WorldWideScience

Sample records for pre operational environmental

  1. Standard protocol for conducting pre-operational environmental surveillance around nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, A G; Verma, P C; Rajan, M P [Health Safety and Environment Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2009-02-15

    This document presents the standard procedures for evaluation of site specific environmental transfer factors around NPP sites. The scope of this document is to provide standard protocol to be followed for conducting pre-operational environmental surveillance around nuclear facilities. Such surveillances have been proposed to be carried out by university professionals under DAE-BRNS projects. This document contains a common methodology in terms of sampling, processing, measurements and analysis of elemental/radionuclides, while keeping the site specific requirements also in place. (author)

  2. Standard protocol for conducting pre-operational environmental surveillance around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, A.G.; Verma, P.C.; Rajan, M.P.

    2009-02-01

    This document presents the standard procedures for evaluation of site specific environmental transfer factors around NPP sites. The scope of this document is to provide standard protocol to be followed for conducting pre-operational environmental surveillance around nuclear facilities. Such surveillances have been proposed to be carried out by university professionals under DAE-BRNS projects. This document contains a common methodology in terms of sampling, processing, measurements and analysis of elemental/radionuclides, while keeping the site specific requirements also in place. (author)

  3. Pre-operational monitoring and assessment of aquatic biota in environmental impact assessment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, T.K.

    2001-01-01

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an ideal anticipatory mechanism which establishes quantitative values for parameters indicating the quality of the environment before, during and after the proposed developmental activity, thus allowing measures that ensure environmental compatibility in developmental process. EIA studies have been made mandatory in India by MoEF, GOI for expansion/modernization of any activity or development of new project. Biological assessment, under aquatic environment, is one of the major components of EIA and it requires systematic way of data collection. Generation of substantial baseline data can then be used for formulation of subsequent stages of EIA, viz. prediction, evaluation, impact statements and environmental management plan (EMP). However, a definite approach towards biological studies under EIA during pre-operational stage has not been outlined in available guidelines. (author)

  4. Pre-operational monitoring and assessment of aquatic biota in environmental impact assessment studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, T K [Ecotechnology Division, National Environmental Engineering Research Inst., Nagpur (India)

    2001-06-01

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an ideal anticipatory mechanism which establishes quantitative values for parameters indicating the quality of the environment before, during and after the proposed developmental activity, thus allowing measures that ensure environmental compatibility in developmental process. EIA studies have been made mandatory in India by MoEF, GOI for expansion/modernization of any activity or development of new project. Biological assessment, under aquatic environment, is one of the major components of EIA and it requires systematic way of data collection. Generation of substantial baseline data can then be used for formulation of subsequent stages of EIA, viz. prediction, evaluation, impact statements and environmental management plan (EMP). However, a definite approach towards biological studies under EIA during pre-operational stage has not been outlined in available guidelines. (author)

  5. Superconducting Super Collider site environmental report for calendar year 1991. Pre-operational

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This is the first annual SER prepared for the SSC project. It is a pre-operational report, intended primarily to describe the baseline characterization of the Ellis County, Texas site that has been developed subsequent to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Supplemental Environmental impact Statement (SEIS). As such, the emphasis will be on environmental compliance efforts, including monitoring and mitigation programs. The SER also reports on the measures taken to meet the commitments made in the EIS and SEIS. These measures are detailed in the Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) (Department of Energy (DOE), 1991), which was prepared following the signing of the Record of Decision (ROD) to construct the SSC in Texas. The SER will continue to be preoperational until the first high-energy (20 trillion electron volt or TeV) protons collisions are observed, at which point the SSC will become operational. At that time, the SER will place more emphasis on the radiological monitoring program. This SER will report on actions taken in 1991 or earlier and briefly mention some of those planned for calendar year 1992. AU actions completed in 1992 will be addressed in the SER for calendar year 1992

  6. Superconducting Super Collider site environmental report for calendar year 1991. Pre-operational

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This is the first annual SER prepared for the SSC project. It is a pre-operational report, intended primarily to describe the baseline characterization of the Ellis County, Texas site that has been developed subsequent to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Supplemental Environmental impact Statement (SEIS). As such, the emphasis will be on environmental compliance efforts, including monitoring and mitigation programs. The SER also reports on the measures taken to meet the commitments made in the EIS and SEIS. These measures are detailed in the Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) (Department of Energy (DOE), 1991), which was prepared following the signing of the Record of Decision (ROD) to construct the SSC in Texas. The SER will continue to be preoperational until the first high-energy (20 trillion electron volt or TeV) protons collisions are observed, at which point the SSC will become operational. At that time, the SER will place more emphasis on the radiological monitoring program. This SER will report on actions taken in 1991 or earlier and briefly mention some of those planned for calendar year 1992. AU actions completed in 1992 will be addressed in the SER for calendar year 1992.

  7. Application of Space Environmental Observations to Spacecraft Pre-Launch Engineering and Spacecraft Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Janet L.; Xapsos, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the effects of the space environment on spacecraft systems and applying this knowledge to spacecraft pre-launch engineering and operations. Particle radiation, neutral gas particles, ultraviolet and x-rays, as well as micrometeoroids and orbital debris in the space environment have various effects on spacecraft systems, including degradation of microelectronic and optical components, physical damage, orbital decay, biasing of instrument readings, and system shutdowns. Space climate and weather must be considered during the mission life cycle (mission concept, mission planning, systems design, and launch and operations) to minimize and manage risk to both the spacecraft and its systems. A space environment model for use in the mission life cycle is presented.

  8. Pre-operative evaluation for thorax surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Luis, Saenz; Morales, Oscar Alberto

    2002-01-01

    A pre-operative analysis of the function of the breathing system is made in the patient that will be taken to thorax surgery. The paper includes risk factors, pre-operative clinical evaluation and of breathing and cardiovascular system

  9. Report on the pre-operational environmental radiological and micrometeorological studies around Kaiga Atomic Power Project site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    This report presents a summary of the results of preoperational environmental radiological and micro- meteorological studies carried out during the year 1992, 1993, 1995, 1998 and 1999. Baseline radioactivity levels in Kaiga environment originating from 137 Cs, 90 Sr and natural radionuclides are given. Micro-meteorological data includes that from SODAR, tower and surface instruments. The data is compared with that observed at other NPP Sites in the country. (author)

  10. Operational Area Environmental Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey-White, Brenda Eileen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nagy, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wagner, Katrina Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goodman, Thomas Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herring, Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catechis, Christopher S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kinghorn, Aubrianna Nicole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, Ellie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barthel, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casaus, Benito [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Operational Area Environmental Evaluation update provides a description of activities that have the potential to adversely affect natural and cultural resources, including soil, air, water, biological, ecological, and historical resources. The environmental sensitivity of an area is evaluated and summarized, which may facilitate informed management decisions as to where development may be prohibited, restricted, or subject to additional requirements.

  11. Operational and environmental safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The responsibility of the DOE Office of Operational and Environmental Safety is to assure that DOE-controlled activities are conducted in a manner that will minimize risks to the public and employees and will provide protection for property and the environment. The program supports the various energy technologies by identifying and resolving safety problems; developing and issuing safety policies, standards, and criteria; assuring compliance with DOE, Federal, and state safety regulations; and establishing procedures for reporting and investigating accidents in DOE operations. Guidelines for the radiation protection of personnel; radiation monitoring at nuclear facilities; an assessment of criticality accidents by fault tree analysis; and the preparation of environmental, safety, and health standards applicable to geothermal energy development are discussed

  12. Reactor operation environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Hunter, C.H.; Marter, W.L.; Moyer, R.A.

    1989-12-01

    This volume is a reactor operation environmental information document for the Savannah River Plant. Topics include meteorology, surface hydrology, transport, environmental impacts, and radiation effects. 48 figs., 56 tabs. (KD)

  13. Pre-operative fasting guidelines: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, E; Eriksson, L I; Hirlekar, G

    2005-01-01

    Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children......Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children...

  14. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Azhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The anaesthetic management of patients with pre-existing pulmonary disease is a challenging task. It is associated with increased morbidity in the form of post-operative pulmonary complications. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function helps in reducing these complications. Patients are advised to stop smoking for a period of 4–6 weeks. This reduces airway reactivity, improves mucociliary function and decreases carboxy-haemoglobin. The widely used incentive spirometry may be useful only when combined with other respiratory muscle exercises. Volume-based inspiratory devices have the best results. Pharmacotherapy of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease must be optimised before considering the patient for elective surgery. Beta 2 agonists, inhaled corticosteroids and systemic corticosteroids, are the main drugs used for this and several drugs play an adjunctive role in medical therapy. A graded approach has been suggested to manage these patients for elective surgery with an aim to achieve optimal pulmonary function.

  15. Pre-operative haematological investigations in paediatric orofacial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pre-operative haematological investigations in paediatric orofacial cleft repair: Any relevance to management outcome? ... Aim and Objectives: To determine the value of routine pre-operative haematologic investigations in children undergoing orofacial cleft repair. Background: Although routine pre-operative laboratory ...

  16. Clinical target volume delineation in glioblastomas: pre-operative versus post-operative/pre-radiotherapy MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, P; Giri, M G; Meliadò, G; Amelio, D; Widesott, L; Ricciardi, G K; Dall'Oglio, S; Rizzotti, A; Sbarbati, A; Beltramello, A; Maluta, S; Amichetti, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Delineation of clinical target volume (CTV) is still controversial in glioblastomas. In order to assess the differences in volume and shape of the radiotherapy target, the use of pre-operative vs post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 and T2 weighted MRI was compared. Methods 4 CTVs were delineated in 24 patients pre-operatively and post-operatively using T1 contrast-enhanced (T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV) and T2 weighted images (T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV). Pre-operative MRI examinations were performed the day before surgery, whereas post-operative examinations were acquired 1 month after surgery and before chemoradiation. A concordance index (CI) was defined as the ratio between the overlapping and composite volumes. Results The volumes of T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV were not statistically different (248 ± 88 vs 254 ± 101), although volume differences >100 cm3 were observed in 6 out of 24 patients. A marked increase due to tumour progression was shown in three patients. Three patients showed a decrease because of a reduced mass effect. A significant reduction occurred between pre-operative and post-operative T2 volumes (139 ± 68 vs 78 ± 59). Lack of concordance was observed between T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV (CI = 0.67 ± 0.09), T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV (CI = 0.39 ± 0.20) and comparing the portion of the T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV not covered by that defined on T2PRECTV images (CI = 0.45 ± 0.16 and 0.44 ± 0.17, respectively). Conclusion Using T2 MRI, huge variations can be observed in peritumoural oedema, which are probably due to steroid treatment. Using T1 MRI, brain shifts after surgery and possible progressive enhancing lesions produce substantial differences in CTVs. Our data support the use of post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 weighted MRI for planning purposes. PMID:21045069

  17. Reactor operation environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselow, J.S.; Price, V.; Stephenson, D.E.; Bledsoe, H.W.; Looney, B.B.

    1989-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All three of these reactors discontinued operation in 1988. Currently, intense efforts are being extended to prepare these three reactors for restart in a manner that protects human health and the environment. To document that restarting the reactors will have minimal impacts to human health and the environment, a three-volume Reactor Operations Environmental Impact Document has been prepared. The document focuses on the impacts of restarting the K, L, and P reactors on both the SRS and surrounding areas. This volume discusses the geology, seismology, and subsurface hydrology. 195 refs., 101 figs., 16 tabs.

  18. Implementation of Pre-Operative Checklist: An Effort to Reduce ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementation of Pre-Operative Checklist: An Effort to Reduce Delays in. Surgery and ... insight to develop a pre-operative checklist to ensure that patients were prepared for surgery and to minimize disruptions ... documentation audit was conducted in May 2014, showing 59% compliance in completing the checklist. Since.

  19. Pre-IPO Operational and Financial Decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Volodymyr Babich; Matthew J. Sobel

    2004-01-01

    Many owners of growing privately held firms make operational and financial decisions in an effort to maximize the expected present value of the proceeds from an initial public offering (IPO). We ask: ÜWhat is the right time to make an IPO?Ý and ÜHow should operational and financial decisions be coordinated to increase the likelihood of a successful IPO?Ý Financial and operational decisions in this problem are linked because adequate financial capital is crucial for operational decisions to be...

  20. Integration of operational research and environmental management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemhof - Ruwaard, J.M.

    1996-01-01


    The subject of this thesis is the integration of Operational Research and Environmental Management. Both sciences play an important role in the research of environmental issues. Part I describes a framework for the interactions between Operational Research and Environmental Management.

  1. Pre-operative pain and sensory function in groin hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske K; Hansen, Jeanette B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although persistent postherniotomy occurs in 5-10% of patients, pathogenic mechanisms remain debatable. Since pre-operative pain has been demonstrated to be a risk factor for persistent postherniotomy pain, pre-operative alterations in nociceptive function may be a potential pathogenic...... mechanism. AIMS: To investigate the correlation between pre-operative pain intensity and sensory functions in the groin hernia area. METHODS: Patients with unilateral groin hernia were examined preoperatively by quantitative sensory testing (thermal, mechanical, and pressure [detection and pain thresholds...... (7%), all whom experienced no pain or pain less than weekly. Only cool detection thresholds were significantly lower between the hernia vs. contralateral side (poperative groin hernia...

  2. Modeling Environmental Literacy of Malaysian Pre-University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamuganathan, Sheila; Karpudewan, Mageswary

    2015-01-01

    In this study attempt was made to model the environmental literacy of Malaysian pre-university students enrolled in a matriculation college. Students enrolled in the matriculation colleges in Malaysia are the top notch students in the country. Environmental literacy of this group is perceived important because in the future these students will be…

  3. Environmental issues in operations management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthulingam, Suresh

    Adoption of sustainable operating practices is becoming an increasingly important issue for many organizations in the world today. In this dissertation, I use empirical methods to investigate factors that influence the adoption of sustainable practices and also identify issues that may hinder the adoption of such practices. I explore these issues in two diverse settings. In Chapter 1, I investigate the adoption and non-adoption of energy efficiency initiatives using a database of over 100,000 recommendations provided to more than 13,000 small and medium sized manufacturing firms. Even though the average payback across all recommendations is just over one year, many of these profitable opportunities are not implemented. Using a probit instrumental variable model, I identify four biases in the adoption of these recommendations. First, managers are myopic as they miss out on many profitable opportunities. Second, managers are more influenced by upfront costs than by net benefits when evaluating such initiatives. Third, adoption of a recommendation depends not only on its characteristics but also on the sequence in which the recommendations are presented. Adoption rates are higher for initiatives appearing early in a list of recommendations. Finally, adoption is not influenced by the number of options provided to decision makers. This contributes to the debate about whether or not choice overload occurs. We highlight decision biases previously unobserved in the Operations Management literature using field data rather than experimental data. We draw implications for enhancing adoption of energy efficiency initiatives and for other decision contexts where a collection of process improvement recommendations are made to firms. In Chapter 2, I examine the depth of adoption of the voluntary LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) standards for green buildings. Depth of adoption refers to the extent to which the buildings adopt practices related to the standard

  4. An anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic reduces pre-operative inpatient stay in patients requiring major vascular surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, D B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing major vascular surgery (MVS) require extensive anaesthetic assessment. This can require extended pre-operative stays. AIMS: We investigated whether a newly established anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic (PAC) would reduce the pre-operative inpatient stay, avoid unnecessary investigations and facilitate day before surgery (DBS) admissions for patients undergoing MVS. PATIENT AND METHODS: One year following and preceding the establishment of the PAC the records of patients undergoing open or endovascular aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy and infra-inguinal bypass were reviewed to measure pre-operative length of stay (LoS). RESULTS: Pre-operative LoS was significantly reduced in the study period (1.85 vs. 4.2 days, respectively, P < 0.0001). Only 12 out of 61 patients in 2007 were admitted on the DBS and this increased to 33 out of 63 patients (P = 0.0002). No procedure was cancelled for medical reasons. CONCLUSION: The PAC has facilitated accurate outpatient anaesthetic assessment for patients requiring MVS. The pre-operative in-patient stay has been significantly reduced.

  5. Pre-operative biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Wang, Qin; Davidson, Brian R; Lin, He; Xie, Xiaodong; Wang, Chaohua

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with obstructive jaundice have various pathophysiological changes that affect the liver, kidney, heart, and the immune system. There is considerable controversy as to whether temporary relief of biliary obstruction prior to major definitive surgery (pre-operative biliary drainage) is of any benefit to the patient. Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of pre-operative biliary drainage versus no pre-operative biliary drainage (direct surgery) in patients with obstructive jaundice (irrespective of a benign or malignant cause). Search methods We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2012. Selection criteria We included all randomised clinical trials comparing biliary drainage followed by surgery versus direct surgery, performed for obstructive jaundice, irrespective of the sample size, language, and publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR), rate ratio (RaR), or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on the available patient analyses. We assessed the risk of bias (systematic overestimation of benefit or systematic underestimation of harm) with components of the Cochrane risk of bias tool. We assessed the risk of play of chance (random errors) with trial sequential analysis. Main results We included six trials with 520 patients comparing pre-operative biliary drainage (265 patients) versus no pre-operative biliary drainage (255 patients). Four trials used percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage and two trials used endoscopic sphincterotomy and stenting as the method of pre-operative biliary drainage. The risk of bias was high in all trials. The proportion of patients with malignant obstruction varied between 60

  6. Lease Operations Environmental Guidance Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau of Land Management

    2001-02-14

    This report contains discussions in nine different areas as follows: (1) Good Lease Operating Practices; (2) Site Assessment and Sampling; (3) Spills/Accidents; (4) Containment and Disposal of Produced Waters; (5) Restoration of Hydrocarbon Impacted Soils; (6) Restoration of Salt Impacted Soils; (7) Pit Closures; (8) Identification, Removal and Disposal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM); and (9) Site Closure and Construction Methods for Abandonment Wells/Locations. This report is primary directed towards the operation of oil and gas producing wells.

  7. Environmental impact of ongoing operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, L.C.

    1980-07-01

    Present technology in the management of uranium mine and mill wastes, coupled with appropriate site selection, quality construction and good operating procedures, can ensure that impacts on health, safety and the environment will be acceptably low over the period of operation. The methods of chemical and physical stabilization of the tailings and retention structures are also compatible with close-out procedures and will ensure that any releases to the environment will continue to be within the requirements, assuming the continued availability of surveillance

  8. WIPP - Pre-Licensing and Operations: Developer and Regulator Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peake, Tom; Patterson, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a disposal system for defense-related transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. Developed by the Department of Energy (DOE), WIPP is located in Southeastern New Mexico: radioactive waste is disposed of 2,150 feet underground in an ancient layer of salt with a total capacity of 6.2 million cubic feet of waste. Congress authorized the development and construction of WIPP in 1980 for the express purpose of providing a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from the defense activities and programs of the United States. This paper makes a historical review of the site development, site operations (waste disposal operations started in 1999), communications between US EPA and DOE, the chronology of pre-licensing and pre-operations, the operational phase and the regulatory challenges, and the lessons learned after 12 years of operations

  9. Research for correction pre-operative MRI images of brain during operation using particle method simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shino, Ryosaku; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Sakai, Mikio; Ito, Hirotaka; Iseki, Hiroshi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    In the neurosurgical procedures, surgeon formulates a surgery plan based on pre-operative images such as MRI. However, the brain is transformed by removal of the affected area. In this paper, we propose a method for reconstructing pre-operative images involving the deformation with physical simulation. First, the domain of brain is identified in pre-operative images. Second, we create particles for physical simulation. Then, we carry out the linear elastic simulation taking into account the gravity. Finally, we reconstruct pre-operative images with deformation according to movement of the particles. We show the effectiveness of this method by reconstructing the pre-operative image actually taken before surgery. (author)

  10. The Relationship between Environmental Moral Reasoning and Environmental Attitudes of Pre-Service Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncay, Busra; Yilmaz-Tuzun, Ozgul; Tuncer-Teksoz, Gaye

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between environmental moral reasoning patterns and environmental attitudes of 120 pre-service science teachers. Content analysis was carried out on participants' written statements regarding their concerns about the presented environmental problems and the statements were labeled as…

  11. Manual on environmental monitoring in normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Many establishments handling radioactive materials produce, and to some extent also discharge, radioactive waste as part of their normal operation. The radiation doses to which members of the public may be exposed during such operation must remain below the stipulated level. The purpose of this manual is to provide technical guidance for setting up programmes of routine environmental monitoring in the vicinity of nuclear establishment. The annex gives five examples of routine environmental monitoring programmes currently in use: these have been indexed separately.

  12. Community-Operated Environmental Surveillance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the environmental surveillance activities with which citizens living near the Hanford Site have been participating. Local teachers have been managing and operating three special radiological air sampling stations located in Richland, Basin City, and Franklin County, Washington. Other expansion efforts of this program are also described.

  13. Community-Operated Environmental Surveillance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the environmental surveillance activities with which citizens living near the Hanford Site have been participating. Local teachers have been managing and operating three special radiological air sampling stations located in Richland, Basin City, and Franklin County, Washington. Other expansion efforts of this program are also described

  14. Operable severe obstructive jaundice: How should we use pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obstructive jaundice is a common surgical problem, and surgery in jaundiced patients is associated with a higher risk of postoperative complications than surgery in non-jaundiced patients. However, the efficacy of pre-operative biliary drainage (PBD) for patients with obstructive jaundice remains controversial. Many studies ...

  15. The potential benefit of pre-operative assessment of amputation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential benefit of pre-operative assessment of amputation wound healing potential in peripheral vascular disease. M. Mars, R. P. Mills, J. V. Robbs. Abstract. Choosing the most distal amputation level that will heal is difficult in patients with peripheral vascular disease. From 1984 to 1988,965 patients underwent 1 563 ...

  16. Reactor operation environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wike, L.D.; Specht, W.L.; Mackey, H.E.; Paller, M.H.; Wilde, E.W.; Dicks, A.S.

    1989-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a large United States Department of Energy installation on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina. The SRS contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, varied wetlands including Carolina Bays, the Savannah River swamp system, and impoundment related and riparian wetlands, and the aquatic habitats of several stream systems, two large cooling reservoirs, and the Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a large variety of plants and animals including many commercially or recreational valuable species and several rare, threatened or endangered species. This volume describes the major habitats and their biota found on the SRS, and discuss the impacts of continued operation of the K, L, and P production reactors.

  17. The Relationship between Environmental Moral Reasoning and Environmental Attitudes of Pre-Service Science Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    TUNCAY, Busra; YILMAZ-TUZUN, Ozgul; TUNCER-TEKSOZ, Gaye

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between environmental moral reasoning patterns and environmental attitudes of 120 pre-service science teachers. Content analysis was carried out on participants’ written statements regarding their concerns about the presented environmental problems and the statements were labeled as ecocentric, anthropocentric, and non-environmental according to their meanings. Then, descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted ...

  18. Economic environmental management of drilling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longwell, H.J.; Akers, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents significant environmental and regulatory initiatives developed by Exxon's New Orleans Drilling Organization. Specifically, the paper will cover drilling waste minimization techniques and disposal options, recycling of drilling waste streams, and environmentally managed drilling location design considerations. The implementation of some of these initiatives at Exxon's Chalkley field land locations have resulted in a fifty percent reduction in drilling location waste management costs. Some of these same initiatives have been successfully applied to Exxon's barge drilling locations. For operations at the environmentally sensitive Mobile Bay, Exxon contracted with a local company and assisted in the development of an economically and environmentally superior drilling waste disposal and treatment system. In summary, it is possible for drilling operators to pro-actively manage escalating environmental and regulatory challenges through the implementation of economic and practical initiatives

  19. Pre operational background radiation monitoring around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project site - a decade long experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, B.; George, Thomas; Sundara Rajan, P.; Selvi, B.S.; Balamurugan, M.; Pandit, G.G.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-operational environmental background radiation monitoring around nuclear power plants is very important to understand baseline values existing in the site and also to identify any hot spots of naturally occurring high background radiation areas and their sources. These baseline measurements will act as a benchmark for future comparison after the reactors go into operation. The radiation measurements are continued during the operational phase of the plant and the results are compared to see whether there is any impact of the operation of the plant on the environment. A comprehensive background radiation monitoring plan has been in vogue at site from 2004 to meet this objective. This paper describes the different monitoring strategies adopted around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project site and throws light on the pre operational background radiation levels in the environment

  20. Acute gallbladder torsion - a continued pre-operative diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desrochers Randal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute gallbladder volvulus continues to remain a relatively uncommon process, manifesting itself usually during exploration for an acute surgical abdomen with a presumptive diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. The pathophysiology is that of mechanical organo-axial torsion along the gallbladder's longitudinal axis involving the cystic duct and cystic artery, and with a pre-requisite of local mesenteric redundancy. The demographic tendency is septua- and octo-genarians of the female sex, and its overall incidence is increasing, this being attributed to increasing life expectancy. We discuss two cases of elderly, fragile women presenting to the emergency department complaining of sudden onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Their subsequent evaluation suggested acute cholecystitis. Ultimately both were taken to the operating room where the correct diagnosis of gallbladder torsion was made. Pre-operative diagnosis continues to be a major challenge with only 4 cases reported in the literature diagnosed with pre-operative imaging; the remainder were found intra-operatively. Consequently, a delay in diagnosis can have devastating patient outcomes. Herein we propose a necessary high index of suspicion for gallbladder volvulus in the outlined patient demographic with symptoms and signs mimicking acute cholecystitis.

  1. Pre-operative pain and sensory function in groin hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske K; Hansen, Jeanette B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    (rho=-0.413, p=0.049), indicating a paradoxical association between level of mechanical pain threshold and magnitude of spontaneous pain. No other sensory modality was significantly correlated to pain intensity. New/increased pain during repetitive pinprick stimulation (wind-up) was seen in 3 patients...... mechanism. AIMS: To investigate the correlation between pre-operative pain intensity and sensory functions in the groin hernia area. METHODS: Patients with unilateral groin hernia were examined preoperatively by quantitative sensory testing (thermal, mechanical, and pressure [detection and pain thresholds...... pain is not related to findings of hyperalgesia or other changes in sensory function that may support pain-induced pre-operative neuroplasticity as a pathogenic mechanism for the development of persistent postherniotomy pain....

  2. [Pre-operation evaluation and intra-operation management of cochlear implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dao-xing; Hu, Bao-hua; Xiao, Yu-li; Shi, Bo-ning

    2004-10-01

    To summarize pre-operation evaluation experiences in cochlear implantation. Performing auditory evaluation and image analysis seriously in 158 severe hearing loss or total deaf cases before cochlear implantation, comparing their performance with the findings during and post operation. Among the total 158 cases, 116 cases with normal structure, 42 cases with the abnormal findings of the inner or middle ear. Stapedial gusher happened in 6 cases, 1 case was not predicted before operation. Except 1 case with serious malformation, the findings of other 157 cases in operation were consistent with the pre-operation evaluation. We helped all patients reconstruct auditory conduction with cochlear implantation, and the average hearing level up to 37.6 dB SPL. Performing image analysis seriously before operation and planning for operation according to HRCT can do great help to cochlear implantation. The operation under the HRCT instruction has less complications.

  3. Environmental design of the Olympic Dam operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Environmental Design of The Olympic Dam Operations has been required to take into account the Environmental Management Programme as approved by the South Australian Government and radiological protection standards as determined by the Commonwealth of Australia's Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores 1987. The article describes the natural environment, project assessment and infrastructure relating to the environmental design. The radiological standards refer to the control of exposure to radiation above naturally occurring background levels both for employees and for members of the public. 2 tabs., maps

  4. General Introduction: PREVIMER, a French pre-operational coastal ocean forecasting capability.

    OpenAIRE

    Dumas, Franck; Pineau-guillou, Lucia; Lecornu, Fabrice; Le Roux, Jean-francois; Le Squere, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Pre-operational system PREVIMER provides with coastal observations and forecasts along French coasts: currents, waves, sea levels, temperature, salinity, primary production and turbidity. These marine environmental data come from in situ observations, satellite images, and numerical models. They are centralized and archived in PREVIMER databases, then published on website (real time and historical data), and freely available to users, private companies as well as public administrations. This ...

  5. Pre-operative assessment and post-operative care in elective shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Ahsan; Macfarlane, Robert J; Waseem, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Pre-operative assessment is required prior to the majority of elective surgical procedures, primarily to ensure that the patient is fit to undergo surgery, whilst identifying issues that may need to be dealt with by the surgical or anaesthetic teams. The post-operative management of elective surgical patients begins during the peri-operative period and involves several health professionals. Appropriate monitoring and repeated clinical assessments are required in order for the signs of surgical complications to be recognised swiftly and adequately. This article examines the literature regarding pre-operative assessment in elective orthopaedic surgery and shoulder surgery, whilst also reviewing the essentials of peri- and post-operative care. The need to recognise common post-operative complications early and promptly is also evaluated, along with discussing thromboprophylaxis and post-operative analgesia following shoulder surgery.

  6. The effect of pre-operative optimization on post-operative outcome in Crohn's disease resections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Hussuna, Alaa; Iesalnieks, Igors; Horesh, Nir

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The timing of surgical intervention in Crohn's disease (CD) may depend on pre-operative optimization (PO) which includes different interventions to decrease the risk for unfavourable post-operative outcome. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of multi-model PO on...

  7. Operational Flexibility Responses to Environmental Uncertainties

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Kent D.

    1994-01-01

    This study develops and tests a behavioral model of organizational changes in operational flexibility. Regression results using an international data set provide strong support for the general proposition that uncertainties associated with different environmental components--poitical, government policy, macroeconomic, competitive, input and product demand uncertainties--have different implications for firm internal, locational, and supploer flexibility. Slack acts as a buffer attenuating, a...

  8. Environmental concerns gaining importance in industry operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that environmental concerns have leapt to the forefront of industry's concerns in operating in Latin America. The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro June 3-14 focused a strong world spotlight on the region's environmental and commercial resources. Protection of the region's rain forests, which accounts for a huge share of the world's total, is emerging as an especially contentious issue. Ecuador's Oriente region may well prove the litmus test of how or whether oil and gas companies are able to operate in Latin American rain forests. Controversy over industry operations in the Oriente have heated to the point that environmentalist and native groups have routinely picketed company offices in Quito and used mass fundraiser mailings in North America

  9. Implementation of pre-operational version of RODOS in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duranova, T.; Janko, K.

    2000-01-01

    With support of the European Commission's Echo programme ''Implementation of the Rodeos Decision Support System for Off-Site Emergency Preparation and response in the Emergency centres in Poland and the Slovak Republics' '', Rodeos was implemented in the Slovak Republic. The main objective of the project - implemented by the Consortium of Ecton and STUK, with participation of VUJE and IAE - was to accelerate the implementation of the RODOS system within national emergency preparedness arrangements in Poland and the Slovak Republic. The main elements are: procure and install the computer hardware for the RODOS; establish dedicated communication lines; install and adapt RODOS software; test and verify the operability of the whole system; develop and implement procedures for the pre-operational integration of RODOS into national emergency arrangements; develop and implement maintenance procedures; develop and implement a training programme. (author)

  10. Implementation of pre-operational version of RODOS in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duranova, T.

    2001-01-01

    With support from the European Commission's ECHO programme 'Implementation of the RODOS Decision Support System for Off-Site Emergency Preparation and response in the Emergency centres in Poland and the Slovak Republic', RODOS was implemented in the Slovak Republic. The main objective of the project which was implemented by the Consortium of ENCONET and STUK, with participation of VUJE and IAE, was to accelerate the implementation of the RODOS system within national emergency preparedness arrangements in Poland and the Slovak Republic. The main elements are: procure and install the computer hardware for the RODOS; establish dedicated communication lines; install and adapt RODOS software; test and verify the operability of the whole system; develop and implement procedures for the pre-operational integration of RODOS into national emergency arrangements; develop and implement maintenance procedures; develop and implement a training programme. (author)

  11. The Impact of the Environmental Documentary Movies on Pre-Service German Teachers' Environmental Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyaz, Yunus; Isigicok, Erkan; Gursoy, Esim

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the environmental attitudes of Turkish pre-service teachers of German as a foreign language using the German version of The Revised New Ecological Paradigm Scale (RNEP) and aims to compare New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) level of participants before and after a larger research project that uses documentary movies as a language…

  12. How we improved operations in drilling pre-salt wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hougaz, Augusto Borella [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Martins, Luiz Felipe; Bittencourt, Jessica Lima; Braz, Luciano Machado [Genesis do Brasil, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Damski, Carlos [Genesis Petroleum Technology Pty Ltd. (GPT), Bentley, WA (Australia)

    2012-07-01

    The development of pre-salt wells offshore Brazil has been one of the most challenging projects in history of E and P. Facing water depths of 2000+ meters, a salt layer 2000 meters thick to reach reservoirs at 7000 meters below sea level, has to use technological and procedural techniques never used before. In those 2 years of exploration of those fields many technologies were tested and improved. This paper describes the systematic approach was taken to analyze, plan and follow-up the development of drilling operations campaign in those fields, and the case study of overall process improvement. The assumption was to apply a risk analysis tool which uses previous data to analyze the performance and plan future time. The goals of this process are continuous improvement of execution and process control for each operation. Looking into previous performance, new interventions were planned more accurately and further improvements were studied. The frequent follow up of the drilling intervention was done using the statistical base to compare the most recent results. At operational level it was possible to see if the last operation was done in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 4th quartile of its related statistical distribution, as well as to verify the difference within P10 and P90, which indicates the control of each operation execution process. The same process was done for some rig related operations and for the whole intervention at end of it. Close contact with the intervention progress was kept and actions taken in any major deviation from the plan. This paper describes the case study where the process control and optimization of the total time for drilling 10 wells with similar design was measured between March 2009 and May 2011. It resulted in significant improvement in the drilling process. (author)

  13. Clinical feasibility of pre-operative neurodevelopmental assessment of infants undergoing open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Miranda; Rabbidge, Bridgette; Ziviani, Jenny; Sakzewski, Leanne

    2017-08-01

    Assessing the neurodevelopmental status of infants with congenital heart disease before surgery provides a means of identifying those at heightened risk of developmental delay. This study aimed to investigate factors impacting clinical feasibility of pre-operative neurodevelopmental assessment of infants undergoing early open heart surgery. Infants who underwent open heart surgery prior to 4 months of age participated in this cross-sectional study. The Test of Infant Motor Performance and Prechtl's Assessment of General Movements were undertaken on infants pre-operatively. When assessments could not be undertaken, reasons were ascribed to either infant or environmental circumstances. Demographic data and Aristotle scores were compared between groups of infants who did or did not undergo assessment. Binary logistic regression was used to explore associations. A total of 60 infants participated in the study. Median gestational age was 38.78 weeks (interquartile range: 36.93-39.72). Of these infants, 37 (62%) were unable to undergo pre-operative assessment. Twenty-four (40%) could not complete assessment due to infant-related factors and 13 (22%) due to environmental-related factors. For every point increase in the Aristotle Patient-Adjusted Complexity score, the infants likelihood of being unable to undergo assessment increased by 35% (odds ratio: 0.35; 95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.77, P = 0.03). Over half of the infants undergoing open heart surgery were unable to complete pre-operative neurodevelopmental assessment. The primary reason for this was infant-related medical instability. Findings suggest further research is warranted to investigate whether the Aristotle Patient-Adjusted Complexity score might serve as an indicator to inform developmental surveillance with this medically fragile cohort. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Choreographer Pre-Testing Code Analysis and Operational Testing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, David J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Harrison, Christopher B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Perr, C. W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hurd, Steven A [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Choreographer is a "moving target defense system", designed to protect against attacks aimed at IP addresses without corresponding domain name system (DNS) lookups. It coordinates actions between a DNS server and a Network Address Translation (NAT) device to regularly change which publicly available IP addresses' traffic will be routed to the protected device versus routed to a honeypot. More details about how Choreographer operates can be found in Section 2: Introducing Choreographer. Operational considerations for the successful deployment of Choreographer can be found in Section 3. The Testing & Evaluation (T&E) for Choreographer involved 3 phases: Pre-testing, Code Analysis, and Operational Testing. Pre-testing, described in Section 4, involved installing and configuring an instance of Choreographer and verifying it would operate as expected for a simple use case. Our findings were that it was simple and straightforward to prepare a system for a Choreographer installation as well as configure Choreographer to work in a representative environment. Code Analysis, described in Section 5, consisted of running a static code analyzer (HP Fortify) and conducting dynamic analysis tests using the Valgrind instrumentation framework. Choreographer performed well, such that only a few errors that might possibly be problematic in a given operating situation were identified. Operational Testing, described in Section 6, involved operating Choreographer in a representative environment created through EmulyticsTM . Depending upon the amount of server resources dedicated to Choreographer vis-á-vis the amount of client traffic handled, Choreographer had varying degrees of operational success. In an environment with a poorly resourced Choreographer server and as few as 50-100 clients, Choreographer failed to properly route traffic over half the time. Yet, with a well-resourced server, Choreographer handled over 1000 clients without missrouting. Choreographer

  15. Hypertrophic Pyloric stenosis: Pre- and post-operative sonographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joung Suk; Han, Douk Sub; Oh, Jong Sub; Kim, Min Jung; Gi, Joo Yun; Park, Byung Ran; Kim, Se Jong; Koh, Kang Suk; Kim, Byung Kun

    1993-01-01

    The authors retrospectively analysed the ultrasonographic findings of 43 cases of surgically confirmed hypertrophic pyloric stenosis and their postoperative findings of sonograms taken at 1 month(n=40) or 3 month(n=5) after pyloromyotomy. In preoperative study, the thickened pyloric muscle was isoechoic or slight hypoechoic relative to liver on the midline longitudinal view and appeared as a 'nonuniform acoustic ring' on the transverse view. The results of measurement in the all cases with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis were the pyloric muscle thickness ≥ 3.8 mm, the pyloric diameter ≥ 14 mm, the pyloric channel length ≥ 16 mm, the pyloric muscle volume ≥ 2.21 cm 3 and the pyloric muscle index ≥ 0.57, respectively. It usually required 1 month after operation for the hypertrophied muscle to resolve in 36 of 41 patients. The normalized pyloric muscle appeared more hypoechoic than that of adjacent parenchyma, and the nonuniform echogenicity of the pyloric muscle disappeared. Five patients whose hypertrophied muscle did not return to normal range on 1 month's follow-up sonogram were follow-up 3 months later again, and we have ascertained their resolution in all of them. In conclusion, the pre-operative sonographic findings of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis were different quantitatively and qualitatively from of those of post-operative follow-up ultrasound exam. High-resolution real time sonography is a safe and accurate method for the diagnosis of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis and useful in postpyloromyotomy follow-up

  16. Pre-operative radiochemotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi-Chu Yang; Jian-Bin Hu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate results of pre-operative radiochemotherapy followed by surgery for 15 patients with locally advanced un-resectable rectal cancer.METHODS: 15 patients with advanced non-resectable rectal cancer were treated with pre-operative irriadiation of 40-46 Gy plus concomitant chemotherapy (5-FU+LV and 5′-DFuR) (RCS group). For comparison, 27 similar patients,treated by preoperative radiotherapy (40-50 Gy) plus surgery were served as control (RS group).RESULTS: No radiochemotherapy or radiotherapy was interrupted and then was delayed because of toxicities in both groups. The radical resectability rate was 73.3% in the RCS group and 37.0% (P=0.024) in RS group. Sphincter preservation rates were 26.6% and 3.7% respectively (P=0.028). Sphincter preservation rates of lower rectal cancer were 27.3 % and 0.0 % respectively (P=0.014). Response rates of RCS and RS groups were 46.7 % and 18.5 %(P=0.053). The tumor downstage rates were 8 (53.3%)and 9 (33.3%) in these groups (P=0.206). The 3-year overall survival rates were 66.7 % and 55.6% (P=0.485), and the disease free survival rates were 40.1% and 33.2%(P=0.663). The 3-year local recurrent rates were 26.7%and 48.1% (P=0.174). No obvious late effects were found in either groups.CONCLUSION: High resectability is possible following preoperative radiochemotherapy and can have more sphincters preserved. It is important to improve the quality of the patients′ life even without increasing the survival or local control rates. Preoperative radiotherapy with concomitant full course chemotherapy (5-Fu+LV and 5′-DFuR) is effective and safe.

  17. Restoring Environmental Flows by Modifying Dam Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Richter

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The construction of new dams has become one of the most controversial issues in global efforts to alleviate poverty, improve human health, and strengthen regional economies. Unfortunately, this controversy has overshadowed the tremendous opportunity that exists for modifying the operations of existing dams to recover many of the environmental and social benefits of healthy ecosystems that have been compromised by present modes of dam operation. The potential benefits of dam "re-operation" include recovery of fish, shellfish, and other wildlife populations valued both commercially and recreationally, including estuarine species; reactivation of the flood storage and water purification benefits that occur when floods are allowed to flow into floodplain forests and wetlands; regaining some semblance of the naturally dynamic balance between river erosion and sedimentation that shapes physical habitat complexity, and arresting problems associated with geomorphic imbalances; cultural and spiritual uses of rivers; and many other socially valued products and services. This paper describes an assessment framework that can be used to evaluate the benefits that might be restored through dam re-operation. Assessing the potential benefits of dam re-operation begins by characterizing the dam's effects on the river flow regime, and formulating hypotheses about the ecological and social benefits that might be restored by releasing water from the dam in a manner that more closely resembles natural flow patterns. These hypotheses can be tested by implementing a re-operation plan, tracking the response of the ecosystem, and continually refining dam operations through adaptive management. The paper highlights a number of land and water management strategies useful in implementing a dam re-operation plan, with reference to a variety of management contexts ranging from individual dams to cascades of dams along a river to regional energy grids. Because many of the

  18. Quality assurance of pre-operative assessment--a review of quality assurance activities related to pre-operative assessment in nine hospitals in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, N. S.; Helsloot, R.

    1989-01-01

    Pre-operative assessment of patients for surgery is one of the most prevalent topics for quality assurance by peer-review in Dutch hospitals. This article describes the experiences with pre-operative assessment in nine hospitals. It is discussed why preoperative assessment is performed, what tests

  19. Connectome analysis for pre-operative brain mapping in neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael G.; Price, Stephen J.; Suckling, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Object: Brain mapping has entered a new era focusing on complex network connectivity. Central to this is the search for the connectome or the brains ‘wiring diagram’. Graph theory analysis of the connectome allows understanding of the importance of regions to network function, and the consequences of their impairment or excision. Our goal was to apply connectome analysis in patients with brain tumours to characterise overall network topology and individual patterns of connectivity alterations. Methods: Resting-state functional MRI data were acquired using multi-echo, echo planar imaging pre-operatively from five participants each with a right temporal–parietal–occipital glioblastoma. Complex networks analysis was initiated by parcellating the brain into anatomically regions amongst which connections were identified by retaining the most significant correlations between the respective wavelet decomposed time-series. Results: Key characteristics of complex networks described in healthy controls were preserved in these patients, including ubiquitous small world organization. An exponentially truncated power law fit to the degree distribution predicted findings of general network robustness to injury but with a core of hubs exhibiting disproportionate vulnerability. Tumours produced a consistent reduction in local and long-range connectivity with distinct patterns of connection loss depending on lesion location. Conclusions: Connectome analysis is a feasible and novel approach to brain mapping in individual patients with brain tumours. Applications to pre-surgical planning include identifying regions critical to network function that should be preserved and visualising connections at risk from tumour resection. In the future one could use such data to model functional plasticity and recovery of cognitive deficits. PMID:27447756

  20. Connectome analysis for pre-operative brain mapping in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael G; Price, Stephen J; Suckling, John

    2016-10-01

    Brain mapping has entered a new era focusing on complex network connectivity. Central to this is the search for the connectome or the brains 'wiring diagram'. Graph theory analysis of the connectome allows understanding of the importance of regions to network function, and the consequences of their impairment or excision. Our goal was to apply connectome analysis in patients with brain tumours to characterise overall network topology and individual patterns of connectivity alterations. Resting-state functional MRI data were acquired using multi-echo, echo planar imaging pre-operatively from five participants each with a right temporal-parietal-occipital glioblastoma. Complex networks analysis was initiated by parcellating the brain into anatomically regions amongst which connections were identified by retaining the most significant correlations between the respective wavelet decomposed time-series. Key characteristics of complex networks described in healthy controls were preserved in these patients, including ubiquitous small world organization. An exponentially truncated power law fit to the degree distribution predicted findings of general network robustness to injury but with a core of hubs exhibiting disproportionate vulnerability. Tumours produced a consistent reduction in local and long-range connectivity with distinct patterns of connection loss depending on lesion location. Connectome analysis is a feasible and novel approach to brain mapping in individual patients with brain tumours. Applications to pre-surgical planning include identifying regions critical to network function that should be preserved and visualising connections at risk from tumour resection. In the future one could use such data to model functional plasticity and recovery of cognitive deficits.

  1. The ultrastructure of tumor cells in patients with rectal cancer after pre-operative irradiation and intra-operative cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyinnik, Yu.O.; Kotenko, O.Je.; Nevzorov, V.P.; Chyibyisov, L.P.

    2000-01-01

    Electronic microscopy of the tumor cells was performed to confirm the efficacy of combined pre-operative gamma-therapy and intraoperative cryotherapy (CT). Pre-operative irradiation at the dose of 20 Gy accompanied by intra-operative cryotherapy caused the changes in the ultrastructure, the depth and degree of which allow to consider them destructive and irreversible

  2. The Army's Green Warriors: Environmental Considerations in Contingency Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    .... Environmental considerations encompass anything related to the environment that either affects the planning and execution of military operations, positively or negatively, or is affected by those operations...

  3. Association between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin and post-operative infections after non-emergent surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Blankush

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: The risk factors of post-operative infection are multiple and likely synergistic. While pre-operative HbA1c level is not independently associated with risk of post-operative infection, there are scenarios and patient subgroups where pre-operative HbA1c is useful in predicting an increased risk of infectious complications in the post-operative period.

  4. Pre-operational Study on Impact of Temelin NPP on Hydrosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanslik, E.J.

    1999-01-01

    Beginning of the construction of Temelin Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in south Bohemia (CR) dates back to 1986. It is planned that the first water-cooled reactor could be put into operation in 2000. A research project, funded from the national budget and carried out under supervision of the Czech Ministry of Environment, has been aimed at examining pre-operational environmental conditions (a reference level) in terms of concentrations of radioactive and non-radioactive polluting substances in components of the environment, particularly in hydrosphere, and at predicting possible impacts of future operation of Temelin NPP. Special attention paid to the hydrosphere is associated with requirements for protection of water quality in the Vltava River, which serves as water resource for Prague capital. The paper summarises selected interim results of the project, particularly those concerning per-operational environmental conditions and impacts predicted for standard operation of the plant. More detailed description of the results including possible impacts of the so called maximum project accident is presented in (1)

  5. Olympic Dam operations - environmental management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This is the 3rd Annual Report pertaining to the Olympic Dam Operations Environmental Management Programme and covers the period 1st March, 1989 to 28th February, 1990. The monitoring programe has provided detailed assessment of meteorological data, vegetation, fauna, soil stability, soil salinity, hydrogeology and well-fields both inside and outside the operations area. Mine site rehabilitation is considered to be progressing satisfactorily. Out of the 851 drill pad sites 72% have been rehabilitated to the stage where natural soil stability and plant cover has been achieved. Drill pad sites that have received good rainfall within one year of being ripped have rehabilitated very succesfully. Sites that receive no significant rainfall for more than two years, particularly on dune slopes may require re-ripping before successful regeneration can occur. To improve the drill pad site rehabilitation monitoring programme it is recommended that 200 drill sites be analysed each year. Air emission and solid waste data are also presented. This program is considered to be particularly successful in relation to SO 2 assessment. 90 tabs., 63 figs., ills

  6. Pre-operative anxiety. Effect of early or late position on the operating list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, N; Bajaj, A; Pershad, D; Yaddanapudi, L N; Chari, P

    1996-04-01

    The influence of the relative position on the operating list on pre-operative anxiety was studied in 60 adult female ASA 1 patients undergoing major surgery. Thirty patients were placed first on the operating list (group 1) and 30 were given a time 4-5 h later (group 2). Each patient was visited on the evening prior to surgery and again on the morning of surgery. Anxiety was measured at each visit by objective criteria and part 1 of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire. The pulse rate, systolic blood pressure and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire scores were higher on the second visit than on the first (p patients. This increase was greater in group 2 than in group 1 (p < 0.05). The evening anxiety scores were not correlated with those on the morning visit and could not predict them.

