide/mars/mars.asp You will find on these pages: MARS procedures including the MARS timetable for proposals and decisions; Regulations with links to the scheme’s statutory basis; Frequently Asked Questions; Useful documents with links to relevant documentation; e.g. mandate of the Senior Staff Advisory Committee (SSAC); Related links and contacts. HR Department Tel. 73566

  12. Beagle 2 and NASA's Mars 2003 Orbiter: A Unique Exobiology Opportunity with an Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Pillinger, Colin T.; Thatcher, John; Westall, Frances

    2000-01-01

    With the exploration strategy for Mars undergoing reexamination, the opportunity exists for the incorporation of the 60 kg Beagle 2 lander, developed in the United Kingdom for inclusion on ESA's 2003 Mars Express mission, with NASA's Mars 2003 orbiter derived from the Mars Global Orbiter. The combination of Beagle 2 with a Mars orbiter would result in a unique mission which could obtain information on Mars' life, climate and resources both from orbit as well as on the surface of the planet. Beagle 2 has been developed in the LJK for ESA as a low-cost opportunity to study the exobiology of Mars and the spacecraft is in its final stages of manufacture. Only limited modifications to the Beagle 2 package would be required for inclusion on NASA's Mars 2003 orbiter. With the ESA Mars Express mission launch in 2003 and a potential NASA Mars orbiter in 2003, both Beagle 2 landers on Mars would offer a low-cost, decreased risk and increased science return opportunity for the exploration of Mars at two distinct geologically interesting sites.

  13. Mars Rover RTG Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1989-10-01

    Presented at the 40th Congress of the IAF, Oct. 7-13, 1989 in Torremolinos, Malaga-Spain. The paper describes the design and analysis of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for powering the Mars Rover vehicle, which is a critical element of the unmanned Mars Rover and Sample Return mission (MRSR). The RTG design study was conducted by Fairchild Space for the U.S. DOE in support of the JPL MRSR Project. The paper briefly describes a reference mission scenario, an illustrative Rover design and activity pattern on Mars, and its power system requirements and environmental constraints, including the RTG cooling requirements during transit to Mars. It summarizes the baseline RTG's mass breakdown, and presents a detailed description of its thermal, thermoelectric, and electrical analysis. The results presented show the RTG performance achievable with current technology, and the performance improvements that would be achievable with various technology developments. It provides a basis for selecting the optimum strategy for meeting the Mars Rover design goals with minimal programmatic risk and cost. There is a duplicate copy and three copies in the file.

  14. The Mars Plasma Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, C. T

    2007-01-01

    Mars sits very exposed to the solar wind and, because it is a small planet, has but a weak hold on its atmosphere. The solar wind therefore plays an important role in the evolution of the martian atmosphere. Over the last four decades a series of European missions, first from the Soviet Union and more recently from the European Space Agency, together with a single investigation from the U.S., the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, have added immeasurably to our understanding of the interplay between the solar wind and Mars atmosphere. Most recently the measurements of the plasma and fast neutral populations, conducted on the Mars Express spacecraft by the ASPERA-3 instrument have been acquired and analyzed. Their presentation to the public, most notably at the workshop "The Solar Wind Interaction and Atmosphere Evolution of Mars" held in Kiruna in early 2006, was the inspiration for this series of articles. However participation in the Kiruna conference was not a selection criterion for this volume. The papers ...

  15. Mars Technologies Spawn Durable Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    To develop and test wind power technology for use on Mars, Ames Research Center turned to Northern Power Systems (NPS), based in Barre, Vermont. Ames awarded NPS an SBIR contract so the company could enhance their turbine’s function. Today, over 200 NASA-derived Northern Power 100s are in operation on Earth and have reduced carbon emissions by 50,000 tons annually.

  16. Mars Spark Source Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; Weiland, Karen J.; VanderWal, Randall L.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware has been developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma that will allow their identification and quantification. Trace metal measurements are vital for the assessment of the potential toxicity of the Martian environment for human exploration. The current method of X-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations only of major species. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. This paper describes the Mars Spark Source Prototype hardware, the results of the characterization tests, and future plans for hardware development.

  17. Magnetic storms on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Based on data from the Mars Global Surveyor magnetometer we examine periods of significantly enhanced magnetic disturbances in the martian space environment. Using almost seven years of observations during the maximum and early declining phase of the previous solar cycle the occurrence pattern...... and typical time profile of such periods is investigated and compared to solar wind measurements at Earth. Typical durations of the events are 20–40h, and there is a tendency for large events to last longer, but a large spread in duration and intensity are found. The large and medium intensity events at Mars...... field disturbance at Mars is solar wind dynamic pressure variations associated with the eccentricity of the martian orbit around the Sun....

  18. Remanent magnetism at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S. A.; Ness, N. F.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that a strong case can be made for an intrinsic magnetic field of dynamo origin for Mars earlier in its history. The typical equatorial magnetic field intensity would have been equal to about 0.01-0.1 gauss. The earlier dynamo activity is no longer extant, but a significant remanent magnetic field may exist. A highly non-dipole magnetic field could result from the remanent magnetization of the surface. Remanent magnetization may thus play an important role in the Mars solar wind interactions, in contrast to Venus with its surface temperatures above the Curie point. The anomalous characteristics of Mars'solar wind interaction compared to that of Venus may be explicable on this basis.

  19. VR for Mars Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology has played an integral role for Mars Pathfinder mission, operations Using an automated machine vision algorithm, the 3d topography of the Martian surface was rapidly recovered fro -a the stereo images captured. by the Tender camera to produce photo-realistic 3d models, An advanced, interface was developed for visualization and interaction with. the virtual environment of the Pathfinder landing site for mission scientists at the Space Flight Operations Facility of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The VR aspect of the display allowed mission scientists to navigate on Mars in Bud while remaining here on Earth, thus improving their spatial awareness of the rock field that surrounds the lenders Measurements of positions, distances and angles could be easily extracted from the topographic models, providing valuable information for science analysis and mission. planning. Moreover, the VR map of Mars has also been used to assist with the archiving and planning of activities for the Sojourner rover.

  20. Spiders from Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-426, 19 July 2003No, this is not a picture of a giant, martian spider web. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a plethora of polygonal features on the floor of a northern hemisphere impact crater near 65.6oN, 327.7oW. The picture was acquired during spring, after the seasonal carbon dioxide frost cap had largely migrated through the region. At the time the picture was taken, remnants of seasonal frost remained on the crater rim and on the edges of the troughs that bound each of the polygons. Frost often provides a helpful hint as to where polygons and patterned ground occur. The polygons, if they were on Earth, would indicate the presence of freeze-thaw cycles in ground ice. Although uncertain, the same might be true of Mars. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  1. Mars Aqueous Processing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Aqueous Processing System (MAPS) is a novel technology for recovering oxygen, iron, and other constituents from lunar and Mars soils. The closed-loop...

  2. The Mars Pathfinder Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1996-09-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission is a Discovery class mission that will place a small lander and rover on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997. The Pathfinder flight system is a single small lander, packaged within an aeroshell and back cover with a back-pack-style cruise stage. The vehicle will be launched, fly independently to Mars, and enter the atmosphere directly on approach behind the aeroshell. The vehicle is slowed by a parachute and 3 small solid rockets before landing on inflated airbags. Petals of a small tetrahedron shaped lander open up, to right the vehicle. The lander is solar powered with batteries and will operate on the surface for up to a year, downlinking data on a high-gain antenna. Pathfinder will be the first mission to use a rover, with 3 imagers and an alpha proton X-ray spectrometer, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which will provide a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. The rover (includes a series of technology experiments), the instruments (including a stereo multispectral surface imager on a pop up mast and an atmospheric structure instrument-surface meteorology package) and the telemetry system will allow investigations of: the surface morphology and geology at meter scale, the petrology and geochemistry of rocks and soils, the magnetic properties of dust, soil mechanics and properties, a variety of atmospheric investigations and the rotational and orbital dynamics of Mars. Landing downstream from the mouth of a giant catastrophic outflow channel, Ares Vallis, offers the potential of identifying and analyzing a wide variety of crustal materials, from the ancient heavily cratered terrain, intermediate-aged ridged plains and reworked channel deposits, thus allowing first-order scientific investigations of the early differentiation and evolution of the crust, the development of weathering products and early environments and conditions on Mars.

  3. Flying To Mars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周铭杨

    2015-01-01

    <正>Do you know"Mars migration programme"by SpaceX?It’s an immigrant plan to a planet—Mars,Sounds incredible,isn’t it?After two-round tests,Li Dapeng,graduating from Handan NO.1 high school in 2001,was selected.There entered four Chinese in final test.To be more precise,Li is the only one who comes from the mainland of China.Last weekend,Li came to our school for a speech.Driven by

  4. EquiMar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnstone, C. M.; McCombes, T.; Bahaj, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    / financiers etc when attempting to quantify the performance of a device since it makes it very difficult to reference and benchmark the performance of a marine energy converter. The EC Framework Programme VII EquiMar project has set out to develop a suite of Best Practices to be adopted when undertaking...... the performance evaluation of such systems in order to address this deficiency. This paper reports the development of a set of ‘Best Practices’ within the ECFPVII EquiMar project to be adopted for the performance quantification of wave and tidal energy converters as they evolve from an engineering concept...

  5. Mars Obliquity Cycle Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The tilt of Mars' spin axis (obliquity) varies cyclically over hundreds of thousands of years, and affects the sunlight falling on the poles. Because the landing site of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is so near the north pole, higher sun and warmer temperatures during high obliquity lead to warmer, more humid surface environments, and perhaps thicker, more liquid-like films of water in soil. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Lakes on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrol, Nathalie A

    2014-01-01

    On Earth, lakes provide favorable environments for the development of life and its preservation as fossils. They are extremely sensitive to climate fluctuations and to conditions within their watersheds. As such, lakes are unique markers of the impact of environmental changes. Past and current missions have now demonstrated that water once flowed at the surface of Mars early in its history. Evidence of ancient ponding has been uncovered at scales ranging from a few kilometers to possibly that of the Arctic ocean. Whether life existed on Mars is still unknown; upcoming missions may find critic

  7. Vulkanisme en water op Mars?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loef, J.; Schmets, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In januari 2004 werd Mars bezocht door de tweeling robotverkenners Spirit en Opportunity. Zij werden erop uitgestuurd om eindelijk het definitieve antwoord te geven op de vraag of er leven op Mars is geweest. Alles wijst er inmiddels op dat er op Mars ooit vloeibaar water stroomde. Of daarmee een

  8. Vulkanisme en water op Mars?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loef, J.; Schmets, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In januari 2004 werd Mars bezocht door de tweeling robotverkenners Spirit en Opportunity. Zij werden erop uitgestuurd om eindelijk het definitieve antwoord te geven op de vraag of er leven op Mars is geweest. Alles wijst er inmiddels op dat er op Mars ooit vloeibaar water stroomde. Of daarmee een be

  9. Vulkanisme en water op Mars?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loef, J.; Schmets, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In januari 2004 werd Mars bezocht door de tweeling robotverkenners Spirit en Opportunity. Zij werden erop uitgestuurd om eindelijk het definitieve antwoord te geven op de vraag of er leven op Mars is geweest. Alles wijst er inmiddels op dat er op Mars ooit vloeibaar water stroomde. Of daarmee een be

  10. Ancient aliens on mars

    CERN Document Server

    Bara, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Best-selling author and Secret Space Program researcher Bara brings us this lavishly illustrated volume on alien structures on Mars. Was there once a vast, technologically advanced civilization on Mars, and did it leave evidence of its existence behind for humans to find eons later? Did these advanced extraterrestrial visitors vanish in a solar system wide cataclysm of their own making, only to make their way to Earth and start anew? Was Mars once as lush and green as the Earth, and teeming with life? Did Mars once orbit a missing member of the solar system, a "Super Earth” that vanished in a disaster that devastated life on Earth and Venus and left us only the asteroid belt as evidence of its once grand existence? Did the survivors of this catastrophe leave monuments and temples behind, arranged in a mathematical precision designed to teach us the Secret of a new physics that could lift us back to the stars? Does the planet have an automated defense shield that swallows up robotic probes if they wander int...

  11. Mission from Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian; Eriksson, Eva; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a particular design method is propagated as a supplement to existing descriptive approaches to current practice studies especially suitable for gathering requirements for the design of children's technology. The Mission from Mars method was applied during the design of an electronic...

  12. Carbon sequestration on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Christopher S.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, carbon sequestration in geologic units plays an important role in the carbon cycle, scrubbing CO_2 from the atmosphere for long-term storage. While carbonate is identified in low abundances within the dust and soils of Mars, at

  13. Mission from Mars:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian; Eriksson, Eva; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a particular design method is propagated as a supplement to existing descriptive approaches to current practice studies especially suitable for gathering requirements for the design of children's technology. The Mission from Mars method was applied during the design of an electronic...

  14. The Phoenix Mars Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, Leslie K.; Smith, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation details the Phoenix Mission which was designed to enhance our understanding of water and the potential for habitability on the north polar regions of Mars. The slides show the instruments and the robotics designed to scrape Martian surface material, and analyze it in hopes of identifying water in the form of ice, and other chemicals.

  15. Comparison of Different MARs(Matrix Attachment Regions)Effect on Transgene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Jin; LIU Shu-jun; YANG Wei; HU Yuan-lei; LIN Zhong-ping

    2004-01-01

    Three MARs(matrix attachment regions)fragments were cloned from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)(MAR1),yeast(Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (MAR3)and kidney bean(Phaseolus vulgaris) (MAR5)which ranged 984,822 and 782 bp,respectively.Sequence analysis showed that all the fragments had fairly high A/T content (73,62 and 75%,respectively),harbored different number and different type of some characteristic motifs of MARs,such as A-box and T-box,etc.The results of in vitro binding assay showed that the three MARs fragments derived from different organisms could bind specifically to the matrix extracted from the tobacco nuclei with different strength,which also demonstrated that these MARs fragments are functionally conserved during evolution.By using these MARs fragments to flank the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and bialaphos resistance(bar) selectable marker gene,and then introducing the resulting plant expression vectors containing MARs-uidA-barMARs into tobacco through Agrobacteriummediated procedures,the effects of MARs sequences on the expression of transgenes in tobacco were investigated and compared.The GUS activity in individual transformants showed that,comparing to the controls without additional MARs,the overall transgene expression level in transformants with MARs had been greatly increased while the variations in transgene expression among transformants were decreased in different degrees.In accordance with the results of sequence analysis and in vitro binding assay in which MAR1 fragment showed the strongest binding strength,this MARs fragment also showed the greatest effect in increasing transgene overall expression level.

  16. The Small Mars System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantino, E.; Grassi, M.; Pasolini, P.; Causa, F.; Molfese, C.; Aurigemma, R.; Cimminiello, N.; de la Torre, D.; Dell'Aversana, P.; Esposito, F.; Gramiccia, L.; Paudice, F.; Punzo, F.; Roma, I.; Savino, R.; Zuppardi, G.

    2017-08-01

    The Small Mars System is a proposed mission to Mars. Funded by the European Space Agency, the project has successfully completed Phase 0. The contractor is ALI S.c.a.r.l., and the study team includes the University of Naples ;Federico II;, the Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte and the Space Studies Institute of Catalonia. The objectives of the mission are both technological and scientific, and will be achieved by delivering a small Mars lander carrying a dust particle analyser and an aerial drone. The former shall perform in situ measurements of the size distribution and abundance of dust particles suspended in the Martian atmosphere, whereas the latter shall demonstrate low-altitude flight in the rarefied planetary environment. The mission-enabling technology is an innovative umbrella-like heat shield, known as IRENE, developed and patented by ALI. The mission is also a technological demonstration of the shield in the upper atmosphere of Mars. The core characteristics of SMS are the low cost (120 M€) and the small size (320 kg of wet mass at launch, 110 kg at landing), features which stand out with respect to previous Mars landers. To comply with them is extremely challenging at all levels, and sets strict requirements on the choice of the materials, the sizing of payloads and subsystems, their arrangement inside the spacecraft and the launcher's selection. In this contribution, the mission and system concept and design are illustrated and discussed. Special emphasis is given to the innovative features and to the challenges faced in the development of the work.

  17. [MaRS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruljothi, Arunvenkatesh

    2016-01-01

    The Space Exploration Division of the Safety and Mission Assurances Directorate is responsible for reducing the risk to Human Space Flight Programs by providing system safety, reliability, and risk analysis. The Risk & Reliability Analysis branch plays a part in this by utilizing Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) tools to identify possible types of failure and effective solutions. A continuous effort of this branch is MaRS, or Mass and Reliability System, a tool that was the focus of this internship. Future long duration space missions will have to find a balance between the mass and reliability of their spare parts. They will be unable take spares of everything and will have to determine what is most likely to require maintenance and spares. Currently there is no database that combines mass and reliability data of low level space-grade components. MaRS aims to be the first database to do this. The data in MaRS will be based on the hardware flown on the International Space Stations (ISS). The components on the ISS have a long history and are well documented, making them the perfect source. Currently, MaRS is a functioning excel workbook database; the backend is complete and only requires optimization. MaRS has been populated with all the assemblies and their components that are used on the ISS; the failures of these components are updated regularly. This project was a continuation on the efforts of previous intern groups. Once complete, R&M engineers working on future space flight missions will be able to quickly access failure and mass data on assemblies and components, allowing them to make important decisions and tradeoffs.

  18. Mars Surface Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John

    2002-01-01

    Planetary exploration by astronauts will require extended periods of habitation on a planet's surface, under the influence of environmental factors that are different from those of Earth and the spacecraft that delivered the crew to the planet. Human exploration of Mars, a possible near-term planetary objective, can be considered a challenging scenario. Mission scenarios currently under consideration call for surface habitation periods of from 1 to 18 months on even the earliest expeditions. Methods: Environmental issues associated with Mars exploration have been investigated by NASA and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) as part of the Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap Project (see http ://criticalpath.jsc.nasa.gov). Results: Arrival on Mars will immediately expose the crew to gravity only 38% of that at Earth's surface in possibly the first prolonged exposure to gravity other than the 1G of Earth's surface and the zero G of weightless space flight, with yet unknown effects on crew physiology. The radiation at Mars' surface is not well documented, although the planet's bulk and even its thin atmosphere may moderate the influx of galactic cosmic radiation and energetic protons from solar flares. Secondary radiation from activated components of the soil must also be considered. Ultrafine and larger respirable and nonrespirable particles in Martian dust introduced into the habitat after surface excursions may induce pulmonary inflammation exacerbated by the additive reactive and oxidizing nature of the dust. Stringent decontamination cannot eliminate mechanical and corrosive effects of the dust on pressure suits and exposed machinery. The biohazard potential of putative indigenous Martian microorganisms may be assessed by comparison with analog environments on Earth. Even in their absence, human microorganisms, if not properly controlled, can be a threat to the crew's health. Conclusions: Mars' surface offers a substantial challenge to the

  19. Citric acid cycle and the origin of MARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M; Fox, Paul L

    2013-05-01

    The vertebrate multiaminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex (MARS) is an assemblage of nine aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and three non-synthetase scaffold proteins, aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex-interacting multifunctional protein (AIMP)1, AIMP2, and AIMP3. The evolutionary origin of the MARS is unclear, as is the significance of the inclusion of only nine of 20 tRNA synthetases. Eight of the nine amino acids corresponding to ARSs of the MARS are derived from two citric acid cycle intermediates, α-ketoglutatrate and oxaloacetate. We propose that the metabolic link with the citric acid cycle, the appearance of scaffolding proteins AIMP2 and AIMP3, and the subsequent disappearance of the glyoxylate cycle, together facilitated the origin of the MARS in a common ancestor of metazoans and choanoflagellates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Marshall Application Realignment System (MARS) Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belshe, Andrea; Sutton, Mandy

    2010-01-01

    The Marshall Application Realignment System (MARS) Architecture project was established to meet the certification requirements of the Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DoDAF) V2.0 Federal Enterprise Architecture Certification (FEAC) Institute program and to provide added value to the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Application Portfolio Management process. The MARS Architecture aims to: (1) address the NASA MSFC Chief Information Officer (CIO) strategic initiative to improve Application Portfolio Management (APM) by optimizing investments and improving portfolio performance, and (2) develop a decision-aiding capability by which applications registered within the MSFC application portfolio can be analyzed and considered for retirement or decommission. The MARS Architecture describes a to-be target capability that supports application portfolio analysis against scoring measures (based on value) and overall portfolio performance objectives (based on enterprise needs and policies). This scoring and decision-aiding capability supports the process by which MSFC application investments are realigned or retired from the application portfolio. The MARS Architecture is a multi-phase effort to: (1) conduct strategic architecture planning and knowledge development based on the DoDAF V2.0 six-step methodology, (2) describe one architecture through multiple viewpoints, (3) conduct portfolio analyses based on a defined operational concept, and (4) enable a new capability to support the MSFC enterprise IT management mission, vision, and goals. This report documents Phase 1 (Strategy and Design), which includes discovery, planning, and development of initial architecture viewpoints. Phase 2 will move forward the process of building the architecture, widening the scope to include application realignment (in addition to application retirement), and validating the underlying architecture logic before moving into Phase 3. The MARS Architecture key stakeholders are most

  1. Icebergs on early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uceda, E.; Fairen, A.; Woodworth-Lynas, C.; Palmero Rodriguez, A.

    2015-12-01

    The smooth topography of the Martian northern lowlands has been classically equated to an ancient ocean basin. The High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is providing unprecedented images of the Martian surface at scales of 25 to 32 cm per pixel. The analysis of this high-resolution imaging reveals the presence of three differentiated geomorphologies throughout the northern lowlands of Mars and the Hellas basin, which are informative of the presence of icebergs floating in ancient oceans and/or seas. These morphologies are: (i) scattered scour marks, including curvilinear furrows several km long and some meters deep; (ii) boulders ranging in size from 0.5 m to ~2 m in diameter, distributed forming clusters with sizes from several hundred meters to 1-2 km; and (iii) flat-topped and conical circular fractured mounds. The association of plough marks, clusters of boulders and mounds on the northern plains of Mars can be related to the dual processes of ice keel scouring and ice rafting of both glacial and non-glacial detritus by a floating ice canopy and icebergs. These processes are well documented on Earth and result in distinct morphologies on the ocean floor, which are analogous to features observed in the Martian basins. Importantly, the features are located in elevated areas of the northern plains and Hellas, near the dichotomy boundary and on local topographic highs. Such distribution is expected, as these relatively shoal areas are where the iceberg-related features should occur on Mars: these areas had shallow water depths, less than the iceberg's keel depth, and therefore keels reached through the full depth of the water column to impinge on the sediments below. The presence of icebergs floating in cold oceans early in Mars' history imply the occurrence of continental glaciers forming in the highlands and streaming northward towards the lowlands, and towards the Hellas and Argyre Basins. Glacier

  2. SNC meteorites - Igneous rocks from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C. A.; Ashwal, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    It is argued that SNC (shergottite, nakhlite, chassignite) meteorites are ejecta from Mars. The mineralogy and chemistry of these objects is discussed, including rare earth element content, potassium/uranium ratios, oxidation state, oxygen isotopes, ages and isotopic evolution, magnetism, shock and texture. The possibility of SNC's deriving from Mercury, Venus, earth, moon, or a eucrite parent body is argued against. Mercury is too volatile-poor and anhydrous, Venus's atmosphere too thick and hot and its gravitational field too large, earth's oxygen isotope content too different from that of SNC's, the moon too different isotopically and chemically, and the ages of eucrites too different. Models suggest that SNC's could have escaped from Mars's gravitational field, and their composition supports Martian origin. Statistically, they could have reached the earth within their measured shock ages. Objections to the hypothesis are also discussed.

  3. Quantitative studies of volcanic processes on Mars using data from the Mars Global Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Louise Jane

    Volcanic processes on Mars were investigated using topographic profiles derived with the help of IDL software from data collected by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on the Mars Global Surveyor Mission (MGS) in 1997-2001 and images obtained by the MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and by the earlier Viking mission. Thickness and slope values for lava flows at both Elysium Mons and Alba Patera made it possible to compute flow emplacement times and effusion rates using the flow growth model proposed by C. R. J. Kilburn and R. M. C Lopes in 1990. Geological mapping of the Elysium volcanic region showed that Elysium Mons was emplaced as a result of a single shift in vent position on top of an older volcanic edifice, here termed the Ancient Volcanic Edifice (AVE). This implies that there have been substantial variations in both position and time for the magma supply. Calculations suggest that the flows at Alba Patera were emplaced more quickly than those at Elysium Mons, possibly owing to differences in fissure width and lava composition. There is evidence for both aa and pahoehoe on the summit areas of Elysium Mons and Alba Patera. The presence of aa is consistent with the view that long lava flows on Mars are emplaced quickly. Pahoehoe flows imply slow emplacement, and their inferred presence on Mars provides support for the theory that long terrestrial lavas are often emplaced as sheets of inflated pahoehoe. MOC image analysis indicated that late-stage explosive activity has occurred at several Martian volcanoes where it was previously undetected, contrary to the prevalent view that Martian volcanism evolves from explosive to effusive activity. To resolve the many ambiguities inherent in morphological data and imagery the need remains for ground truthing by experienced observers and detailed geochemical analyses in situ or by means of a sample return mission

  4. Halophilic life on Mars ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, Marion; Holzinger, Anita; Polacsek, Tatjana K.; Legat, Andrea; Grösbacher, Michael; Weigl, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Background: The search for extraterrestrial life has been declared as a goal for the 21th century by several space agencies. Potential candidates are microorganisms on or in the surface of moons and planets, such as Mars. Extremely halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) are of astrobiological interest since viable strains have been isolated from million years old salt deposits (1) and halite has been found in Martian meteorites and in surface pools. Therefore, haloarchaeal responses to simulated and real space conditions were explored. Immuno assays for a potential Life Marker Chip experiment were developed with antisera against the universal enzyme ATP synthase. Methods: The focus of these studies was on the application of fluorescent probes since they provide strong signals, and detection devices are suitable for miniaturization. Viability of haloarchaeal strains (Halococcus dombrowskii and Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1) was probed with the LIVE/DEAD BacLight™ kit and the BacLight™ Bacterial Membrane Potential kit. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in the DNA, following exposure to simulated and real space conditions (UV irradiation from 200 - 400 nm; 18 months exposure on the International Space Station [ISS] within the ADAPT experiment by Dr. P. Rettberg), were detected with fluorescent Alexa-Fluor-488-coupled antibodies. Immuno assays with antisera against the A-ATPase subunits from Halorubrum saccharovorum were carried out with the highly sensitive Immun-Star ™ WesternC ™ chemiluminescent kit (Bio-Rad). Results: Using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight™ kit, the D37 (dose of 37% survival) for Hcc. dombrowskii and Hbt. salinarum NRC-1, following exposure to UV (200-400 nm) was about 400 kJ/m2, when cells were embedded in halite and about 1 kJ/m2, when cells were in liquid cultures. Fluorescent staining indicated a slightly higher cellular activity than that which was derived from the determination of colony forming units. Assessment of viability with the Bac

  5. Polygonal terrains on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pina

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of water ice on Mars is well established. Some featureson the planet point to the occurrence of processes similar to those that take place in periglacial areas of Earth. One of the clues for this is the existence of small-scale polygonal terrains. In this paper, we present a methodology that aims at the automated identification of polygonal patterns on high-spatial resolution images of the surface of Mars. In the context of the research project TERPOLI, this step will be complemented with a full characterization, in both geometric and topological terms, of thenetworks detected. In this manner, we hope to collect data that will lead to a better understanding of the conditions of formation of the polygons, and of their temporal evolution; namely, we intend to identify different groups of polygons and to compare them with terrestrial examples.

  6. The politics of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Harrison H.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion is presented comparing past and present major accomplishments of the U.S. and the Soviet Union in space. It concludes that the Soviets are presently well ahead of the U.S. in several specific aspects of space accomplishment and speculates that the Soviet strategy is directed towards sending a man to the vicinity of Mars by the end of this century. A major successful multinational space endeavor, INTELSAT, is reviewed and it is suggested that the manned exploration of Mars offers a unique opportunity for another such major international cooperative effort. The current attitude of U.S. leadership and the general public is assessed as uniformed or ambivalent about the perceived threat of Soviet dominance in space.

  7. Geophysics of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A physical model of Mars is presented on the basis of light-scattering observations of the Martian atmosphere and surface and interior data obtained from observations of the geopotential field. A general description of the atmosphere is presented, with attention given to the circulation and the various cloud types, and data and questions on the blue haze-clearing effect and the seasonal darkening wave are summarized and the Mie scattering model developed to explain these observations is presented. The appearance of the planet from earth and spacecraft through Mariner 9 is considered, and attention is given to the preparation of topographical contour maps, the canal problem and large-scale lineaments observed from Mariner 9, the gravity field and shape of the planet and the application of Runcorn's geoid/convection theory to Mars. Finally, a summary of Viking results is presented and their application to the understanding of Martian geophysics is discussed.

  8. Organics on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Kate, Inge L

    2010-01-01

    Organics are expected to exist on Mars based on meteorite infall, in situ production, and any possible biological sources. Yet they have not been detected on the martian surface; are they there, or are we not capable enough to detect them? The Viking gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer did not detect organics in the headspace of heated soil samples with a detection limit of parts per billion. This null result strongly influenced the interpretation of the reactivity seen in the Viking biology experiments and led to the conclusion that life was not present and, instead, that there was some chemical reactivity in the soil. The detection of perchlorates in the martian soil by instruments on the Phoenix lander and the reports of methane in the martian atmosphere suggest that it may be time to reconsider the question of organics. The high-temperature oxidizing properties of perchlorate will promote combustion of organics in pyrolytic experiments and may have affected the ability of both Phoenix's organic analysis experiment and the Viking mass spectrometer experiments to detect organics. So the question of organics on Mars remains open. A primary focus of the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory will be the detection and identification of organic molecules by means of thermal volatilization, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry--as was done on Viking. However, to enhance organic detectability, some of the samples will be processed with liquid derivatization agents that will dissolve organics from the soil before pyrolysis, which may separate them from the soil perchlorates. Nonetheless, the problem of organics on Mars is not solved, and for future missions other organic detection techniques should therefore be considered as well.

  9. Meteorites from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, M.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    The SNC METEORITES, named after the initials of the first discovered members (Shergotty, Nakhla and Chassigny), are a group of stony meteorites that are thought to come from Mars, rather than the asteroid belt. They are all igneous rocks (i.e. formed by crystallizing from molten material) and are distinguished from other meteorites by their ages, which are as low as 165 million years old. A young...

  10. Chemical Thermodynamics on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selco, Jodye I.

    1995-07-01

    This seven question take-home exam guides the students through a marathon problem to arrive at a single answer to the overall question: "How sensitive a probe do you need in order to detect signs of "life" (methane produced by bacteria instead of by chemical equilibrium) on Mars". This exam was originally written to correspond to chapters four through seven in Ira Levine's Physical Chemistry, 3rd edition, McGraw Hill, New York, 1988.

  11. Hygroscopic Salts on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorri, R.; Davila, A. F.; Chittenden, J.; Haberle, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    We present preliminary results on the influence of a salt-rich regolith in the water cycle of Mars. Global climate modeling shows that the relative humidity on the Martian surface often reaches values above the deliquescence point of salts that are common components of the regolith. At the deliquescence point, these salts will absorb atmospheric water vapor and form a saturated, transient liquid solution that is stable under a range of temperatures. If atmospheric temperatures fall below the eutectic point of the solution, the later will freeze in the pore space of the regolith, thereby resulting in a net transport of water from the vapor phase in the atmosphere, to the solid state in the regolith. This simple model partially accounts for some the distribution of water on the Martian surface as revealed by Mars Odyssey, in particular, we find that: even though the Cl and surface water distributions detected by HEND/ODYSSEY are highly correlated, salt deliquescence under the the present atmospheric conditions does not explain the overall distribution of water in the near surface regolith. However deliquescence of salt-rich soils could be an important contributor to the distribution of water in the regolith at high obliquity. In that scenario the water in the near-surface regolith would be the remnant of high obliquity conditions salt deliquescence is still active in different regions on Mars today, and it should be introduced as a parameter in the modern GCMs as a new ground/atmosphere interaction

  12. Exobiological exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.; Devincenzi, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Of all the other planets in the solar system, Mars remains the most promising for further elucidating concepts about chemical evolution and the origin of life. Strategies were developed to pursue three exobiological objectives for Mars exploration: determining the abundance and distribution of the biogenic elements and organic compounds, detecting evidence of an ancient biota on Mars, and determining whether indigenous organisms exist anywhere on the planet. The three strategies are quite similar and, in fact, share the same sequence of phases. In the first phase, each requires global reconnaissance and remote sensing by orbiters to select sites of interest for detailed in situ analyses. In the second phase, lander missions are conducted to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the selected sites. The third phase involves conducting 'critical' experiments at sites whose properties make them particularly attractive for exobiology. These critical experiments would include, for example, identification of organics, detection of fossils, and detection of extant life. The fourth phase is the detailed analysis of samples returned from these sites in Earth-based laboratories to confirm and extend previous discoveries. Finally, in the fifth phase, human exploration is needed to establish the geological settings for the earlier findings or to discover and explore sites that are not accessible to robotic spacecraft.

  13. Mars Rocket Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert; Harber, Dan; Nabors, Sammy

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses the methane and carbon monoxide/LOX (McLOx) rocket for ascent from Mars as well as other critical space propulsion tasks. The system offers a specific impulse over 370 s roughly 50 s higher than existing space-storable bio-propellants. Current Mars in-situ propellant production (ISPP) technologies produce impure methane and carbon monoxide in various combinations. While separation and purification of methane fuel is possible, it adds complexity to the propellant production process and discards an otherwise useful fuel product. The McLOx makes such complex and wasteful processes unnecessary by burning the methane/CO mixtures produced by the Mars ISPP systems without the need for further refinement. Despite the decrease in rocket-specific impulse caused by the CO admixture, the improvement offered by concomitant increased propellant density can provide a net improvement in stage performance. One advantage is the increase of the total amount of propellant produced, but with a decrease in mass and complexity of the required ISPP plant. Methane/CO fuel mixtures also may be produced by reprocessing the organic wastes of a Moon base or a space station, making McLOx engines key for a human Lunar initiative or the International Space Station (ISS) program. Because McLOx propellant components store at a common temperature, very lightweight and compact common bulkhead tanks can be employed, improving overall stage performance further.

  14. Guidelines for 2007 MARS exercise

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Following the introduction of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), full details of the scheme are now available via the HR Department's homepage or directly on the Department's MARS web page: in English: http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/HumanResources/internal/personnel/pmd/cr/MARS.asp or French: http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/internal/personnel/pmd/cr/mars_fr.asp You will find on this page: 'Introduction to MARS' with detailed information presented in Frequently Asked Questions; these include the MARS timetable for proposals and decisions; 'Regulations' with links to the scheme's statutory documents; 'Procedures and Forms' and 'Useful Information' with links to all the relevant documentation; these include the mandates of the Senior Staff Advisory Committee (SSAC) and the Technical Engineers and Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC). HR Department Tel. 73566

  15. Mineralogical Results from the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David Frederick.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's CheMin instrument, the first X-ray Diffractometer flown in space, has been operating on Mars for nearly five years. CheMin was first to establish the quantitative mineralogy of the Mars global soil (1). The instrument was next used to determine the mineralogy of a 3.7 billion year old lacustrine mudstone, a result that, together with findings from other instruments on the MSL Curiosity rover, documented the first habitable environment found on another planet (2). The mineralogy of this mudstone from an ancient playa lake was also used to derive the maximum concentration of CO2 in the early Mars atmosphere, a surprisingly low value that calls into question the current theory that CO2 greenhouse warming was responsible for the warm and wet environment of early Mars. CheMin later identified the mineral tridymite, indicative of silica-rich volcanism, in mudstones of the Murray formation on Mt. Sharp. This discovery challenges the paradigm of Mars as a basaltic planet and ushers in a new chapter of comparative terrestrial planetology (3). CheMin is now being used to systematically sample the sedimentary layers that comprise the lower strata of Mt. Sharp, a 5,000 meter sequence of sedimentary rock laid down in what was once a crater lake, characterizing isochemical sediments that through their changing mineralogy, document the oxidation and drying out of the Mars in early Hesperian time.

  16. Radio Wave Propagation Handbook for Communication on and Around Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser; Kliore, Arvydas

    2002-01-01

    This handbook examines the effects of the Martian environment on radio wave propagation on Mars and in the space near the planet. The environmental effects include these from the Martian atmosphere, ionosphere, global dust storms, aerosols, clouds, and geomorphologic features. Relevant Martian environmental parameters were extracted from the measurements of Mars missions during the past 30 years, especially from Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor. The results derived from measurements and analyses have been reviewed through an extensive literature search. The updated parameters have been theoretically analyzed to study their effects on radio propagation. This handbook also provides basic information about the entire telecommunications environment on and around Mars for propagation researchers, system engineers, and link analysts. Based on these original analyses, some important recommendations have been made, including the use of the Martian ionosphere as a reflector for Mars global or trans-horizon communication between future Martian colonies, reducing dust storm scattering effects, etc. These results have extended our wave propagation knowledge to a planet other than Earth; and the tables, models, and graphics included in this handbook will benefit telecommunication system engineers and scientific researchers.

  17. A Mars Riometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, C. D.; Rosenberg, T. J.; Lutz, L.; Detrick, D. L.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Knouse, E.; Breden, H.; Giganti, J.

    1998-09-01

    The Planetary Surface Instruments Workshop (Meyer et al., LPI Tech. Rpt. 95-05, 1995) identified surface-based radio science instruments as key tools for observing Mars' middle atmosphere, its ionosphere and solar-wind interaction. For example, Mars has a substantial daytime ionosphere, and some important features of the Martian ionosphere can only be observed from below. One instrument, the Relative Ionospheric Opacity Meter (Riometer), is expected to work well on Mars (Detrick et al., PSS, 45, p. 289, 1997). In the past, the size, power requirements and complexity of these instruments have argued against including them on a lander or rover mission, in spite of the potentially rich science return. We describe the development of a miniature radio receiver designed to operate as a Riometer. The development of this receiver was funded by NASA as an enabling technology for future planetary radio science missions. Our receiver includes features that are desirable for extended autonomous operation: low power consumption, wide dynamic range and linearity, computer command and data interface, and the ability to be remotely reconfigured. The receiver design provides significant improvements over previous implementations used in terrestrial riometry. The high degree of system linearity, combined with a digital feedback loop (including a low-duty calibration cycle), allows a longer measurement time. We were able to significantly miniaturize the receiver by using modern, low-power electronic components that have come on the market. We also implemented several of the subsystems in a field-programmable gate array, including the receiver detector, the control logic, and the data acquisition and processing blocks. Considerable efforts were made to eliminate or minimize RF noise and spurious emissions generated by the receiver's digital circuitry. Results of laboratory and field tests are presented and discussed.

  18. Un mar compartido

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Existen pocos ámbitos más reveladores que el mar para entender las virtudes de la cooperación internacional en materia científica. En las ciencias marinas esta cooperación es más que deseable: es imprescindible para poder contestar preguntas relacionadas con el movimiento de las corrientes, el aporte de los ríos, los ciclos migratorios de las especies, las pesquerías, etc. Se analiza la importancia de los proyectos conjuntos donde participaron países latinoamericanos, algunos con éxitos, y so...

  19. Mars Rover RTG Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1989-08-25

    This report summarizes the results of a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) design study conducted by Fairchild Space Company at the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of SpecialApplications, in suppport of the Mars Rover and Sample Return mission under investigation at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The report is a rearranged, updated, and significantly expanded amalgam of three interrelated papers presented at the 24th Intersocity Energy Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC) at Arlington, Virginia, on August 10, 1989.

  20. The salts of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B. C.; Van Hart, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Salt compounds are apparently an important component of the fine-grained regolith on Mars. Salt enrichment may be explained either as a secondary concentration of chemical weathering products or as direct incorporation of planetary released volatiles. Geochemical measurements and chemical relationships constrain the salt species and resultant physicochemical consequences. A likely assemblage is dominated by (Mg,Na)SO4, NaCl, and (Mg,Ca)CO3. Formation of brine in equilibrium with such a salt mixture is unlikely under the temperature and water-vapor restrictions prevalent over most, if not all, of the Martian surface. Acidic conditions, accompanying salt formation, favor the preferential destruction of susceptible igneous minerals.

  1. Mars Surface Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørnberg, Per; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur P.

    2010-05-01

    Laboratory simulations of the Martian surface are of importance to broaden scientific understanding of the physical processes, but also in order to develop the technology necessary for exploration of the planet. The Mars Simulation Laboratory at Aarhus University [1] has been involved in such simulations for around ten years and has developed several experimental facilities for carrying out science or instrument testing under conditions similar to those at the Martian surface, specifically low pressure, low temperature and importantly recreating the wind flow environment and dust suspension (reproducing the Martian dusty aerosol) using Mars analogue material [2]. The science involved in this simulation work has covered a broad spectrum including, erosion induced mineralogy/chemistry, particulate electrification, magnetic properties of Martian dust, biological survival, UV induced chemistry/mineralogy (using a solar simulator), adhesion/cohesion processes and the wind driven transport of dust and sand [3,4]. With regard to technology the wind tunnel facilities have been used in the development of the latest wind and dust sensing instrumentation [5,6]. With support from the European Space Agency (ESA) and Danish national funding an advanced Mars simulation facility has recently been constructed (2009). This wind tunnel facility has a cross section of 2 x 1 m and a length of 8 m, a temperature range down to below -120C, wind speeds in excess of 20m/s, and automated dust control. With a range of (specialised) sensing instrumentation it provides the opportunity to perform a new generation of scientific experiments and allow testing and technology development in the most realistic and rigorous environment. As well as being available for the space agencies, this facility will be open to all potential scientific collaborators. Also European planetary scientists may benefit from support through the EU Europlanet FP7 networking programme. For more information on access

  2. MARS15 overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    MARS15 is a Monte Carlo code for inclusive and exclusive simulation of three-dimensional hadronic and electromagnetic cascades, muon, heavy-ion, and low-energy neutron transport in accelerator, detector, spacecraft, and shielding components in the energy range from a fraction of an electronvolt up to 100 TeV. Main features of the code are described in this paper with a focus on recent developments and benchmarking. Newest developments concern inclusive and exclusive nuclear event generators, extended particle list in both modes, heavy-ion capability, electromagnetic interactions, enhanced geometry, tracking, histogramming and residual dose modules, improved graphical-user interface, and other external interfaces.

  3. In-Space Transportation for NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Thomas K.; McGuire, Melissa; Polsgrove, Tara

    2015-01-01

    As the nation embarks on a new and bold journey to Mars, significant work is being done to determine what that mission and those architectural elements will look like. The Evolvable Mars Campaign, or EMC, is being evaluated as a potential approach to getting humans to Mars. Built on the premise of leveraging current technology investments and maximizing element commonality to reduce cost and development schedule, the EMC transportation architecture is focused on developing the elements required to move crew and equipment to Mars as efficiently and effectively as possible both from a performance and a programmatic standpoint. Over the last 18 months the team has been evaluating potential options for those transportation elements. One of the key aspects of the EMC is leveraging investments being made today in missions like the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) mission using derived versions of the Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) propulsion systems and coupling them with other chemical propulsion elements that maximize commonality across the architecture between both transportation and Mars operations elements. This paper outlines the broad trade space being evaluated including the different technologies being assessed for transportation elements and how those elements are assembled into an architecture. Impacts to potential operational scenarios at Mars are also investigated. Trades are being made on the size and power level of the SEP vehicle for delivering cargo as well as the size of the chemical propulsion systems and various mission aspects including Inspace assembly and sequencing. Maximizing payload delivery to Mars with the SEP vehicle will better support the operational scenarios at Mars by enabling the delivery of landers and habitation elements that are appropriately sized for the mission. The purpose of this investigation is not to find the solution but rather a suite of solutions with potential application to the challenge of sending cargo and crew to Mars

  4. BUILDING ON THE MARS PLANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Pershakov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  The main task is the terraforming of the Mars planet. Nowadays it is a very important task, because there are a lot of problems on the planet Earth, which deals with the exhaustion of natural resources. The solution is in the colonizing and building on the Mars planet.

  5. Monitoring Mars for Electrostatic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, D.

    2011-01-01

    The DSN radio telescope DSS-13 was used to monitor Mars for electrostatic discharges from 17 February to 11 April, 2010, and from 19 April to 4 May, 2011, over a total of 72 sessions. Of these sessions, few showed noteworthy results and no outstanding electrostatic disturbances were observed on Mars from analyzing the kurtosis of radio emission from Mars. Electrostatic discharges on mars were originally detected in June of 2006 by Ruf et al. using DSS-13. he kurtosis (normalized fourth moment of the electrical field strength) is sensitive to non-thermal radiation. Two frequencies bands, either 2.4 and 8.4 GHz or 8.4 and 32 GHz were used. The non-thermal radiation spectrum should have peaks at the lowest three modes of the theoretical Schumann Resonances of Mars. The telescope was pointed away from Mars every 5 minutes for 45 seconds to confirm if Mars was indeed the sources of any events. It was shown that by including a down-link signal in one channel and by observing when the kurtosis changed as the telescope was pointed away from the source that the procedure can monitor Mars without the need of extra equipment monitoring a control source.

  6. A method to estimate the neutral atmospheric density near the ionospheric main peak of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hong; Ye, Yu Guang; Wang, Jin Song; Nielsen, Erling; Cui, Jun; Wang, Xiao Dong

    2016-04-01

    A method to estimate the neutral atmospheric density near the ionospheric main peak of Mars is introduced in this study. The neutral densities at 130 km can be derived from the ionospheric and atmospheric measurements of the Radio Science experiment on board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The derived neutral densities cover a large longitude range in northern high latitudes from summer to late autumn during 3 Martian years, which fills the gap of the previous observations for the upper atmosphere of Mars. The simulations of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Mars global circulation model can be corrected with a simple linear equation to fit the neutral densities derived from the first MGS/RS (Radio Science) data sets (EDS1). The corrected simulations with the same correction parameters as for EDS1 match the derived neutral densities from two other MGS/RS data sets (EDS2 and EDS3) very well. The derived neutral density from EDS3 shows a dust storm effect, which is in accord with the Mars Express (MEX) Spectroscopy for Investigation of Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars measurement. The neutral density derived from the MGS/RS measurements can be used to validate the Martian atmospheric models. The method presented in this study can be applied to other radio occultation measurements, such as the result of the Radio Science experiment on board MEX.

  7. The 2009 Mars Telecommunications Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. R.; Depaula, R.; Diehl, R. E.; Edwards, C. D.; Fitzgerald, R. J.; Franklin, S. F.; Gibbs, R. G.; Kerridge, S. A.; Komarek, T. A.; Noreen, G. K.

    The first spacecraft with a primary function of providing communication links while orbiting a foreign planet has begun development for a launch in 2009. NASA's Mars Telecommunications Orbiter would use three radio bands to magnify the benefits of other future Mars missions and enable some types of missions otherwise impractical. It would serve as the Mars hub for a growing interplanetary Internet. And it would pioneer the use of planet-to-planet laser communications to demonstrate the possibility for even great networking capabilities in the future. During its nearly 10-year mission in orbit, Mars Telecommunications Orbiter would aid navigation of arriving spacecraft to their martian landing sites and monitor critical events during landings and orbit insertions. In addition, it would enable data-transmission volumes great enough to bring a virtual Mars presence to the public through a range of Internet and video features.

  8. Mars Express 10 years at Mars: Observations by the Mars Express Radio Science Experiment (MaRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pätzold, M.; Häusler, B.; Tyler, G. L.; Andert, T.; Asmar, S. W.; Bird, M. K.; Dehant, V.; Hinson, D. P.; Rosenblatt, P.; Simpson, R. A.; Tellmann, S.; Withers, P.; Beuthe, M.; Efimov, A. I.; Hahn, M.; Kahan, D.; Le Maistre, S.; Oschlisniok, J.; Peter, K.; Remus, S.

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Express spacecraft is operating in Mars orbit since early 2004. The Mars Express Radio Science Experiment (MaRS) employs the spacecraft and ground station radio systems (i) to conduct radio occultations of the atmosphere and ionosphere to obtain vertical profiles of temperature, pressure, neutral number densities and electron density, (ii) to conduct bistatic radar experiments to obtain information on the dielectric and scattering properties of the surface, (iii) to investigate the structure and variation of the crust and lithosphere in selected target areas, (iv) to determine the mass, bulk and internal structure of the moon Phobos, and (v) to track the MEX radio signals during superior solar conjunction to study the morphology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Here we report observations, results and discoveries made in the Mars environment between 2004 and 2014 over almost an entire solar cycle.

  9. Intimations of water on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    This photo essay contains images of Mars that propose evidence of the possible present or past existence of liquid water on Mars. Images were taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera. Images presented include: Polar Wall Pit region, consisting of gully landforms possibly caused by seepage and runoff of liquid water; Noachis Terra region, an area of gullies eroded into the wall of a meteor impact crater, where channels and related debris are seen, possibly formed by seepage, runoff, and debris flow; two images of Gorgonum Chaos region, one a series of troughs and layers of gullies and the other of gullies in a specific layer forming an alcove similar to an aquifer; Sirenum Fossae/Gorgonum Chaos mosaic of two images from this region of the southern hemisphere of Mars, showing 20 different channels coming down from a trough and their associated debris fans. Images and their enhancements are from NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science System.

  10. Mathematics and Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, M. P.; Usero, D.; Jiménez, S.; Aguirre, C.; Vázquez, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we consider modelization associated with study of solar radiation at the surface of Mars and the Martian atmosphere. In particular, we present elements concerning retrieval of the solar irradiance spectrum on the surface of Mars from data collected by arrays of photodiodes, such as those onboard the "Curiosity" MSL-rover and other missions currently under design. By using these techniques we are able to provide an approximate description of the expected measures. In this work we have also developed a new method of tomography-based signal analysis for detection of events in the Martian atmosphere boundary layer, such as dust devils. In general, this method enables detection of events that occur briefly in time and are localized in space. This tomographic method allows us to identify the presence of more dust devils than detected previously using the same data. Finally we show new scenarios of modelization through fractional differential equations associated with diffusion processes and nonlocal problems. Such approaches could be used to model complex Martian dynamics.

  11. Mars synthetic topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.S.C.

    1978-01-01

    Topographic contour maps of Mars are compiled by the synthesis of data acquired from various scientific experiments of the Mariner 9 mission, including S-band radio-occulation, the ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS), the infrared radiometer (IRR), the infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) and television imagery, as well as Earth-based radar information collected at Goldstone, Haystack, and Arecibo Observatories. The entire planet is mapped at scales of 1:25,000,000 and 1:25,000,000 using Mercator, Lambert, and polar stereographic map projections. For the computation of map projections, a biaxial spheroid figure is adopted. The semimajor and semiminor axes are 3393.4 and 3375.7 km, respectively, with a polar flattening of 0.0052. For the computation of elevations, a topographic datum is defined by a gravity field described in terms of spherical harmonics of fourth order and fourth degree combined with a 6.1-mbar occulation pressure surface. This areoid can be approximated by a triaxial ellipsoid with semimajor axes of A = 3394.6 km and B = 3393.3 km and a semiminor axis of C = 3376.3 km. The semimajor axis A intersects the Martian surface at longitude 105??W. The dynamic flattening of Mars is 0.00525. The contour intercal of the maps is 1 km. For some prominent features where overlapping pictures from Mariner 9 are available, local contour maps at relatively larger scales were also compiled by photogrammetric methods on stereo plotters. ?? 1978.

  12. Oxygen foreshock of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Frahm, R. A.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Holmström, M.; Barabash, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mars Express (MEX) has operated for more than 10 years in the environment of Mars, providing solar wind ion observations from the Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms experiment's Ion Mass Analyser (IMA). On 21 September 2008, MEX/IMA detected foreshock-like discrete distributions of oxygen ions at around 1 keV in the solar wind attached to the bow shock and this distribution was observed continuously up to more than 2000 km from the bow shock. Foreshock-like protons are also observed but at a shifted location from the oxygen by about 1000 km, at a slightly higher energy, and flowing in a slightly different direction than the oxygen ions. Both protons and oxygen ions are flowing anti-sunward at different angles with respect to the solar wind direction. This is the first time that a substantial amount of planetary oxygen is observed upstream of the bow shock. Although rare, this is not the only IMA observation of foreshock-like oxygen: oxygen ions are sometimes observed for a short period of time (<5 min) inside the foreshock region. These observations suggest a new escape channel for planetary ions through the acceleration in the bow shock-magnetosheath region.

  13. Water on early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Large flood channels, valley networks and a variety of features attributed to the action of ground ice indicate that Mars emerged from heavy bombardment 3.8 Ga ago, with an inventory of water at the surface equivalent to at least a few hundred metres spread over the whole planet, as compared with 3 km for the Earth. The mantle of Mars is much drier than that of the Earth, possibly as a result of global melting at the end of accretion and the lack of plate tectonics to subsequently reintroduce water into the interior. The surface water resided primarily in a porous, kilometres-thick megaregolith created by the high impact rates. Under today's climatic conditions groundwater is trapped below a thick permafrost zone. At the end of heavy bombardment any permafrost zone would have been much thinner because of the high heat flows, but climatic conditions may have been very different then, as suggested by erosion rates 1000 times higher than subsequent rates. Water trapped below the permafrost periodically erupted onto the surface to form large flood channels and lakes. Given abundant water at the surface and sustained volcanism, hydrothermal activity must have frequently occurred but we have yet to make the appropriate observations to detect the results of such activity.

  14. [Cryptobiosphere of Mars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal'chenko, V F

    2003-01-01

    The US Viking missions (1975-1976) failed to discover any biological activity on the surface of Mars. Yet, life may exist in the planet lithosphere which was found to contain a substantial amount of water. Martian interior can also provide microbial cryptolife with sources of carbon (CO, CO2, CH4) and energy (reduced elements and compounds, e.g. H2, CO, H2S, NH4+, CH4, Fe3+). Microorganisms identical to the Earth's anaerobic methanogens, sulfate reducers, acetogens, denitrifiers etc. are the most probable Martian aborigines. Well-balanced continuous functioning of the Martian cryptobiosphere implies closure of biochemical carbon, sulfur and nitrogen cycles which cannot be reached but with participation of organotrophic and anaerobic hydrolytic and zymotic organisms, ammonifiers and denitrifiers. Considering the low intensity of biological and chemical processes in the absence of surface hydrosphere, low-power atmosphere and cryptobiosphere closure on Mars, and slow global energy matter cycles, evolution of the presumable Martian cryptolife should also go at a slack pace and directions and forms of the evolution of living substance can have little in common with those on Earth. Comprehensive investigations of the Martian biota will employ a great variety of geochemical, radi- and stable isotope, microbiological, enzymatic and molecular biology methods.

  15. Water on early Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M H

    1996-01-01

    Large flood channels, valley networks and a variety of features attributed to the action of ground ice indicate that Mars emerged from heavy bombardment 3.8 Ga ago, with an inventory of water at the surface equivalent to at least a few hundred metres spread over the whole planet, as compared with 3 km for the Earth. The mantle of Mars is much drier than that of the Earth, possibly as a result of global melting at the end of accretion and the lack of plate tectonics to subsequently reintroduce water into the interior. The surface water resided primarily in a porous, kilometres-thick megaregolith created by the high impact rates. Under today's climatic conditions groundwater is trapped below a thick permafrost zone. At the end of heavy bombardment any permafrost zone would have been much thinner because of the high heat flows, but climatic conditions may have been very different then, as suggested by erosion rates 1000 times higher than subsequent rates. Water trapped below the permafrost periodically erupted onto the surface to form large flood channels and lakes. Given abundant water at the surface and sustained volcanism, hydrothermal activity must have frequently occurred but we have yet to make the appropriate observations to detect the results of such activity.

  16. Mars Exploration Rover mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Joy A.; Adler, Mark; Matijevic, Jacob R.; Squyres, Steven W.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Kass, David M.

    2003-10-01

    In January 2004 the Mars Exploration Rover mission will land two rovers at two different landing sites that show possible evidence for past liquid-water activity. The spacecraft design is based on the Mars Pathfinder configuration for cruise and entry, descent, and landing. Each of the identical rovers is equipped with a science payload of two remote-sensing instruments that will view the surrounding terrain from the top of a mast, a robotic arm that can place three instruments and a rock abrasion tool on selected rock and soil samples, and several onboard magnets and calibration targets. Engineering sensors and components useful for science investigations include stereo navigation cameras, stereo hazard cameras in front and rear, wheel motors, wheel motor current and voltage, the wheels themselves for digging, gyros, accelerometers, and reference solar cell readings. Mission operations will allow commanding of the rover each Martian day, or sol, on the basis of the previous sol's data. Over a 90-sol mission lifetime, the rovers are expected to drive hundreds of meters while carrying out field geology investigations, exploration, and atmospheric characterization. The data products will be delivered to the Planetary Data System as integrated batch archives.

  17. Safety during MARS exercise

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    It is MARS(1) time again! All employed members of the CERN personnel are currently undergoing the annual MARS evaluations.   This is also a good occasion for supervisors and their supervisees to fill in or update the OHS-0-0-3 form(2) “Identification of occupational hazards”. Filling in the OHS-0-0-3 form is an opportunity to assess any safety issues related to the supervisee's activities.  Each of us should, together with our supervisor, regularly identify and assess the hazards we may be exposed to in the course of our professional activities and reflect on how to control and mitigate them. When filling in the OHS form for the first time, it is important to determine any potential hazards as well as the corresponding preventive measures, in particular training and protective equipment. When updating the form, please review the available information to ensure that it still corresponds to the current activities. The form should be updated w...

  18. The Mars Oxygen ISRU Experiment (MOXIE) on the yet-to-be-named Mars 2020 Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, M. H.; Hoffman, J.; Rapp, D.; Voecks, G.; Lackner, K. S.; Hartvigsen, J.; Yildiz, B.; Smith, P. H.; Pike, W. T.; Graves, C.; De La Torre Juarez, M.; Schreiner, S.; Madsen, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge to sample return is the transport to Mars of an adequate supply of fuel and oxidizer (the heavier component) for the return trip. A possible novel architecture would be for the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) to share a platform with a device that would manufacture the oxidizer in situ. Far from fanciful, that hypothetical platform would look very much like the Mars 2020 rover. The Mars Oxygen In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Experiment, MOXIE, will produce 22 g/hr oxygen from atmospheric carbon dioxide using solid oxide electrolysis (SOXE). With proper refrigeration, it could readily fill a MAV tank with high Isp LOx while waiting for rendezvous with a sample acquisition rover. The immediate motivation for MOXIE, however, is as a prototype for a 100:1 scale unit that would serve the same function on an eventual human expedition. If optimistic plans for a crewed mission are realized, it may well carry the second, and far more bountiful, Mars sample return. To make 22 g/hr oxygen from the CO2 in the martian atmosphere, MOXIE must first collect and compress that CO2, while purging other atmospheric components (4-5 vol%) that would otherwise build up and choke the process. Two distinct technologies are under consideration for that function; a batch-process based on condensation by conventional cryocoolers, and an Advanced Technology Option mechanical compressor that would allow more efficient, continuous operation. The SOXE itself derives from solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, essentially running the fuel cell process in reverse by feeding in electricity and CO2 to produce O2and CO. MOXIE development is supported by the NASA HEOMD and STMD offices. We are particularly grateful to support from JPL and MIT, as well as our partners Ceramatec and Creare, in the preparation of the MOXIE proposal.

  19. Thermophysical Properties of Mars' North Polar Layered Deposits and Related Materials from Mars Odyssey THEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavada, A. R.; Richardson, M. I.; Byrne, S.; Ivanov, A. B.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    The presence of a thick sequence of horizontal layers of ice-rich material at Mars north pole, dissected by troughs and eroding at its margins, is undoubtedly telling us something about the evolution of Mars climate [1,2] we just don t know what yet. The North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) most likely formed as astronomically driven climate variations led to the deposition of conformable, areally extensive layers of ice and dust over the polar region. More recently, the balance seems to have fundamentally shifted to net erosion, as evidenced by the many troughs within the NPLD and the steep, arcuate scarps present near its margins, both of which expose layering. We defined a number of Regions of Interest ROI) for THEMIS to target as part of the Mars Odyssey Participating Scientist program. We use these THEMIS data in order to understand the morphology and color/thermal properties of the NPLD and related materials over relevant (i.e., m to km) spatial scales. We have assembled color mosaics of our ROIs in order to map the distribution of ices, the different layered units, dark material, and underlying basement. The color information from THEMIS is crucial for distinguishing these different units which are less distinct on Mars Orbiter Camera images. We wish to understand the nature of the marginal scarps and their relationship to the dark material. Our next, more ambitious goal is to derive the thermophysical properties of the different geologic materials using THEMIS and Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer TES) data.

  20. Mars thermospheric scale height: CO Cameron and CO2+ dayglow observations from Mars Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiepen, A.; Gérard, J.-C.; Bougher, S.; Montmessin, F.; Hubert, B.; Bertaux, J.-L.

    2015-01-01

    The CO Cameron (170-270 nm) and CO2+ ultraviolet doublet (298 and 299 nm) emissions have been observed on the Mars dayside with Mars Express Spectroscopy for Investigation of Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM) instrument in the limb viewing mode. These ultraviolet emissions ultimately arise from the excitation of the neutral atmosphere by solar extreme ultraviolet radiation. We analyze a wide dataset covering the years 2003-2013 to determine the scale height of the thermosphere and its variability. We show under which conditions the neutral thermospheric temperature is derived from the CO Cameron and CO2+ emission topside scale height of the limb profiles. We show that emission scale heights are highly variable, ranging from 8.4 to 21.8 km and analyze possible differences between CO Cameron and CO2+-derived scale heights. These large variations appear to dominate over the long-term control exerted by the solar flux reaching the top of the atmosphere during the SPICAM observing period when solar minimum to moderate conditions prevailed. Solar heating impacting the topside thermosphere scale height is apparently overwhelmed by other forcing processes (e.g. waves and tides) during this observing period. It also appears that the crustal residual magnetic field does not significantly influence the scale height of the thermosphere. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that local variations in the thermospheric scale height and associated temperature are equal to or larger than seasonal-latitudinal variability.

  1. On the Raman Detectability of Biomarkers in Geological Matrices in preparation for Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malherbe, Cedric; Hutchinson, Ian B.; DEMARET, Lucas; INGLEY, Richard; EDWARDS, Howell G. M.; EPPE, Gauthier; ExoMars Raman Team at the University of Leicester, Group of Inorganic Analytical Chemsitry at the University of Liege

    2016-10-01

    In 2020, Raman spectrometers will be launched to Mars as part of the ESA/ROSCOSMOS's ExoMars 2020 mission and the NASA's Mars 2020 mission. The miniaturized Raman instrument on board the ExoMars rover has two scientific goals: characterize the geochemistry of the surface and subsurface of Mars, and search for molecular evidence of past and present life. Raman spectrometers have indeed the capability to characterize non-destructively the geology of the rocky surface of Mars. Information on the nature and the molecular composition of the surface and subsurface of Mars will provide valuable information about the habitability of the red planet. In addition, Raman spectrometers have the ability to detect potential molecular biomarkers which are substances obtained by biochemical processes or their derivatives preserved in a protective geological niche. In preparation for Mars mission, studying the detection capability of miniaturized Raman spectrometers (specifically developed for space missions and therefore compromised by the associated challenging constraints) is highly important, on both lab synthetic samples and natural terrestrial analogues samples. We present here an analytical strategy to determine the limit of detection achievable based on Raman spectral images. Raman data were recorded with benchtop instruments and a Raman Laser Spectrometer prototype developed at the University of Leicester to optimize/characterize the camera system that will be used for the ExoMars mission.

  2. Martian clouds observed by Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huiqun; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    We have made daily global maps that cover both polar and equatorial regions of Mars for Ls 135°–360° and 0°–111° using the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) red and blue wide-angle swaths taken from May 1999 to January 2001. We study the seasonal distribution of condensate clouds and dust clouds during roughly 1 Martian year using these daily global maps. We present the development and decay of the tropical cloud belt and the polar hoods, the spatial and temporal distributi...

  3. Searching for amino-acid homochirality on Mars with the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) onboard ExoMars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Sternberg, R.; Brault, A.; Szopa, C.; Claude-Geffroy, C.; Coll, P. J.; Grand, N.; Raulin, F.; Pinick, V.; Goesmann, F.

    2012-12-01

    The joint ESA-Roscosmos Exo-Mars-2018 rover mission plans to seek the signs of a past or a present life on Mars. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment onboard theExoMars rover will be a key analytical tool in providing molecular information from Mars solid samples, with a specific focus on the characterization of their organic content. In this purpose, one of MOMA's main instruments is a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), which provides a unique ability to characterize a broad range of compounds and allow chemical analyses on volatile and refractory species. The challenge with the analysis of this refractory matter embedded in soil is their primary extraction before their analysis by GC-MS. Since the extraction of organic matter is not possible by liquid solvent extraction, we have developed a method based on the thermodesorption and subsequent derivatization of the organic molecules. The goal of the thermodesorption is to extract the organic matter by heating the sample quickly enough not to degrade its organic content. One of the main focuses is to determine the chirality of this organic matter, notably amino acids. Indeed, on Earth, homochirality of molecules is an indicator for the presence of life. Amino acids appear to bear only the left-handed form (L) in living system. However, other refractory compounds can raise interest: nucleobases, carboxylic acids and PAHs are among molecules supported by life as we know it, and all of them can display chirality. The intrinsic chirality of molecules being thermosensitive, the thermodesorption parameters have been adjusted to occur within a range of temperatures from 150 °C to 300 °C over a period of 30 s to 10 min, depending on the chemical compound. Under these conditions, we have shown that amino acids are not degraded and that their chirality is preserved. Once extracted, refractory molecules with labile hydrogens (e.g. amino acids, nucleobases, carboxylic acids, etc.) are derivatized

  4. Multivariate Analysis, Retrieval, and Storage System (MARS). Volume 6: MARS System - A Sample Problem (Gross Weight of Subsonic Transports)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, D. S.; Woodbury, N. W.

    1975-01-01

    The Mars system is a tool for rapid prediction of aircraft or engine characteristics based on correlation-regression analysis of past designs stored in the data bases. An example of output obtained from the MARS system, which involves derivation of an expression for gross weight of subsonic transport aircraft in terms of nine independent variables is given. The need is illustrated for careful selection of correlation variables and for continual review of the resulting estimation equations. For Vol. 1, see N76-10089.

  5. Mars Before the Space Age

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Barrie W

    2008-01-01

    Mars has surely been scrutinised since the dawn of humankind. In the 16th century Tycho Brahe made accurate observations of the position of Mars that enabled Johannes Kepler to obtain his first two laws of planetary motion. In the 17th century the first telescope observations were made, but very little surface detail could be discerned. Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries telescopes improved, revealing many dark areas on the red tinted surface. After the close opposition of 1877 Giovanni Schiaparelli announced about 40 canali on Mars. This led to the saga of the canals of Mars, laid to rest in 1971 when Mariner 9 made observations from Martian orbit showing that the canali/canals of Mars do not exist. Belief that there was life on Mars was widespread in the 19th century, including the view that the dark areas were some form of plant life. This view persisted until Mariner 4 flew past Mars in 1965 and discovered a far thinner atmosphere than previously thought, with impact craters dominating the images. It ...

  6. Mars: a small terrestrial planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, N.; Baratoux, D.; Witasse, O.; Encrenaz, T.; Sotin, C.

    2016-11-01

    Mars is characterized by geological landforms familiar to terrestrial geologists. It has a tenuous atmosphere that evolved differently from that of Earth and Venus and a differentiated inner structure. Our knowledge of the structure and evolution of Mars has strongly improved thanks to a huge amount of data of various types (visible and infrared imagery, altimetry, radar, chemistry, etc) acquired by a dozen of missions over the last two decades. In situ data have provided ground truth for remote-sensing data and have opened a new era in the study of Mars geology. While large sections of Mars science have made progress and new topics have emerged, a major question in Mars exploration—the possibility of past or present life—is still unsolved. Without entering into the debate around the presence of life traces, our review develops various topics of Mars science to help the search of life on Mars, building on the most recent discoveries, going from the exosphere to the interior structure, from the magmatic evolution to the currently active processes, including the fate of volatiles and especially liquid water.

  7. Kepler's "War on Mars"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, William; Orchiston, W.; Stephenson, F. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an interpretation of how Johannes Kepler changed the study of astronomy. We propose that in his metaphorical "War on Mars,” the Astronomia Nova, Kepler used a revolutionary rhetoric to bring about the usurpation of seventeenth-century astronomy. We discuss how Kepler approached the well-established conceptual framework within which the hypotheses of Ptolemy, Copernicus and Tycho Brahe functioned, and how he sought comprehensive physical principles that could determine the true cause and form of the known Universe. We examine Kepler's need to redefine reality and his use of rhetoric in shaping his astronomical argument for a new astronomy, and we show that his new `laws’ represent a fusion of physics and geometry based upon astronomical observations. We suggest that although Kepler may have believed in and defended some Copernican ideas, his innovative Astronomia Nova opened up a whole new vista for international astronomy.

  8. Mars - an escaping planet?

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, R

    2005-01-01

    The chaotic behaviour of the motion of the planets in our Solar System is well established. Numerical experiments with a modified Solar System consisting of a more massive Earth have shown, that for special values of an enlargement factor K around 5 the dynamical state of a truncated planetary system (excluding Mercury and the outer planets Uranus and Neptune) is highly chaotic. On the contrary for values of the mass of the Earth up to the mass of Saturn no irregular dynamical behaviour was observed. We extended our investigations to the complete planetary system and showed, that this chaotic window found before still exists. Tests in different 'Solar Systems' showed that only including Jupiter and Saturn with their actual masses together with a 'massive' Earth (between 4 and 6 times more massive) destabilize the orbit of Mars so that even escapes from the system are possible.

  9. Geologic map of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Skinner, James A.; Dohm, James M.; Irwin, Rossman P.; Kolb, Eric J.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Platz, Thomas; Michael, Gregory G.; Hare, Trent M.

    2014-01-01

    This global geologic map of Mars, which records the distribution of geologic units and landforms on the planet's surface through time, is based on unprecedented variety, quality, and quantity of remotely sensed data acquired since the Viking Orbiters. These data have provided morphologic, topographic, spectral, thermophysical, radar sounding, and other observations for integration, analysis, and interpretation in support of geologic mapping. In particular, the precise topographic mapping now available has enabled consistent morphologic portrayal of the surface for global mapping (whereas previously used visual-range image bases were less effective, because they combined morphologic and albedo information and, locally, atmospheric haze). Also, thermal infrared image bases used for this map tended to be less affected by atmospheric haze and thus are reliable for analysis of surface morphology and texture at even higher resolution than the topographic products.

  10. Illustration of Launching Samples Home from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    One crucial step in a Mars sample return mission would be to launch the collected sample away from the surface of Mars. This artist's concept depicts a Mars ascent vehicle for starting a sample of Mars rocks on their trip to Earth.

  11. Updating the Evidence for Oceans on Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairen, Alberto G.; Dohm, James M.; Oner, Tayfun; Ruiz, Javier; Rodriguez, Alexis P.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Ormoe, Jens; McKay, Chris P.; Baker, Victor R.; Amils, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    Different-sized bodies of water have been proposed to have occurred episodically in the lowlands of Mars throughout the planet's history, largely related to major stages of development of Tharsis and/or orbital obliquity. These water bodies range from large oceans in the Noachian-Early Hesperian, to a minor sea in the Late Hesperian, and dispersed lakes during the Amazonian. To evaluate the more recent discoveries regarding the oceanic possibility, here we perform a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of water on Mars, including: 1. Geological assessment of proposed shorelines; 2. A volumetric approximation to the plains-filing proposed oceans; 3. Geochemistry of the oceans and derived mineralogies; 4. Post-oceanic (i.e., Amazonian) evolution of the shorelines; and 5. Ultimate water evolution on Mars.

  12. MOLA: The New Approach for Mars Global Cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    The MGS Orbiter is carrying the high-precision Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) which, when combined with telemetered latitude data, provides a tie between inertial space and Mars-fixed coordinates to an accuracy of 100 m in latitude/longitude and 10 m in radius (1 sigma), orders of magnitude more accurate than previous global geodetic/ cartographic control data. Over the 2 year MGS mission lifetime, it is expected that over 30,000 MOLA Global Cartographic Control Points will be produced to form the basis for new and re-derived map and geodetic products, key to the analysis of existing and evolving MGS data as well as future Mars exploration.

  13. Acetylene fuel from atmospheric CO2 on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars mission scenario proposed by Baker and Zubrin (1990) intended for an unmanned preliminary mission is extended to maximize the total impulse of fuel produced with a minimum mass of hydrogen from Earth. The hydrogen along with atmospheric carbon dioxide is processed into methane and oxygen by the exothermic reaction in an atmospheric processing module. Use of simple chemical reactions to produce acetylene/oxygen rocket fuel on Mars from hydrogen makes it possible to produce an amount of fuel that is nearly 100 times the mass of hydrogen brought from earth. If such a process produces the return propellant for a manned Mars mission, the required mission mass in LEO is significantly reduced over a system using all earth-derived propellants.

  14. NASA Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Since August 2012, the NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has been operating on the Martian surface. The primary goal of the MSL mission is to assess whether Mars ever had an environment suitable for life. MSL Science Team member Dr. Tim Olson will provide an overview of the rover's capabilities and the major findings from the mission so far. He will also share some of his experiences of what it is like to operate Curiosity's science cameras and explore Mars as part of a large team of scientists and engineers.

  15. Approach to Mars Field Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlberger, William; Rice, James W.; Parker, Timothy; Lipps, Jere H.; Hoffman, Paul; Burchfiel, Clark; Brasier, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The goals of field study on Mars are nothing less than to understand the processes and history of the planet at whatever level of detail is necessary. A manned mission gives us an unprecedented opportunity to use the immense power of the human mind to comprehend Mars in extraordinary detail. To take advantage of this opportunity, it is important to examine how we should approach the field study of Mars. In this effort, we are guided by over 200 years of field exploration experience on Earth as well as six manned missions exploring the Moon.

  16. Magnetic activity at Mars - Mars Surface Magnetic Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Menvielle, M.; Merayo, José M.G.

    2012-01-01

    We use the extensive database of magnetic observations from the Mars Global Surveyor to investigate magnetic disturbances in the Martian space environment statistically, both close to and far from crustal anomalies. We discuss the results in terms of possible ionospheric and magnetospheric currents...... a magnetic experiment at the martian surface, the Mars Surface Magnetic Observatory (MSMO) including the science objectives, science experiment requirements, instrument and basic operations. We find the experiment to be feasible within the constraints of proposed stationary landing platforms....

  17. Boots on Mars: Earth Independent Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Josephine; Gill, Tracy R.; Ellis, Kim Gina

    2017-01-01

    This package is for the conduct of a workshop during the International Space University Space Studies Program in the summer of 2017 being held in Cork, Ireland. It gives publicly available information on NASA and international plans to move beyond low Earth orbit to Mars and discusses challenges and capabilities. This information will provide the participants a basic level of insight to develop a response on their perceived obstacles to a future vision of humans on Mars.

  18. The ballistic Mars hopper: An alternative Mars mobility concept

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The ballistic Mars hopper is proposed as an alternative mobility concept for unmanned exploration of the martian surface. In the ballistic Mars hopper concept, oxygen and carbon monoxide produced from the martian atmosphere are used as propellants in a rocket propulsion system for an unmanned vehicle on suborbital trajectories between landing sights separated by distances of up to 1000 km. This mobility concept is seen as uniquely capable of allowing both intensive and extensive exploration o...

  19. Mars Digital Image Model 2.1 Control Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archinal, B. A.; Kirk, R. L.; Duxbury, T. C.; Lee, E. M.; Sucharski, R.; Cook, D.

    2003-01-01

    USGS is currently preparing a new version of its global Mars digital image mosaic, which will be known as MDIM 2.1. As part of this process we are completing a new photogrammetric solution of the global Mars control network. This is an improved version of the network established earlier by RAND and USGS personnel, as partially described previously. MDIM 2.1 will have many improvements over earlier Viking Orbiter (VO) global mosaics. Geometrically, it will be an orthoimage product, draped on Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) derived topography, thus accounting properly for the commonly oblique VO imagery. Through the network being described here it will be tied to the newly defined IAU/IAG 2000 Mars coordinate system via ties to MOLA data. Thus, MDIM 2.1 will provide complete global orthorectified imagery coverage of Mars at the resolution of 1/256 deg of MDIM 2.0, and be compatible with MOLA and other products produced in the current coordinate system.

  20. 2031, an edaphological Mars odyssey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrón, Vidal

    2016-04-01

    NASA is projecting to send humans to Mars in the 2030s. In the PICO session we will make a 4D experience, a journey in space and time. Wéll connect with a meeting in the future mission "Edaphos one" travelling to Mars in 2031. In that meeting, an international scientific team with one geophysicist, one mineralogist and two agronomist will review the state of the art of the geo-edaphological knowledge of the martian surface, based on the main Mars missions using orbiters (Mariner), landers (Viking) and rovers (Pathfinder, Spirit-Opportunity, Curiosity). A special attention will be devoted to the mineralogy of the iron oxides, as important aquamarkers. Finally, they discuss about the biological, physical and chemical limitations for plants growth on Mars. You can see the trailer of the presentation in this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRS0tPNpvFU

  1. BUILDING ON THE MARS PLANET

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valeriy Pershakov; Tatyana Petrova

    2012-01-01

    The main task is the terraforming of the Mars planet. Nowadays it is a very important task, because there are a lot of problems on the planet Earth, which deals with the exhaustion of natural resources...

  2. Properties of cryobrines on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möhlmann, D.; Thomsen, Kaj

    2011-01-01

    Brines, i.e. aqueous salty solutions, increasingly play a role in a better understanding of physics and chemistry (and eventually also putative biology) of the upper surface of Mars. Results of physico-chemical modeling and experimentally determined data to characterize properties of cryobrines...... of potential interest with respect to Mars are described. Eutectic diagrams, the related numerical eutectic values of composition and temperature, the water activity of Mars-relevant brines of sulfates, chlorides, perchlorides and carbonates, including related deliquescence relative humidity, are parameters...... and properties, which are described here in some detail. The results characterize conditions for liquid low-temperature brines ("cryobrines") to evolve and to exist, at least temporarily, on present Mars. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  3. Mars Regolith Water Extractor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Regolith Water Extractor (MRWE) is a system for acquiring water from the Martian soil. In the MRWE, a stream of CO2 is heated by solar energy or waste heat...

  4. Mars Solar Balloon Lander Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Solar Balloon Lander (MSBL) is a novel concept which utilizes the capability of solar-heated hot air balloons to perform soft landings of scientific...

  5. Mars Exploration Science in 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, B. L.; Johnson, S. S.; Horgan, B.; Niles, P. B.; Amador, E. S.; Archer, P. D.; Byrne, S.; Edwards, C. S.; Fraeman, A. A.; Glavin, D. P.; Glotch, T. D.; Hardgrove, C.; Hayne, P. O.; Kite, E. S.; Lanza, N. L.; Lapotre, M. G. A.; Michalski, J.; Rice, M.; Rogers, A. D.

    2017-02-01

    We describe an approach to Mars exploration in 2050 and the decades leading in that couples fundamental science on the workings of planets and the search for life with collection of information on resources and hazards essential for human exploration.

  6. MARVY: Mars Velocity Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The successful landing of the large Mars rover Curiosity on August 5, 2012 outlined the increasing complexity of safely landing large rovers on the planet. A precise...

  7. Outstanding problems in Mars aeronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    Although the Phobos-2 spacecraft recently obtained important results relevant to some of the major remaining questions in Mars aeronomy, much remains to be done. In particular, not since the Viking Landers have we made in-situ measurements of aeronomical quantities such as atmospheric and ionospheric densities and temperatures below 400 km altitude. We have never made magnetic field measurements at these altitudes. Without such measurements we cannot unambiguously resolve arguments concerning issues such as the significance of the planetary magnetic field in the solar wind interaction, or understand the atmospheric cycle that leads to escape to space. With the trio of future orbiters including Mars Observer, Mars-94, and Planet-B we should see a veritable explosion of new knowledge, but some gaps in aeronomical science coverage will still remain. This paper briefly reviews some of the major unsolved problems in Mars aeronomy, and points out which are expected to remain outstanding after this flotilla of missions.

  8. Ice at Mars lander site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-01-01

    Eight dice‐sized bits of ice vanished within 4 days from a trench dug on Mars by the robotic arm on NASA's Phoenix lander, confirming what scientists suspected the material was. “It must be ice...

  9. Mars Aqueous Processing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mars Aqueous Processing System (MAPS) is an innovative method to produce useful building materials from Martian regolith. Acids and bases produced from the regolith...

  10. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  11. Mars Express releases Beagle 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    At 9:31 CET, the crucial sequence started to separate the Beagle 2 lander from Mars Express. As data from Mars Express confirm, the pyrotechnic device was fired to slowly release a loaded spring, which gently pushed Beagle 2 away from the mother spacecraft. An image from the onboard visual monitoring camera (VMC) showing the lander drifting away is expected to be available later today. Since the Beagle 2 lander has no propulsion system of its own, it had to be put on the correct course for its descent before it was released. For this reason, on 16 December the trajectory of the whole Mars Express spacecraft had to be adjusted to ensure that Beagle 2 would be on course to enter the atmosphere of Mars. This manoeuvre, called "retargeting'' was critical: if the entry angle is too steep, the lander could overheat and burn up in the atmosphere; if the angle is too shallow, the lander might skim like a pebble on the surface of a lake and miss its target. This fine targeting and today's release were crucial manoeuvres for which ESA's Ground Control Team at ESOC (European Space Operations Centre) had trained over the past several months. The next major milestone for Mars Express will be the manoeuvre to enter into orbit around Mars. This will happen at 3:52 CET on Christmas morning, when Beagle 2 is expected to land on the surface of Mars. "Good teamwork by everybody - ESA, industry and the Beagle 2 team - has got one more critical step accomplished. Mars, here comes Europe!" said David Southwood, ESA Director of Science.

  12. Europe's eye on Mars: first spectacular results from Mars Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Although the seven scientific instruments on board Mars Express are still undergoing a thorough calibration phase, they have already started collecting amazing results. The first high-resolution images and spectra of Mars have already been acquired. This first spectacular stereoscopic colour picture was taken on 14 January 2004 by ESA’s Mars Express satellite from 275 km above the surface of Mars by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC). This image is available on the ESA portal at: http://mars.esa.int The picture shows a portion of a 1700 km long and 65 km wide swath which was taken in south-north direction across the Grand Canyon of Mars (Valles Marineris). It is the first image of this size that shows the surface of Mars in high resolution (12 metres per pixel), in colour, and in 3D. The total area of the image on the Martian surface (top left corner) corresponds to 120 000 km². The lower part of the picture shows the same region in perspective view as if seen from a low-flying aircraft. This perspective view was generated on a computer from the original image data. One looks at a landscape which has been predominantly shaped by the erosional action of water. Millions of cubic kilometres of rock have been removed, and the surface features seen now such as mountain ranges, valleys, and mesas, have been formed. The HRSC is just one of the instruments to have collected exciting data. To learn more about the very promising beginning to ESA's scientific exploration of Mars, media representatives are invited to attend a press conference on Friday, 23 January 2004, at 11:00 CET at ESA’s Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany, and in video-conference with the other ESA centres. There, under the auspices of ESA Council Chair at Ministerial level, Germany's Minister for Education and Research, Mrs Edelgard Bulmahn, ESA's Director of the Scientific Programme, Prof. David Southwood and the Principal Investigators of all instruments on board Mars Express will

  13. Mars global digital dune database: MC-30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.; Fenton, L.K.; Titus, T.N.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    . Where availability and quality of THEMIS visible (VIS), Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle, Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera, or Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Context Camera and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images allowed, we classified dunes and included some dune slipface measurements, which were derived from gross dune morphology and represent the approximate prevailing wind direction at the last time of significant dune modification. It was beyond the scope of this report to look at the detail needed to discern subtle dune modification. It was also beyond the scope of this report to measure all slipfaces. We attempted to include enough slipface measurements to represent the general circulation (as implied by gross dune morphology) and to give a sense of the complex nature of aeolian activity on Mars. The absence of slipface measurements in a given direction should not be taken as evidence that winds in that direction did not occur. When a dune field was located within a crater, the azimuth from crater centroid to dune field centroid was calculated, as another possible indicator of wind direction. Output from a general circulation model is also included. In addition to polygons locating dune fields, the database includes ~700 of the THEMIS VIS and MOC images that were used to build the database.