  7. Improving operating room first start efficiency - value of both checklist and a pre-operative facilitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panni, M K; Shah, S J; Chavarro, C; Rawl, M; Wojnarwsky, P K; Panni, J K

    2013-10-01

    There are multiple components leading to improved operating room efficiency. We undertook a project focusing on first case starts; accounting for each delay component on a global basis. Our hypothesis was there would be a reduction in first start delays after we implemented strategies to address the issues identified through this accounting process. An orange sheet checklist was implemented, with specific items that needed to be clear prior to roll back to the operating room (OR), and an OR facilitator was employed to intervene whenever there were any missing items needed for a specific patient. We present the data from this quality improvement project over an 18-month period. Initially, 10.07 (± 0.73) delayed first starts occurred per day but declined steadily over time to a low of 4.95 (± 0.38) per day after 6 months (-49.2 %, P < 0.001). By the end of the project, the most common reasons for delay still included late surgical attending (19%), schedule changes (14%) as well as 'other reasons' (13%), but with an overall reduction per day of each. Total anaesthesia delay initially totalled 11% of the first start delays, but was negligible (< 1%) at the project's completion. While we have a challenging operating room environment based on our patient population, multiple trainees in both the surgery and anaesthesiology teams: an orange sheet - pre-operative checklist in addition to a dedicated pre-operative facilitator; allowed us to make a substantial improvement in our first start on time starts. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Environmental Education in Pre-Service Teacher Training: A Literature Review of Existing Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-García, Olaya; Sureda-Negre, Jaume; Comas-Forgas, Rubén

    2015-01-01

    The importance of pre-service teacher training regarding environmental education (EE) has been vastly demonstrated. This systematic review examined the existing evidence from studies evaluating and analysing the relationship between EE, including environmental competences and pre-service primary school teacher training. The literature review…

  9. Environmental impact of nuclear fuel cycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, W.L.

    1989-09-01

    This paper considers the environmental impact of nuclear fuel cycle operations, particularly those operated by British Nuclear Fuels plc, which include uranium conversion, fuel fabrication, uranium enrichment, irradiated fuel transport and storage, reprocessing, uranium recycle and waste treatment and disposal. Quantitative assessments have been made of the impact of the liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment from all stages in the fuel cycle. An upper limit to the possible health effects is readily obtained using the codified recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. This contrasts with the lack of knowledge concerning the health effects of many other pollutants, including those resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. Most of the liquid and gaseous discharges result at the reprocessing stage and although their impact on the environment and on human health is small, they have given rise to much public concern. Reductions in discharges at Sellafield over the last few years have been quite dramatic, which shows what can be done provided the necessary very large investment is undertaken. The cost-effectiveness of this investment must be considered. Some of it has gone beyond the point of justification in terms of health benefit, having been undertaken in response to public and political pressure, some of it on an international scale. The potential for significant off-site impact from accidents in the fuel cycle has been quantitatively assessed and shown to be very limited. Waste disposal will also have an insignificant impact in terms of risk. It is also shown that it is insignificant in relation to terrestrial radioactivity and therefore in relation to the human environment. 14 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Pre-operative skin preparation practices: results of the 2007 French national assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgey, F; Thibon, P; Ertzscheid, M-A; Bernet, C; Gautier, C; Mourens, C; Bettinger, A; Aggoune, M; Galy, E; Lejeune, B; Kadi, Z

    2012-05-01

    Pre-operative skin preparation, aimed at reducing the endogenous microbial flora, is one of the main preventive measures employed to decrease the likelihood of surgical site infection. National recommendations on pre-operative management of infection risks were issued in France in 2004. To assess compliance with the French national guidelines for pre-operative skin preparation in 2007. A prospective audit was undertaken in French hospitals through interviews with patients and staff, and observation of professional practice. Compliance with five major criteria selected from the guidelines was studied: patient information, pre-operative showering, pre-operative hair removal, surgical site disinfection and documentation of these procedures. Data for 41,188 patients from all specialties at 609 facilities were analysed. Patients were issued with information about pre-operative showering in 88.2% of cases [95% confidence interval (CI) 87.9-88.5]. The recommended procedure for pre-operative showering, including hairwashing, with an antiseptic skin wash solution was followed by 70.3% of patients (95% CI 69.9-70.8); this percentage was higher when patients had received appropriate information (P pre-operative surgical hygiene, 82.3% of cases; and pre-operative site disinfection, 71.7% of cases. The essential content of the French guidelines seems to be understood, but reminders need to be issued. Some recommendations may need to be adapted for certain specialties. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prediction of chronic post-operative pain: pre-operative DNIC testing identifies patients at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnitsky, David; Crispel, Yonathan; Eisenberg, Elon; Granovsky, Yelena; Ben-Nun, Alon; Sprecher, Elliot; Best, Lael-Anson; Granot, Michal

    2008-08-15

    Surgical and medical procedures, mainly those associated with nerve injuries, may lead to chronic persistent pain. Currently, one cannot predict which patients undergoing such procedures are 'at risk' to develop chronic pain. We hypothesized that the endogenous analgesia system is key to determining the pattern of handling noxious events, and therefore testing diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) will predict susceptibility to develop chronic post-thoracotomy pain (CPTP). Pre-operative psychophysical tests, including DNIC assessment (pain reduction during exposure to another noxious stimulus at remote body area), were conducted in 62 patients, who were followed 29.0+/-16.9 weeks after thoracotomy. Logistic regression revealed that pre-operatively assessed DNIC efficiency and acute post-operative pain intensity were two independent predictors for CPTP. Efficient DNIC predicted lower risk of CPTP, with OR 0.52 (0.33-0.77 95% CI, p=0.0024), i.e., a 10-point numerical pain scale (NPS) reduction halves the chance to develop chronic pain. Higher acute pain intensity indicated OR of 1.80 (1.28-2.77, p=0.0024) predicting nearly a double chance to develop chronic pain for each 10-point increase. The other psychophysical measures, pain thresholds and supra-threshold pain magnitudes, did not predict CPTP. For prediction of acute post-operative pain intensity, DNIC efficiency was not found significant. Effectiveness of the endogenous analgesia system obtained at a pain-free state, therefore, seems to reflect the individual's ability to tackle noxious events, identifying patients 'at risk' to develop post-intervention chronic pain. Applying this diagnostic approach before procedures that might generate pain may allow individually tailored pain prevention and management, which may substantially reduce suffering.

  12. Predictive potential of pre-operative functional neuroimaging in patients treated with subthalamic stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sestini, Stelvio; Castagnoli, Antonio; Pupi, Alberto; Sciagra, Roberto; Ammannati, Franco; Ramat, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro; Mansi, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive potential of pre-operative regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and clinical factors in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. Ten patients underwent rCBF SPECT and motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) pre- and post-operatively during stimulation at 5 and 42 months. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to extract rCBF values in the pre-SMA because it is related with motor improvement. Post-operative outcomes included motor response to stimulation and percent improvement in UPDRS. Pre-operative predictors were explored by correlation test, linear regression and multivariate analyses. Higher pre-operative rCBF in the pre-SMA and younger age were associated with favourable outcomes at 5 and 42 months. Pre-operative rCBF results were significantly associated with baseline clinical factors. This study shows that PD patients with younger age have higher rCBF values in the pre-SMA and better outcome, thus giving the rationale to the hypothesis that STN stimulation could be considered early in the course of disease. (orig.)

  13. Predictive potential of pre-operative functional neuroimaging in patients treated with subthalamic stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sestini, Stelvio; Castagnoli, Antonio [Ospedale Misericordia e Dolce, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Prato (Italy); Pupi, Alberto; Sciagra, Roberto [University of Florence, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Florence (Italy); Ammannati, Franco; Ramat, Silvia; Sorbi, Sandro [University of Florence, Department of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, Florence (Italy); Mansi, Luigi [University II Naples, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Naples (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive potential of pre-operative regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and clinical factors in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. Ten patients underwent rCBF SPECT and motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) pre- and post-operatively during stimulation at 5 and 42 months. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to extract rCBF values in the pre-SMA because it is related with motor improvement. Post-operative outcomes included motor response to stimulation and percent improvement in UPDRS. Pre-operative predictors were explored by correlation test, linear regression and multivariate analyses. Higher pre-operative rCBF in the pre-SMA and younger age were associated with favourable outcomes at 5 and 42 months. Pre-operative rCBF results were significantly associated with baseline clinical factors. This study shows that PD patients with younger age have higher rCBF values in the pre-SMA and better outcome, thus giving the rationale to the hypothesis that STN stimulation could be considered early in the course of disease. (orig.)

  14. Pre-operative clinical assessment for anaesthesia and the effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. HIV infection is common in South Africa, often remaining clinically latent and liable to be missed during clinical pre-operative assessment, despite the patient having a severe degree of immune compromise. Objectives. The primary objective was to determine the pre-operative physical status of patients ...

  15. Agreement between pre-operative and intra-operative bacteriological samples in 85 chronic peri-prosthetic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter-Parrat, V; Ronde-Oustau, C; Boéri, C; Gaudias, J; Jenny, J-Y

    2017-04-01

    Whether pre-operative microbiological sampling contributes to the management of chronic peri-prosthetic infection remains controversial. We assessed agreement between the results of pre-operative and intra-operative samples in patients undergoing single-stage prosthesis exchange to treat chronic peri-prosthetic infection. Agreement between pre-operative and intra-operative samples exceeds 75% in patients undergoing single-stage exchange of a hip or knee prosthesis to treat chronic peri-prosthetic infection. This single-centre retrospective study included 85 single-stage prosthesis exchange procedures in 82 patients with chronic peri-prosthetic infection at the hip or knee. Agreement between pre-operative and intra-operative sample results was evaluated. Changes to the initial antibiotic regimen made based on the intra-operative sample results were recorded. Of 149 pre-operative samples, 109 yielded positive cultures, in 75/85 cases. Of 452 intra-operative samples, 354 yielded positive cultures, in 85/85 cases. Agreement was complete in 54 (63%) cases and partial in 9 (11%) cases; there was no agreement in the remaining 22 (26%) cases. The complete agreement rate was significantly lower than 75% (P=0.01). The initial antibiotic regimen was inadequate in a single case. Pre-operative sampling may contribute to the diagnosis of peri-prosthetic infection but is neither necessary nor sufficient to confirm the diagnosis and identify the causative agent. The spectrum of the initial antibiotic regimen cannot be safely narrowed based on the pre-operative sample results. We suggest the routine prescription of a probabilistic broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen immediately after the prosthesis exchange, even when a pathogen was identified before surgery. IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, H.

    The tri-agency Integrated Program Office (IPO) is responsible for managing the development of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS will replace the current military and civilian operational polar-orbiting ``weather'' satellites. The Northrop Grumman Space Technology - Raytheon team was competitively selected in 2002 as the Acquisition and Operations contractor team to develop, integrate, deploy, and operate NPOESS satellites to meet the tri-agency user requirements for NPOESS over the 10-year (2009-2018) operational life of the program. Beginning in 2009, NPOESS spacecraft will be launched into three orbital planes to provide significantly improved operational capabilities and benefits to satisfy critical civil and national security requirements for space-based, remotely sensed environmental data. With the development of NPOESS, we are evolving operational ``weather'' satellites into integrated environmental observing systems by expanding our capabilities to observe, assess, and predict the total Earth system - atmosphere, ocean, land, and the space environment. In recent years, the operational weather forecasting and climate science communities have levied more rigorous requirements on space-based observations of the Earth's system that have significantly increased demands on performance of the instruments, spacecraft, and ground systems required to deliver NPOESS data, products, and information to end users. The ``end-to-end'' system consists of: the spacecraft; instruments and sensors on the spacecraft; launch support capabilities; the command, control, communications, and data routing infrastructure; and data processing hardware and software. NPOESS will observe significantly more phenomena simultaneously from space than its operational predecessors. NPOESS is expected to deliver large volumes of more accurate measurements at higher spatial (horizontal and vertical) and temporal resolution at much higher data

  17. Association between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin and post-operative infections after non-emergent surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankush, Joseph M; Leitman, I Michael; Soleiman, Aron; Tran, Trung

    2016-09-01

    A chronic state of impaired glucose metabolism affects multiple components of the immune system, possibly leading to an increased incidence of post-operative infections. Such infections increase morbidity, length of stay, and overall cost. This study evaluates the correlation between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and post-operative infections. Adult patients undergoing non-emergent procedures across all surgical subspecialties from January 2010 to July 2014 had a preoperative HbA1c measured as part of their routine pre-surgical assessment. 2200 patient charts (1100 operative infection (superficial surgical site infection, deep wound/surgical space abscess, pneumonia, and/or urinary tract infection as defined by Centers for Disease Control criteria) within 30 days of surgery. Patients with HbA1c infection rate (3.8% in the HbA1c infection. Elevated HbA1c was, however, predictive of significantly increased risk of post-operative infection when associated with increased age (≥81 years of age) or dirty wounds. The risk factors of post-operative infection are multiple and likely synergistic. While pre-operative HbA1c level is not independently associated with risk of post-operative infection, there are scenarios and patient subgroups where pre-operative HbA1c is useful in predicting an increased risk of infectious complications in the post-operative period.

  18. Investigation of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Attitudes towards Sustainable Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Özgül

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate pre-service science teachers' sustainable environmental education attitudes and the factors affecting them in terms of some variables (gender and grade level). The study group of the current research is comprised of 154 pre-service teachers attending the Department of Science Education in the…

  19. Pre-, intra- and post-operative imaging of cochlear implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Naguib, N.N.N.; Burck, I. [University Hospital Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tawfik, A. [Mansoura Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Emam, A. [University Hospital Alexandria (Egypt). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Nour-Eldin, A. [University Hospital Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Radiology; Stoever, T. [University Hospital of Frankfurt (Germany). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to present essential imaging aspects in patients who are candidates for a possible cochlear implant as well as in postsurgical follow-up. Imaging plays a major role in providing information on preinterventional topography, variations and possible infections. Preoperative imaging using DVT, CT, MRI or CT and MRI together is essential for candidate selection, planning of surgical approach and exclusion of contraindications like the complete absence of the cochlea or cochlear nerve, or infection. Relative contraindications are variations of the cochlea and vestibulum. Intraoperative imaging can be performed by fluoroscopy, mobile radiography or DVT. Postoperative imaging is regularly performed by conventional X-ray, DVT, or CT. In summary, radiological imaging has its essential role in the pre- and post-interventional period for patients who are candidates for cochlear implants.

  20. Operational performance at the German Pre-Konvoi Philippsburg-2 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, K.; Ruehle, W.; Enkler, G.

    1998-01-01

    Philippsburg 2 is one of the first German Pre-Konvoi PWRs starting commercial operation in 1985. From a chemistry point of view three major modifications have been implemented focusing on radiation source reduction, improving steam generator corrosion performance and changing from high hydrazine to low hydrazine chemistry in the component cooling water systems. From an environmental protection perspective, all component cooling water systems were changed from the high hydrazine inhibitor treatment (300-400 ppm N 2 H 4 ) to an oxygen-free treatment, using only small amount of hydrazine of 3 to 5 ppm of N 2 H 4 for oxygen scavenging. During the 13 years of operation, the overall plant performance and availability is excellent; more than 140 million MW hrs of electricity have been generated at an average plant availability of more than 88%. After about 13 years of power operation, it can be concluded, that all modifications applied at the Philippsburg 2 NPP during the design phase resulted in considerable plant performance. Primary side dose rate build-up is experienced on very low levels, leading to extremely low annual personnel radiation exposures, which usually range in the area of 0.2 man Sievert per year. Also steam generator operational and corrosion performance is excellent; at present, no tubes had to be plugged by any reason and no indications for any tubing degradation process has been observed during the ECT tube integrity inspections. Component cooling water systems are operated on low iron and copper concentration indicating the absence of any structural material degradation phenomenon. (J.P.N.)

  1. Pre-operative antibiotic use reduces surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Asad Ali; Farooka, Muhammad Waris; Ayyaz, Mahmood; Sarwar, Hassan; Malik, Awais Amjad; Shabbir, Faisal

    2015-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist as a simple, reliable and effective tool to ensure appropriate administration of intravenous antibiotics. The prospective interventional study was conducted in three phases at Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May 2011 to January 2012. The first phase comprised baseline data collection, followed by implementation of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist, and finally post-implementation data collection. The duration of each phase was 3 months. Primary end points were discharge from hospital, 30 days or death of the patient. Of the 613 patients in the study, 303(49.4%) were in the pre-implementation phase and 310(50.5%) in post-implementation phase. Adherence of optimal administration of antibiotic increased from 114(37.6%) to 282(91%) (poperative infection fell from 99(32.7%) to 47(15.2%) (psite infection by more than half. Hospital stay was shortened by 1.3 days on average which results in considerable reduction in morbidity, mortality and costs.

  2. Pre-operative evaluation of patients with chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapias M Monica; Idrovo Cubides, Victor

    2006-01-01

    Patients with advanced liver disease have an increased risk of complications, compared to healthy patients when they undergo a surgical procedure. This risk is related to the type of surgery, to the type of anesthetic used, and to the severity of the underlying liver disease. Several risk factors for liver disease should be identified prior to a procedure. Those with advanced disease should undergo specific pre-surgical diagnostic tests. The Child Pugh score, and the MELD score, are very useful to establish the surgical risk in individuals with liver disease. The Child-Pugh score is a very useful tool that correlates closely to morbidity and mortality in patients with liver disease. Mortality rates in these patients undergoing major surgery is 10, 30 and 82% for Child-Pugh scores A, B and C respectively. In order to optimize the patient's condition before surgery, a complete evaluation and management of conditions such as jaundice, coagulopathy, ascites, electrolyte abnormalities, renal insufficiency and encephalopathy must be performed. This approach helps to reduce the complication rate in these individuals

  3. Pre-Service Teachers' Perception toward Environmental Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhan, Mohamad Termizi; Ismail, Zurida

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The study investigated the environmental knowledge, attitudes and behaviours exhibited by the pre-service teachers and determined if there was any significant relationship between environmental knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. Method: This descriptive study adopted a quantitative approach using questionnaires to obtain information on…

  4. Does pre-operative psychological distress affect patient satisfaction after primary total hip arthroplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolan John

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are concerns that pre-operative psychological distress might be associated with reduced patient satisfaction after total hip replacement (THR. Methods We investigated this in a multi-centre prospective study between January 1999 and January 2002. We dichotomised the patients into the mentally distressed (MHS ≤ 56 and the not mentally distressed (MHS > 56 groups based on their pre-operative Mental Health Score (MHS of SF36. Results 448 patients (340 not distressed and 108 distressed completed the patient satisfaction survey. Patient satisfaction rate at five year was 96.66% (415/448. There was no difference in patient satisfaction or willingness to have the surgery between the two groups. None of pre-operative variables predicted five year patient satisfaction in logistic regression. Conclusions Patient satisfaction after surgery may not be adversely affected by pre-operative psychological distress.

  5. Fostering Pre-service Teachers' Self-Determined Environmental Motivation Through Green Chemistry Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpudewan, Mageswary; Ismail, Zurida; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-10-01

    The global environmental crisis intensifies particularly in developing nations. Environmental educators have begun to understand that changing the environmental impact requires not only changes in pro-environmental knowledge and attitudes but also in associated, self-determined motivation. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that a green chemistry curriculum changes Malaysian pre-service teachers' environmental motivation. Two comparable groups of pre-service teachers participated in this study. The students in the experimental group ( N = 140) did green chemistry experiments whereas the control group ( N = 123) did equivalent experiments in a traditional manner. Posttest results indicate that there is significant difference between both the groups for intrinsic motivation, integration, identification, and introjections scales and no differences for external regulation and amotivation scales. The qualitative analysis of interview data suggests that the changes are predominantly due to the personal satisfaction that participants derived from engaging in pro-environmental behavior.

  6. Pre- and post-operative values of serum CRP in patients undergoing surgery for brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syeda, T.; Rizvi, H.A.; Hashim, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concentration of C-reactive protein in pre- and post-operative serum samples of brain tumour patients in order to detect the potential risks of post-operative infections. Methods: Serum C-reactive protein was measured on pre- and post-operative Day 1, Day 2 and Day 7 in 18 patients who underwent surgery for brain tumours. The study was performed at the Neurosurgical Ward, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from May 2007 to April 2008. Mean pre-operative patients and control values were compared using Mann-Whitney or Wilcoxon tests for comparing between pre- and post-operative values. P-value was considered significant at 5.0mg/L but no statistically significant difference was found when compared with healthy controls, with mean 4.4+-6.6 and 0.9+-0.7, respectively. Significantly raised serum concentrations were observed in all post-operative samples when compared with pre-operative samples. Serum CRP concentrations significantly increased post-operatively on Day 1, with mean value of 102.9+-82.0mg/L (p<0.0005), and further increased on Day 2 with mean value of 166.9+-128.1mg/L (p<0.0005), but declined on Day 7, with mean value of 42.7+-63.6mg/L (p<0.005). Conclusion: Pre-operative serum C-reactive protein concentrations of 28% of the patients were elevated, suggesting an association with brain tumours. Post-operative serum concentrations were significantly higher than those noted before the surgery. Absence of a fall of concentration from peak value on post-operative Day 2 or a secondary rise from post-operative Day 7 could be alarming for inter-current infection. (author)

  7. Computer guided pre-operative planning and dental implant placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Grošelj

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Implants in dentistry are, besides fixed, removable and maxillofacial prosthodontics, one of the reliable possibility to make functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the edentulism. Surgical and prosthodontic implant complications are often an inattentive consequence of wrong diagnosis, planning, and placement. In this article we present a technique using a highly advanced software program along with a rapid prototyping technology named stereolithography. A planning software for implant placement needs basically the high quality computed tomographic scan of one or both jaws for making accurate preoperative diagnostics and 3D preoperative plan. Later individual drill guide is designed and generated based on both the CT images and the preoperative planning. The patient specific drill guide transfers the virtual planning to the patient’s mouth at time of surgery.Conclusions: The advantages of computer guided implantology are the better prepared surgery with visualisation of critical anatomic structures, assessment of available bone and data about bone quality, increased confidence for the surgeon, deceased operative time, less frequent use of bone grafts, higher quality of collaboration between specialists and prosthetic lab and better communication with patients. Radiographic examination of the operation field for computer guided planning for implant placement is due to high costs justified as the most important information source on the areas to be implanted.

  8. Association between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin and post-operative infections after non-emergent surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Blankush, Joseph M.; Leitman, I. Michael; Soleiman, Aron; Tran, Trung

    2016-01-01

    Background: A chronic state of impaired glucose metabolism affects multiple components of the immune system, possibly leading to an increased incidence of post-operative infections. Such infections increase morbidity, length of stay, and overall cost. This study evaluates the correlation between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and post-operative infections. Study design: Adult patients undergoing non-emergent procedures across all surgical subspecialties from January...

  9. An integrated environmental and health performance quantification model for pre-occupancy phase of buildings in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaodong, E-mail: eastdawn@tsinghua.edu.cn; Su, Shu, E-mail: sushuqh@163.com; Zhang, Zhihui, E-mail: zhzhg@tsinghua.edu.cn; Kong, Xiangqin, E-mail: kxlwq@126.com

    2017-03-15

    To comprehensively pre-evaluate the damages to both the environment and human health due to construction activities in China, this paper presents an integrated building environmental and health performance (EHP) assessment model based on the Building Environmental Performance Analysis System (BEPAS) and the Building Health Impact Analysis System (BHIAS) models and offers a new inventory data estimation method. The new model follows the life cycle assessment (LCA) framework and the inventory analysis step involves bill of quantity (BOQ) data collection, consumption data formation, and environmental profile transformation. The consumption data are derived from engineering drawings and quotas to conduct the assessment before construction for pre-evaluation. The new model classifies building impacts into three safeguard areas: ecosystems, natural resources and human health. Thus, this model considers environmental impacts as well as damage to human wellbeing. The monetization approach, distance-to-target method and panel method are considered as optional weighting approaches. Finally, nine residential buildings of different structural types are taken as case studies to test the operability of the integrated model through application. The results indicate that the new model can effectively pre-evaluate building EHP and the structure type significantly affects the performance of residential buildings.

  10. An integrated environmental and health performance quantification model for pre-occupancy phase of buildings in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaodong; Su, Shu; Zhang, Zhihui; Kong, Xiangqin

    2017-01-01

    To comprehensively pre-evaluate the damages to both the environment and human health due to construction activities in China, this paper presents an integrated building environmental and health performance (EHP) assessment model based on the Building Environmental Performance Analysis System (BEPAS) and the Building Health Impact Analysis System (BHIAS) models and offers a new inventory data estimation method. The new model follows the life cycle assessment (LCA) framework and the inventory analysis step involves bill of quantity (BOQ) data collection, consumption data formation, and environmental profile transformation. The consumption data are derived from engineering drawings and quotas to conduct the assessment before construction for pre-evaluation. The new model classifies building impacts into three safeguard areas: ecosystems, natural resources and human health. Thus, this model considers environmental impacts as well as damage to human wellbeing. The monetization approach, distance-to-target method and panel method are considered as optional weighting approaches. Finally, nine residential buildings of different structural types are taken as case studies to test the operability of the integrated model through application. The results indicate that the new model can effectively pre-evaluate building EHP and the structure type significantly affects the performance of residential buildings.

  11. Environmental management system for transportation maintenance operations : [technical brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This report provides the framework for the environmental management system to analyze : greenhouse gas emissions from transportation maintenance operations. The system enables user : to compare different scenarios and make informed decisions to minim...

  12. NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Imager Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) series provides continuous measurements of the atmosphere and surface over the Western Hemisphere....

  13. NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) Radiometer Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) series offers the advantage of daily global coverage, by making nearly polar orbits 14 times per day...

  14. Operational environmental monitoring plan for the waste isolation pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, D.D.; Baker, P.L.; Cockman, J.S.; Fischer, N.T.; Flynn, D.T.; Harvill, J.P.; Knudtsen, K.L.; Louderbough, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    This plan defines the scope and extent of the WIPP effluent and environmental monitoring programs during the facility's operational life. It also discusses the quality assurance/quality control programs which ensure that samples collected and the resulting analytical data are representative of actual conditions at the WIPP site. This plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP, including: a summary of environmental program information, including an update of the status of environmental permits and compliance activities; a description of the WIPP project and its mission; a description of the local environment, including demographics; a summary of applicable standards and regulatory requirements and brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences; a summary of the preoperational environmental monitoring and assessment activities and responses to the requirements (Appendix A) and guidelines presented in the ''Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance for US DOE Operations.'' 166 refs., 28 figs., 27 tabs

  15. Environmental impact assessment of coal power plants in operation

    OpenAIRE

    Bartan Ayfer; Kucukali Serhat; Ar Irfan

    2017-01-01

    Coal power plants constitute an important component of the energy mix in many countries. However, coal power plants can cause several environmental risks such as: climate change and biodiversity loss. In this study, a tool has been proposed to calculate the environmental impact of a coal-fired thermal power plant in operation by using multi-criteria scoring and fuzzy logic method. We take into account the following environmental parameters in our tool: CO, SO2, NOx, particulate matter, fly as...

  16. The role of pre-operative and post-operative glucose control in surgical-site infections and mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Y Jeon

    Full Text Available The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death.This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to analyze how thirty-day risk of SSI and in-hospital death varies by glucose levels and variability. Maximum pre- and post-operative glucose levels were determined for 72 hours before and after the operation and glucose variability was defined as the coefficient of variation of the glucose measurements. We employed logistic regression to model the risk of SSI or death against glucose variables and the following potential confounders: age, sex, body mass index, duration of operation, diabetes status, procedure classification, physical status, emergency status, and blood transfusion.While association of pre- and post-operative hyperglycemia with SSI were apparent in the crude analysis, multivariate results showed that SSI risk did not vary significantly with glucose levels. On the other hand, in-hospital deaths were associated with pre-operative hypoglycemia (OR = 5.09, 95% CI (1.80, 14.4 and glucose variability (OR = 1.14, 95% CI (1.03, 1.27 for 10% increase in coefficient of variation.In-hospital deaths occurred more often among those with pre-operative hypoglycemia and higher glucose variability. These findings warrant further investigation to determine whether stabilization of glucose and prevention of hypoglycemia could reduce post-operative deaths.

  17. The role of pre-operative and post-operative glucose control in surgical-site infections and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Christie Y; Furuya, E Yoko; Berman, Mitchell F; Larson, Elaine L

    2012-01-01

    The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI) and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death. This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to analyze how thirty-day risk of SSI and in-hospital death varies by glucose levels and variability. Maximum pre- and post-operative glucose levels were determined for 72 hours before and after the operation and glucose variability was defined as the coefficient of variation of the glucose measurements. We employed logistic regression to model the risk of SSI or death against glucose variables and the following potential confounders: age, sex, body mass index, duration of operation, diabetes status, procedure classification, physical status, emergency status, and blood transfusion. While association of pre- and post-operative hyperglycemia with SSI were apparent in the crude analysis, multivariate results showed that SSI risk did not vary significantly with glucose levels. On the other hand, in-hospital deaths were associated with pre-operative hypoglycemia (OR = 5.09, 95% CI (1.80, 14.4)) and glucose variability (OR = 1.14, 95% CI (1.03, 1.27) for 10% increase in coefficient of variation). In-hospital deaths occurred more often among those with pre-operative hypoglycemia and higher glucose variability. These findings warrant further investigation to determine whether stabilization of glucose and prevention of hypoglycemia could reduce post-operative deaths.

  18. Environmental Responsibility: A Panacea for Operational Disturbances in Offshore West Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayo, I.

    2002-01-01

    Reports from onshore E and P activities in Nigeria have shown that operating in the Niger Delta region poses some of the toughest challenges in the world. The region has witnessed a spate of attacks on oil and gas facilities, staff and contractors, consequently, major oil and gas players have to contend with complex operational uncertainties due to increase pressure from the local communities for improved environmental control measures.To effectively de-risk this region of this category of operational uncertainties, the industry must begin to see environmental performance as not only a measure of how well she can comply with existing environmental regulations, but also as a measure of how well she can pre-empt environmental pressures as well as maintain constant harmony with all concerned stakeholders and seeing herself as responsible to the environment with a view to improve performance.In this project, we have been able to develop SMART' models based on continous consultation, integrated management approach and continous improvement attitude (CIA). With a good FOCUS' approach, this will help in safe and effective operations, pre-empt pressures, maintain harmony with local communities and effectively manage operational disturbances within complex environmental settings like the Nigerian Niger Delta area. Finally, we are of the opinion that every industry that seeks to remain efficient and relevant in this millennium should constantly be looking for ways of becoming more environmentally responsible because no business can call itself efficient if it threatens the environment within which it operates.SMART is an acronym for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time Bond.FOCUS is an acronym for Fair, Objective, Consistent, Unbiased and Succint

  19. Environmental impact assessment of coal power plants in operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartan Ayfer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal power plants constitute an important component of the energy mix in many countries. However, coal power plants can cause several environmental risks such as: climate change and biodiversity loss. In this study, a tool has been proposed to calculate the environmental impact of a coal-fired thermal power plant in operation by using multi-criteria scoring and fuzzy logic method. We take into account the following environmental parameters in our tool: CO, SO2, NOx, particulate matter, fly ash, bottom ash, the cooling water intake impact on aquatic biota, and the thermal pollution. In the proposed tool, the boundaries of the fuzzy logic membership functions were established taking into account the threshold values of the environmental parameters which were defined in the environmental legislation. Scoring of these environmental parameters were done with the statistical analysis of the environmental monitoring data of the power plant and by using the documented evidences that were obtained during the site visits. The proposed method estimates each environmental impact factor level separately and then aggregates them by calculating the Environmental Impact Score (EIS. The proposed method uses environmental monitoring data and documented evidence instead of using simulation models. The proposed method has been applied to the 4 coal-fired power plants that have been operation in Turkey. The Environmental Impact Score was obtained for each power plant and their environmental performances were compared. It is expected that those environmental impact assessments will contribute to the decision-making process for environmental investments to those plants. The main advantage of the proposed method is its flexibility and ease of use.

  20. Environmental impact assessment of coal power plants in operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartan, Ayfer; Kucukali, Serhat; Ar, Irfan

    2017-11-01

    Coal power plants constitute an important component of the energy mix in many countries. However, coal power plants can cause several environmental risks such as: climate change and biodiversity loss. In this study, a tool has been proposed to calculate the environmental impact of a coal-fired thermal power plant in operation by using multi-criteria scoring and fuzzy logic method. We take into account the following environmental parameters in our tool: CO, SO2, NOx, particulate matter, fly ash, bottom ash, the cooling water intake impact on aquatic biota, and the thermal pollution. In the proposed tool, the boundaries of the fuzzy logic membership functions were established taking into account the threshold values of the environmental parameters which were defined in the environmental legislation. Scoring of these environmental parameters were done with the statistical analysis of the environmental monitoring data of the power plant and by using the documented evidences that were obtained during the site visits. The proposed method estimates each environmental impact factor level separately and then aggregates them by calculating the Environmental Impact Score (EIS). The proposed method uses environmental monitoring data and documented evidence instead of using simulation models. The proposed method has been applied to the 4 coal-fired power plants that have been operation in Turkey. The Environmental Impact Score was obtained for each power plant and their environmental performances were compared. It is expected that those environmental impact assessments will contribute to the decision-making process for environmental investments to those plants. The main advantage of the proposed method is its flexibility and ease of use.

  1. Automatic joint alignment measurements from pre- and post-operative long leg standing radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossen, A.; Weber, G.M.; Dries, S.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: For diagnosis or treatment assessment of knee joint osteoarthritis it is required to measure bone morphometry from radiographic images. We propose a method for automatic measurement of joint alignment from pre-operative as well as post-operative radiographs.Methods: In a two step

  2. Light Duty Utility Arm system pre-operational (cold test) test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility (LDUA) Cold Test Facility, located in the Hanford 400 Area, will be used to support cold testing (pre- operational tests) of LDUA subsystems. Pre-operational testing is composed of subsystem development testing and rework activities, and integrated system qualification testing. Qualification testing will be conducted once development work is complete and documentation is under configuration control. Operational (hot) testing of the LDUA system will follow the testing covered in this plan and will be covered in a separate test plan

  3. Environmentally friendly hybrid coatings for corrosion protection: silane based pre-treatments and nanostructured waterborne coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Fedel, Michele

    2009-01-01

    This thesis considers a nanotechnology approach based on the production of metals pre-treatments and organic coatings (a complete protection system at all) designed from the nanoscale. The final aim is to develop protection systems with improved corrosion protection properties and a low environmental impact. In particular, multifunctional silane hybrid molecules were used to design sol-gel pre-treatments for metals and to modify the inner structure of UV curable waterborne organic coatings...

  4. Safety Culture in Pre-operational Phases of Nuclear Power Plant Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    An abundance of information exists on safety culture related to the operational phases of nuclear power plants; however, pre-operational phases present unique challenges. This publication focuses on safety culture during pre-operational phases that span the interval from before a decision to launch a nuclear power programme to first fuel load. It provides safety culture insights and focuses on eight generic issues: safety culture understanding; multicultural aspects; leadership; competencies and resource competition; management systems; learning and feedback; cultural assessments; and communication. Each issue is discussed in terms of: specific challenges; desired state; approaches and methods; and examples and resources. This publication will be of interest to newcomers and experienced individuals faced with the opportunities and challenges inherent in safety culture programmes aimed at pre-operational activities.

  5. Safety Culture in Pre-operational Phases of Nuclear Power Plant Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    An abundance of information exists on safety culture related to the operational phases of nuclear power plants; however, pre-operational phases present unique challenges. This publication focuses on safety culture during pre-operational phases that span the interval from before a decision to launch a nuclear power programme to first fuel load. It provides safety culture insights and focuses on eight generic issues: safety culture understanding; multicultural aspects; leadership; competencies and resource competition; management systems; learning and feedback; cultural assessments; and communication. Each issue is discussed in terms of: specific challenges; desired state; approaches and methods; and examples and resources. This publication will be of interest to newcomers and experienced individuals faced with the opportunities and challenges inherent in safety culture programmes aimed at pre-operational activities.

  6. The Westinghouse Hanford Company Operational Environmental Monitoring Program CY-93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.W.

    1993-10-01

    The Operational Environmental Monitoring Program (OEMP) provides facility-specific environmental monitoring to protect the environment adjacent to facilities under the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and assure compliance with WHC requirements and local, state, and federal environmental regulations. The objectives of the OEMP are to evaluate: compliance with federal (DOE, EPA), state, and internal WHC environmental radiation protection requirements and guides; performance of radioactive waste confinement systems; and trends of radioactive materials in the environment at and adjacent to nuclear facilities and waste disposal sites. This paper identifies the monitoring responsibilities and current program status for each area of responsibility

  7. Pre-operative simulation of pediatric mastoid surgery with 3D-printed temporal bone models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Austin S; Webster, Caroline E; Harrysson, Ola L A; Formeister, Eric J; Rawal, Rounak B; Iseli, Claire E

    2015-05-01

    As the process of additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3D) printing, has become more practical and affordable, a number of applications for the technology in the field of pediatric otolaryngology have been considered. One area of promise is temporal bone surgical simulation. Having previously developed a model for temporal bone surgical training using 3D printing, we sought to produce a patient-specific model for pre-operative simulation in pediatric otologic surgery. Our hypothesis was that the creation and pre-operative dissection of such a model was possible, and would demonstrate potential benefits in cases of abnormal temporal bone anatomy. In the case presented, an 11-year-old boy underwent a planned canal-wall-down (CWD) tympano-mastoidectomy for recurrent cholesteatoma preceded by a pre-operative surgical simulation using 3D-printed models of the temporal bone. The models were based on the child's pre-operative clinical CT scan and printed using multiple materials to simulate both bone and soft tissue structures. To help confirm the models as accurate representations of the child's anatomy, distances between various anatomic landmarks were measured and compared to the temporal bone CT scan and the 3D model. The simulation allowed the surgical team to appreciate the child's unusual temporal bone anatomy as well as any challenges that might arise in the safety of the temporal bone laboratory, prior to actual surgery in the operating room (OR). There was minimal variability, in terms of absolute distance (mm) and relative distance (%), in measurements between anatomic landmarks obtained from the patient intra-operatively, the pre-operative CT scan and the 3D-printed models. Accurate 3D temporal bone models can be rapidly produced based on clinical CT scans for pre-operative simulation of specific challenging otologic cases in children, potentially reducing medical errors and improving patient safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  8. Changes in biological markers, particularly hormone receptors, due to pre-operative chemotherapy (epirubicin/docetaxel in operable breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumiko Tashima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the correlation between biological markers prior to pre-operative chemotherapy with epirubicin and docetaxel (ET therapy and the effect of treatment as well as the clinically significant changes in biological markers before and after chemotherapy. Since April 2002, 52 patients with tumors ≥3 cm in diameter or lymph node metastases have received pre-operative ET chemotherapy. The items investigated were ER/PgR, proliferative activity (MIB-1, etc. The correlation of changes in these factors between pre- and post-treatment status and the clinical and pathological responses was investigated. Clinical response was 82%, BCS rate was 67%. Pathological response was 31.4%. The ER/PgR positive cell rate significantly decreased from 48%/32% to 37%/14%. The MIB-1 decreased from 48% to 27%. The pathological response was significantly high in patients with low ER/PgR-positive rates and those with high MIB-1 values.

  9. Pre-operative and early post-operative factors associated with surgical site infection after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Oller, Inmaculada; Llavero, Carolina; Arroyo, Antonio; Muñoz, Jose Luis; Calero, Alicia; Diez, María; Zubiaga, Lorea; Calpena, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Surgical procedures on obese patients are expected to have a high incidence of surgical site infection (SSI). The identification of pre-operative or early post-operative risk factors for SSI may help the surgeon to identify subjects in risk and adequately optimize their status. We conducted a study of the association of comorbidities and pre- and post-operative analytical variables with SSI following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for the treatment of morbid obesity. We performed a prospective study of all morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as a bariatric procedure between 2007 and 2011. An association of clinical and analytical variables with SSI was investigated. The study included 40 patients with a mean pre-operative body mass index (BMI) of 51.2±7.9 kg/m(2). Surgical site infections appeared in three patients (7.5%), of whom two had an intra-abdominal abscess located in the left hypochondrium and the third had a superficial incisional SSI. Pre-operatively, a BMI >45 kg/m(2) (OR 8.7; p=0.008), restrictive disorders identified by pulmonary function tests (OR 10.0; p=0.012), a serum total protein concentration 30 mcg/dL (OR 13.0; p=0.003), and a mean corpuscular volume (MCV) operative SSI. Post-operatively, a serum glucose >128 mg/dL (OR 4.7; p=0.012) and hemoglobin operative anemia and hyperglycemia as risk factors for SSI. In these situations, the surgeon must be aware of and seek to control these risk factors.

  10. Role of emotion in public information on environmental risk and pre-environmental behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnders, A.L.; Midden, C.J.H.; Wilke, H.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    What role does emotion play in the provision of public information about· the risks of environmental pollution? This is a question that is asked in the research project on the 'Role of emotion in public information on environmental risks and pro-environmental behaviour'. This article describes the

  11. Pre-operative use of anti-TNF-alpha agents and the risk of post-operative complications in patients with Crohn's disease--a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente Mertz; Nielsen, J.; Qvist, N.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible negative role of pre-operative use of antitumour necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) agents on post-operative outcomes in Crohn's disease (CD) patients is still debated. AIM: To examine the impact of pre-operative anti-TNF-alpha agents on post-operative outcomes 30 and 6...

  12. Pre-operative use of anti-TNF-α agents and the risk of post-operative complications in patients with ulcerative colitis - a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, B M; Nielsen, J; Qvist, N

    2012-01-01

    It is still controversial whether pre-operative anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-α) agents increase post-operative complications in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).......It is still controversial whether pre-operative anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-α) agents increase post-operative complications in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC)....

  13. Use of operational data for the assessment of pre-existing software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helminen, Atte; Gran, Bjoern Axel; Kristiansen, Monica; Winther, Rune

    2004-01-01

    To build sufficient confidence on the reliability of the safety systems of nuclear power plants all available sources of information should be used. One important data source is the operational experience collected for the system. The operational experience is particularly applicable for systems of pre-existing software. Even though systems and devices involving pre-existing software are not considered for the functions of highest safety levels of nuclear power plants, they will most probably be introduced to functions of lower safety levels and to none-safety related applications. In the paper we shortly discuss the use of operational experience data for the reliability assessment of pre-existing software in general, and the role of pre-existing software in relation to safety applications. Then we discuss the modelling of operational profiles, the application of expert judgement on operational profiles and the need of a realistic test case. Finally, we discuss the application of operational experience data in Bayesian statistics. (Author)

  14. A comparison of radiological and historical findings in osteosarcomas following pre-operative chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, H.J.; Riebel, T.; Winkler, K.; Heise, U.; Delling, G.; Hamburg Univ.; Hamburg Univ.

    1985-01-01

    Since the introduction of pre-operative chemotherapy, osteosarcomas have shown a more favourable prognosis. Reaction of the tumour due to chemotherapy is judged pre-operative primarily by radiology (plain films, angiography, CT, scintigraphy). There is little evidence concerning the radiological appearances after pre-operative chemotherapy and morphological changes, particularly in respect of tumour regression. Specific radiological changes were therefore compared with pathological findings following chemotherapy and operation in 17 patients with osteosarcomas. Tumours were examined which showed radiological evidence of intra- and extra-osseous sclerosis or lysis and which still were classified as vital tumour tissue. Tumour planes were reconstructed from large histological sections of the operative specimen and compared with the radiological appearances. Sclerosis was found to be due to reactive new bone formation or to mineralisation of the osteosarcomatous tissue. Lysis correlated with persistent vital tumour, or in connective tissue. Nine out of ten cases, regarded as vital on radiological evidence, showed vital tumour cells on histological section. Lyses and scleroses were not reliable indications of the pre-operative state of the osteosarcoma following chemotherapy. On the other hand, combined qualitative radiological criteria for assesing tumour vitality, proved to be helpful. (orig.) [de

  15. Assessing Environmental Literacy of Pre-Vocational Education Teachers in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dajeh, Hesham I.

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the environmental literacy (knowledge, attitudes, and concerns) of pre-vocational education teachers. A total of 124 teachers participated in the study. Data was collected through a closed ended questionnaire. Questionnaire validity was established by content and a Cranach's alpha coefficient used to determine reliability. The…

  16. Environmental requirements for oil and gas operations in Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystuen, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The administration and regulation of environmental issues regarding the oil and gas industry in Saskatchewan were discussed. The political and cultural differences in Saskatchewan that make environmental processes distinct from its neighbouring jurisdictions were described. The following Saskatchewan legislation deals with environmental requirements: Environmental Management and Protection Act, Environmental Assessment Act, Oil and Gas Conservation Act, Wildlife Habitat Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Planning and Development Act, Forest Act, Water Corporation Act, Heritage Property Act, and Parks Act. The Saskatchewan Department of Energy and Mines (SEM) is the primary regulator of the upstream oil and gas industry. It regulates the construction, operation, reporting and abandonment requirements for oilfield operations. SEM also manages crude oil prior to refining and manages the wastes contaminated with crude oil. Provisions of the relevant Acts regarding drilling in environmentally sensitive areas, flaring requirements, transporting and disposing of oilfield wastes, road-building, operating restrictions, emergency response plans, spill clean-up responsibilities, well abandonment and site reclamation responsibilities were discussed. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  17. Strategic Stakeholder Communication and Co-operation in Environmental Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2002-01-01

    in this process is strategic stakeholder relationships like communication and co-operation. The paper addresses this topic based on a proposed approach for identifying and evaluating the influence from various groups of stakeholders as well as the findings from recent surveys of environmental management......Ever since the introduction of the first major Danish environmental protection law in 1974, environmental regulation has been instrumental in pushing industry towards adopting environmentally less harmful behaviour. However, since the early 1990s, pressure from a growing number of other...... stakeholders, such as for example customers, NGO's, neighbours, etc., has increasingly driven industry towards incorporating environmental considerations in their decisions and activities to an extent which justifies placing Danish companies at the cutting edge of industrial greening. An essential element...

  18. Exploration and production operations in an environmentally sensitive area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, G.W.; Steele, E.J.; Robalino, J.; Baldwin, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Ecuadorian portion of the Amazon Basin, known locally as the Oriente, is the major oil producing region in Ecuador. The tropical rain forests of the Oriente contain some of the Earth's most biologically diverse and ecologically sensitive areas. In addition, the rain forest is home to several groups of indigenous peoples.When formulating an exploration plan and prior to beginning E and P activities in the Oriente, operators must understand the environmental and sociocultural issues in the region. These concerns are considered throughout the planning process, from project conception to project closure. An environmental management plan is adopted which addresses environmental and sociocultural concerns, minimizes environmental impact, prevents delays, and limits environmental liability

  19. Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E; Gschwind, Michael K; Gunnels, John A

    2013-11-05

    Mechanisms for performing matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture are provided. A vector load operation is performed to load a first vector operand of the matrix multiplication operation to a first target vector register. A load and splat operation is performed to load an element of a second vector operand and replicating the element to each of a plurality of elements of a second target vector register. A multiply add operation is performed on elements of the first target vector register and elements of the second target vector register to generate a partial product of the matrix multiplication operation. The partial product of the matrix multiplication operation is accumulated with other partial products of the matrix multiplication operation.

  20. Pre-operative imaging of rectal cancer and its impact on surgical performance and treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets-Tan, R G H; Lettinga, T; Beets, G L

    2005-08-01

    To discuss the ability of pre-operative MRI to have a beneficial effect on surgical performance and treatment outcome in patients with rectal cancer. A description on how MRI can be used as a tool so select patients for differentiated neoadjuvant treatment, how it can be used as an anatomical road map for the resection of locally advanced cases, and how it can serve as a tool for quality assurance of both the surgical procedure and overall patient management. As an illustration the proportion of microscopically complete resections of the period 1993-1997, when there was no routine pre-operative imaging, is compared to that of the period 1998-2002, when pre-operative MR imaging was standardized. The proportion of R0 resections increased from 92.5 to 97% (p=0.08) and the proportion of resections with a lateral tumour free margin of >1mm increased from 84.4 to 92.1% (p=0.03). The incomplete resections in the first period were mainly due to inadequate surgical management of unsuspected advanced or bulky tumours, whereas in the second period insufficient consideration was given to extensive neoadjuvant treatment when the tumour was close to or invading the mesorectal fascia on MR. There are good indications that in our setting pre-operative MR imaging, along with other improvements in rectal cancer management, had a beneficial effect on patient outcome. Audit and discussion of the incomplete resections can lead to an improved operative and perioperative management.

  1. Assessing the effectiveness of a guideline recommendation for pre-operative radiochemotherapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchon-Walsh, Paula; Borras, Josep Maria; Espinas, Josep Alfons; Aliste, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To ascertain the degree of adherence to the guideline recommendation on pre-operative RT/ChT for stage-II and -III patients in Catalonian public hospitals, and its impact on local recurrence among rectal cancer patients. Methods: Data were derived from a multicentre retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent curative-intent surgery for primary rectal cancer at Catalonian public hospitals in 2005 and 2007. Results: The study covered 1229 patients with TNM stage-II or -III primary rectal cancer. Of these patients, 54.5% underwent pre-operative RT/ChT; 14.9% underwent post-operative RT (± chemotherapy); and 30.6% did not undergo any RT. The crude local recurrence rate at 2 years was 4.1% and the crude distant recurrence rate at 2 years was 6.5%. The results of the univariate analyses showed a local-recurrence hazard ratio of 1.84 for the group of patients that received no RT versus the group that received pre-operative RT/ChT (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This is the first population-based study in Catalonia to support the use of pre-operative RT/ChT in rectal cancer patients because, in line with the results of population-based studies reported from other countries, its application, compared to non-application of RT, was found to lead to a clear reduction in the probability of local recurrence.

  2. Model of environmental life cycle assessment for coal mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchart-Korol, Dorota; Fugiel, Agata; Czaplicka-Kolarz, Krystyna; Turek, Marian

    2016-08-15

    This paper presents a novel approach to environmental assessment of coal mining operations, which enables assessment of the factors that are both directly and indirectly affecting the environment and are associated with the production of raw materials and energy used in processes. The primary novelty of the paper is the development of a computational environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) model for coal mining operations and the application of the model for coal mining operations in Poland. The LCA model enables the assessment of environmental indicators for all identified unit processes in hard coal mines with the life cycle approach. The proposed model enables the assessment of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) based on the IPCC method and the assessment of damage categories, such as human health, ecosystems and resources based on the ReCiPe method. The model enables the assessment of GHGs for hard coal mining operations in three time frames: 20, 100 and 500years. The model was used to evaluate the coal mines in Poland. It was demonstrated that the largest environmental impacts in damage categories were associated with the use of fossil fuels, methane emissions and the use of electricity, processing of wastes, heat, and steel supports. It was concluded that an environmental assessment of coal mining operations, apart from direct influence from processing waste, methane emissions and drainage water, should include the use of electricity, heat and steel, particularly for steel supports. Because the model allows the comparison of environmental impact assessment for various unit processes, it can be used for all hard coal mines, not only in Poland but also in the world. This development is an important step forward in the study of the impacts of fossil fuels on the environment with the potential to mitigate the impact of the coal industry on the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Significance of Genetic, Environmental, and Pre- and Postharvest Factors Affecting Carotenoid Contents in Crops: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Ramesh Kumar; Keum, Young-Soo

    2018-05-30

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of tetraterpenoid pigments that play indispensable roles in plants and animals. The biosynthesis of carotenoids in plants is strictly regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in accordance with inherited genetic signals and developmental requirements and in response to external environmental stimulants. The alteration in the biosynthesis of carotenoids under the influence of external environmental stimulants, such as high light, drought, salinity, and chilling stresses, has been shown to significantly influence the nutritional value of crop plants. In addition to these stimulants, several pre- and postharvesting cultivation practices significantly influence carotenoid compositions and contents. Thus, this review discusses how various environmental stimulants and pre- and postharvesting factors can be positively modulated for the enhanced biosynthesis and accumulation of carotenoids in the edible parts of crop plants, such as the leaves, roots, tubers, flowers, fruit, and seeds. In addition, future research directions in this context are identified.