  14. Habitability of Mars: hyperthermophiles in permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilichinsky, David; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Felipe, Gomez; Mironov, Vasilii; Blamey, Jenny; Ramos, Miguel; Ángel de Pablo, Miguel; Castro, Miguel; Boehmwald, Freddy

    This is a first microbiological study of volcanic permafrost carried out on Kluchevskaya volcano group (Kamchatka Peninsula) and Deception Island (Antarctica). By culture-and culture-independent methods we showed the presence of viable hyper(thermophilic) microorganisms and their genes within volcanic permafrost. The optimal temperature for sulfide producing bacteria was 65, whereas acetogens and methanogens were able to produce acetate and methane at temperatures up to 75o C, while sulphur-reducers showed optimal growth at 85-92o C. Hy-per(thermophiles) were never found in permafrost outside the volcanic areas before. The only way they are to appear within a frozen material is a concurrent deposition during the eruption, together with products associated with volcano heated subsurface geothermal oases. The elo-quent evidence to the hypothesis is the presence among clones of the sequences affiliated with (hyper)thermophilic bacteria, both, aerobic and anaerobic, in the environmental DNA derived from ashes freshly deposited on snow in close proximity to volcano Shiveluch (Kamchatka) and aerobic bacteria incubated at 80o C from ashes freshly deposited on the top of Llaima Vol-cano glacier (Andes). Thus, in the areas of active volcanism the catastrophic geological events transports the life from the depths to the surface and this life from high-temperature ecological niches might survive in permafrost over a long period of time. The results obtained give insights for habitability of Mars. Terrestrial permafrost represents a possible ecosystem for Mars as an Earth-like cryogenic planet. But permafrost on Earth and Mars vary in age, from a few million years on Earth to a few billion years on Mars. Because such difference in age, the longevity of life forms preserved within terrestrial permafrost may only serve as an approximate model for Mars. On the other hand, numerous ancient extinct volcanoes are known on Mars. Their past eruptions periodically burn-through the

  15. The Search for Nitrates on Mars by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer C.; Freissinet, Caroline; McKay, Chirstopher P.; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Coll, Partice J.; Glavin, Daniel Patrick; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Wong, Mike; Atreya, Sushiil K.; Wray, James J.; Steele, Andrew; Prats, Benito D.; Szopa, Cyril; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Buch, Arnaud; Leshin, Laurie A.; Ming, Douglas W.; Conrad, Pamela Gales; Cabane, Michel; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Grotzinger, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Planetary models suggest that nitrogen was abundant in the early Martian atmosphere as N2 but it was lost by sputtering and photochemical loss to space, impact erosion, and chemical oxidation to nitrates. A nitrogen cycle may exist on Mars where nitrates, produced early in Mars' history, may have been later decomposed back into N2 by the current impact flux. Nitrates are a fundamental source of nitrogen for terrestrial microorganisms, and they have evolved metabolic pathways to perform both oxidation and reduction to drive a complete biological nitrogen cycle. Therefore, the characterization of nitrogen in Martian soils is important to assess habitability of the Martian environment, particularly with respect to the presence of nitrates. The only previous mission that was designed to search for soil nitrates was the Phoenix mission but N-containing species were not detected by TEGA or the MECA WCL. Nitrates have been tentatively identified in Nakhla meteorites, and if nitrogen was oxidized on Mars, this has important implications for the habitability potential of Mars. Here we report the results from the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite aboard the Curiosity rover during the first year of surface operations in Gale Crater. Samples from the Rocknest aeolian deposit and sedimentary rocks (John Klein) were heated to approx 835degC under helium flow and the evolved gases were analyzed by MS and GC-MS. Two and possibly three peaks may be associated with the release of m/z 30 at temperatures ranging from 180degC to 500degC. M/z 30 has been tentatively identified as NO; other plausible contributions include CH2O and an isotopologue of CO, 12C18O. NO, CH2O, and CO may be reaction products of reagents (MTBSTFA/DMF) carried from Earth for the wet chemical derivatization experiments with SAM and/or derived from indigenous soil nitrogenated organics. Laboratory analyses indicate that it is also possible that <550degC evolved NO is produced via reaction of HCl with

  16. Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer : The Search For Biosignatures And Biohints On Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Arnaud; Freissinet, C.; Brault, A.; Sternberg, R.; Rodier, C.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P.; Pinnick, V.; MOMA Team

    2012-10-01

    The joint ESA-Roscosmos Exo-Mars-2018 rover mission seeks the signs of past or present life on Mars. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) aboard the ExoMars rover will be a key analytical tool in providing chemical (molecular) information from the solid samples, with particular focus on the characterization of organic content. One of the instruments aboard MOMA is a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) which provides a unique ability to characterize a broad range of compounds allowing chemical analyses on volatile and non-volatile species. The key challenge with the analysis of refractory organic compounds contained in soil is their extraction and subsequent analysis by GC-MS. Since the extraction of organic matter is not possible by liquid solvent extraction, thermodesoprtion followed by derivatization has been developed. The goal of the thermodesorption is to quickly extract the organic matter before degradation. One of the main focus is to determine the chirality of amino acids. Indeed, on earth homochirality (especially the L-form) is an indicator for the presence of life. However, other refractory compounds can be analyzed: nucleobases, carbox-ylic acids, PAHs, etc. Thermodesorption occurs within a range of temperatures from 150 °C to 300 °C over a period of 30 s to 10 min, depending on the chemical compound. Under these conditions, we have shown that amino acids are not degraded and that their chirality is preserved. Once extracted, refractory molecules with labile hydrogens (e.g. amino acids, nucleobases, carboxylic acids, etc.) were derivatized. General and sensitive derivatization occurs with a sillylated compounds N,N-methyl-tert-butyl-dimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Derivative compounds were separated on an RTX-5 (Restek) column. If a chiral separation was targeted, then dimethylformamide dimethylacetale derivatization (DMF-DMA) was utilized. With DMF-DMA 11 of the 19 proteinic amino acids were separated on the Chirasil

  17. Mars at Ls 93o: Syrtis Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    15 August 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 93o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 93o occurs in mid-August 2006. The picture shows the Syrtis Major face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Summer/Southern Winter

  18. Mars at Ls 249o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    5 July 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 249o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 249o occurs in mid-July 2005. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  19. Mars at Ls 53o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    2 May 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 53o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 53o occurs in mid-May 2006. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  20. Mars at Ls 79o: Syrtis Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    18 July 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 79o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 79o occurs in mid-July 2006. The picture shows the Syrtis Major face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  1. Mars at Ls 269o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    2 August 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 269o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 269o occurs in mid-August 2005. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: last days of Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  2. Mars at Ls 12o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    7 February 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 12o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 12o occurs in mid-February 2006. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  3. Mars at Ls 25o: Syrtis Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    21 March 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 25o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 25o occurs in mid-March 2006. The picture shows the Syrtis Major face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring

  4. Mars at Ls 79o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    4 July 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 79o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 79o occurs in mid-July 2006. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  5. Mars at Ls 306o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    4 October 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 306o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 306o occurs in mid-October 2005. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  6. Mars at Ls 357o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    4 January 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 357o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 357o occurs in mid-January 2006. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science SystemsSeason: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  7. Mars at Ls 66o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    6 June 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 66o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 66o occurs in mid-June 2006. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  8. Mars at Ls 53o: Syrtis Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    16 May 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 53o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 53o occurs in mid-May 2006. The picture shows the Syrtis Major face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  9. Mars at Ls 341o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    6 December 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 341o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 341o occurs in mid-December 2005. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  10. Mars at Ls 25o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    7 March 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 25o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 25o occurs in mid-March 2006. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  11. Mars at Ls 93o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    1 August 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 93o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 93o occurs in mid-August 2006. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Summer/Southern Winter

  12. Mars at Ls 12o: Syrtis Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    21 February 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 12o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 12o occurs in mid-February 2006. The picture shows the Syrtis Major face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  13. Mars at Ls 39o: Syrtis Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    18 April 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 39o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 39o occurs in mid-April 2006. The picture shows the Syrtis Major face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  14. Mars at Ls 39o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    4 April 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 39o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 39o occurs in mid-April 2006. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  15. Mars at Ls 324o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    1 November 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 324o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 324o occurs in mid-November 2005. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  16. Mars at Ls 288o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    6 September 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 288o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 288o occurs in mid-September 2005. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  17. Mars at Ls 66o: Syrtis Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    20 June 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 66o during a previous Mars year This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 66o occurs in mid-June 2006. The picture shows the Syrtis Major face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  18. Quantitive analysis of gully long profiles on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Susan; Balme, Matthew; Murray, John; Towner, Martin

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the scale, slope and curvature properties of gully long profiles on Earth and Mars to ascertain whether gullies on Mars are formed by alluvial and/or debris flow processes. During this investigation we also compared generic slope profiles on Mars to those with gullies. To perform these analyses we used digital elevation models (DEMs) for Earth, the majority of which were derived from ~ 1 m resolution LiDAR data from the UK's NERC ARSF and the USA's NSF NCALM. For Mars we used a technique developed by Kreslavsky [1] to extract elevation data from pairs of RDR HiRISE images. We successfully validated this technique by comparing its results to those from HiRISE DEMs made using automated stereo photogrammetry techniques [2]. We found that gullies produced by debris flow have properties distinct from those formed by alluvial processes on Earth. In general, debris flow gullies are less concave than alluvial gullies, have a basal concavity and have higher slopes than alluvial gullies. We then compared our results from Earth to the gully profiles on Mars and found that properties of gullies on Mars overlap those of both debris flow and alluvial gullies on Earth, however, gullies on Mars are slightly more similar to terrestrial debris flow gullies. In addition gully long profiles on Mars are distinct from generic slope profiles on Mars with some overlap - this shows that the gully forming process has a marked morphological impact on martian slopes. Our observed latitudinal patterns in gully formation are in agreement with previous investigations [3, 4], with greater numbers of gullies found at ~40° and ~70° latitude north and south. In addition we found that gullies at mid-latitudes are more densely packed and occur across whole slope sections (rather than isolated patches), suggesting this region has preferential conditions for gully formation. Our morphological comparison with gullies on Earth suggests that the formation process shifts from pure water

  19. The ExoMars 2016 Mission arriving at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedhem, H.; Vago, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    The ExoMars 2016 mission was launched on a Proton rocket from Baikonur, Kazakhstan, on 14 March 2016 and is scheduled to arrive at Mars on 19 October 2016. ExoMars is a joint programme of the European Space Agency (ESA) and Roscosmos, Russia. It consists of the ExoMars 2016 mission with the Trace Gas Orbiter, TGO, and the Entry Descent and Landing Demonstrator, EDM, named Schiaparelli, and the ExoMars 2020 mission, which carries a lander and a rover. The TGO scientific payload consists of four instruments. These are: ACS and NOMAD, both infrared spectrometers for atmospheric measurements in solar occultation mode and in nadir mode, CASSIS, a multichannel camera with stereo imaging capability, and FREND, an epithermal neutron detector to search for subsurface hydrogen (as proxy for water ice and hydrated minerals). The mass of the TGO is 3700 kg, including fuel. The EDM, with a mass of 600 kg, is mounted on top of the TGO as seen in its launch configuration. The EDM is carried to Mars by the TGO and is separated three days before arrival at Mars. In addition to demonstrating the landing capability two scientific investigations are included with the EDM. The AMELIA investigation aims at characterising the Martian atmosphere during the entry and descent using technical and engineering sensors of the EDM, and the DREAMS suite of sensors that will characterise the environment of the landing site for a few days after the landing. ESA provides the TGO spacecraft and the Schiaparelli Lander demonstrator, ESA member states provide two of the TGO instruments and Roscosmos provides the launcher and the other two TGO instruments. After the arrival of the ExoMars 2020 mission at the surface of Mars, the TGO will handle all communications between the Earth and the Rover. The communication between TGO and the rover/lander is done through a UHF communications system, a contribution from NASA. This presentation will cover a description of the 2016 mission, including the spacecraft

  20. Mars at Ls 137o

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    13 November 2006 These images capture what Mars typically looks like in mid-afternoon at Ls 137o. In other words, with the exception of occasional differences in weather and polar frost patterns, this is what the red planet looks like this month (November 2006). Six views are shown, including the two polar regions. These are composites of 24-26 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global mapping images acquired at red and blue wavelengths. The 'hole' over the south pole is an area where no images were obtained, because this polar region is enveloped in wintertime darkness. Presently, it is summer in the northern hemisphere and winter in the southern hemisphere. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Northern summer/southern winter begins at Ls 90o, northern autumn/southern spring start at Ls 180o, and northern winter/southern summer begin at Ls 270o. Ls 137o occurs in the middle of this month (November 2006). The pictures show how Mars appeared to the MOC wide angle cameras at a previous Ls 137o in March 2001. The six views are centered on the Tharsis region (upper left), Acidalia and Mare Eyrthraeum (upper right), Syrtis Major and Hellas (middle left), Elysium and Mare Cimmeria (middle right), the north pole (lower left), and the south pole (lower right).

  1. Mars at Ls 121o

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    1 October 2006 These images capture what Mars typically looks like in mid-afternoon at L s 121o. In other words, with the exception of occasional differences in weather and polar frost patterns, this is what the red planet looks like this month (October 2006). Six views are shown, including the two polar regions. These are composites of 24-26 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global mapping images acquired at red and blue wavelengths. The 'hole' over the south pole is an area where no images were obtained, because this polar region is enveloped in wintertime darkness. Presently, it is summer in the northern hemisphere and winter in the southern hemisphere. Ls, solar longitude, a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Northern summer/southern winter begins at Ls 90o, northern autumn/southern spring start at Ls 180o, and northern winter/southern summer begin at Ls 270o. Ls 121o occurs in the middle of this month (October 2006). The pictures show how Mars appeared to the MOC wide angle cameras at a previous Ls 121o in February 2001. The six views are centered on the Tharsis region (upper left), Acidalia and Mare Eyrthraeum (upper right), Syrtis Major and Hellas (middle left), Elysium and Mare Cimmeria (middle right), the north pole (lower left), and the south pole (lower right).

  2. Hypersonic and Supersonic Static Aerodynamics of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonov, Artem A.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Vannorman, John W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of continuum static aerodynamics of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle (EV). The method is derived from earlier work for Mars Exploration Rover (MER) and Mars Path Finder (MPF) and the appropriate additions are made in the areas where physics are different from what the prior entry systems would encounter. These additions include the considerations for the high angle of attack of MSL EV, ablation of the heatshield during entry, turbulent boundary layer, and other aspects relevant to the flight performance of MSL. Details of the work, the supporting data and conclusions of the investigation are presented.

  3. Improving Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Extensively utilized for numerous mission applications, the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model. In a Monte-Carlo mode, Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is used to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Mars-GRAM has been found to be inexact when used during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3. Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) from the surface to 80 km altitude. Mars-GRAM with the MapYear parameter set to 0 utilizes results from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 at all locations for the entire year. Imprecise atmospheric density and pressure at all altitudes is a consequence of this use of MGCM with tau=3. Density factor values have been determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 as a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem. These factors adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. These density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls and are included in Mars-GRAM Release 1.3. Work currently being done, to derive better multipliers by including variations with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data, will be highlighted in the presentation. The TES limb data utilized in this process has been validated by a comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). This comparison study was undertaken for locations on Mars of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST. The more precise density factors will be included in Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 and thus improve the results of future sensitivity studies done for large

  4. Nitrogen on Mars: Insights from Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J. C.; Sutter, B.; Jackson, W. A.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Chrisopher P.; Ming, W.; Archer, P. Douglas; Glavin, D. P.; Fairen, A. G.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent detection of nitrate on Mars indicates that nitrogen fixation processes occurred in early martian history. Data collected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity Rover can be integrated with Mars analog work in order to better understand the fixation and mobility of nitrogen on Mars, and thus its availability to putative biology. In particular, the relationship between nitrate and other soluble salts may help reveal the timing of nitrogen fixation and post-depositional behavior of nitrate on Mars. In addition, in situ measurements of nitrogen abundance and isotopic composition may be used to model atmospheric conditions on early Mars.

  5. Guidelines for the 2011 MARS exercise

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    Full details of the Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS) are available via the HR Department’s homepage or directly on the Department’s MARS web page: https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/admin-eguide/mars/mars.asp You will find on these pages: MARS procedures, including the MARS timetable for proposals and decisions; regulations with links to the scheme’s statutory basis; a list of frequently asked questions; useful documents with links to relevant documentation, e.g. mandate of the Senior Staff Advisory Committee (SSAC); and related links and contacts. Tel. 70674 / 72728  

  6. Atmospheric energy for subsurface life on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, B. P.; Yung, Y. L.; Nealson, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    The location and density of biologically useful energy sources on Mars will limit the biomass, spatial distribution, and organism size of any biota. Subsurface Martian organisms could be supplied with a large energy flux from the oxidation of photochemically produced atmospheric H(2) and CO diffusing into the regolith. However, surface abundance measurements of these gases demonstrate that no more than a few percent of this available flux is actually being consumed, suggesting that biological activity driven by atmospheric H(2) and CO is limited in the top few hundred meters of the subsurface. This is significant because the available but unused energy is extremely large: for organisms at 30-m depth, it is 2,000 times previous estimates of hydrothermal and chemical weathering energy and far exceeds the energy derivable from other atmospheric gases. This also implies that the apparent scarcity of life on Mars is not attributable to lack of energy. Instead, the availability of liquid water may be a more important factor limiting biological activity because the photochemical energy flux can only penetrate to 100- to 1,000-m depth, where most H(2)O is probably frozen. Because both atmospheric and Viking lander soil data provide little evidence for biological activity, the detection of short-lived trace gases will probably be a better indicator of any extant Martian life.

  7. Europe is going to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The Agency's Science Programme Committee (SPC) approved Mars Express after ESA's Council, meeting at ministerial level in Brussels on 11 and 12 May, had agreed the level of the science budget for the next 4 years, just enough to make the mission affordable. "Mars Express is a mission of opportunity and we felt we just had to jump in and do it. We are convinced it will produce first-rate science", says Hans Balsiger, SPC chairman. As well as being a first for Europe in Mars exploration, Mars Express will pioneer new, cheaper ways of doing space science missions. "With a total cost of just 150 million euros, Mars Express will be the cheapest Mars mission ever undertaken", says Roger Bonnet, ESA's Director of Science. Mars Express will be launched in June 2003. When it arrives at the red planet six months later, it will begin to search for water and life. Seven instruments, provided by space research institutes throughout Europe, will make observations from the main spacecraft as it orbits the planet. Just before the spacecraft arrives, it will release a small lander, provided by research institutes in the UK, that will journey on to the surface to look for signs of life. The lander is called Beagle 2 after the ship in which Charles Darwin sailed round the world in search of evidence supporting his theory of evolution. But just as Darwin had to raise the money for his trip, so the search is on for public and private finance for Beagle 2. "Beagle 2 is an extremely important element of the mission", says Bonnet. Europe's space scientists have envisaged a mission to Mars for over fifteen years. But limited funding has prevented previous proposals from going ahead. The positioning of the planets in 2003, however, offers a particularly favourable passage to the red planet - an opportunity not to be missed. Mars Express will be joined by an international flotilla of spacecraft that will also be using this opportunity to work together on scientific questions and pave the way

  8. Mars Analytical Microimager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batory, Krzysztof J.; Govindjee; Andersen, Dale; Presley, John; Lucas, John M.; Sears, S. Kelly; Vali, Hojatollah

    Unambiguous detection of extraterrestrial nitrogenous hydrocarbon microbiology requires an instrument both to recognize potential biogenic specimens and to successfully discriminate them from geochemical settings. Such detection should ideally be in-situ and not jeopardize other experiments by altering samples. Taken individually most biomarkers are inconclusive. For example, since amino acids can be synthesized abiotically they are not always considered reliable biomarkers. An enantiomeric imbalance, which is characteristic of all terrestrial life, may be questioned because chirality can also be altered abiotically. However, current scientific understanding holds that aggregates of identical proteins or proteinaceous complexes, with their well-defined amino acid residue sequences, are indisputable biomarkers. Our paper describes the Mars Analytical Microimager, an instrument for the simultaneous imaging of generic autofluorescent biomarkers and overall morphology. Autofluorescence from ultraviolet to near-infrared is emitted by all known terrestrial biology, and often as consistent complex bands uncharacteristic of abiotic mineral luminescence. The MAM acquires morphology, and even sub-micron morphogenesis, at a 3-centimeter working distance with resolution approaching a laser scanning microscope. Luminescence is simultaneously collected via a 2.5-micron aperture, thereby permitting accurate correlation of multi-dimensional optical behavior with specimen morphology. A variable wavelength excitation source and photospectrometer serve to obtain steady-state and excitation spectra of biotic and luminescent abiotic sources. We believe this is the first time instrumentation for detecting hydrated or desiccated microbiology non-destructively in-situ has been demonstrated. We have obtained excellent preliminary detection of biota and inorganic matrix discrimination from terrestrial polar analogues, and perimetric morphology of individual magnetotactic bacteria. Proposed

  9. Pluto is the new Mars!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Mckinnon, William B.; Spencer, John R.; Howard, Alan D.; Grundy, William M.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie A.; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Data from NASA's New Horizons encounter with Pluto in July 2015 revealed an astoundingly complex world. The surface seen on the encounter hemisphere ranged in age from ancient to recent. A vast craterless plain of slowly convecting solid nitrogen resides in a deep primordial impact basin, reminiscent of young enigmatic deposits in Mars' Hellas basin. Like Mars, regions of Pluto are dominated by valleys, though the Pluto valleys are thought to be carved by nitrogen glaciers. Pluto has fretted terrain and halo craters. Pluto is cut by tectonics of several different ages. Like Mars, vast tracts on Pluto are mantled by dust and volatiles. Just as on Mars, Pluto has landscapes that systematically vary with latitude due to past and present seasonal (and mega-seasonal) effects on two major volatiles. On Mars, those volatiles are H2O and CO2; on Pluto they are CH4 and N2. Like Mars, some landscapes on Pluto defy easy explanation. In the Plutonian arctic there is a region of large (approx. 40 km across) deep (approx. 3-4 km) pits that probably could not be formed by sublimation, or any other single process, alone. Equally bizarre is the Bladed terrain, which is composed of fields of often roughly aligned blade-like ridges covering the flanks and crests of broad regional swells. Topping the unexpected are two large mounds approximately150 km across, approx. 5-6 km high, with great central depressions at their summits. The central depressions are almost as deep as the mounds are tall. These mounds have many of the characteristics of volcanic mountains seen on Mars and elsewhere in the inner solar system. Hypotheses for the formation of these Plutonian mounds so far all have challenges, principally revolving around the need for H2O ice to support their relief and the difficulty imagining mechanisms that would mobilize H2O. From the perspective of one year after the encounter, our appreciation of the extent of Pluto's diversity and complexity is quite reminiscent of the

  10. The International Mars Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavney, S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Eichentopf, K.; Natenzon, M.; Kirsanova, T.; Tarnopolsky, V.

    1996-03-01

    The next five years will witness the beginning of a period of unprecedented activity and interest in the exploration of Mars. Numerous missions are scheduled involving a broad array of spacecraft and instrumentation, and several important experiments will depend on international collaborations. They include Mars Global Surveyor and Pathfinder to be launched in 1996, along with the Russian Mars 96 Mission. Through the Mars Surveyor Program, a lander will descend to the south polar latitudes in 1999 while an orbiter circles the planet and acquires images and infrared data. These missions will produce a welcome deluge of new data, as well as a sharp increase in the demand for data from past Mars missions. One result of this increased activity will be the need for a rapid, efficient system for sharing new data with the scientific community after the proprietary periods have elapsed. With the boom in growth of the Internet, it is now possible to design a system for international access using ordinary laboratory and desktop computers. The advantage of using the World-Wide Web as the basis for such a system is that the infrastructure is already in place, as many users are already accustomed to using Web browsers to locate and transfer information.

  11. Space radiation protection: Destination Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco

    2014-04-01

    National space agencies are planning a human mission to Mars in the XXI century. Space radiation is generally acknowledged as a potential showstopper for this mission for two reasons: a) high uncertainty on the risk of radiation-induced morbidity, and b) lack of simple countermeasures to reduce the exposure. The need for radiation exposure mitigation tools in a mission to Mars is supported by the recent measurements of the radiation field on the Mars Science Laboratory. Shielding is the simplest physical countermeasure, but the current materials provide poor reduction of the dose deposited by high-energy cosmic rays. Accelerator-based tests of new materials can be used to assess additional protection in the spacecraft. Active shielding is very promising, but as yet not applicable in practical cases. Several studies are developing technologies based on superconducting magnetic fields in space. Reducing the transit time to Mars is arguably the best solution but novel nuclear thermal-electric propulsion systems also seem to be far from practical realization. It is likely that the first mission to Mars will employ a combination of these options to reduce radiation exposure.

  12. Network science landers for Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harri, A.M.; Marsal, O.; Lognonne, P.

    1999-01-01

    The NetLander Mission will deploy four landers to the Martian surface. Each lander includes a network science payload with instrumentation for studying the interior of Mars, the atmosphere and the subsurface, as well as the ionospheric structure and geodesy. The NetLander Mission is the first...... FMI (the Finnish Meteorological Institute), DLR (the German Space Agency), and other research institutes. According to current plans, the NetLander Mission will be launched in 2005 by means of an Ariane V launch, together with the Mars Sample Return mission. The landers will be separated from...... the spacecraft and targeted to their locations on the Martian surface several days prior to the spacecraft's arrival at Mars. The landing system employs parachutes and airbags. During the baseline mission of one Martian year, the network payloads will conduct simultaneous seismological, atmospheric, magnetic...

  13. Mars Integrated Propellant Production System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Mars In-Situ Propellant Production System (IMISPPS) is an end-to-end system that will produce rocket propellant on Mars from CO2 in the Martian...

  14. Overview of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateer, B.; Graf, J.; Zurek, R.; Jones, R.; Eisen, H.; Johnston, M.; Jai, D. B.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will deliver to Mars orbit a payload to conduct remote sensing science observations, characterize sites for future landers, and provide critical telecom/navigation relay capability for follow-on missions.

  15. Mars Integrated Propellant Production System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Mars In-Situ Propellant Production System (IMISPPS) is an end-to-end system that will produce rocket propellant on Mars from CO2 in the Martian...

  16. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) Distribution of Large Visible and Buried Impact Basins on Mars: Comparison with Free-Air Gravity, Crustal Thickness, and Magnetization Models; 2) The Early Thermal and Magnetic State of Terra Cimmeria, Southern Highlands of Mars; 3) Compatible Vector Components of the Magnetic Field of the Martian Crust; 4) Vertical Extrapolation of Mars Magnetic Potentials; 5) Rock Magnetic Fields Shield the Surface of Mars from Harmful Radiation; 6) Loading-induced Stresses near the Martian Hemispheric Dichotomy Boundary; 7) Growth of the Hemispheric Dichotomy and the Cessation of Plate Tectonics on Mars; 8) A Look at the Interior of Mars; 9) Uncertainties on Mars Interior Parameters Deduced from Orientation Parameters Using Different Radio-Links: Analytical Simulations; 10) Refinement of Phobos Ephemeris Using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimetry Radiometry.

  17. Mars Sample Transfer Testbed (MSTT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The task will assess the requirements for a testbed to study the retrieval of a Mars sample cache from the Martian surface, or from a Mars caching rover, and...

  18. Mars 2020 Planetary Protection Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Moogega; Bernard, Douglas; Benardini, James Nick; Jones, Melissa

    2016-07-01

    The Mars 2020 (M2020) flight system consists of a cruise stage; an entry, descent and landing system (EDL); and a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) powered roving science vehicle that will land on the surface of Mars. The M2020 Mission is designed to investigate key question related to the habitability of Mars and will conduct assessments that set the stage for potential future human exploration of Mars. Per its Program Level Requirements, the project will also acquire and cache samples of rock, regolith, and/or procedural "blank" samples for possible return to Earth by a subsequent mission. NASA has assigned the M2020 Mission as a Category V Restricted Earth Return due to the possible future return of collected samples. As indicated in NPR8020.12D, Section 5.3.3.2, the outbound leg of a Category V mission that could potentially return samples to Earth, Mars 2020 would be expected to meet the requirements of a Category IVb mission. The entire flight system is subject to microbial reduction requirements, with additional specific emphasis on the sample acquisition and caching. A bioburden accounting tool is being used to track the microbial population on the surfaces to ensure that the biological cleanliness requirements are met. Initial bioburden estimates based on MSL heritage allows M2020 to gauge more precisely how the bioburden is allocated throughout each hardware element. Mars 2020 has completed a Planetary Protection Plan with Planetary Implementation Plans at a mature draft form. Planetary protection sampling activities have commenced with the start of flight system fabrication and assembly. The status of the Planetary Protection activities will be reported.

  19. Cultivando el mar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Radulovich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Las conocidas y crecientes limitaciones a la agricultura, pesca y disponibilidad de agua para riego tienen pocas soluciones viables y muy probablemente se acrecentarán con el cambio climático. Para contrarrestar estos y otros problemas, estamos desarrollando con y para pobladores costeros empobrecidos, unos sistemas productivos flotantes altamente innovativos, a mar abierto, en aguas protegidas de alto oleaje -comenzando en el Golfo de Nicoya, Costa Rica, que es un sitio representativo que cubre miles de km2-. Estos sistemas de propósito múltiple, y de multi-estratos, que hemos probado por 3 años y que describimos aquí, consisten de: hortalizas orgánicas u otros cultivos de alto valor, en macetas sobre isletas o jardineras flotantes, construidas con botellas plásticas recicladas y otros materiales de bajo costo; maricultura de poco insumo bajo el agua (peces, crustáceos, otros con cultivo de algas flotando en la superficie; producción de agua dulce para riego y otros usos por destilación solar pasiva y cosecha de agua de lluvia; pesca desde las estructuras flotantes; facilidades para recreación; y, todavía por explorar, producción alternativa de energía. Se considera aquí también una variedad de aspectos relacionados con el ambiente y la biodiversidad. Estos sistemas compuestos, únicos en el mundo a la fecha, tienen una productividad general alta al sumar la productividad de todo el año de cada uno de varios componentes eco-amigables y de bajo insumo, lo cual permite optimizar la rentabilidad en función ambiental. Esperamos que, una vez que estén validados, la implementación equitativa a escala de estos nuevos sistemas proveerá a los pobladores costeros, alrededor del mundo tropical y subtropical, oportunidades para derivar su ingreso a partir de esta generación de nueva riqueza, incrementándose así y ganando en seguridad la capacidad mundial de producción de alimentos y agua, practicándose a la vez un uso de los

  20. Habitability and Biosignature Preservation in Impact-Derived Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapers, H. M.; Pontefract, A.; Osinski, G. R.; Cannon, K. M.; Mustard, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    Meteorite impacts create environments conducive to microbial colonization. Biosignatures in impact-derived materials have been characterized on Earth. Impact environments comprise candidates for biosignature detection and preservation on Mars.

  1. Updating Mars-GRAM to Increase the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, Hiliary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). During the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process, it was discovered that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear set to 0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. As a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented from work being done to derive better multipliers by including variation with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data. The addition of these more precise density factors to Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  2. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Mars" included the following reports:Tentative Theories for the Long-Term Geological and Hydrological Evolution of Mars; Stratigraphy of Special Layers Transient Ones on Permeable Ones: Examples from Earth and Mars; Spatial Analysis of Rootless Cone Groups on Iceland and Mars; Summer Season Variability of the North Residual Cap of Mars from MGS-TES; Spectral and Geochemical Characteristics of Lake Superior Type Banded Iron Formation: Analog to the Martian Hematite Outcrops; Martian Wave Structures and Their Relation to Mars; Shape, Highland-Lowland Chemical Dichotomy and Undulating Atmosphere Causing Serious Problems to Landing Spacecrafts; Shear Deformation in the Graben Systems of Sirenum Fosssae, Mars: Preliminary Results; Components of Martian Dust Finding on Terrestrial Sedimentary Deposits with Use of Infrared Spectra; Morphologic and Morphometric Analyses of Fluvial Systems in the Southern Highlands of Mars; Light Pattern and Intensity Analysis of Gray Spots Surrounding Polar Dunes on Mars; The Volume of Possible Ancient Oceanic Basins in the Northern Plains of Mars MARSES: Possibilities of Long-Term Monitoring Spatial and Temporal Variations and Changes of Subsurface Geoelectrical Section on the Base; Results of the Geophysical Survey Salt/Water Interface and Groundwater Mapping on the Marina Di Ragusa, Sicily and Shalter Island, USA ;A Miniature UV-VIS Spectrometer for the Surface of Mars; Automatic Recognition of Aeolian Ripples on Mars; Absolute Dune Ages and Implications for the Time of Formation of Gullies in Nirgal Vallis, Mars; Diurnal Dust Devil Behaviour for the Viking 1 Landing Site: Sols 1 to 30; Topography Based Surface Age Computations for Mars: A Step Toward the Formal Proof of Martian Ocean Recession, Timing and Probability; Gravitational Effects of Flooding and Filling of Impact Basins on Mars; Viking 2 Landing Site in MGS/MOC Images South Polar Residual Cap of Mars: Features, Stratigraphy, and Changes.

  3. Periodic insolation variations on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B C; Ward, W R; Yeung, S C

    1973-05-11

    Previously unrecognized insolation variations on Mars are a consequence of periodic variations in eccentricity, first established by the theory of Brouwer and Van Woerkom (1950). Such annual insolation variations, characterized by both 95,000-year and 2,000,000-year periodicities, may actually be recorded in newly discovered layered deposits in the polar regions of Mars. An additional north-south variation in seasonal insolation, but not average annual insolation, exists with 51,000-year and 2,000,000-year periodicities.

  4. The chaotic obliquity of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touma, Jihad; Wisdom, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The discovery (by Laskar, 1989, 1990) that the evolution of the solar system is chaotic, made in a numerical integration of the averaged secular approximation of the equations of motions for the planets, was confirmed by Sussman and Wisdom (1992) by direct numerical integration of the whole solar system. This paper presents results of direct integrations of the rotation of Mars in the chaotically evolved planetary system, made using the same model as that used by Sussman and Wisdom. The numerical integration shows that the obliquity of Mars undergoes large chaotic variations, which occur as the system evolves in the chaotic zone associated with a secular spin-orbit resonance.

  5. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented of the work underway to derive better multipliers by including possible variation with latitude and/or Ls. This is achieved by comparison of Mars-GRAM MapYear=0 output with TES limb data. The addition of these density factors to Mars-GRAM will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths. Answers may also be provided to the issues raised in a recent study by Desai(2008). Desai has shown that the actual landing sites of Mars Pathfinder, the Mars Exploration Rovers and the Phoenix Mars Lander have been further downrange than predicted by models prior to landing. Desai s reconstruction of their entries into the Martian atmosphere showed that the models consistently predicted higher densities than those found upon EDL. The solution of this problem would be important to the Mars Program since future exploration of Mars by landers and rovers will require more accurate landing capabilities, especially for the proposed Mars Sample Return mission.

  6. Advanced Stellar Compass - Alenia Mars Express

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilsgaard, Søren; Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif;

    1998-01-01

    This document, submitted in reply to an Alenia R.f.P., is a proposal to implement the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) in the Mars Express mission.The Mars Express is an ESA dedicated mission to Mars scientific investigation.The ASC is a very advanced instrument designed by the Space Instrumentation...

  7. Exploring Mars. Grades 5-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan; And Others

    This learning guide provides detailed information about exploring the planet Mars. The guide covers a variety of topics related to space exploration including: (1) the reasons for exploring Mars; (2) a history of the exploration of and thinking about Mars beginning with the Babylonians and continuing through the Viking missions; (3) the status of…

  8. Mission design options for human Mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, Paul D.; Braun, Robert D.; Ahn, Jaemyung; Putnam, Zachary R.

    Trajectory options for conjunction-class human Mars missions are examined, including crewed Earth-Mars trajectories with the option for abort to Earth, with the intent of serving as a resource for mission designers. An analysis of the impact of Earth and Mars entry velocities on aeroassist systems is included, and constraints are suggested for interplanetary trajectories based upon aeroassist system capabilities.

  9. Splashing on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Cota; Suzuki, Ayako; Kurita, Kei

    2008-09-01

    1 Introduction In the northern lowland regions of Mars such as Chryse Planitia and Utopia Planitia there exist several wel-preserved fresh-looking craters having distinct fluidized ejecta morphologies. They are mostly composed of two contrasting types of ejecta, One is massive and forms clear topography concentrated near the rim. The other is less massive and faintly spreading in the outer region. When they are clearly recognized, it is classified as Double Layered Ejecta crater(DLE) and they are named Inner Lobe and Outer Lobe,respectively. But sometimes Outer Lobe is faintly recognisable only in the albedo pattern or completely lacking. This suggests that the material forming the Outer Lobe is gas or liquid dominant. To understand the nature of the Outer Lobe material is a key in the exploration of the subsurface environments in the northern lowlands of Mars, where large amount of volatiles are supposed to be stored. Here we present several examples of images supporting this nature as well as experimental images simulating the formation process of Outer Lobe in the laboratory. 2 THEMIS IR Night images THEMIS-IR Night-time images have been used to characterize the nature of the ejecta materials (1,2,3). Because of the contrast of thermal inertia, night time IR image is a powerful tool to identify the morphology of the Outer Lobe even when the associated topography is so faint. Fig. 1 shows such example. The Inner Lobe is recognized as topographic high in the Day-time image. In the Night-time image, this part is characterized by bright color. The remarkable point is the splash pattern morphology. The edge of the Inner Lobe is round shaped while that of the Outer Lobe is sharp angular shaped and irregular. The Outer Lobe is composed of many slender flow units whose length seems quite heterogeneous. Sometimes the extent of the flow units exhibits anisotropic pattern while the Inner Lobe and the cavity are circular. This suggests the flow forming the Outer Lobe has

  10. The present-day heat flow structure of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parro, L. M.; Jiménez-Díaz, A.; Mansilla, F.; Ruiz, J.

    2016-12-01

    Until the arrival of in-situ measurements, the study of the current heat flow of Mars goes through indirect methods, mainly based on the relation between the thermal state of lithosphere and their mechanical strength, or on theoretical models of internal evolution. Here, we present a first-order global model for the present-day surface heat flow for Mars, based on the current radiogenic heat production of the crust and mantle, scaling heat flow variations arising from crustal thickness and topography crustal thickness variations, and on the heat flow derived from the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere beneath the North Polar Region. Our preferred model find heat flows varying between 14 and 23 mW m-2, with an average value of 18.6 mW m-2. Similar results are obtained if we use heat flow based on the lithosphere strength of the South Polar Region. Moreover, expressing our results in terms of the Urey ratio (the ratio between total internal heat production and heat loss), we have values close to 0.8, which indicates a moderate contribution of secular cooling to the heat flow of Mars (consistent with low heat flow values deduced from lithosphere strength), unless that heat-producing elements abundances for Mars are subchondritics.

  11. Present-day heat flow model of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parro, Laura M.; Jiménez-Díaz, Alberto; Mansilla, Federico; Ruiz, Javier

    2017-04-01

    Until the acquisition of in-situ measurements, the study of the present-day heat flow of Mars must rely on indirect methods, mainly based on the relation between the thermal state of the lithosphere and its mechanical strength, or on theoretical models of internal evolution. Here, we present a first-order global model for the present-day surface heat flow for Mars, based on the radiogenic heat production of the crust and mantle, on scaling of heat flow variations arising from crustal thickness and topography variations, and on the heat flow derived from the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere beneath the North Polar Region. Our preferred model finds heat flows varying between 14 and 25 mW m-2, with an average value of 19 mW m-2. Similar results (although about ten percent higher) are obtained if we use heat flow based on the lithospheric strength of the South Polar Region. Moreover, expressing our results in terms of the Urey ratio (the ratio between total internal heat production and total heat loss through the surface), we estimate values close to 0.7-0.75, which indicates a moderate contribution of secular cooling to the heat flow of Mars (consistent with the low heat flow values deduced from lithosphere strength), unless heat-producing elements abundances for Mars are subchondritic.

  12. The MARS Photon Processing Cameras for Spectral CT

    CERN Document Server

    Doesburg, Robert Michael Nicholas; Butler, APH; Renaud, PF

    This thesis is about the development of the MARS camera: a stan- dalone portable digital x-ray camera with spectral sensitivity. It is built for use in the MARS Spectral system from the Medipix2 and Medipix3 imaging chips. Photon counting detectors and Spectral CT are introduced, and Medipix is identified as a powerful new imaging device. The goals and strategy for the MARS camera are discussed. The Medipix chip physical, electronic and functional aspects, and ex- perience gained, are described. The camera hardware, firmware and supporting PC software are presented. Reports of experimental work on the process of equalisation from noise, and of tests of charge sum- ming mode, conclude the main body of the thesis. The camera has been actively used since late 2009 in pre-clinical re- search. A list of publications that derive from the use of the camera and the MARS Spectral scanner demonstrates the practical benefits already obtained from this work. Two of the publications are first- author, eight are co-authore...

  13. Present-day heat flow model of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parro, Laura M; Jiménez-Díaz, Alberto; Mansilla, Federico; Ruiz, Javier

    2017-04-03

    Until the acquisition of in-situ measurements, the study of the present-day heat flow of Mars must rely on indirect methods, mainly based on the relation between the thermal state of the lithosphere and its mechanical strength, or on theoretical models of internal evolution. Here, we present a first-order global model for the present-day surface heat flow for Mars, based on the radiogenic heat production of the crust and mantle, on scaling of heat flow variations arising from crustal thickness and topography variations, and on the heat flow derived from the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere beneath the North Polar Region. Our preferred model finds heat flows varying between 14 and 25 mW m(-2), with an average value of 19 mW m(-2). Similar results (although about ten percent higher) are obtained if we use heat flow based on the lithospheric strength of the South Polar Region. Moreover, expressing our results in terms of the Urey ratio (the ratio between total internal heat production and total heat loss through the surface), we estimate values close to 0.7-0.75, which indicates a moderate contribution of secular cooling to the heat flow of Mars (consistent with the low heat flow values deduced from lithosphere strength), unless heat-producing elements abundances for Mars are subchondritic.

  14. A Revolution in Mars Topography and Gravity and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.

    2002-01-01

    Since the arrival of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) at Mars in September 1997 and the subsequent beginning of observations of the planet there has been a constant stream of surprises and puzzling observations that have kept scientists looking at new 'out of the box' explanations. Observations of the shape and topography have shown a planet with one hemisphere, the southern, several kilometers higher than the north and a northern hemisphere that is so flat and smooth in places that it's difficult to imagine it was not once the bottom of an ocean. And yet the ocean idea presents some enormous difficulties. The measurements of gravity derived from the tracking of MGS have shown that several Mars volcanoes are enormous positive gravity anomalies much larger than we see on Earth and revealed small errors in the orbit of Mars and or Earth. And the magnetic field is found to be composed of a number of extremely large crustal anomalies; but as far as can be ascertained there is no main dipole field such as we have on Earth. Understanding these diverse observations and placing them in the sequence of the evolution of the planet will be a long, challenging but rewarding task.

  15. Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Justin N.; Thiessen, David L.; Pourangi, Ali M.; Kobzeff, Peter A.; Lee, Steven W.; Dingizian, Arsham; Schwochert, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, which launched to Mars in 2011, is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) cameras, which were sent to Mars in 2003. The engineering cameras weigh less than 300 grams each and use less than 3 W of power. Images returned from the engineering cameras are used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The hazard avoidance cameras (Haz - cams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a frame-transfer CCD (charge-coupled device) with a 1024x1024 imaging region and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer A and the other set is connected to rover computer B. The MSL rover carries 8 Hazcams and 4 Navcams.

  16. Global Geomorphometric Map of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiewicz, J.; Stepinski, T. F.

    2012-03-01

    A global geomorphometric map of Mars is generated from DEM using a novel computer algorithm. This map provides a new valuable tool for terrain analysis and objective quantification of surface units. Auto-mapping of surface units is a future application.

  17. Handling S/MAR vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Claudia; Baiker, Armin; Postberg, Jan; Ehrhardt, Anja; Lipps, Hans J

    2012-06-01

    Nonviral episomal vectors represent attractive alternatives to currently used virus-based expression systems. In the late 1990s, it was shown that a plasmid containing an expression cassette linked to a scaffold/matrix attached region (S/MAR) replicates as a low copy number episome in all cell lines tested, as well as primary cells, and can be used for the genetic modification of higher animals. Once established in the cell, the S/MAR vector replicates early during S-phase and, in the absence of selection, is stably retained in the cells for an unlimited period of time. This vector can therefore be regarded as a minimal model system for studying the epigenetic regulation of replication and functional nuclear architecture. In theory, this construct represents an almost "ideal" expression system for gene therapy. In practice, S/MAR-based vectors stably modify mammalian cells with efficiencies far below those of virus-based constructs. Consequently, they have not yet found application in gene therapy trials. Furthermore, S/MAR vector systems are not trivial to handle and several critical technical issues have to be considered when modifying these vectors for various applications.

  18. Mars Radar Opens a Planet's Third Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Radar sounder instruments orbiting Mars have looked beneath the Martian surface and opened up the third dimension for planetary exploration. The technique's success is prompting scientists to think of all the other places in the Solar System where they would like to use radar sounders. The first radar sounder at Mars was the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on the European Space Agency's Mars Express Orbiter. It has been joined by the complementary Shallow Subsurface Radar (SHARAD), operating at a different wavelength aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The data in this animation are from SHARAD.

  19. Human Mars Landing Site and Impacts on Mars Surface Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Bussey, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes NASA's initial steps for identifying and evaluating candidate Exploration Zones (EZs) and Regions of Interests (ROIs) for the first human crews that will explore the surface of Mars. NASA's current effort to define the exploration of this planet by human crews, known as the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC), provides the context in which these EZs and ROIs are being considered. The EMC spans all aspects of a human Mars mission including launch from Earth, transit to and from Mars, and operations on the surface of Mars. An EZ is a collection of ROIs located within approximately 100 kilometers of a centralized landing site. ROIs are areas relevant for scientific investigation and/or development/maturation of capabilities and resources necessary for a sustainable human presence. The EZ also contains one or more landing sites and a habitation site that will be used by multiple human crews during missions to explore and utilize the ROIs within the EZ. With the EMC as a conceptual basis, the EZ model has been refined to a point where specific site selection criteria for scientific exploration and in situ resource utilization can be defined. In 2015 these criteria were distributed to the planetary sciences community and the in situ resource utilization and civil engineering communities as part of a call for EZ proposals. The resulting "First Landing Site/Exploration Zone Workshop for Human Missions to the Surface of Mars" was held in October 2015 during which 47 proposals for EZs and ROIs were presented and discussed. Proposed locations spanned all longitudes and all allowable latitudes (+/- 50 degrees). Proposed justification for selecting one of these EZs also spanned a significant portion of the scientific and resource criteria provided to the community. Several important findings resulted from this Workshop including: (a) a strong consensus that, at a scale of 100 km (radius), multiple places on Mars exist that have both sufficient scientific interest

  20. The Athena Mars Rover Science Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squyes, S. W.; Arvidson, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Carr, M.; Christensen, P.; DesMarais, D.; Economou, T.; Gorevan, S.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Haskin, L.

    1998-01-01

    .28 mrad/pixel, nearly a factor of four higher than that of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Surveyor '98 cameras. Image compression will be performed using a wavelet compression algorithm. The Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) is a point spectrometer operating in -the thermal IR. It produces high spectral resolution (5 /cm) image cubes with a wavelength range of 5-40 gm, a nominal signal/noise ratio of 500:1, and a maximum angular resolution of 7 mrad (7 cm at a distance of 10 in). The wavelength region over which it operates samples the diagnostic fundamental absorption features of rockforming minerals, and also provides some capability to see through dust coatings that could tend to obscure spectral features. The mineralogical information that Mini-TES provides will be used to select from a distance the rocks and soils that will be investigated in more detail and ultimately sampled. Mini-TES is derived from the MO/MGS TES instrument, but is significantly smaller and simpler. The instrument uses an 8-cm Cassegrain telescope, a Michelson interferometer, and uncooled pyroelectric detectors. Along with its mineralogical capabilities, Mini-TES can provide information on the thermophysical properties of rocks and soils. Viewing upward, it can also provide temperature profiles through the martian atmospheric boundary layer. Elemental and Mineralogical Composition: Once promising samples have been identified from a distance using Pancam/Mini-TES, they will be studied in detail using up to three compositional sensors that can be placed directly against them by an Instrument Arm. The two compositional sensors, presently on the payload are an Alpha-Proton-X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), and a Mossbauer Spectrometer. The APXS is derived closely from the instrument that flew on Mars Pathfinder. Radioactive alpha sources and three detection modes (alpha, proton, and x-ray) provide elemental abundances of rocks and soils to complement and constrain mineralogical data. The Athena

  1. The Athena Mars Rover Science Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squyes, S. W.; Arvidson, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Carr, M.; Christensen, P.; DesMarais, D.; Economou, T.; Gorevan, S.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Haskin, L.

    1998-01-01

    .28 mrad/pixel, nearly a factor of four higher than that of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Surveyor '98 cameras. Image compression will be performed using a wavelet compression algorithm. The Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) is a point spectrometer operating in -the thermal IR. It produces high spectral resolution (5 /cm) image cubes with a wavelength range of 5-40 gm, a nominal signal/noise ratio of 500:1, and a maximum angular resolution of 7 mrad (7 cm at a distance of 10 in). The wavelength region over which it operates samples the diagnostic fundamental absorption features of rockforming minerals, and also provides some capability to see through dust coatings that could tend to obscure spectral features. The mineralogical information that Mini-TES provides will be used to select from a distance the rocks and soils that will be investigated in more detail and ultimately sampled. Mini-TES is derived from the MO/MGS TES instrument, but is significantly smaller and simpler. The instrument uses an 8-cm Cassegrain telescope, a Michelson interferometer, and uncooled pyroelectric detectors. Along with its mineralogical capabilities, Mini-TES can provide information on the thermophysical properties of rocks and soils. Viewing upward, it can also provide temperature profiles through the martian atmospheric boundary layer. Elemental and Mineralogical Composition: Once promising samples have been identified from a distance using Pancam/Mini-TES, they will be studied in detail using up to three compositional sensors that can be placed directly against them by an Instrument Arm. The two compositional sensors, presently on the payload are an Alpha-Proton-X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), and a Mossbauer Spectrometer. The APXS is derived closely from the instrument that flew on Mars Pathfinder. Radioactive alpha sources and three detection modes (alpha, proton, and x-ray) provide elemental abundances of rocks and soils to complement and constrain mineralogical data. The Athena

  2. Constructing an Educational Mars Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Stephen A.

    2004-01-01

    January 14th 2004, President George Bush announces his plans to catalyst the space program into a new era of space exploration and discovery. His vision encompasses a robotics program to explore our solar system, a return to the moon, the human exploration of Mars, and to promote international prosperity towards our endeavors. We at NASA now have the task of constructing this vision in a very real timeframe. I have been chosen to begin phase 1 of making this vision a reality. I will be working on creating an Educational Mars Simulation of human exploration of Mars to stimulate interest and involvement with the project from investors and the community. GRC s Computer Services Division (CSD) in collaboration with the Office of Education Programs will be designing models, constructing terrain, and programming this simulation to create a realistic portrayal of human exploration on mars. With recent and past technological breakthroughs in computing, my primary goal can be accomplished with only the aid of 3-4 software packages. Lightwave 3D is the modeling package we have selected to use for the creation of our digital objects. This includes a Mars pressurized rover, rover cockpit, landscape/terrain, and habitat. Once we have the models completed they need textured so Photoshop and Macromedia Fireworks are handy for bringing these objects to life. Before directly importing all of this data into a simulation environment, it is necessary to first render a stunning animation of the desired final product. This animation with represent what we hope to capture out of the simulation and it will include all of the accessories like ray-tracing, fog effects, shadows, anti-aliasing, particle effects, volumetric lighting, and lens flares. Adobe Premier will more than likely be used for video editing and adding ambient noises and music. Lastly, V-Tree is the real-time 3D graphics engine which will facilitate our realistic simulation. Additional information is included in the

  3. Manned mars mission enhancements using Pratt & Whitney escort combined propulsion and power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Russell; Feller, Gerald J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the cost implications to manned Mars missions when a nuclear thermal combined propulsion and power unit is used for main propulsion and mission power. The paper uses a series of mission opportunities during the NASA DRM focus period and looks at how a NTR (Nuclear Thermal Rocket) can be used to increase the Mars mission payload delivery capability and mission flexibility across the entire mission spectrum. In propulsive mode, a nuclear reactor is used to heat hot hydrogen, which is expanded through a converging/diverging nozzle to generate thrust. Heat pickup in the nozzle and the radial beryllium reflectors is used to drive the turbomachinery in the ESCORT expander cycle. In electrical mode, the reactor is used to heat a mixture of helium and xenon to drive a closed-loop Brayton cycle in order to generate electrical energy. A Mars transportation system integrated performance methodology was developed to assess the sensitivity to weight, thrust and impulse to the Mars conjunction class mission requirements. Propellant tanks, propulsion system mass, shielding, and Brayton cycle power conversion unit requirements were included in this evaluation. This paper examines how the design characteristics of the ESCORT derivative propulsion and power system affect the mission payload capability and the earth launch vehicle design requirements. The same reactor design is also used for Mars surface power reactor, delivered as payload by the ESCORT derivative powered Mars transfer stage. Trade curves of mission mass and payload are presented.

  4. Carl Sagan and the Exploration of Mars and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Inspired by childhood readings of books by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Carl Sagan's first interest in planetary science focused on Mars and Venus. Typical of much of his career he was skeptical of early views about these planets. Early in this century it was thought that the Martian wave of darkening, a seasonal albedo change on the planet, was biological in origin. He suggested instead that it was due to massive dust storms, as was later shown to be the case. He was the first to recognize that Mars has huge topography gradients across its surface. During the spacecraft era, as ancient river valleys were found on the planet, he directed studies of Mars' ancient climate. He suggested that changes in the planets orbit were involved in climate shifts on Mars, just as they are on Earth. Carl had an early interest in Venus. Contradictory observations led to a controversy about the surface temperature, and Carl was one of the first to recognize that Venus has a massive greenhouse effect at work warming its surface. His work on radiative transfer led to an algorithm that was extensively used by modelers of the Earth's climate and whose derivatives still dominate the calculation of radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres today. Carl inspired a vast number of young scientists through his enthusiasm for new ideas and discoveries, his skeptical approach, and his boundless energy. I had the privilege to work in Carl's laboratory during the peak of the era of Mars' initial exploration. It was an exciting time, and place. Carl made it a wonderful experience.

  5. Thermodynamic model of Mars Oxygen ISRU Experiment (MOXIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyen, Forrest E.; Hecht, Michael H.; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.

    2016-12-01

    As humankind expands its footprint in the solar system, it is increasingly important to make use of the resources already in our solar system to make these missions economically feasible and sustainable. In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), the science of using resources at a destination to support exploration missions, unlocks potential destinations by significantly reducing the amount of resources that need to be launched from Earth. Carbon dioxide is an example of an in-situ resource that comprises 96% of the Martian atmosphere and can be used as a source of oxygen for propellant and life support systems. The Mars Oxygen ISRU Experiment (MOXIE) is a payload being developed for NASA's upcoming Mars 2020 rover. MOXIE will produce oxygen from the Martian atmosphere using solid oxide electrolysis (SOXE). MOXIE is on the order of magnitude of a 1% scale model of an oxygen processing plant that might enable a human expedition to Mars in the 2030s through the production of the oxygen needed for the propellant of a Mars ascent vehicle. MOXIE is essentially an energy conversion system that draws energy from the Mars 2020 rover's radioisotope thermoelectric generator and ultimately converts it to stored energy in oxygen and carbon monoxide molecules. A thermodynamic model of this novel system is used to understand this process in order to derive operating parameters for the experiment. This paper specifically describes the model of the SOXE component. Assumptions and idealizations are addressed, including 1D and 2D simplifications. Operating points are discussed as well as impacts of flow rates and production.

  6. Demonstrating the Elliptical Orbit of Mars using Naked Eye Data

    CERN Document Server

    Krisciunas, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Over the course of eleven months we determined the position of Mars on 45 occasions using a handheld cross staff and two to five bright reference stars of known right ascension and declination on each occasion. On average the observed positions are within 12 arc minutes of the true positions. Given that we took data prior to the start of retrograde motion and well past the end of retrograde motion, we can easily derive the date of opposition to the Sun. We were able to derive the date of perihelion, the orbital eccentricity, and the semi-major axis size of Mars' orbit. We obtain a value of the eccentricity of 0.086 +/- 0.010, which is to be compared to the modern value of 0.0934. Values as low as 0.053 or as high as 0.123 can be rejected at a high confidence level. A simple dataset can be obtained with cardboard and a ruler that demonstrates the elliptical shape of Mars' orbit.

  7. Compositions of Mars Rocks: SNC Meteorites, Differentiates, and Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Minitti, M.; Weitz, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    The 13 samples from Mars identified in the terrestrial meteorite collections vary from dunite to pyroxenite to microgabbro or basalt. All of these rocks appear to have formed from primitive melts with similar major element compositional characteristics; i.e., FeO-rich and Al2O3-Poor melts relative to terrestrial basalt compositions. Although all of the SNC rocks can be derived by melting of the same Al-depleted mantle, contamination of SNC's by a Rb-enriched mantle or crustal source is required to explain the different REE characteristics of SNC rocks. Thus, there are indications of an old crustal rocktype on Mars, and this rock does not appear to have been sampled. This paper focuses primarily on the composition of the SNC basalts, however, and on the compositions of rocks which could be derived from SNC basaltic melt by magmatic processes. In particular, we consider the possible compositions which could be achieved through accumulation of early-formed crystals in the SNC primitive magma. Through a set of experiments we have determined (1) melt (magma) compositions which could be produced by melt evolution as crystals are removed from batches of this magma cooling at depth, and (2) which evolved (Si02enriched, MgO-depleted) rock compositions could be produced from the SNC magma, and how these compare with the Pathfinder andesite composition. Finally, we compare the SNC magma compositions to the Mars soil composition in order to determine whether any source other than SNC is required.

  8. The Mars Color Imager (MARCI) on the Mars Climate Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, M. C.; Calvin, W.; Clancy, R. T.; Haberle, R. M.; James, P. B.; Lee, S. W.; Thomas, P. C.; Caplinger, M. A.

    2001-08-01

    The Mars Color Imager, or MARCI, experiment on the Mars Climate Orbiter (MCO) consists of two cameras with unique optics and identical focal plane assemblies (FPAs), Data Acquisition System (DAS) electronics, and power supplies. Each camera is characterized by small physical size and mass (~6 × 6 × 12 cm, including baffle; case downlink data rate. Under better downlink conditions the WA will provide kilometer-scale global maps of atmospheric phenomena such as clouds, hazes, dust storms, and the polar hood. Limb observations will provide additional detail on atmospheric structure at 13 scale-height resolution. The Medium Angle (MA) camera is designed to study selected areas of Mars at regional scale. From 400 km altitude its 6° FOV, which covers ~40 km at 40 m/pixel, will permit all locations on the planet except the poles to be accessible for image acquisitions every two mapping cycles (roughly 52 sols). Eight spectral channels between 425 and 1000 nm provide the ability to discriminate both atmospheric and surface features on the basis of composition. The primary science objectives of MARCI are to (1) observe Martian atmospheric processes at synoptic scales and mesoscales, (2) study details of the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface at a variety of scales in both space and time, and (3) examine surface features characteristic of the evolution of the Martian climate over time. MARCI will directly address two of the three high-level goals of the Mars Surveyor Program: Climate and Resources. Life, the third goal, will be addressed indirectly through the environmental factors associated with the other two goals.

  9. Emirates Mars Mission (EMM) Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, Omran; Amiri, Sarah; AlMheiri, Suhail; Alrais, Adnan; Wali, Mohammad; AlShamsi, Zakareyya; AlQasim, Ibrahim; AlHarmoodi, Khuloud; AlTeneiji, Nour; Almatroushi, Hessa; AlShamsi, Maryam; AlAwadhi, Mohsen; McGrath, Michael; Withnell, Pete; Ferrington, Nicolas; Reed, Heather; Landin, Brett; Ryan, Sean; Pramann, Brian

    2017-04-01

    United Arab Emirates (UAE) has entered the space exploration race with the announcement of Emirates Mars Mission (EMM), the first Arab Islamic mission to another planet, in 2014. Through this mission, UAE is to send an unmanned probe, called Hope probe, to be launched in summer 2020 and reach Mars by 2021 to coincide with UAE's 50th anniversary. Through a sequence of subsequent maneuvers, the spacecraft will enter a large science orbit that has a periapsis altitude of 20,000 km, an apoapsis altitude of 43,000 km, and an inclination of 25 degrees. The mission is designed to (1) characterize the state of the Martian lower atmosphere on global scales and its geographic, diurnal and seasonal variability, (2) correlate rates of thermal and photochemical atmospheric escape with conditions in the collisional Martian atmosphere, and (3) characterize the spatial structure and variability of key constituents in the Martian exosphere. These objectives will be met by four investigations with diurnal variability on sub-seasonal timescales which are (1) determining the three-dimensional thermal state of the lower atmosphere, (2) determining the geographic and diurnal distribution of key constituents in the lower atmosphere, (3) determining the abundance and spatial variability of key neutral species in the thermosphere, and (4) determining the three-dimensional structure and variability of key species in the exosphere. EMM will collect these information about the Mars atmospheric circulation and connections through a combination of three distinct instruments that image Mars in the visible, thermal infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths and they are the Emirates eXploration Imager (EXI), the Emirates Mars InfraRed Spectrometer (EMIRS), and the EMM Mars Ultraviolet Spectrometer (EMUS). EMM has passed its Mission Concept Review (MCR), System Requirements Review (SRR), System Design Review (SDR), and Preliminary Design Review (PDR) phases. The mission is led by Emiratis from Mohammed

  10. Curation of Samples from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, D.; Allen, C.

    One of the strong scientific reasons for returning samples from Mars is to search for evidence of current or past life in the samples. Because of the remote possibility that the samples may contain life forms that are hazardous to the terrestrial biosphere, the National Research Council has recommended that all samples returned from Mars be kept under strict biological containment until tests show that they can safely be released to other laboratories. It is possible that Mars samples may contain only scarce or subtle traces of life or prebiotic chemistry that could readily be overwhelmed by terrestrial contamination. Thus, the facilities used to contain, process, and analyze samples from Mars must have a combination of high-level biocontainment and organic / inorganic chemical cleanliness that is unprecedented. We have been conducting feasibility studies and developing designs for a facility that would be at least as capable as current maximum containment BSL-4 (BioSafety Level 4) laboratories, while simultaneously maintaining cleanliness levels exceeding those of the cleanest electronics manufacturing labs. Unique requirements for the processing of Mars samples have inspired a program to develop handling techniques that are much more precise and reliable than the approach (currently used for lunar samples) of employing gloved human hands in nitrogen-filled gloveboxes. Individual samples from Mars are expected to be much smaller than lunar samples, the total mass of samples returned by each mission being 0.5- 1 kg, compared with many tens of kg of lunar samples returned by each of the six Apollo missions. Smaller samp les require much more of the processing to be done under microscopic observation. In addition, the requirements for cleanliness and high-level containment would be difficult to satisfy while using traditional gloveboxes. JSC has constructed a laboratory to test concepts and technologies important to future sample curation. The Advanced Curation

  11. Detecting refractory organic matter on Mars: how derivatization will help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissinet, C.; Kashyap, S.; Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Brault, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    The search for organic molecules on Mars can provide important first clues of extinct or extant biota on the planet. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) is currently the most relevant space-compatible analytical tool for the detection of organics. Nevertheless, GC separation is intrinsically restricted to volatile molecules, and a lot of the molecules of exobiological interest are refractory or polar. To analyze these organics such as amino acids, nucleobases and carboxylic acids, an additional derivatization step is required to transform them into volatile derivatives that are amenable to GC analysis. As part of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover which successfully landed on Mars on August 5, 2012, a single-step protocol of extraction and chemical derivatization with the silylating reagent N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide MTBSTFA has been developed to reach a wide range of astrobiology-relevant refractory organic molecules. Seven cups on SAM are devoted to MTBSTFA derivatization. However, this chemical reaction adds a protective silyl group in place of each labile hydrogen, which make the molecule non-identifiable in common mass spectra libraries. We thus created an extended library of mass spectra of derivatized compounds of interest, considering their potential occurrence in Mars soils. We then looked specifically at these compounds using the existing and the newly created library, in various Mars analog soils. To enable a more accurate interpretation of the in situ derivatization GC-MS results that will be obtained by SAM, the lab experiments are performed in the restrictive conditions of the SAM flight instrument. First experiments display promising results, the system permitting an extraction and detection of several proteinic amino and carboxylic acids from Martian representative matrices. Preliminary results show a lack of derivatized organic molecules in

  12. A Little Vacation on Mars: Mars Simulation Microbial Challenge Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, P.; Todd, P.; Van De Camp, J.; Northup, D.; Spilde, M.

    2008-06-01

    Communities of microbial organisms isolated from a variety of extreme environments were subjected to 1 to 5 weeks of simulated Martian environmental conditions using the Mars Environment Simulation Chamber at the Techshot, Inc. facility in Greenville, Indiana. The goal of the overall experiment program was to assess survival of test Earth organisms under Mars full spectrum sunlight, low-latitude daily temperature profile and various Mars-atmosphere pressures (~50 mbar to 500 mbar, 100% CO2) and low moisture content. Organisms surviving after 5 weeks at 100 mbar included those from gypsum surface fracture communities in a Permian aged evaporite basin, desert varnish on andesite lavas around a manganese mine, and iron and manganese oxidizing organisms isolated from two caves in Mew Mexico. Phylogenetic DNA analysis revealed strains of cyanobacteria, bacterial genera (present in all surviving communities) Asticacaulis, Achromobacter, Comamonas, Pantoea, Verrucomicrobium, Bacillus, Gemmatimonas, Actinomyces, and others. At least one microcolonial fungal strain from a desert varnish community and at least one strain from Utah survived simulations. Strains related to the unusual cave bacterial group Bacteroidetes are present in survivor communities that resist isolation into pure culture implying that their consortial relationships may be critical to their survival.

  13. Olivine and pyroxene diversity in the crust of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, J F; Poulet, F; Gendrin, A; Bibring, J-P; Langevin, Y; Gondet, B; Mangold, N; Bellucci, G; Altieri, F

    2005-03-11

    Data from the Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces, et l'Activité (OMEGA) on the Mars Express spacecraft identify the distinct mafic, rock-forming minerals olivine, low-calcium pyroxene (LCP), and high-calcium pyroxene (HCP) on the surface of Mars. Olivine- and HCP-rich regions are found in deposits that span the age range of geologic units. However, LCP-rich regions are found only in the ancient Noachian-aged units, which suggests that melts for these deposits were derived from a mantle depleted in aluminum and calcium. Extended dark regions in the northern plains exhibit no evidence of strong mafic absorptions or absorptions due to hydrated materials.

  14. Geoscience in Support of a Mars Methane Analogue Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Alexandre

    The Mars Methane Analogue Mission, funded by the Canadian Space Agency through its Analogue Missions program, simulates a Mars rover mission whose purpose is to detect, analyse, and determine the source of methane emissions on the planet's surface. As part of this project, both an electromagnetic induction sounder (EMIS) and a high-resolution triangulation-based 3D laser scanner were tested in the field to demonstrate the benefit of including these instruments on future rover missions. EMIS data was inverted in order to derive information on the conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of the near subsurface. 3D laser scanner data was processed with fracture detection as a goal in order to simplify the search for areas of potential methane seepage. Both instruments were found to be very valuable for future rover missions of this type.

  15. Charged particle spectra measured during the transit to Mars with the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehresmann, Bent; Hassler, Donald M.; Zeitlin, Cary; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Appel, Jan K.; Brinza, David E.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Böttcher, Stephan I.; Burmeister, Sönke; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Böhm, Eckart; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) started its 253-day cruise to Mars on November 26, 2011. During cruise the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), situated on board the Curiosity rover, conducted measurements of the energetic-particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. This environment consists mainly of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), as well as secondary particles created by interactions of these GCRs with the spacecraft. The RAD measurements can serve as a proxy for the radiation environment a human crew would encounter during a transit to Mars, for a given part of the solar cycle, assuming that a crewed vehicle would have comparable shielding. The measurements of radiological quantities made by RAD are important in themselves, and, the same data set allow for detailed analysis of GCR-induced particle spectra inside the spacecraft. This provides important inputs for the evaluation of current transport models used to model the free-space (and spacecraft) radiation environment for different spacecraft shielding and different times in the solar cycle. Changes in these conditions can lead to significantly different radiation fields and, thus, potential health risks, emphasizing the need for validated transport codes. Here, we present the first measurements of charged particle fluxes inside a spacecraft during the transit from Earth to Mars. Using data obtained during the last two month of the cruise to Mars (June 11-July 14, 2012), we have derived detailed energy spectra for low-Z particles stopping in the instrument's detectors, as well as integral fluxes for penetrating particles with higher energies. Furthermore, we analyze the temporal changes in measured proton fluxes during quiet solar periods (i.e., when no solar energetic particle events occurred) over the duration of the transit (December 9, 2011-July 14, 2012) and correlate them with changing heliospheric conditions.

  16. Charged particle spectra measured during the transit to Mars with the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehresmann, Bent; Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Appel, Jan K; Brinza, David E; Rafkin, Scot C R; Böttcher, Stephan I; Burmeister, Sönke; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Böhm, Eckart; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) started its 253-day cruise to Mars on November 26, 2011. During cruise the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), situated on board the Curiosity rover, conducted measurements of the energetic-particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. This environment consists mainly of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), as well as secondary particles created by interactions of these GCRs with the spacecraft. The RAD measurements can serve as a proxy for the radiation environment a human crew would encounter during a transit to Mars, for a given part of the solar cycle, assuming that a crewed vehicle would have comparable shielding. The measurements of radiological quantities made by RAD are important in themselves, and, the same data set allow for detailed analysis of GCR-induced particle spectra inside the spacecraft. This provides important inputs for the evaluation of current transport models used to model the free-space (and spacecraft) radiation environment for different spacecraft shielding and different times in the solar cycle. Changes in these conditions can lead to significantly different radiation fields and, thus, potential health risks, emphasizing the need for validated transport codes. Here, we present the first measurements of charged particle fluxes inside a spacecraft during the transit from Earth to Mars. Using data obtained during the last two month of the cruise to Mars (June 11-July 14, 2012), we have derived detailed energy spectra for low-Z particles stopping in the instrument's detectors, as well as integral fluxes for penetrating particles with higher energies. Furthermore, we analyze the temporal changes in measured proton fluxes during quiet solar periods (i.e., when no solar energetic particle events occurred) over the duration of the transit (December 9, 2011-July 14, 2012) and correlate them with changing heliospheric conditions.

  17. Searching for life on Mars: selection of molecular targets for ESA's aurora ExoMars mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, John; Cullen, David; Sims, Mark R; Bowden, Stephen; Cockell, Charles S; Court, Richard; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Gaubert, Francois; Grant, William; Parro, Victor; Rohmer, Michel; Sephton, Mark; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Steele, Andrew; Toporski, Jan; Vago, Jorge

    2007-08-01

    The European Space Agency's ExoMars mission will seek evidence of organic compounds of biological and non-biological origin at the martian surface. One of the instruments in the Pasteur payload may be a Life Marker Chip that utilizes an immunoassay approach to detect specific organic molecules or classes of molecules. Therefore, it is necessary to define and prioritize specific molecular targets for antibody development. Target compounds have been selected to represent meteoritic input, fossil organic matter, extant (living, recently dead) organic matter, and contamination. Once organic molecules are detected on Mars, further information is likely to derive from the detailed distribution of compounds rather than from single molecular identification. This will include concentration gradients beneath the surface and gradients from generic to specific compounds. The choice of biomarkers is informed by terrestrial biology but is wide ranging, and nonterrestrial biology may be evident from unexpected molecular distributions. One of the most important requirements is to sample where irradiation and oxidation are minimized, either by drilling or by using naturally excavated exposures. Analyzing regolith samples will allow for the search of both extant and fossil biomarkers, but sequential extraction would be required to optimize the analysis of each of these in turn.

  18. Evolution of the rheological structure of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Shintaro; Katayama, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of Mars has been greatly influenced by temporal changes in its rheological structure, which may explain the difference in tectonics between Mars and Earth. Some previous studies have shown the rheological structures of Mars calculated from the flow law of rocks and the predicted thermal structure. However, the Peierls mechanism, which is the dominant deformation mechanism at relatively low temperature, and the evolution of water reservoirs on Mars were not considered in such studies. In this paper, we apply the Peierls mechanism to refine the rheological structure of Mars to show a new history of the planet that considers the most recent reports on its evolution of water reservoirs. Considering the Peierls creep and the evolution of water reservoirs, we attempt to explain why the tectonics of Mars is inactive compared with that of Earth. On early Mars, the lithospheric thickness inferred from the brittle-ductile transition was small, and the lithospheric strength was low ( 200-300 MPa) under wet conditions at 4 Gya. This suggests that plate boundaries could have developed on the early "wet" Mars, which is a prerequisite for the operation of plate tectonics. Our results also imply that the lithospheric strength had significantly increased in the Noachian owing to water loss. Therefore, plate tectonics may have ceased or could no longer be initiated on Mars. At the least, the tectonic style of Mars would have dramatically changed during the Noachian.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Astrobiology and the Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Garvin, James B.; Drake, B. G.; Beaty, David

    2010-01-01

    In March 2007, the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) chartered the Human Exploration of Mars Science Analysis Group (HEM-SAG), co-chaired by J. B. Garvin and J. S. Levine and consisting of about 30 Mars scientists from the U.S. and Europe. HEM-SAG was one of a half dozen teams charted by NASA to consider the human exploration of Mars. Other teams included: Mars Entry, Descent and Landing, Human Health and Performance, Flight and Surface Systems, and Heliospheric/Astrophysics. The results of these Mars teams and the development of an architecture for the human exploration of Mars were summarized in two recent publications: Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0, NASA Special Publication-2009-566 (B. G. Drake, Editor), 100 pages, July 2009 and Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0, NASA Special Publication-2009-566 Addendum (B. G. Drake, Editor), 406 pages, July 2009. This presentation summarizes the HEM-SAG conclusions on astrobiology and the search for life on Mars by humans.

  20. Photovoltaic Cell Operation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Kerslake, Thomas; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Scheiman, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The Martian surface environment provides peculiar challenges for the operation of solar arrays: low temperature, solar flux with a significant scattered component that varies in intensity and spectrum with the amount of suspended atmospheric dust, and the possibility of performance loss due to dust deposition on the array surface. This paper presents theoretical analyses of solar cell performance on the surface of Mars and measurements of cells under Martian conditions.

  1. CMEs at Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, T. V.; Vennerstrom, S.; Taktakishvili, A.; Pulkkinen, A.; Brain, D. A.; Delory, G. T.; Mitchell, D.

    2010-12-01

    We perform a survey of the longitudinal extent and general nature of fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) identifiable at both Mars and Earth and use the ENLIL Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic model to replicate data for the CMEs at both planets. We have chosen 18 fast CMEs with initial velocities, according to the SOHO/LASCO catalogue, between 1200 and 2700 km/s in the period 2001-2003. CME arrival is identified at Earth by sharp increases in velocity, density and magnetic field strength in data compiled from the ACE,WIND and Geotail spacecraft, while CME arrival at Mars is identified by a large increase in magnetic field strength and by increases in the background countrate of the Electron Reflectometer (ER) instrument on Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The ER backgrounds are used to determine the presence of Solar Energetic Particles related to fast CMEs. We run ENLIL using two different sets of input parameters, both estimated from SOHO/LASCO images, but one set is estimated manually and one set is estimated using an automated method. Specific parameters of interest are arrival time, longitudinal span, and propagation direction of the CMEs. At Earth the velocity, density and magnetic field strength are compared to Omni data, while at Mars the solar wind dynamic pressure is compared to an upstream pressure proxy estimated from magnetic field data from MGS. A qualitative estimate of the usefulness of ENLIL in CME modeling will be given, as well as a comparison of the effectiveness of the two methods used to find input parameters for the model.

  2. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  3. The nitrogen cycle on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    1989-01-01

    Nirtogen is an essential element for the evolution of life, because it is found in a variety of biologically important molecules. Therefore, N is an important element to study from a exobiological perspective. In particular, fixed nitrogen is the biologically useful form of nitrogen. Fixed nitrogen is generally defines as NH3, NH4(+), NO(x), or N that is chemically bound to either inorganic or organic molecules, and releasable by hydrolysis to NH3 or NH4(+). On Earth, the vast majority of nitrogen exists as N2 in the atmosphere, and not in the fixes form. On early Mars the same situations probably existed. The partial pressure of N2 on early Mars was thought to be 18 mb, significantly less than that of Earth. Dinitrogen can be fixed abiotically by several mechanisms. These mechanisms include thernal shock from meteoritic infall and lightning, as well as the interaction of light and sand containing TiO2 which produces NH3 that would be rapidly destroyed by photolysis and reaction with OH radicals. These mechanisms could have been operative on primitive Mars.The chemical processes effecting these compounds and possible ways of fixing or burying N in the Martian environment are described. Data gathered in this laboratory suggest that the low abundance of nitrogen along (compared to primitive Earth) may not significantly deter the origin and early evolution of a nitrogen utilizing organisms. However, the conditions on current Mars with respect to nitrogen are quite different, and organisms may not be able to utilize all of the available nitrogen.

  4. Medical Archive Recording System (MARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Tajvidi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In this talk, one of the most efficient, and reliable integrated tools for CD/DVD production workflow, called Medical Archive Recording System (MARS by ETIAM Company, France, which is a leader in multimedia connectivity for healthcare in Europe, is going to be introduced. "nThis tool is used to record all patient studies, route the studies to printers and PACS automatically, print key images and associated reports and log all study production for automated post processing/archiving. Its benefits vary from multi-departmental system to highly customizability, IHE compliancy, high productivity, inclusion of workflow manager and web interface."nAn automated user-friendly DICOM viewer is in-cluded in this tool, which is used to display reports and key image. It also allows comparing several stu-dies on several discs."nThe viewer supports all DICOM objects including compressed images such as JPEG, JPEG 2000, RLE etc. and video added-value non-image DICOM ob-jects."nThe ETIAM MARS is offered in two versions: MARS 15d for medium productions and MARS 20d for medium to large productions. Some of the new features that are added are supports for Windows Vista, support of new DICOM objects (enhanced CT, MR, XA, Encapsulated PDF ... IHE PDI update, creation of object keys for key images; importing non-standard reports form files and many other features."nThe tool enables users to create, verify and index CDs and DVDs by simply sending studies from any DICOM node.

  5. The Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Surveyor (ARES): New Mars Science to Reduce Human Risk and Prepare for the Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Croom, Mark A.; Wright, Henry S.; Killough, B. D.; Edwards, W. C.

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining critical measurements for eventual human Mars missions while expanding upon recent Mars scientific discoveries and deriving new scientific knowledge from a unique near surface vantage point is the focus of the Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Surveyor (ARES) exploration mission. The key element of ARES is an instrumented,rocket-powered, well-tested robotic airplane platform, that will fly between one to two kilometers above the surface while traversing hundreds of kilometers to collect and transmit previously unobtainable high spatial measurements relevant to the NASA Mars Exploration Program and the exploration of Mars by humans.

  6. The Climate of Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordsworth, Robin D.

    2016-06-01

    The nature of the early martian climate is one of the major unanswered questions of planetary science. Key challenges remain, but a new wave of orbital and in situ observations and improvements in climate modeling have led to significant advances over the past decade. Multiple lines of geologic evidence now point to an episodically warm surface during the late Noachian and early Hesperian periods 3-4 Ga. The low solar flux received by Mars in its first billion years and inefficiency of plausible greenhouse gases such as CO2 mean that the steady-state early martian climate was likely cold. A denser CO2 atmosphere would have caused adiabatic cooling of the surface and hence migration of water ice to the higher-altitude equatorial and southern regions of the planet. Transient warming caused melting of snow and ice deposits and a temporarily active hydrological cycle, leading to erosion of the valley networks and other fluvial features. Precise details of the warming mechanisms remain unclear, but impacts, volcanism, and orbital forcing all likely played an important role. The lack of evidence for glaciation across much of Mars's ancient terrain suggests the late Noachian surface water inventory was not sufficient to sustain a northern ocean. Though mainly inhospitable on the surface, early Mars may nonetheless have presented significant opportunities for the development of microbial life.

  7. Human Mars Mission Contamination Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupisella, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    A potential challenge for a human Mars mission is that while humans are by most measures the obvious best way to search for life on Mars, we may also be the most problematic in that we could unduly compromise the search for life by contaminating relevant environments and/or possibly adversely and irreversibly affecting indigenous life. Perhaps more problematic is the fundamental epistemic challenge of the "one data point" limitation which could decrease confidence in applying terrestrially based research to extraterrestrial life issues in general. An informal decision tree is presented as one way to begin thinking about contamination issues. There are many sub-questions and distinctions not shown such as biological vs. nonbiological (but biologically relevant) contamination, viable vs. dead organisms, masking indigenous organisms vs. merely making the search more difficult, and independent origin vs. panspermia distinctions. While it may be unlikely that terrestrial microbes could survive on Mars, let alone reproduce and unduly compromise the search for life, the unpredictable potential for microbial life to survive, grow exponentially, evolve and modify (and sometimes destroy) environments, warrants focusing carefully on biologically relevant contamination as we prepare to send humans to the first planet that may have indigenous life-forms.

  8. Cold Ion Escape from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Wei, Y.; Morgan, D.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.; Fedorov, A.

    2013-09-01

    It has always been challenging to observe the flux of ions with energies of less than 10eV escaping from the planetary ionospheres. We here report on new measurements of the ionospheric ion flows at Mars by the ASPERA-3 experiment on board Mars Express in combination with the MARSIS radar experiment. We first compare calculations of the mean ion flux observed by ASPERA-3 alone with previously published results. We then combine observations of the cold ion velocity by ASPERA-3 with observations of the cold plasma density by MARSIS since ASPERA-3 misses the cold core of the ion distribution. We show that the mean density of the nightside plasma observed by MARSIS is about two orders higher than observed by ASPERA-3 (Fig.1). Combining both datasets we show that the main escape channel is along the shadow boundary on the tailside of Mars (Fig. 2). At a distance of about 0.5 R_M the flux settles at a constant value (Fig. 3) which indicates that about half of the transterminator ionospheric flow escapes from the planet. Possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside or momentum transfer from the solar wind via the induced magnetic field since the flow velocity is in the Alfvénic regime.

  9. Dynamical Modeling of Mars' Paleoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark I.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes work undertaken under a one-year grant from the NASA Mars Fundamental Research Program. The goal of the project was to initiate studies of the response of the Martian climate to changes in planetary obliquity and orbital elements. This work was undertaken with a three-dimensional numerical climate model based on the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Skyhi General Circulation Model (GCM). The Mars GCM code was adapted to simulate various obliquity and orbital parameter states. Using a version of the model with a basic water cycle (ice caps, vapor, and clouds), we examined changes in atmospheric water abundances and in the distribution of water ice sheets on the surface. This work resulted in a paper published in the Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets. In addition, the project saw the initial incorporation of a regolith water transport and storage scheme into the model. This scheme allows for interaction between water in the pores of the near subsurface (<3m) and the atmosphere. This work was not complete by the end of the one-year grant, but is now continuing within the auspices of a three-year grant of the same title awarded by the Mars Fundamental Research Program in late 2003.

  10. How to Snowboard on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwaine, J.; Diniega, S.; Hansen, C. J.; Bourke, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Long, narrow grooves found on the slopes of martian sand dunes havebeen cited as evidence of liquid water via the hypothesis thatmelt-water initiated debris flows eroded channels and depositedlateral levées. However, this theory has several short-comings forexplaining the observed morphology and activity of these lineargullies. We present an alternative hypothesis that is consistent withthe observed morphology, location, and current activity: that blocksof carbon dioxide ice break from over-steepened cornices assublimation processes destabilize the surface in the spring, and theseblocks move downslope, carving out levéed grooves of relativelyuniform width and forming terminal pits. To test this hypothesis, wedescribe experiments involving water and carbon dioxide blocks onterrestrial dunes and then compare results with the martianfeatures. We present a theoretical model of the initiation of blockmotion due to sublimation and use this to quantitatively compare theexpected behavior of blocks on the Earth and Mars. The modeldemonstrates that carbon dioxide blocks can be expected to move viaour proposed mechanism on the Earth and Mars, and the experiments showthat the motion of these blocks will naturally create the mainmorphological features of linear gullies seen on Mars.

  11. ISRU in the Context of Future European Human Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. M.; Tomatis, C.

    2002-01-01

    ISRU or In-Situ Resource Utilisation is the use of Martian resources to manufacture, typically, life support consumables (e.g. water, oxygen, breathing buffer gases), and propellant for a return journey to Earth. European studies have shown that some 4kg of reaction mass must be launched to LEO to send 1kg payload to Mars orbit, with landing on the Mars surface reducing payload mass still further. This results in very high transportation costs to Mars, and still higher costs for returning payloads to Earth. There is therefore a major incentive to reduce payload mass for any form of Mars return mission (human or otherwise) by generating consumables on the surface. ESA through its GSTP programme has been investigating the system level design of a number of mission elements as potential European contributions to an international human Mars exploration mission intended for the 2020-2030 timeframe. One of these is an ISRU plant, a small chemical factory to convert feedstock brought from Earth (hydrogen), and Martian atmospheric gases (CO2 and trace quantities of nitrogen and argon) into methane and oxygen propellant for Earth return and life support consumables, in advance of the arrival of astronauts. ISRU technology has been the subject of much investigation around the world, but little detailed research or system level studies have been reported in Europe. Furthermore, the potential applicability of European expertise, technology and sub- system studies to Martian ISRU is not well quantified. Study work covered in this paper has compared existing designs (e.g. NASA's Design Reference Mission, DLR and Mars Society studies) with the latest ESA derived requirements for human Mars exploration, and has generated a system level ISRU design. This paper will review and quantify the baseline chemical reactions essential for ISRU, including CO2 collection and purification, Sabatier reduction of CO2 with hydrogen to methane and water, and electrolysis of water in the context of

  12. Circadian rhythm of autonomic cardiovascular control during Mars500 simulated mission to Mars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vigo, Daniel E; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Ogrinz, Barbara; Wan, Li; Simonelli, Guido; Bersenev, Evgeny; Van Den Bergh, Omer; Aubert, André E

    2013-01-01

    The Mars500 project was conceived to gather knowledge about the psychological and physiological effects of living in an enclosed environment during 520 d as would be required for a real mission to Mars...

  13. Landscapes of Mars A Visual Tour

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Gregory L

    2008-01-01

    Landscapes of Mars is essentially a picture book that provides a visual tour of Mars. All the major regions and topographical features will be shown and supplemented with chapter introductions and extended captions. In a way, think of it as a visual tourist guide. Other topics covered are Martian uplands on the order of the elevation of Mt. Everest, Giant volcanoes and a rift system, the Grand Canyon of Mars, craters and the absence of craters over large regions (erosion), and wind shadows around craters, sand dunes, and dust devils. The book includes discussions on the search for water (braided channels, seepage, sedimentary layering, etc.) as well as on the Viking mission search for life, Mars meteorite fossil bacteria controversy, and planetary protection in future missions. The book concludes with an exciting gallery of the best 3D images of Mars making the book a perfect tool for understanding Mars and its place in the solar system.

  14. Magnetic Storms at Mars and Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup

    In analogy with magnetic storms at the Earth, periods of significantly enhanced global magnetic activity also exist at Mars. The extensive database of magnetic measurements from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), covering almost an entire solar cycle, is used in combination with geomagnetic activity...... indices at Earth to compare the occurrence of magnetic storms at Mars and Earth. Based on superposed epochs analysis the time-development of typical magnetic storms at Mars and Earth is described. In contradiction to storms at Earth, most magnetic storms at Mars are found to be associated...... with heliospheric current sheet crossings, where the IMF changes polarity. While most storms at the Earth occur due to significant southward excursions of the IMF associated with CMEs, at Mars most storms seem to be associated with the density enhancement of the heliospheric current sheet. Density enhancements...

  15. Effects of a CME on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Brain, D.

    We investigate the effects of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) on Mars. The magnetic field in the magnetic pileup region on Mars is dominated by the dynamic pressure from the solar as increased dynamic pressure compresses the magnetic pileup region causing a larger magnetic pressure, until...... this balances the solar wind pressure. As the dynamic pressure is severely increased during a CME, so is the magnetic pressure. A CME are also typically connected to a Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) event, causing large amounts of radiation. When the shock front of a CME arrives at Mars strong signals are seen...... in both the magnetic field data and in the radiation data. Based on Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Magnetometer (MAG) and Electron Reflectometer (ER) data we study the radiation and magnetic field variations on Mars during a CME event. We also compare the effects on Mars to the effects on Earth for the same...

  16. Human Mars Surface Mission Nuclear Power Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2018-01-01

    A key decision facing Mars mission designers is how to power a crewed surface field station. Unlike the solar-powered Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) that could retreat to a very low power state during a Martian dust storm, human Mars surface missions are estimated to need at least 15 kilowatts of electrical (kWe) power simply to maintain critical life support and spacecraft functions. 'Hotel' loads alone for a pressurized crew rover approach two kWe; driving requires another five kWe-well beyond what the Curiosity rover’s Radioisotope Power System (RPS) was designed to deliver. Full operation of a four-crew Mars field station is estimated at about 40 kWe. Clearly, a crewed Mars field station will require a substantial and reliable power source, beyond the scale of robotic mission experience. This paper explores the applications for both fission and RPS nuclear options for Mars.

  17. The NASA environmental models of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. I.

    1991-01-01

    NASA environmental models are discussed with particular attention given to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) and the Mars Terrain simulator. The Mars-GRAM model takes into account seasonal, diurnal, and surface topography and dust storm effects upon the atmosphere. It is also capable of simulating appropriate random density perturbations along any trajectory path through the atmosphere. The Mars Terrain Simulator is a software program that builds pseudo-Martian terrains by layering the effects of geological processes upon one another. Output pictures of the constructed surfaces can be viewed from any vantage point under any illumination conditions. Attention is also given to the document 'Environment of Mars, 1988' in which scientific models of the Martian atmosphere and Martian surface are presented.

  18. Effects of a CME on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Brain, D.

    We investigate the effects of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) on Mars. The magnetic field in the magnetic pileup region on Mars is dominated by the dynamic pressure from the solar as increased dynamic pressure compresses the magnetic pileup region causing a larger magnetic pressure, until...... this balances the solar wind pressure. As the dynamic pressure is severely increased during a CME, so is the magnetic pressure. A CME are also typically connected to a Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) event, causing large amounts of radiation. When the shock front of a CME arrives at Mars strong signals are seen...... in both the magnetic field data and in the radiation data. Based on Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Magnetometer (MAG) and Electron Reflectometer (ER) data we study the radiation and magnetic field variations on Mars during a CME event. We also compare the effects on Mars to the effects on Earth for the same...

  19. Magnetic Storms at Mars and Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup

    In analogy with magnetic storms at the Earth, periods of significantly enhanced global magnetic activity also exist at Mars. The extensive database of magnetic measurements from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), covering almost an entire solar cycle, is used in combination with geomagnetic activity...... indices at Earth to compare the occurrence of magnetic storms at Mars and Earth. Based on superposed epochs analysis the time-development of typical magnetic storms at Mars and Earth is described. In contradiction to storms at Earth, most magnetic storms at Mars are found to be associated...... with heliospheric current sheet crossings, where the IMF changes polarity. While most storms at the Earth occur due to significant southward excursions of the IMF associated with CMEs, at Mars most storms seem to be associated with the density enhancement of the heliospheric current sheet. Density enhancements...

  20. Human Mars Ascent Configuration and Design Sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, Tara P.; Gernhardt, Mike; Collins, Tim; Martin, John

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may utilize several small cabins where crew members could live for days up to a couple of weeks. At the end of a Mars surface mission the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) crew cabin would carry the crew to their destination in orbit in a matter of hours or days. Other small cabins in support of a Mars mission would include pressurized rovers that allow crew members to travel great distances from their primary habitat on Mars while unconstrained by time limits of typical EVAs. An orbital crew taxi could allow for exploration of the moons of Mars with minimum impact to the primary Earth-Mars transportation systems. A common crew cabin design that can perform in each of these applications is desired and could reduce the overall mission cost. However, for the MAV, the crew cabin size and mass can have a large impact on vehicle design and performance. The total ascent vehicle mass drives performance requirements for the Mars descent systems and the Earth to Mars transportation elements. Minimizing MAV mass is a priority and minimizing the crew cabin size and mass is one way to do that. This paper explores the benefits and impacts of using a common crew cabin design for the MAV. Results of a MAV configuration trade study will be presented along with mass and performance estimates for the selected design.

  1. The cool and distant formation of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasser, R.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Matsumura, S.; Ida, S.

    2017-06-01

    With approximately one ninth of Earth's mass, Mars is widely considered to be a stranded planetary embryo that never became a fully-grown planet. A currently popular planet formation theory predicts that Mars formed near Earth and Venus and was subsequently scattered outwards to its present location. In such a scenario, the compositions of the three planets are expected to be similar to each other. However, bulk elemental and isotopic data for martian meteorites demonstrate that key aspects of Mars' composition are markedly different from that of Earth. This suggests that Mars formed outside of the terrestrial feeding zone during primary accretion. It is therefore probable that Mars always remained significantly farther from the Sun than Earth; its growth was stunted early and its mass remained relatively low. Here we identify a potential dynamical pathway that forms Mars in the asteroid belt and keeps it outside of Earth's accretion zone while at the same time accounting for strict age and compositional constraints, as well as mass differences. Our uncommon pathway (approximately 2% probability) is based on the Grand Tack scenario of terrestrial planet formation, in which the radial migration by Jupiter gravitationally sculpts the planetesimal disc at Mars' current location. We conclude that Mars' formation requires a specific dynamical pathway, while this is less valid for Earth and Venus. We further predict that Mars' volatile budget is most likely different from Earth's and that Venus formed close enough to our planet that it is expected to have a nearly identical composition from common building blocks.