  4. Environmental analytical laboratory setup operation and QA/QC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, J.P.; Boyd, J.A.; DeViney, S.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental analysis requires precise and timely measurements. The required precise measurement is ensured with quality control and timeliness through an efficient operation. The efficiency of the operation also ensures cost-competitiveness. Environmental analysis plays a very important role in the environmental protection program. Due to the possible litigation involvement, most environmental analyses follow stringent criteria, such as the U.S. EPA Contract Laboratory Program procedures with analytical results documented in an orderly manner. The documentation demonstrates that all quality control steps are followed and facilitates data evaluation to determine the quality and usefulness of the data. Furthermore, the tedious documents concerning sample checking, chain-of-custody, standard or surrogate preparation, daily refrigerator and oven temperature monitoring, analytical and extraction logbooks, standard operation procedures, etc., also are an important part of the laboratory documentation. Quality control for environmental analysis is becoming more stringent, required documentation is becoming more detailed and turnaround time is shorter. However, the business is becoming more cost-competitive and it appears that this trend will continue. In this paper, we discuss what should be done to deal this high quality, fast-paced and tedious environmental analysis process at a competitive cost. The success of environmental analysis is people. The knowledge and experience of the staff are the key to a successful environmental analysis program. In order to be successful in this new area, the ability to develop new methods is crucial. In addition, the laboratory information system, laboratory automation and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) are major factors for laboratory success. This paper concentrates on these areas

  5. Environmental Performance of Hypothetical Canadian Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Processes Using Life-Cycle Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakkana Piewkhaow

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of life-cycle assessment was applied in order to evaluate the environmental performance of a hypothetical Saskatchewan lignite-fueled Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC electricity generation, with and without pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2 capture from a full life-cycle perspective. The emphasis here is placed on environmental performance associated with air contaminants of the comparison between IGCC systems (with and without CO2 capture and a competing lignite pulverized coal-fired electricity generating station in order to reveal which technology offers the most positive environmental effects. Moreover, ambient air pollutant modeling was also conducted by using American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD air dispersion modeling to determine the ground-level concentration of pollutants emitted from four different electricity generating stations. This study assumes that all stations are located close to Estevan. The results showed a significant reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and acidification potential by applying both post-combustion and pre-combustion CO2 capture processes. The GHG emissions were found to have reduced by 27%–86%, and IGCC systems were found to compare favorably to pulverized coal systems. However, in other environmental impact categories, there are multiple environmental trade-offs depending on the capture technology used. In the case of post-combustion capture, it was observed that the environmental impact category of eutrophication potential, summer smog, and ozone depletion increased due to the application of the CO2 capture process and the surface mining coal operation. IGCC systems, on the other hand, showed the same tendency as the conventional coal-fired electricity generation systems, but to a lesser degree. This is because the IGCC system is a cleaner technology that produces lower pollutant emission levels than the electricity

  6. Effect of pre-operative methylprednisolone on orthostatic hypotension during early mobilization after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, V; Petersen, P B; Jans, Ø

    2018-01-01

    a standardized mobilization protocol pre-operatively, 6, and 24 h after surgery. Systolic and diastolic arterial pressure and heart rate were measured non-invasively (Nexfin® ). The systemic inflammation was monitored by the C-reactive protein (CRP) response. RESULTS: At 6 h post-operatively, 11 (38%) versus 11......BACKGROUND: Orthostatic hypotension (OH) and intolerance (OI) are common after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and may delay early mobilization. The pathology of OH and OI includes a dysregulated post-operative vasopressor response, by a hitherto unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that OI could...... be related to the inflammatory stress response which is inhibited by steroid administration. Consequently, this study evaluated the effect of a pre-operative high-dose methylprednisolone on OH and OI early after THA. METHODS: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 59 patients undergoing...

  7. Pre-operative Tei Index does not predict left ventricular function immediately after mitral valve repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirojit Mukherjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Echocardiographic assessment of systolic left ventricular (LV function in patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR undergoing mitral valve (MV repair can be challenging because the measurement of ejection fraction (EF or fractional area change (FAC in pathological states is of questionable value. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of the pre-operative Tei Index in predicting left ventricular EF or FAC immediately after MV repair. One hundred and thirty patients undergoing MV repair with sinus rhythm pre- and post-operatively were enrolled in this prospective study. Twenty-six patients were excluded due to absence of sinus rhythm post-operatively. Standard transesophageal examination(IE 33,Philips,Netherlands was performed before and after cardiopulmonary bypass according to the guidelines of the ASE/SCA. FAC was determined in the transgastric midpapillary short-axis view. LV EF was measured in the midesophageal four- and two-chamber view. For calculation of the Tei Index, the deep transgastric and the midesophageal four-chamber view were used. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 17.0. values are expressed as mean with standard deviation. LV FAC and EF decreased significantly after MV repair (FAC: 56±12% vs. 50±14%, P<0.001; EF: 58±11 vs. 50±12Έ P<0.001. The Tei Index decreased from 0.66±0.23 before MV repair to 0.41±0.19 afterwards (P<0.001. No relationship between pre-operative Tei Index and post-operative FAC or post-operative EF were found (FAC: r=−0.061, P=0.554; EF: r=−0.29, P=0.771. Conclusion: Pre-operative Tei Index is not a good predictor for post-operative FAC and EF in patients undergoing MV repair.

  8. Model of environmental life cycle assessment for coal mining operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchart-Korol, Dorota, E-mail: dburchart@gig.eu; Fugiel, Agata, E-mail: afugiel@gig.eu; Czaplicka-Kolarz, Krystyna, E-mail: kczaplicka@gig.eu; Turek, Marian, E-mail: mturek@gig.eu

    2016-08-15

    This paper presents a novel approach to environmental assessment of coal mining operations, which enables assessment of the factors that are both directly and indirectly affecting the environment and are associated with the production of raw materials and energy used in processes. The primary novelty of the paper is the development of a computational environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) model for coal mining operations and the application of the model for coal mining operations in Poland. The LCA model enables the assessment of environmental indicators for all identified unit processes in hard coal mines with the life cycle approach. The proposed model enables the assessment of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) based on the IPCC method and the assessment of damage categories, such as human health, ecosystems and resources based on the ReCiPe method. The model enables the assessment of GHGs for hard coal mining operations in three time frames: 20, 100 and 500 years. The model was used to evaluate the coal mines in Poland. It was demonstrated that the largest environmental impacts in damage categories were associated with the use of fossil fuels, methane emissions and the use of electricity, processing of wastes, heat, and steel supports. It was concluded that an environmental assessment of coal mining operations, apart from direct influence from processing waste, methane emissions and drainage water, should include the use of electricity, heat and steel, particularly for steel supports. Because the model allows the comparison of environmental impact assessment for various unit processes, it can be used for all hard coal mines, not only in Poland but also in the world. This development is an important step forward in the study of the impacts of fossil fuels on the environment with the potential to mitigate the impact of the coal industry on the environment. - Highlights: • A computational LCA model for assessment of coal mining operations • Identification of

  9. Model of environmental life cycle assessment for coal mining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchart-Korol, Dorota; Fugiel, Agata; Czaplicka-Kolarz, Krystyna; Turek, Marian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to environmental assessment of coal mining operations, which enables assessment of the factors that are both directly and indirectly affecting the environment and are associated with the production of raw materials and energy used in processes. The primary novelty of the paper is the development of a computational environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) model for coal mining operations and the application of the model for coal mining operations in Poland. The LCA model enables the assessment of environmental indicators for all identified unit processes in hard coal mines with the life cycle approach. The proposed model enables the assessment of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) based on the IPCC method and the assessment of damage categories, such as human health, ecosystems and resources based on the ReCiPe method. The model enables the assessment of GHGs for hard coal mining operations in three time frames: 20, 100 and 500 years. The model was used to evaluate the coal mines in Poland. It was demonstrated that the largest environmental impacts in damage categories were associated with the use of fossil fuels, methane emissions and the use of electricity, processing of wastes, heat, and steel supports. It was concluded that an environmental assessment of coal mining operations, apart from direct influence from processing waste, methane emissions and drainage water, should include the use of electricity, heat and steel, particularly for steel supports. Because the model allows the comparison of environmental impact assessment for various unit processes, it can be used for all hard coal mines, not only in Poland but also in the world. This development is an important step forward in the study of the impacts of fossil fuels on the environment with the potential to mitigate the impact of the coal industry on the environment. - Highlights: • A computational LCA model for assessment of coal mining operations • Identification of

  10. Environmental dosimetry for normal operations at SRP. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marter, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The radiological effect of environmental releases from SRP during normal operations has been assessed annually since 1972 with a dosimetry model developed by SRL in 1971 to 1972, as implemented in the MREM code for atmospheric releases and RIVDOSE code for liquid releases. Starting in 1978, SRL started using environmental models and dose commitment factors developed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for all other environmental dose calculations. The NRC models are more flexible than the older SRL models, use more up-to-date methodologies, cover more exposure pathways, and permit more detailed analysis of effects of normal operations. It is recommended that the NRC models, as implemented in the computer codes X0QD0Q and GASPAR for atmospheric releases and LADTAP for liquid releases, and NRC dose commitment factors be used as the standard method at SRP for assessing offsite dose from normal operations in Health Protection Department annual environmental monitoring reports, and in National Environmental Policy Act documents and Safety Analysis Reports for SRP facilities. 23 references, 3 figures, 9 tables

  11. Target motion predictions for pre-operative planning during needle-based interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Buijs, J.; Abayazid, Momen; de Korte, Chris L.; Misra, Sarthak

    During biopsies, breast tissue is subjected to displacement upon needle indentation, puncture, and penetration. Thus, accurate needle placement requires pre-operative predictions of the target motions. In this paper, we used ultrasound elastography measurements to non-invasively predict elastic

  12. Pre-operative irradiation with rectal carcinoma - clinical practices and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendl, H.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this work is to portray the effect of a high-dosed short-timed pre-irradiation on intra- and post-operative therapy of rectal carcinoma and the appearance of recidivistic tumors, respectively distant metastasis. This intermediate balance should help make the decision easier as to whether to continue to use this combined treatment form. The subjects consisted of 65 rectal carcinoma patients - pre-irradiated and operated - and 95 only operated patients. The irradiation was completed using a 8 MeV linear accelerator with ultra hard x-radiation. Dosing - (more than 80%) as short-timed irradiation with 16 Gy (4 x 4 Gy in 2 days) - 25 Gy (10 x 2,5 Gy in 12 days); average field size 150 mm x 150 mm. There were no significant differences with regard to intra- and post-operative complications, late complications or distant metastasis, but there was with tumor recidivision reduced with pre-irradiated. Regarding the survival rate, there was a slight tendency in favor of the pre-irradiated. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Instructions for operating LBL Passive Environmental Radon Monitor (PERM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegel, M.L.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Ingersoll, J.G.

    1979-08-01

    The Passive Environmental Radon Monitor (PERM) is used to assess the impact of energy conservation in buildings, with reduced ventilation. Reduced ventilation can lead to increased concentration of air contaminants. The instrument operates on the principle of electrostatic collection of 218 Po ions. Cumulative alpha activity collects on the electrode and is detected with a lithium fluoride thermoluminescent detector

  14. The use of CT scan in the pre-operative staging of bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pada, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    Surgery remains the treatment of choice in patients with localized bronchogenic carcinoma. Pre-operative identification of inoperability spares the patient from unnecessary surgery. This prospective study was carried out to determine the correctness of judgement regarding a patient's operability or inoperability based on the pre-operative staging of CT scan; to find out the sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of the CT scan in estimating tumor description, nodal status and metastatic spread to the chest. Staging was done by 3 senior radiologists aware of the diagnosis. Both the surgical and histopathologic findings and staging were gathered and used as measurement of truth in arriving at the CT scan's accuracy. Overall accuracy rate of CT scan in determining operability or inoperability is 80%; tumor description accuracy of assessment is 87% and nodal status estimation has an accuracy of 60%. Sensitivity of CT scan is assessment of metastatic spread to the chest is 93%. There is no statistically significant difference in the judgement of operability or interpretability by CT scan compared to surgical and histopathologic results. The CT scan is recommended as a valuable tool in the pre-operative staging of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma who are candidates for surgery. (auth.). 21 refs.; 8 tabs

  15. An Analysis of Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes towards Environmental Issues in Terms of Various Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Rabia; Saraç, Esra

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the attitudes of the pre-service teachers towards environmental issues are analysed by such variables as gender, the department of education, year, department, taking or not taking environmental education course, participating in any environmental activity, being a member of any environmental organization, and the longest duration…

  16. L-Reactor operation, Savannah River Plant: environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to assess the significance of the effects on the human environment of the proposed resumption of L-reactor operation at the Savannah River Plant, scheduled for October 1983. The discussion is presented under the following section headings: need for resumption of L-Reactor operations and purpose of this environmental assessment; proposed action and alternative; affected environment (including, site location and description, land use, historic and archeological resources, socioeconomic and community characteristics, geology and seismology, hydrology, meteorology and climatology, ecology, and radiation environment); environmental consequences; summary of projected L-Reactor releases and impacts; and Federal and State permits and approval. The three appendices are entitled: radiation dose calculation methods and assumptions; floodplain/wetlands assessment - L-Reactor operations; and, conversion table. A list of references is included at the end of each chapter

  17. Can the pre-operative Western Ontario and McMaster score predict patient satisfaction following total hip arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B A; Alolabi, B; Carrothers, A D; Kreder, H J; Jenkinson, R J

    2015-02-01

    In this study we evaluated whether pre-operative Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis scores can predict satisfaction following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Prospective data for a cohort of patients undergoing THA from two large academic centres were collected, and pre-operative and one-year post-operative WOMAC scores and a 25-point satisfaction questionnaire were obtained for 446 patients. Satisfaction scores were dichotomised into either improvement or deterioration. Scatter plots and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used to describe the association between pre-operative WOMAC and one-year post-operative WOMAC scores and patient satisfaction. Satisfaction was compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis against pre-operative, post-operative and δ WOMAC scores. We found no relationship between pre-operative WOMAC scores and one-year post-operative WOMAC or satisfaction scores, with Spearman's rank correlation coefficients of 0.16 and -0.05, respectively. The ROC analysis showed areas under the curve (AUC) of 0.54 (pre-operative WOMAC), 0.67 (post-operative WOMAC) and 0.43 (δ WOMAC), respectively, for an improvement in satisfaction. We conclude that the pre-operative WOMAC score does not predict the post-operative WOMAC score or patient satisfaction after THA, and that WOMAC scores can therefore not be used to prioritise patient care. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  18. Application of operating experience in environmental qualification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Wise, R.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental qualification (EQ) of equipment related to nuclear safety has been carried out in the nuclear community since the 70's. It started with electrical equipment and then expanded to include mechanical equipment. During this evolutionary process, the methods used for EQ have gone through a long period of refinement and clarification. Prior to 1971, qualification for equipment in licensed nuclear power plants was based on the use of electrical components of commonly accepted high industrial quality without the benefit of specific environmental qualification standards. Between 1971 and 1974, most plants used the criteria of IEEE Standard 323-1971 as the basis for demonstrating qualification. Also during this period related 'daughter' standards, mainly by IEEE, became available which addressed qualification for specific equipment items. After July 1974, plants were required to meet the more comprehensive guidelines specified in IEEE Standard 323-1974 and the related 'daughter' standards. IEEE Standard 323-1974 later evolved into IEEE Standard 323-1983. For nuclear power plants built in Ontario during the 70's, i.e. Pickering B and Bruce B, has included the environmental qualification requirements in their respective nuclear safety design guides. It is now recognized that they are not up to the current EQ standards. Darlington, constructed during the 80's, implemented the environmental qualification program in its project. An Environmental Qualification (EQ) Program is now under way in Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to formally implement the Environmental Qualification for Bruce B, Pickering B, and Pickering A and to preserve the Qualification for Darlington G.S. This paper makes a thorough a review of the standard methods used in the past by utilities for environmental qualification. These methods include type testing, analysis, and operating experience. Both type testing and analysis have been clearly defined in standards listed in References [2] to [6] and

  19. A phase I trial of pre-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Clinical and translational studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supiot, Stephane; Shubbar, Shubber; Fleshner, Neil; Warde, Padraig; Hersey, Karen; Wallace, Kris; Cole, Heather; Sweet, Joan; Tsihlias, John; Jewett, Michael A.S.; Klotz, Laurence; Bristow, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Selected patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer can be at high-risk for pT3 disease and require subsequent radiotherapy. In a phase I trial, we investigated the feasibility of pre-operative radiotherapy for this patient subset. Materials and methods: Eligibility criteria were: T1/T2N0M0 tumors plus (i) Gleason ≥ 7, PSA > 10 ng/ml and 15 ng/ml and less WAF associated with reduced cell proliferation. Conclusion: Intra-operative morbidity is low following short-course, pre-operative radiotherapy. A phase II trial is planned to fully document biochemical response with this combined-modality approach

  20. Operational practices of lean manufacturing: Potentiating environmental improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Marcos José Alves Junior; Mendes, Juliana Veiga

    2017-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to investigate how environmental improvements can be achieved through operational practices of Lean Manufacturing. Design/methodology/approach: A literature review was conducted to analyze the relationship between operational practices of Lean and reduction of environmental impact in organizational contexts. Verified theoretically, this relationship was observed in a company of the electronics industry, through an exploratory research which contemplated a mixed approach. The adopted research method consisted of a single case study, by providing greater depth and detail of the study. Utilized a research protocol, validated test pilot. The instruments for data collection were semi-structured interviews, direct observation and document analysis. The information was examined qualitatively considering the technique for content analysis. Findings: As a result of the study, it was found that there is evidence for the existence of relationship between the practices of Lean, for example, Kaizen, PDCA (plan, do, check, act), Ishikawa Diagram, Poka-Yoke, Standardized Work and Value Stream Mapping, with the reduction of environmental impacts of an organization. This reduction was observed after application of these practices that resulted in the reduction of energy consumption, water and waste generation. These results were accounted for financially, contributing to a reduction of annual costs by about US$ 20,900. Originality/value: The study presents in detail, the application of operational practices of Lean Manufacturing, with an effective view to reducing the environmental impact and cost reduction. The literature review, a detailed description of the application process and financial results are important information that contributes to the scientific studies that address traditional operating practices and the search for better environmental performance.

  1. Operational practices of lean manufacturing: Potentiating environmental improvements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos José Alves Pinto Junior

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this paper is to investigate how environmental improvements can be achieved through operational practices of Lean Manufacturing. Design/methodology/approach: A literature review was conducted to analyze the relationship between operational practices of Lean and reduction of environmental impact in organizational contexts. Verified theoretically, this relationship was observed in a company of the electronics industry, through an exploratory research which contemplated a mixed approach. The adopted research method consisted of a single case study, by providing greater depth and detail of the study. Utilized a research protocol, validated test pilot. The instruments for data collection were semi-structured interviews, direct observation and document analysis. The information was examined qualitatively considering the technique for content analysis. Findings: As a result of the study, it was found that there is evidence for the existence of relationship between the practices of Lean, for example, Kaizen, PDCA (plan, do, check, act, Ishikawa Diagram, Poka-Yoke, Standardized Work and Value Stream Mapping, with the reduction of environmental impacts of an organization. This reduction was observed after application of these practices that resulted in the reduction of energy consumption, water and waste generation. These results were accounted for financially, contributing to a reduction of annual costs by about US$ 20,900. Originality/value: The study presents in detail, the application of operational practices of Lean Manufacturing, with an effective view to reducing the environmental impact and cost reduction. The literature review, a detailed description of the application process and financial results are important information that contributes to the scientific studies that address traditional operating practices and the search for better environmental performance.

  2. Operational practices of lean manufacturing: Potentiating environmental improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Marcos José Alves Junior; Mendes, Juliana Veiga

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to investigate how environmental improvements can be achieved through operational practices of Lean Manufacturing. Design/methodology/approach: A literature review was conducted to analyze the relationship between operational practices of Lean and reduction of environmental impact in organizational contexts. Verified theoretically, this relationship was observed in a company of the electronics industry, through an exploratory research which contemplated a mixed approach. The adopted research method consisted of a single case study, by providing greater depth and detail of the study. Utilized a research protocol, validated test pilot. The instruments for data collection were semi-structured interviews, direct observation and document analysis. The information was examined qualitatively considering the technique for content analysis. Findings: As a result of the study, it was found that there is evidence for the existence of relationship between the practices of Lean, for example, Kaizen, PDCA (plan, do, check, act), Ishikawa Diagram, Poka-Yoke, Standardized Work and Value Stream Mapping, with the reduction of environmental impacts of an organization. This reduction was observed after application of these practices that resulted in the reduction of energy consumption, water and waste generation. These results were accounted for financially, contributing to a reduction of annual costs by about US$ 20,900. Originality/value: The study presents in detail, the application of operational practices of Lean Manufacturing, with an effective view to reducing the environmental impact and cost reduction. The literature review, a detailed description of the application process and financial results are important information that contributes to the scientific studies that address traditional operating practices and the search for better environmental performance.

  3. Pre-operational monitoring program of Ra-226 in biological material in uranium mining and milling areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Pereira, Wagner de; Azevedo Py Junior, Delcy de; Kelecom, Alphonse; Iatesta, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    The environmental licensing processes of 'Santa Quiteria' uranium mining and milling unit are being carried out nowadays. The pre-operational radiological environmental monitoring program is part of those processes, which has the objective of determining the background for further comparisons and evaluation of radiological environmental impact of the operation unit. This work shows the results of Ra-226 determination in the most consumed farm products of the region, which are black beans, corn and milk. These data are compared with data available in the literature. Measurement results of Ra-226 in black beans vary from 3.3 x 10 -2 Bq/Kg to 9.1 x 10 -2 Bq/Kg; in corn, the results vary from 8.0 x 10 -3 Bq/Kg to 4.6 x 10 -2 Bq/Kg; in milk the results vary from 1.0 x 10 -3 Bq/Kg to 7.0 x 10 -3 Bq/Kg that represents the smallest variation range. All of these results are in good agreement with literature reported data. (author)

  4. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Pilot Study: XRF Evaluation of Select Pre-Hanford Orchards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Gorton, Alicia M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Pino, Christian; Martinez, Dominique M.; Rana, Komal; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-20

    Prior to the acquisition of land by the U.S. Department of War in February 1943 and the creation of the Hanford Site, the land along the Columbia River was home to over 1000 people. Farming and orchard operations by both homesteaders and commercial organizations were prevalent. Orchard activities and the associated application of lead arsenate pesticide ceased in 1943, when residents were moved from the Hanford Site at the beginning of the Manhattan Project. Today, the residues from historical application of lead arsenate pesticide persist in some locations on the Hanford Site. In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology established the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The pre-Hanford orchard lands identified as the 100-OL-1 OU are located south of the Columbia River and east of the present-day Vernita Bridge, and extend southeast to the former Hanford townsite. The discontinuous orchard lands within 100-OL-1 OU are approximately 20 km2 (5000 ac). A pilot study was conducted to support the approval of the remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 OU. This pilot study evaluated the use of a field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of lead arsenate pesticide residues in the OU. The objectives of the pilot study included evaluating a field portable XRF analyzer as the analytical method for decision making, estimating the nature and extent of lead and arsenic in surface soils in four decision units, evaluating the results for the purpose of optimizing the sampling approach implemented in the remedial investigation, and collecting information to improve the cost estimate and planning the cultural resources review for sampling activities in the remedial investigation. Based on

  5. Pre- and post-operative evaluations of eight dogs following right nephrectomy due to Dioctophyma renale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, L R; Rahal, S C; Faria, L G; Takahira, R K; Rocha, N S; Mamprim, M J; Oliveira, H S

    2014-01-01

    Dioctophyma renale is a large nematode distributed worldwide that may cause progressive and severe destruction of renal parenchyma. The present study aimed to evaluate pre- and post-operatively dogs submitted to right nephrectomy due to D. renale and to assess the histopathological damage of the removed kidney. Eight crossbred dogs, aged from 12 to 48 months that were unilaterally nephrectomized due to the presence of D. renale were evaluated. Physical examination, urinalysis, complete blood count, serum biochemistry, and abdominal ultrasound were performed immediately before and one month after nephrectomy. The nephrectomized right kidneys were submitted to macroscopic and microscopic evaluations. Urinalysis preoperatively detected occult blood in all dogs and D. renale eggs in five cases. Complete blood count showed all parameters within the reference range, except one dog post-operatively. Serum biochemistry performed before and after surgery verified that urea, creatinine and sodium were within the reference range values in all dogs. Other findings varied among the dogs. The length and arterial resistive index mean values of the left kidney were similar pre- and post-operatively. Thus, the inconsiderable change in laboratory findings pre- and post-operatively was attributable to compensation by left kidney function for the removed abnormal right kidney. Right kidney histology revealed chronic nephropathy due to D. renale. Imaging diagnosis should be performed on dogs suspected as carrying the disease or on those from an enzootic area since the laboratory findings are not specific except eggs in the urine.

  6. Pre-operative Asymptomatic Bacteriuria: A Risk Factor For Prosthetic Joint Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weale, R; El-Bakri, F; Saeed, Kordo

    2018-04-13

    Infection is a rare complication following implantation of prosthetic material into a joint. The impact of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) before elective operations and the subsequent risk of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) are not well understood. • Assess the prevalence of ASB amongst patients undergoing total arthroplasty of the hip and knee. • Determine the rates of PJI diagnosed within two years of the arthroplasty and if ASB is an independent risk factor for developing PJI. Patients who had total/unicondylar knee or total hip arthroplasty were retrospectively reviewed over a five-year period. Pre-operative urine samples within one year of surgery were analysed and those with ASB identified. Primary outcome was prosthetic joint infection (PJI) within the first postoperative year. 5542 patients were included. 4368 had a pre-operative urine culture recorded. The prevalence of ASB was 140 of 4368 (3.2%). The overall PJI rate was 56 of 5542 (1.01%). Of those with a PJI, 33 had a pre-operative urine sample recorded. The infection rate in the ASB group was 5% (7 of 140), in the no-ASB group it was 0.61% (26 of 4228) and in the group without a urine sample it was 1.96% (23 of 1174) (p value prosthetic joint, suggestive the relationship is unlikely causal. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Pre-operative fasting: a nationwide survey of German anaesthesia departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, J-P; Bosse, G; Seifert, S; Prochnow, L; Martin, J; Schleppers, A; Geldner, G; Soreide, E; Spies, C

    2010-03-01

    Shorter pre-operative fasting improves clinical outcome without an increased risk. Since October 2004, German Anaesthesiology Societies have officially recommended a fast of 2 h for clear fluids and 6 h for solid food before elective surgery. We conducted a nationwide survey to evaluate the current clinical practice in Germany. Between July 2006 and January 2007, standardized questionnaires were mailed to 3751 Anaesthesiology Society members in leading positions requesting anonymous response. The overall response rate was 66% (n=2418). Of those, 2148 (92%) claimed familiarity with the new guidelines. About a third (n=806, 34%) reported full adherence to the new recommendations, whereas 1043 (45%) reported an eased fasting practice. Traditional Nil per os after midnight was still recommended by 157 (7%). Commonest reasons reported for adopting the new guidelines were: 'improved pre-operative comfort' (84%), and 'increased patient satisfaction' (83%); reasons against were: 'low flexibility in operation room management' (19%), and 'increased risk of aspiration' (13%). Despite the apparent understanding of the benefits from reduced pre-operative fasting, full implementation of the guidelines remains poor in German anaesthesiology departments.

  8. Ionization beam profile monitor for operation under hard environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teterev, Yu.G.; Kaminski, G.; Phi Thanh Huong; Kaminski, G.; Kozik, E.

    2010-01-01

    The design and the performance of the Ionization Beam Profile Monitor (IBPM) operating on the residual gas ionization principle are described. The main advantage of the constructed device is the non-contact measuring method. Operating under hard environmental conditions it delivers the information about the primary beam position, profile and intensity in 'on-line' regime. It was found out that the device is capable to operate in vacuum in the range of 10 -6 /10 -3 mbar without the loss of the resolution power at the beam current as low as a few nA. The IBPM is prospective for beam profile monitoring due to long time. Emergency situations do not lead to decrease of its operability.

  9. Pre-operative assessment of patients undergoing endoscopic, transnasal, transsphenoidal pituitary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbe, D; Semple, P

    2008-06-01

    To demonstrate the importance of pre-operative ear, nose and throat assessment in patients undergoing endoscopic, transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumours. Literature pertaining to the pre-operative otorhinolaryngological assessment and management of patients undergoing endoscopic anterior skull base surgery is sparse. We describe two cases from our series of 59 patients undergoing endoscopic pituitary surgery. The first case involved a young male patient with a large pituitary macroadenoma. His main complaint was visual impairment. He had no previous history of sinonasal pathology and did not complain of any nasal symptoms during the pre-operative neurosurgical assessment. At the time of surgery, a purulent nasal discharge was seen emanating from both middle meati. Surgery was abandoned due to the risk of post-operative meningitis, and postponed until the patient's chronic rhinosinusitis was optimally managed. The second patient was a 47-year-old woman with a large pituitary macroadenoma, who presented to the neurosurgical department with a main complaint of diplopia. She too gave no history of previous nasal problems, and she underwent uneventful surgery using the endoscopic, transnasal approach. Two weeks after surgery, she presented to the emergency unit with severe epistaxis. A previous diagnosis of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia was discovered, and further surgical and medical intervention was required before the epistaxis was finally controlled. Pre-operative otorhinolaryngological assessment is essential prior to endoscopic pituitary or anterior skull base surgery. A thorough otorhinolaryngological history will determine whether any co-morbid diseases exist which could affect the surgical field. Nasal anatomy can be assessed via nasal endoscopy and sinusitis excluded. Computed tomography imaging is a valuable aid to decisions regarding additional procedures needed to optimise access to the pituitary fossa.

  10. A histopathological effectiveness of pre-operative irradiation for biliary tract cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizusaki, Kaoru

    1993-01-01

    There is almost no report on pre-operative irradiation therapy in biliary tract cancer. For the purpose of attaining improved operative results, pre-operative irradiation has so for been performed in our department. We experienced 106 cases of biliary tract cancer during the period from January 1982 to December 1990, including 30 cases treated by pre-operative irradiation. Among 30 cases, 20 cases, including 9 cases of gallbladder cancer and 11 cases of bile duct cancer, were resectable. Final histopathological findings were obtained in 8 cases of gallbladder cancer and 9 cases of bile duct cancer. The effectiveness of irradiation was evaluated according to the histopathological criteria proposed by Ohboshi and Shimosato in 1971. Four cases were Grade I, 2 cases were Grade IIA, and 2 cases were Grade IIB, and 1 case was Grade III of bile duct cancer. In both groups, no correlation was observed between the exposure doses and their effects. Although no correlation was noted between the degree of differentiation of tubular adenocarcinoma of microscopic pathological findings and the irradiation effects, 1 case of poorly differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma of the bile duct was evaluated as Grade III. Mucinous adenocarcinoma and papillary adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder were revealed to be Grade I. According to the main affected site of bile duct cancer, a good irradiation effect was obtained in patients with upper to middle bile duct cancer. The irradiation effect on the gallbladder and the bile duct wall was predominant on the mucous side but less effective on the serous side. From the histopathological findings, the effectiveness of pre-operative irradiation was suggested. These results suggested that the further clinical evaluation, such as rates of resection or prognostic outcome would be relevant. (author)

  11. Environmental management and operational performance in automotive companies in Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbour, C.J.C.; De Sousa Jabbour, A.B.L.; Govindan, Kannan

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to verify the influence of Environmental Management (EM) on Operational Performance (OP) in Brazilian automotive companies, analyzing whether Lean Manufacturing (LM) and Human Resources (HR) interfere in the greening of these companies. Therefore, a conceptual...... framework listing these concepts was proposed, and three research hypotheses were presented. A questionnaire was elaborated based on this theoretical background and sent to respondents occupying the highest positions in the production/operations areas of Brazilian automotive companies. The data, collected...

  12. Implementing and operating the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, P.J.; Schwab, M.R.; Fox, R.D.

    1994-03-01

    In the process of performing environmental restoration at the 560-square mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, vast amounts of scientific and technical data are being generated from sampling taking place all over the Site. This paper provides an overview of the lessons we have learned in designing, implementing, and putting into operation a computerized system named the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS), which is being used to manage the Site's environmental characterization sampling data. Topics discussed in this paper include helping the Site adapt to a data management culture, the advantages of electronic data over paper data, issues of data validation and defensibility, being a resource to the user community (including the regulatory community), managing and tracking data changes, integrating data from multiple programs, providing configuration control for data and software, getting priorities for software development, and developing a baseline for on-going funding to maintain the infrastructure for the information system

  13. Environmental education van Kaarna: Results of the operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivikoski, N.

    2000-02-01

    Kaarna, a van specialising in environmental education, has toured North Karelia since 1996 disseminating information about the environment. This survey focused on the impact of the van on specific target groups. Attitudes towards the environmental van were positive and there was a clear need for it. It is, however, difficult to define the impact of the van's operation on people's attitudes towards the environment as it often takes several years before the results of this kind of environmental project become evident. According to the respondents in the survey, the van provided them with additional information they would not otherwise have had. More than 25% of school children and almost every third adult said that the van had given them information which had an impact on their attitudes towards the environment. This can be regarded as a positive result. (orig.)

  14. Applying AI tools to operational space environmental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnak, Mike; Jesse, Lisa; Mucks, John

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force and National Oceanic Atmospheric Agency (NOAA) space environmental operations centers are facing increasingly complex challenges meeting the needs of their growing user community. These centers provide current space environmental information and short term forecasts of geomagnetic activity. Recent advances in modeling and data access have provided sophisticated tools for making accurate and timely forecasts, but have introduced new problems associated with handling and analyzing large quantities of complex data. AI (Artificial Intelligence) techniques have been considered as potential solutions to some of these problems. Fielding AI systems has proven more difficult than expected, in part because of operational constraints. Using systems which have been demonstrated successfully in the operational environment will provide a basis for a useful data fusion and analysis capability. Our approach uses a general purpose AI system already in operational use within the military intelligence community, called the Temporal Analysis System (TAS). TAS is an operational suite of tools supporting data processing, data visualization, historical analysis, situation assessment and predictive analysis. TAS includes expert system tools to analyze incoming events for indications of particular situations and predicts future activity. The expert system operates on a knowledge base of temporal patterns encoded using a knowledge representation called Temporal Transition Models (TTM's) and an event database maintained by the other TAS tools. The system also includes a robust knowledge acquisition and maintenance tool for creating TTM's using a graphical specification language. The ability to manipulate TTM's in a graphical format gives non-computer specialists an intuitive way of accessing and editing the knowledge base. To support space environmental analyses, we used TAS's ability to define domain specific event analysis abstractions. The prototype system defines

  15. Federal Environmental Regulations Impacting Hydrocarbon Exploration, Drilling, and Production Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    Waste handling and disposal from hydrocarbon exploration, drilling, and production are regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) through federal and state regulations and/or through implementation of federal regulations. Some wastes generated in these operations are exempt under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) but are not exempt under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and other federal environmental laws. Exempt wastes remain exempt only if they are not mixed with hazardous wastes or hazardous substances. Once mixture occurs, the waste must be disposed as a hazardous material in an approved hazardous waste disposal facility. Before the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990, air emissions from production, storage, steam generation, and compression facilities associated with hydrocarbon exploration, drilling, and production industry were not regulated. A critical proposed regulatory change which will significantly effect Class II injection wells for disposal of produced brine and injection for enhanced oil recovery is imminent. Federal regulations affecting hydrocarbon exploration, drilling and production, proposed EPA regulatory changes, and a recent significant US Court of Appeals decision are covered in this report. It appears that this industry will, in the future, fall under more stringent environmental regulations leading to increased costs for operators.

  16. Optimizing Environmental Flow Operation Rules based on Explicit IHA Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongnan, L.; Wan, W.; Zhao, J.

    2017-12-01

    Multi-objective operation of reservoirs are increasingly asked to consider the environmental flow to support ecosystem health. Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA) is widely used to describe environmental flow regimes, but few studies have explicitly formulated it into optimization models and thus is difficult to direct reservoir release. In an attempt to incorporate the benefit of environmental flow into economic achievement, a two-objective reservoir optimization model is developed and all 33 hydrologic parameters of IHA are explicitly formulated into constraints. The benefit of economic is defined by Hydropower Production (HP) while the benefit of environmental flow is transformed into Eco-Index (EI) that combined 5 of the 33 IHA parameters chosen by principal component analysis method. Five scenarios (A to E) with different constraints are tested and solved by nonlinear programming. The case study of Jing Hong reservoir, located in the upstream of Mekong basin, China, shows: 1. A Pareto frontier is formed by maximizing on only HP objective in scenario A and on only EI objective in scenario B. 2. Scenario D using IHA parameters as constraints obtains the optimal benefits of both economic and ecological. 3. A sensitive weight coefficient is found in scenario E, but the trade-offs between HP and EI objectives are not within the Pareto frontier. 4. When the fraction of reservoir utilizable capacity reaches 0.8, both HP and EI capture acceptable values. At last, to make this modelmore conveniently applied to everyday practice, a simplified operation rule curve is extracted.

  17. Structural Health Monitoring under Nonlinear Environmental or Operational Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrki Kullaa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration-based structural health monitoring is based on detecting changes in the dynamic characteristics of the structure. It is well known that environmental or operational variations can also have an influence on the vibration properties. If these effects are not taken into account, they can result in false indications of damage. If the environmental or operational variations cause nonlinear effects, they can be compensated using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM without the measurement of the underlying variables. The number of Gaussian components can also be estimated. For the local linear components, minimum mean square error (MMSE estimation is applied to eliminate the environmental or operational influences. Damage is detected from the residuals after applying principal component analysis (PCA. Control charts are used for novelty detection. The proposed approach is validated using simulated data and the identified lowest natural frequencies of the Z24 Bridge under temperature variation. Nonlinear models are most effective if the data dimensionality is low. On the other hand, linear models often outperform nonlinear models for high-dimensional data.

  18. Globalization of environmental regulations for offshore E & P operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    One of the enduring legacies of the Rio Environmental Summit of 1992 (United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, UNCED) is Agenda 21 (Chapter 17 - Protection of the Oceans), which among other things called for the assessment of the need for a global authority to regulate offshore Exploration & Production (E&P) discharges, emissions and safety. Despite advice to the contrary from the International Maritime Organization (IMO), interest is building within the European community for the standardization of regulations for offshore E&P activities. Several international of regulations for offshore E&P activities. Several international frameworks or forums have been mentioned as possible candidates. These include the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, 1982 (UNCLOS); London Convention 1972 (LC 1972) and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 (MARPOL) 73/78. International offshore oil and gas operators operate within requirements of regional conventions under the United Nations Environmental Program`s (UNEP) - Regional Seas Program. Domestic offshore operations are undertaken under the auspices of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Minerals Management Service.

  19. Pre-Operational Seismic Walk-Through of NPPs in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, R.S.; Mishra, R.K.; Agrawal, M.K.; Reddy, G.R.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.; Badrinarayan, G.; Hawaldar, R.V.; Ingole, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, it is essential to design the various safety and safety related systems and components of the plant in such a manner that they maintain their structural integrity as well as serve their functional performance during a seismic event. The pre-operational seismic walk-through helps in ensuring the installation of various seismic supports as per design intent, identifying the areas where supports are inadequate, identifying the interaction concerns between the systems of various safety classes and locating the various undesired loose, untied / unanchored components, tools, etc. used during the construction activity. A detailed procedure for the pre-operational seismic walk-through of the NPPs was therefore, prepared. Since the types and locations of seismic supports for the various systems and components of the plant had been already reviewed, the major emphasis during the walk-through was laid on their proper installation. (authors)

  20. Effect of pre operative heart rate on post spinal hypotension in obsteric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.; Zahoor, M.U.; Zaid, A.Y.; Buland, K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the association between of preoperative heart rate and post spinal hypotension in women undergoing cesarean section, Two hundred patients undergoing caesarean were included in the study selected on non probability convenience sampling technique, The patients were divided into two groups depending upon their pre operative heart rate. Spinal anesthesia was administered and number of patients developing hypotension was noted. Among 200 patients, who were included in the study; 112 were placed in group A and 88 were placed in group B depending on mean heart rate of 90 beats per minute or less or 91 beats per minute or more respectively. In group A 14 (11.86%) patients developed hypotension where as in group B 28 (31,82%) patients developed hypotension. Pre operative heart rate is significantly associated with post spinal hypotension in obstetric patients undergoing cesarean section. (author)

  1. Anesthesiologists’ and surgeons’ perceptions about routine pre-operative testing in low-risk patients: application of the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF to identify factors that influence physicians’ decisions to order pre-operative tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patey Andrea M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Routine pre-operative tests for anesthesia management are often ordered by both anesthesiologists and surgeons for healthy patients undergoing low-risk surgery. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF was developed to investigate determinants of behaviour and identify potential behaviour change interventions. In this study, the TDF is used to explore anaesthesiologists’ and surgeons’ perceptions of ordering routine tests for healthy patients undergoing low-risk surgery. Methods Sixteen clinicians (eleven anesthesiologists and five surgeons throughout Ontario were recruited. An interview guide based on the TDF was developed to identify beliefs about pre-operative testing practices. Content analysis of physicians’ statements into the relevant theoretical domains was performed. Specific beliefs were identified by grouping similar utterances of the interview participants. Relevant domains were identified by noting the frequencies of the beliefs reported, presence of conflicting beliefs, and perceived influence on the performance of the behaviour under investigation. Results Seven of the twelve domains were identified as likely relevant to changing clinicians’ behaviour about pre-operative test ordering for anesthesia management. Key beliefs were identified within these domains including: conflicting comments about who was responsible for the test-ordering (Social/professional role and identity; inability to cancel tests ordered by fellow physicians (Beliefs about capabilities and social influences; and the problem with tests being completed before the anesthesiologists see the patient (Beliefs about capabilities and Environmental context and resources. Often, tests were ordered by an anesthesiologist based on who may be the attending anesthesiologist on the day of surgery while surgeons ordered tests they thought anesthesiologists may need (Social influences. There were also conflicting comments about the potential

  2. Anesthesiologists' and surgeons' perceptions about routine pre-operative testing in low-risk patients: application of the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify factors that influence physicians' decisions to order pre-operative tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patey, Andrea M; Islam, Rafat; Francis, Jill J; Bryson, Gregory L; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2012-06-09

    Routine pre-operative tests for anesthesia management are often ordered by both anesthesiologists and surgeons for healthy patients undergoing low-risk surgery. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) was developed to investigate determinants of behaviour and identify potential behaviour change interventions. In this study, the TDF is used to explore anaesthesiologists' and surgeons' perceptions of ordering routine tests for healthy patients undergoing low-risk surgery. Sixteen clinicians (eleven anesthesiologists and five surgeons) throughout Ontario were recruited. An interview guide based on the TDF was developed to identify beliefs about pre-operative testing practices. Content analysis of physicians' statements into the relevant theoretical domains was performed. Specific beliefs were identified by grouping similar utterances of the interview participants. Relevant domains were identified by noting the frequencies of the beliefs reported, presence of conflicting beliefs, and perceived influence on the performance of the behaviour under investigation. Seven of the twelve domains were identified as likely relevant to changing clinicians' behaviour about pre-operative test ordering for anesthesia management. Key beliefs were identified within these domains including: conflicting comments about who was responsible for the test-ordering (Social/professional role and identity); inability to cancel tests ordered by fellow physicians (Beliefs about capabilities and social influences); and the problem with tests being completed before the anesthesiologists see the patient (Beliefs about capabilities and Environmental context and resources). Often, tests were ordered by an anesthesiologist based on who may be the attending anesthesiologist on the day of surgery while surgeons ordered tests they thought anesthesiologists may need (Social influences). There were also conflicting comments about the potential consequences associated with reducing testing, from negative

  3. Defense Waste Processing Facility staged operations: environmental information document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    Environmental information is presented relating to a staged version of the proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant. The information is intended to provide the basis for an Environmental Impact Statement. In either the integral or the staged design, the DWPF will convert the high-level waste currently stored in tanks into: a leach-resistant form containing about 99.9% of all the radioactivity, and a residual, slightly contaminated salt, which is disposed of as saltcrete. In the first stage of the staged version, the insoluble sludge portion of the waste and the long lived radionuclides contained therein will be vitrified. The waste glass will be sealed in canisters and stored onsite until shipped to a Federal repository. In the second stage, the supernate portion of the waste will be decontaminated by ion exchange. The recovered radionuclides will be transferred to the Stage 1 facility, and mixed with the sludge feed before vitrification. The residual, slightly contaminated salt solution will be mixed with Portland cement to form a concrete product (saltcrete) which will be buried onsite in an engineered landfill. This document describes the conceptual facilities and processes for producing glass waste and decontaminated salt. The environmental effects of facility construction, normal operations, and accidents are then presented. Descriptions of site and environs, alternative sites and waste disposal options, and environmental consultations and permits are given in the base Environmental Information Document

  4. The Role of Pre-Operative and Post-Operative Glucose Control in Surgical-Site Infections and Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Christie Y.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Berman, Mitchell F.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI) and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death. Methods This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to anal...

  5. Association of pre-operative medication use with post-operative delirium in surgical oncology patients receiving comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Young Mi; Lee, Eunsook; Kim, Kwang-Il; Chung, Jee Eun; In Park, Hae; Lee, Byung Koo; Gwak, Hye Sun

    2016-07-07

    Older patients undergoing surgery tend to have a higher frequency of delirium. Delirium is strongly associated with poor surgical outcomes. This study evaluated the association between pre-operative medication use and post-operative delirium (POD) in surgical oncology patients receiving comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). A total of 475 patients who were scheduled for cancer surgery and received CGA from January 2014 to June 2015 were included. Pre-operative medication review through CGA was conducted on polypharmacy (≥5 medications), delirium-inducing medications (DIMs), fall-inducing medications (FIMs), and potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). POD was confirmed by psychiatric consultation, and DSM-V criteria were used for diagnosing delirium. The model fit of the prediction model was assessed by computing the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test. Effect size was measured using the Nagelkerke R(2). Discrimination of the model was assessed by an analysis of the area under receiver operating curve (AUROC). Two models were constructed for multivariate analysis based on univariate analysis; model I included dementia and DIM in addition to age and sex, and model II included PIM instead of DIM of model I. Every one year increase of age increased the risk of POD by about 1.1-fold. DIM was a significant factor for POD after adjusting for confounders (AOR 12.78, 95 % CI 2.83-57.74). PIM was also a significant factor for POD (AOR 5.53, 95 % CI 2.03-15.05). The Hosmer-Lemeshow test results revealed good fits for both models (χ(2) = 3.842, p = 0.871 for model I and χ(2) = 8.130, p = 0.421 for model II). The Nagelkerke R(2) effect size and AUROC for model I was 0.215 and 0.833, respectively. Model II had the Nagelkerke R(2)effect size of 0.174 and AUROC of 0.819. These results suggest that pharmacists' comprehensive review for pre-operative medication use is critical for the post-operative outcomes like delirium in older patients.

  6. Pre-operative Functional Cardiovascular Reserve Is Associated with Acute Kidney Injury after Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratzis, A; Shakespeare, J; Jones, O; Bown, M J; Mahmood, A; Imray, C H E

    2017-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after endovascular intervention, associated with poor short and long-term outcomes. However, the mechanisms underlying AKI development remain poorly understood. The impact of pre-existing cardiovascular disease and low cardiovascular reserve (CVR) in AKI is unclear; it remains unknown whether AKI is primarily related to pre-existing comorbidity or to procedural parameters. The association between CVR and AKI after EVAR was therefore assessed. This is a case control study. From a database of 484 patients, 292 undergoing elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in two tertiary centres were included. Of these, 73 patients who had developed AKI after EVAR were case matched, based on pre-operative estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; within 5 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) and age, with patients who had not developed AKI. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) was used to assess CVR using the anaerobic threshold (AT). Development of AKI was defined using the Kidney Disease Improving Outcomes (KDIGO) guidance. Associations between CVR (based on AT levels) and AKI development were then analysed. Pre-operative AT levels were significantly different between those who did and did not develop AKI (12.1±2.9 SD vs. 14.8±3.0 mL/min/kg, p < .001). In multivariate analysis, a higher level of AT (per 1 mL/min/kg) was associated with a lower odds ratio (OR) of 0.72 (95% CI, 0.63-0.82, p < .001), relative to AKI development. A pre-operative AT level of < 11 mL/min/kg was associated with post-operative AKI development in adjusted analysis, with an OR of 7.8 (95% CI, 3.75-16.51, p < .001). The area under the curve (receiver operating characteristic) for AT as a predictor of post-operative AKI was 0.81 (standard error, 0.06, 95% CI, 0.69-0.93, p < .001). Poor CVR was strongly associated with the development of AKI. This provides pathophysiological insights into the

  7. Branchial cleft anomalies: accuracy of pre-operative diagnosis, clinical presentation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldfred, L-A; Philipsen, B B; Siim, C

    2012-06-01

    To examine the accuracy of the pre-operative diagnosis of branchial cleft anomalies, and also to describe their occurrence, clinical presentation and management. Retrospective review of the records of patients diagnosed with a branchial cleft anomaly between 1997 and 2006. One hundred and twenty-six patients were included. Pre-operative diagnosis had a positive predictive value of 0.856 (95 per cent confidence interval, 0.771-0.918) and a sensitivity of 0.944 (95 per cent confidence interval, 0.869-0.979). These patients' demographic data, investigations, findings and management are presented, along with a possible strategy for dealing with solitary cystic masses in the neck. As pre-operative diagnosis has a positive predictive value of 86 per cent, cystic lesions in the neck should be presumed to be carcinomatous until proven otherwise. Branchial fistulae and sinuses seem to be a disease of childhood, while branchial cysts occur mainly in adults. Branchial cleft anomalies are equally frequent in men and women, and equally distributed on the left and right side of the neck.

  8. Wilms' tumour: a comparison of surgical aspects in patients with or without pre-operative chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safdar, C.A.; Aslam, M.; Awan, S.H.; Ahmed, I.; Badshah, S.

    2006-01-01

    To compare the technical aspects of Wilms' tumour (WT) surgery in patients with and without pre-operative chemotherapy. Patients of WT, presenting between January 1999 and December 2001, were treated, using the NWTSG protocol, with primary surgery (group I). Between January 2001 and December 2004, WT patients were treated according to SIOP protocol, with pre-operative chemotherapy followed by surgery (group II). Volume reduction with chemotherapy, duration of surgery, rupture of tumour, extent of excision, adherence and damage to surrounding structures, blood loss, complications, stay in hospital and event-free survival (EFS) were compared in the two groups. Out of 22 patients in group I, 19 (86.4%) underwent primary surgery. Of the 23 patients in group II, 21 (91.3%) received pre-operative chemotherapy followed by surgery. Average volume reduction in this group was 54% with chemotherapy. Difference in duration of surgery and blood loss was significantly low in group II (p=0.003 and p<0.001, respectively). In group I, rupture (6 vs 2), adherence (14 vs 10) and damage to surrounding structures (5 vs 2) were more. Complete macroscopic excision was possible in 90.5% of WT in group II as compared to 73.7% in group I. Immediate postoperative complications and length of hospital stay were similar in both groups. There was no difference in EFS. (author)

  9. Experiential thinking as transition between pre-operational and operational thinking in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Svetina

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abilities of conservation (of number, length, volume, etc. tend to appear between 6 and 10 years of age. According to the Piaget's theory, the conservation abilities on different domains are supposed to appear at about the same age because their development is related to the concrete operational thinking. Most of the empirical evidence, however, did not support this assumption, suggesting that conservation on specific domains (e. g. number tends to appear earlier in regard to other domains (e. g. liquid, volume. In addition, children often showed understanding of conservation when presented with every-day problems, but failed to explain the same problem on its logical level. The problem of the present research was twofold: to determine the developmental priority of either domain of conservation, and to better comprehend the relation between logical, experiential, and perceptual understanding of conservation in children. In the study, 153 children, aged 6 to 8 years, were presented with two Piagetian problems of conservation: number and liquid tasks. The results suggested that understanding of the first task (conservation of number seems to be necessary for understanding of the other task (conservation of liquid. In addition, experiential thinking seems to play an important role in the development of conservation. The findings can be partly explained in terms of the Vigotsky's zone of proximal development, yet they rise hypotheses that still call for further empirical justification.

  10. Surveillance of Environmental and Procedural Measures of Infection Control in the Operating Theatre Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Dallolio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological contamination of operating theatres and the lack of adherence to best practices by surgical staff represent some of the factors affecting Surgical Site Infections (SSIs. The aim of the present study was to assess the microbiological quality of operating settings and the staff compliance to the SSI evidence-based control measures. Ten operating rooms were examined for microbiological contamination of air and surfaces, after cleaning procedures, in “at rest” conditions. Furthermore, 10 surgical operations were monitored to assess staff compliance to the recommended practices. None of the air samples exceeded microbiological reference standards and only six of the 200 surface samples (3.0% were slightly above recommended levels. Potentially pathogenic bacteria and moulds were never detected. Staff compliance to best practices varied depending on the type of behaviour investigated and the role of the operator. The major not compliant behaviours were: pre-operative skin antisepsis, crowding of the operating room and hand hygiene of the anaesthetist. The good environmental microbiological quality observed is indicative of the efficacy of the cleaning-sanitization procedures adopted. The major critical point was staff compliance to recommended practices. Awareness campaigns are therefore necessary, aimed at improving the organisation of work so as to facilitate compliance to operative protocols.

  11. Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuttle, R. J. [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    1997-11-10

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power of Boeing North American. Inc. (formerly Rockwell International Corporation). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL and the De Soto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing; R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to ensure protection of the environment.

  12. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) Operator`s Manual. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, R.I.

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is a consolidated set of automated resources that effectively manage the data gathered during environmental monitoring and restoration of the Hanford Site. The HEIS includes an integrated database that provides consistent and current data to all users and promotes sharing of data by the entire user community. This manual describes the facilities available to the operational user who is responsible for data entry, processing, scheduling, reporting, and quality assurance. A companion manual, the HEIS User`s Manual, describes the facilities available-to the scientist, engineer, or manager who uses the system for environmental monitoring, assessment, and restoration planning; and to the regulator who is responsible for reviewing Hanford Site operations against regulatory requirements and guidelines.

  13. Pre-operative renal volume predicts peak creatinine after congenital heart surgery in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, J Bryan; Seckeler, Michael D; Ballengee, Cortney R; Conaway, Mark; Jayakumar, K Anitha; Charlton, Jennifer R

    2014-10-01

    Acute kidney injury is common in neonates following surgery for congenital heart disease. We conducted a retrospective analysis to determine whether neonates with smaller pre-operative renal volume were more likely to develop post-operative acute kidney injury. We conducted a retrospective review of 72 neonates who underwent congenital heart surgery for any lesion other than patent ductus arteriosus at our institution from January 2007 to December 2011. Renal volume was calculated by ultrasound using the prolate ellipsoid formula. The presence and severity of post-operative acute kidney injury was determined both by measuring the peak serum creatinine in the first 7 days post-operatively and by using the Acute Kidney Injury Network scoring system. Using a linear change point model, a threshold renal volume of 17 cm³ was identified. Below this threshold, there was an inverse linear relationship between renal volume and peak post-operative creatinine for all patients (p = 0.036) and the subgroup with a single morphologic right ventricle (p = 0.046). There was a non-significant trend towards more acute kidney injury using Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria in all neonates with renal volume ≤17 cm³ (p = 0.11) and in the subgroup with a single morphologic right ventricle (p = 0.17). Pre-operative renal volume ≤17 cm³ is associated with a higher peak post-operative creatinine and potentially greater risk for post-operative acute kidney injury for neonates undergoing congenital heart surgery. Neonates with a single right ventricle may be at higher risk.

  14. Dam pre-release as an important operation strategy in reducing flood impact in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayah Ishak, Nurul; Mustafa Hashim, Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    The 2014 flood was reported to be one of the worst natural disaster has ever affected several states in the northern part of Peninsular Malaysia. Overwhelming rainfall was noted as one of the main factors causing such impact, which was claimed to be unprecedented to some extent. The state of Perak, which is blessed with four cascading dams had also experienced flood damage at a scale that was considered the worst in history. The rainfall received had caused the dam to reach danger level that necessitated additional discharge to be released. Safety of the dams was of great importance and such unavoidable additional discharge was allowed to avoid catastrophic failure of the dam structures. This paper discusses the dam pre-release as a significant dam management strategy in reducing flood impact. An important balance between required dam storage to be maintained and the risk element that can be afforded is the crucial factor in such enhanced operation strategy. While further possibility in developing a carefully engineered dam pre-release strategy can be explored for dam operation in Malaysia, this has already been introduced in some developed countries. Australia and South Africa are examples where pre-release has been practiced and proven to reduce flood risk. The concept involves controlling the dam lake level throughout the year, in reference to the rainfall data and the hydrological properties for the catchment area of the dams. Plentiful data analysis need to be done in contemplation of producing the optimal pre-release model. The amount of heavy rainfalls received is beyond human control but the distribution of the discharge from the dams can be further managed with the appropriate pre-release strategy.

  15. Predictors of Success in Bariatric Surgery: the Role of BMI and Pre-operative Comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Magda Rosa Ramos; Branco-Filho, Alcides José; Zaparolli, Marília Rizzon; Wagner, Nathalia Farinha; de Paula Pinto, José Simão; Campos, Antônio Carlos Ligocki; Taconeli, Cesar Augusto

    2017-11-10

    This is a retrospective review of 204 patients who underwent bariatric surgery. The impact of weight regain (WR), pre-operative comorbidities and BMI values on the recurrence of comorbidities was evaluated, and an equation was elaborated to estimate BMI at 5 years of bariatric surgery. Pre-operative data, after 1 year and after 5 years, was collected from the medical records. Descriptive analyses and bivariate hypothesis tests were performed first, and then, a generalised linear regression model with Tweedie distribution was adjusted. The hit rate and the Kendall coefficient of concordance (Kendall's W) of the equation were calculated. At the end, the Mann-Whitney test was performed between the BMI, WR and the presence of comorbidities, after a post-operative period of 5 years. The adjustment of the model resulted in an equation that estimates the mean value of BMI 5 years after surgery. The hit rate was 82.35% and the value of Kendall's W was 0.85 for the equation. It was found that patients with comorbidities presented a higher median WR (10.13%) and a higher mean BMI (30.09 kg/m 2 ) 5 years after the surgery. It is concluded that the equation is useful for estimating the mean BMI at 5 years of surgery and that patients with low pre-operative HDL and folic acid levels, with depression and/or anxiety and a higher BMI, have a higher BMI at 5 years of surgery and higher incidence of comorbid return and dissatisfaction with post-operative results.

  16. Pre-operative simulation of periacetabular osteotomy via a three-dimensional model constructed from salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukushima Kensuke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periacetabular osteotomy (PAO is an effective joint-preserving procedure for young adults with developmental dysplasia of the hip. Although PAO provides excellent radiographic and clinical results, it is a technically demanding procedure with a distinct learning curve that requires careful 3D planning and, above all, has a number of potential complications. We therefore developed a pre-operative simulation method for PAO via creation of a new full-scale model. Methods: The model was prepared from the patient’s Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM formatted data from computed tomography (CT, for construction and assembly using 3D printing technology. A major feature of our model is that it is constructed from salt. In contrast to conventional models, our model provides a more accurate representation, at a lower manufacturing cost, and requires a shorter production time. Furthermore, our model realized simulated operation normally with using a chisel and drill without easy breakage or fissure. We were able to easily simulate the line of osteotomy and confirm acetabular version and coverage after moving to the osteotomized fragment. Additionally, this model allowed a dynamic assessment that avoided anterior impingement following the osteotomy. Results: Our models clearly reflected the anatomical shape of the patient’s hip. Our models allowed for surgical simulation, making realistic use of the chisel and drill. Our method of pre-operative simulation for PAO allowed for the assessment of accurate osteotomy line, determination of the position of the osteotomized fragment, and prevented anterior impingement after the operation. Conclusion: Our method of pre-operative simulation might improve the safety, accuracy, and results of PAO.

  17. Spatial and volumetric changes of retroperitoneal sarcomas during pre-operative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Philip; Dickie, Colleen; Lee, David; Chung, Peter; O’Sullivan, Brian; Letourneau, Daniel; Xu, Wei; Swallow, Carol; Gladdy, Rebecca; Catton, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the positional and volumetric changes of retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS) during pre-operative external beam radiotherapy (PreRT). Material and methods: After excluding 2 patients who received chemotherapy prior to PreRT and 15 RPS that were larger than the field-of-view of cone-beam CT (CBCT), the positional and volumetric changes of RPS throughout PreRT were characterized in 19 patients treated with IMRT using CBCT image guidance. Analysis was performed on 118 CBCT images representing one image per week of those acquired daily during treatment. Intra-fraction breathing motions of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and kidneys were measured in 22 RPS patients simulated using 4D-CT. Fifteen other patients were excluded whose tumors were incompletely imaged on CBCT or who received pre-RT chemotherapy. Results: A GTV volumetric increase (mean: 6.6%, p = 0.035) during the first 2 weeks (CBCT1 vs. CBCT2) of treatment was followed by GTV volumetric decrease (mean: 4%, p = 0.009) by completion of radiotherapy (CBCT1 vs. CBCT6). Internal margins of 8.6, 15 and 15 mm in the lateral, anterior/posterior and superior/inferior directions would be required to account for inter-fraction displacements. The extent of GTV respiratory motion was significantly (p < 0.0001) correlated with more superiorly positioned tumors. Conclusion: Inter-fraction CBCT provides important volumetric and positional information of RPS which may improve PreRT quality and prompt re-planning. Planning target volume may be reduced using online soft-tissue matching to account for interfractional displacements of GTVs. Important breathing motion occurred in superiorly placed RPS supporting the utility of 4D-CT planning

  18. Feasibility of pre-operative autologous blood donation in Indian patients with elective orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Karan; Marwaha, Neelam; Thakral, Beenu; Goni, Vijay; Sharma, R R; Puri, G D

    2006-11-01

    Pre-operative autologous blood donation (PABD) in elective orthopaedic surgeries is a well known procedure in the West. We initiated this programme at a tertiary care hospital in north India to study its feasibility in Indian patients. In a prospective case-control study, 144 patients undergoing primary total hip or knee replacement, inter-vertebral discectomy, mal-union and non-union reconstruction were educated and motivated to pre-donate. Patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria and making autologous donation formed the PABD group (n=22). Patients eligible for PABD, but unwilling to participate; age, sex, pre-operative haemoglobin and operative procedure matched acted as controls (n=27). Unit(s) collected was processed like an allogeneic unit. Unit(s) found reactive for infectious markers or not utilized was discarded. Mean blood losses, transfusion trigger, allogeneic exposure and wastage between the two groups were compared. Of the 144 patients motivated, 40 per cent of the eligible subjects pre-deposited. The main motivational factor was fear of getting infection from someone's blood. Cardiac events and anaemia prevented 61.8 per cent patients to participate. Of the 50 units ordered, autologous units with a mean of 1.4 units/patient contributed 62 per cent. For total hip and total knee replacement (THR and TKR), autologous units met 76.2 and 80 per cent respectively of the total blood requirement. A significant decrease in the allogeneic exposure was observed between PABD and control group (18.2 vs 66.7%); 32.3 per cent of the autologous units were discarded. Comprehensive PABD programme may be an effective method for reducing the need for allogeneic transfusion in patients undergoing joint replacement surgeries in our country, where transfusion transmitted infections due to high percentage of replacement donations and lack of sensitive assays for testing are still a cause for concern.

  19. Pre and post-operational radioecological studies around Kaiga Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karunakara, N.

    2018-01-01

    Four PHWR rectors of 220 MWe each are operating at Kaiga. The Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Radioactivity (CARER), Mangalore University is engaged in frontline research studies on different aspects of environmental radioactivity and radioecology studies around Kaiga and West Coast of India for the last 30 years. Extensive studies were carried out on radiation levels, radionuclides distribution, and transfer of radionuclides through terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric pathways in the environment of West Coast of India including the Kaiga nuclear power plant. The baseline studies on radioactivity levels around Kaiga region was carried out well before the nuclear power plant became operational and the data generated under these studies are considered to be highly valuable for impact assessments. The nuclear power plant became operational in the year 1999 and since then extensive studies were carried out on radiological impact assessments, through collaboration with Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and Nuclear Power Corporation of India (NPCIL)

  20. Domain general sequence operations contribute to pre-SMA involvement in visuo-spatial processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Charles eLeek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used 3T MRI to elucidate the functional role of supplementary motor area (SMA in relation to visuo-spatial processing. A localizer task contrasting sequential number subtraction and repetitive button pressing was used to functionally delineate non-motor sequence processing in pre-SMA, and activity in SMA-proper associated with motor sequencing. Patterns of BOLD responses in these regions were then contrasted to those from two tasks of visuo-spatial processing. In one task participants performed mental rotation in which recognition memory judgments were made to previously memorized 2D novel patterns across image-plane rotations. The other task involved abstract grid navigation in which observers computed a series of imagined location shifts in response to directional (arrow cues around a mental grid. The results showed overlapping activation in pre-SMA for sequential subtraction and both visuo-spatial tasks. These results suggest that visuo-spatial processing is supported by non-motor sequence operations that involve pre-SMA. More broadly, these data further highlight the functional heterogeneity of pre-SMA, and show that its role extends to processes beyond the planning and online control of movement.

  1. Pre-surgery briefings and safety climate in the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Jon; Bleakley, Alan; Hobbs, Adrian; Coombes, Lee

    2011-08-01

    In 2008, the WHO produced a surgical safety checklist against a background of a poor patient safety record in operating theatres. Formal team briefings are now standard practice in high-risk settings such as the aviation industry and improve safety, but are resisted in surgery. Research evidence is needed to persuade the surgical workforce to adopt safety procedures such as briefings. To investigate whether exposure to pre-surgery briefings is related to perception of safety climate. Three Safety Attitude Questionnaires, completed by operating theatre staff in 2003, 2004 and 2006, were used to evaluate the effects of an educational intervention introducing pre-surgery briefings. Individual practitioners who agree with the statement 'briefings are common in the operating theatre' also report a better 'safety climate' in operating theatres. The study reports a powerful link between briefing practices and attitudes towards safety. Findings build on previous work by reporting on the relationship between briefings and safety climate within a 4-year period. Briefings, however, remain difficult to establish in local contexts without appropriate team-based patient safety education. Success in establishing a safety culture, with associated practices, may depend on first establishing unidirectional, positive change in attitudes to create a safety climate.

  2. CT pre-operative planning of a new semi-implantable bone conduction hearing device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Eric K.C.; Bhatia, Kunwar S.S. [Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Tsang, Willis S.S.; Tong, Michael C.F. [Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Shi, Lin [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Hong Kong, SAR (China); The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Chow Yuk Ho Technology Center for Innovative Medicine, Hong Kong, SAR (China)

    2016-06-15

    Accommodating a novel semi-implantable bone conduction hearing device within the temporal bone presents challenges for surgical planning. This study describes the utility of CT in pre-operative assessment of such an implant. Retrospective review of pre-operative CT, clinical and surgical records of 16 adults considered for device implantation. Radiological suitability was assessed on CT using 3D simulation software. Antero-posterior (AP) dimensions of the mastoid bone and minimum skull thickness were measured. CT planning results were correlated with operative records. Eight and five candidates were suitable for device placement in the transmastoid and retrosigmoid positions, respectively, and three were radiologically unsuitable. The mean AP diameter of the mastoid cavity was 14.6 mm for the transmastoid group and 4.6 mm for the retrosigmoid group (p < 0.05). Contracted mastoid and/or prior surgery were predisposing factors for unsuitability. Four transmastoid and five retrosigmoid positions required sigmoid sinus/dural depression and/or use of lifts due to insufficient bone capacity. A high proportion of patients being considered have contracted or operated mastoids, which reduces the feasibility of the transmastoid approach. This finding combined with the complex temporal bone geometry illustrates the importance of careful CT evaluation using 3D software for precise device simulation. (orig.)

  3. Effect of stapedotomy on pre-operative tinnitus and its psychosomatic burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, Florian; Mazurek, Birgit; Schrom, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    According to the literature, between 40 and 90% of otosclerosis patients suffering from hearing loss also suffer from tinnitus on the affected side. For a lot of these patients tinnitus represents a handicap that is just as debilitating as the hearing loss itself. The main goal of the surgical treatment of otosclerosis is a significant improvement in hearing loss, but frequent reports of reduced tinnitus after surgery suggest that this can be a positive side effect. All patients who underwent stapedotomy were initially included in the study. Retrospectively, the tinnitus questionnaire as compiled by Goebel and Hiller was sent to the patients, and 34 patients (37 ears) replied. The pre- and postoperative cases of tinnitus were divided into compensated and non-compensated tinnitus. In addition the following tinnitus-related factors were evaluated: emotional, cognitive and mental burden; intrusiveness of the tinnitus; hearing problems; somatic ailments; and sleep disturbances. Over 80% of the patients surveyed suffered from tinnitus pre-operation. The tinnitus disappeared or improved in over 60% of the cases after stapedotomy. In addition, the related factors surveyed also improved appreciably post surgery and reached a significant level in patients with compensated tinnitus. Besides a significant improvement in hearing loss the intensity and the psychosomatic burden of a pre-operative tinnitus can be reduced by stapedotomy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of the pre-dose technique for environmental dosimetry. [Thermoluminescence from fired bricks or tiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailiff, I K [Durham Univ. (UK). TL Lab.; Haskell, E H [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City (USA). Radiobiology Div.

    1984-01-01

    The pre-dose effect associated with the 110/sup 0/C TL peak of quartz is the basis of a dating technique developed at the Oxford Laboratory, and now in use to date pottery and brick at the Durham Laboratory. Recently its use for the measurement of fallout gamma dose has been initiated at the University of Utah. Using quartz extracted from fired brick, the technique has been shown to be sufficiently sensitive to measure doses in the region of 10 mGy. The complexities of the technique encountered during dating in its upper range (approx. 5 Gy) are equally apparent in its lower range (10 mGy). With a common interest in the pre-dose technique, the research that is being performed to apply the technique through its full range in environmental dosimetry is discussed.

  5. NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET): NASA's key to environmental technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Beth

    1993-01-01

    NASA has stepped forward to face the environmental challenge to eliminate the use of Ozone-Layer Depleting Substances (OLDS) and to reduce our Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) by 50 percent in 1995. These requirements have been issued by the Clean Air Act, the Montreal Protocol, and various other legislative acts. A proactive group, the NASA Operational Environment Team or NOET, received its charter in April 1992 and was tasked with providing a network through which replacement activities and development experiences can be shared. This is a NASA-wide team which supports the research and development community by sharing information both in person and via a computerized network, assisting in specification and standard revisions, developing cleaner propulsion systems, and exploring environmentally-compliant alternatives to current processes.

  6. Modeling the Environmental Impact of Air Traffic Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Neil

    2011-01-01

    There is increased interest to understand and mitigate the impacts of air traffic on the climate, since greenhouse gases, nitrogen oxides, and contrails generated by air traffic can have adverse impacts on the climate. The models described in this presentation are useful for quantifying these impacts and for studying alternative environmentally aware operational concepts. These models have been developed by leveraging and building upon existing simulation and optimization techniques developed for the design of efficient traffic flow management strategies. Specific enhancements to the existing simulation and optimization techniques include new models that simulate aircraft fuel flow, emissions and contrails. To ensure that these new models are beneficial to the larger climate research community, the outputs of these new models are compatible with existing global climate modeling tools like the FAA's Aviation Environmental Design Tool.

  7. Applications of ordered weighted averaging (OWA operators in environmental problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Llopis-Albert

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of a prioritized weighted aggregation operator based on ordered weighted averaging (OWA to deal with stakeholders' constructive participation in water resources projects. They have different degree of acceptance or preference regarding the measures and policies to be carried out, which lead to different environmental and socio-economic outcomes, and hence, to different levels of stakeholders’ satisfaction. The methodology establishes a prioritization relationship upon the stakeholders, which preferences are aggregated by means of weights depending on the satisfaction of the higher priority policy maker. The methodology establishes a prioritization relationship upon the stakeholders, which preferences are aggregated by means of weights depending on the satisfaction of the higher priority policy maker. The methodology has been successfully applied to a Public Participation Project (PPP in watershed management, thus obtaining efficient environmental measures in conflict resolution problems under actors’ preference uncertainties.

  8. Assessment of Environmental Impacts of Limestone Quarrying Operations in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittipongvises Suthirat

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental impacts of the mineral extraction have been a public concern. Presently, there is widespread global interest in the area of mining and its sustainability that focused on the need to shift mining industry to a more sustainable framework. The aim of this study was to systematically assess all possible environmental and climate change related impacts of the limestone quarrying operation in Thailand. By considering the life cycle assessment method, the production processes were divided into three phases: raw material extraction, transportation, and comminution. Both IMPACT 2002+ and the Greenhouse Gas Protocol methods were used. Results of IMPACT 2002+ analysis showed that per 1 ton crushed limestone rock production, the total depletion of resource and GHGs emissions were 79.6 MJ and 2.76 kg CO2 eq., respectively. Regarding to the four damage categories, ‘resources’ and ‘climate change’ categories were the two greatest environmental impacts of the limestone rock production. Diesel fuel and electricity consumption in the mining processes were the main causes of those impacts. For climate change, the unit of CO2 eq. was expressed to quantify the total GHGs emissions. Estimated result was about 3.13 kg CO2 eq. per ton limestone rock product. The results obtained by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol were also similar to IMPACT 2002+ method. Electrical energy consumption was considered as the main driver of GHGs, accounting for approximately 46.8 % of total fossil fuel CO2 emissions. A final point should be noted that data uncertainties in environmental assessment over the complete life cycle of limestone quarrying operation have to be carefully considered.

  9. Assessment of Environmental Impacts of Limestone Quarrying Operations in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittipongvises, Suthirat

    2017-11-01

    Environmental impacts of the mineral extraction have been a public concern. Presently, there is widespread global interest in the area of mining and its sustainability that focused on the need to shift mining industry to a more sustainable framework. The aim of this study was to systematically assess all possible environmental and climate change related impacts of the limestone quarrying operation in Thailand. By considering the life cycle assessment method, the production processes were divided into three phases: raw material extraction, transportation, and comminution. Both IMPACT 2002+ and the Greenhouse Gas Protocol methods were used. Results of IMPACT 2002+ analysis showed that per 1 ton crushed limestone rock production, the total depletion of resource and GHGs emissions were 79.6 MJ and 2.76 kg CO2 eq., respectively. Regarding to the four damage categories, `resources' and `climate change' categories were the two greatest environmental impacts of the limestone rock production. Diesel fuel and electricity consumption in the mining processes were the main causes of those impacts. For climate change, the unit of CO2 eq. was expressed to quantify the total GHGs emissions. Estimated result was about 3.13 kg CO2 eq. per ton limestone rock product. The results obtained by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol were also similar to IMPACT 2002+ method. Electrical energy consumption was considered as the main driver of GHGs, accounting for approximately 46.8 % of total fossil fuel CO2 emissions. A final point should be noted that data uncertainties in environmental assessment over the complete life cycle of limestone quarrying operation have to be carefully considered.

  10. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil

    1999-01-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m 2 /day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post-operative tumor

  11. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1999-06-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post-operative

  12. Association between Pre-Operative Cefazolin Dose and Surgical Site Infection in Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppard, William J; Eberle, David G; Kugler, Nathan W; Mabrey, Danielle M; Weigelt, John A

    A fixed dose of cefazolin results in serum concentrations that decrease as body mass increases. Current national guidelines suggest a pre-operative cefazolin dose of two grams may be insufficient for patients ≥120 kg; thus a three gram dose is recommended. These recommendations, however, are based on pharmacokinetic rather than outcome data. We evaluate the efficacy of pre-operative cefazolin two gram and three gram doses as measured by the rate of surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a retrospective review of adult patients ≥100 kg who were prescribed cefazolin as surgical prophylaxis between September 1, 2012 and May 31, 2013 at an academic medical center. Patients were excluded if cefazolin was prescribed but not administered, had a known infection at the site of surgery, or inappropriately received cefazolin prophylaxis based on surgical indication. The SSIs were identified by documentation of SSI in the medical record or findings consistent with the standard Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition. Inpatient and outpatient records up to 90 days post-operative were reviewed for delayed SSI. Four hundred eighty-three surgical cases were identified in which pre-operative cefazolin was prescribed. Forty-seven patients were excluded leaving a total of 436 patients for final analysis: 152 in the cefazolin two gram group and 284 in the three gram group. Baseline demographics were similar between groups with a mean follow-up duration of 77 days for both groups. Unadjusted SSI rates were 7.2% and 7.4% (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, p = 0.95), for the two gram and three gram groups, respectively. When differences in follow-up between groups were considered and logistic regression was adjusted with propensity score, there remained no difference in SSI rates (OR 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.36-2.06, p = 0.77). In otherwise similar obese surgical patients weighing ≥100 kg, the administration of a pre-operative cefazolin two gram dose is

  13. Annual radiological environmental operating report: Sequoyah Nuclear Plant, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant in 1987. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas not influenced by plant operations. Station locations are selected after careful consideration of the weather patterns and projected radiation doses to the various areas around the plant. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. Results from stations near the plant are compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts of plant operations. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Evaluation of environmental impact of radioactive waste from reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.; Pages, P.

    1989-10-01

    This paper evaluates the environmental impact of radioactive wastes from reactors operation. We estimate a case of a plant of 20 GWe power operating for 30 years which is equivalent to 600 tons of uranium per year. According to the properties, the waste is stored on surface (Aube site). Starting from the year of storage, we have defined the maximum dose equivalent for an individual from the reference group. The calculation depends on water of outlet water in which some initially stored radionuclides have migrated. Under the most pessimistic estimation, maximum annual dose was of the order of magnitude 0.5 μ Sv (0.05 mrem) for the storage 400 years after opening the site, and after 4000 years. Compared to the values obtained for the radioactive waste storage, the value of this impact is five times higher than the respective surface storage, but two time less than values for underground storage [fr

  15. Longview District Operations and Maintenance Headquarters: Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) operations and maintenance staff are presently based at a headquarters next to the Longview Substation. These headquarters buildings, however, were built in 1941 and have deteriorated to the point of needing extensive repair. They also lack sufficient inside storage space. New buildings cannot be constructed on the site because of surrounding development. In addition, the site is within an area exposed to industrial fallout (coal tar pitch and metallic particles) that may be damaging buildings, equipment, and vehicles. BPA is concerned about the potential health risk to headquarters staff from the fallout. In light of these problems, BPA proposes to construct a new operations and maintenance headquarters at a different location, and to demolish the existing headquarters. This paper discusses the environmental impacts of the proposed action and alternatives

  16. Review of environmental aspects of uranium mill operations: industry's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beverly, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Problems faced by uranium mill operators in complying with new environmental regulations and guidelines are discussed. It is pointed out that valid data must be available in order to evaluate impacts on the environment, to determine background radiation levels, to measure the effectiveness of control techniques, and to determine compliance with standards and regulations. Specific problem areas facing mill operators today and some of the unresolved questions include: sampling methods and equipment for radon in ambient air, measurements of radon and radon daughter exposures of people, radon emanation rate meaurements applicable to monitoring mill tailings, the calibration of γ counters, measurements of population doses, regulations concerning mill tailings reclamation nd stabilization, and the comparative value of in-vivo counting and uranium urinary excretion measurements for monitoring personnel

  17. Annual radiological environmental operating report: Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This report describes the environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BFN) in 1992. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas not influenced by plant operations. Station locations are selected after careful consideration of the weather patterns and projected radiation doses to the various areas around the plant. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. Results from stations near the plant are compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts of plant operations. Small amounts of Co-60 and Cs-134 were found in sediment samples downstream from the plant. This activity in stream sediment would result in no measurable increase over background in the dose to the general public

  18. Determination of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Level of Awareness of Environmental Ethics in Relation to Different Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Özgül; Özer, Nilgün

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to determine the pre-service science teachers' awareness levels of environmental ethics in relation to different variables. The sampling of the present study is comprised of 1,023 third and fourth year pre-service science teachers selected from 12 different universities in the spring term of 2013-2014 academic…

  19. A well test analysis method accounting for pre-test operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, D.B.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2003-01-01

    We propose to use regular monitoring data from a production or injection well for estimating the formation hydraulic properties in the vicinity of the wellbore without interrupting the operations. In our approach, we select a portion of the pumping data over a certain time interval and then derive our conclusions from analysis of these data. A distinctive feature of the proposed approach differing it form conventional methods is in the introduction of an additional parameter, an effective pre-test pumping rate. The additional parameter is derived based on a rigorous asymptotic analysis of the flow model. Thus, we account for the non-uniform pressure distribution at the beginning of testing time interval caused by pre-test operations at the well. By synthetic and field examples, we demonstrate that deviation of the matching curve from the data that is usually attributed to skin and wellbore storage effects, can also be interpreted through this new parameter. Moreover, with our method, the data curve is matched equally well and the results of the analysis remain stable when the analyzed data interval is perturbed, whereas traditional methods are sensitive to the choice of the data interval. A special efficient minimization procedure has been developed for searching the best fitting parameters. We enhanced our analysis above with a procedure of estimating ambient reservoir pressure and dimensionless wellbore radius. The methods reported here have been implemented in code ODA (Operations Data Analysis). A beta version of the code is available for free testing and evaluation to interested parties

  20. Romanian-Danish Environmental Co-operation. Co-operation development 1993-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy has, since 1991, through the Danish Environmental Support Fund, contributed towards protecting the environment and nature in Central and Eastern European countries and has helped to limit regional as well as global pollution. The Romanian Ministry of Waters, Forests and Environmental Protection and the Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy initiated the co-operation in 1993 and an official Agreement was signed in 1994. This publication describes the co-operation between the two countries in the field of the environment in the hope that this will give both the general public of Romania and the international community a better understanding of the work being accomplished. It also gives an overview of the 19 projects developed within this framework, which has a total Danish grant of DKK 77.9 million. (au)

  1. Annual radiological environmental operating report, Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant in 1988. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas not influenced by plant operations. Station locations are selected after careful consideration of the weather patterns and projected radiation doses to the various areas around the plant. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. Results from stations near the plant are compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts of plant operations. The vast majority of the exposures calculated from environmental samples were contributed by naturally occurring radioactive materials or from materials commonly found in the environment as a result of atmospheric nuclear weapons fallout. Small amounts of Co-60 were found in sediment samples downstream from the plant. This activity in stream sediment would result in no measurable increase over background in the dose to the general public. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Proposed radiological criteria for pre-operative determination of resectability in peritoneal-based malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Grace Hwei Ching; Chanyaputhipong, Jendana; Teo, Melissa Ching Ching; Kwek, Jin Wei; Hosseini, Reza; Tham, Chee Kian; Soo, Khee Chee

    2016-01-01

    The selection of patients for cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intra-peritoneal chemotherapy infusion (HIPEC) is important, and relies heavily on imaging. However, it has been reported that Computer Tomographic (CT) scans may only achieve a low sensitivity of 33% for peritoneal disease. We propose a set of radiological criteria for pre-operative determination of resectability of peritoneal disease in peritoneal-based malignancies and validate this in our cohort of patients. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent laparotomy with a view for CRS and HIPEC, at the National Cancer Centre Singapore from January 2000 to April 2010, was performed. Intra-operative Peritoneal Cancer Index (PCI) scores were recorded. The pre-operative imaging was reviewed with a senior radiologist who was blinded, and recorded the radiological PCI scores (CT-PCI) and eight additional CT prognostic factors (CT-PF). The CT-PCI and CT-PF scores were then compared with the intra-operative findings to determine the radiological accuracy. The scores and the individual prognostic factors were then evaluated for their predictive ability for unresectability. Comparison of the CT-PCI and PCI scores showed a concordance correlation coefficient at 0.52 (95% CI 0.34–0.7). Accuracy was increased with the addition CT-PF. The presence of omental caking and ascites were predictors of unresectability. We propose a scoring system which is able to predict for unresectable disease with a specificity of 80% and a sensitivity of 62%. With our proposed criteria, and scoring system, the selection of patients for CRS and HIPEC can be improved, and unnecessary exploratory operations avoided.

  3. Environmental monitoring program design for uranium refining and conversion operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop recommendations for the design of environmental monitoring programs at Canadian uranium refining and conversion operations. In order to develop monitoring priorities, chemical and radioactive releases to the air and water were developed for reference uranium refining and conversion facilities. The relative significance of the radioactive releases was evaluated through a pathways analysis which estimated dose to individual members of the critical receptor group. The effects of chemical releases to the environment were assessed by comparing predicted air and water contaminant levels to appropriate standards or guidelines. For the reference facilities studied, the analysis suggested that environmental effects are likely to be dominated by airborne release of both radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants. Uranium was found to be the most important radioactive species released to the air and can serve as an overall indicator of radiological impacts for any of the plants considered. The most important nonradioactive air emission was found to be fluoride (as hydrogen fluoride) from the uranium hexafluoride plant. For the uranium trioxide and uranium dioxide plants, air emissions of oxides of nitrogen were considered to be most important. The study recommendations for the design of an environmental monitoring program are based on consideration of those factors most likely to affect local air and water quality, and human radiation exposure. Site- and facility-specific factors will affect monitoring program design and the selection of components such as sampling media, locations and frequency, and analytical methods

  4. Environmental impact of offshore operation reduced using innovative engineering solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, C.J.; Wensel, E.A.; Edelblum, L.S.; Beal, D.

    1994-01-01

    The North Dauphin Island Tract 73 platform is located in eleven feet (3.4 m) of water and one mile (1.6 km) from shore in Mobile Bay, Alabama. The platform is designed to dehydrate and compress up to 70 MMSCFD (1.98 x 10 6 SM 3 ) from five remote gas production wells. Located near the city of Mobile, Alabama, the surrounding metropolitan and coastal areas has multiple uses including manufacturing, tourism, commercial and sport fishing, and wetlands and wildlife conservation. The multiple and interdependent economic uses of the area required that the platform be designed to minimize any adverse environmental impact. A cost-effective environmental engineering solution was desired at the design phase of the project. A water catchment, containment and disposal system was designed to meet the zero discharge requirement. Pollution from air emissions was reduced by the installation of lean burning engines. A floatover installation process was used to prevent dredging of the bay, thus protecting the bay water quality. An aesthetically concealing paint and lighting scheme was chosen and applied to the entire structure. These cost-effective engineering solutions during the design phase of the project saved time and money over the life of the project. All regulatory permits were obtained in a timely manner, with little or no opposition. The operator of the North Dauphin Island Development won several environmental awards due to the implementation of innovative solutions and their commitment to conservation of the natural environment

  5. Impact of the environmental conditions and substrate pre-treatment on whey protein hydrolysis: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheison, Seronei Chelulei; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2017-01-22

    Proteins in solution are subject to myriad forces stemming from interactions with each other as well as with the solvent media. The role of the environmental conditions, namely pH, temperature, ionic strength remains under-estimated yet it impacts protein conformations and consequently its interaction with, and susceptibility to, the enzyme. Enzymes, being proteins are also amenable to the environmental conditions because they are either activated or denatured depending on the choice of the conditions. Furthermore, enzyme specificity is restricted to a narrow regime of optimal conditions while opportunities outside the optimum conditions remain untapped. In addition, the composition of protein substrate (whether mixed or single purified) have been underestimated in previous studies. In addition, protein pre-treatment methods like heat denaturation prior to hydrolysis is a complex phenomenon whose progression is influenced by the environmental conditions including the presence or absence of sugars like lactose, ionic strength, purity of the protein, and the molecular structure of the mixed proteins particularly presence of free thiol groups. In this review, we revisit protein hydrolysis with a focus on the impact of the hydrolysis environment and show that preference of peptide bonds and/or one protein over another during hydrolysis is driven by the environmental conditions. Likewise, heat-denaturing is a process which is dependent on not only the environment but the presence or absence of other proteins.

  6. Experential Learning Approach For Training Pre-Service Teachers In Environmental Science Using Mobile Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, D. C.; Nair, U. S.

    2015-12-01

    In the context of complex environmental problems facing societies, environmental education is becoming an integral part of curriculum all levels of education, including teacher education. Traditional teaching methodology is often criticized for being reductionist and empirical and thus not optimal for training next generation of students who are expected to formulate solutions to complex, interdisciplinary environmental issues. This study will report on the use of mobile application, based on the Open Data Kit (ODK), along with the Google Earth Engine (GEE) to implement a better approach, namely experiential learning, for teacher education in Kerala, India. The specific topic considered is land use and land cover change due to human activity. The experiential learning approach implemented will involve students using Android mobile application to collect a sample of geo-locations for different land cover types. This data will be used to classify satellite imagery within Google Earth Engine and used to understand how their neighborhoods have changed over the years. Rather than being passive information recipients, the students will develop understanding based on their own analysis of how urban regions grow, crop lands shrink and forests disappear. This study will report on the implementation of experiential learning approach through the use of ODK and GEE, and on the ongoing evaluation of effectiveness of experiential learning approach for environmental education. A Pretest-Posttest study design will be used for evaluation. Change in environmental consciousness, as characterized by a well-designed and validated Environmental Consciousness Scale will be determined for a study group of 300 Pre-service teachers of Kerala, India. The significance between the mean scores of the data collected during pretest and posttest will be analyzed using paired t tests. Qualitative feedback about the Mobile Application through focus group interviews will also collected and analyzed.

  7. Cultural and Environmental Predictors of Pre-European Deforestation on Pacific Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Quentin D; Coomber, Ties; Passmore, Sam; Greenhill, Simon J; Kushnick, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    The varied islands of the Pacific provide an ideal natural experiment for studying the factors shaping human impact on the environment. Previous research into pre-European deforestation across the Pacific indicated a major effect of environment but did not account for cultural variation or control for dependencies in the data due to shared cultural ancestry and geographic proximity. The relative importance of environment and culture on Pacific deforestation and forest replacement and the extent to which environmental impact is constrained by cultural ancestry therefore remain unexplored. Here we use comparative phylogenetic methods to model the effect of nine ecological and two cultural variables on pre-European Pacific forest outcomes at 80 locations across 67 islands. We show that some but not all ecological features remain important predictors of forest outcomes after accounting for cultural covariates and non-independence in the data. Controlling for ecology, cultural variation in agricultural intensification predicts deforestation and forest replacement, and there is some evidence that land tenure norms predict forest replacement. These findings indicate that, alongside ecology, cultural factors also predict pre-European Pacific forest outcomes. Although forest outcomes covary with cultural ancestry, this effect disappears after controlling for geographic proximity and ecology. This suggests that forest outcomes were not tightly constrained by colonists' cultural ancestry, but instead reflect a combination of ecological constraints and the short-term responses of each culture in the face of those constraints.

  8. Cultural and Environmental Predictors of Pre-European Deforestation on Pacific Islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin D Atkinson

    Full Text Available The varied islands of the Pacific provide an ideal natural experiment for studying the factors shaping human impact on the environment. Previous research into pre-European deforestation across the Pacific indicated a major effect of environment but did not account for cultural variation or control for dependencies in the data due to shared cultural ancestry and geographic proximity. The relative importance of environment and culture on Pacific deforestation and forest replacement and the extent to which environmental impact is constrained by cultural ancestry therefore remain unexplored. Here we use comparative phylogenetic methods to model the effect of nine ecological and two cultural variables on pre-European Pacific forest outcomes at 80 locations across 67 islands. We show that some but not all ecological features remain important predictors of forest outcomes after accounting for cultural covariates and non-independence in the data. Controlling for ecology, cultural variation in agricultural intensification predicts deforestation and forest replacement, and there is some evidence that land tenure norms predict forest replacement. These findings indicate that, alongside ecology, cultural factors also predict pre-European Pacific forest outcomes. Although forest outcomes covary with cultural ancestry, this effect disappears after controlling for geographic proximity and ecology. This suggests that forest outcomes were not tightly constrained by colonists' cultural ancestry, but instead reflect a combination of ecological constraints and the short-term responses of each culture in the face of those constraints.

  9. Environmental Control Plan for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit Remedial Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This environmental control plan is for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit Remedial Action Project. The purpose of this plan is to identify environmental requirements for the 300-FF-1 operable unit Remedial Action/Waste Disposal Project

  10. Signalling in international environmental agreements. Using pre-agreement emission level as a signalling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, U.

    1997-12-31

    This paper addresses the question about strategic incentives in international environmental agreements and tries to give a positive description of how the design of the agreement influences the strategic behaviour of potential participants before they enter the treaty. A common feature of the design of agreements is that the reduction obligations (RO) are made contingent on a pre-agreement or baseline emission. As it is assumed that countries posses better information about their reduction costs than does the international body in charge of deciding the RO, countries might have incentives to signal higher costs by increasing their baseline emission, and thereby reducing the costs of entering the agreement. The appropriate analytical framework is to use a signalling game approach, where the pre-agreement emission level conveys information about the privately informed country`s reduction cost. In this paper two types of agreement design are considered, one with uniform obligations, and one with differentiated obligations. This enables us to make a comparison between two different reduction regimes. The result is that the predicted outcomes vary with regard to both the environmental effectiveness and the associated expected costs for the participating countries. This means that when private information is considered, the anticipation of a given institutional framework has significant impact on the resulting distortion of the total emission level, highlighting the necessity of taking this into consideration when future designs are proposed. (au)

  11. Signalling in international environmental agreements: Using pre-agreement emission level as a signalling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, U.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the question about strategic incentives in international environmental agreements and tries to give a positive description of how the design of the agreement influences the strategic behaviour of potential participants before they enter the treaty. A common feature of the design of agreements is that the reduction obligations (RO) are made contingent on a pre-agreement or baseline emission. As it is assumed that countries posses better information about their reduction costs than does the international body in charge of deciding the RO, countries might have incentives to signal higher costs by increasing their baseline emission, and thereby reducing the costs of entering the agreement. The appropriate analytical framework is to use a signalling game approach, where the pre-agreement emission level conveys information about the privately informed country's reduction cost. In this paper two types of agreement design are considered, one with uniform obligations, and one with differentiated obligations. This enables us to make a comparison between two different reduction regimes. The result is that the predicted outcomes vary with regard to both the environmental effectiveness and the associated expected costs for the participating countries. This means that when private information is considered, the anticipation of a given institutional framework has significant impact on the resulting distortion of the total emission level, highlighting the necessity of taking this into consideration when future designs are proposed. (au)

  12. Environmental Restoration Operations: Consolidated Quarterly Report January -March 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This Environmental Restoration Operations (ER) Consolidated Quarterly Report (ER Quarterly Report) provides the status of ongoing corrective action activities being implemented at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) during the January, February, and March 2017 quarterly reporting period. Table I-1 lists the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) identified for corrective action at SNL/NM. Sections I.2.1 and I.2.2 summarize the work completed during this quarter. Section I.2.1 summarizes the quarterly activities at sites undergoing corrective action field activities. Field activities are conducted at the three groundwater AOCs (Burn Site Groundwater [BSG AOC], Technical Area [TA]-V Groundwater [TAVG AOC], and Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater [TAG AOC]). Section I.2.2 summarizes quarterly activities at sites where the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous Waste Bureau (HWB) issued a certificate of completion and the sites are in the corrective action complete (CAC) regulatory process. Currently, SWMUs 8 and 58, 68, 149, 154, and 502 are in the CAC regulatory process. Corrective action activities are deferred at the Long Sled Track (SWMU 83), the Gun Facilities (SWMU 84), and the Short Sled Track (SWMU 240) because these three sites are active mission facilities. These three active mission sites are located in TA-III. This Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico Environmental Restoration Operations (ER) Consolidated Quarterly Report (ER Quarterly Report) fulfills all quarterly reporting requirements set forth in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Operating Permit and the Compliance Order on Consent.

  13. Pre-Study Walkthrough with a Commercial Pilot for a Preliminary Single Pilot Operations Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor-Dreher, Ryan; Roberts, Z.; Ziccardi, J.; Vu, K-P. L.; Strybel, T.; Koteskey, Robert William; Lachter, Joel B.; Vi Dao, Quang; Johnson, Walter W.; Battiste, V.

    2013-01-01

    The number of crew members in commercial flights has decreased to two members, down from the five-member crew required 50 years ago. One question of interest is whether the crew should be reduced to one pilot. In order to determine the critical factors involved in safely transitioning to a single pilot, research must examine whether any performance deficits arise with the loss of a crew member. With a concrete understanding of the cognitive and behavioral role of a co-pilot, aeronautical technologies and procedures can be developed that make up for the removal of the second aircrew member. The current project describes a pre-study walkthrough process that can be used to help in the development of scenarios for testing future concepts and technologies for single pilot operations. Qualitative information regarding the tasks performed by the pilots can be extracted with this technique and adapted for future investigations of single pilot operations.

  14. Pre-operative irradiation of eosinophilic granuloma in the parotid area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Satoshi; Toda, Yukio; Nakajima, Hisami; Takeyama, Isamu; Sodemoto, Yukio; Endo, Masaru

    1983-01-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma is thought to originate in the reticuloendothelial system and cannot clearly be distinguished from the surrounding tissue during operation. An eosinophilic granuloma in the parotid area was removed after 25 days of irradiation at a dosage of 10.0 Gy per 3 days. A thin capsule of connective tissue was observed after the tumor was cut in half. Then, histopathological studies were performed on this connective tissue to determine the effect of the irradiation. Histopathologically, at the periphery of the tissue, atrophy of lymphocytes and destruction of the lymphoid tissue, which were thought to result in an increase in the connective tissue, were observed. It was concluded that a small dose of pre-operative radiation on eosinophilic granuloma in the parotid area made the tumor small and produced a capsule around the tumor. (author)

  15. Pre and post operative facial angles in patients submitted to rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soccol, Andréa T

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Parameters used in facial aesthetic surgeries are currently based on POWELL and HUMPHREYS (1. These authors have formulated suitable relations between the face and the nose, and defined the face angles. Objective: To compare pre and pos-operative nasolabial, nasofrontal, nasomental and nasofacial angles in patients submitted to rhinoseptoplasty. Method: Prospective analysis of 37 patients submitted to rhinoplasty, with an average of 30±11 years of age, being 13 (36% men and 24 (64% women. The nasolabial, nasofrontal, nasomental and nasofacial angles were measured and compared, before and after the surgery, in profile pictures. Results: An average increase of 8.6o in the nasolabial angle was observed, of 8.5o in the nasofrontal and reduction of 2.3o in the nasofacial angle, and all the measures presented a statistically significant difference between the pre and pos-operative period. The nasomental angle increased, on average, 1.6o, a difference without statistical importance. Conclusions: The nasolabial and nasofrontal angles increase significantly after rhinoseptoplasty, while the nasofacial angle diminishes. There was no significant alteration in the nasomental angle with the accomplishment of the surgery.

  16. Is pre-operative imaging essential prior to ureteric stone surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, F R; Wilkinson, B A; Hastie, K J; Hall, J

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify patients not requiring ureteric stone surgery based on pre-operative imaging (within 24 hours) prior to embarking on semirigid ureteroscopy (R-URS) for urolithiasis. The imaging of all consecutive patients on whom R-URS for urolithiasis was performed over a 12-month period was reviewed. All patients had undergone a plain x-ray of the kidney, ureters and bladder (KUB), abdominal non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT-KUB) or both on the day of surgery. A total of 96 patients were identified for the study. Stone sizes ranged from 3 mm to 20 mm. Thirteen patients (14%) were cancelled as no stone(s) were identified on pre-operative imaging. Of the patients cancelled, 8 (62%) required NCCT-KUB to confirm spontaneous stone passage. One in seven patients were stone free on the day of surgery. This negates the need for unnecessary anaesthetic and instrumentation of the urinary tract, with the associated morbidity. Up-to-date imaging prior to embarking on elective ureteric stone surgery is highly recommended.

  17. Value of flexible bronchoscopy in the pre-operative work-up of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Carsten; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Bittner, Roland C; Mairinger, Thomas; Rüssmann, Holger; Bauer, Torsten T; Kaiser, Dirk; Loddenkemper, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The diagnostic value of flexible bronchoscopy in the pre-operative work-up of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) is still under debate among pneumologists, radiologists and thoracic surgeons. In a prospective observational manner, flexible bronchoscopy was routinely performed in 225 patients with SPN of unknown origin. Of the 225 patients, 80.5% had lung cancer, 7.6% had metastasis of an extrapulmonary primary tumour and 12% had benign aetiology. Unsuspected endobronchial involvement was found in 4.4% of all 225 patients (or in 5.5% of patients with lung cancer). In addition, flexible bronchoscopy clarified the underlying aetiology in 41% of the cases. The bronchoscopic biopsy results from the SPN were positive in 84 (46.5%) patients with lung cancer. Surgery was cancelled due to the results of flexible bronchoscopy in four cases (involvement of the right main bronchus (impaired pulmonary function did not allow pneumonectomy) n=1, small cell lung cancer n=1, bacterial pneumonia n=2), and the surgical strategy had to be modified to bilobectomy in one patient. Flexible bronchoscopy changed the planned surgical approach in five cases substantially. These results suggest that routine flexible bronchoscopy should be included in the regular pre-operative work-up of patients with SPN.