  2. Optimal parking orbits for manned Mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Michael L.; Nordwall, Jill A.

    This paper summarizes a Mars parking orbit optimization effort. This parking orbit study includes the selection of optimal elliptic Mars parking orbits that meet mission constraints and that include pertinent apsidal misalignment losses. Mars missions examined are for the opportunity years of 2014, 2016, and 2018. For these mission opportunities, it is shown that the optimal parking orbits depend on the year that the mission occurs and are coupled with the outbound, Mars stay, and return phases of the mission. Constraints included in the parking orbit optimization process are periapsis lighting angle (related to a daylight landing requirement), periapsis latitude (related to a landing latitude range requirement) and the vehicle Trans-Earth-Injection stage mass. Also, effects of mission abort requirements on optimal parking orbits are investigated. Off-periapsis maneuvers for Mars orbit capture were found to be cost effective in reducing the mission delta-V for the 2016 abort from Mars capture scenario. The total capture and departure delta-V was `split' between the capture maneuver and the departure maneuver to reduce the 2016 Mars departure delta-V to below the level of the corresponding stage of the 2014 baseline mission. Landing results are provided that show Mars landing site access from the optimal elliptic parking orbits for Mars excursion vehicles with low (0.2) and high (1.3 and 1.6) lift to drag ratio.

  3. Dust Devils and Convective Vortices on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez-Etxeberria, I.; Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2017-03-01

    Dust devils are low pressure convective vortices able to lift dust from the surface of a planet. They are a common feature on Mars and they can also be found on desertic locations on Earth. On Mars they are considered an important part of the atmospheric dust cycle. Dust in Mars is an essential ingredient of the atmosphere where it affects the radiative balance of the planet. Here we review observations of these dusty vortices from orbit, from in situ measurements on the surface of Mars and some of the models developed to simulate them.

  4. Phoenix - The First Mars Scout Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Barry; Shotwell, Robert

    2008-01-01

    As the first of the new Mars Scouts missions, the Phoenix project was selected by NASA in August of 2003. Four years later, almost to the day, Phoenix was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station and successfully injected into an interplanetary trajectory on its way to Mars. On May 25, 2008 Phoenix conducted the first successful powered decent on Mars in over 30 years. This paper will highlight some of the key changes since the 2008 IEEE paper of the same name, as well as performance through cruise, landing at the north pole of Mars and some of the preliminary results of the surface mission.

  5. The 1990 MB: The first Mars Trojan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowell, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Asteroid 1990 MB was discovered during the course of the Mars and Earth-crossing Asteroid and Comet Survey. An orbit based on a 9-day arc and the asteroid's location near Mars L5 longitude led to speculation that it might be in 1:1 resonance with Mars, analogous to the Trojan asteroids of Jupiter. Subsequent observations strengthened the possibility, and later calculations confirmed it. The most recent orbit shows that the asteroid's semimajor axis is very similar to that of Mars.

  6. Overview of Mars: SNC meteorite results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waenke, H.

    1988-01-01

    The SNC meteorites according to their oxygen isotope ratios and various trace element ratios form a distinct group of 8 achondrites. Their young crystallization ages and fractionated REE pattern which exclude an asteroidal origin, were the first observations to point towards Mars as their parent body. In spite of the many arguments for Mars as the parent body of the SNC meteorites there does not exist a generally accepted model for the ejecting process and other dynamical problems involved. In this discussion it is, however, assumed that Mars is the SNC parent body. The chemical composition of Mars is examined.

  7. In-situ resource utilization for the human exploration of Mars : a Bayesian approach to valuation of precursor missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey H.

    2006-01-01

    The need for sufficient quantities of oxygen, water, and fuel resources to support a crew on the surface of Mars presents a critical logistical issue of whether to transport such resources from Earth or manufacture them on Mars. An approach based on the classical Wildcat Drilling Problem of Bayesian decision theory was applied to the problem of finding water in order to compute the expected value of precursor mission sample information. An implicit (required) probability of finding water on Mars was derived from the value of sample information using the expected mass savings of alternative precursor missions.

  8. The Mars Science Laboratory Mars Hand Lens Imager (MSL MAHLI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minitti, Michelle E.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Msl Mastcam/Mahli/Mardi Team

    2007-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission, slated to begin Martian surface operations in 2010, seeks to explore the past and present habitability of a yet-to-be-selected site on Mars. Armed with a suite of instruments capable of spectral, chemical, mineralogical, organic and isotopic analyses, MSL will comprehensively study the Martian atmosphere and rocks and soils on the Martian surface. The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), the "geologist's handlens" for MSL, supports habitability studies through aiding the selection of samples for in-depth analysis and placing such samples in a geologic and geomorphic context. More broadly, the goal of MAHLI is to examine the texture, morphology, structure, mineralogy, and stratigraphy of rocks, soils, frost and ice at the microscale. MAHLI will achieve this objective using capabilities new to Martian cameras including a CCD with a Bayer Pattern Filter coupled with a focusable lens. The Bayer Pattern Filter produces RGB color images akin to those taken by the standard commercial digital camera. Placement of MAHLI by the MSL Robotic Arm (RA) at a particular distance from the sample of interest and MAHLI's internal focus mechanism combine to achieve a desired image resolution. At its closest placement (22.5 mm), MAHLI has 9 µm/pixel resolution. In practice, RA placement may be sufficiently uncertain that 9 µm/pixel will not be achieved regularly; however, resolutions in the 12-15 µm/pixel range are expected for typical high resolution images. Depending on the target distance and its surface relief, the target may not be in focus over the entire image. For those cases, MAHLI acquires a series of images taken at a range of focus positions that bracket the location of best focus. MAHLI's onboard software is capable of merging this stack of images, into a single best-focus image. MAHLI can image in natural illumination but it also possesses four, white light emitting diodes (LED) for illumination of samples in shadow or at

  9. Detection and Mapping of Ice Clouds in Mars' Mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefton-Nash, E.; Teanby, N. A.; Calcutt, S. B.; Hurley, J.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2012-03-01

    We map ice cloud occurrence in Mars' mesosphere using > 2 Mars years worth of limb spectra acquired by the Mars Climate Sounder. We find two distinct seasonal regimes with short periods/latitudes of increased formation and limited longitudinal bias.

  10. The case for Mars III: Strategies for exploration - Technical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Carol R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Papers on issues related to Mars exploration are presented, covering topics such as the social implications of manned missions to Mars, mission strategies, mission designs, the economics of a Mars mission, Space Station support for a Mars mission, a Diagnostic and Environmental Monitoring System, and a zero-g CELSS/recreation facility for an earth/Mars crew shuttle. Other topics include biomedical concerns and fitness in spaceflight, spaceflight environment habitability, the Mars Rover/Sample Return Mission, a rooitic Mars surface sampler, a Mars Orbiter, and scientific goals of Mars exploration. Additional topics include Space Station evolution, mission options, modeling advanced space systems, computer support for Mars missions, launch system options, advanced propulsion techniques, the utilization of resources on Mars, the development of a Martian base, and options for mobility on Mars.

  11. Experimental Acid Weathering of Fe-Bearing Mars Analog Minerals and Rocks: Implications for Aqueous Origin of Hematite-Bearing Sediments in Meridiani Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Koster, A. M.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    A working hypothesis for Meridiani evaporite formation involves the evaporation of fluids derived from acid weathering of Martian basalts and subsequent diagenesis [1, 2]. However, there are no reported experimental studies for the formation of jarosite and gray hematite (spherules), which are characteristic of Meridiani rocks from Mars analog precursor minerals. A terrestrial analog for hematite spherule formation from basaltic rocks under acidic hydrothermal conditions has been reported [3], and we have previously shown that the hematite spherules and jarosite can be synthetically produced in the laboratory using Fe3+ -bearing sulfate brines under hydrothermal conditions [4]. Here we expand and extend these studies by reacting Mars analog minerals with sulfuric acid to form Meridiani-like rock-mineral compositions. The objective of this study is to provide environmental constraints on past aqueous weathering of basaltic materials on Mars.

  12. Data mining algorithm for discovering matrix association regions (MARs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gautam B.; Krawetz, Shephan A.

    2000-04-01

    Lately, there has been considerable interest in applying Data Mining techniques to scientific and data analysis problems in bioinformatics. Data mining research is being fueled by novel application areas that are helping the development of newer applied algorithms in the field of bioinformatics, an emerging discipline representing the integration of biological and information sciences. This is a shift in paradigm from the earlier and the continuing data mining efforts in marketing research and support for business intelligence. The problem described in this paper is along a new dimension in DNA sequence analysis research and supplements the previously studied stochastic models for evolution and variability. The discovery of novel patterns from genetic databases as described is quite significant because biological patterns play an important role in a large variety of cellular processes and constitute the basis for gene therapy. Biological databases containing the genetic codes from a wide variety of organisms, including humans, have continued their exponential growth over the last decade. At the time of this writing, the GenBank database contains over 300 million sequences and over 2.5 billion characters of sequenced nucleotides. The focus of this paper is on developing a general data mining algorithm for discovering regions of locus control, i.e. those regions that are instrumental for determining cell type. One such type of element of locus control are the MARs or the Matrix Association Regions. Our limited knowledge about MARs has hampered their detection using classical pattern recognition techniques. Consequently, their detection is formulated by utilizing a statistical interestingness measure derived from a set of empirical features that are known to be associated with MARs. This paper presents a systematic approach for finding associations between such empirical features in genomic sequences, and for utilizing this knowledge to detect biologically interesting

  13. The Mars climate for a photovoltaic system operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed information on the climatic conditions on Mars are very desirable for the design of photovoltaic systems for establishing outposts on the Martian surface. The distribution of solar insolation (global, direct and diffuse) and ambient temperature is addressed. This data are given at the Viking lander's locations and can also be used, to a first approximation, for other latitudes. The insolation data is based on measured optical depth of the Martian atmosphere derived from images taken of the sun with a special diode on the Viking cameras; and computation based on multiple wavelength and multiple scattering of the solar radiation. The ambient temperature (diurnal and yearly distribution) is based on direct measurements with a thermocouple at 1.6 m above the ground at the Viking lander locations. The insolation and ambient temperature information are short term data. New information about Mars may be forthcoming in the future from new analysis of previously collected data or from future flight missions. The Mars climate data for photovoltaic system operation will thus be updated accordingly.

  14. Recent (Late Amazonian) enhanced backweathering rates on Mars : Paracratering evidence from gully alcoves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haas, Tjalling; Conway, Susan J.; Krautblatter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mars is believed to have been exposed to low planet-wide weathering and denudation since the Noachian. However, the widespread occurrence of alcoves at the rim of pristine impact craters suggests locally enhanced recent backweathering rates. Here we derive Late Amazonian backweathering rates from th

  15. Elemental geochemistry of sedimentary rocks at Yellowknife Bay, Gale crater, Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLennan, S.M.; Anderson, R.B.; Bell III, J.F.; Bridges, J.C.; Calef III, F.; Campbell, J.L.; Clark, B.C.; Clegg, S.; Conrad, P.; Cousin, A.; Des Marais, D.J.; Dromart, G.; Dyar, M.D.; Edgar, L.A.; Ehlmann, B.L.; Fabre, C.; Forni, O.; Gasnault, O.; Gellert, R.; Gordon, S.; Grant, J.A.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Gupta, S.; Herkenhoff, K.E.; Hurowitz, J.A.; King, P.L.; Mouélic, S.L.; Leshin, L.A.; Léveillé, R.; Lewis, K.W.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Ming, D.W.; Morris, R.V.; Nachon, M.; Newsom, H.E.; Ollila, A.M.; Perrett, G.M.; Rice, M.S.; Schmidt, M.E.; Schwenzer, S.P.; Stack, K.; Stolper, E.M.; Sumner, D.Y.; Treiman, A.H.; VanBommel, S.; Vaniman, D.T.; Vasavada, A.; Wiens, R.C.; Yingst, R.A.; ten Kate, Inge Loes

    2014-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks examined by the Curiosity rover at Yellowknife Bay, Mars, were derived from sources that evolved from an approximately average martian crustal composition to one influenced by alkaline basalts. No evidence of chemical weathering is preserved, indicating arid, possibly cold, paleocl

  16. Recent (Late Amazonian) enhanced backweathering rates on Mars : Paracratering evidence from gully alcoves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haas, Tjalling; Conway, Susan J.; Krautblatter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mars is believed to have been exposed to low planet-wide weathering and denudation since the Noachian. However, the widespread occurrence of alcoves at the rim of pristine impact craters suggests locally enhanced recent backweathering rates. Here we derive Late Amazonian backweathering rates from

  17. Recent (Late Amazonian) enhanced backweathering rates on Mars : Paracratering evidence from gully alcoves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haas, Tjalling; Conway, Susan J.; Krautblatter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mars is believed to have been exposed to low planet-wide weathering and denudation since the Noachian. However, the widespread occurrence of alcoves at the rim of pristine impact craters suggests locally enhanced recent backweathering rates. Here we derive Late Amazonian backweathering rates from th

  18. A Global Map of Thermal Inertia from Mars Global Surveyor Mapping-Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, M. T.; Kretke, K. A.; Smith, M. D.; Pelkey, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    TES (thermal emission spectrometry) has obtained high spatial resolution surface temperature observations from which thermal inertia has been derived. Seasonal coverage of these data now provides a nearly global view of Mars, including the polar regions, at high resolution. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J. A.; Wilson, S. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Geissler, P. E.; Sullivan, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Victoria crater (2.05N, 354.51E) is ~750 m in diameter and the largest crater on Mars observed in situ. The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity traversed NW to SE across a broad annulus dominated by dark sand that at least partially surrounds the crater before navigating the northern crater rim. Rover observations of the crater and ejecta deposits are complemented by images with 26-52 cm/pixel scales from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and enable assessment of degradation state. The present depth/diameter ratio for Victoria is 0.1, less than the 0.2 expected for a pristine primary impact structure. Together with the eroded, serrated rim, this implies an originally smaller crater diameter and/or considerable infilling consistent with occurrence of a large dune field and few exposed rocks on the crater floor. The height and width of the raised rim is generally 4-5 m and 150-225 m, respectively, less than the 30 m and 500-600 m, respectively, expected for a pristine 750 m diameter crater. Ejecta thicknesses around the rim were derived using rover-based and HiRISE images and yield consistent estimates averaging ~3 m. The serrated rim plan creates a series of promontories extending up to 50 m into the crater and generally fronted by 30-60 degree slopes that are locally vertical and are separated by bays whose floors typically slope 15-25 degrees. A crater originally on order of 600-650 m in diameter and subsequently enlarged by mass wasting and aeolian erosion may yield a structure resembling Victoria today. The steep expression of the promontories and local outcroppings of rocks in the ejecta blanket points to some ongoing mass wasting, but the relative paucity of associated flanking talus indicates derived blocks of sulfate sandstone are not resistant to saltating sand and are rapidly broken down by the wind or are completely covered/filled in by aeolian drift. At Cape St. Vincent, the promontory appears undercut

  20. Breakthrough in Mars balloon technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Cutts, J. A.; Cooper, H. W.; Hall, J. L.; McDonald, B. A.; Pauken, M. T.; White, C. V.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Castano, A.; Cathey, H. M.; Fairbrother, D. A.; Smith, I. S.; Shreves, C. M.; Lachenmeier, T.; Rainwater, E.; Smith, M.

    2004-01-01

    Two prototypes of Mars superpressure balloons were flight tested for aerial deployment and inflation in the Earth's stratosphere in June, 2002. One was an 11.3 m diameter by 6.8 m high pumpkin balloon constructed from polyethylene film and Zylon (PBO) tendons, the second was a 10 m diameter spherical balloon constructed from 12 μm thick Mylar film. Aerial deployment and inflation occurred under parachute descent at 34 km altitude, mimicing the dynamic pressure environment expected during an actual Mars balloon mission. Two on-board video cameras were used on each flight to provide real-time upward and downward views of the flight train. Atmospheric pressure and temperature were also recorded. Both prototypes successfully deployed from their storage container during parachute descent at approximately 40 m/s. The pumpkin balloon also successfully inflated with a 440 g charge of helium gas injected over a 1.5-min period. Since the helium inflation system was deliberately retained after inflation in this test, the pumpkin balloon continued to fall to the ocean where it was recovered for post-flight analysis. The less robust spherical balloon achieved only a partial (~70%) inflation before a structural failure occurred in the balloon film resulting in the loss of the vehicle. This structural failure was diagnosed to result from the vigorous oscillatory motion of the partially inflated balloon, possibly compounded by contact between the balloon film and an instrumentation box above it on the flight train. These two flights together represent significant progress in the development of Mars superpressure balloon technology and pave the way for future flight tests that will include post-deployment flight of the prototype balloons at a stable altitude.

  1. The fluvial history of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael H

    2012-05-13

    River channels and valleys have been observed on several planetary bodies in addition to the Earth. Long sinuous valleys on Venus, our Moon and Jupiter's moon Io are clearly formed by lava, and branching valleys on Saturn's moon Titan may be forming today by rivers of methane. But by far the most dissected body in our Solar System apart from the Earth is Mars. Branching valleys that in plan resemble terrestrial river valleys are common throughout the most ancient landscapes preserved on the planet. Accompanying the valleys are the remains of other indicators of erosion and deposition, such as deltas, alluvial fans and lake beds. There is little reason to doubt that water was the erosive agent and that early in Mars' history, climatic conditions were very different from the present cold conditions and such that, at least episodically, water could flow across the surface. In addition to the branching valley networks, there are large flood features, termed outflow channels. These are similar to, but dwarf, the largest terrestrial flood channels. The consensus is that these channels were also cut by water although there are other possibilities. The outflow channels mostly postdate the valley networks, although most are still very ancient. They appear to have formed at a time when surface conditions were similar to those that prevail today. There is evidence that glacial activity has modified some of the water-worn valleys, particularly in the 30-50° latitude belts, and ice may also be implicated in the formation of geologically recent, seemingly water-worn gullies on steep slopes. Mars also has had a long volcanic history, and long, sinuous lava channels similar to those on the Moon and Venus are common on and around the large volcanoes. These will not, however, be discussed further; the emphasis here is on the effects of running water on the evolution of the surface.

  2. Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on the Mars Polar Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, M.C.; Caplinger, M.A.; Carr, M.H.; Squyres, S.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Descent Imager, or MARDI, experiment on the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) consists of a camera characterized by small physical size and mass (???6 ?? 6 ?? 12 cm, including baffle; geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments: precise location, detailed local relief); and (3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. To accomplish these goals, MARDI will collect three types of images. Four small images (256 x 256 pixels) will be acquired on 0.5 s centers beginning 0.3 s before MPL's heatshield is jettisoned. Sixteen full-frame images (1024 X 1024, circularly edited) will be acquired on 5.3 s centers thereafter. Just after backshell jettison but prior to the start of powered descent, a "best final nonpowered descent image" will be acquired. Five seconds after the start of powered descent, the camera will begin acquiring images on 4 s centers. Storage for as many as ten 800 x 800 pixel images is available during terminal descent. A number of spacecraft factors are likely to impact the quality of MARDI images, including substantial motion blur resulting from large rates of attitude variation during parachute descent and substantial rocket-engine-induced vibration during powered descent. In addition, the mounting location of the camera places the exhaust plume of the hydrazine engines prominently in the field of view. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. New perspectives on ancient Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C; Aharonson, Oded; Aurnou, Jonathan M; Banerdt, W Bruce; Carr, Michael H; Dombard, Andrew J; Frey, Herbert V; Golombek, Matthew P; Hauck, Steven A; Head, James W; Jakosky, Bruce M; Johnson, Catherine L; McGovern, Patrick J; Neumann, Gregory A; Phillips, Roger J; Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T

    2005-02-25

    Mars was most active during its first billion years. The core, mantle, and crust formed within approximately 50 million years of solar system formation. A magnetic dynamo in a convecting fluid core magnetized the crust, and the global field shielded a more massive early atmosphere against solar wind stripping. The Tharsis province became a focus for volcanism, deformation, and outgassing of water and carbon dioxide in quantities possibly sufficient to induce episodes of climate warming. Surficial and near-surface water contributed to regionally extensive erosion, sediment transport, and chemical alteration. Deep hydrothermal circulation accelerated crustal cooling, preserved variations in crustal thickness, and modified patterns of crustal magnetization.

  4. Mars Global Digital Dune Database; MC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.; Fenton, L.K.; Tanaka, K.L.; Titus, T.N.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Digital Dune Database presents data and describes the methodology used in creating the global database of moderate- to large-size dune fields on Mars. The database is being released in a series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Reports. The first release (Hayward and others, 2007) included dune fields from 65 degrees N to 65 degrees S (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1158/). The current release encompasses ~ 845,000 km2 of mapped dune fields from 65 degrees N to 90 degrees N latitude. Dune fields between 65 degrees S and 90 degrees S will be released in a future USGS Open-File Report. Although we have attempted to include all dune fields, some have likely been excluded for two reasons: (1) incomplete THEMIS IR (daytime) coverage may have caused us to exclude some moderate- to large-size dune fields or (2) resolution of THEMIS IR coverage (100m/pixel) certainly caused us to exclude smaller dune fields. The smallest dune fields in the database are ~ 1 km2 in area. While the moderate to large dune fields are likely to constitute the largest compilation of sediment on the planet, smaller stores of sediment of dunes are likely to be found elsewhere via higher resolution data. Thus, it should be noted that our database excludes all small dune fields and some moderate to large dune fields as well. Therefore, the absence of mapped dune fields does not mean that such dune fields do not exist and is not intended to imply a lack of saltating sand in other areas. Where availability and quality of THEMIS visible (VIS), Mars Orbiter Camera narrow angle (MOC NA), or Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) images allowed, we classified dunes and included some dune slipface measurements, which were derived from gross dune morphology and represent the prevailing wind direction at the last time of significant dune modification. It was beyond the scope of this report to look at the detail needed to discern subtle dune modification. It was also

  5. MNSM - A Future Mars Network Science Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicarro, A. F.

    2012-04-01

    Following ESA' s successful Mars Express mission, European efforts in Mars Exploration are now taking place within the joint ESA-NASA Mars Exploration Programme, starting in 2016 with the Trace Gases Orbiter (TGO) focusing on atmospheric trace gases and in particular methane, and with the Entry and Descent Module (EDM). In 2018, a joint NASA-ESA rover will perform sample caching as well as geological, geochemical and exobiological measurements of the surface and the subsurface of Mars. A number of missions for 2020 and beyond are currently under study. Among those, a possible candidate is a Mars Network Science Mission (MNSM) of 3-6 surface stations, to investigate the interior of the planet, its rotational parameters and its atmospheric dynamics. These important science goals have not been fully addressed by Mars exploration so far and can only be achieved with simultaneous measurements from a number of landers located on the surface of the planet such as a Mars Network mission. In addition, the geology, mineralogy and astrobiological significance of each landing site would be addressed, as three new locations on Mars would be reached. Such Mars Network Science Mission has been considered a significant priority by the planetary science community worldwide for the past two decades. In fact, a Mars Network mission concept has a long heritage, as it was studied a number of times by ESA, NASA and CNES (e.g., Marsnet, Intermarsnet, Netlander and MarsNEXT mission studies) since 1990. Study work has been renewed in ESA recently with MNSM Science and Engineering Teams being set up to update the scientific objectives of the mission and to evaluate its technical feasibility, respectively. The current mission baseline includes three ESA-led small landers with a robotic arm to be launched with a Soyuz rocket and direct communications to Earth (no need of a dedicated orbiter). However, a larger network could be put in place through international collaboration, as several

  6. Earth and Mars: Water inventories as clues to accretional histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M.H.; Wanke, H.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth has 2.7 km of water on its surface. Its mantle contains at least 150 ppm water, and probably significantly more depending on the amount of undepleted mantle and subducted crustal water that is present. Geologic evidence suggests that a few hundred meters of water are close to the Martian surface, but evidence from SNC meteorites indicates that the Martian mantle is very dry, containing no more than about 35 ppm water. Part of the difference in water content of the mantles of the two planets is attributed to plate tectonics. However, the Earth's mantle appears to contain at least several times the water content of the Martian mantle, even accounting for plate tectonics. We attribute the difference to two possible causes. The first possibility is that melting of the Earth's surface during accretion, as a result of the development of a steam atmosphere, allowed impact-devolatized water at the surface to dissolve into the Earth's interior. In contrast, because of Mars' smaller size and greater distance from the Sun, the Martian surface may not have melted, so that the devolatilized water could not dissolve into the surface. A second and preferred possibility is that Mars, like the Earth, acquired a late volatile rich veneer, but it did not get folded into the interior as with the Earth, but instead remained as a water-rich veneer. The perception of Mars as having a wet surface, but a dry interior, is consistent with what we know of the geologic history of Mars, which can be viewed as the progressive intrusion and overplating of a water-rich crust by dry, mantle-derived volcanic rocks. ?? 1992.

  7. Computer-generated global map of valley networks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Stepinski, T. F.

    2009-11-01

    The presence of valley networks (VN) on Mars suggests that early Mars was warmer and wetter than present. However, detailed geomorphic analyses of individual networks have not led to a consensus regarding their origin. An additional line of evidence can be provided by the global pattern of dissection on Mars, but the currently available global map of VN, compiled from Viking images, is incomplete and outdated. We created an updated map of VN by using a computer algorithm that parses topographic data and recognizes valleys by their morphologic signature. This computer-generated map was visually inspected and edited to produce the final updated map of VN. The new map shows an increase in total VN length by a factor of 2.3. A global map of dissection density, D, derived from the new VN map, shows that the most highly dissected region forms a belt located between the equator and mid-southern latitudes. The most prominent regions of high values of D are the northern Terra Cimmeria and the Margaritifer Terra where D reaches the value of 0.12 km-1 over extended areas. The average value of D is 0.062 km-1, only 2.6 times lower than the terrestrial value of D as measured in the same fashion. These relatively high values of dissection density over extensive regions of the planet point toward precipitation-fed runoff erosion as the primary mechanism of valley formation. Assuming a warm and wet early Mars, peculiarity of the global pattern of dissection is interpreted in the terms of climate controlling factors influenced by the topographic dichotomy.

  8. Dry Mars: Parched Rocks and Fallen Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2001-01-01

    While "following the water" to find life on Mars, it is easy to overlook evidence that Mars is harshly dry, and to neglect ideas that do not invoke water. Direct evidence for a dry Mars comes from the ALH 84001 meteorite, which has seen little or no liquid water during its last 3.9 billion years on Mars. Its aridity is difficult to reconcile with a Mars of abundant near-surface surface water or with episodes of warm wet climate. Alternative scenarios are also possible, even likely, for the martian gullies and debris flows that have been cited as evidence of liquid water. It is reasonable that the gullies flows are the remnants of massive dust avalanches, comparable to large climax snow avalanches seen on Earth. Mars' surface is now desiccated, and at least part of it has been equally desiccated for the past 3.9 billion years. With this background, and the wealth of atmospheric, imaging, and chemical data available from Mars, one must be very cautious in evaluating claims for liquid water recently at or near Mars' surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Results of the MarCom questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    On request of MarCom a questionnaire has been prepared to investigate the opinion of PIANC members and others about the quality and the usefulness of the MarCom working group reports. The results of this questionnaire were presented and discussed at the Sydney Conference (September 2002).

  10. High Resolution Surface Science at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Zachary J.; Tamppari, Leslie K.; Lock, Robert E.; Sturm, Erick J.

    2013-01-01

    The proposed mission would place a 2.4 m telescope in orbit around Mars with two focal plane instruments to obtain the highest resolution images and spectral maps of the surface to date (3-10x better than current). This investigation would make major contributions to all of the Mars Program Goals: life, climate, geology and preparation for human presence.

  11. Planet Mars story of another world

    CERN Document Server

    Forget, François; Lognonné, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Give an insight of Mars by adopting an outline based on history rather than on subtopic (atmosphere, surface, interior). This work looks at its evolution, and incorporates the results from the space missions of Mars Express, Spirit and Opportunity. It also examines its formation from the ashes of dead stars, more than 4 5 billion years ago.

  12. The Electrostatic Environments of Mars: Atmospheric Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Hogue, Michael D.; Phillips, James, III; Cox, Rachel E.

    2016-01-01

    The electrostatic environment on Mars is controlled by its ever present atmospheric dust. Dust devils and dust storms tribocharge this dust. Theoretical studies predict that lightning and/or glow discharges should be present on Mars, but none have been directly observed. Experiments are planned to shed light on this issue.

  13. Geographical Distribution of Crater Depths on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.

    2010-03-01

    Global maps of crater depths on Mars are constructed using a new dataset that lists depths of >75,000 craters. Distribution of crater depths is interpreted in terms of cryosphere extent, and the locations of deepest craters on Mars are identified.

  14. NASA Facts, Mars as a Planet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    Presented is one of a series of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facts about the exploration of Mars. Photographs, showing Mars as seen from Earth through a telescope, show dark markings and polar caps present. Photographs from Mariner 7, Mariner 4, and Mariner 9 are included. Presented is a composite of several Mariner 9…

  15. Navigation services of the Mars Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, T. A.; Guinn, J.; Quintanilla, E.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Network provides proximity based communications and navigation services to support Mars exploration. The network will be comprised of science orbiters with a MN relay transceiver, and potentially, dedicated telecommunication orbiters. The common MN transceiver, called Electra, is currently in deployment, and is being designed for both communications and radiometric tracking.

  16. Are you ready for Mars? - Main media events surrounding the arrival of ESA's Mars Express at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Launched on 2 June 2003 from Baikonur (Kazakhstan) on board a Russian Soyuz launcher operated by Starsem, the European probe -built for ESA by a European team of industrial companies led by Astrium - carries seven scientific instruments that will perform a series of remote-sensing experiments designed to shed new light on the Martian atmosphere, the planet’s structure and its geology. In particular, the British-made Beagle 2 lander, named after the ship on which Charles Darwin explored uncharted areas of the Earth in 1830, will contribute to the search for traces of life on Mars through exobiology experiments and geochemistry research. On Christmas Eve the Mars Express orbiter will be steered on a course taking it into an elliptical orbit, where it will safely circle the planet for a minimum of almost 2 Earth years. The Beagle 2 lander - which will have been released from the mother craft a few days earlier (on 19 December) - instead will stay on a collision course with the planet. It too should also be safe, being designed for atmospheric entry and geared for a final soft landing due to a sophisticated system of parachutes and airbags. On arrival, the Mars Express mission control team will report on the outcome of the spacecraft's delicate orbital insertion manoeuvre. It will take some time for Mars Express to manouvre into position to pick communications from Beagle 2. Hence, initially, other means will be used to check that Beagle 2 has landed: first signals from the Beagle 2 landing are expected to be available throughout Christmas Day, either through pick-up and relay of Beagle 2 radio signals by NASA’s Mars Odyssey, or by direct pick-up by the Jodrell Bank radio telescope in the UK. Mars Express will then pass over Beagle 2 in early January 2004, relaying data and images back to Earth. The first images from the cameras of Beagle 2 and Mars Express are expected to be available between the end of the year and the beginning of January 2004. The key dates

  17. An independent assessment of the technical feasibility of the Mars One mission plan - Updated analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Sydney; Owens, Andrew; Ho, Koki; Schreiner, Samuel; de Weck, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, the Mars One program has gained significant publicity for its plans to colonize the red planet. Beginning in 2025, the program plans to land four people on Mars every 26 months via a series of one-way missions, using exclusively existing technology. This one-way approach has frequently been cited as a key enabler of accelerating the first crewed landing on Mars. While the Mars One program has received considerable attention, little has been published in the technical literature regarding the formulation of its mission architecture. In light of this, we perform an independent analysis of the technical feasibility of the Mars One mission plan, focusing on the architecture of the life support and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) systems, and their impact on sparing and space logistics. To perform this analysis, we adopt an iterative analysis approach in which we model and simulate the mission architecture, assess its feasibility, implement any applicable modifications while attempting to remain within the constraints set forth by Mars One, and then resimulate and reanalyze the revised version of the mission architecture. Where required information regarding the Mars One mission architecture is not available, we assume numerical values derived from standard spaceflight design handbooks and documents. Through four iterations of this process, our analysis finds that the Mars One mission plan, as publicly described, is not feasible. This conclusion is obtained from analyses based on mission assumptions derived from and constrained by statements made by Mars One, and is the result of the following findings: (1) several technologies including ISRU, life support, and entry, descent, and landing (EDL) are not currently "existing, validated and available" as claimed by Mars One; (2) the crop growth area described by Mars One is insufficient to feed their crew; (3) increasing the crop growth area to provide sufficient food for the crew leads to atmospheric

  18. Connecting Robots and Humans in Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Louis

    2000-07-01

    Mars exploration is a very special public interest. It's preeminence in the national space policy calling for "sustained robotic presence on the surface," international space policy (witness the now aborted international plan for sample return, and also aborted Russian "national Mars program") and the media attention to Mars exploration are two manifestations of that interest. Among a large segment of the public there is an implicit (mis)understanding that we are sending humans to Mars. Even among those who know that isn't already a national or international policy, many think it is the next human exploration goal. At the same time the resources for Mars exploration in the U.S. and other country's space programs are a very small part of space budgets. Very little is being applied to direct preparations for human flight. This was true before the 1999 mission losses in the United States, and it is more true today. The author's thesis is that the public interest and the space program response to Mars exploration are inconsistent. This inconsistency probably results from an explicit space policy contradiction: Mars exploration is popular because of the implicit pull of Mars as the target for human exploration, but no synergy is permitted between the human and robotic programs to carry out the program. It is not permitted because of narrow, political thinking. In this paper we try to lay out the case for overcoming that thinking, even while not committing to any premature political initiative. This paper sets out a rationale for Mars exploration and uses it to then define recommended elements of the programs: missions, science objectives, technology. That consideration is broader than the immediate issue of recovering from the failures of Mars Climate OrbIter, Mars Polar Lander and the Deep Space 2 microprobes in late 1999. But we cannot ignore those failures. They are causing a slow down Mars exploration. Not only were the three missions lost, with their planned

  19. The transformative value of liberating Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Haqq-Misra, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Humanity has the knowledge to solve its problems but lacks the moral insight to implement these ideas on a global scale. New moral insight can be obtained through transformative experiences that allow us to examine and refine our underlying preferences, and the eventual landing of humans on Mars will be of tremendous transformative value. Before such an event, I propose that we liberate Mars from any controlling interests of Earth and allow Martian settlements to develop into a second independent instance of human civilization. Such a designation is consistent with the Outer Space Treaty and allows Mars to serve as a test bed and point of comparison by which to learn new information about the phenomenon of civilization. Rather than develop Mars through a series of government and corporate colonies, let us steer the future by liberating Mars and embracing the concept of planetary citizenship.

  20. Dosimetric investigations on Mars-96 mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkova, J; Dachev, T s; Matviichuk, Y u; Koleva, R; Tomov, B; Baynov, P; Petrov, V; Nguyen, V; Siegrist, M; Chene, J; d'Uston, C; Cotin, F

    1994-10-01

    The dosimetric experiments Dose-M and Liulin as part of the more complex French-German-Bulgarian-Russian experiments for the investigation of the radiation environment for Mars-96 mission are described. The experiments will be realized with dosemeter-radiometer instruments, measuring absorbed dose in semiconductor detectors and the particle flux. Two detectors will be mounted on board the Mars-96 orbiter. Another detector will be on the guiderope of the Mars-96 Aerostate station. The scientific aims of Dose-M and Liulin experiments are: Analysis of the absorbed dose and the flux on the path and around Mars behind different shielding. Study of the shielding characteristics of the Martian atmosphere from galactic and solar cosmic rays including solar proton events. Together with the French gamma-spectrometer and the German neutron detectors the investigation of the radiation environment on the surface of Mars and in the atmosphere up to 4000 m altitude will be conducted.

  1. Biogenic catalysis of soil formation on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    The high iron abundance and the weak ferric iron spectral features of martian surface material are consistent with nanophase (nm-sized) iron oxide minerals as a major source of iron in the bright region soil on Mars. Nanophase iron oxide minerals, such as ferrihydrite and schwertmannite, and nanophase forms of hematite and goethite are formed by both biotic and abiotic processes on Earth. The presence of these minerals on Mars does not indicate biological activity on Mars, but it does raise the possibility. This work includes speculation regarding the possibility of biogenic soils on Mars based on previous observations and analyses. A remote sensing goal of upcoming missions should be to determine if nanophase iron oxide minerals, clay silicates and carbonates are present in the martian surface material. These minerals are important indicators for exobiology and their presence on Mars would invoke a need for further investigation and sample return from these sites.

  2. Tectonic implications of Mars crustal magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J E P; Acuña, M H; Ness, N F; Kletetschka, G; Mitchell, D L; Lin, R P; Reme, H

    2005-10-18

    Mars currently has no global magnetic field of internal origin but must have had one in the past, when the crust acquired intense magnetization, presumably by cooling in the presence of an Earth-like magnetic field (thermoremanent magnetization). A new map of the magnetic field of Mars, compiled by using measurements acquired at an approximately 400-km mapping altitude by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, is presented here. The increased spatial resolution and sensitivity of this map provide new insight into the origin and evolution of the Mars crust. Variations in the crustal magnetic field appear in association with major faults, some previously identified in imagery and topography (Cerberus Rupes and Valles Marineris). Two parallel great faults are identified in Terra Meridiani by offset magnetic field contours. They appear similar to transform faults that occur in oceanic crust on Earth, and support the notion that the Mars crust formed during an early era of plate tectonics.

  3. Emirates Mars Mission Planetary Protection Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadhi, Mohsen Al

    2016-07-01

    The United Arab Emirates is planning to launch a spacecraft to Mars in 2020 as part of the Emirates Mars Mission (EMM). The EMM spacecraft, Amal, will arrive in early 2021 and enter orbit about Mars. Through a sequence of subsequent maneuvers, the spacecraft will enter a large science orbit and remain there throughout the primary mission. This paper describes the planetary protection plan for the EMM mission. The EMM science orbit, where Amal will conduct the majority of its operations, is very large compared to other Mars orbiters. The nominal orbit has a periapse altitude of 20,000 km, an apoapse altitude of 43,000 km, and an inclination of 25 degrees. From this vantage point, Amal will conduct a series of atmospheric investigations. Since Amal's orbit is very large, the planetary protection plan is to demonstrate a very low probability that the spacecraft will ever encounter Mars' surface or lower atmosphere during the mission. The EMM team has prepared methods to demonstrate that (1) the launch vehicle targets support a 0.01% probability of impacting Mars, or less, within 50 years; (2) the spacecraft has a 1% probability or less of impacting Mars during 20 years; and (3) the spacecraft has a 5% probability or less of impacting Mars during 50 years. The EMM mission design resembles the mission design of many previous missions, differing only in the specific parameters and final destination. The following sequence describes the mission: 1.The mission will launch in July, 2020. The launch includes a brief parking orbit and a direct injection to the interplanetary cruise. The launch targets are specified by the hyperbolic departure's energy C3, and the hyperbolic departure's direction in space, captured by the right ascension and declination of the launch asymptote, RLA and DLA, respectively. The targets of the launch vehicle are biased away from Mars such that there is a 0.01% probability or less that the launch vehicle arrives onto a trajectory that impacts Mars

  4. Mars Spark Source Prototype Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; VanderWal, Randall L.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware was developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample, and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma to identify and quantify them. Trace metal measurements are vital in assessing whether or not the Martian environment will be toxic to human explorers. The current method of x-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations of major species only. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The new instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but it would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field initiated the development of the MSSP as part of Glenn's Director's Discretionary Fund project for the Spark Analysis Detection of Trace Metal Species in Martian Dusts and Soils. The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a compact, sensitive optical instrument for the detection of trace hazardous metals in Martian dusts and soils.

  5. Sunrise over Mars - electronic transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Caption: 'Taken during the Viking Orbiter 1's 40th revolution of Mars, this electronically transmitted image shows sunrise over the tributary canyons of a high plateau region. The white areas are bright clouds of water ice.' As the sun rises over Noctis Labryinthus (the labyrinth of the night), bright clouds of water ice can be observed in and around the tributary canyons of this high plateau region of Mars. This color composite image, reconstructed from three individual black and white frames taken through violet, green, and orange filters, vividly shows the distribution of the clouds against the rust colored background of this Martian desert. The picture was reconstructed by JPL's Image Processing Laboratory using in-flight calibration data to correct the color balance. Scientists have puzzled why the clouds cling to the canyon areas and, only in certain areas, spill over onto the plateau surface. One possibility is that water which condensed during the previous afternoon in shaded eastern-facing slopes of the canyon floor is vaporized as the early morning sun falls on those same slopes. The area covered is about 10,000 square kilometers (4000 square miles), centered at 9 degrees South, 95 degrees West, and the large partial crater at lower right is Oudemans. The picture was taken on Viking Orbiter 1's 40th revolution of the planet. Photograph and caption published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (pages 108-109), by James Schultz.

  6. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  7. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  8. A Mars Exploration Discovery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Paige, D. A.

    2000-07-01

    The Mars Exploration Program should consider following the Discovery Program model. In the Discovery Program a team of scientists led by a PI develop the science goals of their mission, decide what payload achieves the necessary measurements most effectively, and then choose a spacecraft with the capabilities needed to carry the payload to the desired target body. The primary constraints associated with the Discovery missions are time and money. The proposer must convince reviewers that their mission has scientific merit and is feasible. Every Announcement of Opportunity has resulted in a collection of creative ideas that fit within advertised constraints. Following this model, a "Mars Discovery Program" would issue an Announcement of Opportunity for each launch opportunity with schedule constraints dictated by the launch window and fiscal constraints in accord with the program budget. All else would be left to the proposer to choose, based on the science the team wants to accomplish, consistent with the program theme of "Life, Climate and Resources". A proposer could propose a lander, an orbiter, a fleet of SCOUT vehicles or penetrators, an airplane, a balloon mission, a large rover, a small rover, etc. depending on what made the most sense for the science investigation and payload. As in the Discovery program, overall feasibility relative to cost, schedule and technology readiness would be evaluated and be part of the selection process.

  9. Candidate cave entrances on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Glen E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents newly discovered candidate cave entrances into Martian near-surface lava tubes, volcano-tectonic fracture systems, and pit craters and describes their characteristics and exploration possibilities. These candidates are all collapse features that occur either intermittently along laterally continuous trench-like depressions or in the floors of sheer-walled atypical pit craters. As viewed from orbit, locations of most candidates are visibly consistent with known terrestrial features such as tube-fed lava flows, volcano-tectonic fractures, and pit craters, each of which forms by mechanisms that can produce caves. Although we cannot determine subsurface extents of the Martian features discussed here, some may continue unimpeded for many kilometers if terrestrial examples are indeed analogous. The features presented here were identified in images acquired by the Mars Odyssey's Thermal Emission Imaging System visible-wavelength camera, and by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Context Camera. Select candidates have since been targeted by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment. Martian caves are promising potential sites for future human habitation and astrobiology investigations; understanding their characteristics is critical for long-term mission planning and for developing the necessary exploration technologies.

  10. Simultaneous Mars Express / MGS observations of plasma near Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, D.; Luhmann, J.; Halekas, J.; Frahm, R.; Winningham, D.; Barabash, S.

    2006-12-01

    Since late 2003, Mars Express (MEX) and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) have been making complementary in situ measurements (in terms of both instrument and orbit) of the Martian plasma environment. Study of MGS and MEX data in tandem provides an opportunity to mitigate the shortcomings of each dataset and increase our overall understanding of the Martian solar wind interaction and atmospheric escape. Close passes of spacecraft (conjunctions) are one particularly powerful means of increasing the utility of measurements, as evidenced by the Cluster mission at Earth. At Mars, conjunctions might be used to obtain more complete simultaneous and/or co-located plasma measurements, which can be used to study a variety of phenomena, including measurements of auroral-like particle acceleration near crustal fields and the three-dimensional motion and shape of plasma boundaries. We will present an analysis of approximately forty conjunctions (instances with instantaneous spacecraft separation smaller than 400 km) of MEX and MGS identified between January 2004 and February 2006. The closest pass was ~40~km, near the South Pole. Conjunctions occur both at mid-latitudes (when the surface-projected orbit tracks of the two spacecraft nearly overlap), and at the poles. We will present comparisons of MEX Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-3) data with MGS Magnetometer and Electron Reflectometer (MAG/ER) data for these events. Our case studies include intercomparison of MEX and MGS electron data, the addition of MGS magnetic field and MEX ion data, and the inclusion of solar wind proxy information to establish context. In addition to these close conjunctions, we will present the preliminary results of a search for times when MEX and MGS pass through the same region of space separated by a delay (for time evolution of plasma populations in certain regions), and times when they occupy the same flux tube (for spatial evolution of particle distributions). Continued study of

  11. Simultaneous MSL REMS and Mars Odyssey THEMIS ground temperature measurements in Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Victoria; Vasavada, Ashwin; Christensen, Philip; Ramos, Miguel; de Pablo, Miguel Angel

    2014-05-01

    Ground temperature measurements and thermal models have been used extensively to infer physical properties of the Martian surface such as effective mean particle size [1], rock abundance [2], the presence of lateral or vertical heterogeneity [e.g., 3], degree of induration or cementation [4], etc. Knowledge of these physical properties is valuable for interpreting Mars' geologic history at a variety of spatial scales from local to global, as well as providing important insight into the safety and trafficability of landing sites, both prior to [e.g., 5, 6] and during landed mission operations. The Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS) of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) onboard the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity provides the first in situ observations of ground temperature throughout the diurnal cycle [7]. We have compared GTS-measured temperatures and derived thermal inertias through sol 414 with simultaneously acquired data obtained from the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) onboard the Mars Odyssey orbiter [8]. These measurements enable us to: 1) compare orbital and in situ temperature observations, 2) compare thermal inertias derived from single time-of-day measurements to those derived from a full diurnal temperature cycle, and 3) validate interpretations of thermophysical data with visual observations of local terrain. Surface temperatures measured by GTS and THEMIS at locations along Curiosity's traverse show a good correlation and deviations from a perfect fit are expected based on the instruments' spatial resolution differences. Local imaging (e.g., Mastcam clast survey images) show that, not surprisingly, the relatively small GTS field of view can be heavily biased by small-scale, local thermophysical features. THEMIS thermal inertias appear to be somewhat higher than their GTS-derived counterparts overall. However, much of this difference can be attributed to the difference in the spatial resolution of the instruments, particularly at

  12. Regularization of Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter CRISM along-track oversampled hyperspectral imaging observations of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisch, C. D.; O'Sullivan, J. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Politte, D. V.; He, L.; Stein, N. T.; Finkel, J.; Guinness, E. A.; Wolff, M. J.; Lapôtre, M. G. A.