  18. Environmental Assessment for Ongoing and Future Operations at U.S. Navy Dabob Bay and Hood Canal Military Operating Areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ...) of the Department of the Navy gives notice that an Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared for the proposed action of implement inc an Operations Management Plan for ongoing and future operations at the U.S...

  19. Pre-operational proof and leakage rate testing requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This Standard provides the requirements for pre-operational proof tests and leakage rate tests of concrete containment structures of a containment system designed as Class Containment components. 1 fig

  20. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix A: River Operation Simulation (ROSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The River Operation Simulation Experts (ROSE) work group is comprised of representatives of the Corps, BPA, Reclamation, NMFS, Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC), and Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). ROSE was responsible for using computer hydroregulation models to simulate the operation of the river system for all of the alternatives evaluated in screening and full scale analysis in SOR. These models are complex computer programs which sequentially route streamflows through each dam in the system, calculating the streamflows, reservoir elevations, spill, power generation and other information at each project and pertinent locations on the river system. ROSE first reviewed specifications of proposed alternatives to determine whether such alternatives were formulated adequately to be run on hydroregulation models

  1. Experiential Learning Approach for Training Pre-Service Teachers in Environmental Science Using Mobile Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, D. C.; Nair, U. S.

    2016-12-01

    In the context of complex environmental problems, it is desirable to enhance public awareness of environmental issues. In response to this challenge, environmental education is an integral part of curriculum at all levels of education, including teacher education. However, it is often criticized for being reductionist and empirical and thus not optimal for training next generation of students who are expected to formulate solutions to complex, interdisciplinary environmental issues. Experiential learning is better suited for such training. It create a connection between the learner and the content by involving the students in reflection on their experiences. It is very appropriate in teacher education where students carry their own unique experiences into the learning environment. This study will report on the use of mobile application, based on the Open Data Kit (ODK), along with the Google Earth Engine (GEE) to implement experiential learning approach for teacher education in Kerala, India. The specific topic considered is land use and land cover change due to human activity. The approach will involve students using Android mobile application to collect a sample of geo-locations for different land cover types. This data will be used to classify satellite imagery and understand how their neighborhoods have changed over the years. The present study will also report on evaluation of effectiveness of the developed Mobile Application as a tool for experiential learning of Environmental Education. The study uses an experimental method with mixed methods-one group Pretest-Posttest design. The sample for the study consists of 300 Pre-service teachers of Kerala, India. The data collected is analyzed using paired t tests. Qualitative feedback about the Mobile Application through focus group interviews is also collected. Implementation of the experiential learning algorithm and analysis of data collected for evaluation of the learning approach will also be presented.

  2. Pre-operative localization of parathyroid adenoma by Tc-99m-sestamibi scintigraphy (MIBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, Edward; Vishne, Tal H; Koren, Romelia; Lerner, Igor; Melloul, Moshe; Dreznik, Zeev

    2002-01-01

    The use of pre-operative imaging for localization of primary parathyroid adenoma may influence the duration and results of parathyroidectomy. The current study was aimed to evaluate the efficiency of localization of parathyroid adenoma by Tc-99m-sestamibi (MIBI) scintigraphy and compare the results with those achieved by the use of preoperative ultrasound. Seventy five patients, aged 25 to 83 years with primary hyperparathyroidism were operated due to primary adenoma in Rabin Medical Center from January 1995 to April 1997. Fifty of them had a preoperative MIBI scintigraphy and ultrasound for localization of parathyroid adenoma, while 25 had a preoperative ultrasound alone. Ultrasound identified correctly the adenoma in 84 percent of the cases, as compared to 96 percent identified by MIBI scintigraphy (p<0.01). MIBI scintigraphy shortened operation length from 120±20 min to 80±15 min (p<0.05) and reduced the number of frozen sections from 2.2±0.4 to 1.1±0.3 (p<0.001). MIBI scintigraphy is the most efficient modality for preoperative localization of parathyroid adenoma as compared to other imaging procedures, and can shorten operative time (Au)

  3. Environmental Sciences Division Toxicology Laboratory standard operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; Wicker, L.F.; Logsdon, G.M.

    1989-09-01

    This document was developed to provide the personnel working in the Environmental Sciences Division's Toxicology Laboratory with documented methods for conducting toxicity tests. The document consists of two parts. The first part includes the standard operating procedures (SOPs) that are used by the laboratory in conducting toxicity tests. The second part includes reference procedures from the US Environmental Protection Agency document entitled Short-Term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, upon which the Toxicology Laboratory's SOPs are based. Five of the SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction test. These SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia food (SOP-3), maintaining Ceriodaphnia cultures (SOP-4), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-13), analyzing the test data (SOP-13), and conducting a Ceriodaphnia reference test (SOP-15). Five additional SOPs relate specifically to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test: methods for preparing fathead minnow larvae food (SOP-5), maintaining fathead minnow cultures (SOP-6), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-9), analyzing the test data (SOP-12), and conducting a fathead minnow reference test (DOP-14). The six remaining SOPs describe methods that are used with either or both tests: preparation of control/dilution water (SOP-1), washing of glassware (SOP-2), collection and handling of samples (SOP-7), preparation of samples (SOP-8), performance of chemical analyses (SOP-11), and data logging and care of technical notebooks (SOP-16)

  4. Pre-operative Duplex Ultrasonography in Arteriovenous Fistula Creation: Intra- and Inter-observer Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonnebeld, Niek; Maas, Tommy M G; Huberts, Wouter; van Loon, Magda M; Delhaas, Tammo; Tordoir, Jan H M

    2017-11-01

    Although clinical guidelines on arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation advocate minimum luminal arterial and venous diameters, assessed by duplex ultrasonography (DUS), the clinical value of routine DUS examination is under debate. DUS might be an insufficiently repeatable and/or reproducible imaging modality because of its operator dependency. The present study aimed to assess intra- and inter-observer agreement of DUS examination in support of AVF surgery planning. Ten end stage renal disease patients were included, to assess intra- and inter-observer agreement of pre-operative DUS measurements. All measurements were performed by two trained and experienced vascular technicians, blinded to measurement readings. From the routine DUS protocol, representative measurements (venous diameters, and arterial diameters and volume flow in the upper arm and forearm) were selected. For intra-observer agreement the measurements were performed in triplicate, with the probe released from the skin between each. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for intra- and inter-observer agreement, and Bland-Altman plots used to graphically display mean measurement differences and limits of agreement. Ten patients (6 male, 59.4±19.7 years) consented to participate, and all predefined measurements were obtained. Intraclass correlation coefficients for intra-observer agreement of diameter measurements were at least 0.90 (95% CI 0.74-0.97; radial artery). Inter-observer agreement was at least 0.83 (0.46-0.96; lateral diameter upper arm cephalic vein). The Bland-Altman plots showed acceptable mean measurement differences and limits of agreement. In experienced hands, excellent intra- and inter-observer agreement can be reached for the discrete pre-operative DUS measurements advocated in clinical guidelines. DUS is therefore a reliable imaging modality to support AVF surgery planning. The content of DUS protocols, however, needs further standardisation. Copyright © 2017 European

  5. Overview of the role of pre-operative breast MRI in the absence of evidence on patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanelli, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    The role of pre-operative breast MRI is outlined on the basis of the existing evidence in favor of a superior capability in comparison with mammography and sonography to detect ipsilateral and contralateral malignant lesions and to evaluate the disease extent, including the extensive intraductal component associated with invasive cancers. Patients with a potential higher anticipated benefit from pre-operative MRI can be identified as those: with mammographically dense breasts; with a unilateral multifocal/multicentric cancer or a synchronous bilateral cancer already diagnosed at mammography and sonography; with a lobular invasive cancer; at high-risk for breast cancer; with a cancer which shows a discrepancy in size of >1 cm between mammography and sonography; or under consideration for partial breast irradiation. More limited evidence exists in favor of MRI for evaluating candidates for total skin sparing mastectomy or for patients with Paget's disease. Irrespective of whether the clinical team routinely uses preoperative MRI or not: women newly diagnosed with breast cancer should always be informed of the potential risks and benefits of pre-operative MRI; results of pre-operative MRI should be interpreted taking into account clinical breast examination, mammography, sonography and verified by percutaneous biopsy; MRI-only detected lesions require MR-guidance for needle biopsy and pre-surgical localization, and these should be available or potentially accessible if pre-operative MRI is to be implemented; total therapy delay due to pre-operative MRI (including MRI-induced work-up) should not exceed one month; changes in therapy planning resulting from pre-operative MRI should be decided by a multidisciplinary team. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Indoor environmental quality in Hellenic hospital operating rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dascalaki, Elena G.; Gaglia, Athina G.; Balaras, Constantinos A. [Group Energy Conservation, Institute for Environmental Research and Sustainable Development, National Observatory of Athens, I. Metaxa and Vas. Pavlou, GR 152 36 P. Penteli (Greece); Lagoudi, Argyro [Terra Nova Ltd., Environmental Engineering Consultancy, Athens, Kaisareias 39, GR 115 27 Athens (Greece)

    2009-05-15

    Indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in hospital operating rooms (ORs) constitutes a major challenge for the proper design and operation of an energy efficient hospital. A subjective assessment of the indoor environment along with a short monitoring campaign was performed during the audits of 18 ORs at nine major Hellenic hospitals. A total of 557 medical personnel participated in an occupational survey, providing data for a subjective assessment of IEQ in the audited ORs. The OR personnel reported work related health symptoms and an assessment of indoor conditions (thermal, visual and acoustical comfort, and air quality). Overall, personnel reported an average of 2.24 work-related symptoms each, and 67.2% of respondents reported at least one. Women suffer more health symptoms than men. Special dispositions, such as smoking and allergies, increase the number of reported symptoms for male and female personnel. Personnel that perceive satisfactory indoor comfort conditions (temperature, humidity, ventilation, light, and noise) average 1.18 symptoms per person, while for satisfactory indoor air quality the average complaints are 0.99. The perception of satisfactory IEQ (satisfactory comfort conditions and air quality) reduces the average number of health complaints to 0.64 symptoms per person and improves working conditions, even in a demanding OR environment. (author)

  7. Accuracy of pre-operative hysteroscopic guided biopsy for predicting final pathology in uterine malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Fabio; Ditto, Antonino; Bogani, Giorgio; Signorelli, Mauro; Chiappa, Valentina; Lorusso, Domenica; Haeusler, Edward; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate concordance (C) between pre-operative hysteroscopic-directed sampling and final pathology in uterine cancers. A retrospective cross-sectional evaluation of prospectively collected data of women who underwent hysterectomy for uterine malignancies and a previous hysteroscopic-guided biopsy was performed. Diagnostic concordance between pre-operative (hysteroscopic biopsy) and postoperative (uterine specimen) histology was evaluated. In endometrioid-endometrial cancers cases Kappa (k) statistics was applied to evaluate agreement for grading (G) between the preoperative and final pathology. A total 101 hysterectomies for uterine malignancies were evaluated. There were 23 non-endometrioid cancers: 7 serous (C:5/7, 71.4%); 10 carcinosarcomas (C:7/10, 70%, remaining 3 cases only epithelial component diagnosed); 3 clear cell (C:3/3, 100%); 3 sarcomas (C:3/3, 100%). In 78 cases an endometrioid endometrial cancer was found. In 63 cases there was a histological C (63/78, 80.8%) between hysteroscopic-guided biopsy and final pathology, while in 15 cases (19.2%) only hyperplasia (with/without atypia) was found preoperatively. Overall accuracy to detect endometrial cancer was 80.2%. In 50 out of 63 endometrial cancers (79.4%) grading was concordant. The overall level of agreement between preoperative and postoperative grading was "substantial" according to Kappa (k) statistics (k 0.64; 95% CI: 0.449-0.83; p < 0.001), as well as for G1 (0.679; 95% CI: 0.432-0.926; p < 0.001) and G3 (0.774; 94% CI: 0.534-1; p < 0.001), while for G2 (0.531; 95% CI: 0.286-0.777; p < 0.001) it was moderate. In our series we found an 80% C between pre-operative hysteroscopic-guided biopsy and final pathology, in uterine malignancies. Moreover, hysteroscopic biopsy accurately predicted endometrial cancer in 80% of cases and "substantially" predicted histological grading. Hysteroscopic-guided uterine sampling could be a useful tool to tailor treatment in patients with uterine

  8. A review on hydrothermal pre-treatment technologies and environmental profiles of algal biomass processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavish; Guo, Miao; Izadpanah, Arash; Shah, Nilay; Hellgardt, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The need for efficient and clean biomass conversion technologies has propelled Hydrothermal (HT) processing as a promising treatment option for biofuel production. This manuscript discussed its application for pre-treatment of microalgae biomass to solid (biochar), liquid (biocrude and biodiesel) and gaseous (hydrogen and methane) products via Hydrothermal Carbonisation (HTC), Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Supercritical Water Gasification (SCWG) as well as the utility of HT water as an extraction medium and HT Hydrotreatment (HDT) of algal biocrude. In addition, the Solar Energy Retained in Fuel (SERF) using HT technologies is calculated and compared with benchmark biofuel. Lastly, the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) discusses the limitation of the current state of art as well as introduction to new potential input categories to obtain a detailed environmental profile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tracing freshwater nitrate sources in pre-alpine groundwater catchments using environmental tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoewer, M. M.; Knöller, K.; Stumpp, C.

    2015-05-01

    Groundwater is one of the main resources for drinking water. Its quality is still threatened by the widespread contaminant nitrate (NO3-). In order to manage groundwater resources in a sustainable manner, we need to find options of lowering nitrate input. Particularly, a comprehensive knowledge of nitrate sources is required in areas which are important current and future drinking water reservoirs such as pre-alpine aquifers covered with permanent grassland. The objective of the present study was to identify major sources of nitrate in groundwater with low mean nitrate concentrations (8 ± 2 mg/L). To achieve the objective, we used environmental tracer approaches in four pre-alpine groundwater catchments. The stable isotope composition and tritium content of water were used to study the hydrogeology and transit times. Furthermore, nitrate stable isotope methods were applied to trace nitrogen from its sources to groundwater. The results of the nitrate isotope analysis showed that groundwater nitrate was derived from nitrification of a variety of ammonium sources such as atmospheric deposition, mineral and organic fertilizers and soil organic matter. A direct influence of mineral fertilizer, atmospheric deposition and sewage was excluded. Since temporal variation in stable isotopes of nitrate were detected only in surface water and locally at one groundwater monitoring well, aquifers appeared to be well mixed and influenced by a continuous nitrate input mainly from soil derived nitrogen. Hydrogeological analysis supported that the investigated aquifers were less vulnerable to rapid impacts due to long average transit times, ranging from 5 to 21 years. Our study revealed the importance of combining environmental tracer approaches and a comprehensive sampling campaign (local sources of nitrate, soil water, river water, and groundwater) to identify the nitrate sources in groundwater and its vulnerability. In future, the achieved results will help develop targeted

  10. Operation and control strategies in pre-series testing of cold circulating pumps for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Vaghela, H.; Sarkar, B.; Srinivas, M.; Choukekar, K.

    2013-01-01

    Cryo-distribution system of ITER is responsible for the distribution and control of forced-flow supercritical helium for cooling of the superconducting magnets and the cryo-pumps. The requirements of cold circulating pumps (CCP) for mass flow rates and performance are much higher than presently existing and commercially available one used at 4.0 K helium. Design up-scaling with pre-series test of CCP has been proposed including test infrastructure. Operation and control strategies for the test distribution box (TDB) of test infrastructure have been developed and analyzed using steady state and dynamic process simulation to cope with the functional requirements of CCPs. Off-normal scenario with CCP inlet pressure variation is an important concern, dynamic process responses during such scenario have been evaluated to verify the operability of CCP. The paper describes process simulation to cope with the functional requirements of CCPs along with evaluation of off-normal scenario to verify the operability of CCP. (author)

  11. Pre-planned versus unplanned decision making in the case of environmental decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Tranjan Filho, A.

    2000-01-01

    Until a few years ago it was not usual to pre-plan realistic countermeasures directly related to a radiological emergency or a nuclear accident (RENA), mostly because the probability of occurrence of such events was considered to be too low for real concern. The Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Goiania accidents, however, changed long accepted views of the decision making community throughout the world. Today, meetings are being held just to discuss how one can go about making decisions to face the problems that may occur in a number of RENAs. The present work will examine several well established scientifically based radiological criteria to be used in decision making processes concerning either radioactive decontamination following a severe RENA, or decommissioning procedures. Such criteria can certainly be used to select pre-planned countermeasures, but can also be helpful as guidance to decision makers when facing a choice of untested and unplanned options. Selected advantages and disadvantages of each criterion based option will be presented and briefly discussed, as, for example, the amount of radioactive waste produced vis-B-vis the risk (concentration or projected dose) level adopted in the decontamination procedures. In addition, non-scientific aspects will be brought into the discussion, because their social, economical, and political implications cannot be ignored by responsible decision makers. Uncertainties associated with both non-scientific aspects and scientifically based environmental and dosimetric models will also be examined for specific cases. (author)

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL AND GENETIC INFLUENCES ON PRE-WEANING DAILY WEIGHT GAIN IN TEDDY GOAT KIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Ullah Hyder, Pervez Akhtar and Omer Usman Haider

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Records belonging to 1248 Teddy goats kept at the Livestock Production Research Institute, Bahadurnagar, (Okara, Pakistan were analyzed to identify genetic and environmental factors affecting pre-weaning average daily weight gain. Sex of kid, season and year of kidding affected average daily weight gain significantly (P<0.01. Male kids gained at a faster rate (111.00 ± 6.01 g/day than female kids (106.00 ± 6.06 g per day. The kids born in summer gained 108.90 + 1.3 g per day, which. was lower (P<0.01 than winter born kids ( 115.4 ± 1.4 9 per day. Different years of birth had shown gradual decrease in pre-weaning average daily gains. The effects of. parity of dam and birth type were found to be non-significant. Habitability estimate for daily weight gain was 0.12 ± 0.06. The phenotypic and genetic trends were negative.

  13. Operational approach to the environmental problems in the developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amsyari, F

    1980-01-01

    Environmental programs associated with socioeconomic development are examined. In most developing countries, environmental problems affecting human health are connected with poverty, over-population, and biological pollutants. An analysis of the environmental problems associated with socioeconomic development in Surabaya City, Indonesia, is presented. An analytical methodology and a mathematical model for an integrated environmental program are described. (1 diagram, 5 references, 5 tables)

  14. Effect of investments on fundamentals and market reaction on pre-operational and operational Brazilian companies for the period 2006-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Pereira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper provides evidence on the market reaction to corporate investment decisions whose shareholder value is largely attributed to growth options. The exploratory research raised pre-operational companies and their operational pairs on the same economy segments. It had the purpose of investigating the existence of statistical differentiation from financial indicators that reflect the installed assets and growth assets, and then study the market reaction to changes in fixed assets as a signaling element about investment decisions. The formation process of operational assets and shareholder value almost exclusively dependent on asset growth stands out in the pre-operational companies. As a result, differentiation tests confirmed that the pre-operational companies had their value especially derived on growth options. The market reaction was particularly bigger in pre-operational companies with abnormal negative stock returns, while the operational companies had positive returns, which may indicate that the quality of the investment is judged based on the financial disclosure. Additionally, operational companies' investors await the disclosure to adjust their prices. We conclude that the results are consistent with the empirical evidence and the participants in financial markets to long-term capital formation investments should give that special attention.

  15. ART THERAPY MANAGEMENT IN THE PRE-OPERATIVE PERIOD IN PEDIATRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Afonso Valladares

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Every child, particularly those who will be submitted to surgery, needs to express themselves, createand establish relationships with the world. This study was based on qualitative studies which were, in turn,substantiated on the behavioral changes of patients and their images. It was developed in the pediatric clinic of apublic hospital in the city of Goiânia/GO in a two years’ period (1998-2000. The target population consisted ofhospitalized children in the pre-operative process. It was concluded that great therapeutic benefit was achievedfrom the use of art therapy for this population as it helped the children to recover their mental balance, thusstrengthening a healthier side of the child which had been deadened by the illness, hospitalization and treatment.

  16. Clinical value of pre-operative embolization of maxillary artery for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Wenke; Shan Hong; Zhu Kangshun; Jiang Zabo; Guan Shouhai; Huang Mingsheng; Li Zhengran; Shen Xinying

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of pre-operative embolization for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Methods: 13 patients with nasopharyngeal angiofibroma confirmed by surgery and biopsy were retrospectively analysed. Bilateral carotid artery angiography was performed for demonstration of the arterial supply of tumor. According to the size and different caliber of arteries, embolization were separately undertaken by different types of coil via 4.1 or 5F Head-Hunter catheter. The embolization efficacy, embolization was evaluated by amount of blood loss. Results: After coil embolization, no complication happened ranging 1-4 days (mean 2 days) in all 13 patients and then all the tumor masses were totally resected with mean blood loss of (584.6 ± 379.4) ml (range 250-1500 ml). Conclusions: Preoperative coils embolization is safe, reliable with less complication especially for reducing intraoperative blood loss and promoting the prognosis. (authors)

  17. Vascular involvement in pancreatic carcinoma. Pre-operative assessment by multislice CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Huawei; Guan Yongjing; Ding Bei; Lin Xiaozhu; Zhang Huan; Chen Kemin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) in the pre-operative assessment of vascular involvement in pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: 33 cases with pathologically proven pancreatic carcinoma underwent MSCTA prior to surgical intervention. The MSCTA findings in each of the 33 patients were evaluated prospectively by four radiologists. Vascular involvement of pancreatic carcinoma was validated at the time of surgery, which was a reference standard for comparison. Correlation was made between MSCTA findings and surgical results. Results: 11 out of 33 cases with pancreatic carcinoma were considered to be resectable by MSCTA with a positive predictive value of 82% in comparison with surgical findings. MSCTA also had high correlation with surgical results in assessing the non-resectability of pancreatic carcinoma (positive predictive value =95%). Conclusion: MSCTA could delineate the vascular involvement of pancreatic carcinoma with high accuracy and provided valuable information in the preoperative assessment of pancreatic carcinoma

  18. Using 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-operative evaluation of tongue carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, K F; Cornelius, R S; Lucas, F V; Meinzen-Derr, J; Patil, Y J

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the role of 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in predicting tongue tumour thickness via direct and reconstructed measures, and their correlations with corresponding histological measures, nodal metastasis and extracapsular spread. A prospective study was conducted of 25 patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and pre-operative 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging from 2009 to 2012. Correlations between 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and histological measures of tongue tumour thickness were assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient: r values were 0.84 (p Tesla magnetic resonance imaging had 83 per cent sensitivity, 82 per cent specificity, 82 per cent accuracy and a 90 per cent negative predictive value for detecting cervical lymph node metastasis. In this cohort, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging measures of tumour thickness correlated highly with the corresponding histological measures. Further, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging was an effective method of detecting malignant adenopathy with extracapsular spread.

  19. Role of B-scan ultrasonography in pre-operative cataract patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Manzoor A; Laghari, Khalida

    2010-01-01

    To visualize the posterior portion of eye globe in dense cataract patients with B scan ultrasound, and to find out any posterior segment lesion in such pre-operative cases. We performed diagnostic B-scan ultrasound on 750 cataract patients before surgery. This was a prospective diagnostic study which was conducted in the Department of Opthalmology, Liaquat University Eye Hospital, Hyderabad Sind, Pakistan from January 2007 to July 2007. Detailed history and some basic eye examination techniques, like slit lamp and tonometry were done in two groups of patients, traumatic (71) and non traumatic(679). Patients in the age range of 1 to 79 years of both sexes were included. Patients having already posterior segment lesions and those who had previous history of ocular surgery were excluded from the study. An ultrasound machine Nidek Echo Scan Model US-3300 with a probe of direct contact was used. Out of 750 patients, 90 patients had posterior segment lesions. Among traumatic group of 71 patients, 39 (55%) had positive posterior segment lesions, while in the non traumatic group of 679 patients, only 51 (7%) cases had positive posterior segment lesions. Out of the 90 positive cases, 25 (3%) had retinal detachment, 14 (2%) had posterior vitreous detachment, 24 (3%) had vitreous hemorrhage, 12 (2%) were asteroid hyolosis, while posterior staphyloma and intra-ocular foreign body were found with the frequency of 9 (1.2%) and 6 (1%), respectively. We concluded that two dimensional B-scan ultrasound can be one of the diagnostic tool for the detection of hidden posterior segment lesions and can be performed routinely in pre-operative cataract patients, as this would help in surgical planning. In cases, where a two dimensional B-scan is not sufficient or helpful. a three dimensional ultrasound would be justified.

  20. Combining task-evoked and spontaneous activity to improve pre-operative brain mapping with fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Michael D.; Qian, Tianyi; Madsen, Joseph R.; Wang, Danhong; Li, Meiling; Ge, Manling; Zuo, Huan-cong; Groppe, David M.; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Hong, Bo; Liu, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive localization of brain function is used to understand and treat neurological disease, exemplified by pre-operative fMRI mapping prior to neurosurgical intervention. The principal approach for generating these maps relies on brain responses evoked by a task and, despite known limitations, has dominated clinical practice for over 20 years. Recently, pre-operative fMRI mapping based on correlations in spontaneous brain activity has been demonstrated, however this approach has its own limitations and has not seen widespread clinical use. Here we show that spontaneous and task-based mapping can be performed together using the same pre-operative fMRI data, provide complimentary information relevant for functional localization, and can be combined to improve identification of eloquent motor cortex. Accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of our approach are quantified through comparison with electrical cortical stimulation mapping in eight patients with intractable epilepsy. Broad applicability and reproducibility of our approach is demonstrated through prospective replication in an independent dataset of six patients from a different center. In both cohorts and every individual patient, we see a significant improvement in signal to noise and mapping accuracy independent of threshold, quantified using receiver operating characteristic curves. Collectively, our results suggest that modifying the processing of fMRI data to incorporate both task-based and spontaneous activity significantly improves functional localization in pre-operative patients. Because this method requires no additional scan time or modification to conventional pre-operative data acquisition protocols it could have widespread utility. PMID:26408860

  1. A comparison of pre- and post-operational hydrographic data of a coastal waters near a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpathy, K.K.; Nair, K.V.K.

    1998-01-01

    Data gathered on air and water temperature, salinity, DO, suspended matter (SM) and water transparency over a period of 11 years (1980-90) from the coastal waters in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant were analysed to assess the impact of power plant operation on the physico-chemical properties of coastal waters. The major change observed in water temperature from pre-operational to the post-operational was a slight flatterning of the monthly average curve showing a more even distribution during the latter period. Salinity data did not show any change between the pre- and post-operational periods. Monthly variations in DO values during the post-operational period were larger as compared to the pre-operational period. Post-operational period showed a marginal increase in SM content and a decrease in water transparency as compared to the pre-operational period. Results of ANOVA indicated the existence of a significant difference between seasons for air and water temperature, salinity, DO, SM and water transparency. An increasing trend for atmospheric temperature (0.0036 deg C/ year), SM content (1.54 mg/l/year) and decreasing trend for surface water temperature (0.0184 deg C/year), salinity (0.094 x10 -3 /year), DO (0.0052 mg/l/year) and Secchi disc depth (0.037 m/year) from 1980 was observed. (author)

  2. Phase I dose escalating trial of hyperfractionated pre-operative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Lanciano, Rachelle; Scher, Richard M.; Weiner, Louis M.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John P.; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Cooper, Harry S.; Provins, Susan; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the acute toxicity, post-operative complications, pathologic response and extent of downstaging to high dose pre-operative radiation using a hyperfractionated radiation boost and concurrent chemotherapy in a prospective Phase I trial. Materials and Methods: To be eligible for this study, patients had to have adenocarcinoma of the rectum less than 12 cm from the anal verge with either Stage T4 or T3 but greater than 4 cm or greater than 40% of the bowel circumference. All patients received 45 Gy pelvic radiation (1.8 Gy per fraction). Subsequent radiation was given to the region of the gross tumor with a 2 cm margin. This 'boost' treatment was given at 1.2 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54.6 Gy for Level I, 57 Gy for Level II, and 61.8 Gy for Level III. 5-FU was given at 1g/m 2 over 24 hours for a four day infusion during the first and sixth weeks of radiation, with the second course concurrent with the hyperfractionated radiation. Surgical resection was carried out 4-6 weeks following completion of chemoradiation (in curative cases) and additional adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of 5-FU and Leucovorin was given for an additional 4 monthly cycles Days 1 through 5 beginning four weeks post surgery. Results: Twenty-seven patients, age 40-82 (median 61), completed the initial course of chemoradiation and are included in the analysis of toxicity. The median follow-up is 27 months (range 8-68). Eleven patients were treated to a dose of 54.6 Gy, nine patients to 57 Gy, and seven patients to 61.8 Gy. Twenty-one patients had T3 tumors, and six patients T4 tumors. Grade III acute toxicity from chemoradiation included proctitis (5 patients), dermatitis (9), diarrhea (five), leukopenia (1), cardiac (1). Grade IV toxicities included one patient with diarrhea (on dose Level I) and one patient (on dose Level III) with cardiac toxicity (unrelated to radiation). Surgical resection consisted of abdominal perineal resection in 16 and low anterior resection

  3. Environmental Assessment for Operations, Upgrades, and Consolidation at the Western Command Site, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Mexico Environmental Geo ra hie InformationS stem Source: NNSA AOWC Agent Operations Westem Command ER Environmental restoration NNSA National...8217)’ UU1’ Cll TONGA TE J)oputy Secretaey RE: Kirtland Air Force Dase~ Environmental Assessment for Operations, Upgrades and Consolidation at the Western

  4. The ability of conservation and seriation in the transition from the pre-operational stage to the stage of concrete logical operations

    OpenAIRE

    Zadnikar Rupnik, Daša

    2016-01-01

    In the theoretical part of the thesis I closely addressed the Piaget's theory from the field of children's thinking. I described four stages of cognitive development as defined by Piaget. I focused on cognitive operations which are characteristic of the transition from the pre-operational stage to the stage of concrete logical operations, namely conservation and seriation. I summarized certain reviews of the Piaget's theory and described the use of the Piaget's theory in education. A part of ...

  5. Columbia River system operation review. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This study attempts to identify and analyze the impacts of the System Operating Strategy (SOS) alternatives on cultural resources. The impacts include effects on Native American traditional cultural values, properties and practices. They also include effects on archeological or historic properties meeting the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to responding to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this analysis addresses the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the Native American Religious Freedom Act (NARFA), and other relevant legislation. To meet their legally mandated cultural resources requirements, the SOR agencies will develop agreements and Implementation Plans with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), Tribes, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) detailing the measures necessary to best manage the resource. The planning and implementation activities will be staged over a number of years in consultation with affected Tribes

  6. Westinghouse Hanford Company Operational Environmental Monitoring. Annual report, CY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Perkins, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1993 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sediments, soil, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite conditions, the differences are less than in previous years. At certain locations on or directly adjacent to nuclear facilities and waste sites, levels can be several times higher than offsite conditions

  7. Environmental Restoration Operations Consolidated Quarterly Report: July-September 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This Environmental Restoration Operations (ER) Consolidated Quarterly Report (ER Quarterly Report) provides the status of ongoing corrective action activities being implemented at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) during the July, August, and September 2016 quarterly reporting period. The Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) identified for corrective action at SNL/NM are listed in Table I-1. Sections I.2.1 and I.2.2 summarize the work completed during this quarter. Section I.2.1 summarizes the quarterly activities at sites undergoing corrective action field activities. Field activities are conducted at the three groundwater AOCs (Burn Site Groundwater [BSG AOC], Technical Area [TA]-V Groundwater [TAVG AOC], and Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater [TAG AOC]). Section I.2.2 summarizes quarterly activities at sites where the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) issued a certificate of completion and the sites are in the corrective action complete (CAC) regulatory process. Currently, SWMUs 8 and 58, 68, 149, 154, and 502 are in the CAC regulatory process. Corrective action activities are deferred at the Long Sled Track (SWMU 83), the Gun Facilities (SWMU 84), and the Short Sled Track (SWMU 240) because these three sites are active mission facilities. These three active sites are located in TA-III.

  8. Core instrumentation and pre-operational procedures for core conversion HEU to LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report is intended for the reactor operator, to be used as a manual or checklist for general guidance on pre-startup activities that need to be addressed in preparation for conversion to Low Enriched Fuel (LEU). All nuclear, thermodynamic and safety calculations should have been performed prior to this stage of the core conversion process. During these calculations and certainly before ordering the new LEU fuel elements the reactor operator needs to very carefully consider additional important factors concerning the new fuel: fuel reliability, reliability of fuel fabricator, reprocessing contract or fuel element storage and disposal, economics of the new fuel cycle. At this stage, too, a preoperational experimental programme has to be developed and presented to the regulatory authorities for approval. This experimental programme could lead to additional requirements on: in-core instrumentation, out-of-core instrumentation or additional experimental devices. Detailed instructions on specific tests and measurements are not provided in this report since much information on the subject is available in the open literature

  9. Conception, construction, and taking into operation of a pre-accelerator system at ELSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klarner, Fabian

    2011-01-01

    In order to enhance the operating capabilities of the Bonn University Accelerator Facility ELSA by a single pulse mode, a new injector was designed, built up and successfully commissioned. In addition, the new injector was designed to provide an unpolarized electron beam with increased current to the external hadron physics experiments. For this purpose, the injector will produce an 1-3 microseconds long pulse of 900 mA beam current or a single electron bunch with 1.5 A pulse current. For single bunch operation, a 1.5 ns long pulse is produced by a thermal electron source, then compressed and pre-accelerated by a subsequent resonator and a four-cell travelling wave buncher. After acceleration of the electrons in the main linac, the natural broadening of the energy distribution in the particle ensemble due to the acceleration process will be reduced by an energy compressor system. By the succeeding optical elements in the transfer beamline, the beam is guided to the synchrotron, taking into account the requirements for injection into the synchrotron including its acceptance. Finally, the first beam of the new LINAC1 section was successfully used to irradiate ammonia for preparation as polarized target material for the COMPASS experiment and to irradiate detector components of the DEPFET project. (orig.)

  10. Advance pre-operative chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywiel, Michael G; Daley, Jacqueline A; Delanois, Ronald E; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Surgical site infections following elective knee arthroplasties occur most commonly as a result of colonisation by the patient's native skin flora. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of deep surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty patients who used an advance cutaneous disinfection protocol and who were compared to patients who had peri-operative preparation only. All adult reconstruction surgeons at a single institution were approached to voluntarily provide patients with chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths and a printed sheet instructing their use the night before and morning of surgery. Records for all knee arthroplasties performed between January 2007 and December 2008 were reviewed to determine the incidence of deep incisional and periprosthetic surgical site infections. Overall, the advance pre-operative protocol was used in 136 of 912 total knee arthroplasties (15%). A lower incidence of surgical site infection was found in patients who used the advance cutaneous preparation protocol as compared to patients who used the in-hospital protocol alone. These findings were maintained when patients were stratified by surgical infection risk category. No surgical site infections occurred in the 136 patients who completed the protocol as compared to 21 infections in 711 procedures (3.0%) performed in patients who did not. Patient-directed skin disinfection using chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths the evening before, and the morning of, elective knee arthroplasty appeared to effectively reduce the incidence of surgical site infection when compared to patients who underwent in-hospital skin preparation only.

  11. 77 FR 24979 - Plan of Operations, Environmental Assessment, Big Thicket National Preserve, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [7148-NZY] Plan of Operations, Environmental.... ACTION: Notice of Availability of a Plan of Operations and Environmental Assessment for a 30-day public... Energy Company (Cimarex), a Plan of Operations to conduct the Rivers Edge 3-D Seismic Survey within the...

  12. Short-term pre- and post-operative stress prolongs incision-induced pain hypersensitivity without changing basal pain perception

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jing; Wang, Po-Kai; Tiwari, Vinod; Liang, Lingli; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Shieh, Kun-Ruey; Zang, Wei-Dong; Kaufman, Andrew G.; Bekker, Alex; Gao, Xiao-Qun; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic stress has been reported to increase basal pain sensitivity and/or exacerbate existing persistent pain. However, most surgical patients have normal physiological and psychological health status such as normal pain perception before surgery although they do experience short-term stress during pre- and post-operative periods. Whether or not this short-term stress affects persistent postsurgical pain is unclear. Results In this study, we showed that pre- or post-surgical expos...

  13. Rescue pre-operative treatment with Lugol's solution in uncontrolled Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calissendorff, Jan; Falhammar, Henrik

    2017-05-01

    Graves' disease is a common cause of hyperthyroidism. Three therapies have been used for decades: pharmacologic therapy, surgery and radioiodine. In case of adverse events, especially agranulocytosis or hepatotoxicity, pre-treatment with Lugol's solution containing iodine/potassium iodide to induce euthyroidism before surgery could be advocated, but this has rarely been reported. All patients hospitalised due to uncontrolled hyperthyroidism at the Karolinska University Hospital 2005-2015 and treated with Lugol's solution were included. All electronic files were carefully reviewed manually, with focus on the cause of treatment and admission, demographic data, and effects of iodine on thyroid hormone levels and pulse frequency. Twenty-seven patients were included. Lugol's solution had been chosen due to agranulocytosis in 9 (33%), hepatotoxicity in 2 (7%), other side effects in 11 (41%) and poor adherence to medication in 5 (19%). Levels of free T4, free T3 and heart rate decreased significantly after 5-9 days of iodine therapy (free T4 53-20 pmol/L, P  = 0.0002; free T3 20-6.5 pmol/L, P  = 0.04; heart rate 87-76 beats/min P  = 0.0007), whereas TSH remained unchanged. Side effects were noted in 4 (15%) (rash n  = 2, rash and vomiting n  = 1, swelling of fingers n  = 1). Thyroidectomy was performed in 26 patients (96%) and one was treated with radioiodine; all treatments were without serious complications. Treatment of uncontrolled hyperthyroidism with Lugol's solution before definitive treatment is safe and it decreases thyroid hormone levels and heart rate. Side effects were limited. Lugol's solution could be recommended pre-operatively in Graves' disease with failed medical treatment, especially if side effects to anti-thyroid drugs have occurred. © 2017 The authors.

  14. Rescue pre-operative treatment with Lugol’s solution in uncontrolled Graves’ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Calissendorff

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Graves’ disease is a common cause of hyperthyroidism. Three therapies have been used for decades: pharmacologic therapy, surgery and radioiodine. In case of adverse events, especially agranulocytosis or hepatotoxicity, pre-treatment with Lugol’s solution containing iodine/potassium iodide to induce euthyroidism before surgery could be advocated, but this has rarely been reported. Methods: All patients hospitalised due to uncontrolled hyperthyroidism at the Karolinska University Hospital 2005–2015 and treated with Lugol’s solution were included. All electronic files were carefully reviewed manually, with focus on the cause of treatment and admission, demographic data, and effects of iodine on thyroid hormone levels and pulse frequency. Results: Twenty-seven patients were included. Lugol’s solution had been chosen due to agranulocytosis in 9 (33%, hepatotoxicity in 2 (7%, other side effects in 11 (41% and poor adherence to medication in 5 (19%. Levels of free T4, free T3 and heart rate decreased significantly after 5–9 days of iodine therapy (free T4 53–20 pmol/L, P = 0.0002; free T3 20–6.5 pmol/L, P = 0.04; heart rate 87–76 beats/min P = 0.0007, whereas TSH remained unchanged. Side effects were noted in 4 (15% (rash n = 2, rash and vomiting n = 1, swelling of fingers n = 1. Thyroidectomy was performed in 26 patients (96% and one was treated with radioiodine; all treatments were without serious complications. Conclusion: Treatment of uncontrolled hyperthyroidism with Lugol’s solution before definitive treatment is safe and it decreases thyroid hormone levels and heart rate. Side effects were limited. Lugol’s solution could be recommended pre-operatively in Graves’ disease with failed medical treatment, especially if side effects to anti-thyroid drugs have occurred.

  15. Assessment of 99Tcm-ethylenedicysteine diuretic renography in pre-and post-operative pediatric congenital hydronephrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhiyi; Wang Hui; Li Jianing; Fu Hongliang; Wu Jingchuan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of 99 Tc m -ethylenedicysteine (EC) diuretic renography (DR) in pre-and post-operative pediatric congenital hydronephrosis. Methods: The DR with injection of Furosemide at 15 min of forty children with hydronephrosis was retrospectively studied. The preoperative renal blood perfusion rate (BPR), effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), grade of hydronephrosis,renogram and renal dynamic imaging of pre- and post-operative kidneys were compared. The t-test and Mann-Whitney test were used for data analysis. Results: (1) Of 40 pathological kidneys, the BPR increased 5.99% (t=-5.13, P<0.01) from pre-operative to post-operative: (34.05 ± 11.07)% to (40.04 ± 8.56)%. The ERPF increased 12.48 ml/min (t=-4.35, P<0.01) from pre-operative to post-operative: (57.81 ± 34.32) ml/min to (70.29 ± 5.37) ml/min. (2) The grade of hydronephrosis of 40 pathological kidneys improved significantly(Z=-2.64, P<0.01) with the mean sum of ranks of 47.21 pre-operatively to 33.79 post-operatively.(3) As the hydronephrosis worsened, the collecting system became bigger, the renal parenchyma became thinner, the extent of intrarenal parenchymal photopenia became larger and the response to diuretic challenge in pathological kidneys decreased or became totally irresponsive. (4)Thirty-seven cases of obstruction at ureteropelvic junction (UPJO) and 3 cases at ureterovesical junction (UVJO) were diagnosed by DR, which were all confirmed by surgery. Conclusions: DR is a reliable method to evaluate pediatric congenital hydronephrosis.It can accurately reflect the grade and (or) severity of the disease, guide therapy and assess the therapeutic success of operation. (authors)

  16. Sociodemographic, behavioural and environmental correlates of sweetened beverage consumption among pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabayo, Roman; Spence, John C; Cutumisu, Nicoleta; Casey, Linda; Storey, Kate

    2012-08-01

    To identify sociodemographic and environmental correlates of sweetened beverages (regular soft drinks, fruit juice) among children of pre-school age. Children's dietary intake, food behaviours and screen time were measured by parental report. A Geographic Informational System was used to assess the number of grocery stores and fast-food restaurants available within 1 km of the children's residence. Multivariate log-binomial regression models were constructed to determine correlates of drinking soft drinks during the previous week. Edmonton region, Canada. Children aged 4 and 5 years (n 2114) attending a public health unit for immunization were recruited for a cohort study on determinants of childhood obesity, between 2005 and 2007. Children from neighbourhoods with low socio-economic status (relative risk (RR) = 1·17, 95 % CI 0·98, 1·40) or who participated in >2 h of screen time daily (RR = 1·28, 95 % CI 1·13, 1·45) were significantly more likely to have consumed regular soft drinks within the last week. Those who lived within 1 km of a grocery store were significantly less likely to consume regular soft drinks (RR = 0·84, 95 % CI 0·73, 0·96). Children who participated in >2 h of screen time daily (RR = 1·16, 95 % CI 1·06, 1·27) were more likely to exceed the recommended weekly number of servings of fruit juice. Socio-economic and built environment factors are associated with soft drink consumption in children of pre-school age. These findings may help health professionals to advocate for policies that reduce soft drink consumption among children.

  17. Safety Culture Perspective. Managing the pre Managing the pre-operational phases of new NPPs and creating the safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, Pamela B.; Oh, Chaewoon; Dahlgren Persson, Kerstin; Carnino, Annick

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear safety is a key for the revival of nuclear energy future programmes. Lots of competent people will be needed worldwide for ensuring the safety of the installations both existing ones and future ones. Their expertise should range from design to operation, from regulatory role to operators, from fuel fabrication to waste disposal. The challenge in front of us will be to prepare for the right recruitment, the development of the needed expertise in order to face the demand in developed countries, in countries with economies in transition and in developing countries. Time allocated for the panel does not allow for covering all aspects but the panelists will cover some of the important aspects of the challenge in terms of needs, of new competencies, of learning from operation and licensing requirements including for new designs. The key objectives of the panel are: 1- Maintaining safe operation, learning from experience, licensing including aging management and re-licensing with safety improvements for existing installations: - Presentation by Junko Ogawa of the experience and lessons learned from the earthquake on Kashiwasaki Kariwa NPP: effects in terms of manpower involved in the investigation, effects on regulations and licensing, expertise used. - Presentation by Pamela Cowan of her experience in preparing licensing actions, regulatory compliance and interface with the Regulator for both operating plants and modern requirements for constructing new ones. 2 - Special training needed for the human aspect of safety: what are the challenges in areas of safety culture and management of safety: - Presentation by Chae Woon Oh of the Korean safety culture features developed nationally, at the regulator and at the operating organizations and their integration within the safety training programmes. - Presentation by Kerstin Dahlgren Person of the needs in terms of safety culture and safety management, in terms of expertise, practitioners and assessors. 3 - How to

  18. Safety Culture Perspective. Managing the pre Managing the pre-operational phases of new NPPs and creating the safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Pamela B. [Exelon Generation, 200 Exelon Way, 19348 Kennett Square, PA 19348 (United States); Oh, Chaewoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Gusung-Dong, Yuseong-Ku, 305-338 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Dahlgren Persson, Kerstin [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 100 A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Carnino, Annick [IAEA, Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 100 A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear safety is a key for the revival of nuclear energy future programmes. Lots of competent people will be needed worldwide for ensuring the safety of the installations both existing ones and future ones. Their expertise should range from design to operation, from regulatory role to operators, from fuel fabrication to waste disposal. The challenge in front of us will be to prepare for the right recruitment, the development of the needed expertise in order to face the demand in developed countries, in countries with economies in transition and in developing countries. Time allocated for the panel does not allow for covering all aspects but the panelists will cover some of the important aspects of the challenge in terms of needs, of new competencies, of learning from operation and licensing requirements including for new designs. The key objectives of the panel are: 1- Maintaining safe operation, learning from experience, licensing including aging management and re-licensing with safety improvements for existing installations: - Presentation by Junko Ogawa of the experience and lessons learned from the earthquake on Kashiwasaki Kariwa NPP: effects in terms of manpower involved in the investigation, effects on regulations and licensing, expertise used. - Presentation by Pamela Cowan of her experience in preparing licensing actions, regulatory compliance and interface with the Regulator for both operating plants and modern requirements for constructing new ones. 2 - Special training needed for the human aspect of safety: what are the challenges in areas of safety culture and management of safety: - Presentation by Chae Woon Oh of the Korean safety culture features developed nationally, at the regulator and at the operating organizations and their integration within the safety training programmes. - Presentation by Kerstin Dahlgren Person of the needs in terms of safety culture and safety management, in terms of expertise, practitioners and assessors. 3 - How to

  19. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Security Forces Operations Facility, Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meyer, Elizabeth; Myklebust, Jessica; Denier, James; Christner, Jennifer; Fontaine, Kathyrn

    2006-01-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) has prepared this EA in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act to evaluate the potential environmental and social impacts from the construction and operation of the proposed SFOF...

  20. Green Warriors: Army Environmental Considerations for Contingency Operations from Planning through Post-Conflict

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mosher, David E; Lachman, Beth E; Greenberg, Michael D; Nichols, Tiffany; Rosen, Brian; Willis, Henry H

    2008-01-01

    .... Army conducts overseas. Countries in which the Army conducts operations tend to have environmental problems caused by industrialization, lack of environmental protection, long-running conflict, and natural conditions...

  1. Phase I dose escalating trial of hyperfractinated pre-operative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Lanciano, Rachelle M.; Scher, Richard M.; Weiner, Louis M.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John P.; Cooper, Harry S.; Provins, Susan; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the acute toxicity, post-operative complications, pathologic response and extent of downstaging to high dose pre-operative radiation using hyperfractionated radiation boost and concurrent chemotherapy in a prospective Phase I trial. MATERIALS and METHODS: To be eligible for this study, patients had to have adenocarcinoma of the rectum less than 12 cm from the anal verge with either Stage T4 or T3 but greater than 4 cm or greater than 40% of the bowel circumference. Pre-operative T-stage was based on digital rectal examination (DRE), endorectal ultrasound or Helmholtz coil pelvic MRI. All patients received 45 Gy pelvic radiation (1.8 Gy per fraction). Subsequent radiation was given to the region of the gross tumor with a 2 cm margin in all directions with the aid of CT simulation. This 'boost' treatment was given at 1.2 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54.6 Gy for Level I, 57 Gy for Level II, and 61.8 Gy for Level III. 5-FU was given at 1g/m 2 over 24 hours for a four day infusion during the first and fifth weeks of radiation, with the second course concurrent with the hyperfractionated radiation. Surgical resection was to be carried out four to six weeks following completion of chemoradiation (in curative cases) and additional adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of 5-FU and Leucovorin was to be given for an additional four monthly cycles Days 1 through 5 beginning four weeks post surgery. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients, age 40-82 (median 61), completed the initial course of chemoradiation and are included in the analysis of toxicity. The median follow-up is 24 months (range 8-39). Eleven patients were treated to a dose of 54.6 Gy, nine patients to 57 Gy, and seven patients to 61.8 Gy. Twenty-one patients had T3 tumors, and six patients T4 tumors. Median tumor length was 5 cm, median diameter 4 cm, and circumferential involvement greater than (1(3)) was present in 20 patients. Nine patients had primaries that were fixed or tethered on DRE. Grade

  2. Global Environmental Micro Sensors Test Operations in the Natural Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark L.; Buza, Matthew; Manobianco, John; Merceret, Francis J.