    2017-01-01

    Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) hyperspectral image data have been acquired in an along-track oversampled (ATO) mode with the intent of processing the data to better than the nominal ∼18 m/pixel ground resolution. We have implemented an iterative maximum log-likelihood method (MLM) that utilizes the instrument spectral and spatial transfer functions and includes a penalty function to regularize the data. Products are produced both in sensor space and as projected hyperspectral image cubes at 12 m/pixel. Preprocessing steps include retrieval of surface single scattering albedos (SSA) using the Hapke Function and DISORT-based radiative modeling of atmospheric gases and aerosols. Resultant SSA cubes are despiked to remove extrema and tested to ensure that the remaining data are Poisson-distributed, an underlying assumption for the MLM algorithm implementation. Two examples of processed ATO data sets are presented. ATO0002EC79 covers the route taken by the Curiosity rover during its initial ascent of Mount Sharp in Gale Crater. SSA data are used to model mineral abundances and grain sizes predicted to be present in the Namib barchan sand dune sampled and analyzed by Curiosity. CRISM based results compare favorably to in situ results derived from Curiosity's measurement campaign. ATO0002DDF9 covers Marathon Valley on the Cape Tribulation rim segment of Endeavour Crater. SSA spectra indicate the presence of a minor component of Fe3+ and Mg2+ smectites on the valley floor and walls. Localization to 12 m/pixel provided the detailed spatial information needed for the Opportunity rover to traverse to and characterize those outcrops that have the deepest absorptions. The combination of orbital and rover-based data show that the smectite-bearing outcrops in Marathon Valley are impact breccias that are basaltic in composition and that have been isochemically altered in a low water to rock environment.

  13. Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity Mobility Simulation of Traverses at Endeavour Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutrot, G. L.; Arvidson, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Mars Rover Opportunity selected drives over Cape York and Solander Point were simulated using ARTEMIS (Adams-based Rover Terramechanics and Mobility Interaction Simulator), a dynamic computer-based model for rover drives over realistic terrains. Artemis provides insight into how Opportunity responds in terms of rover 3D slip (defined as 100*(1 - actual discance / commanded distance)) and wheel sinkages on tilted surfaces to retrieve soil properties and to have a useful tool for path planning. Elevation data for the simulations were derived from HiRISE setereo observations, complemented by Navcam and Pancam-based elevation maps. Mechanical properties were estimated based on previous drives and tests in the JPL Mars Yard and Mojave Desert. Soil properties were assigned to map cells based on examination of image data and characterization of the extent of bedrock as opposed to soil exposures. Two models were tested: the deformable soil model using the classical terramechanics equations and the contact model using Coulomb's laws of friction. Both models were run and parameters adjusted to match the flight rover 3D slip and wheel sinkage data... The deformable soil model reproduced accurately the drives in terms of rover 3D slip and wheel sinkage. The longitudinal shear deformation modulus and soil cohesion were found to be the two main parameters that strongly impacted results by affecting the shear stresses and slip values. For example, on the uphill segment of Matijevic Hill driven on sol 3212, the simulation requirestwo types of soil over bedrock, one with a cohesion of 2500 Pa and a deformation modulus of 5 mm, and one with a lower cohesion of 1000 Pa and a deformation modulus of 10 mm, matching the geologic map over Matijevic Hill that displays a change in soil type at this location.

  14. Acid Sulfate Weathering on Mars: Results from the Mars Exploration Rover Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2006-01-01

    Sulfur has played a major role in the formation and alteration of outcrops, rocks, and soils at the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites on Meridiani Planum and in Gusev crater. Jarosite, hematite, and evaporite sulfates (e.g., Mg and Ca sulfates) occur along with siliciclastic sediments in outcrops at Meridiani Planum. The occurrence of jarosite is a strong indicator for an acid sulfate weathering environment at Meridiani Planum. Some outcrops and rocks in the Columbia Hills in Gusev crater appear to be extensively altered as suggested by their relative softness as compared to crater floor basalts, high Fe(3+)/FeT, iron mineralogy dominated by nanophase Fe(3+) oxides, hematite and/or goethite, corundum-normative mineralogies, and the presence of Mg- and Casulfates. One scenario for aqueous alteration of these rocks and outcrops is that vapors and/or fluids rich in SO2 (volcanic source) and water interacted with rocks that were basaltic in bulk composition. Ferric-, Mg-, and Ca-sulfates, phosphates, and amorphous Si occur in several high albedo soils disturbed by the rover's wheels in the Columbia Hills. The mineralogy of these materials suggests the movement of liquid water within the host material and the subsequent evaporation of solutions rich in Fe, Mg, Ca, S, P, and Si. The presence of ferric sulfates suggests that these phases precipitated from highly oxidized, low-pH solutions. Several hypotheses that invoke acid sulfate weathering environments have been suggested for the aqueous formation of sulfate-bearing phases on the surface of Mars including (1) the oxidative weathering of ultramafic igneous rocks containing sulfides; (2) sulfuric acid weathering of basaltic materials by solutions enriched by volcanic gases (e.g., SO2); and (3) acid fog (i.e., vapors rich in H2SO4) weathering of basaltic or basaltic-derived materials.

  15. Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on the Mars Polar Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, M. C.; Caplinger, M. A.; Carr, M. H.; Squyres, S.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    2001-08-01

    The Mars Descent Imager, or MARDI, experiment on the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) consists of a camera characterized by small physical size and mass (~6 × 6 × 12 cm, including baffle; rocket-powered deceleration. Observational goals will include studies of (1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes) (2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments: precise location, detailed local relief) and (3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. To accomplish these goals, MARDI will collect three types of images. Four small images (256 × 256 pixels) will be acquired on 0.5 s centers beginning 0.3 s before MPL's heatshield is jettisoned. Sixteen full-frame images (1024 × 1024, circularly edited) will be acquired on 5.3 s centers thereafter. Just after backshell jettison but prior to the start of powered descent, a ``best final nonpowered descent image'' will be acquired. Five seconds after the start of powered descent, the camera will begin acquiring images on 4 s centers. Storage for as many as ten 800 × 800 pixel images is available during terminal descent. A number of spacecraft factors are likely to impact the quality of MARDI images, including substantial motion blur resulting from large rates of attitude variation during parachute descent and substantial rocket-engine-induced vibration during powered descent. In addition, the mounting location of the camera places the exhaust plume of the hydrazine engines prominently in the field of view.

  16. Evidence of oil and gas hydrates within planet Mars: early biogenic or thermogenic sources from the Martian soils and deeper sediments near the deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta K.

    2012-10-01

    The presence of water (in liquid form) within the gullies of the Newton Crater from Mars (near the equator), oil-like hydrocarbons on the surface, gas hydrates in the deeper zones on Mars, and a list of publications on the geochemistry and astrobiology of carbonaceous chondrites have indicated that these petroleum hydrocarbons are closely related to the complex biological species similar to our terrestrial environment. Recent evidence of the possible presence of bacterial globule associated with carbonate minerals in the geological history of Mars may have indicated the link between possible bacterial growth and generation of petroleum hydrocarbons on Mars. Recent evidence of the possible presence of bacterially derived source rocks (organic rich black carbonaceous rocks) and heat flow distribution within Eberswalde and Holden areas of Mars during the earlier Martian geological time (possibly within the first 2 Ga) may have been originated from both biogeneic and thermogenic oil and gas hydrates. The thermal evolution of this biological geopolymer (source rock) could be observed in our earlier findings within the carbonaceous chondrites which show three distinct thermal events. Based on the current knowledge gained from carbonaceous chondrites, deltas, and hydrocarbons present within Mars, the methane on Mars may have been derived from the following sources: (1) deeper gas hydrates; (b) from the cracking of oil to gas within deeper oil or gas bearing reservoirs from a higher reservoir temperature; and (c) the high temperature conversion of current bacterial bodies within the upper surface of Mars.

  17. Solar vs. Fission Surface Power for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    crewed expedition mission. Unlike the demonstration mission, a lengthy power outage due to the global dust storms that are known to occur on Mars would pose a safety hazard to a crewed mission. A similar fission versus solar power trade study performed by NASA in 2007 concluded that fission power was more reliable-with a much lower mass penalty-than solar power for this application. However, recent advances in solar cell and energy storage technologies and changes in operational assumptions prompted NASA to revisit the analysis. For the purpose of this exercise a particular landing site at Jezero Crater, located at 18o north latitude, was assumed. A fission power system consisting of four each 10 kW Kilopower fission reactors was compared to a distributed network of Orion-derived Ultraflex solar arrays and Lithium ion batteries mounted on every lander. The team found that a solar power system mass of about 9,800 kg would provide the 22 kilowatts (kW) keep-alive power needed to survive a dust storm lasting up to 120-days at average optical depth of 5, and 35 kW peak power for normal operations under clear skies. Although this is less than half the mass estimated during the 2007 work (which assumed latitudes up to 30o) it is still more than the 7,000 kg mass of the fission system which provides full power regardless of dust storm conditions.

  18. Watershed modeling in the Tyrrhena Terra region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mest, Scott C.; Crown, David A.; Harbert, William

    2010-09-01

    Watershed analyses from high-resolution image (Viking, Mars Orbiter Camera, and Thermal Emission Imaging System) and topographic (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter [MOLA]) data are used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize highland fluvial systems and analyze the role of water in the evolution of Tyrrhena Terra (13°S-30°S, 265°W-280°W), Mars. In this study, Geographical Information System software is used in conjunction with MOLA Digital Elevation Models to delineate drainage basin divides, extract valley networks, and derive basin and network morphometric parameters (e.g., drainage density, stream order, bifurcation ratio, and relief morphometry) useful in characterizing the geologic and climatic conditions of watershed formation, as well as for evaluating basin “maturity” and processes of watershed development. Model-predicted valley networks and watershed boundaries, which are dependent on the degree to which pixel sinks are filled in the topographic data set and a channelization threshold, are evaluated against image and topographic data, slope maps, and detailed maps of valley segments from photogeologic analyses. Valley morphologies, crater/valley relationships, and impact crater distributions show that valleys in Tyrrhena Terra are ancient. Based on geologic properties of the incised materials, valley and network morphologies, morphometric parameters, and the presence of many gullies heading at or near-crater rim crests, surface runoff, derived from rainfall or snowmelt, was the dominant erosional process; sapping may have only played a secondary role in valley formation in Tyrrhena Terra. Furthermore, spatial and temporal relationships of dissected highland materials and impact craters, suggests widespread, but relatively short-lived, erosion by runoff with most activity in the Noachian period.

  19. Mars Digital Image Mosaic Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The photomosaic that forms the base for this globe was created by merging two global digital image models (DIM's) of Mars-a medium-resolution monochrome mosaic processed to emphasize topographic features and a lower resolution color mosaic emphasizing color and albedo variations.The medium-resolution (1/256 or roughly 231 m/pixel) monochromatic image model was constructed from about 6,000 images having resolutions of 150-350 m/pixel and oblique illumination (Sun 20 o -45 o above the horizon). Radiometric processing was intended to suppress or remove the effects of albedo variations through the use of a high-pass divide filter, followed by photometric normalization so that the contrast of a given topographic slope would be approximately the same in all images.The global color mosaic was assembled at 1/64 or roughly 864 m/pixel from about 1,000 red- and green-filter images having 500-1,000 m/pixel resolution. These images were first mosaiced in groups, each taken on a single orbit of the Viking spacecraft. The orbit mosaics were then processed to remove spatially and temporally varying atmospheric haze in the overlap regions. After haze removal, the per-orbit mosaics were photometrically normalized to equalize the contrast of albedo features and mosaiced together with cosmetic seam removal. The medium-resolution DIM was used for geometric control of this color mosaic. A green-filter image was synthesized by weighted averaging of the red- and violet-filter mosaics. Finally, the product seen here was obtained by multiplying each color image by the medium-resolution monochrome image. The color balance selected for images in this map series was designed to be close to natural color for brighter, redder regions, such as Arabia Terra and the Tharsis region, but the data have been stretched so that the relatively dark regions appear darker and less red than they actually are.The images are presented in a projection that portrays the entire surface of Mars in a manner

  20. Mars Aqueous Chemistry Experiment (MACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Clark C. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The concept of an aqueous-based chemical analyzer for Martian surface materials has been demonstrated to be feasible. During the processes of analysis, design, breadboarding, and most importantly, testing, it has become quite apparent that there are many challenges in implementing such a system. Nonetheless, excellent progress has been made and a number of problems which arose have been solved. The ability to conduct this work under a development environment which is separate and which precedes the project-level development has allowed us to find solutions to these implementation realities at low cost. If the instrument had been selected for a mission without this laboratory pre-project work, the costs of implementation would be much higher. In the four areas covered in Sections D, E, F, and G of this Final Report, outstanding progress has been made. There still remains the task of flight-qualifying certain of the components. This is traditionally done under the aegis of a Flight Project, but just as the concept development can be done at much lower cost when kept small and focused, so could the qualification program of critical parts benefit. We recommend, therefore, that NASA consider means of such qualifications and brass-boarding, in advance of final flight development. This is a generic recommendation, but hardware such as the Mars aqueous chemistry experiment (MACE) and other similarly-new concepts are particularly applicable. MACE now has wide versatility, in being able to reliably dispense both liquids and solids as chemical reagents to an entire suite of samples. The hardware and the experiment is much simpler than was developed for the Viking Biology instrument, yet can accomplish all the inorganic chemical measurements that the Viking desing was capable of. In addition, it is much more flexible and versatile to new experiment protocols (and reagents) than the Viking design ever could have been. MACE opens up the opportunity for many different scientific

  1. DS-2 Mars Microprobe Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, H.; Kindler, A.; Deligiannis, F.; Davies, E.; Blankevoort, J.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.

    1999-01-01

    In January of 1999 the NM DS-2 Mars microprobe will be launched to impact on Mars in December. The technical objectives of the missions are to demonstrate: key technologies, a passive atmospheric entry, highly integrated microelectronics which can withstand both low temperatures and high decelerations, and the capability to conduct in-situ, surface and subsurface science data acquisition. The scientific objectives are to determine if ice is present below the Martian surface, measure the local atmospheric pressure, characterize the thermal properties of the martian subsurface soil, and to estimate the vertical temperature gradient of the Martian soil. The battery requirements are 2-4 cell batteries, with voltage of 6-14 volts, capacity of 550 mAh at 80C, and 2Ah at 25C, shelf life of 2.5 years, an operating temperature of 60C and below, and the ability to withstand shock impact of 80,000 g's. The technical challenges and the approach is reviewed. The Li-SOCL2 system is reviewed, and graphs showing the current and voltage is displayed, along with the voltage over discharge time. The problems encountered during the testing were: (1) impact sensitivity, (2) cracking of the seals, and (3) delay in voltage. A new design resulted in no problems in the impact testing phase. The corrective actions for the seal problems involved: (1) pre weld fill tube, (2) an improved heat sink during case to cover weld and (3) change the seal dimensions to reduce stress. To correct the voltage delay problem the solutions involved: (1) drying the electrodes to reduce contamination by water, (2) assemblage of the cells within a week of electrode manufacture, (3) ensure electrolyte purity, and (4) provide second depassivation pulse after landing. The conclusions on further testing were that the battery can: (1) withstand anticipated shock of up to 80,000 g, (2) meet the discharge profile post shock at Mars temperatures, (3) meet the required self discharge rate and (4) meet environmental

  2. Mapping analysis of scaffold/matrix attachment regions (s/MARs) from two different mammalian cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilus, Nur Shazwani Mohd; Johari, Norazfa; Ahmad, Azrin; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd

    2014-09-01

    Scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) are potential element that can be integrated into expression vector to increase expression of recombinant protein. Many studies on S/MAR have been done but none has revealed the distribution of S/MAR in a genome. In this study, we have isolated S/MAR sequences from HEK293 and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines (CHO DG44) using two different methods utilizing 2 M NaCl and lithium-3,5-diiodosalicylate (LIS). The isolated S/MARs were sequenced using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platform. Based on reference mapping analysis against human genome database, a total of 8,994,856 and 8,412,672 contigs of S/MAR sequences were retrieved from 2M NaCl and LIS extraction of HEK293 respectively. On the other hand, reference mapping analysis of S/MAR derived from CHO DG44 against our own CHO DG44 database have generated a total of 7,204,348 and 4,672,913 contigs from 2 M NaCl and LIS extraction method respectively.

  3. Mapping analysis of scaffold/matrix attachment regions (s/MARs) from two different mammalian cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilus, Nur Shazwani Mohd; Ahmad, Azrin; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd [School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Johari, Norazfa [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) are potential element that can be integrated into expression vector to increase expression of recombinant protein. Many studies on S/MAR have been done but none has revealed the distribution of S/MAR in a genome. In this study, we have isolated S/MAR sequences from HEK293 and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines (CHO DG44) using two different methods utilizing 2 M NaCl and lithium-3,5-diiodosalicylate (LIS). The isolated S/MARs were sequenced using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platform. Based on reference mapping analysis against human genome database, a total of 8,994,856 and 8,412,672 contigs of S/MAR sequences were retrieved from 2M NaCl and LIS extraction of HEK293 respectively. On the other hand, reference mapping analysis of S/MAR derived from CHO DG44 against our own CHO DG44 database have generated a total of 7,204,348 and 4,672,913 contigs from 2 M NaCl and LIS extraction method respectively.

  4. Increased Science Instrumentation Funding Strengthens Mars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Lee D.; Graff, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    As the strategic knowledge gaps mature for the exploration of Mars, Mars sample return (MSR), and Phobos/Deimos missions, one approach that becomes more probable involves smaller science instrumentation and integrated science suites. Recent technological advances provide the foundation for a significant evolution of instrumentation; however, the funding support is currently too small to fully utilize these advances. We propose that an increase in funding for instrumentation development occur in the near-term so that these foundational technologies can be applied. These instruments would directly address the significant knowledge gaps for humans to Mars orbit, humans to the Martian surface, and humans to Phobos/ Deimos. They would also address the topics covered by the Decadal Survey and the Mars scientific goals, objectives, investigations and priorities as stated by the MEPAG. We argue that an increase of science instrumentation funding would be of great benefit to the Mars program as well as the potential for human exploration of the Mars system. If the total non-Earth-related planetary science instrumentation budget were increased 100% it would not add an appreciable amount to the overall NASA budget and would provide the real potential for future breakthroughs. If such an approach were implemented in the near-term, NASA would benefit greatly in terms of science knowledge of the Mars, Phobos/Deimos system, exploration risk mitigation, technology development, and public interest.

  5. Examining Traveling Waves in Mars Atmosphere Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greybush, Steven J.; Wilson, R. John

    2015-11-01

    Synoptic-scale eddies (traveling waves) are a key feature of the variability of Mars atmosphere weather in the extratropics, and are linked to the initiation of dust storms. Mars reanalyses, which combine satellite observations with simulations from a Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM), provide a four-dimensional picture of the evolution of these waves in terms of temperature, winds, pressure, and aerosol fields. The Ensemble Mars Atmosphere Reanalysis System (EMARS) has created multiple years of Mars weather maps through the assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) temperature profiles using the ensemble Kalman filter and the GFDL MGCM. We investigate the robustness of the synoptic eddies to changes in the aerosol fields, model parameters, data assimilation system design, and observation dataset (TES vs. MCS). We examine the evolution of wavenumber regimes, their seasonal evolution, and interannual variability. Finally, reanalysis fields are combined with spacecraft visible imagery (e.g. MGS Mars Orbital Camera), demonstrating the link between meteorological fields (temperature, pressure, and wind) and dust fronts.

  6. Mass Spectrometry on Future Mars Landers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry investigations on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and the 2018 ExoMars missions will address core science objectives related to the potential habitability of their landing site environments and more generally the near-surface organic inventory of Mars. The analysis of complex solid samples by mass spectrometry is a well-known approach that can provide a broad and sensitive survey of organic and inorganic compounds as well as supportive data for mineralogical analysis. The science value of such compositional information is maximized when one appreciates the particular opportunities and limitations of in situ analysis with resource-constrained instrumentation in the context of a complete science payload and applied to materials found in a particular environment. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on ExoMars will thus benefit from and inform broad-based analog field site work linked to the Mars environments where such analysis will occur.

  7. Mars surface albedo and changes

    CERN Document Server

    Vincendon, Mathieu; Altieri, Francesca; Ody, Anouck

    2014-01-01

    The pervasive Mars dust is continually transported between surface and atmosphere. When on the surface, dust increases the albedo of darker underlying rocks and regolith, which modifies climate energy balance and must be quantified. Remote observation of surface albedo absolute value and albedo change is however complicated by dust itself when lifted in the atmosphere. Here we present a method to calculate and map the bolometric solar hemispherical albedo of the Martian surface using the 2004 - 2010 OMEGA imaging spectrometer dataset. This method takes into account aerosols radiative transfer, surface photometry, and instrumental issues such as registration differences between visible and near-IR detectors. Resulting albedos are on average 17% higher than previous estimates for bright surfaces while similar for dark surfaces. We observed that surface albedo changes occur mostly during the storm season due to isolated events. The main variations are observed during the 2007 global dust storm and during the fol...

  8. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Wrapper Script

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; Khanampornpan, Teerapat

    2008-01-01

    The MRO OLVM wrapper script software allows Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) sequence and spacecraft engineers to rapidly simulate a spacecraft command product through a tool that simulates the onboard sequence management software (OLVM). This script parses sequence files to determine the appropriate time boundaries for the sequence, and constructs the script file to be executed by OLVM to span the entirety of the designated sequence. It then constructs script files to be executed by OLVM, constructs the appropriate file directories, populates these directories with needed input files, initiates OLVM to simulate the actual command product that will be sent to the spacecraft, and captures the results of the simulation run to an external file for later review. Additionally, the tool allows a user to manually construct the script, if desired, and then execute the script with a simple command line.

  9. Phoenix Deepens Trenches on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took this false color image on Oct. 21, 2008, during the 145th Martian day, or sol, since landing. The bluish-white areas seen in these trenches are part of an ice layer beneath the soil. The trench on the upper left, called 'Dodo-Goldilocks,' is about 38 centimeters (15 inches) long and 4 centimeters (1.5 inches) deep. The trench on the right, called 'Upper Cupboard,' is about 60 centimeters (24 inches) long and 3 centimeters (1 inch) deep. The trench in the lower middle is called 'Stone Soup.' The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Sediment volume in the north polar sand seas of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, N.; Greeley, R. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA))

    1990-07-10

    Data from studies of the cross-sectional area of terrestrial transverse dunes have been combined with maps of dune morphometry derived from Viking orbiter images to generate new estimates of sediment thickness and dune sediment volume in the north polar sand seas of Mars. A relationship between dune spacing and equivalent sediment thickness (EST) was developed from field data on Namibian and North American dunes and was applied to data on dune spacing and dune cover measured on Viking orbiter images to generate maps of dune sediment thickness for Martian north polar sand seas. There are four major sand seas in the north polar region of Mars, covering an area of 6.8 x 10{sup 5} km{sup 2}. Equivalent sediment thickness ranges between 0.5 and 6.1 m with a mean of 1.8 m. The sand seas contain a total of 1158 km{sup 3} of dune sediment, which may have been derived by erosion of polar layered deposits and concentrated in its present location by winds that change direction seasonally.

  11. Chromatin domains and prediction of MAR sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulikas, T

    1995-01-01

    Polynuceosomes are constrained into loops or domains and are insulated from the effects of chromatin structure and torsional strain from flanking domains by the cross-complexation of matrix-attached regions (MARs) and matrix proteins. MARs or SARs have an average size of 500 bp, are spaced about every 30 kb, and are control elements maintaining independent realms of gene activity. A fraction of MARs may cohabit with core origin replication (ORIs) and another fraction might cohabit with transcriptional enhancers. DNA replication, transcription, repair, splicing, and recombination seem to take place on the nuclear matrix. Classical AT-rich MARs have been proposed to anchor the core enhancers and core origins complexed with low abundancy transcription factors to the nuclear matrix via the cooperative binding to MARs of abundant classical matrix proteins (topoisomerase II, histone H1, lamins, SP120, ARBP, SATB1); this creates a unique nuclear microenvironment rich in regulatory proteins able to sustain transcription, replication, repair, and recombination. Theoretical searches and experimental data strongly support a model of activation of MARs and ORIs by transcription factors. A set of 21 characteristics are deduced or proposed for MAR/ORI sequences including their enrichment in inverted repeats, AT tracts, DNA unwinding elements, replication initiator protein sites, homooligonucleotide repeats (i.e., AAA, TTT, CCC), curved DNA, DNase I-hypersensitive sites, nucleosome-free stretches, polypurine stretches, and motifs with a potential for left-handed and triplex structures. We are establishing Banks of ORI and MAR sequences and have undertaken a large project of sequencing a large number of MARs in an effort to determine classes of DNA sequences in these regulatory elements and to understand their role at the origins of replication and transcriptional enhancers.

  12. Enhanced Engineering Cameras (EECAMs) for the Mars 2020 Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, J. N.; McKinney, C. M.; Sellar, R. G.; Copley-Woods, D. S.; Gruel, D. C.; Nuding, D. L.; Valvo, M.; Goodsall, T.; McGuire, J.; Litwin, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    The Mars 2020 Rover will be equipped with a next-generation engineering camera imaging system that represents an upgrade over the previous Mars rover engineering cameras flown on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission.

  13. Mar del Plata, ¿una ciudad a puro servicio?

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Fil: Atucha, Ana Julia. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales; Argentina. Fil: López, María Teresa. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales; Argentina. Fil: Volpato, Guillermo. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales; Argentina.

  14. Low Cost Mars Sample Return Utilizing Dragon Lander Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Carol R.

    2014-01-01

    We studied a Mars sample return (MSR) mission that lands a SpaceX Dragon Capsule on Mars carrying sample collection hardware (an arm, drill, or small rover) and a spacecraft stack consisting of a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) and Earth Return Vehicle (ERV) that collectively carry the sample container from Mars back to Earth orbit.

  15. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sharon A.; Grant, John A.; Cohen, Barbara A.; Golombek, Mathew P.; Geissler, Paul E.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Parker, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    The $\\sim$750 m diameter and $\\sim$75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, presents evidence for significant degradation including a low, serrated, raised rim characterized by alternating alcoves and promontories, a surrounding low relief annulus, and a floor partially covered by dunes. The amount and processes of degradation responsible for the modified appearance of Victoria crater were evaluated using images obtained in situ by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in concert with a digital elevation model created using orbital HiRISE images. Opportunity traversed along the north and northwest rim and annulus, but sufficiently characterized features visible in the DEM to enable detailed measurements of rim relief, ejecta thickness, and wall slopes around the entire degraded, primary impact structure. Victoria retains a 5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by 3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is $\\sim$120 to 220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500 to 750 m across indicate the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by approximately 150 m and infilled by about 50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for modification at Victoria, but lesser contributions from mass wasting or other processes cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for $\\sim$50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is $\\sim$20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when $\\sim$1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped darker, regional

  16. Possible organosedimentary structures on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Vincenzo; Cantasano, Nicola

    2009-10-01

    This study, using the Microscopic Imager (MI) of NASA Rover Exploration Mission's (REM) ‘Opportunity’, aims to explain the origin of laminated sediments lying at Meridiani Planum of Mars, and of the strange spherules, known as blueberries, about which several hypotheses have been formulated. To this purpose, images of the sedimentary textures of layers and fragments captured by REM have been analysed; sediments that NASA has already established as ‘pertinent to water presence’. Our study shows that such laminated sediments and the spherules they contain could be organosedimentary structures, probably produced by microorganisms. The laminated structures are characterized by a sequence of a thin pair of layers, which have the features of skeletal/agglutinated laminae and whose basic constituents are made by a partition of septa and vacuoles radially arranged around a central one. The growth of these supposed organosedimentary masses is based on the ‘built flexibility’ of such a basal element; it may be a coalescing microfossil formed by progressive film accretion (calcimicrobe), in a variety of geometrical gross forms, such as a repeated couplet sequence of laminae or domal mass and large composite polycentric spherule, both in elevation. The acquired structural and textural data seem to be consistent with the existence of life on Mars and could explain an origin of sediments at Meridiani Planum similar to that of terrestrial stromatolites. The Martian deposits, probably produced by cyanobacterial activity, and the embedded blueberries could represent a recurrent and multiform product of colonies with sheath forms, resembling in shape those of the fossil genus Archaeosphaeroides (stromatolites of Fig Tree, South Africa).

  17. MEMOS - Mars Environment Monitoring Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, T.; Barabash, S.; von Schéele, F.; Clacey, E.; Pokrupa, N.

    2007-08-01

    The Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) in cooperation with the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) has conducted first studies on a Mars Environment Monitoring Satellite (MEMOS). The MEMOS microsatellite (mass ELT) Proximity-1 transceiver will autonomously communicate with the parent satellite at inter-satellite ranges 2 kbit/s. The transceiver also implements a coherent transponding mode for orbit determination through two-way Doppler ranging between the parent satellite and MEMOS. In addition ELT is compatible with a future Martian communication and navigation network pursued by NASA, which could be taken advantage of in the future for relaying data or performing ranging via other satellites part of the network. A system design driver for inter-satellite communication at Mars is the high demand of power. This leads to a disk-shape and thus easy to accommodate spacecraft configuration of MEMOS comprising a single sun-pointing solar array favourable in terms of power and spin stability. Multi-junction solar cells, which currently have an efficiency of ~29% under laboratory conditions are a key factor to keep MEMOS solar array area of ~1.15 m2 small compared to the worst case system power requirements of ~105 W. During eclipse periods high-efficient Li-ion batteries (6 x 20 Wh) will ensure power supply. The spacecraft and payload design will incorporate new technology developments such as autonomous navigation, MicroElectroMechanical Systems MEMS, Micro- Opto-ElectroMechanical Systems MOEMS and new materials to achieve low mass at high performance. Thereby it will profit from Swedish developments and heritage in small- / microsatellites like Astrid-2, SMART-1 or the upcoming rendezvous and formation flying demonstration mission PRISMA.

  18. Atmospheric Modeling Using Accelerometer Data During Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Lugo, Rafael A.; Baird, Darren T.; Cianciolo, Alicia D.; Bougher, Stephen W.; Zurek, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is a NASA orbiter designed to explore the Mars upper atmosphere, typically from 140 to 160 km altitude. In addition to the nominal science mission, MAVEN has performed several Deep Dip campaigns in which the orbit's closest point of approach, also called periapsis, was lowered to an altitude range of 115 to 135 km. MAVEN accelerometer data were used during mission operations to estimate atmospheric parameters such as density, scale height, along-track gradients, and wave structures. Density and scale height estimates were compared against those obtained from the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model and used to aid the MAVEN navigation team in planning maneuvers to raise and lower periapsis during Deep Dip operations. This paper describes the processes used to reconstruct atmosphere parameters from accelerometers data and presents the results of their comparison to model and navigation-derived values.

  19. Contribution of magnetic measurements onboard NetLander to Mars exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menvielle, M.; Musmann, G.; Kuhnke, F.

    2000-01-01

    Lander stations will therefore allow study of both the internal structure of Mars and dynamics of its ionised environment. The expected characteristics of transient magnetic variations, and their relation with plasma how and current in the Mars ionised environment are discussed. The use of the network magnetic......In the frame of the international cooperation for Mars exploration, a set of 4 NetLanders developed by an European consortium is expected to land on the planet during the forthcoming years. Among other instruments, the geophysical package of each lander will include a magnetometer. The different...... possible contributions of magnetic measurements onboard the NetLander stations are presented. Intrinsic planetary field and remanent magnetisation investigations by means of magnetometers onboard a network of landers are first considered, and the information that can be thus derived on the Martian core...

  20. A Stormy Forecast for the Upcoming Dust Storm Season on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, J. H.; Mischna, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The dust storm season on Mars is centered on the time of Mars' perihelion, which occurs late in the southern spring. The dust storm season of the current Mars year (MY 33) will begin on 1 June 2016 (Ls=160°) and will end on 28 March 2017 (Ls=340°). Mars will reach perihelion in late October 2016, about a month after the planned landing of the Mars InSight Lander. Spectacular global-scale dust storms (GDS) occur during the dust storm season in some Mars years but not in others. In a prior study (Shirley, 2015; Icarus 251, 128-144), systematic relationships were found linking the occurrence of historic global-scale dust storms on Mars with the variability of the orbital angular momentum of the planet with respect to the solar system barycenter. Conditions favorable to the occurrence of a future GDS in the current Mars year were noted in that study. A physical model that may account for the observed relationships has subsequently emerged. In this model, a weak coupling of the orbital and rotational motions of extended bodies is effected through a modulation of circulatory flows of atmospheres. The formal derivation yields a coupling term, which in turn prescribes an acceleration field that may constructively or destructively interfere with large-scale atmospheric motions driven by other means. This coupling term has been incorporated within the MarsWRF Global Circulation Model, and the GCM thus modified has undergone extensive validation and testing. The GCM "retrodicts" accelerations and circulation patterns favorable for the occurrence of southern summer solstice season global-scale dust storms in all of the prior years (n=7) in which such storms are known to have occurred (Mischna and Shirley, this meeting). The forcing function for the upcoming dust storm season exhibits amplitude and phasing that largely replicates the dynamical conditions prevailing prior to and during the MY 9 GDS of 1971. We conclude that a global-scale dust storm is likely to occur during

  1. Opportunities for ISRU Applications in the Mars Reference Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Michael B.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Mars Exploration Reference Mission envisions sending three crews of six astronauts to Mars, each for 500-day stays on the surface. In situ Resourse Unitlization (ISRU) has been baselined for the production of propellant for crews leaving the surface, as well as to create reservoirs of water and life-support consumables These applications improve performance (by reducing the mass of hardware and supplies that must be brought to Mars for the propulsion system) and reduce risk (by creating consumables as backups to stores brought from Earth). Similar applications of other types of ISRU-derived materials should be sought and selected if they similarly improve performance or reduce risk. Some possible concepts for consideration, based on a review of the components included in the Reference Mission, include (1) emplacement of a hardened landing pad; (2) construction of a roadway for transporting the nuclear power system to a safe distance from the habitat; (3) radiation shielding for inflatable structures; (4) tanks and plumbing for bioregenerative life-support system; (5) drilling rig; (6) additional access structures for equipment and personnel and unpressurized structures for vehicle storage; (7) utilitarian manufactured products (e.g., stools and benches) for habitat and laboratory; (8) thermal radiators; (9) photovoltaic devices and support structures; and ( 10) external structures for storage and preservation of Mars samples. These may be viewed principally as mission- enhancing concepts for the Reference Mission. Selection would require a clear rationale for performance improvement or risk reduction and a demonstration that the cost of developing and transporting the needed equipment would be recovered within the budget for the program. Additional work is also necessary to ascertain whether early applications of ISRU for these types of purposes could lead to the modification of later missions, allowing the replacement of infrastructure payloads currently

  2. Recent enhancements to the MARS15 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolai V. Mokhov et al.

    2004-05-12

    The MARS code is under continuous development and has recently undergone substantial improvements that further increase its reliability and predictive power in numerous shielding, accelerator, detector and space applications. The major developments and new features of the MARS15 (2004) version described in this paper concern an extended list of elementary particles and arbitrary heavy ions and their interaction cross-sections, inclusive and exclusive nuclear event generators, module for modeling particle electromagnetic interactions, enhanced geometry and histograming options, improved MAD-MARS Beam Line Builder, enhanced Graphical-User Interface, and an MPI-based parallelization of the code.

  3. The resources of Mars for human settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas R.; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1989-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration of Marshas shown that the essential resources necessary for life support are present on the Martian surface. The key life-support compounds O2, N2, and H2O are available on Mars. The soil could be used as radiation shielding and could provide many useful industrial and construction materials. Compounds with high chemical energy, such as rocket fuels, can be manufactured in-situ on Mars. Solar power, and possibly wind power, are available and practical on Mars. Preliminary engineering studies indicate that fairly autonomous processes can be designed to extract and stockpile Martian consumables.

  4. Mars MetNet Mission Payload Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Haukka, H.; Alexashkin, S.; Guerrero, H.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Vazquez, L.

    2012-09-01

    A new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars is being developed in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission [1] is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). The scientific payload of the Mars MetNet Precursor mission is divided into three categories: Atmospheric instruments, Optical devices and Composition and structure devices. Each of the payload instruments will provide crucial scientific data about the Martian atmospheric phenomena.

  5. On Mars Exploration Rovers - Spirit and Opportunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李颖; 吴文忠

    2004-01-01

    NASA's twin Mars exploration rovers, now named Spirit and Opportunity, are designed to study the history of water on Mars. These robotic geologists are equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow them to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go.

  6. NASA Set for 2001 Mars Odyssey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国宁

    2001-01-01

    人类对火星的探索处于起步阶段,却体现出了不屈不饶的精神。NASA在1999年的两次发射太空船均以失败告终,今年发射The Mars Odyssey获得成功。文章告诉我们:The Mars Odyssey will complete its 400-million-mile journey in October.让我们在金秋十月等候The Mars Odyssey发回的关于火星的信息吧。

  7. Evidence for collisionless magnetic reconnection at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, J. P.; Brain, D. A.; Halekas, J. S.; Drake, J. F.; Phan, T. D.; Øieroset, M.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Acuña, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) in combination with Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of reconnection, we present the first direct evidence of collisionless magnetic reconnection at Mars. The evidence indicates that the spacecraft passed through the diffusion region where reconnection is initiated and observed the magnetic field signatures of differential electron and ion motion - the Hall magnetic field - that uniquely indicate the reconnection process. These are the first such in-situ reconnection observations at an astronomical body other than the Earth. Reconnection may be the source of Mars' recently discovered auroral activity and the changing boundaries of the closed regions of crustal magnetic field.

  8. Hemoglobin derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003371.htm Hemoglobin derivatives To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemoglobin derivatives are altered forms of hemoglobin . Hemoglobin is ...

  9. Retrieval of ionospheric profiles from the Mars Express MARSIS experiment data and comparison with radio occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sánchez-Cano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 2005 the Mars Advanced Radar and Ionospheric Sounding experiment (MARSIS aboard Mars Express has acquired a unique dataset on the ionosphere of Mars made up of ionospheric soundings taken by the instrument working in its active ionospheric sounding (AIS mode. These soundings play a role similar to those of modern Terrestrial digisondes in the analysis of our planet ionosphere and have allowed us to dramatically improve our knowledge about the Martian ionosphere. This paper describes this kind of data, which are available from the public Planetary Science Archive, and introduces the MAISDAT tool developed by the European Space Agency to analyze and derive the vertical profile of electron density. Comparisons with radio occultation profiles obtained from Mars Express Radio Science instrument are performed to validate the procedure used in this study.

  10. Modeling the Martian neutral particle radiation - predictions for ExoMars/IRAS and implications for Martian habitability during the Noachian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehresmann, Bent; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Burmeister, Soenke; Koehler, Jan; Kulkarni, Shri [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Reitz, Guenther [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The exciting results of recent Mars exploration missions indicate that water existed on the Martian surface, which provides a possibility for life on Mars. Thus, there is an enhanced interest in analyzing the conditions for habitability on Mars, especially in the Noachian epoch. An important aspect of habitability is the radiation level of charged and neutral particles in possible habitats. Using Planetocosmics, we calculate particle radiation in the Martian atmosphere and at ground level for present-day conditions. These calculations allow us to make predictions for the measurements of the Ionizing Radiation Sensor (IRAS) on ExoMars. By changing atmosphere conditions and varying the water-content of the Martian soil, we can derive radiation levels expected during the Noachian period. We will discuss the implications of these model results in terms of Noachian habitability.

  11. Retrieval of ionospheric profiles from the Mars Express MARSIS experiment data and comparison with radio-occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sánchez-Cano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2005 the Mars Advanced Radar and Ionospheric Sounding experiment (MARSIS aboard Mars Express has acquired a unique data set on the ionosphere of Mars made up of ionospheric soundings taken by the instrument working in its Active Ionospheric Sounding (AIS mode. These soundings play a role similar to those of modern Terrestrial digisondes in the analysis of our planet ionosphere and have allowed us to dramatically improve our knowledge about the Martian ionosphere. This paper describes this kind of data, which are available from the public Planetary Science Archive, and introduces the MAISDAT tool developed by the European Space Agency to analyze and derive the vertical profile of electron density. Comparisons with radio-occultation profiles obtained from Mars Express Radio Science instrument are performed to validate the procedure used in this study.

  12. Search for Chemical Biomarkers on Mars Using the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite on the Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Conrad, P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Eigenbrode, J.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    One key goal for the future exploration of Mars is the search for chemical biomarkers including complex organic compounds important in life on Earth. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will provide the most sensitive measurements of the organic composition of rocks and regolith samples ever carried out in situ on Mars. SAM consists of a gas chromatograph (GC), quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and tunable laser spectrometer to measure volatiles in the atmosphere and released from rock powders heated up to 1000 C. The measurement of organics in solid samples will be accomplished by three experiments: (1) pyrolysis QMS to identify alkane fragments and simple aromatic compounds; pyrolysis GCMS to separate and identify complex mixtures of larger hydrocarbons; and (3) chemical derivatization and GCMS extract less volatile compounds including amino and carboxylic acids that are not detectable by the other two experiments.

  13. Relays from Mars demonstrate international interplanetary networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    On 4 August at 14:24 CEST, as Mars Express flew over one of NASA’s Mars exploration rovers, Opportunity, it successfully received data previously collected and stored by the rover. The data, including 15 science images from the rover's nine cameras, were then downlinked to ESA’s European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt (Germany) and immediately relayed to the Mars Exploration Rovers team based at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, USA. NASA orbiters Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor have so far relayed most of the data produced by the rovers since they landed in January. Communication compatibility between Mars Express and the rovers had already been demonstrated in February, although at a low rate that did not convey much data. The 4 August session, at a transmit rate of 42.6 megabits in about six minutes, set a new mark for international networking around another planet. The success of this demonstration is the result of years of groundwork and was made possible because both Mars Express and the Mars rovers use the same communication protocol. This protocol, called Proximity-1, was developed by the international Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems, an international partnership for standardising techniques for handling space data. Mars Express was 1400 kilometres above the Martian surface during the 4 August session with Opportunity, with the goal of a reliable transfer of lots of data. Engineers for both agencies plan to repeat this display of international cooperation today, 10 August, with another set of Opportunity images. “We're delighted how well this has been working, and thankful to have Mars Express in orbit,” said Richard Horttor of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, project manager for NASA's role in Mars Express. JPL engineer Gary Noreen of the Mars Network Office said: “the capabilities that our international teamwork is advancing this month could be important in future exploration of Mars

  14. MarsCAT: Mars Array of ionospheric Research Satellites using the CubeSat Ambipolar Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A., III; Pinsky, L.; Li, L.; Jackson, D. R.; Chen, J.; Reed, H.; Moldwin, M.; Kasper, J. C.; Sheehan, J. P.; Forbes, J.; Heine, T.; Case, A. W.; Stevens, M. L.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The MarsCAT (Mars Array of ionospheric Research Satellites using the CubeSat Ambipolar Thruster) Mission is a two 6U CubeSat mission to study the ionosphere of Mars proposed for the NASA SIMPLeX opportunity. The mission will investigate the plasma and magnetic structure of the Martian ionosphere, including transient plasma structures, magnetic field structure and dynamics, and energetic particle activity. The transit plan calls for a piggy back ride with Mars 2020 using a CAT burn for MOI, the first demonstration of CubeSat propulsion for interplanetary travel. MarsCAT will make correlated multipoint studies of the ionosphere and magnetic field of Mars. Specifically, the two spacecraft will make in situ observations of the plasma density, temperature, and convection in the ionosphere of Mars. They will also make total electron content measurements along the line of sight between the two spacecraft and simultaneous 3-axis local magnetic field measurements in two locations. Additionally, MarsCAT will demonstrate the performance of new CubeSat telemetry antennas designed at the University of Houston that are designed to be low profile, rugged, and with a higher gain than conventional monopole (whip) antennas. The two MarsCAT CubeSats will have five science instruments: a 3-axis DC magnetometer, adouble-Langmuir probe, a Faraday cup, a solid state energetic particle detector (Science Enhancement Option), and interspacecraft total electron content radio occulation experiment. The MarsCAT spacecraft will be solar powered and equipped with a CAT thruster that can provide up to 4.8 km/s of delta-V, which is sufficient to achieve Mars orbit using the Mars 2020 piggyback. They have an active attitude control system, using a sun sensor and flight-proven star tracker for determination, and momentum wheels for 3-axis attitude control.