    2007-01-01

    ENSCO, Inc. is developing an innovative atmospheric observing system known as Global Environmental Micro Sensors (GEMS). The GEMS concept features an integrated system of miniaturized in situ, airborne probes measuring temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and vector wind velocity. In order for the probes to remain airborne for long periods of time, their design is based on a helium-filled super-pressure balloon. The GEMS probes are neutrally buoyant and carried passively by the wind at predetermined levels. Each probe contains onboard satellite communication, power generation, processing, and geolocation capabilities. ENSCO has partnered with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for a project called GEMS Test Operations in the Natural Environment (GEMSTONE) that will culminate with limited prototype flights of the system in spring 2007. By leveraging current advances in micro and nanotechnology, the probe mass, size, cost, and complexity can be reduced substantially so that large numbers of probes could be deployed routinely to support ground, launch, and landing operations at KSC and other locations. A full-scale system will improve the data density for the local initialization of high-resolution numerical weather prediction systems by at least an order of magnitude and provide a significantly expanded in situ data base to evaluate launch commit criteria and flight rules. When applied to launch or landing sites, this capability will reduce both weather hazards and weather-related scrubs, thus enhancing both safety and cost-avoidance for vehicles processed by the Shuttle, Launch Services Program, and Constellation Directorates. The GEMSTONE project will conclude with a field experiment in which 10 to 15 probes are released over KSC in east central Florida. The probes will be neutrally buoyant at different altitudes from 500 to 3000 meters and will report their position, speed, heading, temperature, humidity, and

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the semi-quantitative, pre-operative assessment of patients undergoing spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasby, Michael A; Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Henderson, Lindsay; Horsburgh, Gillian; Jordan, Brian; Michaelson, Ciara; Adams, Christopher I; Garrido, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    To compare measurements of motor evoked potential latency stimulated either magnetically (mMEP) or electrically (eMEP) and central motor conduction time (CMCT) made pre-operatively in conscious patients using transcranial and intra-operatively using electrical cortical stimulation before and after successful instrumentation for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A group initially of 51 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis aged 12-19 years was evaluated pre-operatively in the outpatients' department with transcranial magnetic stimulation. The neurophysiological data were then compared statistically with intra-operative responses elicited by transcranial electrical stimulation both before and after successful surgical intervention. MEPs were measured as the cortically evoked compound action potentials of Abductor hallucis. Minimum F-waves were measured using conventional nerve conduction methods and the lower motor neuron conduction time was calculated and this was subtracted from MEP latency to give CMCT. Pre-operative testing was well tolerated in our paediatric/adolescent patients. No neurological injury occurred in any patient in this series. There was no significant difference in the values of mMEP and eMEP latencies seen pre-operatively in conscious patients and intra-operatively in patients under anaesthetic. The calculated quantities mCMCT and eCMCT showed the same statistical correlations as the quantities mMEP and eMEP latency. The congruency of mMEP and eMEP and of mCMCT and eCMCT suggests that these measurements may be used comparatively and semi-quantitatively for the comparison of pre-, intra-, and post-operative spinal cord function in spinal deformity surgery.

  4. Patient-specific instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty does not match the pre-operative plan as assessed by intra-operative computer-assisted navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, Corey; Sahni, Varun; Lustig, Sebastien; Parker, David A; Coolican, Myles R J

    2014-03-01

    The introduction of patient-specific instruments (PSI) for guiding bone cuts could increase the incidence of malalignment in primary total knee arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to assess the agreement between one type of patient-specific instrumentation (Zimmer PSI) and the pre-operative plan with respect to bone cuts and component alignment during TKR using imageless computer navigation. A consecutive series of 30 femoral and tibial guides were assessed in-theatre by the same surgeon using computer navigation. Following surgical exposure, the PSI cutting guides were placed on the joint surface and alignment assessed using the navigation tracker. The difference between in-theatre data and the pre-operative plan was recorded and analysed. The error between in-theatre measurements and pre-operative plan for the femoral and tibial components exceeded 3° for 3 and 17% of the sample, respectively, while the error for total coronal alignment exceeded 3° for 27% of the sample. The present results indicate that alignment with Zimmer PSI cutting blocks, assessed by imageless navigation, does not match the pre-operative plan in a proportion of cases. To prevent unnecessary increases in the incidence of malalignment in primary TKR, it is recommended that these devices should not be used without objective verification of alignment, either in real-time or with post-operative imaging. Further work is required to identify the source of discrepancies and validate these devices prior to routine use. II.

  5. The value of multislice spiral CT in the pre-operative diagnosis of cleft palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Guangxi; Sun Lianfen; Zhang Xiaolin; Yu Chengxin; Lu Ji; Wang Xiaopeng; Li Liya; Yang Cheng; Wang Jun; Tian Yiqing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the practical value of multislice spiral CT (MSCT) in the preoperative diagnosis of cleft palate. Methods: Twenty patients with cleft palate were examined by using thin-slice (1.25 mm/4i) axial MSCT scanning and CT virtual endoscope (CTVE) imaging before and after operations. The cleft of each lesion was measured in the primary axial images. Results: Of the 20 cases, soft-and-hard cleft palate (grade II) was detected in 10 cases, with the clefts of soft palate between 1.5 cm and 2.2 cm, and the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 1.2 cm and 2.0 cm. The right utter cleft palates were found in 3 cases with the clefts of soft palate between 2.0 cm and 2.5 cm, the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 2.0 cm and 2.4 cm, and the clefts of hard palate between 1.8 cm and 2.2 cm. The left utter cleft palates (grade III) were found in 5 cases with the clefts of soft palate between 1.2 cm and 1.8 cm, the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 0.9 cm and 2.0 cm, and the clefts of hard palate between 0.9 cm and 1.8 cm. The bilateral utter cleft palates (grade III) were detected in 2 cases with the clefts of soft palate between 2.1 cm and 2.3 cm, the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 1.8 cm and 2.0 cm, and the clefts of hard palate between 1.9 cm and 2.3 cm. Conclusion: MSCT could excellently display the shape of all lesions before operation, especially the splitting degree of hard cleft palates in the axial images. Accurate measurements could be done for the cleft of different lesions in MSCT images. CTVE could clearly and directly show the shape of the lesion's interior surface. The pre-operative and post-operative images of each case could be perfectly compared by the combination of MSCT and CTVE

  6. Pre-Service Teacher Opinions about Eco-Friendly Person Activity Package Developed to Raise Environmental Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candan, Sevcan; Erten, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of Eco-Friendly Person Activity Package developed in order to raise environmental awareness in pre-service teachers and enable them to be an example of an eco-friendly teacher for their future students, and the responses about Eco-Friendly Person Activity Package were investigated. The study was conducted on 75…

  7. Pre- and post-industrial environmental changes as revealed by the biogeochemical sedimentary record of Drammensfjord, Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smittenberg, R.H.; Baas, M.; Green, M.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    The biogeochemical sedimentary record of the anoxic Drammensfjord, Norway, was investigated on a decadal to centennial time scale over the last millennium, in order to reconstruct the pre-industrial fjord environment and ecosystem and humaninduced environmental changes. The sediments were dated by

  8. Pre- and post-industrial environmental changes as revealed by the biogeochemical sedimentary record of Drammensfjord, Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Smittenberg, R.H.; Baas, M.; Green, M.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.

    2005-01-01

    The biogeochemical sedimentary record of the anoxic Drammensfjord, Norway, was investigated on a decadal to centennial time scale over the last millennium, in order to reconstruct the pre-industrial fjord environment and ecosystem and human-induced environmental changes. The sediments were dated by

  9. Environmental monitoring and assessment of the water bodies of a pre-construction urban wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Shengpeng; Wan, Kun; Zhou, Shoubiao; Ye, Liangtao; Ma, Sumin

    2014-11-01

    It is planned that the Dayanghan Wetland in China will be transformed into a national park but little is known about its current water quality and pollution status. Thus, we monitored the physical and chemical characteristics of the Dayanghan Wetland, which showed that the water quality was generally good. However, the chemical oxygen demand was more than double the reference value, which may be attributable to previous tillage for vegetable crops and other farmlands. In addition, nickel and chromium caused low-level pollution in the water bodies of the Dayanghan Wetland. The mean trophic level index and nutrient quality index were 39.1 and 2.69, respectively. Both indices suggest that the water bodies of the Dayanghan Wetland are in a mesotrophic state and that no eutrophication has occurred. The study would provide a precise report on the status of environmental quality of the water bodies of a typical pre-construction wetland for the administration and decision of the local government and the planning agent.

  10. Initial Operation of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Pearson, J. Boise; Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The NTREES facility has recently been upgraded such that the power capabilities of the facility have been increased significantly. At its present 1.2 MW power level, more prototypical fuel element temperatures nay now be reached. The new 1.2 MW induction heater consists of three physical units consisting of a transformer, rectifier, and inverter. This multiunit arrangement facilitated increasing the flexibility of the induction heater by more easily allowing variable frequency operation. Frequency ranges between 20 and 60 kHz can accommodated in the new induction heater allowing more representative power distributions to be generated within the test elements. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during testing In this new higher power configuration, NTREES will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials at near-prototypic power densities. As checkout testing progressed and as higher power levels were achieved, several design deficiencies were discovered and fixed. Most of these design deficiencies were related to stray RF energy causing various components to encounter unexpected heating. Copper shielding around these components largely eliminated these problems. Other problems encountered involved unexpected movement in the coil due to electromagnetic forces and electrical arcing between the coil and a dummy test article. The coil movement and arcing which were encountered during the checkout testing effectively destroyed the induction coil in use at

  11. Pre-operative MRI of anorectal anomalies in the newborn period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, K.; Dudley, N.E.; Tam, P.

    1995-01-01

    Nine infants (six boys, three girls) with anorectal anomalies were examined in the immediate newborn period, prior to corrective surgery, with MRI. Three high, one intermediate and five low anomalies were found at MRI - one patient with a 'low' lesion was subsequently found at surgery 2 months later to have a high anorectal anomaly. This infant had passed meconium per urethram soon after the MRI study, prompting the need for a protective colostomy and stressing the importance of a thorough clinical examination of babies with anorectal malformations. The MRI results and findings at surgery were in agreement in all other patients (n=8). Hydronephrosis was evident in two and renal agenesis in one patient. Sacrococcygeal hypoplasia was found in two and two hemivertebrae in one infant. No spinal cord lesion was identified. One fistula was evident on MRI but four were later found at surgery. Uniformly hyperintense T1 signal meconium was seen in all nine newborns, allowing for easy differentiation of rectal contents from rectal wall and the adjacent musculature. MRI can provide useful information regarding the development of the puborectal and external anal sphincter muscles, can help guide the pull-through procedure and help predict future continence pre-operatively in the newborn period. (orig.)

  12. Pre-operative MRI of anorectal anomalies in the newborn period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, K. [Dept. of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Dudley, N.E. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Tam, P. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-01

    Nine infants (six boys, three girls) with anorectal anomalies were examined in the immediate newborn period, prior to corrective surgery, with MRI. Three high, one intermediate and five low anomalies were found at MRI - one patient with a `low` lesion was subsequently found at surgery 2 months later to have a high anorectal anomaly. This infant had passed meconium per urethram soon after the MRI study, prompting the need for a protective colostomy and stressing the importance of a thorough clinical examination of babies with anorectal malformations. The MRI results and findings at surgery were in agreement in all other patients (n=8). Hydronephrosis was evident in two and renal agenesis in one patient. Sacrococcygeal hypoplasia was found in two and two hemivertebrae in one infant. No spinal cord lesion was identified. One fistula was evident on MRI but four were later found at surgery. Uniformly hyperintense T1 signal meconium was seen in all nine newborns, allowing for easy differentiation of rectal contents from rectal wall and the adjacent musculature. MRI can provide useful information regarding the development of the puborectal and external anal sphincter muscles, can help guide the pull-through procedure and help predict future continence pre-operatively in the newborn period. (orig.)

  13. Effect of communication on the reliability of nuclear power plant control room operations - pre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettunen, Jari; Pyy, Pekka

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the study presented in this paper is to investigate communication practices and their impact on human reliability and plant safety in a nuclear power plant environment. The study aims at developing a general systems approach towards the issue. The ultimate goal of the study is to contribute to the development of probabilistic safety assessment methodologies in the area of communications and crew co-operation. This paper outlines the results of the pre-study. The study is based on the use and further development of different modelling techniques and the application of generic systems engineering as well as crew resource management (CRM) principles. The results so far include a concise literature review on communication and crew performance, a presentation of some potential theoretical concepts and approaches for studying communication in relation to organisational reliability, causal failure sequences and human failures mechanisms, and an introduction of a General Communications Model (GCM) that is presented as a promising approach for studying the reliability and adequacy of communication transactions. Finally, some observations and recommendation concerning next phases of the study are made (author) (ml)

  14. Comparison of Pre-operative Central Corneal Thickness in Pediatric Cataract Cases versus Normal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.; Ali, M.; Zaheer, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the pre-operative central corneal thickness (CCT) in paediatric cataract patients with reference to normal control group. Study Design: A case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Ophthalmology Clinic of Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital (ASTEH), Rawalpindi, from November 2009 to May 2010. Methodology: The study included 116 subjects with equal number of cases and controls. Demographic profile of all the subjects was noted followed by history and detailed ophthalmic examination. CCT was measured using an ultrasonic pachymeter (model Pac Scan 300). The mean of three measurements from the central cornea were recorded in microns. Results were analyzed using SPSS version 17.0. Results: Mean CCT values of the cases was 566.83 +- 37.646 microns while the control group had a mean CCT of 535.81 +- 24.466 microns. Difference between the CCT values of the two groups was highly significant (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Eyes with congenital cataracts have greater CCT values as compared to normal paediatric population. This factor must be kept in mind while interpreting intra-ocular pressure in such patients. (author)

  15. Planning and programming of pre-operational and in-service inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udaondo, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    After a brief mention of the actual scope of in-service inspection work, conclusions are presented that relate to the preparations for inspections, making use of experience acquired since 1972 at 11 nuclear power plants in Spain which have commissioned such studies from one particular organization, and analyses are given of the advantages to be gained therefrom. Three different aspects of preparations for inspections are considered: (a) man-hour estimates and the duration of in-service inspections; (b) the sequence of action during a pre-operational inspection (assuming a typical functional organization) from definition of the codes of practice and standards applicable up to the issue of the final report and the schedule for distribution of the annual work load to be invested in a typical project, as a result of combining the two previous estimates, and (c) the documentary aspect of preparations for an inspection during a scheduled outage, as related to the various documents to be drawn up and their contents. Reference is made to the general training to be given to the staff in charge of inspection activities so as to provide them with information on, and a perspective of, the in-service inspection jobs required. (author)

  16. Draft environmental statement related to the operation of River Bend Station (Docket No. 50-458)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This draft environmental statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of River Bend Station, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs

  17. NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET) - NASA's key to environmental technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Beth

    1993-01-01

    NOET is a NASA-wide team which supports the research and development community by sharing information both in person and via a computerized network, assisting in specification and standard revisions, developing cleaner propulsion systems, and exploring environmentally compliant alternatives to current processes. NOET's structure, dissemination of materials, electronic information, EPA compliance, specifications and standards, and environmental research and development are discussed.

  18. Engineering Task Plan to Expand the Environmental Operational Envelope of Core Sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan authorizes the development of an Alternative Generation and Analysis (AGA). The AGA will determine how to expand the environmental operating envelope during core sampling operations

  19. Transitioning from operations to environmental restoration: Startup of the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.C.; Kozlowski, D.R.

    1993-10-01

    This paper will present a description of the program undertaken by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Contractor (ERMC) to effect a transition from operation of the Fernald site by the past M ampersand O contractor, WEMCO, to DOE's new mission and contractual approach focussed on site remediation. This transition, on a first of its kind contract, represented a significant, proactive approach on the part of DOE to pursue the clean up of its weapon's production facilities in a faster, more cost-effective manner. The paper will discuss the formal transition readiness review process and the lessons teamed by DOE and the contractor during transition. The oral presentation will be shared by both authors with one half of the time allocated to the transition readiness demonstration process and one half to the lessons learned. The objective of having a Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters representative participate in the transition to the first ERMC was to develop a handbook to assist other sites proceeding with the ERMC concept, such as the Richland Operations Office, and to develop a lessons learned document. Because a lessons learned report is available separately, only those more significant lessons learned are highlighted in this paper

  20. Pre-operative and intra-operative detection of axillary lymph node metastases in 108 patients with invasive lobular breast cancer undergoing mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Jerica; Besic, Nikola; Dzodic, Radan; Gazic, Barbara; Vogrin, Andrej

    2018-02-05

    Despite the recent changes in the treatment of the axilla in selected breast cancer patient, positive sentinel lymph node (SLN) in patients undergoing mastectomy still necessitates axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). In invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), pre-operative detection of the lymph node metastasis may be demanding due to its unique morphology. The aim of this study was to examine the benefit of preoperative axillary ultrasound (AUS), ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB), and intra-operative imprint cytology (IIC), in order to avoid two-stage axillary surgery in patients with ILC undergoing mastectomy. The object of this study were 102 patients (median age 52, range 34-73 years) with clinically non-suspicious axilla in whom 108 mastectomies were performed after a pre-operative AUS investigation. Whenever a metastasis was detected in a sentinel lymph node, ALND was done. Reports of the pre-operative AUS investigation, US-FNAB, and IIC were compared with definitive histopathological reports of surgical specimens. In 46 cases lymph node metastases were diagnosed. AUS suspicious lymph nodes were found in 29/108 cases and histopathology confirmed metastases in 22/30 cases. US-FNAB was performed in 29 cases with AUS suspicious lymph nodes. Cytology proved metastases in 11/29 cases. Histopathology confirmed metastases in 10/11 cases with only isolated tumor cells found in one case. IIC investigation was performed in 63 cases and in 10/27 cases metastases were confirmed by histopathology. Pre-operative AUS, US-FNAB, and/or IIC investigation enabled ALND during a single surgical procedure in 20/46 patients with metastases in lymph nodes. Pre-operative AUS, US-FNAB, and/or IIC are/is beneficial in patients with ILC planned for mastectomy in order to decrease the number of two stage axillary procedures.

  1. Environmental regulation of exploration and mining operations in Asian countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, J.; Naito, Koh; Pring, G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper offers a new perspective on the environmental laws in Asian nations affecting the exploration, mining, and reclamation activities of the mineral resource industry: the perspective of the senior government officials in those countries, whose job is to enforce these new environmental laws. The article presents the results of a 1998 survey of national environmental officials in Asia conducted by the Colorado School of Mines and the Metal Mining Agency of Japan. Officials in 10 diverse countries - Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam - responded to a detailed questionnaire covering applicable laws, agencies, protected areas, covered mineral activities, financial assurance, environmental impact assessment, public involvement, environmental standards, permit and reclamation requirements. The survey confirms that Asian nations are part of the global trend towards national government regulatory structures that balance mineral development objectives with environmental considerations. The survey also shows developing regulatory systems (some embryonic, some more mature) utilizing a combination of mining and environmental acts, and often an 'insider' perspective of the national officials administering the laws. While that perspective is not without its biases (not least the rigor of enforcement), it may nevertheless be of use in company planning. The emerging regulatory picture contradicts the conventional notion that it is the 'lower' level of regulation in Asia that is attracting foreign direct investment in mining. (author)

  2. Environmental Management Model for Road Maintenance Operation Involving Community Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triyono, A. R. H.; Setyawan, A.; Sobriyah; Setiono, P.

    2017-07-01

    Public expectations of Central Java, which is very high on demand fulfillment, especially road infrastructure as outlined in the number of complaints and community expectations tweeter, Short Mail Massage (SMS), e-mail and public reports from various media, Highways Department of Central Java province requires development model of environmental management in the implementation of a routine way by involving the community in order to fulfill the conditions of a representative, may serve road users safely and comfortably. This study used survey method with SEM analysis and SWOT with Latent Independent Variable (X), namely; Public Participation in the regulation, development, construction and supervision of road (PSM); Public behavior in the utilization of the road (PMJ) Provincial Road Service (PJP); Safety in the Provincial Road (KJP); Integrated Management System (SMT) and latent dependent variable (Y) routine maintenance of the provincial road that is integrated with the environmental management system and involve the participation of the community (MML). The result showed the implementation of routine maintenance of road conditions in Central Java province has yet to implement an environmental management by involving the community; Therefore developed environmental management model with the results of H1: Community Participation (PSM) has positive influence on the Model of Environmental Management (MML); H2: Behavior Society in Jalan Utilization (PMJ) positive effect on Model Environmental Management (MML); H3: Provincial Road Service (PJP) positive effect on Model Environmental Management (MML); H4: Safety in the Provincial Road (KJP) positive effect on Model Environmental Management (MML); H5: Integrated Management System (SMT) has positive influence on the Model of Environmental Management (MML). From the analysis obtained formulation model describing the relationship / influence of the independent variables PSM, PMJ, PJP, KJP, and SMT on the dependent variable

  3. Combining task-evoked and spontaneous activity to improve pre-operative brain mapping with fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Michael D; Qian, Tianyi; Madsen, Joseph R; Wang, Danhong; Li, Meiling; Ge, Manling; Zuo, Huan-Cong; Groppe, David M; Mehta, Ashesh D; Hong, Bo; Liu, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive localization of brain function is used to understand and treat neurological disease, exemplified by pre-operative fMRI mapping prior to neurosurgical intervention. The principal approach for generating these maps relies on brain responses evoked by a task and, despite known limitations, has dominated clinical practice for over 20years. Recently, pre-operative fMRI mapping based on correlations in spontaneous brain activity has been demonstrated, however this approach has its own limitations and has not seen widespread clinical use. Here we show that spontaneous and task-based mapping can be performed together using the same pre-operative fMRI data, provide complimentary information relevant for functional localization, and can be combined to improve identification of eloquent motor cortex. Accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of our approach are quantified through comparison with electrical cortical stimulation mapping in eight patients with intractable epilepsy. Broad applicability and reproducibility of our approach are demonstrated through prospective replication in an independent dataset of six patients from a different center. In both cohorts and every individual patient, we see a significant improvement in signal to noise and mapping accuracy independent of threshold, quantified using receiver operating characteristic curves. Collectively, our results suggest that modifying the processing of fMRI data to incorporate both task-based and spontaneous activity significantly improves functional localization in pre-operative patients. Because this method requires no additional scan time or modification to conventional pre-operative data acquisition protocols it could have widespread utility. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. July 2011 Memorandum: Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations Under the Clean Water Act, National Environmental Policy Act, and the Environmental Justice Executive Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memorandum: Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations Under the Clean Water Act, National Environmental Policy Act, and the Environmental Justice Executive Order, July 21, 2011

  5. Oral Nutrition as a Form of Pre-Operative Enhancement in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, Emma R.J.; Argillander, Tanja E.; Heuvel, Van Den Baukje; Buskens, Christianne J.; Duijvendijk, Van Peter; Winkels, Renate M.; Kalf, Annette; Zaag, Van Der Edwin S.; Wassenaar, Eelco B.; Bemelman, Willem A.; Munster, Van Barbara C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Nutritional status has major impacts on the outcome of surgery, in particular in patients with cancer. The aim of this review was to assess the merit of oral pre-operative nutritional support as a part of prehabilitation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods: A

  6. Oral Nutrition as a Form of Pre-Operative Enhancement in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, Emma R. J.; Argillander, Tanja E.; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Buskens, Christianne J.; van Duijvendijk, Peter; Winkels, Renate M.; Kalf, Annette; van der Zaag, Edwin S.; Wassenaar, Eelco B.; Bemelman, Willem A.; van Munster, Barbara C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Nutritional status has major impacts on the outcome of surgery, in particular in patients with cancer. The aim of this review was to assess the merit of oral pre-operative nutritional support as a part of prehabilitation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods: A

  7. Water-gas shift (WGS) Operation of Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Pilot Plant at the Buggenum IGCC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, H.A.J.; Damen, K.; Makkee, M.; Trapp, C.

    2014-01-01

    In the Nuon/Vattenfall CO2 Catch-up project, a pre-combustion CO2 capture pilot plant was built and operated at the Buggenum IGCC power plant, the Netherlands. The pilot consist of sweet water-gas shift, physical CO2 absorption and CO2 compression. The technology performance was verified and

  8. Pre-operative indicators for mortality following hip fracture surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Toby; Pelpola, Kelum; Ball, Martin; Ong, Alice; Myint, Phyo Kyaw

    2014-07-01

    hip fracture is a common and serious condition associated with high mortality. This study aimed to identify pre-operative characteristics which are associated with an increased risk of mortality after hip fracture surgery. systematic search of published and unpublished literature databases, including EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL, PubMed and the Cochrane Library, was undertaken to identify all clinical studies on pre-operative predictors of mortality after surgery in hip fracture with at least 3-month follow-up. Data pertaining to the study objectives was extracted by two reviewers independently. Where study homogeneity was evidence, a meta-analysis of pooled relative risk and 95% confidence intervals was performed for mortality against pre-admission characteristics. fifty-three studies including 544,733 participants were included. Thirteen characteristics were identified as possible pre-operative indicators for mortality. Following meta-analysis, the four key characteristics associated with the risk of mortality up to 12 months were abnormal ECG (RR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.45, 2.76), cognitive impairment (RR: 1.91; 95% CI: 1.35, 2.70), age >85 years (RR: 0.42; 95% CI: 0.20, 0.90) and pre-fracture mobility (RR: 0.13; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.34). Other statistically significant pre-fracture predictors of increased mortality were male gender, being resident in a care institution, intra-capsular fracture type, high ASA grade and high Charlson comorbidity score on admission. this review has identified the characteristics of patients with a high risk of mortality after a hip fracture surgery beyond the peri-operative period who may benefit from comprehensive assessment and appropriate management. CRD42012002107. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma prognostic determination using pre-operative serum C-reactive protein levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zi-Ying; Liang, Zhen-Xing; Zhuang, Pei-Lin; Chen, Jie-Wei; Cao, Yun; Yan, Li-Xu; Yun, Jing-Ping; Xie, Dan; Cai, Mu-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute inflammatory response biomarker, has been recognized as an indicator of malignant disease progression. However, the prognostic significance of CRP levels collected before tumor removal in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma requires further investigation. We sampled the CRP levels in 140 patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma who underwent hepatectomies with regional lymphadenectomies between 2006 and 2013. A retrospective analysis of the clinicopathological data was performed. We focused on the impact of serum CRP on the patients’ cancer-specific survival and recurrence-free survival rates. High levels of preoperative serum CRP were significantly associated with well-established clinicopathologic features, including gender, advanced tumor stage, and elevated carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels (P < 0.05). Univariate analysis demonstrated a significant association between high levels of serum CRP and adverse cancer-specific survival (P = 0.001) and recurrence-free survival (P < 0.001). In patients with stage I/II intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, the serum CRP level was a prognostic indicator for cancer-specific survival. In patients with stage I/II or stage III/IV, the serum CRP level was a prognostic indicator for recurrence-free survival (P < 0.05). Additionally, multivariate analysis identified serum CRP level in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma as an independent prognostic factor (P < 0.05). We confirmed a significant association of elevated pre-operative CRP levels with poor clinical outcomes for the tested patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Our results indicate that the serum CRP level may represent a useful factor for patient stratification in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma management

  10. Determinants of Pre-Operative Shoulder Imbalance in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ghandhari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Disfiguring complications of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS could significantly affect the patients’ satisfaction. In this regard, shoulder imbalance has recently received much attention in spite of its poorly understood challenge. Objectives While the majority of previous studies have attempted to explore preoperative determinants of postoperative shoulder imbalance, in this study we aimed to investigate the factors correlated with the preoperative shoulder imbalance. Methods A total of 72 AIS patients with no previous history of corrective surgery took part in this study. The study sample comprised 63 females and 9 males with the mean age of 15.72 ± 3.08 years, ranging from 11 to 26 years. Shoulder imbalance parameters including T1 tilt, first rib angle (FRA, and clavicle angle (CA were assessed and their correlation with radiographic characteristics of the curves and patients’ demographic data including age and sex was evaluated. Results T1 tilt was more severe in males (mean -8.2° than females (mean -2.8° (P = 0.04. Moreover, a significant correlation was found between age and FRA (P = 0.04. A significant correlation was also observed between main thoracic (MT curve size and all the three parameters of shoulder imbalance (P < 0.001. The reverse correlation of T5 - T12 kyphosis angle with FRA was also significant (P = 0.04. Conclusions According to our results, in AIS, pre-operative radiographic shoulder imbalance could be affected by some curve parameters including MT and kyphosis size and demographic characteristics of patients including age and gender.

  11. 75 FR 76444 - Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Construction and Operation of a Panoramic Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... potential environmental impacts associated with construction and operation of the proposed Panoramic Survey... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Construction and Operation of a Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) at the Summit...

  12. 78 FR 46255 - Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear... nuclear power plant. Compliance with the provisions of the rule is required by June 20, 2014. This... environmental effect of renewing the operating license of a nuclear power plant. This document is necessary to...

  13. 78 FR 24734 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Construction and Operation of an Infantry Platoon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Final Environmental Impact Statement for the... Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), Southwest of Range 20, is not operationally feasible and has been.... The Army identified and analyzed environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with the proposed...

  14. Final environmental statement related to operation of White Mesa Uranium Project, Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    Environmental impact statements are presented under the following headings: the existing environment; mining and milling operations; air quality; land use; mineral resources; soils; radiological impacts; socioeconomic impacts; environmental effects of accidents; monitoring programs; unavoidable adverse environmental impacts; relation between short-term uses of the environment and long-term productivity; irreversible and irretrievable commitments

  15. Fostering Pre-Service Teachers' Self-Determined Environmental Motivation through Green Chemistry Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpudewan, Mageswary; Ismail, Zurida; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-01-01

    The global environmental crisis intensifies particularly in developing nations. Environmental educators have begun to understand that changing the environmental impact requires not only changes in pro-environmental knowledge and attitudes but also in associated, self-determined motivation. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that a…

  16. A comparison of laparoscopic and open surgery following pre-operative chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Toru; Inomata, Masafumi; Hiratsuka, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Although pre-operative chemoradiation therapy for advanced lower rectal cancer is a controversial treatment modality, it is increasingly used in combination with surgery. Few studies have considered the combination of chemoradiation therapy followed by laparoscopic surgery for locally advanced lower rectal cancer; therefore, this study aimed to assess the usefulness of this therapeutic combination. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with locally advanced lower rectal cancer treated by pre-operative chemoradiation therapy and surgery from February 2002 to November 2012 at Oita University. We divided patients into an open surgery group and a laparoscopic surgery group and evaluated various parameters by univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 33 patients were enrolled (open surgery group, n=14; laparoscopic surgery group, n=19). Univariate analysis revealed that compared with the open surgery group, operative time was significantly longer, whereas intra-operative blood loss and intra-operative blood transfusion requirements were significantly less in the laparoscopic surgery group. There were no significant differences in post-operative complication and recurrence rates between the two groups. According to multivariate analysis, operative time and intra-operative blood loss were significant predictors of outcome in the laparoscopic surgery group. This study suggests that laparoscopic surgery after chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer is a safe procedure. Further prospective investigation of the long-term oncological outcomes of laparoscopic surgery after chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer is required to confirm the advantages of laparoscopic surgery over open surgery. (author)

  17. Face validity of a pre-clinical model of operant binge drinking: just a question of speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanblanc, Jérôme; Sauton, Pierre; Jeanblanc, Virginie; Legastelois, Rémi; Echeverry-Alzate, Victor; Lebourgeois, Sophie; Gonzalez-Marin, Maria Del Carmen; Naassila, Mickaël

    2018-06-04

    Binge drinking (BD) is often defined as a large amount of alcohol consumed in a 'short' period of time or 'per occasion'. In clinical research, few researchers have included the notion of 'speed of drinking' in the definition of BD. Here, we aimed to describe a novel pre-clinical model based on voluntary operant BD, which included both the quantity of alcohol and the rapidity of consumption. In adult Long-Evans male rats, we induced BD by regularly decreasing the duration of ethanol self-administration from 1-hour to 15-minute sessions. We compared the behavioral consequences of BD with the behaviors of rats subjected to moderate drinking or heavy drinking (HD). We found that, despite high ethanol consumption levels (1.2 g/kg/15 minutes), the total amounts consumed were insufficient to differentiate HD from BD. However, consumption speed could distinguish between these groups. The motivation to consume was higher in BD than in HD rats. After BD, we observed alterations in locomotor coordination in rats that consumed greater than 0.8 g/kg, which was rarely observed in HD rats. Finally, chronic BD led to worse performance in a decision-making task, and as expected, we observed a lower stimulated dopaminergic release within nucleus accumbens slices in poor decision makers. Our BD model exhibited good face validity and can now provide animals voluntarily consuming very rapidly enough alcohol to achieve intoxication levels and thus allowing the study of the complex interaction between individual and environmental factors underlying BD behavior. © 2018 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  18. Risk stratification by pre-operative cardiopulmonary exercise testing improves outcomes following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Stephen J; Yow, Heng; Saedon, Mahmud; Shakespeare, Joanna; Hill, Christopher E; Watson, Duncan; Marshall, Colette; Mahmood, Asif; Higman, Daniel; Imray, Christopher He

    2013-05-19

    In 2009, the NHS evidence adoption center and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published a review of the use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). They recommended the development of a risk-assessment tool to help identify AAA patients with greater or lesser risk of operative mortality and to contribute to mortality prediction.A low anaerobic threshold (AT), which is a reliable, objective measure of pre-operative cardiorespiratory fitness, as determined by pre-operative cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is associated with poor surgical outcomes for major abdominal surgery. We aimed to assess the impact of a CPET-based risk-stratification strategy upon perioperative mortality, length of stay and non-operative costs for elective (open and endovascular) infra-renal AAA patients. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken. Pre-operative CPET-based selection for elective surgical intervention was introduced in 2007. An anonymized cohort of 230 consecutive infra-renal AAA patients (2007 to 2011) was studied. A historical control group of 128 consecutive infra-renal AAA patients (2003 to 2007) was identified for comparison.Comparative analysis of demographic and outcome data for CPET-pass (AT ≥ 11 ml/kg/min), CPET-fail (AT 11 ml/kg/min was associated with reduced perioperative mortality (open cases only), LOS, survival and inpatient costs (open and endovascular repair) for elective infra-renal AAA surgery.

  19. Greek Pre-Service Teachers' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Environmental Behavior toward Marine Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubonari, Theodora; Markos, Angelos; Kevrekidis, Theodoros

    2013-01-01

    A structured questionnaire was administered to assess Greek pre-service primary teachers' knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported behavior toward marine pollution issues. Exploratory factor analysis revealed several factors, all demonstrating adequate internal consistency, and showed that pre-service teachers demonstrated a moderate level of…

  20. The design of a novel, environmentally improved cotton pre-treatment proces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, G.H. (Gerrit)

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this thesis of Gerrit Bouwhuis, lecturer at Saxion Research Centre for Design and Technology in Enschede is the development of a new industrial applicable pre-treatment process for cotton based on catalysis. The pre-treatment generally consists of desizing, scouring and bleaching. These

  1. Final environmental statement related to the operation of River Bend Station (Docket No. 50-458)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This Final Environmental Statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of River Bend Station, pursuant to the National Environment Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs

  2. Environmental monitoring program for Itataia industrial complex before operational phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condessa, M.L.M.B.

    1982-01-01

    This environmental monitoring program aims to characterize the environment in adjacent area of Itataia Industrial Complex. The places and frequencies of samples and measurements, as well as analysis and parameters to be measured in each type of samples are presented. (C.M.) [pt

  3. United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The Environment, Safety and Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada

  4. United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Environment, Safety & Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada.

  5. An observational cohort study on pre-operative investigations and referrals: How far are we following recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Yunus, Md; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Pre-operative investigations are often required to supplement information for risk stratification and assessing reserve for undergoing surgery. Although there are evidence-based recommendations for which investigations should be done, clinical practice varies. The present study aimed to assess the pre-operative investigations and referral practices and compare it with the standard guidelines. Methods: The present observational study was carried out during 2014–appen2015 in a teaching institute after the approval from Institute Ethical Committee. A designated anaesthesiologist collected data from the completed pre-anaesthetic check-up (PAC) sheets. Investigations already done, asked by anaesthesiologists as well as referral services sought were noted and compared with an adapted master table prepared from standard recommendations and guidelines. Data were expressed in frequencies, percentage and statistically analysed using INSTAT software (GraphPad Prism software Inc., La Zolla, USA). Results: Seventy-five out of 352 patients (42.67% male, 57.33% female; American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I to III) were included in this study. Nearly, all patients attended PAC with at least 5 investigations done. Of them, 89.33% were subjected to at least one unnecessary investigation and 91.67% of the referral services were not required which lead to 3.5 ( SD ±1.64) days loss. Anaesthesiologist-ordered testing was more focused than surgeons. Conclusion: More than two-third of pre-operative investigations and referral services are unnecessary. Anaesthesiologists are relatively more rational in ordering pre-operative tests yet; a lot can be done to rationalise the practice as well as reducing healthcare cost. PMID:27601737

  6. Environmental Impacts of Airport Operations: Maintenance, and Expansion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luther, Linda

    2007-01-01

    ... impacts associated with airport operations and expansion are likely to be debated. This issue is important to various stakeholders, particularly those whose health, property values, and quality of life may be affected by such impacts...

  7. Non-transboundary pollution and the efficiency of international environmental co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kox, Henk L.M.; Van der Tak, Casper M.

    1996-01-01

    The standard view is that situations where no transborder environmental externalities occur are most efficiently dealt with by national environmental policies rather than by international co-operation. Though this may be the general case, non-coordinated national policies do not always produce the most efficient international allocation. This paper presents four cases in which the allocative outcome of non-coordinated domestic policy choices can be improved upon by international environmental co-operation. The first case refers to the use of environmental policy as a strategic trade instrument. The other cases refer to the existence of discrete technologies, set-up costs and increasing returns to scale. The form of international environmental co-operation should be adapted to the situation. Formal international agreements between countries are characterised by high transaction costs and may not always be the most efficient form of co-operation

  8. Ways to improve the environmental conditions of their buses in operation on passenger routes of cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnychuk S.V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on operational and environmental parameters buses used on bus routes Zhitomir city. It uses statistical methods for determining the intensity of traffic, passenger traffic and ecology in traffic. To assess the environmental chosen stop with the greatest intensity of traffic, which is the probability of accumulation of pollution transport emissions that exceed permissible limits. Calculation of environmental pollution emission route for vehicles made stops street «Str. Hundreds of Heaven» «CUM», «vul. Hlibna» on the main trunk street Kievska. Results obtained environmental field experiments compared with the data defined calculation methods, based on the proposed use appropriate operational vehicles. The conclusions that indicate the seriousness of the problem and the urgency to address it. The system of environmental safety and road safety in Zhitomir requires significant improvements due to the increased quantities bus vehicles plying city routes. Recommendations to improve the ecological condition of intersections can be developed through the optimization of traffic using buses with environmentally improved operating parameters. Keywords: environmental and operational parameters; ecological safety; environmental assessment; intensity of traffic; passenger traffic; environmental conditions; operation; bus choice; stop.

  9. Role of routine pre-operative screening venous duplex ultrasound in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Praveen Raj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: It is well established that obesity is a strongly associated risk factor for post-operative deep vein thrombosis (DVT. Physical effects and pro-thrombotic, pro-inflammatory and hypofibrinolytic effects of severe obesity may predispose to idiopathic DVT (pre-operatively because of which bariatric patients are routinely screened before surgery. The aim of this study was to audit the use of routine screening venous duplex ultrasound in morbidly obese patients before undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 180 patients who underwent bariatric surgery from August 2013 to August 2014 who had undergone pre-operative screening bilateral lower-extremity venous duplex ultrasound for DVT. Data were collected on patient's demographics, history of venous thromboembolism, prior surgeries and duplex ultrasound details of the status of the deep veins and superficial veins of the lower limbs. Results: No patients had symptoms or signs of DVT pre-operatively. No patient gave history of DVT. No patient was found to have iliac, femoral or popliteal vein thrombosis. Superficial venous disease was found in 17 (8%. One patient had a right lower limb venous ulcer. Conclusion: Thromboembolic problems in the morbidly obese before bariatric surgery are infrequent, and screening venous duplex ultrasound can be done in high-risk patients only.

  10. Columbia River system operation review. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings

  11. The sensitivity of pre-operative axillary staging in breast cancer: comparison of invasive lobular and ductal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topps, A; Clay, V; Absar, M; Howe, M; Lim, Y; Johnson, R; Bundred, N

    2014-07-01

    Axillary ultrasound (AUS) with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of abnormal lymph nodes is important for pre-operative staging and planning the surgical management of the axilla. Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) metastases are thought to be difficult to detect because the cells are small and on cytology resemble lymphocytes. To investigate this we directly compared the sensitivity of pre-operative axillary staging between ILC and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Consecutive patients that presented in a single breast unit with pure IDC between April 2005 and December 2006 and pure ILC between January 2008 and December 2012 were retrospectively identified from pathology records. Pre-operative axillary ultrasound and FNA biopsy results were compared with post-operative histopathology from the sentinel node biopsy (SNB) or axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). A total of 275 and 142 axillae were identified in the IDC and ILC groups respectively. In the node positive patients there was no significant difference in the sensitivity of AUS (IDC vs. ILC; 58.7% vs. 52.8%). However, there was a significant difference in the sensitivity of ultrasound-guided FNA biopsy of abnormal nodes (IDC vs. ILC; 98.4% vs. 53.6%; p < 0.001). AUS has comparative sensitivities between IDC and ILC populations. In contrast, FNA biopsy of abnormal axillary nodes is clearly less sensitive in the ILC group. In these patients, who have abnormal AUS, we suggest that a core biopsy is required to improve the pre-operative staging and prevent unnecessary surgical procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES): R series hyperspectral environmental suite (HES) overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gene; Criscione, Joseph C.; Cauffman, Sandra A.; Davis, Martin A.

    2004-11-01

    The Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) instrument is currently under development by the NASA GOES-R Project team within the framework of the GOES Program to fulfill the future needs and requirements of the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) Office. As part of the GOES-R instrument complement, HES will provide measurements of the traditional temperature and water vapor vertical profiles with higher accuracy and vertical resolution than obtained through current sounder technologies. HES will provide measurements of the properties of the shelf and coastal waters and back up imaging (at in-situ resolution) for the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The HES team is forging the future of remote environmental monitoring with the development of an operational instrument with high temporal, spatial and spectral-resolution and broad hemispheric coverage. The HES development vision includes threshold and goal requirements that encompass potential system solutions. The HES team has defined tasks for the instrument(s) that include a threshold functional complement of Disk Sounding (DS), Severe Weather/Mesoscale Sounding (SW/M), and Shelf and Coastal Waters imaging (CW) and a goal functional complement of Open Ocean (OO) imaging, and back up imaging (at in-situ resolution) for the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). To achieve the best-value procurement, the GOES-R Project has base-lined a two-phase procurement approach to the HES design and development; a Formulation/study phase and an instrument Implementation phase. During Formulation, currently slated for the FY04-05 timeframe, the developing team(s) will perform Systems Requirements Analysis and evaluation, System Trade and Requirements Baseline Studies, Risk Assessment and Mitigation Strategy and complete a Preliminary Conceptual Design of the HES instrument. The results of the formulation phase will be leveraged to achieve an effective and efficient system solution during

  13. Pre-operative Predictive Factors of Post-operative Pain in Patients With Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Clara; Díaz-Heredia, Jorge; Berraquero, María Luisa; Crespo, Pablo; Loza, Estíbaliz; Ruiz Ibán, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    To analyze pre-surgical predictive factors of post-surgical pain in patients undergoing hip or knee arthoplasty. A systematic literature review was performed. We defined a sensitive strategy on Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library up to May 2013. The inclusion criteria were: patients undertaking knee and/or hip arthroplasty, adults with moderate or severe pain (≥4 on a Visual Analog Scale) in whom predictive factors of post-surgical pain were evaluated before surgery. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, controlled trials and observational studies were selected. We excluded animals and basic science articles, reviews of prosthesis, prosthesis due to fractures, patients with rheumatic diseases or studies with mixed population in which disaggregated data was not possible to obtain. A total 37 articles of moderate quality were selected. The articles included representative patients undergoing a knee or hip arthroplasty in our country; most of them were aged 60 years or above, with osteoarthritis, and with a high rate of obesity and comorbidities. We found great variability regarding the type of studies and predictive factors. There was a strong association between post-surgical pain and the following pre-surgical factors: female gender, low socio-economic status, higher pain, comorbidities, low back pain, poor functional status, and psychological factors (depression, anxiety or catastrophic pain). There are pre-surgical factors that might influence post-surgical pain in patients undergoing a knee or hip arthroplasty. Therefore, they should be taken into account when considering an arthroplasty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Mark Patrick, E-mail: mark.taylor@mq.edu.au; Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-11-15

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 μg/dL in children aged 1–4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 μg/m{sup 2}) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 μg/m{sup 2}) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 μg/m{sup 2}) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. - Highlights: 1.Playground soils and surface dust in a mining town have high metal concentrations. 2.Elevated levels of As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust are found on playground users′ hands. 3.Pb isotope analysis shows that the source of playground dust is ore body Pb. 4.Surface mine operations must be contained to reduce childhood lead exposure risks. 5.Mine environmental licences need to set trigger values for As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust.

  15. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Mark Patrick; Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 μg/dL in children aged 1–4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 μg/m 2 ) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 μg/m 2 ) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 μg/m 2 ) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ( 206 Pb/ 207 Pb, 208 Pb/ 207 Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. - Highlights: 1.Playground soils and surface dust in a mining town have high metal concentrations. 2.Elevated levels of As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust are found on playground users′ hands. 3.Pb isotope analysis shows that the source of playground dust is ore body Pb. 4.Surface mine operations must be contained to reduce childhood lead exposure risks. 5.Mine environmental licences need to set trigger values for As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust

  16. Endoscopic third ventriculocisternostomies in the infant: Pre- and post-operative Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation elective project undergraduate prize 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharman, Anna

    2000-12-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether it is possible to select patients with obstructive hydrocephalus, in the under 1 age group for endoscopic third ventriculocisternostomy (ETV) using pre-operative T2 weighted turbo spin echo (T2W-TSE) sagittal sequence Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging; and to assess ventriculocisternostomy patency using post-operative T2W-TSE MR. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of MR examinations and clinical notes of 11 patients under 1 year of age who had ETV, was performed. The post-operative flow MR images were divided into the presence or absence of flow-related signal changes. RESULTS: In 6 of the 11 patients, ETV was successful (54.5%) i.e. no VP shunt or revision of the ETV was required. 9 patients had post-operative T2W-TSE MR examinations -- 8 of these 9 MR studies correlated to the clinical situation (89%). The remaining MR examination showed a CSF flow void but the ETV failed at 3 weeks. CONCLUSION: Pre-operative MR using T2W-TSE to select suitable candidates for ETV improves the success rate from < 40% to 54.5%. Post-operatively MRI is a good predictor of whether the ETV has been successful or not. Sharman, A. (2000)

  17. Environmental effects on materials in operating power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews several areas in which corrosion problems have occurred and what can be done to help improve future performance: BWR pipe cracking, PWR steam generators, Three Mile Island-thiosulfate contamination, secondary side problems, mechanical damage (Ginna), piping and vessel cracking, turbine cracking, and bolting. The safety and operational issues involved are listed

  18. Is the Time of administration of misoprostol of value? The uterotonic effect of misoprostol given pre- and post-operative after elective cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed H. Abd-Ellah

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Pre-operative rectally administrated misoprostol appears to be more effective than post-operative rectally administrated misoprostol in reducing blood loss, and in decreasing the need for other uterotonic drugs in cesarean section delivery.

  19. Columbia River system operation review. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930's, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D'Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

  20. Comparison of pre-operative dGEMRIC imaging with intra-operative findings in femoroacetabular impingement: preliminary findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Apprich, Sebastian; Siebenrock, Klaus A.; Mamisch, Tallal Charles; Hosalkar, Harish S.; Werlen, Stefan A.

    2011-01-01

    To study standard MRI and dGEMRIC in patients with symptomatic FAI undergoing surgical intervention and compare them with intra-operative findings to see if they were corroborative. Sixteen patients with symptomatic FAI that warranted surgical intervention were prospectively studied. All patients underwent plain radiographic series for FAI assessment followed by standard MRI and dGEMRIC. Subsequently, patients were surgically treated with safe dislocation and the joint was evaluated for any macroscopic signs of damaged cartilage. Data were statistically analyzed. A total of 224 zones in 16 patients were evaluated. One hundred and sixteen zones were intra-operatively rated as normal with mean T1 values of 510.1 ms ± 141.2 ms. Eighty zones had evidence of damage with mean T1 values of 453.1 ms ± 113.6 ms. The difference in these T1 values was significant (p = 0.003). Correlation between standard MRI and intra-operative findings was moderate (r = 0.535, p < 0.001). Intra-operative findings revealed more damage than standard MRI. On standard MRI, 68.6% zones were graded normal while 31.4% had evidence of damage. On intra-operative visualization, 56.4% zones were graded normal and 43.6% had evidence of damage. Correlation between dGEMRIC and intra-operative findings turned out to be weak (r = 0.114, p < 0.126). On T1 assessment 31.4% of zones were graded as normal and 68.6% as damaged. dGEMRIC was significantly different between normal and affected cartilage based on intra-operative assessment. The correlation for morphological findings was limited, underestimating defects. By combining morphological with biochemical assessment dGEMRIC may play some role in the future to prognosticate outcomes and facilitate surgical planning and intervention. (orig.)

  1. Development of tools to manage the operational monitoring and pre-design of the NPP-LV cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perusquia, R.; Arredondo S, C.; Hernandez M, J. L.; Montes T, J. L.; Castillo M, A.; Ortiz S, J. J.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the development of tools to facilitate the management so much, the operational monitoring of boiling water reactors (BWR) of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-LV) through independent codes, and how to carry out the static calculations corresponding to process of optimized pre-design of the reference cycle next to current cycle. The progress and preliminary results obtained with the program SACal, developed at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), central tool to achieve provide a management platform of the operational monitoring and pre-design of NPP-LV cycle are also described. The reached preliminary advances directed to get an Analysis center and automated design of fuel assembly cells are also presented, which together with centers or similar modules related with the fuel reloads form the key part to meet the targets set for the realization of a Management Platform of Nuclear Fuel of the NPP-LV. (Author)

  2. Patient-specific surgical simulator for the pre-operative planning of single-incision laparoscopic surgery with bimanual robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turini, Giuseppe; Moglia, Andrea; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Ferrari, Mauro; Mosca, Franco

    2012-01-01

    The trend of surgical robotics is to follow the evolution of laparoscopy, which is now moving towards single-incision laparoscopic surgery. The main drawback of this approach is the limited maneuverability of the surgical tools. Promising solutions to improve the surgeon's dexterity are based on bimanual robots. However, since both robot arms are completely inserted into the patient's body, issues related to possible unwanted collisions with structures adjacent to the target organ may arise. This paper presents a simulator based on patient-specific data for the positioning and workspace evaluation of bimanual surgical robots in the pre-operative planning of single-incision laparoscopic surgery. The simulator, designed for the pre-operative planning of robotic laparoscopic interventions, was tested by five expert surgeons who evaluated its main functionalities and provided an overall rating for the system. The proposed system demonstrated good performance and usability, and was designed to integrate both present and future bimanual surgical robots.

  3. A pre-operative group rehabilitation programme provided limited benefit for people with severe hip and knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Jason A; Webster, Kate E; Levinger, Pazit; Fong, Cynthia; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2014-01-01

    To determine if a pre-operative group rehabilitation programme can improve arthritis self-efficacy for people with severe hip and knee osteoarthritis. Single group, repeated measures design: 4-week baseline phase followed by a 6-week intervention phase of water exercise, and education with self-management strategies. The primary outcome was arthritis self-efficacy. The secondary outcomes were measures of pain (WOMAC), activity limitation (WOMAC), activity performance (30 s chair stand test, 10 m walk test) and health-related quality of life (EuroQol). Twenty participants (10 knee osteoarthritis and 10 hip osteoarthritis) with a mean age of 71 years (SD 7) attended 92% (SD 10%) of the scheduled sessions. All measures demonstrated baseline stability between two time points for measurements at week 1 and measurements at week 4. After the 6-week intervention programme there were no significant improvements for arthritis self-efficacy. There was a 12% increase for fast walking speed (mean increase of 0.14 m/s, 95% CI 0.07, 0.22). There were no significant improvements for other secondary outcomes. A pre-operative water-based exercise and educational programme did not improve arthritis self-efficacy, self-reported pain and activity limitation, and health-related quality of life for people with hip and knee osteoarthritis who were candidates for joint replacement. While there was a significant increase in one measure of activity performance (walking speed), these findings suggest the current programme may be of little value. Implications for Rehabilitation This pre-operative group rehabilitation programme for people with severe hip and knee osteoarthritis did not change arthritis self-efficacy, pain, activity limitation and health-related quality of life. This programme may have little value in preparing people for joint replacement surgery. The optimal pre-operative programme requires further design and investigation.

  4. Can EGFR mutation status be reliably determined in pre-operative needle biopsies from adenocarcinomas of the lung?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl, Kim Hein; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Jonstrup, Søren Peter

    2015-01-01

    The identification of EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is important for selecting patients, who may benefit from treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The analysis is usually performed on cytological aspirates and/or histological needle biopsies, representing a small fraction....... Moreover, several inconclusive results in the diagnostic biopsies reveal that attention must be paid on the suitability of pre-operative biopsies for EGFR mutation analysis....

  5. A retrospective analysis of surgical site infections after chlorhexidine-alcohol versus iodine-alcohol for pre-operative antisepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charehbili, Ayoub; Swijnenburg, Rutger-Jan; van de Velde, Cornelis; van den Bremer, Jephta; van Gijn, Willem

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common hospital-acquired infection in the Netherlands. There is little evidence in regard to differences in the efficacy of pre-operative topical antisepsis with iodine-alcohol as compared with chlorhexidine-alcohol for preventing SSI. We conducted a retrospective analysis at a single center, involving all patients who underwent breast, colon, or vascular surgery in 2010 and 2011, in which pre-operative disinfection of the skin was done with iodine-alcohol in 2010 and with chlorhexidine-alcohol in 2011. Demographic characteristics, surgical parameters, and rates of SSI were compared in the two groups of patients. Subgroup analyses were done for wound classification, wound type, and type of surgery performed. Associations of patient characteristics with SSI were also investigated. Data were analyzed with χ(2) tests, Student t-tests, and logistic regression analysis. No statistically significant difference was found in the rates of SSI in the two study groups, at 6.1% for the patients who underwent antisepsis with iodine-alcohol and 3.8% for those who underwent disinfection with chlorhexidine-alcohol (p=0.20). After multivariable analysis, an odds ratio (OR) of 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.30-1.47) in favor of chlorhexidine-alcohol was found. Male gender, acute surgery, absence of antibiotic prophylaxis, and longer hospital length of stay (LOS) were all associated with SSI after pre-operative topical antisepsis. In this single-center study conducted over a course of one year with each of the preparations investigated, no difference in the rate of SSI was found after an instantaneous protocol change from iodine-alcohol to chlorhexidine-alcohol for pre-operative topical antisepsis.

  6. Columbia River system operation review. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    Since the 1930's, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M ampersand I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M ampersand I studies; Irrigation/M ampersand I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M ampersand I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement

  7. Economic efficiency of environmental management system operation in industrial companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukmasova, N.; Ershova, I.; Plastinina, I.; Boyarinov, A.

    2017-06-01

    The article examines the issue of the efficiency of the environmental management system (EMS) implementation in the Russian machine-building companies. The analysis showed that Russia clearly lags behind other developed and developing countries in terms of the number of ISO 14001 certified companies. According to the authors, the main cause of weak system implementation activity is attributed to the lack of interest in ISO 14001 certification on the Russian market. Five-year primary (field) research aimed at the analysis of the environmental priorities of the civilians suggests that the image component of the economic benefits ensures the increase in economic and financial performance of the company due to the increase in customers’ loyalty to the products of the EMS adopter. To quantify economic benefits obtained from EMS implementation, a methodological approach with regard to the image component and the decrease in semi-fixed costs due to the increase in the production scale has been developed. This approach has been tested in a machine-building electrical equipment manufacturer in Ekaterinburg. This approach applied to data processing yields the conclusion that EMS gives a good additional competitive advantage to its adopters.

  8. IEEE guide for planning of pre-operational testing programs for class 1E power systems for nuclear-power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) guide for pre-operational testing of Class 1E power systems for nuclear-power generating stations is presented. The guidelines apply to power systems both ac and dc supplies but not to the equipment which utilizes the ac and dc power. The pre-operational tests are performed after appropriate construction tests

  9. Premedication with gabapentin, alprazolam or a placebo for abdominal hysterectomy: Effect on pre-operative anxiety, post-operative pain and morphine consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Thomas Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims : Utility of gabapentin for pre-operative anxiolysis as compared to commonly administered alprazolam is not evident. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of pre-operative oral gabapentin 600 mg, alprazolam 0.5 mg or a placebo on pre-operative anxiety along with post-operative pain and morphine consumption. Methods: Seventy five patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy under general anaesthesia were included. Groups gabapentin, alprazolam and placebo, received oral gabapentin 600 mg, alprazolam 0.5 mg and one capsule of oral B-complex forte with Vitamin C respectively, on the night prior to surgery and 2 h prior to surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS was used to measure the anxiety and post-operative pain. All patients received patient-controlled analgesia. Statistical tests used were Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon signed rank test and one-way ANOVA. Results: Alprazolam provided significant anxiolysis (median [interquartile range] baseline VAS score 35 [15.5, 52] to 20 [6.5, 34.5] after drug administration; P = 0.007. Gabapentin did not provide significant decrease in anxiety (median [interquartile range] VAS score 21 [7.5, 41] to 20 [6.5, 34.5]; P = 0.782. First analgesic request time (median [interquartile range in minutes] was longer in group gabapentin (17.5 [10, 41.25] compared to group placebo (10 [5, 15] (P = 0.019 but comparable to that in group alprazolam (15 [10, 30]. Cumulative morphine consumption at different time periods and total morphine consumption (mean [standard deviation] at the end of study period (38.65 [18.04], 39.91 [15.73], 44.29 [16.02] mg in group gabapentin, alprazolam and placebo respectively were comparable. Conclusion: Gabapentin 600 mg does not have significant anxiolytic effect compared to alprazolam 0.5 mg. Alprazolam 0.5 mg was found to be an effective anxiolytic in the pre-operative period. Neither alprazolam nor gabapentin, when compared to placebo showed any opioid

  10. Use of a patient completed iPad questionnaire to improve pre-operative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, M; Hood, A J; Jayne, D G

    2017-02-01

    Developments in healthcare technology could improve patient care and reduce healthcare costs. There is a need to facilitate communication and increase efficiency in surgical pre-assessment clinics. This study aimed to develop an iPad application to deliver an electronic patient questionnaire, and to evaluate its use in the pre-assessment environment. Software was developed, MyOp, for a standard iPad that mirrored the paper-based pre-assessment system, with features designed for ease of patient use and remote data transfer. A case-control study was conducted, comparing use of MyOp with paper-based practice, to evaluate feasibility and patient preference. Patients were offered the use of MyOp or paper-based system. Outcomes measured included time to complete iPad questionnaire, consultation duration, and a patient preference questionnaire. MyOp cost £3500 to develop. 104 individuals participated in the study, 53 MyOp and 51 controls. MyOp reduced the median consultation duration by 5.00 min. A reduction was seen in all subgroups except those aged over 70 or urology patients. Patients preferred to complete the form independently, using a touchpad or computer but expressed concerns about data security. Use of an electronic patient questionnaire reduces consultation time delivering greater efficiency of pre-assessment nurse time. Preconceived ideas about the use of technology in older age groups are likely inaccurate and less of a barrier than previously thought. Electronic pre-assessments could be used routinely to reduce demands on healthcare facilities, improve patient care, and triage patients prior to clinic attendance.

  11. Pre-operative stroke and neurological disability do not independently affect short- and long-term mortality in infective endocarditis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Mahmoud; Guenther, Albrecht; Sponholz, Christoph; Lehmann, Thomas; Faerber, Gloria; Matz, Anna; Franz, Marcus; Witte, Otto W; Pletz, Mathias W; Doenst, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is still associated with high morbidity and mortality. The impact of pre-operative stroke on mortality and long-term survival is controversial. In addition, data on the severity of neurological disability due to pre-operative stroke are scarce. We analysed the impact of pre-operative stroke and the severity of its related neurological disability on short- and long-term outcome. We retrospectively reviewed our data from patients operated for left-sided IE between 01/2007 and 04/2013. We performed univariate (Chi-Square and independent samples t test) and multivariate analyses. Among 308 consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery for left-sided IE, pre-operative stroke was present in 87 (28.2 %) patients. Patients with pre-operative stroke had a higher pre-operative risk profile than patient without it: higher Charlson comorbidity index (8.1 ± 2.6 vs. 6.6 ± 3.3) and higher incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection (43 vs. 17 %) and septic shock (37 vs. 19 %). In-hospital mortality was equal but 5-year survival was significantly worse with pre-operative stroke (33.1 % vs. 45 %, p = 0.006). 5-year survival was worst in patients with severe neurological disability compared to mild disability (19.0 vs. 0.58 %, p = 0.002). However, neither pre-operative stroke nor the degree of neurological disability appeared as an independent risk factor for short or long-term mortality by multivariate analysis. Pre-operative stroke and the severity of neurological disability do not independently affect short- and long-term mortality in patients with infective endocarditis. It appears that patients with pre-operative stroke present with a generally higher risk profile. This information may substantially affect decision-making.

  12. 76 FR 37100 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement; Continued Operation of the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ..., hazardous and radioactive material transportation, energy efficiency and renewable energy, nuclear energy, fossil energy, magnetic fusion, basic energy sciences, supercomputing, and biological and environmental.... Further, an updated evaluation of SNL/NM operational and transportation accident analyses and a new...

  13. Sources of Data and Expertise for Environmental Factors Relevant to Amphibious Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew, Colin

    2000-01-01

    In the planning and conduct of amphibious operations it is necessary to have knowledge of a range of environmental variables, such as sea states, surf zone width and wave heights, beach composition, and bathymetry...

  14. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, CEA ratio, and treatment outcome of rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiation and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kai-Lin; Chang, Shih-Ching; Chu, Lee-Shing; Wang, Ling-Wei; Yang, Shung-Haur; Liang, Wen-Yih; Kuo, Ying-Ju; Lin, Jen-Kou; Lin, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Wei-Shone; Jiang, Jeng-Kae; Wang, Huann-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    To investigate serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Between 2000 and 2009, 138 patients with advanced rectal cancer receiving CRT before surgery at our hospital were retrospectively classified into 3 groups: pre-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group L; n = 87); pre-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml and post-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group H-L; n = 32); and both pre- and post-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml (group H-H; n = 19). CEA ratio (defined as post-CRT CEA divided by pre-CRT CEA), post-CRT CEA level and other factors were reviewed for prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was better in groups L (69.0%) and H-L (74.5%) than in group H-H (44.9%) (p = 0.024). Pathologic complete response was observed in 19.5%, 21.9% and 5.3% of groups L, H-L and H-H respectively (p = 0.281). Multivariate analysis showed that ypN stage and pCR were independent prognostic factors for DFS and that post-CRT CEA level was independently predictive of pCR. As a whole, post-CRT CEA <2.61 ng/ml predicted pCR (sensitivity 76.0%; specificity 58.4%). For those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml, post-CRT CEA and CEA ratio both predicted pCR (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 76.7%). In patients with pre-CRT serum CEA ≥6 ng/ml, those with “normalized” CEA levels after CRT may have similar DFS to those with “normal” (<6 ng/ml) pre-CRT values. Post-CRT CEA level is a predictor for pCR, especially in those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml

  15. Pre-operative combined 5-FU, low dose leucovorin, and sequential radiation therapy for unresectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, B.D.; Cohen, A.M.; Kemeny, N.; Enker, W.E.; Kelsen, D.P.; Schwartz, G.; Saltz, L.; Dougherty, J.; Frankel, J.; Wiseberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors performed a Phase 1 trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose of combined pre-operative radiation (5040 cGy) and 2 cycles (bolus daily x 5) of 5-FU and low dose LV (20 mg/m2), followed by surgery and 10 cycles of post-operative LV/5-FU in patients with unresectable primary or recurrent rectal cancer. Twelve patients were entered. The initial dose of 5-FU was 325 mg/m2. 5-FU was to be escalated while the LV remained constant at 20 mg/m2. Chemotherapy began on day 1 and radiation on day 8. The post-operative chemotherapy was not dose escalated; 5-FU: 425 mg/m2 and LV: 20 mg/m2. The median follow-up was 14 months (7--16 months). Following pre-operative therapy, the resectability rate with negative margins was 91% and the pathologic complete response rate was 9%. For the combined modality segment (preoperative) the incidence of any grade 3+ toxicity was diarrhea: 17%, dysuria: 8%, mucositis: 8%, and erythema: 8%. The median nadir counts were WBC: 3.1, HGB: 8.8, and PLT: 153000. The maximum tolerated dose of 5-FU for pre-operative combined LV/5-FU/RT was 325 mg/m2 with no escalation possible. Therefore, the recommended dose was less than 325 mg/m2. Since adequate doses of 5-FU to treat systemic disease could not be delivered until at least 3 months (cycle 3) following the start of therapy, the authors do not recommend that this 5-FU, low dose LV, and sequential radiation therapy regimen be used as presently designed. However, given the 91% resectability rate they remain encouraged with this approach. 31 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  16. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Final Environmental Impact Statement Supersonic Flight Operations in the Valentine Military Operations Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-04

    Federal Activities, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C. Sincerely yours,, PD k Whittington , P.E Regional Administrator Enclosure I I I I...many of the residents are deprived , disadvantaged; uninformed and part of a minority); nor is anyone certain the AF will make full restitUtion in light...only wash 217 our home away but would deprive to us of water for the pipelines that supply 217 water over the whole ranch. This reservoir has been here

  17. Pre-operative ultrasound identification of thyroiditis helps predict the need for thyroid hormone replacement after thyroid lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Lilah F; Iupe, Isabella M; Edeiken-Monroe, Beth S; Warneke, Carla L; Hansen, Mandy O; Evans, Douglas B; Lee, Jeffrey E; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Perrier, Nancy D

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether pre-operative thyroiditis identified by ultrasound (US) could help predict the need for thyroid hormone replacement (THR) following thyroid lobectomy. Data from patients who underwent thyroid lobectomy in 2006-2011, were not taking THR pre-operatively, and had ≥1 month of follow-up were reviewed retrospectively. THR was prescribed for relatively elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and hypothyroid symptoms. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the percentage of patients who required THR at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postoperatively, and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate prognostic factors for requiring post-thyroid lobectomy THR. During follow-up, 45 of 98 patients required THR. Median follow-up among patients not requiring THR was 11.6 months (range, 1.2 to 51.3 months). Six months after thyroid lobectomy, 22% of patients were taking THR (95% confidence interval [CI], 15-32%); the proportion increased to 46% at 12 months (95% CI, 36-57%) and 55% at 18 months (95% CI, 43-67%). On univariate analysis, significant prognostic factors for postoperative THR included a pre-operative TSH level >2.5 μ international units [IU]/mL (hazard ratio [HR], 2.8; 95% CI, 1.4-5.5; P = .004) and pathology-identified thyroiditis (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.3; P = .005). Patients with both pre-operative TSH >2.5 μIU/mL and US-identified thyroiditis had a 5.8-fold increased risk of requiring postoperative THR (95% CI, 2.4-13.9; P2.5 μIU/mL significantly increases the risk of requiring THR after thyroid lobectomy. Thyroiditis can add to that prediction and guide pre-operative patient counseling and surgical decision making. US-identified thyroiditis should be reported and post-thyroid lobectomy patients followed long-term (≥18 months).

  18. Environmental assessment related to the operation of Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    In order to evaluate the environmental impacts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operations, this assessment includes a descriptive section which is intended to provide sufficient detail to allow the various impacts to be viewed in proper perspective. In particular, details are provided on site characteristics, current programs, characterization of the existing site environment, and in-place environmental monitoring programs. In addition, specific facilities and operations that could conceivably impact the environment are described at length. 77 refs., 16 figs., 47 tabs.

  19. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System Operation Review (SOR) is being conducted jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Bonneville Power Administration. This summary of the SOR story begins where the Draft EIS summary left off. It is divided into seven parts, each of which reports some aspect of the study's outcome: Part 1 is a history. The SOR was not a simple study on any level, and to understand the EIS alternatives, some background is necessary. Part 2 reports the major findings of the technical analysis of alternative system operating strategies, and presents the agencies' Preferred Alternative. Part 3 explains actions the agencies may take with respect to the Columbia River Regional Forum, the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement, and the Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements. Part 4 presents the Purpose and Need, elements at the core of any Federal EIS. It includes a map showing the Columbia River Basin and information on the affected Federal projects. Part 5 describes the substantial public participation and outreach that occurred during the SOR, and Part 6 summarizes efforts to incorporate the Tribal perspective into the study. Part 7 describes other activities that will be taking place in the next few years, which are related to and build upon the SOR

  20. 78 FR 37281 - Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... factors: (1) License renewal will involve nuclear power plants for which the environmental impacts of...) Changes in the environment around nuclear power plants are gradual and predictable. The 1996 GEIS improved... environmental impacts that may occur from renewing commercial nuclear power plant operating licenses; (2...

  1. 78 FR 5830 - Draft Environmental Assessment and Proposed Habitat Conservation Plan for the Interim Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ...-FXES11120800000F2-123-F2] Draft Environmental Assessment and Proposed Habitat Conservation Plan for the Interim Operations of PacifiCorp's Klamath Hydroelectric Project on the Klamath River, Klamath County, OR, and... environmental assessment and proposed habitat conservation plan; request for comment. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish...

  2. Complex matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E; Gschwind, Michael K; Gunnels, John A

    2014-02-11

    Mechanisms for performing a complex matrix multiplication operation are provided. A vector load operation is performed to load a first vector operand of the complex matrix multiplication operation to a first target vector register. The first vector operand comprises a real and imaginary part of a first complex vector value. A complex load and splat operation is performed to load a second complex vector value of a second vector operand and replicate the second complex vector value within a second target vector register. The second complex vector value has a real and imaginary part. A cross multiply add operation is performed on elements of the first target vector register and elements of the second target vector register to generate a partial product of the complex matrix multiplication operation. The partial product is accumulated with other partial products and a resulting accumulated partial product is stored in a result vector register.

  3. Studies on the correlation between pre-and post-operative perfusion scintigraphy and differential spirometry in operated lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaseda, Shizuka; Ikeda, Takaaki; Sakai, Tadaaki; Tomaru, Hiroko; Ishihara, Tsuneo; Kikuchi, Keiichi.

    1982-01-01

    For the purpose of clarifying the relationship between the percentage of perfusion and that of vital capacity or oxygen uptake on the affected lung, perfusion scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-MAA and differential spirometry were performed in twenty patients including sixteen patients with lung cancer. Both examinations were performed before and after the operation. The results are as follows: (1) There is a significant correlation between the percentage of perfusion and that of vital capacity or oxygen uptake of the affected lung before and after the operation. (2) The estimation of the percentage of vital capacity or oxygen uptake of the affected lung is possible by combining the spirometry and sup(99m)Tc-MAA pulmonary scintigraphy. (author)

  4. Pre-operative urinary tract infection: is it a risk factor for early surgical site infection with hip fracture surgery? A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassa, Rafik Rd; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Y; Veravalli, Karunakar; Evans, D Alun

    2017-03-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine whether pre-operative urinary tract infections in patients presenting acutely with neck of femur fractures resulted in a delay to surgery and whether such patients were at increased risk of developing post-operative surgical site infections. A retrospective review of all patients presenting with a neck of femur fracture, at a single centre over a one-year period. The hospital hip fracture database was used as the main source of data. UK University Teaching Hospital. All patients ( n  = 460) presenting across a single year study period with a confirmed hip fracture. The presence of pre-operative urinary tract infection, the timing of surgical intervention, the occurrence of post-operative surgical site infection and the pathogens identified. A total of 367 patients were operated upon within 24 hours of admission. Urinary infections were the least common cause of delay. A total of 99 patients (21.5%) had pre-operative urinary tract infection. Post-operatively, a total of 57 (12.4%) patients developed a surgical site infection. Among the latter, 31 (54.4%) did not have a pre-operative urinary infection, 23 (40.4%) patients had a pre-operative urinary tract infection, 2 had chronic leg ulcers and one patient had a pre-operative chest infection. Statistically, there was a strong relationship between pre-operative urinary tract infection and the development of post-operative surgical site infection ( p -value: 0.0005). The results of our study indicate that pre-operative urinary tract infection has a high prevalence amongst those presenting with neck of femur fractures, and this is a risk factor for the later development of post-operative surgical site infection.

  5. Pre-operative planning and intra-operative guidance in modern neurosurgery: a review of 300 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, J.; Dorward, N.; Kitchen, N.; Thomas, D.

    1999-01-01

    Operative neurosurgery has recently entered an exciting era of image guided surgery or neuronavigation and application of this novel technology is beginning to have a significant impact in many ways in a variety of intracranial procedures. In order to fully assess the advantages of image guided techniques over conventional planning and surgery in selected cases, detailed prospective evaluation has been carried out during the advanced development of an optically tracked neuronavigation system. Over a 2-year period, 300 operative neurosurgical procedures have been performed with the assistance of interactive image guidance, as well as the development of new software applications and hardware tools. A broad range of intracranial neurosurgical procedures were seen to benefit from image guidance, including 163 craniotomies, 53 interactive stereotactic biopsies, 7 tracked neuroendoscopies and 37 complex skull base procedures. The most common pathological diagnoses were cerebral glioma in 98 cases, meningioma in 64 and metastasis in 23. Detailed analysis of a battery of postoperative questions revealed benefits in operative planning, appreciation of anatomy, lesion location, safety of surgery and greatly enhanced surgical confidence. The authors believe that image guided surgical technology, with new developments such as those described, has a significant role to play in contemporary neurosurgery and its widespread adoption in practice will be realised in the near future. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10615186

  6. FATTY MUSCLE INFILTRATION IN CUFF TEAR: PRE AND POST OPERATIVE EVALUATION BY MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Sella, Guilherme do Val; Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Zampieri, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the fatty infiltration and atrophy of the supraespinatus in the pre- and postoperative of a rotator cuff lesion (RCL), by MRI. Ten patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears who had undergone surgical arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between September and December 2011 were included. This is a prospective study, with analysis and comparison of fatty infiltration and atrophy of the supraespinatus. The occupation ratio was measured using the magic selection tool in Adobe Photoshop CS3((r)) on T1 oblique sagittal Y-view MRI. Through Photoshop, the proportion occupied by the muscle belly regarding its fossae was calculated. There was a statistically significant increase in the muscle ratio (p=0.013) comparing images pre and postoperative, analyzed by the Wilcoxon T test. The proportion of the supraspinal muscle above the pit increases in the immediate postoperative period, probably due to the traction exerted on the tendon at the time of repair. Level of Evidence II, Cohort Study.

  7. Evaluation of pre and post-operative spinal plain CT and CT-myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Joji; Inoue, Shunichi; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Kamata, Sakae; Shinohara, Hiroyasu.

    1983-01-01

    Confirmation of the level of scan slices is essential for the CT diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases. Pre- and postoperative comparison should be made on the same level. For reading of plain CT and CTM, window levels should be identical pre- and postoperatively. Both methods demonstrated the spinal canal, morphology of the spinal cord, and three-Fdimensional pathologic pictures inside and outside the spinal cord. Preoperative CT contributed useful information on the pathologic conditions and selection of surgical procedures and routes. Postoperative plain CT confirmed surgical results, and CTM revealed the spinal cord and the subarachnoid space, as well as the range and degree of decompression from the spinal cord. (Chiba, N.)

  8. Operationele Oceanografie en Rapid Environmental Assessment (Operational Oceanography and Rapid Environmental Assessment)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    te Raa, L. A; Lam, F. P; Schouten, M. W

    2008-01-01

    .... Possible applications of operational oceanography in REA include improved sonar performance predictions with three-dimensional sound speed forecasts, support of AUV mission planning with the help...

  9. Sentinel node localisation using pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative gamma probe in early oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, M.; Akhtar, S.; Junaid, M.; Dhari, T.; Zaman, M.U.; Hussain, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node localisation using pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy and intra-operative gamma probe radio localisation in Pakistani patients suffering from early stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Methods: The prospective case series was conducted between September 2007 and April 2010 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised patients with T1 and T2 oral cavity cancer with clinically and radiologically negative neck. Pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy was performed one day before surgery and intra-operative gamma probe was used to detect sentinel node. Final histo-pathological evaluation was taken as the gold standard. Results: The study comprised 42 patients: 32(76%) males and 10(24%) females. The primary tumour site was buccal mucosa in 25 (60%) patients, and tongue in 17 (40%). Sentinel lymph node was detected in 38 (90%) patients. On final histopathological identification, 7 (17%) patients had cancer in the neck nodes. In all patients with metastasis, sentinel lymph node technique correctly identified the involved neck level. None of the patients revealed metastasis in non-sentinel lymph nodes. Conclusion:Evidence suggested the use of sentinel node biopsy in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  10. Life cycle assessment based environmental impact estimation model for pre-stressed concrete beam bridge in the early design phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyong Ju; Yun, Won Gun; Cho, Namho; Ha, Jikwang

    2017-01-01

    The late rise in global concern for environmental issues such as global warming and air pollution is accentuating the need for environmental assessments in the construction industry. Promptly evaluating the environmental loads of the various design alternatives during the early stages of a construction project and adopting the most environmentally sustainable candidate is therefore of large importance. Yet, research on the early evaluation of a construction project's environmental load in order to aid the decision making process is hitherto lacking. In light of this dilemma, this study proposes a model for estimating the environmental load by employing only the most basic information accessible during the early design phases of a project for the pre-stressed concrete (PSC) beam bridge, the most common bridge structure. Firstly, a life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted on the data from 99 bridges by integrating the bills of quantities (BOQ) with a life cycle inventory (LCI) database. The processed data was then utilized to construct a case based reasoning (CBR) model for estimating the environmental load. The accuracy of the estimation model was then validated using five test cases; the model's mean absolute error rates (MAER) for the total environmental load was calculated as 7.09%. Such test results were shown to be superior compared to those obtained from a multiple-regression based model and a slab area base-unit analysis model. Henceforth application of this model during the early stages of a project is expected to highly complement environmentally friendly designs and construction by facilitating the swift evaluation of the environmental load from multiple standpoints. - Highlights: • This study is to develop the model of assessing the environmental impacts on LCA. • Bills of quantity from completed designs of PSC Beam were linked with the LCI DB. • Previous cases were used to estimate the environmental load of new case by CBR model. • CBR

  11. Life cycle assessment based environmental impact estimation model for pre-stressed concrete beam bridge in the early design phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyong Ju, E-mail: kjkim@cau.ac.kr; Yun, Won Gun, E-mail: ogun78@naver.com; Cho, Namho, E-mail: nhc51@cau.ac.kr; Ha, Jikwang, E-mail: wlrhkd29@gmail.com

    2017-05-15

    The late rise in global concern for environmental issues such as global warming and air pollution is accentuating the need for environmental assessments in the construction industry. Promptly evaluating the environmental loads of the various design alternatives during the early stages of a construction project and adopting the most environmentally sustainable candidate is therefore of large importance. Yet, research on the early evaluation of a construction project's environmental load in order to aid the decision making process is hitherto lacking. In light of this dilemma, this study proposes a model for estimating the environmental load by employing only the most basic information accessible during the early design phases of a project for the pre-stressed concrete (PSC) beam bridge, the most common bridge structure. Firstly, a life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted on the data from 99 bridges by integrating the bills of quantities (BOQ) with a life cycle inventory (LCI) database. The processed data was then utilized to construct a case based reasoning (CBR) model for estimating the environmental load. The accuracy of the estimation model was then validated using five test cases; the model's mean absolute error rates (MAER) for the total environmental load was calculated as 7.09%. Such test results were shown to be superior compared to those obtained from a multiple-regression based model and a slab area base-unit analysis model. Henceforth application of this model during the early stages of a project is expected to highly complement environmentally friendly designs and construction by facilitating the swift evaluation of the environmental load from multiple standpoints. - Highlights: • This study is to develop the model of assessing the environmental impacts on LCA. • Bills of quantity from completed designs of PSC Beam were linked with the LCI DB. • Previous cases were used to estimate the environmental load of new case by CBR model. • CBR

  12. Short-term pre- and post-operative stress prolongs incision-induced pain hypersensitivity without changing basal pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Wang, Po-Kai; Tiwari, Vinod; Liang, Lingli; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Shieh, Kun-Ruey; Zang, Wei-Dong; Kaufman, Andrew G; Bekker, Alex; Gao, Xiao-Qun; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-12-02

    Chronic stress has been reported to increase basal pain sensitivity and/or exacerbate existing persistent pain. However, most surgical patients have normal physiological and psychological health status such as normal pain perception before surgery although they do experience short-term stress during pre- and post-operative periods. Whether or not this short-term stress affects persistent postsurgical pain is unclear. In this study, we showed that pre- or post-surgical exposure to immobilization 6 h daily for three consecutive days did not change basal responses to mechanical, thermal, or cold stimuli or peak levels of incision-induced hypersensitivity to these stimuli; however, immobilization did prolong the duration of incision-induced hypersensitivity in both male and female rats. These phenomena were also observed in post-surgical exposure to forced swimming 25 min daily for 3 consecutive days. Short-term stress induced by immobilization was demonstrated by an elevation in the level of serum corticosterone, an increase in swim immobility, and a decrease in sucrose consumption. Blocking this short-term stress via intrathecal administration of a selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU38486, or bilateral adrenalectomy significantly attenuated the prolongation of incision-induced hypersensitivity to mechanical, thermal, and cold stimuli. Our results indicate that short-term stress during the pre- or post-operative period delays postoperative pain recovery although it does not affect basal pain perception. Prevention of short-term stress may facilitate patients' recovery from postoperative pain.

  13. Environmental aspects based on operation performance of nuclear fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    This publication was prepared within the framework of the IAEA Project entitled Development and Upgrading of Guidelines, Databases and Tools for Integrating Comparative Assessment into Energy System Analysis and Policy Making, which included the collection, review and input of data into a database on health and environmental impacts related to operation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The objectives of the report included assembling environmental data on operational performance of nuclear fabrication facilities in each country; compiling and arranging the data in a database, which will be easily available to experts and the public; and presenting data that may be of value for future environmental assessment of nuclear fabrication facilities

  14. An Essay on “Pre-elements” for the Renovation of Environmental Thoughts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Kos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses blind spots in the knowledge about the historical development of nature-culture relations. The result is a weak and anthropocentric “warped” understanding of the basic historical stages of the social relationship to nature. This default stance has an impact on modern versions of environmental reflection, and consequentially impacts the efficiency of solving today’s environmental dilemmas and problems. The topic is extremely extensive and complex, therefore an essayist and selective approach is inevitable. The purpose of the article is not to offer a new and more comprehensive “truth”, but to promote discussion and dialogue on alternative interpretations, which have been and are still largely marginalized. The ultimate objective is to draw attention to discussions on the revitalization of the fundamental constitutive elements of the relationship to nature that would also allow for the revitalization of environmental reflections, and thus perhaps also the revitalization of contemporary environmental theories and trends.

  15. Radiological Environmental Protection for LCLS-II High Power Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu James

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The LCLS-II superconducting electron accelerator at SLAC plans to operate at up to 4 GeV and 240 kW average power, which would create higher radiological impacts particularly near the beam loss points such as beam dumps and halo collimators. The main hazards to the public and environment include direct or skyshine radiation, effluent of radioactive air such as 13N, 15O and 41Ar, and activation of groundwater creating tritium. These hazards were evaluated using analytic methods and FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The controls (mainly extensive bulk shielding and local shielding around high loss points and monitoring (neutron/photon detectors with detection capabilities below natural background at site boundary, site-wide radioactive air monitors, and groundwater wells were designed to meet the U.S. DOE and EPA, as well as SLAC requirements. The radiological design and controls for the LCW systems [including concrete housing shielding for 15O and 11C circulating in LCW, 7Be and erosion/corrosion products (22Na, 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, etc. captured in resin and filters, leak detection and containment of LCW with 3H and its waste water discharge; explosion from H2 build-up in surge tank and release of radionuclides] associated with the high power beam dumps are also presented.

  16. Radiological Environmental Protection for LCLS-II High Power Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, James; Blaha, Jan; Cimeno, Maranda; Mao, Stan; Nicolas, Ludovic; Rokni, Sayed; Santana, Mario; Tran, Henry

    2017-09-01

    The LCLS-II superconducting electron accelerator at SLAC plans to operate at up to 4 GeV and 240 kW average power, which would create higher radiological impacts particularly near the beam loss points such as beam dumps and halo collimators. The main hazards to the public and environment include direct or skyshine radiation, effluent of radioactive air such as 13N, 15O and 41Ar, and activation of groundwater creating tritium. These hazards were evaluated using analytic methods and FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The controls (mainly extensive bulk shielding and local shielding around high loss points) and monitoring (neutron/photon detectors with detection capabilities below natural background at site boundary, site-wide radioactive air monitors, and groundwater wells) were designed to meet the U.S. DOE and EPA, as well as SLAC requirements. The radiological design and controls for the LCW systems [including concrete housing shielding for 15O and 11C circulating in LCW, 7Be and erosion/corrosion products (22Na, 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, etc.) captured in resin and filters, leak detection and containment of LCW with 3H and its waste water discharge; explosion from H2 build-up in surge tank and release of radionuclides] associated with the high power beam dumps are also presented.

  17. Pre-Swirl Stator and Propeller Design for Varying Operating Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saettone, Simone; Regener, Pelle Bo; Andersen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    blades ahead of the propeller.This paper describes the hydrodynamic design of apre-swirl stator with radially variable pitch, paired with aconventional propeller. The aim is to achieve the highest possible effciency in various operating conditions, and to avoid effciency penalties in off-design operation.......To investigate the propeller and stator designs and configurations in different operating conditions, the computationally inexpensive vortex-lattice method is used a sa first step to optimize the geometry in an initial parameter study. Then the flow over hull, stator and propelleris simulated in a CFD...

  18. Environmental hedging: A theory and method for reconciling reservoir operations for downstream ecology and water supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L. E.; Lund, J. R.; Moyle, P. B.; Quiñones, R. M.; Herman, J. D.; O'Rear, T. A.

    2017-09-01

    Building reservoir release schedules to manage engineered river systems can involve costly trade-offs between storing and releasing water. As a result, the design of release schedules requires metrics that quantify the benefit and damages created by releases to the downstream ecosystem. Such metrics should support making operational decisions under uncertain hydrologic conditions, including drought and flood seasons. This study addresses this need and develops a reservoir operation rule structure and method to maximize downstream environmental benefit while meeting human water demands. The result is a general approach for hedging downstream environmental objectives. A multistage stochastic mixed-integer nonlinear program with Markov Chains, identifies optimal "environmental hedging," releases to maximize environmental benefits subject to probabilistic seasonal hydrologic conditions, current, past, and future environmental demand, human water supply needs, infrastructure limitations, population dynamics, drought storage protection, and the river's carrying capacity. Environmental hedging "hedges bets" for drought by reducing releases for fish, sometimes intentionally killing some fish early to reduce the likelihood of large fish kills and storage crises later. This approach is applied to Folsom reservoir in California to support survival of fall-run Chinook salmon in the lower American River for a range of carryover and initial storage cases. Benefit is measured in terms of fish survival; maintaining self-sustaining native fish populations is a significant indicator of ecosystem function. Environmental hedging meets human demand and outperforms other operating rules, including the current Folsom operating strategy, based on metrics of fish extirpation and water supply reliability.

  19. An application of the MEMbrain training module: Pre-hospital rescue operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, V.

    1998-01-01

    A system for training in pre-hospital emergency management is being developed and the first version of a prototype has been completed. The training system fulfils the demands from the domain of hospital emergency planning centres and medical attendants concerning increased efficiency of rescue...... efforts. This includes enhanced first aid on site and improved overall co-ordination amongst the organisations involved in coping with emergency situations. The training system is based on the Multi-User System for Training Emergency Response (MUSTER) concept which is used for the training module...

  20. National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Design and Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnant, F.

    2008-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system - the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS will replace the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD and will provide continuity for the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) with the launch of the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP). This poster will provide an overview of the NPOESS architecture, which includes four segments. The space segment includes satellites in two orbits that carry a suite of sensors to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the Earth, atmosphere, and near-Earth space environment. The NPOESS design allows centralized mission management and delivers high quality environmental products to military, civil and scientific users through a Command, Control, and Communication Segment (C3S). The data processing for NPOESS is accomplished through an Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS)/Field Terminal Segment (FTS) that processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government as well as to remote terminal users. The Launch Support Segment completes the four segments that make up NPOESS that will enhance the connectivity between research and operations and provide critical operational and scientific environmental measurements to military, civil, and scientific users until 2026.

  1. Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan's purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner

  2. Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-10

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

  3. Environmental impact of geometric earthwork construction in pre-Columbian Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John Francis; Whitney, Bronwen S; Mayle, Francis E; Iriarte, José; Prümers, Heiko; Soto, J Daniel; Watling, Jennifer

    2014-07-22

    There is considerable controversy over whether pre-Columbian (pre-A.D. 1492) Amazonia was largely "pristine" and sparsely populated by slash-and-burn agriculturists, or instead a densely populated, domesticated landscape, heavily altered by extensive deforestation and anthropogenic burning. The discovery of hundreds of large geometric earthworks beneath intact rainforest across southern Amazonia challenges its status as a pristine landscape, and has been assumed to indicate extensive pre-Columbian deforestation by large populations. We tested these assumptions using coupled local- and regional-scale paleoecological records to reconstruct land use on an earthwork site in northeast Bolivia within the context of regional, climate-driven biome changes. This approach revealed evidence for an alternative scenario of Amazonian land use, which did not necessitate labor-intensive rainforest clearance for earthwork construction. Instead, we show that the inhabitants exploited a naturally open savanna landscape that they maintained around their settlement despite the climatically driven rainforest expansion that began ∼2,000 y ago across the region. Earthwork construction and agriculture on terra firme landscapes currently occupied by the seasonal rainforests of southern Amazonia may therefore not have necessitated large-scale deforestation using stone tools. This finding implies far less labor--and potentially lower population density--than previously supposed. Our findings demonstrate that current debates over the magnitude and nature of pre-Columbian Amazonian land use, and its impact on global biogeochemical cycling, are potentially flawed because they do not consider this land use in the context of climate-driven forest-savanna biome shifts through the mid-to-late Holocene.

  4. Mortality in perforated duodenal ulcer depends upon pre-operative risk: a retrospective 10-year study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Larkin, J O

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Most patients presenting with acutely perforated duodenal ulcer undergo operation, but conservative treatment may be indicated when an ulcer has spontaneously sealed with minimal\\/localised peritoneal irritation or when the patient\\'s premorbid performance status is poor. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with operative and conservative management of perforated duodenal ulcers over a 10-year period and analysed outcome according to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score. METHODS: The records of all patients presenting with perforated duodenal ulcer to the Department of Surgery, Mayo General Hospital, between January 1998 and December 2007 were reviewed. Age, gender, co-morbidity, ASA-score, clinical presentation, mode of management, operative procedures, morbidity and mortality were considered. RESULTS: Of 76 patients included, 48 (44 operative, 4 conservative) were ASA I-III, with no mortality irrespective of treatment. Amongst 28 patients with ASA-score IV\\/V, mortality was 54.5% (6\\/11) following operative management and 52.9% (9\\/17) with conservative management. CONCLUSION: In patients with a perforated duodenal ulcer and ASA-score I-III, postoperative outcome is uniformly favourable. We recommend these patients have repair with peritoneal lavage performed, routinely followed postoperatively by empirical triple therapy. Given that mortality is equivalent between ASA IV\\/V patients whether managed operatively or conservatively, we suggest that both management options are equally justifiable.

  5. Urinary cotinine testing as pre-operative assessment of patients undergoing free flap surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinbold, C; Rausky, J; Binder, J-P; Revol, M

    2015-02-01

    The identified risks of smoking with regard to operated tissues are so elevated that it is clearly dangerous to operate a smoker when the proposed intervention is neither vital nor urgent. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate a simple method of screening patients who smoke, with the evaluation carried out before agreeing to carry out free tissue transfer. The purpose of the testing was to hold the patient responsible for his actions and minimize smoking-related complications by cancelling or postponing the planned operation if the patient continued to smoke. Screening included use of a standardized questionnaire at the first consultation and detection of cotinine using a urine test strip 7 days before the scheduled surgery. Patients were informed that in the event of positive results, the operation would not take place. A six-week preoperative smoking cessation period was mandatory. Seventy-six patients were included in this study. Among them, 25 (32.9%) reported being former smokers and 11 (14.5%) admitted in the initial questionnaire to being active smokers. Six patients (7.9%), including one self-reported non-smoker, tested positive for cotinine, and their operations were cancelled. Screening using a questionnaire and cotinine detection appeared to constitute a simple, inexpensive, rapid and reliable test. It allowed us to refuse to operate 6 non-compliant patients and was thereby likely to diminish morbidity in the free tissue transfers carried out in our ward. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Environmental analysis of the operation of the ERDA facilities in Oak Ridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWherter, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of the environmental effects of current ERDA operations in Oak Ridge is being conducted to establish a baseline for the consideration of the environmental effects of additional facilities or modified operations in the future. An extensive ecological survey has been conducted for about one year; social and economic data were obtained; and an archaeological survey of the area was made. The facilities were described and the effluents associated with operations were quantified to the extent practical. The effects of effluent releases to the environment are being analyzed. The social effects of the ERDA facilities in Oak Ridge are also being studied. (auth)

  7. Pre-operative Spermatic Cord Ultrasonography Helps to Reduce the Incidence of Metachronous Inguinal Hernia in Boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoujiang Huang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: Thickening of the spermatic cord is a clinical sign of an inguinal hernia. We therefore tested whether pre-operative spermatic cord ultrasonography could reduce the incidence of metachronous inguinal hernia (MIH.Methods: Boys under 2 years old with an initial unilateral inguinal hernia were enrolled in this study. In whom the width of the asymptomatic-sided spermatic cord was ≥0.5 cm, these patients underwent contralateral groin exploration. Age at initial operation, weight, initial operation side, the sonographic width of the spermatic cord, the operative findings and presence of MIH were recorded, and the relationship among them was studied. Boys in the US group underwent an open herniorrhaphy with pre-operative ultrasound examination; the non-US group included boys who did not undergo a pre-operative ultrasound examination. A receiver operator curve (ROC analysis was performed to evaluated predictive value of the sonographic width of the spermatic cord for contralateral hernia.Results: A total of 24 months' follow-up data were obtained from 1,793 boys (US group 1,162, non-US group 631. In the US group, the width of the hernia-sided spermatic cord (0.75 ± 0.18 cm was larger than the normal side (0.37 ± 0.05 cm, P < 0.001. And the width of normal side spermatic cord had no significant difference between the groups regarding other factors such as age and weight. In whom the width of the asymptomatic-sided spermatic cord was ≥0.5 cm, the corresponding incidence of CIH was 86.4% (57/66. The width of the spermatic cord predicted the presence of contralateral hernia with ROC area under the curve = 0.943 (95% CI = 0.919–0.966. The total incidence of MIH was 4.1% (74/1793. The incidence of MIH in the US group was 2.2% (25/1162 much lower than 7.8% (49/631 in the non-US group (P < 0.001. If the width of the asymptomatic-sided spermatic cord was 0.5 cm and 0.54 cm, the corresponding sensitivity was 0.682 and 0

  8. Does operational oceanography address the needs of fisheries and applied environmental scientists?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berx, B.; Dickey-Collas, M.; Skogen, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    whether recent developments in operational oceanographic products are addressing these needs. The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) Working Group on Operational Oceanographic products for Fisheries and Environment (WGOOFE) identified a potential mismatch between user requirements......Although many oceanographic data products are now considered operational, continued dialogue between data producers and their user communities is still needed. The fisheries and environmental science communities have often been criticized for their lack of multidisciplinarity, and it is not clear...

  9. Concern for pain in the pre-operative period- is the internet being used for information by patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Viji; Dabu-Bondoc, Susan; Senior, Audrey; Dai, Feng; Hersey, Denise; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2014-02-01

    This study was conducted to provide information regarding prevalence of pain, type of provider managing pain, and use of Internet for information regarding pain, among patients coming for presurgical anesthesia consultation at a major academic institution. With IRB approval, patients were invited to participate in a voluntary and anonymous 14 question survey given to them when they presented for anesthesia consultation prior to their surgical procedure. The qualitative/categorical data were summarized by number (percentage [%]) and analyzed by Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. All data analyses were performed using the statistical software SAS, v9.2. A total of 1039 patients were asked to complete the survey and 670 patients returned their responses (response rate = 64.5%). 83% of patients had a history of prior surgery. 57% were concerned about postoperative pain. 30% of patients had chronic pain for more than 3 months pre-operatively. 16% of patients had looked online for information regarding pain. Pain physicians were involved in pain management only in 3.8% of these patients. Patients are presenting for surgery with significant pre-operative pain issues. Knowing this information pre-operatively will help healthcare personnel manage postsurgical pain more effectively. Patients are also using the Internet to obtain information regarding pain. As providers, there may be value to directing patients to reliable information online during consultation. As all physicians will eventually be managing chronic pain in their patients, pain education should be given priority in medical school curriculum. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  10. Cecal volvulus: a rare cause of bowel obstruction in a pediatric patient diagnosed pre-operatively by conventional imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, Nghia J.; O'Hara, Sara M.; Alonso, Maria H.

    2005-01-01

    Cecal volvulus is an acute surgical condition that is extremely rare in children, with a mortality rate of up to 40%. The clinical symptoms are often non-specific, and pediatric patients frequently have neurological deficits with associated communication difficulties, making the clinical diagnosis extremely challenging. Conventional radiographic imaging studies play a key role in the prospective diagnosis in children. We report a rare case of cecal volvulus in a 12-year-old boy who was diagnosed pre-operatively by abdominal radiographs and a contrast enema. (orig.)

  11. Cecal volvulus: a rare cause of bowel obstruction in a pediatric patient diagnosed pre-operatively by conventional imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo, Nghia J.; O' Hara, Sara M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati (United States); Alonso, Maria H. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pediatric and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, Ohio (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Cecal volvulus is an acute surgical condition that is extremely rare in children, with a mortality rate of up to 40%. The clinical symptoms are often non-specific, and pediatric patients frequently have neurological deficits with associated communication difficulties, making the clinical diagnosis extremely challenging. Conventional radiographic imaging studies play a key role in the prospective diagnosis in children. We report a rare case of cecal volvulus in a 12-year-old boy who was diagnosed pre-operatively by abdominal radiographs and a contrast enema. (orig.)

  12. Value of whole body bone scan in the pre-operative assessment in carcinoma of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, P [Oerebro Regional Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Vikterloef, K J; Beckman, K W [Oerebro Regional Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Rydman, H; Blom, O [Oerebro Regional Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1979-01-01

    In 126 patients with primary breast cancer a patient moving whole-body bone scan was performed when they first presented. None of the patients in stage I had an evidence of skeletal metastases. Two patients (3%) of 62 in stage II and 4 patients (17%) in stage III had evidence of skeletal metastases. It appears that whole-body scanning is the most accurate, sensitive and convenient method of detecting osseous metastases and of staging breast cancer. This investigation should be carried out pre-operatively. Detection of early asymptomatic bony metastases will provide a better planning of treatment with rational approach.

  13. Pre- and post-operative gait analysis for evaluation of neck pain in chronic whiplash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginsburg Glen M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic neck pain after whiplash is notoriously refractory to conservative treatment, and positive radiological findings to explain the symptoms are scarce. The apparent disproportionality between subjective complaints and objective findings is significant for the planning of treatment, impairment ratings, and judicial questions on causation. However, failure to identify a symptom's focal origin with routine imaging studies does not invalidate the symptom per se. It is therefore of a general interest both to develop effective therapeutic strategies in chronic whiplash, and to establish techniques for objectively evaluation of treatment outcomes. Methods Twelve patients with chronic neck pain after whiplash underwent pre- and postoperative computerized 3D gait analysis. Results Significant improvement was found in all gait parameters, cervical range-of-motion, and self reported pain (VAS. Conclusion Chronic neck pain is associated with abnormal cervical spine motion and gait patterns. 3D gait analysis is a useful instrument to assess the outcome of treatment for neck pain.