  15. Critical Masses for Various Terrestrial Planet Atmospheric Gases and Water in/on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-gun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lower critical mass boundaries (CM for various atmospheric gas species on terrestrial planets are estimated. The CM is different for different gas molecules. Except for He, the observed atmospheric compositions of the terrestrial planets are consistent with these estimates. The lower CM boundary for gaseous H2O is calculated as 8.06 × 1026 g, which is significantly greater than the Martian mass (6.419 × 1026 g. Thus, Mars is not capable of retaining H2O in its atmosphere. If the speculated ocean on Mars and the claimed H2O ice in the Martian soil are true, both the ocean and ice had to be derived earlier from H2O degassed from the Martian interior after the surface temperature cooled much below 100°C. These watery bodies cannot be sustained for long durations because evaporation and sublimation would turn them into gaseous H2O, which would be lost to outer-space. It is concluded that H2O in/on Mars is inherent and that the primordial planetesimals that formed Mars must have contained appreciable amounts of hydrous minerals, if the oceans and/or H2O ice on Mars are true.

  16. MarsSedEx III: linking Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and reduced gravity experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Kuhn, B.; Gartmann, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nikolaus J. Kuhn (1), Brigitte Kuhn (1), and Andres Gartmann (2) (1) University of Basel, Physical Geography, Environmental Sciences, Basel, Switzerland (nikolaus.kuhn@unibas.ch), (2) Meteorology, Climatology, Remote Sensing, Environmental Sciences, University of Basel, Switzerland Experiments conducted during the MarsSedEx I and II reduced gravity experiments showed that using empirical models for sediment transport on Mars developed for Earth violates fluid dynamics. The error is caused by the interaction between runing water and sediment particles, which affect each other in a positive feedback loop. As a consequence, the actual flow conditions around a particle cannot be represented by drag coefficients derived on Earth. This study exmines the implications of such gravity effects on sediment movement on Mars, with special emphasis on the limits of sandstones and conglomerates formed on Earth as analogues for sedimentation on Mars. Furthermore, options for correctiong the errors using a combination of CFD and recent experiments conducted during the MarsSedEx III campaign are presented.

  17. Critical Masses for Various Terrestrial Planet Atmospheric Gases and Water in/on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-gun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lower critical mass boundaries (CM for various atmospheric gas species on terrestrial planets are estimated. The CM is different for different gas molecules. Except for He, the observed atmospheric compositions of the terrestrial planets are consistent with these estimates. The lower CM boundary for gaseous H2O is calculated as 8.06 ×× 1026 g, which is significantly greater than the Martian mass (6.419 ×× 1026 g. Thus, Mars is not capable of retaining H2O in its atmosphere. If the speculated ocean on Mars and the claimed H2O ice in the Martian soil are true, both the ocean and ice had to be derived earlier from H2O degassed from the Martian interior after the surface temperature cooled much below 100°C.100°C. These watery bodies cannot be sustained for long durations because evaporation and sublimation would turn them into gaseous H2O, which would be lost to outer-space. It is concluded that H2O in/on Mars is inherent and that the primordial planetesimals that formed Mars must have contained appreciable amounts of hydrous minerals, if the oceans and/or H2O ice on Mars are true.

  18. Entry, Descent, and Landing Guidance and Control Approaches to Satisfy Mars Human Mission Landing Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Powell, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Precision landing on Mars is a challenge. All Mars lander missions prior to the 2012 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) had landing location uncertainty ellipses on the order of hundreds of kilometers. Sending humans to the surface of Mars will likely require multiple landers delivered in close proximity, which will in turn require orders of magnitude improvement in landing accuracy. MSL was the first Mars mission to use an Apollo-derived bank angle guidance to reduce the size of the landing ellipse. It utilized commanded bank angle magnitude to control total range and bank angle reversals to control cross range. A shortcoming of this bank angle guidance is that the open loop phase of flight created by use of bank reversals increases targeting errors. This paper presents a comparison of entry, descent and landing performance for a vehicle with a low lift-to-drag ratio using both bank angle control and an alternative guidance called Direct Force Control (DFC). DFC eliminates the open loop flight errors by directly controlling two forces independently, lift and side force. This permits independent control of down range and cross range. Performance results, evaluated using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST2), including propellant use and landing accuracy, are presented.

  19. Measurements of energetic particle radiation in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, C; Hassler, D M; Cucinotta, F A; Ehresmann, B; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Brinza, D E; Kang, S; Weigle, G; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Köhler, J; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S; Reitz, G

    2013-05-31

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011, and for most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector made detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. These data provide insights into the radiation hazards that would be associated with a human mission to Mars. We report measurements of the radiation dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer spectra. The dose equivalent for even the shortest round-trip with current propulsion systems and comparable shielding is found to be 0.66 ± 0.12 sievert.

  20. Seasonal and static gravity field of Mars from MGS, Mars Odyssey and MRO radio science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-07-01

    We present a spherical harmonic solution of the static gravity field of Mars to degree and order 120, GMM-3, that has been calculated using the Deep Space Network tracking data of the NASA Mars missions, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). We have also jointly determined spherical harmonic solutions for the static and time-variable gravity field of Mars, and the Mars k2 Love numbers, exclusive of the gravity contribution of the atmosphere. Consequently, the retrieved time-varying gravity coefficients and the Love number k2 solely yield seasonal variations in the mass of the polar caps and the solid tides of Mars, respectively. We obtain a Mars Love number k2 of 0.1697 ± 0.0027 (3-σ). The inclusion of MRO tracking data results in improved seasonal gravity field coefficients C30 and, for the first time, C50. Refinements of the atmospheric model in our orbit determination program have allowed us to monitor the odd zonal harmonic C30 for ∼1.5 solar cycles (16 years). This gravity model shows improved correlations with MOLA topography up to 15% larger at higher harmonics (l = 60-80) than previous solutions.

  1. The Mars Climate Database (MCD version 5.3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millour, Ehouarn; Forget, Francois; Spiga, Aymeric; Vals, Margaux; Zakharov, Vladimir; Navarro, Thomas; Montabone, Luca; Lefevre, Franck; Montmessin, Franck; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel; Gonzalez-Galindo, Francisco; Lewis, Stephen; Read, Peter; Desjean, Marie-Christine; MCD/GCM Development Team

    2017-04-01

    Our Global Circulation Model (GCM) simulates the atmospheric environment of Mars. It is developped at LMD (Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris, France) in close collaboration with several teams in Europe (LATMOS, France, University of Oxford, The Open University, the Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia), and with the support of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (French Space Agency). GCM outputs are compiled to build a Mars Climate Database, a freely available tool useful for the scientific and engineering communities. The Mars Climate Database (MCD) has over the years been distributed to more than 300 teams around the world. The latest series of reference simulations have been compiled in a new version (v5.3) of the MCD, released in the first half of 2017. To summarize, MCD v5.3 provides: - Climatologies over a series of synthetic dust scenarios: standard (climatology) year, cold (ie: low dust), warm (ie: dusty atmosphere) and dust storm, all topped by various cases of Extreme UV solar inputs (low, mean or maximum). These scenarios have been derived from home-made, instrument-derived (TES, THEMIS, MCS, MERs), dust climatology of the last 8 Martian years. The MCD also provides simulation outputs (MY24-31) representative of these actual years. - Mean values and statistics of main meteorological variables (atmospheric temperature, density, pressure and winds), as well as surface pressure and temperature, CO2 ice cover, thermal and solar radiative fluxes, dust column opacity and mixing ratio, [H20] vapor and ice columns, concentrations of many species: [CO], [O2], [O], [N2], [H2], [O3], ... - A high resolution mode which combines high resolution (32 pixel/degree) MOLA topography records and Viking Lander 1 pressure records with raw lower resolution GCM results to yield, within the restriction of the procedure, high resolution values of atmospheric variables. - The possibility to reconstruct realistic conditions by combining the provided climatology with

  2. An origin of life on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Christopher P

    2010-04-01

    Evidence of past liquid water on the surface of Mars suggests that this world once had habitable conditions and leads to the question of life. If there was life on Mars, it would be interesting to determine if it represented a separate origin from life on Earth. To determine the biochemistry and genetics of life on Mars requires that we have access to an organism or the biological remains of one-possibly preserved in ancient permafrost. A way to determine if organic material found on Mars represents the remains of an alien biological system could be based on the observation that biological systems select certain organic molecules over others that are chemically similar (e.g., chirality in amino acids).

  3. Mars One the ultimate reality TV show?

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2017-01-01

    This book dissects the hype and hubris of the Mars One venture. Every aspect of the mission design is scrutinized, from the haphazard selection process to the unproven mission architecture. A controversial project, many professional astronauts consider Mars One a reckless attempt, yet it gained popular attention. This go-to reference guide provides the reader with insights into the myriad issues arising from the project's loss of funding, loss of sponsorship, loss of TV rights. It explains what contributed to an overly optimistic assessment of Mars One's mission-specific technology, and what captivated the public and the many willing candidates despite these flaws. From the author of Survival and Sacrifice in Mars Exploration (2015) among many more books on spacefaring, this is yet another up-to-the-minute account of an emerging player in the private space market from an expert on the subject.

  4. Radiolytic Alteration of Biosignatures on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, R. C.

    2016-05-01

    When exposed to ionizing radiation, a complex distribution of redox states and reactive intermediates form in both perchlorate and nitrate salts. These reactive species then act to alter the forms of organic biosignatures preserved on Mars.

  5. Atmosphere of Mars - Mariner IV models compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, V. R.; Fjeldbo, G.; Fjeldbo, W. C.

    1966-01-01

    Mariner IV models of three Mars atmospheric layers analogous to terrestrial E, F-1 and F-2 layers, considering relative mass densities, temperatures, carbon dioxide photodissociation and ionization profile

  6. Current understanding of the aeronomy of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Andrew F.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper provides a short overview of our current understanding of the upper atmosphere/ionosphere of Mars including the escaping neutral atmosphere to space that plays a key role in the current state of the Mars upper atmosphere. The proper definition of the word "aeronomy" relates to the upper atmosphere where ionization is important. Currently there is a paucity of measurements of the internal physical structure of the Martian upper atmosphere/ionosphere. Much that we know has been deduced from theoretical models that predict many more things than thus far measured. The newest Mars orbital missions, the US MAVEN and Indian MOM missions, just beginning their science analyses, will provide the measurements needed to fully characterize the aeronomy of Mars.

  7. CO2 Removal from Mars EMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CO2 control for during ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) on mars is challenging. Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canisters have impractical logistics penalties, and regenerable...

  8. Enabling Tethered Exploration on Mars Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strong science motivations exist for exploring hard to reach terrain on Mars and the leading systems proposed to do so require tethers. While tethers are used...

  9. A Possible Sink for Methane on Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nørnberg, P.; Jensen, S. J. K.; Skibsted, J.; Jakobsen, H. J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Merrison, J. P.; Finster, K.; Bak, E.; Iversen, J. J.; Kondrup, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical simulated wind activation of mineral surfaces act as a trap for Methane through formation of covalent Si-C bonds stable up to temperatures above 250 C. This mechanism is proposed as a Methane sink on Mars.

  10. Surface chemistry and mineralogy. [of planet Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Clark, B. C.; Waenke, H.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulated knowledge on the chemistry and mineralogy of Martian surface materials is reviewed. Pertinent information obtained by direct analyses of the soil on Mars by the Viking Landers, by remote sensing of Mars from flyby and orbiting spacecraft, by telescopic observations from earth, and through detailed analyses of the SNC meteorites presumed to be Martian rocks are summarized and analyzed. A compositional model for Mars soil, giving selected average elemental concentrations of major and trace elements, is suggested. It is proposed that the fine surface materials on Mars are a multicomponent mixture of weathered and nonweathered minerals. Smectite clays, silicate mineraloids similar to palagonite, and scapolite are suggested as possible major candidate components among the weathered minerals.

  11. Geodesy and cartography. [of planet Mars surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Merton E.; Batson, Raymond M.; Wu, Sherman S. C.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of geodesy and cartography of Mars over the past century is presented. The modern exploration began with the Mariner 4, 6, and 7 flyby missions, followed by the Mariner 9 and Viking missions that mapped the entire surface of Mars. The primary modern changes to the coordinate system have led to improved measurements of the rotational period, the direction of the spin axis, and the size and shape of Mars. Planimetric mapping based on Mariner 9 pictures began with a 1:25-M-scale sheet and 30 1:5-M-scale sheets that covered the entire Martian surface. The quality of the Viking Orbiter pictures was greatly improved over Mariner 9 and led to the publication of 140 controlled photomosaic sheets at a scale of 1:2 M. Two digital data bases have been compiled for Mars - the digital image model and the digital terrain model.

  12. CO2 Removal from Mars EMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A practical CO2 control system for ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) on Mars have not yet been developed. TDA Research, Inc. proposes to develop a durable,...

  13. Ongoing Mars Missions: Extended Mission Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Richard; Diniega, Serina; Crisp, Joy; Fraeman, Abigail; Golombek, Matt; Jakosky, Bruce; Plaut, Jeff; Senske, David A.; Tamppari, Leslie; Thompson, Thomas W.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.

    2016-10-01

    Many key scientific discoveries in planetary science have been made during extended missions. This is certainly true for the Mars missions both in orbit and on the planet's surface. Every two years, ongoing NASA planetary missions propose investigations for the next two years. This year, as part of the 2016 Planetary Sciences Division (PSD) Mission Senior Review, the Mars Odyssey (ODY) orbiter project submitted a proposal for its 7th extended mission, the Mars Exploration Rover (MER-B) Opportunity submitted for its 10th, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) for its 4th, and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover and the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MVN) orbiter for their 2nd extended missions, respectively. Continued US participation in the ongoing Mars Express Mission (MEX) was also proposed. These missions arrived at Mars in 2001, 2004, 2006, 2012, 2014, and 2003, respectively. Highlights of proposed activities include systematic observations of the surface and atmosphere in twilight (early morning and late evening), building on a 13-year record of global mapping (ODY); exploration of a crater rim gully and interior of Endeavour Crater, while continuing to test what can and cannot be seen from orbit (MER-B); refocused observations of ancient aqueous deposits and polar cap interiors, while adding a 6th Mars year of change detection in the atmosphere and the surface (MRO); exploration and sampling by a rover of mineralogically diverse strata of Mt. Sharp and of atmospheric methane in Gale Crater (MSL); and further characterization of atmospheric escape under different solar conditions (MVN). As proposed, these activities follow up on previous discoveries (e.g., recurring slope lineae, habitable environments), while expanding spatial and temporal coverage to guide new detailed observations. An independent review panel evaluated these proposals, met with project representatives in May, and made recommendations to NASA in June 2016. In this

  14. Machine cataloging of impact craters on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.; Mendenhall, Michael P.; Bue, Brian D.

    2009-09-01

    This study presents an automated system for cataloging impact craters using the MOLA 128 pixels/degree digital elevation model of Mars. Craters are detected by a two-step algorithm that first identifies round and symmetric topographic depressions as crater candidates and then selects craters using a machine-learning technique. The system is robust with respect to surface types; craters are identified with similar accuracy from all different types of martian surfaces without adjusting input parameters. By using a large training set in its final selection step, the system produces virtually no false detections. Finally, the system provides a seamless integration of crater detection with its characterization. Of particular interest is the ability of our algorithm to calculate crater depths. The system is described and its application is demonstrated on eight large sites representing all major types of martian surfaces. An evaluation of its performance and prospects for its utilization for global surveys are given by means of detailed comparison of obtained results to the manually-derived Catalog of Large Martian Impact Craters. We use the results from the test sites to construct local depth-diameter relationships based on a large number of craters. In general, obtained relationships are in agreement with what was inferred on the basis of manual measurements. However, we have found that, in Terra Cimmeria, the depth/diameter ratio has an abrupt decrease at ˜38°S regardless of crater size. If shallowing of craters is attributed to presence of sub-surface ice, a sudden change in its spatial distribution is suggested by our findings.

  15. Meteorites on Mars observed with Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, C.; Rodionov, D.S.; McCoy, T.J.; Jolliff, B.L.; Gellert, Ralf; Nittler, L.R.; Farrand, W. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Ruff, S.W.; Ashley, James W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Fleischer, I.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Klingelhofer, G.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; de Souza, P.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Weitz, C.; Yen, A. S.; Zipfel, J.; Economou, T.

    2008-01-01

    Reduced weathering rates due to the lack of liquid water and significantly greater typical surface ages should result in a higher density of meteorites on the surface of Mars compared to Earth. Several meteorites were identified among the rocks investigated during Opportunity's traverse across the sandy Meridiani plains. Heat Shield Rock is a IAB iron meteorite and has been officially recognized as 'Meridiani Planum.' Barberton is olivine-rich and contains metallic Fe in the form of kamacite, suggesting a meteoritic origin. It is chemically most consistent with a mesosiderite silicate clast. Santa Catarina is a brecciated rock with a chemical and mineralogical composition similar to Barberton. Barberton, Santa Catarina, and cobbles adjacent to Santa Catarina may be part of a strewn field. Spirit observed two probable iron meteorites from its Winter Haven location in the Columbia Hills in Gusev Crater. Chondrites have not been identified to date, which may be a result of their lower strengths and probability to survive impact at current atmospheric pressures. Impact craters directly associated with Heat Shield Rock, Barberton, or Santa Catarina have not been observed, but such craters could have been erased by eolian-driven erosion. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Vitoria y Grocio frente al mar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Salom-Franco

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Este ensayo exclusivo para nuestra Revista Estudios Socio-Jurídicos del doctor Nicolás Salom Franco, contiene una verdadera primicia jurídica en nuestro medio. La supuesta primera respuesta al conocido opúsculo de Hugo Grocio El mar libre, dada por un ignorado jesuita flamenco, el padre Nicolás Bonaert, titulada Minos o el mar seguro, fascinante historia que nuestro escritor invitado desarrolla en su historia.

  17. Rocks: Windows to History of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This full-resolution image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit before it rolled off the lander shows the rocky surface of Mars. Scientists are eager to begin examining the rocks because, unlike soil, these 'little time capsules' hold memories of the ancient processes that formed them. Data from the camera's red, green and blue filters were combined to create this approximate true color picture.

  18. Rocks: Windows to History of Mars-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This full-resolution image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit before it rolled off the lander shows the rocky surface of Mars. Scientists are eager to begin examining the rocks because, unlike soil, these 'little time capsules' hold memories of the ancient processes that formed them. The lander's deflated airbags can be seen in the foreground. Data from the camera's red, green and blue filters were combined to create this approximate true color picture.

  19. Seismic detection of meteorite impacts on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Teanby, N.A.; Wookey, J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Meteorite impacts provide a potentially important seismic source for probing Mars? interior. It has recently been shown that new craters can be detected from orbit using high resolution imaging, which means the location of any impact-related seismic event could be accurately determined thus improving the constraints that could be placed on internal structure using a single seismic station. This is not true of other seismic sources on Mars such as sub-surface faulting, whic...

  20. NASA reschedules Mars mission for 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2016-04-01

    NASA has announced that its next mission to Mars will be launched in May 2018 following the discovery of a leak in a key scientific instrument. The mission - Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) - was originally scheduled to launch last month and reach Mars later this year, but the new launch window means it will now not land on the red planet until November 2018.

  1. Mars ascent propulsion on a minimum scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.C.; Guernsey, C.S.

    1998-03-03

    A concept is presented for a single stage vehicle intended to lift a Mars sample to an orbital rendezvous. At 200 kg liftoff mass, it can potentially be delivered by a Mars Pathfinder size aeroshell. Based on launch vehicle design principles, propellants are pumped from thin-walled low pressure tanks into compact high pressure thrusters. Technical risk is reduced by using non-cryogenic propellants, and by driving piston pumps with heated helium.

  2. Mars to orbit with pumped hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C

    1999-04-27

    A propulsion point design is presented for lifting geological samples from Mars. Vehicle complexity is kept low by choosing a monopropellant single stage. Little new development is needed, as miniature pump fed hydrazine has been demonstrated. Loading the propellant just prior to operation avoids structural, thermal, and safety constraints otherwise imposed by earlier mission phases. Hardware mass and engineering effort are thereby diminished. The Mars liftoff mass is 7/8 hydrazine, <5% propulsion hardware, and >3% each for the payload and guidance.

  3. Volatile and Isotopic Imprints of Ancient Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Conrad, Pamela G.

    2015-01-01

    The science investigations enabled by Curiosity rover's instruments focus on identifying and exploring the habitability of the Martian environment. Measurements of noble gases, organic and inorganic compounds, and the isotopes of light elements permit the study of the physical and chemical processes that have transformed Mars throughout its history. Samples of the atmosphere, volatiles released from soils, and rocks from the floor of Gale Crater have provided a wealth of new data and a window into conditions on ancient Mars.

  4. Solar electric propulsion for Mars transport vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, J. M.; Curtis, H. B.; Alexander, S. W.; Gilland, J. H.; Hack, K. J.; Lawrence, C.; Swartz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion (SEP) is an alternative to chemical and nuclear powered propulsion systems for both piloted and unpiloted Mars transport vehicles. Photovoltaic solar cell and array technologies were evaluated as components of SEP power systems. Of the systems considered, the SEP power system composed of multijunction solar cells in an ENTECH domed fresnel concentrator array had the least array mass and area. Trip times to Mars optimized for minimum propellant mass were calculated. Additionally, a preliminary vehicle concept was designed.

  5. Human Mars Missions: Cost Driven Architecture Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Benjamin

    1998-01-01

    This report investigates various methods of reducing the cost in space transportation systems for human Mars missions. The reference mission for this task is a mission currently under study at NASA. called the Mars Design Reference Mission, characterized by In-Situ propellant production at Mars. This study mainly consists of comparative evaluations to the reference mission with a view to selecting strategies that would reduce the cost of the Mars program as a whole. One of the objectives is to understand the implications of certain Mars architectures, mission modes, vehicle configurations, and potentials for vehicle reusability. The evaluations start with year 2011-2014 conjunction missions which were characterized by their abort-to-the-surface mission abort philosophy. Variations within this mission architecture, as well as outside the set to other architectures (not predicated on an abort to surface philosophy) were evaluated. Specific emphasis has been placed on identifying and assessing overall mission risk. Impacts that Mars mission vehicles might place upon the Space Station, if it were to be used as an assembly or operations base, were also discussed. Because of the short duration of this study only on a few propulsion elements were addressed (nuclear thermal, cryogenic oxygen-hydrogen, cryogenic oxygen-methane, and aerocapture). Primary ground rules and assumptions were taken from NASA material used in Marshall Space Flight Center's own assessment done in 1997.

  6. Mars Exploration Rover thermal test program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauken, Michael T.; Kinsella, Gary; Novak, Keith; Tsuyuki, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, two Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) landed on the surface of Mars to begin their mission as robotic geologists. A year prior to these historic landings, both rovers and the spacecraft that delivered them to Mars, were completing a series of environmental tests in facilities at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This paper describes the test program undertaken to validate the thermal design and verify the workmanship integrity of both rovers and the spacecraft. The spacecraft, which contained the rover within the aeroshell, were tested in a 7.5 m diameter thermal vacuum chamber. Thermal balance was performed for the near earth (hot case) condition and for the near Mars (cold case) condition. A solar simulator was used to provide the solar boundary condition on the solar array. IR lamps were used to simulate the solar heat load on the aeroshell for the off-sun attitudes experienced by the spacecraft during its cruise to Mars. Each rover was tested separately in a 3.0 m diameter thermal vacuum chamber over conditions simulating the warmest and coldest expected Mars diurnal temperature cycles. The environmental tests were conducted in a quiescent nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 8 to 10 Torr. In addition to thermal balance testing, the science instruments on board the rovers were tested successfully in the extreme environmental conditions anticipated for the mission. A solar simulator was not used in these tests.

  7. Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version Some key components of a NASA-funded instrument being developed for the payload of the European Space Agency's ExoMars mission stand out in this illustration of the instrument. The instrument is the Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector. It can check for the faintest traces of life's molecular building blocks. If those are present, it can assess whether they were produced by anything alive. It can also evaluate harsh environmental conditions that could be erasing those molecular clues. ExoMars is planned as a rover to be launched in 2013 and search on Mars for signs of life. Samples of Martian soil collected by a drill on the rover will be delivered to the Urey instrument. The instrument component called the sub-critical water extractor adds water and heats the sample, getting different types of organic compounds to dissolve into the water at different temperatures. The Mars organic detector uses a fluorescent reagent and laser to detect organic chemicals. The micro-capillary electrophoresis component separates different types of organic chemicals from each others for identifying which ones are present in the sample. The Mars oxidant instrument, part of which is on a separately mounted deck unit not pictured, assesses how readily organic material would be broken down by the radiation, atmosphere and soil chemistry of the site.

  8. Mars and How to Observe It

    CERN Document Server

    Grego, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mars has long been a favorite subject for astronomers, both amateur and professional. Known as the Red Planet because of its distinct color, it shines brightly in the skies when it is closest to the Earth every two years. Exciting to view through a telescope, this most Earth-like of planets transforms into a real world showing phases, brilliant polar ice caps, seasonal changes in its dusty desert markings, and atmospheric phenomena. Mars and How to Observe It takes readers on a planet-wide tour of the Red Planet and explains how a variety of dynamic forces has shaped it through the ages. This book explains how amateur astronomers can view Mars successfully to create accurate observational drawings and secure high-resolution CCD images of the planet. Peter Grego is an accomplished author, an experienced amateur astronomer who has been actively observing Mars for over 30 years. Using the latest imagery and data from Mars probes and rovers, Mars and How to Observe It presents an up-to-date guide on our current u...

  9. Robust, affordable, semi-direct Mars mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salotti, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    A new architecture is proposed for the first manned Mars mission, based on current NASA developments (SLS and Orion), chemical propulsion for interplanetary transit, aerocapture for all vehicles, a split strategy, and a long stay on the surface. Two important choices make this architecture affordable and appropriate for the first mission. The first is splitting the Earth return vehicle into two parts that are launched separately and dock in Mars orbit. This is necessary to make aerocapture feasible and efficient, which considerably reduces mass. The second is reducing the crew to 3 astronauts. This simplifies the mission and reduces the SLS payload mass under the 45-metric ton limit for a direct TMI (trans-Mars injection) burn without LEO assembly. Only 4 SLS launches are required. The first takes the Mars ascent vehicle and in situ resource utilization systems to the planet's surface. The second takes the first part of the Earth return vehicle, the habitat, into Mars orbit. Two years later, two further SLS launches take a dual-use habitat (outbound trip and surface), Orion, and an enhanced service module to LEO, and then into Mars orbit, followed by the landing of the habitat on the surface. Transit time is demonstrated to be easily reduced to less than 6 months, with relatively low impact on propellant mass and none at all on the architecture.

  10. Assessing Group Dynamics in a Mars Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, S. L.

    2007-10-01

    International interest in psychosocial functioning generally and issues of group and inter-group function for space crews has increased as focus has shifted towards longer duration spaceflight and, particularly, the issues involved in sending a human crew to Mars (Kanas, et al., 2001; Dawson, 2002). Planning documents for a human mission to Mars such as the NASA Design Reference Mission (DRM 1.0) emphasize the need for adaptability of crewmembers and autonomy in the crew as a whole (Hoffman and Kaplan, 1997). Similarly a major study by the International Space University (ISU, 1991) emphasized the need for autonomy and initiative for a Mars crew given that many of the scenarios that will be encountered on Mars cannot be rehearsed on earth and given the lack of any realistic possibility for rescue of the crew. This research project was only one subset of data collected during the larger AustroMars Expedition at the Mars Desert Research Facility (MDRS) in 2006. The participating crew comprises part of a multi-year investigation on teams utilizing the MDRS facility. The program of research has included numerous researchers since 2002 with a progressive evolution of key foci addressing stress, personality, coping, adaptation, cognitive functioning, and group identity assessed across the duration period of the individual missions.

  11. Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version Some key components of a NASA-funded instrument being developed for the payload of the European Space Agency's ExoMars mission stand out in this illustration of the instrument. The instrument is the Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector. It can check for the faintest traces of life's molecular building blocks. If those are present, it can assess whether they were produced by anything alive. It can also evaluate harsh environmental conditions that could be erasing those molecular clues. ExoMars is planned as a rover to be launched in 2013 and search on Mars for signs of life. Samples of Martian soil collected by a drill on the rover will be delivered to the Urey instrument. The instrument component called the sub-critical water extractor adds water and heats the sample, getting different types of organic compounds to dissolve into the water at different temperatures. The Mars organic detector uses a fluorescent reagent and laser to detect organic chemicals. The micro-capillary electrophoresis component separates different types of organic chemicals from each others for identifying which ones are present in the sample. The Mars oxidant instrument, part of which is on a separately mounted deck unit not pictured, assesses how readily organic material would be broken down by the radiation, atmosphere and soil chemistry of the site.

  12. The Search for Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    For centuries, the planet Mars has been regarded as a possible abode for life. Serious searches for the signatures of life began in the 19th century, and continue via telescopic investigations and landed missions. While early work focused on phenomenology and bordered on fantasy, modern scientific inquiry has emphasized the search for chemical signatures of life in the soil and rocks at the planet's surface, and the search for biomarker gases in the atmosphere. Living systems produce more than 90% of Earth's atmospheric methane; the balance is of geochemical origin. The discovery of methane on Mars will be described, along with the ongoing extended search for clues to its origins. The possible origins of Mars methane will be discussed in the context of terrestrial analogue sites where geologic and biologic methane production now occurs - ranging from sub-permafrost zones in the arctic to hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean. Terrestrial organisms that could prosper on Mars today will be mentioned. I will briefly touch upon experiments conducted by landed spacecraft, ranging from the Viking Life Science Experiments in 1976 to the impending Mars Science laboratory, and the Trace Gas Orbiter and ExoMars missions now being developed for flight in the coming decade.

  13. Polygonal Ridge Networks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Laura; Dickson, James; Grosfils, Eric; Head, James W.

    2016-10-01

    Polygonal ridge networks, also known as boxwork or reticulate ridges, are found in numerous locations and geological contexts across Mars. While networks formed from mineralized fractures hint at hot, possibly life-sustaining circulating ground waters, networks formed by impact-driven clasting diking, magmatic dikes, gas escape, or lava flows do not have the same astrobiological implications. Distinguishing the morphologies and geological context of the ridge networks sheds light on their potential as astrobiological and mineral resource sites of interest. The most widespread type of ridge morphology is characteristic of the Nili Fossae and Nilosyrtis region and consists of thin, criss-crossing ridges with a variety of heights, widths, and intersection angles. They are found in ancient Noachian terrains at a variety of altitudes and geographic locations and may be a mixture of clastic dikes, brecciated dikes, and mineral veins. They occur in the same general areas as valley networks and ancient lake basins, but they are not more numerous where these features are concentrated, and can appear in places where they morphologies are absent. Similarly, some of the ridge networks are associated with hydrated mineral detections, but some occur in locations without detections. Smaller, light-toned ridges of variable widths have been found in Gale Crater and other rover sites and are interpreted to be smaller version of the Nili-like ridges, in this case formed by the mineralization of fractures. This type of ridge is likely to be found in many other places on Mars as more high-resolution data becomes available. Hellas Basin is host to a third type of ridge morphology consisting of large, thick, light-toned ridges forming regular polygons at several superimposed scales. While still enigmatic, these are most likely to be the result of sediment-filled fractures. The Eastern Medusae Fossae Formation contains large swaths of a fourth, previously undocumented, ridge network type

  14. AN ITERATIVE PIXEL-LEVEL IMAGE MATCHING METHOD FOR MARS MAPPING USING APPROXIMATE ORTHOPHOTOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Geng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mars mapping is essential to the scientific research of the red planet. The special terrain characteristics of Martian surface can be used to develop the targeted image matching method. In this paper, in order to generate high resolution Mars DEM, a pixel-level image matching method for Mars orbital pushbroom images is proposed. The main strategies of our method include: (1 image matching on approximate orthophotos; (2 estimating approximate value of conjugate points by using ground point coordinates of orthophotos; (3 hierarchical image matching; (4 generating DEM and approximate orthophotos at each pyramid level; (5 fast transformation from ground points to image points for pushbroom images. The derived DEM at each pyramid level is used as reference data for the generation of approximate orthophotos at the next pyramid level. With iterative processing, the generated DEM becomes more and more accurate and a very small search window is precise enough for the determination of conjugate points. The images acquired by High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC on European Mars Express were used to verify our method’s feasibility. Experiment results demonstrate that accurate DEM data can be derived with an acceptable time cost by pixel-level image matching.

  15. Financial Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigan, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary derivatives mark the development of capital and constitute a novel form of ownership. By reconfiguring the temporal, spatial and legal character of ownership derivatives present a substantive challenge to the tax collecting state. While fiscal systems are nationally bounded and inheren...... and inherently static, capital itself is unprecedentedly mobile, fluid and fungible. As such derivatives raise the specter of ‘financial weapons of mass destruction’....

  16. Mars Global Surveyor measurements of solar storms and their effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, D. A.; Delory, G. T.; Lillis, R. J.; Ulusen, D.; Mitchell, D.; Luhmann, J. G.; Falkenberg, T. V.

    2010-12-01

    Space weather events in the form of solar photons and energetic charged particles provide brief but relatively intense periods of energy input to the Martian plasma environment and atmosphere, with implications for a number of science and exploration-related issues. The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft orbited Mars for more than 9 years, and was capable of indirectly detecting space weather events and their effects. Shocks associated with passing coronal mass ejections are evident in MGS magnetometer data, and in proxies for upstream solar wind pressure at 1.5 AU derived from magnetometer measurements. Fluxes of solar energetic particles with energies greater than ˜30 MeV are sometimes evident in the background count rates of the MGS electron instrument. Measurements of the background count rates at altitudes of ˜400 km over a seven year period provide an unprecedented long-baseline data set of the energetic particle environment at Mars over a significant fraction of a solar cycle. We will present results of analyses pertaining to three main uses of MGS observations of solar storms. First, by combining MGS measurements of solar storms with terrestrial and solar measurements, we have analyzed the propagation of individual solar storm events from the Sun throughout the inner heliosphere. Next, we have used MGS particle and field measurements to study the effect of solar storms on the Martian plasma environment - including increased fluxes of 10-20 keV electrons close to the planet and influences on auroral activity. Finally, we have studied the influence of solar storms on the Martian upper atmosphere - including suprathermal electrons produced in the atmosphere via impact ionization and a correlation of solar storm periods with ionospheric electron density profiles.

  17. The origin, evolution, and trajectory of large dust storms on Mars during Mars years 24-30 (1999-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiqun; Richardson, Mark I.

    2015-05-01

    Mars Daily Global Maps (MDGM) derived from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Mars Color Imager (MARCI) are used to study the distribution and evolution of large dust storms over the period from Mars years 24-30 (1999-2001). Large storms are defined here as discrete dust events visible in image sequences extending over at least 5 sols (Mars days) and where the dust covers areas beyond the origination region. A total of 65 large dust storms meeting these criteria are identified during the observational period and all are observed during the Ls = 135-30° seasonal window. Dust storms originating in the northern and southern hemispheres appear to form two distinct families. All but two of the storms originating in the northern hemisphere are observed in two seasonal windows at Ls = 180-240° and Ls = 305-350°; while all but two of those originating in the southern hemisphere are observed during Ls = 135-245°. None of the large dust storms originating in the northern hemisphere are observed to develop to global scale, but some of them develop into large regional storms with peak area >1 × 107 km2 and duration on the order of several weeks. In comparison, large dust storms originating in the southern hemisphere are typically much smaller, except notably in the two cases that expanded to global scale (the 2001 and 2007 global storms). Distinct locations of preferred storm origination emerge from the dust storm image sequences, including Acidalia, Utopia, Arcadia and Hellas. A route (trajectory) 'graph' for the observed sequences is provided. The routes are highly asymmetric between the two hemispheres. In the south, for non-global dust storms, the main routes are primarily oriented eastwest, whereas in the north, the routes are primarily north-south and zonally-concentrated into meridional channels. In a few impressive cases, storms originating in the northern hemisphere are observed to "flush" through

  18. LED minilidar for Mars rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Yamada, Sonoko; Senshu, Hiroki; Otobe, Naohito; Hashimoto, George; Kawabata, Yasuhiro

    2016-10-01

    A mini-lidar to observe the activity of Martian atmosphere is developed. The 10cm-cube LED mini-lidar was designed to be onboard a Mars rover. The light source of the mini-lidar is a high powered LED of 385nm. LED was adopted as light source because of its toughness against circumference change and physical shock for launch. The pulsed power and the pulse repetition frequency of LED beam were designed as 0.75W (=7.5nJ/10ns) and 500kHz, respectively. Lidar echoes were caught by the specially designed Cassegrain telescope, which has the shorter telescope tube than the usual to meet the 10cm-cube size limit. The high-speed photon counter was developed to pursue to the pulse repetition frequency of the LED light. The measurement range is no shorter than 30m depending back-ground condition. Its spatial resolution was improved as 0.15m (=1ns) by this photon counter. The demonstrative experiment was conducted at large wind tunnel facility of Japan Meteorological Agency. The measurement target was smoke of glycerin particles. The smoke was flowed in the wind tunnel with wind speed of 0 - 5m. Smoke diffusion and its propagation due to the wind flow were observed by the LED mini-lidar. This result suggests that the developed lidar can pursue the structure and the motion of dust devil of >2m.

  19. The AMADEE-15 Mars simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groemer, Gernot; Losiak, Anna; Soucek, Alexander; Plank, Clemens; Zanardini, Laura; Sejkora, Nina; Sams, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    We report on the AMADEE-15 mission, a 12-day Mars analog field test at the Kaunertal Glacier in Austria. Eleven experiments were conducted by a field crew at the test site under simulated martian surface exploration conditions and coordinated by a Mission Support Center in Innsbruck, Austria. The experiments' research fields encompassed geology, human factors, astrobiology, robotics, tele-science, exploration, and operations research. A Remote Science Support team analyzed field data in near real time, providing planning input for a flight control team to manage a complex system of field assets in a realistic work flow, including: two advanced space suit simulators; and four robotic and aerial vehicles. Field operations were supported by a dedicated flight planning group, an external control center tele-operating the PULI-rover, and a medical team. A 10-min satellite communication delay and other limitations pertinent to human planetary surface activities were introduced. This paper provides an overview of the geological context and environmental conditions of the test site and the mission architecture, with a focus on the mission's communication infrastructure. We report on the operational workflows and the experiments conducted, as well as a novel approach of measuring mission success through the introduction of general analog mission transferrable performance indicators.

  20. The Climate of Early Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, Robin

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the early Martian climate is one of the major unanswered questions of planetary science. Key challenges remain, but a new wave of orbital and in situ observations and improvements in climate modeling have led to significant advances over the last decade. Multiple lines of geologic evidence now point to an episodically warm surface during the late Noachian and early Hesperian periods 3-4 Ga. The low solar flux received by Mars in its first billion years and inefficiency of plausible greenhouse gases such as CO2 means that the steady-state early Martian climate was likely cold. A denser CO2 atmosphere would have caused adiabatic cooling of the surface and hence migration of water ice to the higher altitude equatorial and southern regions of the planet. Transient warming caused melting of snow and ice deposits and a temporarily active hydrological cycle, leading to erosion of the valley networks and other fluvial features. Precise details of the warming mechanisms remain unclear, but impacts, volca...

  1. Aqueous Solution Chemistry on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, R.; Hecht, M.; Kounaves, S.; Young, S.; West, S.; Fisher, A.; Grunthaner, P.

    2007-12-01

    Currently en route to Mars, the Phoenix mission carries four wet chemistry cells designed to perform basic solution chemistry on martian soil. The measurement objectives are typical of those that would be performed on an unknown sample on Earth, including detection of common anions and cations, total conductivity, pH, redox potential, cyclic voltammetry (CV), etc. Both the challenge and the novelty arise from the necessity to perform these measurements with severely constrained resources in a harsh and (literally) alien environment. Sensors for all measurements are integrated into a common "beaker," with the ability to perform a two-point calibration of some sensors using a pair of low-concentration solutions. Sulfate measurement is performed with a crude titration. While most measurements use ion selective electrodes, halide interferences are resolved by independent chronopotentiometry (CP) measurements. No preconditioning of the soil-water mixture is possible, nor is any physical characterization of the introduced soil sample beyond coarse visual inspection. Among the idiosyncrasies of the measurement is the low external pressure, which requires that the analysis be performed close to the boiling point of water under an atmosphere consisting almost entirely of water vapor. Despite these liabilities, however, extensive laboratory characterization has validated the basic approach, and protocols for both CV and CP have been developed and tested. Enhancing the value of the measurement is the suite of coordinated observations, such as microscopy and evolved gas analysis, to be performed by other Phoenix instruments.

  2. Mars sample return power supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Don; Ludwigs, Sharon; Schmitz, Paul; Wright, John

    A power supply is designed for a vehicle able to operate on the surface of Mars for a period of 5 to 10 years. This vehicle will be used for sample and data collection. The design is based on the assumption that the vehicle will be unmanned. Also, there will be no means by which components could be repaired or replaced while on the Martian surface. A consequence of this is that all equipment must meet high standards of reliability and, if possible, redundancy. Power will be supplied to the vehicle by means of a General Purpose Heat Source capable of producing a minimum of 7 kW of thermal power. The heat generated from the General Purpose Heat Source will be transferred to a Stirling engine via hot side heat pipes. The Stirling engine will then convert this heat into 2 kW of electrical power. Cold side heat pipes will be used to carry away waste heat, which will be released to the Martian environment via radiators connected to the end of the cold side heat pipes.

  3. Mars Greenhouses: Concepts and Challenges. Proceedings from a 1999 Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Ray M. (Editor); Martin-Brennan, Cindy (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Topic covered include :Plants on Mars: On the Next Mission and in the Long Term Future; Bubbles in the Rocks: Natural and Artificial Caves and Cavities as Like Support Structures; Challenges for Bioregenerative Life Support on Mars; Cost Effectiveness Issues; Low Pressure Systems for Plant Growth; Plant Responses to Rarified Atmospheres; Can CO2 be Used as a Pressurizing Gas for Mars Greenhouses?; Inflatable Habitats Technology Development; Development of an Inflatable Greenhouse for a Modular Crop Production System; Mars Inflatable Greenhouse Workshop; Design Needs for Mars Deployable Greenhouse; Preliminary Estimates of the Possibilities for Developing a Deployable Greenhouse for a Planetary Surface Mars; Low Pressure Greenhouse Concepts for Mars; Mars Greenhouse Study: Natural vs. Artificial Lighting; and Wire Culture for an Inflatable Mars Greenhouse and Other Future Inflatable Space Growth Chambers.

  4. Mars at Ls 306o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    11 October 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 306o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 306o occurs in mid-October 2005. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  5. Mars at Ls 79o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    25 July 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 79o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 79o occurred in mid-July 2006. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  6. Mars at Ls 53o: North Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    30 May 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 53o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 53o occurred in mid-May 2006. The picture shows the north polar region of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  7. Mars at Ls 324o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    8 November 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 324o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 324o occurs in mid-November 2005. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  8. Mars at Ls 12o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    28 February 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 12o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 12o occurred in mid-February 2006. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  9. Mars at Ls 269o: South Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    30 August 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 269o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 269o occurred in mid-August 2005. The picture shows the south polar region of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: last days of Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  10. Mars at Ls 39o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    25 April 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 39o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 39o occurred in mid-April 2006. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  11. Mars at Ls 53o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    9 May 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 53o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 53o occurs in mid-May 2006. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  12. Mars at Ls 306o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    25 October 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 306o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 306o occurred in mid-October 2005. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  13. Mars at Ls 269o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    9 August 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 269o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 269o occurs in mid-August 2005. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: last days of Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  14. Mars at Ls 288o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    27 September 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 288o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 288o occurred in mid-September 2005. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  15. Mars at Ls 107o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    13 September 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 107o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 107o occurs in mid-September 2006. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Summer/Southern Winter

  16. Mars at Ls 357o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    10 January 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 357o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 357o occurs in mid-January 2006. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  17. Mars at Ls 25o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    14 March 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 25o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 25o occurs in mid-March 2006. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  18. Mars at Ls 93o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    22 August 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 93o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 93o occurred in mid-August 2006. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Location near: 86.1oN, 208.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer/Southern Winter

  19. Mars at Ls 230o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    28 June 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 230o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 230o occurred in mid-June 2005. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  20. Mars at Ls 324o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    22 November 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 324o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 324o occurred in mid-November 2005. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  1. Mars at Ls 12o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    15 February 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 12o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 12o occurs in mid-February 2006. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  2. Mars at Ls 39o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    11 April 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 39o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 39o occurs in mid-April 2006. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  3. Mars at Ls 107o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    26 September 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 107o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 107o occurred in mid-September 2006. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Summer/Southern Winter

  4. Mars at Ls 249o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    12 July 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 249o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 249o occurs in mid-July 2005. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  5. Mars at Ls 288o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    13 September 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 288o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 288o occurs in mid-September 2005. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  6. Mars at Ls 25o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    28 March 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 25o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 25o occurred in mid-March 2006. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  7. Mars at Ls 79o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    11 July 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 79o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 79o occurs in mid-July 2006. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  8. Mars at Ls 341o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    27 December 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 341o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 341o occurred in mid-December 2005. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  9. Mars at Ls 66o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    13 June 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 66o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 66o occurs in mid-June 2006. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  10. Mars at Ls 357o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    25 January 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 357o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 357o occurred in mid-January 2006. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Winter/Southern Summer

  11. Mars at Ls 66o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    27 June 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 66o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 66o occurred in mid-June 2006. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  12. Mars at Ls 93o: Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    8 August 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 93o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 93o occurs in mid-August 2006. The picture shows the Acidalia/Mare Erythraeum face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Summer/Southern Winter

  13. Mars at Ls 53o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    23 May 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 53o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 53o occurred in mid-May 2006. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  14. Mars at Ls 249o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    26 July 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 249o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 249o occurred in mid-July 2005. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  15. Mars at Ls 269o: Elysium/Mare Cimmerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    23 August 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 269o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 269o occurred in mid-August 2005. The picture shows the Elysium/Mare Cimmerium face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: last days of Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  16. MMPM - Mars MetNet Precursor Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Schmidt, W.; Pichkhadze, K.; Linkin, V.; Vazquez, L.; Uspensky, M.; Polkko, J.; Genzer, M.; Lipatov, A.; Guerrero, H.; Alexashkin, S.; Haukka, H.; Savijarvi, H.; Kauhanen, J.

    2008-09-01

    We are developing a new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars - MetNet in situ observation network based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called the Met-Net Lander (MNL). The eventual scope of the MetNet Mission is to deploy some 20 MNLs on the Martian surface using inflatable descent system structures, which will be supported by observations from the orbit around Mars. Currently we are working on the MetNet Mars Precursor Mission (MMPM) to deploy one MetNet Lander to Mars in the 2009/2011 launch window as a technology and science demonstration mission. The MNL will have a versatile science payload focused on the atmospheric science of Mars. Detailed characterization of the Martian atmospheric circulation patterns, boundary layer phenomena, and climatology cycles, require simultaneous in-situ measurements by a network of observation posts on the Martian surface. The scientific payload of the MetNet Mission encompasses separate instrument packages for the atmospheric entry and descent phase and for the surface operation phase. The MetNet mission concept and key probe technologies have been developed and the critical subsystems have been qualified to meet the Martian environmental and functional conditions. Prototyping of the payload instrumentation with final dimensions was carried out in 2003-2006.This huge development effort has been fulfilled in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), the Russian Lavoschkin Association (LA) and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI) since August 2001. Currently the INTA (Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial) from Spain is also participating in the MetNet payload development. To understand the behavior and dynamics of the Martian atmosphere, a wealth of simultaneous in situ observations are needed on varying types of Martian orography, terrain and altitude spanning all latitudes and longitudes. This will be performed by the Mars MetNet Mission. In addition to the science aspects the

  17. Geologic overview of the Mars Science Laboratory rover mission at the Kimberley, Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Melissa S.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Treiman, Allan H.; Stack, Kathryn M.; Calef, Fred; Edgar, Lauren A.; Grotzinger, John; Lanza, Nina; Le Deit, Laetitia; Lasue, Jeremie; Siebach, Kirsten L.; Vasavada, Ashwin; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover completed a detailed investigation at the Kimberley waypoint within Gale crater from sols 571-634 using its full science instrument payload. From orbital images examined early in the Curiosity mission, the Kimberley region had been identified as a high-priority science target based on its clear stratigraphic relationships in a layered sedimentary sequence that had been exposed by differential erosion. Observations of the stratigraphic sequence at the Kimberley made by Curiosity are consistent with deposition in a prograding, fluvio-deltaic system during the late Noachian to early Hesperian, prior to the existence of most of Mount Sharp. Geochemical and mineralogic analyses suggest that sediment deposition likely took place under cold conditions with relatively low water-to-rock ratios. Based on elevated K2O abundances throughout the Kimberley formation, an alkali feldspar protolith is likely one of several igneous sources from which the sediments were derived. After deposition, the rocks underwent multiple episodes of diagenetic alteration with different aqueous chemistries and redox conditions, as evidenced by the presence of Ca-sulfate veins, Mn-oxide fracture fills, and erosion-resistant nodules. More recently, the Kimberley has been subject to significant aeolian abrasion and removal of sediments to create modern topography that slopes away from Mount Sharp, a process that has continued to the present day.

  18. Mars for Earthlings: an analog approach to Mars in undergraduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Marjorie; Kahmann-Robinson, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Mars for Earthlings (MFE) is a terrestrial Earth analog pedagogical approach to teaching undergraduate geology, planetary science, and astrobiology. MFE utilizes Earth analogs to teach Mars planetary concepts, with a foundational backbone in Earth science principles. The field of planetary science is rapidly changing with new technologies and higher-resolution data sets. Thus, it is increasingly important to understand geological concepts and processes for interpreting Mars data. MFE curriculum is topically driven to facilitate easy integration of content into new or existing courses. The Earth-Mars systems approach explores planetary origins, Mars missions, rocks and minerals, active driving forces/tectonics, surface sculpting processes, astrobiology, future explorations, and hot topics in an inquiry-driven environment. Curriculum leverages heavily upon multimedia resources, software programs such as Google Mars and JMARS, as well as NASA mission data such as THEMIS, HiRISE, CRISM, and rover images. Two years of MFE class evaluation data suggest that science literacy and general interest in Mars geology and astrobiology topics increased after participation in the MFE curriculum. Students also used newly developed skills to create a Mars mission team presentation. The MFE curriculum, learning modules, and resources are available online at http://serc.carleton.edu/marsforearthlings/index.html.

  19. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars science laboratory's curiosity rover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, D.M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S.; Eigenbrode, J.L.; Brinza, D.E.; Weigle, G.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Köhler, J.; Martin, C.; Reitz, G.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Kim, M.-H.; Grinspoon, D.; Bullock, M.A.; Posner, A.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Vasavada, A.; Grotzinger, J.P.; MSL Science Team, the

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equival

  20. Concepts for Mars Polar Science in Current and Future Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, R.; Campbell, B.; Diniega, S.; Beaty, D. W.; Hamilton, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    Mars polar/non-polar ice science has been identified as a high priority for current and future Mars missions. As a guide to ongoing and future mission planning, further discussion of needs and capabilities related to ice science is warranted.

  1. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars science laboratory's curiosity rover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, D.M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S.; Eigenbrode, J.L.; Brinza, D.E.; Weigle, G.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Köhler, J.; Martin, C.; Reitz, G.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Kim, M.-H.; Grinspoon, D.; Bullock, M.A.; Posner, A.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Vasavada, A.; Grotzinger, J.P.; MSL Science Team, the

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equival

  2. Cryogenics and the Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current plans within NASA involve extending the human exploration of space from low earth orbit into the solar system, with the first human exploration of Mars presently planned in 2011. Integral to all hum Mars mission phases is cryogenic fluid management. Cryogenic fluids will be required both as propellant and for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Without safe and efficient cryogen storage human Mars missions will not be possible. Effective control and handling of cryogenic fluids is the key to affordable Mars missions, and advancing active thermal control technology is synergistic with all of NASA's exploration initiatives and with existing and future instrument cooling programs, including MTPE and Origins. Present mission scenarios for human exploration require cryogenic propellant storage for up to 1700 days and for up to 60 metric tons. These requirements represent increases of an order of magnitude over previous storage masses and lifetimes. The key cryogenic terminology areas to be addressed in human Mars missions are long-term propellant storage, cryogenic refrigeration, cryogenic liquefaction, and zero gravity fluid management. Long-term storage for the thermal control of cryogenic propellants is best accomplished with a mix of passive and active technologies. Passive technologies such as advanced multilayer insulation (MLI) concepts will be combined with the development of active coolers (cryogenic refrigerators). Candidates for long-life active cooling applications include Reverse Turbo-Brayton, Stirling, and Pulse-Tube coolers. The integration of passive and active technologies will form a hybrid system optimized to minimize the launch mass while preserving the cryogenic propellants. Since cryogenic propellants are the largest mass that Mars missions must launch from earth, even a modest reduction in the percentage of propellant carried results in a significant weight saving. This paper will present a brief overview of cryogenic fluid management

  3. Financial Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigan, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary derivatives mark the development of capital and constitute a novel form of ownership. By reconfiguring the temporal, spatial and legal character of ownership derivatives present a substantive challenge to the tax collecting state. While fiscal systems are nationally bounded...

  4. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrogen. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquids. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  5. Nuclear thermal propulsion transportation systems for lunar/Mars exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, John S.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Mcilwain, Melvin C.; Pellaccio, Dennis G.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion technology development is underway at NASA and DoE for Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to Mars, with initial near-earth flights to validate flight readiness. Several reactor concepts are being considered for these missions, and important selection criteria will be evaluated before final selection of a system. These criteria include: safety and reliability, technical risk, cost, and performance, in that order. Of the concepts evaluated to date, the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) derivative (NDR) is the only concept that has demonstrated full power, life, and performance in actual reactor tests. Other concepts will require significant design work and must demonstrate proof-of-concept. Technical risk, and hence, development cost should therefore be lowest for the concept, and the NDR concept is currently being considered for the initial SEI missions. As lighter weight, higher performance systems are developed and validated, including appropriate safety and astronaut-rating requirements, they will be considered to support future SEI application. A space transportation system using a modular nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) system for lunar and Mars missions is expected to result in significant life cycle cost savings. Finally, several key issues remain for NTR's, including public acceptance and operational issues. Nonetheless, NTR's are believed to be the 'next generation' of space propulsion systems - the key to space exploration.

  6. Valles Marineris, Mars: Wet debris flows and ground ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchitta, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed study of the Valles Marineris equatorial troughs suggests that the landslides in that area contained water and probably were gigantic wet debris flows: one landslide complex generated a channel that has several bends and extends for 250 km. Further support for water or ice in debris masses includes rounded flow lobes and transport of some slide masses in the direction of the local topographic slope. Differences in speed and emplacement efficiency between Martian and terrestrial landslides can be attributed to the entrainment of volatiles on Mars, but they can also be explained by other mechanisms. Support that the wall rock contained water comes from the following observations: (1) the water within the landslide debris must have been derived from wall rock; (2) debris appears to have been transported through tributary canyons; (3) locally, channels emerged from the canyons; (4) the wall rock apprarently disintegrated and flowed easily; and (5) fault zones within the troughs are unusually resistant to erosion. The study further suggests that, in the equatorial region of Mars, material below depths of 400-800 m was not desiccated during the time of landslide activity (within the last billion years of Martian history). Therefore the Martian ground-water or groundice reservoir, if not a relic from ancient times, must have been replenished. ?? 1987.

  7. Duststones on Mars: source, transport, deposition and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Nathan T.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Grotzinger, John P.; Milliken, Ralph E.

    2012-01-01

    Dust is an abundant material on Mars, and there is strong evidence that it is a contributor to the rock record as “duststone,” analogous in many ways to loess on Earth. Although a common suite of dust formation mechanisms has operated on the two planets, fundamental differences in environments and geologic histories have resulted in vastly different weighting functions, causing distinct depositional styles and erosional mechanisms. On Earth, dust is derived predominantly from glacial grinding and, in nonglacial environments, by other processes, such as volcanism, eolian abrasion, and fluvial comminution. Hydrological and biological processes convert dust accumulations to loess deposits. Active hydrology also acts to clean dust from the atmosphere and convert loess into soil or erode it entirely. On Mars, glacial production of dust has been minor, with most fine particles probably produced from ancient volcanic, impact, and fluvial processes. Dust is deposited under arid conditions in which aggregate growth and cementation are the stabilizing agents. Thick accumulations result in duststone.

  8. Nuclear rockets: High-performance propulsion for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C. W.

    1994-05-01

    A new impetus to manned Mars exploration was introduced by President Bush in his Space Exploration Initiative. This has led, in turn, to a renewed interest in high-thrust nuclear thermal rocket propulsion (NTP). The purpose of this report is to give a brief tutorial introduction to NTP and provide a basic understanding of some of the technical issues in the realization of an operational NTP engine. Fundamental physical principles are outlined from which a variety of qualitative advantages of NTP over chemical propulsion systems derive, and quantitative performance comparisons are presented for illustrative Mars missions. Key technologies are described for a representative solid-core heat-exchanger class of engine, based on the extensive development work in the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs (1955 to 1973). The most driving technology, fuel development, is discussed in some detail for these systems. Essential highlights are presented for the 19 full-scale reactor and engine tests performed in these programs. On the basis of these tests, the practicality of graphite-based nuclear rocket engines was established. Finally, several higher-performance advanced concepts are discussed. These have received considerable attention, but have not, as yet, developed enough credibility to receive large-scale development.

  9. Probabilistic Thermal Analysis During Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Aerobraking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.

    2007-01-01

    A method for performing a probabilistic thermal analysis during aerobraking has been developed. The analysis is performed on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter solar array during aerobraking. The methodology makes use of a response surface model derived from a more complex finite element thermal model of the solar array. The response surface is a quadratic equation which calculates the peak temperature for a given orbit drag pass at a specific location on the solar panel. Five different response surface equations are used, one of which predicts the overall maximum solar panel temperature, and the remaining four predict the temperatures of the solar panel thermal sensors. The variables used to define the response surface can be characterized as either environmental, material property, or modeling variables. Response surface variables are statistically varied in a Monte Carlo simulation. The Monte Carlo simulation produces mean temperatures and 3 sigma bounds as well as the probability of exceeding the designated flight allowable temperature for a given orbit. Response surface temperature predictions are compared with the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter flight temperature data.

  10. Planning Mars Memory: Learning from the Mer Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge management for space exploration is part of a multi-generational effort at recognizing, preserving and transmitting learning. Each mission should be built on the learning, of both successes and failures, derived from previous missions. Knowledge management begins with learning, and the recognition that this learning has produced knowledge. The Mars Exploration Rover mission provides us with an opportunity to track how learning occurs, how it is recorded, and whether the representations of this learning will be optimally useful for subsequent missions. This paper focuses on the MER science and engineering teams during Rover operations. A NASA team conducted an observational study of the ongoing work and learning of the these teams. Learning occurred in a wide variety of areas: how to run two teams on Mars time for three months; how to use the instruments within the constraints of the martian environment, the deep space network and the mission requirements; how to plan science strategy; how best to use the available software tools. This learning is preserved in many ways. Primarily it resides in peoples memories, to be carried on to the next mission. It is also encoded in stones, in programming sequences, in published reports, and in lessons learned activities, Studying learning and knowledge development as it happens allows us to suggest proactive ways of capturing and using it across multiple missions and generations.

  11. Valles Marineris, Mars: High-Resolution Digital Terrain Model on the basis of Mars-Express HRSC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, A.; Spiegel, M.; van Gasselt, S.; Neukum, G.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction: Since December 2003, the European Space Agency's (ESA) Mars Express (MEX) orbiter has been investigating Mars. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), one of the scientific experiments onboard MEX, is a pushbroom stereo color scanning instrument with nine line detectors, each equipped with 5176 CCD sensor elements. Five CCD lines operate with panchromatic filters and four lines with red, green, blue and infrared filters at different observation angles [1]. MEX has a highly elliptical near-polar orbit and reaches a distance of 270 km at periapsis. Ground resolution of image data predominantly varies with respect to spacecraft altitude and the chosen macro-pixel format. Usually, although not exclusively, the nadir channel provides full resolution of up to 10 m per pixel. Stereo-, photometry and color channels generally have a coarser resolution. One of the goals for MEX HRSC is to cover Mars globally in color and stereoscopically at high-resolution. So far, HRSC has covered almost half of the surface of Mars at a resolution better than 20 meters per pixel. Such data are utilized to derive high resolution digital terrain models (DTM), ortho-image mosaics and additionally higher-level 3D data products such as 3D views. Standardized high-resolution single-strip digital terrain models (using improved orientation data) have been derived at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin-Adlershof [2]. Those datasets, i.e. high-resolution digital terrain models as well as ortho-image data, are distributed as Vicar image files (http://www-mipl.jpl.nasa.gov/external/vicar.html) via the HRSCview web-interface [3], accessible at http://hrscview.fu-berlin.de. A systematic processing workflow is described in detail in [4,5]. In consideration of the scientific interest, the processing of the Valles Marineris region will be discussed in this paper. The DTM mosaic was derived from 82 HRSC orbits at approximately -22° S to 1° N and 250° to 311° E. Methods: Apart from

  12. Three new stable L5 Mars Trojans

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, C de la Fuente

    2013-01-01

    Mars was second to Jupiter in being recognized as the host of a population of Trojan minor bodies. Since 1990, 5 asteroids -5261 Eureka, (101429) 1998 VF31, (121514) 1999 UJ7, 2001 DH47 and (311999) 2007 NS2- have been identified as Mars Trojans, 1 L4 and 4 L5. Dynamical and spectroscopic evidence suggests that some Mars Trojans may be remnants of the original planetesimal population that formed in the terrestrial planets region. Here we revisit the long-term dynamical evolution of the previously known Mars Trojans and show that 2011 SC191, 2011 SL25 and 2011 UN63 are also trailing (L5) Mars Trojans. They appear to be as stable as Eureka and may have been Trojans over the age of the Solar system. The fact that 5 Trojans move in similar orbits and one of them is a binary may point to the disruption of a larger body early in the history of the Solar system. Such a catastrophic event may also explain the apparently strong asymmetry in terms of number of objects (1 vs. 7) between the L4 and L5 regions. Future spe...

  13. Fluvial processes on Mars: Erosion and sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squyres, Steven W.

    1988-01-01

    One of the most important discoveries of the Mariner 9 and Viking missions to Mars was evidence of change of the Martian surface by the action of liquid water. From the standpoint of a Mars Rover/Sample Return Mission, fluvial activity on Mars is important in two ways: (1) channel formation has deeply eroded the Martian crust, providing access to relatively undisturbed subsurface units; and (2) much of the material eroded from channels may have been deposited in standing bodies of liquid water. The most striking fluvial erosion features on Mars are the outflow channels. A second type of channel apparently caused by flow of liquid water is the valley systems. These are similar to terrestial drainage systems. The sedimentary deposits of outflow channels are often difficult to identfy. No obvious deposits such as deltaic accumulations are visible in Viking images. Another set of deposits that may be water lain and that date approx. from the epoch of outflow channels are the layered deposits in the Valles Marineris. From the standpoint of a Mars Rover/Sample Return mission, the problem with all of these water-lain sediments is their age, or rather the lack of it.

  14. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Christopher P; Friedmann, E Imre; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  15. Mars Science Laboratory Rover System Thermal Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Keith S.; Kempenaar, Joshua E.; Liu, Yuanming; Bhandari, Pradeep; Dudik, Brenda A.

    2012-01-01

    On November 26, 2011, NASA launched a large (900 kg) rover as part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to Mars. The MSL rover is scheduled to land on Mars on August 5, 2012. Prior to launch, the Rover was successfully operated in simulated mission extreme environments during a 16-day long Rover System Thermal Test (STT). This paper describes the MSL Rover STT, test planning, test execution, test results, thermal model correlation and flight predictions. The rover was tested in the JPL 25-Foot Diameter Space Simulator Facility at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Rover operated in simulated Cruise (vacuum) and Mars Surface environments (8 Torr nitrogen gas) with mission extreme hot and cold boundary conditions. A Xenon lamp solar simulator was used to impose simulated solar loads on the rover during a bounding hot case and during a simulated Mars diurnal test case. All thermal hardware was exercised and performed nominally. The Rover Heat Rejection System, a liquid-phase fluid loop used to transport heat in and out of the electronics boxes inside the rover chassis, performed better than predicted. Steady state and transient data were collected to allow correlation of analytical thermal models. These thermal models were subsequently used to predict rover thermal performance for the MSL Gale Crater landing site. Models predict that critical hardware temperatures will be maintained within allowable flight limits over the entire 669 Sol surface mission.

  16. Mars Cameras Make Panoramic Photography a Snap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    If you wish to explore a Martian landscape without leaving your armchair, a few simple clicks around the NASA Web site will lead you to panoramic photographs taken from the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. Many of the technologies that enable this spectacular Mars photography have also inspired advancements in photography here on Earth, including the panoramic camera (Pancam) and its housing assembly, designed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University for the Mars missions. Mounted atop each rover, the Pancam mast assembly (PMA) can tilt a full 180 degrees and swivel 360 degrees, allowing for a complete, highly detailed view of the Martian landscape. The rover Pancams take small, 1 megapixel (1 million pixel) digital photographs, which are stitched together into large panoramas that sometimes measure 4 by 24 megapixels. The Pancam software performs some image correction and stitching after the photographs are transmitted back to Earth. Different lens filters and a spectrometer also assist scientists in their analyses of infrared radiation from the objects in the photographs. These photographs from Mars spurred developers to begin thinking in terms of larger and higher quality images: super-sized digital pictures, or gigapixels, which are images composed of 1 billion or more pixels. Gigapixel images are more than 200 times the size captured by today s standard 4 megapixel digital camera. Although originally created for the Mars missions, the detail provided by these large photographs allows for many purposes, not all of which are limited to extraterrestrial photography.

  17. Soil-like bodies on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targulian, V. O.; Mergelov, N. S.; Goryachkin, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    Soils sensu stricto are absent on Mars; most probably, they have never been formed there, because, up to now, we have no evidence of the presence of life, either relict or recent, on this planet. Numerous references to "Martian soils" in scientific literature concern loose substrates rather than Dokuchaev's soils. In this context, surface bodies on Mars can be described using the concept of planetary shells, or exons. Exons can be subdivided into sitons formed via in situ transformation of parent material, transons formed in the course of lateral transportation and deposition of substances, and transsitons formed by the combination of both in situ and lateral processes. Among Martian exons, transons predominate. They represent loose sediments of mainly eolian genesis related to extremely strong winds. Soil-like bodies (soloids) on Mars are represented by sitons and transsitons. These are abiotic formations having the profiles differentiated by the contents of iron oxides, soluble salts, and clay minerals and mainly formed in the presence of liquid water during the paleohumid eras of Mars evolution more than 2.5/3 billion years ago. True deep sitons (Martian weathering mantles) could only be formed under the impact of long-term weathering on stable surfaces during humid eras. Then, they were either buried by later deposited sediments, or eroded. Up to now, such objects have not been discovered on Mars.

  18. Localized precipitation and runoff on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Kite, Edwin S; Rafkin, Scot; Manga, Michael; Dietrich, William E

    2010-01-01

    We use the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) to simulate lake storms on Mars, finding that intense localized precipitation will occur for lake size >=10^3 km^2. Mars has a low-density atmosphere, so deep convection can be triggered by small amounts of latent heat release. In our reference simulation, the buoyant plume lifts vapor above condensation level, forming a 20km-high optically-thick cloud. Ice grains grow to 200 microns radius and fall near (or in) the lake at mean rates up to 1.5 mm/hr water equivalent (maximum rates up to 6 mm/hr water equivalent). Because atmospheric temperatures outside the surface layer are always well below 273K, supersaturation and condensation begin at low altitudes above lakes on Mars. In contrast to Earth lake-effect storms, lake storms on Mars involve continuous precipitation, and their vertical velocities and plume heights exceed those of tropical thunderstorms on Earth. Convection does not reach above the planetary boundary layer for lakes O(10^2) mbar. In...

  19. Dust aerosol, clouds, and the atmospheric optical depth record over 5 Mars years of the Mars Exploration Rover mission

    CERN Document Server

    Lemmon, Mark T; Bell, James F; Smith, Michael D; Cantor, Bruce A; Smith, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    Dust aerosol plays a fundamental role in the behavior and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. The first five Mars years of Mars Exploration Rover data provide an unprecedented record of the dust load at two sites. This record is useful for characterization of the atmosphere at the sites and as ground truth for orbital observations. Atmospheric extinction optical depths have been derived from solar images after calibration and correction for time-varying dust that has accumulated on the camera windows. The record includes local, regional, and globally extensive dust storms. Comparison with contemporaneous thermal infrared data suggests significant variation in the size of the dust aerosols, with a 1 {\\mu}m effective radius during northern summer and a 2 {\\mu}m effective radius at the onset of a dust lifting event. The solar longitude (LS) 20-136{\\deg} period is also characterized by the presence of cirriform clouds at the Opportunity site, especially near LS=50 and 115{\\deg}. In addition to water ice clouds, ...

  20. Dust Aerosol, Clouds, and the Atmospheric Optical Depth Record over 5 Mars Years of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Mark T.; Wolff, Michael J.; Bell, James F., III; Smith, Michael D.; Cantor, Bruce A.; Smith, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Dust aerosol plays a fundamental role in the behavior and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. The first five Mars years of Mars Exploration Rover data provide an unprecedented record of the dust load at two sites. This record is useful for characterization of the atmosphere at the sites and as ground truth for orbital observations. Atmospheric extinction optical depths have been derived from solar images after calibration and correction for time-varying dust that has accumulated on the camera windows. The record includes local, regional, and globally extensive dust storms. Comparison with contemporaneous thermal infrared data suggests significant variation in the size of the dust aerosols, with a 1 micrometer effective radius during northern summer and a 2 micrometer effective radius at the onset of a dust lifting event. The solar longitude (L (sub s)) 20-136 degrees period is also characterized by the presence of cirriform clouds at the Opportunity site, especially near LS = 50 and 115 degrees. In addition to water ice clouds, a water ice haze may also be present, and carbon dioxide clouds may be present early in the season. Variations in dust opacity are important to the energy balance of each site, and work with seasonal variations in insolation to control dust devil frequency at the Spirit site.

  1. Alteration of immature sedimentary rocks on Earth and Mars. Recording Aqueous and Surface-atmosphere Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Kenneth M. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Mustard, John F. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Salvatore, Mark R. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-03-05

    The rock alteration and rind formation in analog environments like Antarctica may provide clues to rock alteration and therefore paleoclimates on Mars. Clastic sedimentary rocks derived from basaltic sources have been studied in situ by martian rovers and are likely abundant on the surface of Mars. Moreover, how such rock types undergo alteration when exposed to different environmental conditions is poorly understood compared with alteration of intact basaltic flows. Here we characterize alteration in the chemically immature Carapace Sandstone from Antarctica, a terrestrial analog for martian sedimentary rocks. We employ a variety of measurements similar to those used on previous and current Mars missions. Laboratory techniques included bulk chemistry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), hyperspectral imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through these methods we find that primary basaltic material in the Carapace Sandstone is pervasively altered to hydrated clay minerals and palagonite as a result of water–rock interaction. A thick orange rind is forming in current Antarctic conditions, superimposing this previous aqueous alteration signature. The rind exhibits a higher reflectance at visible-near infrared wavelengths than the rock interior, with an enhanced ferric absorption edge likely due to an increase in Fe3+ of existing phases or the formation of minor iron (oxy)hydroxides. This alteration sequence in the Carapace Sandstone results from decreased water–rock interaction over time, and weathering in a cold, dry environment, mimicking a similar transition early in martian history. This transition may be recorded in sedimentary rocks on Mars through a similar superimposition mechanism, capturing past climate changes at the hand sample scale. These results also suggest that basalt-derived sediments could have sourced significant volumes of hydrated minerals on early Mars due to their greater permeability compared with intact igneous rocks.

  2. Habitability & Astrobiology Research in Mars Terrestrial Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    We performed a series of field research campaigns (ILEWG EuroMoonMars) in the extreme Utah desert relevant to Mars environments, and in order to help in the interpretation of Mars missions measurements from orbit (MEX, MRO) or from the surface (MER, MSL), or Moon geochemistry (SMART-1, LRO). We shall give an update on the sample analysis in the context of habitability and astrobiology. Methods & Results: In the frame of ILEWG EuroMoonMars campaigns (2009 to 2013) we deployed at Mars Desert Research station, near Hanksville Utah, a suite of instruments and techniques [A, 1, 2, 9-11] including sample collection, context imaging from remote to local and microscale, drilling, spectrometers and life sensors. We analyzed how geological and geochemical evolution affected local parameters (mineralogy, organics content, environment variations) and the habitability and signature of organics and biota. Among the important findings are the diversity in the composition of soil samples even when collected in close proximity, the low abundances of detectable PAHs and amino acids and the presence of biota of all three domains of life with significant heterogeneity. An extraordinary variety of putative extremophiles was observed [3,4,9]. A dominant factor seems to be soil porosity and lower clay-sized particle content [6-8]. A protocol was developed for sterile sampling, contamination issues, and the diagnostics of biodiversity via PCR and DGGE analysis in soils and rocks samples [10, 11]. We compare the 2009 campaign results [1-9] to new measurements from 2010-2013 campaigns [10-12] relevant to: comparison between remote sensing and in-situ measurements; the study of minerals; the detection of organics and signs of life. Keywords: field analogue research, astrobiology, habitability, life detection, Earth-Moon-Mars, organics References [A] Foing, Stoker & Ehrenfreund (Editors, 2011) "Astrobiology field Research in Moon/Mars Analogue Environments", Special Issue of International

  3. Results From Mars Show Electrostatic Charging of the Mars Pathfinder Sojourner Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolecki, Joseph C.; Siebert, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    -9) C, and average arc time of 1 msec, arcs can also occur with estimated arc currents approaching 10 milliamperes (mA). Discharges of this magnitude could interfere with the operation of sensitive electrical or electronic elements and logic circuits. Sojourner rover wheel tested in laboratory before launch to Mars. Before launch, we believed that the dust would become triboelectrically charged as it was moved about and compacted by the rover wheels. In all cases observed in the laboratory, the test wheel charged positively, and the wheel tracks charged negatively. Dust samples removed from the laboratory wheel averaged a few ones to tens of micrometers in size (clay size). Coarser grains were left behind in the wheel track. On Mars, grain size estimates of 2 to 10 mm were derived for the Martian surface materials from the Viking Gas Exchange Experiment. These size estimates approximately match the laboratory samples. Our tentative conclusion for the Sojourner observations is that fine clay-sized particles acquired an electrostatic charge during rover traverses and adhered to the rover wheels, carrying electrical charge to the rover. Since the Sojourner rover carried no instruments to measure this mission's onboard electrical charge, confirmatory measurements from future rover missions on Mars are desirable so that the physical and electrical properties of the Martian surface dust can be characterized. Sojourner was protected by discharge points, and Faraday cages were placed around sensitive electronics. But larger systems than Sojourner are being contemplated for missions to the Martian surface in the foreseeable future. The design of such systems will require a detailed knowledge of how they will interact with their environment. Validated environmental interaction models and guidelines for the Martian surface must be developed so that design engineers can test new ideas prior to cutting hardware. These models and guidelines cannot be validated without actual

  4. Transportation-Driven Mars Surface Operations Supporting an Evolvable Mars Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toups, Larry; Brown, Kendall; Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study evaluating options for supporting a series of human missions to a single Mars surface destination. In this scenario the infrastructure emplaced during previous visits to this site is leveraged in following missions. The goal of this single site approach to Mars surface infrastructure is to enable "Steady State" operations by at least 4 crew for up to 500 sols at this site. These characteristics, along with the transportation system used to deliver crew and equipment to and from Mars, are collectively known as the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). Information in this paper is presented in the sequence in which it was accomplished. First, a logical buildup sequence of surface infrastructure was developed to achieve the desired "Steady State" operations on the Mars surface. This was based on a concept of operations that met objectives of the EMC. Second, infrastructure capabilities were identified to carry out this concept of operations. Third, systems (in the form of conceptual elements) were identified to provide these capabilities. This included top-level mass, power and volume estimates for these elements. Fourth, the results were then used in analyses to evaluate three options (18t, 27t, and 40t landed mass) of Mars Lander delivery capability to the surface. Finally, Mars arrival mass estimates were generated based upon the entry, descent, and landing requirements for inclusion in separate assessments of in-space transportation capabilities for the EMC.

  5. ExoMars Lander Radioscience LaRa, a Space Geodesy Experiment to Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehant, Veronique; Le Maistre, Sebastien; Yseboodt, Marie; Peters, Marie-Julie; Karatekin, Ozgur; Van Hove, Bart; Rivoldini, Attilio; Baland, Rose-Marie; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2017-04-01

    The LaRa (Lander Radioscience) experiment is designed to obtain coherent two-way Doppler measurements from the radio link between the ExoMars lander and Earth over at least one Martian year. The instrument life time is thus almost twice the one Earth year of nominal mission duration. The Doppler measurements will be used to observe the orientation and rotation of Mars in space (precession, nutations, and length-of-day variations), as well as polar motion. The ultimate objective is to obtain information / constraints on the Martian interior, and on the sublimation / condensation cycle of atmospheric CO2. Rotational variations will allow us to constrain the moment of inertia of the entire planet, including its mantle and core, the moment of inertia of the core, and seasonal mass transfer between the atmosphere and the ice caps. The LaRa experiment will be combined with other ExoMars experiments, in order to retrieve a maximum amount of information on the interior of Mars. Specifically, combining LaRa's Doppler measurements with similar data from the Viking landers, Mars Pathfinder, Mars Exploration Rovers landers, and the forthcoming InSight-RISE lander missions, will allow us to improve our knowledge on the interior of Mars with unprecedented accuracy, hereby providing crucial information on the formation and evolution of the red planet.

  6. Zapping Mars Rocks with Gamma Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    1999-12-01

    Because we do not know what deadly microorganisms might be lurking inside samples returned from Mars, the samples will either have to be sterilized before release or kept in isolation until biological studies declare them safe. One way to execute microorganisms is with radiation, such as gamma rays. Although quite effective in snuffing out bacteria and viruses, gamma rays might also affect the mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic compositions of the zapped rocks and soils. Carl Allen (Lockheed Martin Space Operations, Houston) and a team of 18 other analysts tested the effect of gamma rays on rock and mineral samples like those we expect on Mars. Except for some darkening of some minerals, high doses of gamma rays had no significant effect on the rocks, making gamma radiation a feasible option for sterilizing samples returned from Mars.

  7. Insect food aiming at Mars emigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Naomi; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Nagasaka, Sanako; Kuwayama, Akemi; Sofue, Megumi

    2012-07-01

    We study insect food aiming at Mars emigration.In space agriculture, insect is the important creature which we cannot miss.It is necessary for the pollination of the plant, and it is rich to protein and lipid as food.I reported that silkworm is an insect necessary for astroponics in particular last time.We make clothes using silk thread, and the pupa becomes the food.In addition, the clothes can make food as protein when we need not to use it. The bee is a very important insect in the space agriculture,too.We examined nutrition of silkworm, bee, grasshopper, snail and the white ant which are necessary for Mars emigration.We will introduce of good balance space foods.We will report many meal menu for Mars emigration.

  8. Modeling the hydrological cycle on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Machtoub

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The study provides a detailed analysis of the hydrological cycle on Mars simulated with a newly developed microphysical model, incorporated in a spectral Mars General Circulation Model. The modeled hydrological cycle is compared well with simulations of other global climate models. The simulated seasonal migration ofwater vapor, circulation instability, and the high degree of temporal variability of localized water vapor outbursts are shown closely consistent with recent observations. The microphysical parameterization provides a significant improvement in the modeling of ice clouds evolved over the tropics and major ancient volcanoes on Mars. The most significant difference between the simulations presented here and other GCM results is the level at which the water ice clouds are found. The model findings also support interpretation of observed thermal anomalies in the Martian tropics during northern spring and summer seasons.

  9. Discovery of diffuse aurora on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, N M; Deighan, J I; Jain, S K; Stiepen, A; Stewart, A I F; Larson, D; Mitchell, D L; Mazelle, C; Lee, C O; Lillis, R J; Evans, J S; Brain, D; Stevens, M H; McClintock, W E; Chaffin, M S; Crismani, M; Holsclaw, G M; Lefevre, F; Lo, D Y; Clarke, J T; Montmessin, F; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-01

    Planetary auroras reveal the complex interplay between an atmosphere and the surrounding plasma environment. We report the discovery of low-altitude, diffuse auroras spanning much of Mars' northern hemisphere, coincident with a solar energetic particle outburst. The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph, a remote sensing instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft, detected auroral emission in virtually all nightside observations for ~5 days, spanning nearly all geographic longitudes. Emission extended down to ~60 kilometer (km) altitude (1 microbar), deeper than confirmed at any other planet. Solar energetic particles were observed up to 200 kilo--electron volts; these particles are capable of penetrating down to the 60 km altitude. Given minimal magnetic fields over most of the planet, Mars is likely to exhibit auroras more globally than Earth.

  10. The great 2003 perihelic apparition of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beish, Jeffrey D.; Parker, Donald C.

    2003-02-01

    Mars will approach closer to the Earth during the 2003 apparition than at any other time in over 59,000 years! Always an intriguing world, Mars offers both casual and serious observers many challenges and delights. It also provides astronomers a laboratory to study the atmosphere and surface of another planet, including the behavior of condensates and their effects on its atmosphere and surface. Mars is similar to Earth in that it has four seasons, exhibits global climates, changing weather patterns, annual thawing and growing of polar caps, storm clouds of water ice, dusty winds, and a variety of surface features that predictably change in color and size and appear to shift position over extended periods of time.

  11. Flyover Animation of Becquerel Crater on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] View the Movie Click on image to view the movie This simulated flyover shows rhythmic layers of sedimentary rock inside Becquerel crater on Mars. The animation uses three-dimensional modeling based on a stereo pair of images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo.

  12. Fractal Analysis of Drainage Basins on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Marinova, M. M.; McGovern, P. J.; Clifford, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    We used statistical properties of drainage networks on Mars as a measure of martian landscape morphology and an indicator of landscape evolution processes. We utilize the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data to construct digital elevation maps (DEMs) of several, mostly ancient, martian terrains. Drainage basins and channel networks are computationally extracted from DEMs and their structures are analyzed and compared to drainage networks extracted from terrestrial and lunar DEMs. We show that martian networks are self-affine statistical fractals with planar properties similar to terrestrial networks, but vertical properties similar to lunar networks. The uniformity of martian drainage density is between those for terrestrial and lunar landscapes. Our results are consistent with the roughening of ancient martian terrains by combination of rainfall-fed erosion and impacts, although roughening by other fluvial processes cannot be excluded. The notion of sustained rainfall in recent Mars history is inconsistent with our findings.

  13. Photochemical Escape of Oxygen from Early Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical escape is an important process for oxygen escape from present Mars. In this work, a 1-D Monte-Carlo Model is developed to calculate escape rates of energetic oxygen atoms produced from O2+ dissociative recombination reactions (DR) under 1, 3, 10, and 20 times present solar XUV fluxes. We found that although the overall DR rates increase with solar XUV flux almost linearly, oxygen escape rate increases from 1 to 10 times present solar XUV conditions but decreases when increasing solar XUV flux further. Analysis shows that atomic species in the upper thermosphere of early Mars increases more rapidly than O2+ when increasing XUV fluxes. While the latter is the source of energetic O atoms, the former increases the collision probability and thus decreases the escape probability of energetic O. Our results suggest that photochemical escape be a less important escape mechanism than previously thought for the loss of water and/or CO2 from early Mars.

  14. Mars MetNet Precursor Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Guerrero, H.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Vazquez, L.; Haukka, H.

    2013-09-01

    We are developing a new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). The scientific payload of the Mars MetNet Precursor [1] mission is divided into three categories: Atmospheric instruments, Optical devices and Composition and structure devices. Each of the payload instruments will provide significant insights in to the Martian atmospheric behavior. The key technologies of the MetNet Lander have been qualified and the electrical qualification model (EQM) of the payload bay has been built and successfully tested.

  15. Mars MetNet Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Arruego, I.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Vazquez, L.; Haukka, H.; Palin, M.; Nikkanen, T.

    2015-10-01

    New kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars is under development in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission is based on a new semihard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). The scientific payload of the Mars MetNet Precursor [1] mission is divided into three categories: Atmospheric instruments, Optical devices and Composition and structure devices. Each of the payload instruments will provide significant insights in to the Martian atmospheric behavior. The key technologies of the MetNet Lander have been qualified and the electrical qualification model (EQM) of the payload bay has been built and successfully tested.

  16. Fractal Analysis of Drainage Basins on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Marinova, M. M.; McGovern, P. J.; Clifford, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    We used statistical properties of drainage networks on Mars as a measure of martian landscape morphology and an indicator of landscape evolution processes. We utilize the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data to construct digital elevation maps (DEMs) of several, mostly ancient, martian terrains. Drainage basins and channel networks are computationally extracted from DEMs and their structures are analyzed and compared to drainage networks extracted from terrestrial and lunar DEMs. We show that martian networks are self-affine statistical fractals with planar properties similar to terrestrial networks, but vertical properties similar to lunar networks. The uniformity of martian drainage density is between those for terrestrial and lunar landscapes. Our results are consistent with the roughening of ancient martian terrains by combination of rainfall-fed erosion and impacts, although roughening by other fluvial processes cannot be excluded. The notion of sustained rainfall in recent Mars history is inconsistent with our findings.

  17. Evaporation Rates of Brine on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Chittenden, J.; Moore, S. R.; Meier, A.; Kareev, M.; Farmer, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    While Mars is now largely a dry and barren place, recent data have indicated that water has flowed at specific locations within the last approx. 10(exp 6) y. This had led to a resurgence of interest in theoretical and experimental work aimed at understanding the behavior of water on Mars. There are several means whereby the stability of liquid water on Mars could be increased, one being the presence solutes that would depress the freezing point. Salt water on Earth is about 0.5M NaCl, but laboratory experiments suggest that martian salt water is quite different. We recently began a program of laboratory measurements of the stability of liquid water, ice and ice-dust mixtures under martian conditions and here report measurements of the evaporation rate of 0.25M brine.

  18. Gravity and topography. [of planet Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, P. B.; Banerdt, W. B.; Lindal, G. F.; Sjogren, W. L.; Slade, M. A.; Bills, B. G.; Smith, D. E.; Balmino, G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper summarizes the fundamental gravity field constants for Mars and a brief historical review of early determinations and current-day accurate estimates. These include the planetary gravitational constant, global figure, dynamical oblateness, mean density, and rotational period. Topographic results from data acquired from the 1967 opposition to the most recent, 1988, opposition are presented. Both global and selected local topographic variations and features are discussed. The inertia tensor and the nonhydrostatic component of Mars are examined in detail. The dimensionless moment of inertia about the rotational axis is 0.4 for a body of uniform density and 0.37621 if Mars were in hydrostatic equilibrium. By comparing models of both gravity and topography, inferences are made about the degree and depth of compensation in the interior and stresses in the lithosphere.

  19. A Pragmatic Approach to Sovereignty on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruhns, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Rising interest in Mars colonization from both private and public sectors necessitates a renewed discussion about sovereignty in space. The non-appropriation principle of the Outer Space Treaty currently prohibits any sovereign claims to celestial bodies, but it remains unclear how this principle should be applied to the peaceful colonization of Mars. Here we develop a pragmatic approach to guide the settlement of Mars, which is based upon a "bounded first possession" model with mandatory planetary parks. The international scientific community will establish planetary park locations and regulations in order to protect sites of scientific, cultural, and aesthetic value. Colonization parties may occupy limited plots of martian land and may claim exclusive economic rights within this zone, while still refraining from any claims to sovereignty. All colonists remain under the legal jurisdiction of their host nation, with conflicts to be resolved diplomatically or through a temporary tribunal system composed of rep...

  20. Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, R.J.; Smith, P.H.; Lemmon, M.; Tanner, R.; Burkland, M.; Wegryn, E.; Weinberg, J.; Marcialis, R.; Britt, D.T.; Thomas, N.; Kramm, R.; Dummel, A.; Crowe, D.; Bos, B.J.; Bell, J.F.; Rueffer, P.; Gliem, F.; Johnson, J. R.; Maki, J.N.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Singer, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder returned over 16,000 high-quality images from the surface of Mars. The camera was well-calibrated in the laboratory, with <5% radiometric uncertainty. The photometric properties of two radiometric targets were also measured with 3% uncertainty. Several data sets acquired during the cruise and on Mars confirm that the system operated nominally throughout the course of the mission. Image calibration algorithms were developed for landed operations to correct instrumental sources of noise and to calibrate images relative to observations of the radiometric targets. The uncertainties associated with these algorithms as well as current improvements to image calibration are discussed. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.