  14. Effect of safe environmental pre and post harvest treatments and irradiation on handling of some fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawito, M.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out during two successive seasons of 2005 and 2006 seasons on M ontakhab El-Kanater g uavas and H achiya p ersimmons.two different experiments were studied, the first one for pre harvest and second post harvest. Regarding pre harvest experiment,hand or chemical flower thinning by urea or ethrel and date of fruit picking (maturity) were evaluated on both guavas and persimmons.All flower thinning treatments increased fruit set,total yield,average fruit weight and decreased fruit abscission.However,a great effect on fruit quality and chemical compositions were also found with flower thinning treatments. Chemical flower thinning was more effective than hand thinning in improving yield and quality in M ontakhab El-Kanater g uavas and H achiya p ersimmons. However,early maturation(120 and 150 days for guava and persimmon respect.) produced poor fruit quality.Whereas, medium maturity(130 and 180 days for guava and persimmon respect.) produced fruit with high quality.However,late picking(140 and 210 days for guava and persimmon respect.) produced fruits with less marketability. On the other side, post harvest treatments including irradiation of fruits with or without pre-cooling process at 0.2,0.4,and 0.8 K.Gy for guavas and 1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 K.Gy for persimmons. Also,hot water at 45 degree C, fungicide at 0.5 and 1.0 g/L.and ethanol vapor at 25 and 50% were evaluated on both fruits. The obtained data were evaluated on discarded fruits %, weight loss %, fruit firmness,fruit marketability, total soluble solids,acidity,L-ascorbic acid (guava), tannins (persimmon), total sugars and fruit respiration. All supplementary refrigeration treatments improved fruit quality during cold storage but ethanol vapor either 25 or 50 % were more effective than other treatments

  15. The Relationship between Pre-Service Teachers' Awareness Levels of Electromagnetic Pollution and Other Environmental Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koklukaya, Ayse Nesibe; Guven Yildirim, Ezgi; Selvi, Mahmut

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to find out the relationship between the awareness level of preservice science teachers' conscious use of technological devices, which cause electromagnetic pollution, and their awareness level of related environmental problems. Research Methods: In this study, a mixed design method was used. A relational…

  16. Environmental Audit at Santa Barbara Operations, Special Technologies Laboratory, Remote Sensing Laboratory, North Las Vegas Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Audit of selected facilities under the jurisdiction of the DOE Nevada Operations Office (NV) that are operated by EG and G Energy Measurements, Incorporated (EG and G/EM). The facilities included in this Audit are those of Santa Barbara Operation (SBO) at Goleta, California; the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) at Santa Barbara, California; and Las Vegas Area Operations (LVAO) including the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, and the North Las Vegas Facilities (NLVF) at North Las Vegas, Nevada. The Environmental Audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Audit, commencing on January 28, 1991 and ending on February 15, 1991. The scope of the Audit was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air, surface water/drinking water, groundwater, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, quality assurance, radiation, inactive waste sites, and environmental management. Also assessed was compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations and requirements; internal operating requirements; DOE Orders; and best management practices. 8 tabs

  17. Comparing Pre- and Post-Operative Fontan Hemodynamic Simulations: Implications for the Reliability of Surgical Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Christopher M.; de Zélicourt, Diane A.; Restrepo, Maria; Rossignac, Jarek; Spray, Thomas L.; Kanter, Kirk R.; Fogel, Mark A.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Virtual modeling of cardiothoracic surgery is a new paradigm that allows for systematic exploration of various operative strategies and uses engineering principles to predict the optimal patient-specific plan. This study investigates the predictive accuracy of such methods for the surgical palliation of single ventricle heart defects. Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based surgical planning was used to model the Fontan procedure for four patients prior to surgery. The objective for each was to identify the operative strategy that best distributed hepatic blood flow to the pulmonary arteries. Post-operative magnetic resonance data were acquired to compare (via CFD) the post-operative hemodynamics with predictions. Results Despite variations in physiologic boundary conditions (e.g., cardiac output, venous flows) and the exact geometry of the surgical baffle, sufficient agreement was observed with respect to hepatic flow distribution (90% confidence interval-14 ± 4.3% difference). There was also good agreement of flow-normalized energetic efficiency predictions (19 ± 4.8% error). Conclusions The hemodynamic outcomes of prospective patient-specific surgical planning of the Fontan procedure are described for the first time with good quantitative comparisons between preoperatively predicted and postoperative simulations. These results demonstrate that surgical planning can be a useful tool for single ventricle cardiothoracic surgery with the ability to deliver significant clinical impact. PMID:22777126

  18. Human actions treatment in the Juragua NPP pre-operational PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro Fernandez, R.

    1996-01-01

    The human reliability analysis is an important part of the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA). Because Juragua NPP PSA has been accomplished during construction stage of the plant, no specific operational procedures nor experience for human reliability analysis task taking into account the worlds current methodologies in this field and the actual situation of the plant. This papers describes the approach we followed

  19. Is Tc99m-MIBI scintigraphy a predictor of response to pre-operative neoadjuvant chemotherapy in Osteosarcoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahidreza Dabbagh Kakhki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Multidrug resistance (MDR, which may be due to the over expression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp and/or MRP, is a major problem in neoadjuvant chemotherapy of osteosarcoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Tc-99m MIBI scan for predicting the response to pre-operative chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients (12 males and 13 females, aged between 8 and 52y with osteosarcoma were studied. Before the chemotherapy, planar 99mTc-MIBI anterior and posterior images were obtained 10-min [tumor-to-background ratio: (T1/B110min] and 3-hr after tracer injection. After completion of chemotherapy, again 99mTc-MIBI scan was performed at 10-min after tracer injection. In addition to calculation of decay corrected tumor to background (T/B ratios ,  using the 10-min and 3-hr images of the pre-chemotherapy scintigraphy , percent wash-out rate (WR% of 99mTc-MIBI was calculated. Using the 10-min images of the pre- and post-chemotherapy scans, the percent reduction in uptake at the tumor site after treatment (Red% was also calculated. Then after surgical resection, tumor response was assessed by percentage of necrosis. Results: All patients showed significant 99mTc-MIBI uptake in early images. Only 9 patients showed good response to chemotherapy (necrosis≥90% while 16 patients were considered as non-responder (necrosis

  20. Standard operating procedures for pre-analytical handling of blood and urine for metabolomic studies and biobanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, Patrizia; Bertini, Ivano; Luchinat, Claudio; Nincheri, Paola; Staderini, Samuele; Turano, Paola

    2011-04-01

    (1)H NMR metabolic profiling of urine, serum and plasma has been used to monitor the impact of the pre-analytical steps on the sample quality and stability in order to propose standard operating procedures (SOPs) for deposition in biobanks. We analyzed the quality of serum and plasma samples as a function of the elapsed time (t = 0-4 h) between blood collection and processing and of the time from processing to freezing (up to 24 h). The stability of the urine metabolic profile over time (up to 24 h) at various storage temperatures was monitored as a function of the different pre-analytical treatments like pre-storage centrifugation, filtration, and addition of the bacteriostatic preservative sodium azide. Appreciable changes in the profiles, reflecting changes in the concentration of a number of metabolites, were detected and discussed in terms of chemical and enzymatic reactions for both blood and urine samples. Appropriate procedures for blood derivatives collection and urine preservation/storage that allow maintaining as much as possible the original metabolic profile of the fresh samples emerge, and are proposed as SOPs for biobanking.

  1. Standard operating procedures for pre-analytical handling of blood and urine for metabolomic studies and biobanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernini, Patrizia; Bertini, Ivano; Luchinat, Claudio; Nincheri, Paola; Staderini, Samuele; Turano, Paola

    2011-01-01

    1 H NMR metabolic profiling of urine, serum and plasma has been used to monitor the impact of the pre-analytical steps on the sample quality and stability in order to propose standard operating procedures (SOPs) for deposition in biobanks. We analyzed the quality of serum and plasma samples as a function of the elapsed time (t = 0−4 h) between blood collection and processing and of the time from processing to freezing (up to 24 h). The stability of the urine metabolic profile over time (up to 24 h) at various storage temperatures was monitored as a function of the different pre-analytical treatments like pre-storage centrifugation, filtration, and addition of the bacteriostatic preservative sodium azide. Appreciable changes in the profiles, reflecting changes in the concentration of a number of metabolites, were detected and discussed in terms of chemical and enzymatic reactions for both blood and urine samples. Appropriate procedures for blood derivatives collection and urine preservation/storage that allow maintaining as much as possible the original metabolic profile of the fresh samples emerge, and are proposed as SOPs for biobanking.

  2. Standard operating procedures for pre-analytical handling of blood and urine for metabolomic studies and biobanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernini, Patrizia; Bertini, Ivano, E-mail: bertini@cerm.unifi.it; Luchinat, Claudio [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Nincheri, Paola; Staderini, Samuele [FiorGen Foundation (Italy); Turano, Paola [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    {sup 1}H NMR metabolic profiling of urine, serum and plasma has been used to monitor the impact of the pre-analytical steps on the sample quality and stability in order to propose standard operating procedures (SOPs) for deposition in biobanks. We analyzed the quality of serum and plasma samples as a function of the elapsed time (t = 0-4 h) between blood collection and processing and of the time from processing to freezing (up to 24 h). The stability of the urine metabolic profile over time (up to 24 h) at various storage temperatures was monitored as a function of the different pre-analytical treatments like pre-storage centrifugation, filtration, and addition of the bacteriostatic preservative sodium azide. Appreciable changes in the profiles, reflecting changes in the concentration of a number of metabolites, were detected and discussed in terms of chemical and enzymatic reactions for both blood and urine samples. Appropriate procedures for blood derivatives collection and urine preservation/storage that allow maintaining as much as possible the original metabolic profile of the fresh samples emerge, and are proposed as SOPs for biobanking.

  3. Pre-operative radio-chemo-thermotherapy for advanced (T3-4) and/or recurrent rectal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wust, P.; Gremmler, M.; Rau, B.; Loeffel, J.; Gellermann, J.; Stahl, H.; Vogl, T.; Riess, H.; Schlag, P.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies suggest that pre-operative radio-chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer can increase resectability and local control (T4 stages), and might facilitate sphincter-preserving surgery (T3 stages). However, response rates are still unsatisfactory for radiotherapy alone, and are only slightly better for radio-chemotherapy. Radiofrequency hyperthermia has now achieved a technical stage already suitable for treating this tumor entity effectively in clinical practice. Therefore, a trimodal pre-operative approach for T3-4 rectal carcinomas has been investigated in a phase I/II study. Materials and Methods: A phase I/II study was conducted on 30 pts with advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer. (7(30)) pts had recurrences, (9(30)) uT3, (14(30)) T4-stage of the primary. Initial tumor stage was assessed by endosonography, CT and occasionally MRI (T1-w ± Echovist, T2-w, proton density). Radiotherapy was delivered in prone position using a belly-board, three-field technique, standard blocks, 5x1.8 → 45 Gy in 5 weeks. In parallel, 5-FU (300-350 mg/kg, dose escalation) and folinic acid (50 mg) on days 1-5 and days 22-28. Regional hyperthermia was administered using the annular phased array applicator SIGMA-60 once a week. Index temperatures T x were deduced from thermal mapping scans in endocavitary/intratumoral catheters. Re-staging was done by endosonography and CT. Four weeks after radiotherapy, surgery was performed with preference to continence preserving operations. If the tumor remained unresectable, a boost to a total tumor dose of 60 Gy was claimed. Results: (7(30)) pts (23%) did not undergo resection because their tumors remained technically non-resectable: 4 pts with persistent local control of 12-18 mts, 2 pts with progressive disease, 1 pt with too short observation time. (23(30)) pts underwent surgery: only 1 R2-resection, 22 R0-resections. The patho-histological analysis documented 4 CR (17%) at the primary tumor, 12 PR

  4. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix G: Land use and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. The SOR began in early 1990, prior to the filing of petitions for endangered status for several salmon species under the Endangered Species Act. The comprehensive review of Columbia River operations encompassed by the SOR was prompted by the need for Federal decisions to (1) develop a coordinated system operating strategy (SOS) for managing the multiple uses of the system into the 21st century; (2) provide interested parties with a continuing and increased long-term role in system planning (Columbia River Regional Forum); (3) renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA), a contractual arrangement among the region's major hydroelectric-generating utilities and affected Federal agencies to provide for coordinated power generation on the Columbia River system; and (4) renew or develop new Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements. The review provides the environmental analysis required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR

  5. Comparison of 3D reconstruction of mandible for pre-operative planning using commercial and open-source software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Johari Yap; Omar, Marzuki; Pritam, Helmi Mohd Hadi; Husein, Adam; Rajion, Zainul Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    3D printing of mandible is important for pre-operative planning, diagnostic purposes, as well as for education and training. Currently, the processing of CT data is routinely performed with commercial software which increases the cost of operation and patient management for a small clinical setting. Usage of open-source software as an alternative to commercial software for 3D reconstruction of the mandible from CT data is scarce. The aim of this study is to compare two methods of 3D reconstruction of the mandible using commercial Materialise Mimics software and open-source Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit (MITK) software. Head CT images with a slice thickness of 1 mm and a matrix of 512x512 pixels each were retrieved from the server located at the Radiology Department of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. The CT data were analysed and the 3D models of mandible were reconstructed using both commercial Materialise Mimics and open-source MITK software. Both virtual 3D models were saved in STL format and exported to 3matic and MeshLab software for morphometric and image analyses. Both models were compared using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Hausdorff Distance. No significant differences were obtained between the 3D models of the mandible produced using Mimics and MITK software. The 3D model of the mandible produced using MITK open-source software is comparable to the commercial MIMICS software. Therefore, open-source software could be used in clinical setting for pre-operative planning to minimise the operational cost.

  6. Digital multimedia books produced using iBooks Author for pre-operative surgical patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Matthew; Wilkinson, Caroline; Golash, Aprajay

    2014-10-01

    Presenting patients with medical information and ensuring informed consent can be difficult due to patients with varying levels of literacy, physical and mental disabilities and spoken languages. Patients obtaining information from external sources, such as the internet, can also be problematic as the information can be irrelevant, inaccurate or misleading. A patient satisfaction study was performed in order to assess the effectiveness of using ebooks in order to communicate pre and post surgical information to neurosurgical patients. 3 digital books were produced using iBooks Author (a free desktop publishing program designed by Apple) including ACDF (anterior cervical discectomy and fusion), lumbar laminectomy and lumbar discectomy. Each book contained written information organised into sections and chapters along with an array of multimedia elements including 3D animations, interactive diagrams, 3D models of anatomy and patient experience videos. 32 volunteer patients were then presented with the digital books via an iPad during their preoperative assessment and then asked to complete a questionnaire. The results demonstrated a demand for this type of digital presentation of medical information and also showed patients no longer felt the need to seek further information from external sources.

  7. Radiological and pathological response following pre-operative radiotherapy for soft-tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberge, David; Skamene, Tanya; Nahal, Ayoub; Turcotte, Robert E.; Powell, Tom; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report radiological and pathological response to neo-adjuvant radiotherapy for extremity and trunk soft-tissue sarcomas. Materials/methods: Fifty patients were identified retrospectively. All patients had MRI imaging pre and post neo-adjuvant external beam radiotherapy. Tumor volumes were measured in 3D on T1 Gadolinium enhanced sequences. Pathological treatment response was quantified in terms of percentage of treatment-related necrosis for each case. Results: Histopathologic responses to treatment varied from 0% to 100%. The median pathological treatment response was 67.5% for low-grade sarcomas and 50% for high-grade sarcomas. The median decrease in tumor volume was 13.8% for non-myxoid low-grade sarcomas, 82.1% for myxoid liposarcomas and <1% for high-grade sarcomas. A partial response on MRI (volume reduction ≥ 50%) was highly predictive of a good pathological response (p < 0.001). Patients with stable disease on imaging or volumetric progression had wide ranging pathological responses. Conclusions: Soft-tissue sarcomas show significant pathological treatment responses in the form of hyaline fibrosis, necrosis and granulation tissue. Despite this, there is minimal early volumetric response to radiation, especially for high-grade tumors. Although radiological partial response was predictive of pathological response, the significance of radiological progression was unclear. Myxoid liposarcoma tumor type was predictive of both pathological and radiological tumor response.

  8. Effect of safe environmental pre and post harvest treatments and irradiation on handling of some fruits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawito, M A.A. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2008-07-01

    The present study was carried out during two successive seasons of 2005 and 2006 seasons on{sup M}ontakhab El-Kanater{sup g}uavas and{sup H}achiya{sup p}ersimmons.two different experiments were studied, the first one for pre harvest and second post harvest. Regarding pre harvest experiment,hand or chemical flower thinning by urea or ethrel and date of fruit picking (maturity) were evaluated on both guavas and persimmons.All flower thinning treatments increased fruit set,total yield,average fruit weight and decreased fruit abscission.However,a great effect on fruit quality and chemical compositions were also found with flower thinning treatments. Chemical flower thinning was more effective than hand thinning in improving yield and quality in {sup M}ontakhab El-Kanater{sup g}uavas and {sup H}achiya{sup p}ersimmons. However,early maturation(120 and 150 days for guava and persimmon respect.) produced poor fruit quality.Whereas, medium maturity(130 and 180 days for guava and persimmon respect.) produced fruit with high quality.However,late picking(140 and 210 days for guava and persimmon respect.) produced fruits with less marketability. On the other side, post harvest treatments including irradiation of fruits with or without pre-cooling process at 0.2,0.4,and 0.8 K.Gy for guavas and 1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 K.Gy for persimmons. Also,hot water at 45 degree C, fungicide at 0.5 and 1.0 g/L.and ethanol vapor at 25 and 50% were evaluated on both fruits. The obtained data were evaluated on discarded fruits %, weight loss %, fruit firmness,fruit marketability, total soluble solids,acidity,L-ascorbic acid (guava), tannins (persimmon), total sugars and fruit respiration. All supplementary refrigeration treatments improved fruit quality during cold storage but ethanol vapor either 25 or 50 % were more effective than other treatments.

  9. Pre-operative evaluation with MR in tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmqvist, C.; Hochbergs, P.; Bjoerkhem, G.; Brockstedt, S.; Laurin, S.

    2000-01-01

    To assess whether MR imaging could replace angiography in pre-operative evaluation of patients with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect (VSD), especially since the surgical correction was done earlier than was previously the rule. Fourteen patients with tetralogy of Fallot (n=10) or pulmonary atresia with VSD (n=4), mean age 7.5±4.4 months, were evaluated with angiocardiography and MR before definitive surgical correction. There was good diagnostic agreement between the two modalities when evaluating right ventricular outflow obstruction; 86% for valvular and 93% for supra valvular stenosis, but the agreement was somewhat lower for the sub valvular obstruction (57%). Surgery findings, however, were in favour of MR in 5 patients concerning the sub valvular right ventricular outflow tract obstruction. MR images identified all stenoses in the right and left pulmonary arteries, but overlooked one stenosis in the main pulmonary artery. MR could evaluate patency in all palliative shunts. Even in this young age group, MR imaging offers a good alternative to angiocardiography for the pre-operative evaluation of the right ventricular outflow tract, the main pulmonary artery and the proximal right and left pulmonary arteries, before definitive surgical correction of tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia with VSD

  10. Pre-operative evaluation with MR in tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmqvist, C.; Hochbergs, P. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept of Diagnostic Radiology; Bjoerkhem, G. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept of Paediatrics; Brockstedt, S.; Laurin, S. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept of Diagnostic Radiology

    2000-01-01

    To assess whether MR imaging could replace angiography in pre-operative evaluation of patients with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect (VSD), especially since the surgical correction was done earlier than was previously the rule. Fourteen patients with tetralogy of Fallot (n=10) or pulmonary atresia with VSD (n=4), mean age 7.5{+-}4.4 months, were evaluated with angiocardiography and MR before definitive surgical correction. There was good diagnostic agreement between the two modalities when evaluating right ventricular outflow obstruction; 86% for valvular and 93% for supra valvular stenosis, but the agreement was somewhat lower for the sub valvular obstruction (57%). Surgery findings, however, were in favour of MR in 5 patients concerning the sub valvular right ventricular outflow tract obstruction. MR images identified all stenoses in the right and left pulmonary arteries, but overlooked one stenosis in the main pulmonary artery. MR could evaluate patency in all palliative shunts. Even in this young age group, MR imaging offers a good alternative to angiocardiography for the pre-operative evaluation of the right ventricular outflow tract, the main pulmonary artery and the proximal right and left pulmonary arteries, before definitive surgical correction of tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia with VSD.

  11. Assessment of the economic impact of environmental constraints on short-term hydropower plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Diaz, Juan I.; Wilhelmi, Jose R.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental constraints imposed on hydropower plant operation are usually given in the form of minimum environmental flows and, in some cases, in the form of maximum and minimum rates of change of flows, or ramping rates. Environmental constraints reduce the amount of water available to produce electricity and limit the contribution of peak hydropower plants to adapting the power supply to the demand and to providing certain ancillary services to the electrical grid, such as spinning reserve or load-frequency control. The objective of this paper is to assess the economic impact of environmental constraints on short-term hydropower plant operation. For that purpose, a revenue-driven daily optimization model based on mixed integer linear programming is used. The model considers the head variation and its influence on the units' efficiency, as well as the option of starting-up or shutting-down the plant at any hour of the day, should it be advantageous, while releasing the environmental flow through the bottom outlets. In order to illustrate the applicability of the methodology, it is applied in a real hydropower plant under different operating conditions and environmental constraints. (author)

  12. Assessment of the economic impact of environmental constraints on short-term hydropower plant operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Diaz, Juan I.; Wilhelmi, Jose R. [Department of Hydraulic and Energy Engineering, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), c/Profesor Aranguren s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    Environmental constraints imposed on hydropower plant operation are usually given in the form of minimum environmental flows and, in some cases, in the form of maximum and minimum rates of change of flows, or ramping rates. Environmental constraints reduce the amount of water available to produce electricity and limit the contribution of peak hydropower plants to adapting the power supply to the demand and to providing certain ancillary services to the electrical grid, such as spinning reserve or load-frequency control. The objective of this paper is to assess the economic impact of environmental constraints on short-term hydropower plant operation. For that purpose, a revenue-driven daily optimization model based on mixed integer linear programming is used. The model considers the head variation and its influence on the units' efficiency, as well as the option of starting-up or shutting-down the plant at any hour of the day, should it be advantageous, while releasing the environmental flow through the bottom outlets. In order to illustrate the applicability of the methodology, it is applied in a real hydropower plant under different operating conditions and environmental constraints. (author)

  13. Pre-operative evaluation of cleft palate using three dimensional computerized tomography (s-D CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azia, A.; Hashmi, R.

    1999-01-01

    Cleft palate is a congenital anomaly with major development concerns. Surgery with bone grafting is often required to correct the lesion. With the introduction of 3-D CT the evaluation of cleft pa late has become more accurate. We present two cases of cleft palate, which were operated upon with bone grafting. We employed 3-D CT techniques in addition to the conventional 2-D CT, 3-D CT improves the estimation of the required bone graft and signification reduces length of surgery and complications. (author)

  14. Environmental dose-assessment methods for normal operations at DOE nuclear sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Corley, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. The report includes a discussion of environmental doses to be calculated, a review of currently available environmental pathway models and a set of recommended models for use when environmental pathway modeling is necessary. Currently available models reviewed include those used by DOE contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other organizations involved in environmental assessments. General modeling areas considered for routine releases are atmospheric transport, airborne pathways, waterborne pathways, direct exposure to penetrating radiation, and internal dosimetry. The pathway models discussed in this report are applicable to long-term (annual) uniform releases to the environment: they do not apply to acute releases resulting from accidents or emergency situations

  15. Operable Unit 3: Proposed Plan/Environmental Assessment for interim remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This document presents a Proposed Plan and an Environmental Assessment for an interim remedial action to be undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) within Operable Unit 3 (OU3) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This proposed plan provides site background information, describes the remedial alternatives being considered, presents a comparative evaluation of the alternatives and a rationnale for the identification of DOE's preferred alternative, evaluates the potential environmental and public health effects associated with the alternatives, and outlines the public's role in helping DOE and the EPA to make the final decision on a remedy

  16. Manitoba Hydro's environmental management system and its application to hydraulic facilities and operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, D. C.

    1996-01-01

    Development at Manitoba Hydro of a series of environmental practices manuals, as part of the public utilities' approach to environmental management, were described. Experiences gained during the process of developing these manuals were described. It has been found that to be accepted environmental practices must: (1) support existing facilities, operations and procedures, (2) be presented in an easily accessible form, (3) have an evident purpose, (4) be stated clearly; (5) be practical and feasible, and (6) have implementation clearly defined. The audience level of detail, style of presentation, implementation, frequency of revision and update were also summarized. A detailed outline of the current policy of Manitoba Hydro was included in the appendices

  17. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D and D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment

  18. Improving environmental management on small-scale farms: perspectives of extension educators and horse farm operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca, Perry-Hill; Linda, Prokopy

    2015-01-01

    Although the number of small-scale farms is increasing in North America and Europe, few studies have been conducted to better understand environmental management in this sector. We investigate this issue by examining environmental management on horse farms from both the perspective of the "expert" extension educator and horse farm operator. We conducted a Delphi survey and follow-up interviews with extension educators in Indiana and Kentucky. We also conducted interviews and farm assessments with 15 horse farm operators in the two states. Our results suggest a disconnection between the perceptions of extension educators and horse farm operators. Extension educators believed that operators of small horse farms are unfamiliar with conservation practices and their environmental benefits and they found it difficult to target outreach to this audience. In the interviews with horse farm operators, we found that the majority were somewhat familiar with conservation practices like rotational grazing, soil testing, heavy use area protection, and manure composting. It was not common, however, for practices to be implemented to generally recognized standards. The horse farm respondents perceived these practices as interrelated parts of a system of farm management that has developed over time to best deal with the physical features of the property, needs of the horses, and available resources. Because conservation practices must be incorporated into a complex farm management system, traditional models of extension (i.e., diffusion of innovations) may be inappropriate for promoting better environmental management on horse farms.

  19. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-09-01

    OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment.

  20. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix P: Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The purpose of this technical appendix is to provide the environmental review necessary to enter into agreements regarding the distribution between Federal and non-Federal project owners with respect to delivery of the Canadian Entitlement obligation to Canada for the period 1998 through 2024

  1. Rise time reduction of thermal actuators operated in air and water through optimized pre-shaped open-loop driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, T; Doll, J C; Loizeau, F; Pruitt, B L; Hosseini, N; Fantner, G E; Peng, A W; Ricci, A J

    2017-01-01

    Electrothermal actuators have many advantages compared to other actuators used in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). They are simple to design, easy to fabricate and provide large displacements at low voltages. Low voltages enable less stringent passivation requirements for operation in liquid. Despite these advantages, thermal actuation is typically limited to a few kHz bandwidth when using step inputs due to its intrinsic thermal time constant. However, the use of pre-shaped input signals offers a route for reducing the rise time of these actuators by orders of magnitude. We started with an electrothermally actuated cantilever having an initial 10–90% rise time of 85 μ s in air and 234 μ s in water for a standard open-loop step input. We experimentally characterized the linearity and frequency response of the cantilever when operated in air and water, allowing us to obtain transfer functions for the two cases. We used these transfer functions, along with functions describing desired reduced rise-time system responses, to numerically simulate the required input signals. Using these pre-shaped input signals, we improved the open-loop 10–90% rise time from 85 μ s to 3 μ s in air and from 234 μ s to 5 μ s in water, an improvement by a factor of 28 and 47, respectively. Using this simple control strategy for MEMS electrothermal actuators makes them an attractive alternative to other high speed micromechanical actuators such as piezoelectric stacks or electrostatic comb structures which are more complex to design, fabricate, or operate. (paper)

  2. Rise Time Reduction of Thermal Actuators Operated in Air and Water through Optimized Pre-Shaped Open-Loop Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, T; Doll, J C; Loizeau, F; Hosseini, N; Peng, A W; Fantner, G; Ricci, A J; Pruitt, B L

    2017-01-01

    Electrothermal actuators have many advantages compared to other actuators used in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). They are simple to design, easy to fabricate and provide large displacements at low voltages. Low voltages enable less stringent passivation requirements for operation in liquid. Despite these advantages, thermal actuation is typically limited to a few kHz bandwidth when using step inputs due to its intrinsic thermal time constant. However, the use of pre-shaped input signals offers a route for reducing the rise time of these actuators by orders of magnitude. We started with an electrothermally actuated cantilever having an initial 10-90% rise time of 85 μs in air and 234 μs in water for a standard open-loop step input. We experimentally characterized the linearity and frequency response of the cantilever when operated in air and water, allowing us to obtain transfer functions for the two cases. We used these transfer functions, along with functions describing desired reduced rise-time system responses, to numerically simulate the required input signals. Using these pre-shaped input signals, we improved the open-loop 10-90% rise time from 85 μs to 3 μs in air and from 234 μs to 5 μs in water, an improvement by a factor of 28 and 47, respectively. Using this simple control strategy for MEMS electrothermal actuators makes them an attractive alternative to other high speed micromechanical actuators such as piezoelectric stacks or electrostatic comb structures which are more complex to design, fabricate, or operate.

  3. Operation and performance of bunch pre-compression for increased transmission at the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minty, M.G.; Akre, R.; Decker, F.J.; Turner, J.

    1997-11-01

    As the beam currents at the SLC are increased, transverse aperture restrictions in the ring-to-linac transport line (RTL) become increasingly important. The RTL contains a bunch compressor which introduces a large energy variation across the bunch and hence a larger transverse beam size. Since 1994 the compressor amplitude has been operating at higher than design voltage. While advantageous for shaping the bunch distribution, this increased the bunch energy spread and therefore resulted in more beam loss. Moreover, due to current-dependent bunch lengthening in the damping ring, the higher the beam current, the more the current loss. To avoid such losses, the bunch length may be precompressed in the damping ring. Until recently, bunch precompression with high beam currents was not stable. In this paper the authors identify the reasons for the difficulties, describe the changes made to accommodate bunch precompression, and discuss performance aspects after implementation. The estimated increase in current at the interaction point is 15%

  4. Environmental analysis of the operation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10 site)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, J.W.; Blumberg, R.; Cotter, S.J.

    1982-11-01

    An environmental analysis of the operation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facilities in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley was conducted to present to the public information concerning the extent to which recognizable effects, or potential effects, on the environment may occur. The analysis addresses current operations of the ORNL X-10 site and completed operations that may continue to have residual effects. Solid wastes from ORNL operations at the Y-12 site which are transported to the X-10 site for burial (e.g., Biology Division animal wastes) are included as part of X-10 site operation. Socioeconomic effects are associated primarily with the communities where employees live and with the Knoxville Bureau of Economic Analysis economic area as a whole. Therefore, ORNL employees at both Y-12 and X-10 sites are included in the ORNL socioeconomic impact analysis. An extensive base of environmental data was accumulated for this report. Over 80 reports related to ORNL facilities and/or operations are cited as well as many open-literature citations. Environmental effects of the operation of ORNL result from operational discharges from the onsite facilities; construction and/or modification of facilities, transportation to and from the site of persons, goods and services; socioeconomic impacts to the local, regional, and general population; and accidental discharges if they should occur. Operational discharges to the environnment are constrained by federal, state, and local regulations and by criteria established by the US Department of Energy to minimize adverse impacts. It is the purpose of this document to evaluate the operation of the ORNL insofar as impacts beyond the site boundary may occur or have the potential for occurrence.

  5. Environmental analysis of the operation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10 site)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, J.W.; Blumberg, R.; Cotter, S.J.

    1982-11-01

    An environmental analysis of the operation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facilities in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley was conducted to present to the public information concerning the extent to which recognizable effects, or potential effects, on the environment may occur. The analysis addresses current operations of the ORNL X-10 site and completed operations that may continue to have residual effects. Solid wastes from ORNL operations at the Y-12 site which are transported to the X-10 site for burial (e.g., Biology Division animal wastes) are included as part of X-10 site operation. Socioeconomic effects are associated primarily with the communities where employees live and with the Knoxville Bureau of Economic Analysis economic area as a whole. Therefore, ORNL employees at both Y-12 and X-10 sites are included in the ORNL socioeconomic impact analysis. An extensive base of environmental data was accumulated for this report. Over 80 reports related to ORNL facilities and/or operations are cited as well as many open-literature citations. Environmental effects of the operation of ORNL result from operational discharges from the onsite facilities; construction and/or modification of facilities, transportation to and from the site of persons, goods and services; socioeconomic impacts to the local, regional, and general population; and accidental discharges if they should occur. Operational discharges to the environnment are constrained by federal, state, and local regulations and by criteria established by the US Department of Energy to minimize adverse impacts. It is the purpose of this document to evaluate the operation of the ORNL insofar as impacts beyond the site boundary may occur or have the potential for occurrence

  6. Pre-engineering Spaceflight Validation of Environmental Models and the 2005 HZETRN Simulation Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealy, John E.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Dachev, Ts. P.; Tomov, B. T.; Walker, Steven A.; DeAngelis, Giovanni; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2006-01-01

    The HZETRN code has been identified by NASA for engineering design in the next phase of space exploration highlighting a return to the Moon in preparation for a Mars mission. In response, a new series of algorithms beginning with 2005 HZETRN, will be issued by correcting some prior limitations and improving control of propagated errors along with established code verification processes. Code validation processes will use new/improved low Earth orbit (LEO) environmental models with a recently improved International Space Station (ISS) shield model to validate computational models and procedures using measured data aboard ISS. These validated models will provide a basis for flight-testing the designs of future space vehicles and systems of the Constellation program in the LEO environment.

  7. Environmental issues in oil and gas operations in Yukon and in the N.W.T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacWilliam, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Companies planning an expansion into the two territories ought to examine the way each territory deals with potential environmental issues such as spills, releases, contaminated sites and the reclamation of land. Recent legislation has provided each territory with a certain amount of autonomy, which includes the ability to oversee environmental protection. The Yukon, in particular, has considerable freedom in addressing environmental issues relating to oil and gas activities. Both territories are subject to the input and approval of the federal government and First Nations citizens where their respective interests or lands are involved. An overview is included of the regulation of environmental matters north of the 60th parallel. Although the expansion of oil and gas companies into the two territories 'north of 60' offers new opportunities, operators must consider the potential for environmental issues such as spills, releases, site contamination and reclamation of land. In the Yukon where the government has assumed jurisdiction to regulate oil and gas resources, it is implementing a comprehensive regime to deal with environmental issues, at first, in draft form. In contrast, in the N.W.T. the federal government retains considerable control over gas and oil rights and the consequent environmental issues, and, accordingly, it is essential to be aware of federal environmental regulations for the time being

  8. ECOSPACE : a pre-operational satellite system and services for ocean colour monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, André; Cerutti-Maori, Guy; Morel, Michel

    2017-11-01

    A permanent monitoring of the oceanic algal biomass (phytoplankton), of its photosynthetic activity, ecological and biogeochemical impact, or of its long-term response to changing physical and climatic conditions, is a crucial goal of scientific programmes (such as JGOFS, GLOBEC, LOICZ), as well as of international observing systems (such as GOOS, GCOS, IGOS). After a decade without ocean colour satellite-borne sensor, several instruments have been, or will be launched. They are increasingly sophisticated in their design and operation. Their complexity results from constraints for multipurpose mission (involving not only ocean, but also land and atmosphere), or from requirements for exploratory research projects and development of new methodologies for improved ocean colour interpretation and "advanced" products. In contrast, the proposed specific ECOSPACE mission is an ocean colour dedicated instrument, with a global monitoring vocation. It relies on known algorithms for accurate atmospheric corrections and aerosol load estimate over open ocean (about 96% of the whole ocean), and known algorithms for a meaningful quantification of the oceanic algal biomass (in terms of Chlorophyll concentration). The coastal zones are observed as well, and their particular features delineated : however, detailed studies that imply high ground resolution and more spectral channels are out of the scope of the present proposal. The ECOSPACE mission represents a feasibility demonstration ; more precisely it is a first step toward the setting up of an operational Satellite System and Services for a future continuous supply of stable, compatible, easy-to-merge ocean colour date products. In essence, such a Service would be similar to those already existing for meteorology and for some oceanic variables (e.g. sea level). Although new approaches to management and implementation over a short time scale are needed, the ECOSPACE project relies essentially on existing scientific and

  9. Non-transboundary pollution and the efficiency of international environmental co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kox, H.L.M.; Van der Tak, C.M. [Economics Department, Faculty of Economics and Econometrics, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-10-01

    The increased awareness of the transboundary pollution problems resulted in a number of international treaties, such as the Montreal protocol on ozone-depleting substances (1987), and the Basel Convention on hazardous waste (1989). Most authors writing on efficient environmental instruments make a sharp distinction between domestic and transboundary environmental problems. While the former should be abated by domestic environmental instruments, an efficient treatment of the latter requires international instruments. The underlying logic is that in case of non-transboundary pollution both the costs and benefits of environmental policies are strictly domestic, the trade-off between benefits and costs of abatement should also be a strictly domestic issue. In contrast, with transboundary pollution the trade-off between abatement costs and benefits becomes an international issue. In this paper we analyse four cases where international environmental co-ordination is required to achieve an efficient outcome, even though the environmental externality is non-transboundary in nature. Section two sketches the standard view on efficient intervention levels with regard to transborder and non-transborder pollution. In the third section we deal with cases where environmental policy is used in a trade-strategic way. The section pays attention to the motives for using domestic environmental policy as a disguise for trade policies. It will be argued that the resulting allocative efficiency can be improved upon by international co-operation. Sections 4-6 analyse three cases where international co-operation may improve the international outcome on the basis of non-coordinated domestic allocation decisions. These cases refer in particular to the situation of developing countries, when there is a high export dependency on the polluting good in combination with the existence of discrete technologies, set-up costs of environment-friendly technologies, and the existence of increasing

  10. Non-transboundary pollution and the efficiency of international environmental co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kox, H.L.M.; Van der Tak, C.M.

    1995-10-01

    The increased awareness of the transboundary pollution problems resulted in a number of international treaties, such as the Montreal protocol on ozone-depleting substances (1987), and the Basel Convention on hazardous waste (1989). Most authors writing on efficient environmental instruments make a sharp distinction between domestic and transboundary environmental problems. While the former should be abated by domestic environmental instruments, an efficient treatment of the latter requires international instruments. The underlying logic is that in case of non-transboundary pollution both the costs and benefits of environmental policies are strictly domestic, the trade-off between benefits and costs of abatement should also be a strictly domestic issue. In contrast, with transboundary pollution the trade-off between abatement costs and benefits becomes an international issue. In this paper we analyse four cases where international environmental co-ordination is required to achieve an efficient outcome, even though the environmental externality is non-transboundary in nature. Section two sketches the standard view on efficient intervention levels with regard to transborder and non-transborder pollution. In the third section we deal with cases where environmental policy is used in a trade-strategic way. The section pays attention to the motives for using domestic environmental policy as a disguise for trade policies. It will be argued that the resulting allocative efficiency can be improved upon by international co-operation. Sections 4-6 analyse three cases where international co-operation may improve the international outcome on the basis of non-coordinated domestic allocation decisions. These cases refer in particular to the situation of developing countries, when there is a high export dependency on the polluting good in combination with the existence of discrete technologies, set-up costs of environment-friendly technologies, and the existence of increasing

  11. The value of MRI and CT in the pre-operative diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Kumano, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Soichiro; Ishii, Jun (Kanto Rosai Hospital, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1991-05-01

    A prospective analysis of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 51 patients with lumbar disc herniation was made to determine the height of hernia for operation and, if impossible, the indications of myelography. Among the 51 patients, 40 (78%) received surgery based on these imaging modalities (Group A); and the remaining 11 (22%) underwent myelography for the confirmation of the height of hernia or detailed examination (Group B). Satisfactory or excellent surgical outcome was achieved in 95% in Group A and in 91% in Group B. Twenty seven patients had multiple disc herniation on CT and MRI; in 17 patients surgery was performed for one disc hernia that was radiologically found to compress the spinal nerve root; and in the other 10 hernia-related disc was not determined by either radiological or neurological manifestations. Satisfactory or excellent surgical outcome could, however, be achieved in 26 patients (96%). Myelography should be indicated when there is no neurological radicular sign in the lower extremities, and when there is no radiological evidence of the compressed spinal nerve root in spite of the presence of multiple disc herniation. The height of hernia may be determined when compression of the spinal nerve root is visualized on CT or MRI. (N.K.).

  12. The value of MRI and CT in the pre-operative diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Kumano, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Soichiro; Ishii, Jun

    1991-01-01

    A prospective analysis of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 51 patients with lumbar disc herniation was made to determine the height of hernia for operation and, if impossible, the indications of myelography. Among the 51 patients, 40 (78%) received surgery based on these imaging modalities (Group A); and the remaining 11 (22%) underwent myelography for the confirmation of the height of hernia or detailed examination (Group B). Satisfactory or excellent surgical outcome was achieved in 95% in Group A and in 91% in Group B. Twenty seven patients had multiple disc herniation on CT and MRI; in 17 patients surgery was performed for one disc hernia that was radiologically found to compress the spinal nerve root; and in the other 10 hernia-related disc was not determined by either radiological or neurological manifestations. Satisfactory or excellent surgical outcome could, however, be achieved in 26 patients (96%). Myelography should be indicated when there is no neurological radicular sign in the lower extremities, and when there is no radiological evidence of the compressed spinal nerve root in spite of the presence of multiple disc herniation. The height of hernia may be determined when compression of the spinal nerve root is visualized on CT or MRI. (N.K.)

  13. Prospective evaluation of stress myocardial perfusion imaging for pre-operative cardiac risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, A.J.; Rowe, C.C.; Flannery, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A prospective evaluation of patients who underwent stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to assess preoperative cardiac risk was undertaken. At the time of the scan patients were classified into 4 Clinical Risk groups (CR) based on known clinical data. On completion of the scan, the patient was then categorised into 4 Scan based Risk groups (SR), incorporating size of perfusion deficit, single versus multi-vessel disease and ejection fraction. Surgery at Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre within 6 months of scan and complications were identified using the hospital medical database. Major early cardiac events coded were death (cardiac related), myocardial infarction, unstable angina, acute pulmonary oedema, cardiac arrest, and urgent revascularisation. 208 patients have reached 6 months post-MPI scan. Of these 119 (57%) were identified as having surgery. Of the Scan Risk groups, 63% of normal, 57% of increased, and 47% of high and very high groups have had surgery. An abnormal scan is associated with a three-fold risk of cardiac complication (3.5% vs 11.3%). This is lower than most previous reports and may be due to higher representation of low risk surgical procedures (14% in this series), improved peri-operative care and/or the test result influence on management (suggested by decreasing surgical rate as SR estimate rose). Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  14. Environmental status of groundwater affected by chromite ore processing residue (COPR) dumpsites during pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matern, Katrin; Weigand, Harald; Singh, Abhas; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Chromite ore processing residue (COPR) is generated by the roasting of chromite ores for the extraction of chromium. Leaching of carcinogenic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from COPR dumpsites and contamination of groundwater is a key environmental risk. The objective of the study was to evaluate Cr(VI) contamination in groundwater in the vicinity of three COPR disposal sites in Uttar Pradesh, India, in the pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons. Groundwater samples (n = 57 pre-monsoon, n = 70 monsoon) were taken in 2014 and analyzed for Cr(VI) and relevant hydrochemical parameters. The site-specific ranges of Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater were Rania), <0.005 to 115 mg L -1 (Chhiwali), and <0.005 to 2.0 mg L -1 (Godhrauli). Maximum levels of Cr(VI) were found close to the COPR dumpsites and significantly exceeded safe drinking water limits (0.05 mg L -1 ). No significant dependence of Cr(VI) concentration on monsoons was observed.

  15. Introduction and evaluation of a ‘pre-ART care’ service in Swaziland: an operational research study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtle, David; Elden, Susan; Mamvura, Canaan; Vandelanotte, Joris; Petherick, Emily; Walley, John; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective To implement and evaluate a formal pre-antiretroviral therapy (ART) care service at a district hospital in Swaziland. Design Operational research. Setting District hospital in Southern Africa. Participants 1171 patients with a previous diagnosis of HIV. A baseline patient group consisted of the first 200 patients using the service. Two follow-up groups were defined: group 1 was all patients recruited from April to June 2009 and group 2 was 200 patients recruited in February 2010. Intervention Introduction of pre-ART care—a package of interventions, including counselling; regular review; clinical staging; timely initiation of ART; social and psychological support; and prevention and management of opportunistic infections, such as tuberculosis. Primary and secondary outcome measures Proportion of patients assessed for ART eligibility, proportion of eligible patients who were started on ART and proportion receiving defined evidence-based interventions (including prophylactic co-trimoxazole and tuberculosis screening). Results Following the implementation of the pre-ART service, the proportion of patients receiving defined interventions increased; the proportion of patient being assessed for ART eligibility significantly increased (baseline: 59%, group 1: 64%, group 2: 76%; p=0.001); the proportion of ART-eligible patients starting treatment increased (baseline: 53%, group 1: 81%, group: 2, 81%; pART and initiation of treatment significantly decreased (baseline: 61 days, group 1: 39 days, group 2: 14 days; pART was associated with significant improvements in the assessment, management and timeliness of initiation of treatment for patients with HIV. PMID:22422913

  16. Environmental Engineering Education (E3) in the Gulf Co-Operation Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassim, Majeed; Coskuner, Gulnur

    2007-01-01

    The six members of the Gulf Co-operation Countries (GCC)--Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates--are facing enormous environmental challenges associated with rapid urbanisation and industrialisation, especially in the last three decades, due to its role as a global hydrocarbon energy centre. None of these…

  17. A Study on an appropriate operating system of environmental basic facility service industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Hyun Joo [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    The environmental basic facility service industry is designed to have a structural reorganization of general operating system and the efficient and effective participation of private industry and regulation of industry in connection with the general system. 35 refs., 9 figs., 20 tabs.

  18. 78 FR 58570 - Environmental Assessment; Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Big Rock Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... Assessment; Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Big Rock Point AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... applicant or the licensee), for the Big Rock Point (BRP) Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI... Rock Point (BRP) Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). II. Environmental Assessment (EA...

  19. Does operational oceanography address the needs of fisheries and applied environmental scientists?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berx, B.; Dickey-Collas, M.; Skogen, M.D.; Roeck, de Y.H.

    2011-01-01

    Although many oceanographic data products are now considered operational, continued dialogue between data producers and their user communities is still needed. The fisheries and environmental science communities have often been criticized for their lack of multidisciplinarity, and it is not clear

  20. Operating a Microwave Radiation Detection Monitor. Module 10. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on operating a microwave radiation detection monitor. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) testing the…

  1. Morsleben repository for radioactive waste (ERAM). Operational safety, radiation protection and environmental monitoring. Release: December 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The report overviews the monitoring activities of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection at the Morsleben repository for radioactive waste (ERAM), focussing the ERAM inventory of radioactive waste and the measures and results of geomechanical and hydrogeological monitoring, operational radiation protection, the monitoring of discharges of radioactive substances, environmental monitoring, and the dose levels expected from discharges of radioactive substances. (orig.)

  2. Production of environmentally friendly aerated concrete with required construction and operational properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkach Evgeniya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of these studies is to justify the feasibility of recycling different types of industrial waste instead of conventional expensive raw materials in production of environmentally friendly aerated concrete with required construction and operational properties. The impact of wastes from various industries on the environmental condition of affected areas, as well as the results of their environmental assessment were analyzed to determine whether these wastes could be used in production of high-performance building materials. The assessment of industrial wastes in aerated concrete production suggests that industrial wastes of hazard class IV can be recycled to produce aerated concrete. An environmentally friendly method for large-scale waste recycling, including a two-step environmentally sustainable mechanism, was developed. The basic quality indicators of the modified aerated concrete proved that the environmental safety could be enhanced by strengthening the structure, increasing its uniformity and improving thermal insulation properties. The modified non-autoclaved aerated concrete products with improved physical and operational properties were developed. They have the following properties: density – D700; class of concrete – B3.5; thermal transmittance coefficient – 0.143 W/(m·°C; frost resistance – F75.

  3. Role of Pre-Operative Blood Transfusion and Subcutaneous Fat Thickness as Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection after Posterior Thoracic Spine Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Georg; Burla, Laurin; Werner, Clément M L; Jentzsch, Thorsten; Wanner, Guido A; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Sprengel, Kai

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) increase morbidity and mortality rates and generate additional cost for the healthcare system. Pre-operative blood transfusion and the subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) have been described as risk factors for SSI in other surgical areas. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of pre-operative blood transfusion and the SFT on the occurrence of SSI in posterior thoracic spine surgery. In total, 244 patients (median age 55 y; 97 female) who underwent posterior thoracic spine fusions from 2008 to 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Patient-specific characteristics, pre-operative hemoglobin concentration/hematocrit values, the amount of blood transfused, and the occurrence of a post-operative SSI were documented. The SFT was measured on pre-operative computed tomography scans. Surgical site infection was observed in 26 patients (11%). The SFT was 13 mm in patients without SSI and 14 mm in those with infection (p=0.195). The odds ratio for patients with pre-operative blood transfusion to present with SSI was 3.1 (confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.2) and 2.7 (CI 1.1-6.4) when adjusted for age. There was no difference between the groups with regard to pre-operative hemoglobin concentration (p=0.519) or hematocrit (p=0.908). The SFT did not differ in the two groups. Allogeneic red blood cell transfusion within 48 h prior to surgery was an independent risk factor for SSI after posterior fusion for the fixation of thoracic spine instabilities. Pre-operative blood transfusion tripled the risk, whereas SFT had no influence on the occurrence of SSI.

  4. Pre-operative risk scores for the prediction of outcome in elderly people who require emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bates Tom

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The decision on whether to operate on a sick elderly person with an intra-abdominal emergency is one of the most difficult in general surgery. A predictive risk-score would be of great value in this situation. Methods A Medline search was performed to identify those predictive risk-scores relevant to sick elderly patients in whom emergency surgery might be life-saving. Results Many of the risk scores for surgical patients include the operative findings or require tests which are not available in the acute situation. Most of the relevant studies include younger patients and elective surgery. The Glasgow Aneurysm Score and Hardman Index are specific to ruptured aortic aneurysm while the Boey Score and the Hacetteppe Score are specific to perforated peptic ulcer. The Reiss Index and Fitness Score can be used pre-operatively if the elements of the score can be completed in time. The ASA score, which includes a significant element of subjective clinical judgement, can be augmented with factors such as age and urgency of surgery but no test has a negative predictive value sufficient to recommend against surgical intervention without clinical input. Conclusion Risk scores may be helpful in sick elderly patients needing emergency abdominal surgery but an experienced clinical opinion is still essential.

  5. Pre-operative brachial plexus block compared with an identical block performed at the end of surgery: a prospective, double-blind, randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, A; Sauter, A R; Klaastad, Ø; Draegni, T; Raeder, J C

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated whether pre-emptive analgesia with a pre-operative ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block resulted in better postoperative analgesia than an identical block performed postoperatively. Fifty-two patients undergoing fixation of a fractured radius were included. All patients received general anaesthesia with remifentanil and propofol. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups: a pre-operative block or a postoperative block with 0.5 ml.kg -1 ropivacaine 0.75%. After surgery, all patients received regular paracetamol plus opioids for breakthrough pain. Mean (SD) time to first rescue analgesic after emergence from general anaesthesia was 544 (217) min in the pre-operative block group compared with 343 (316) min in the postoperative block group (p = 0.015). Postoperative pain scores were higher and more patients required rescue analgesia during the first 4 h after surgery in the postoperative block group. There were no significant differences in plasma stress mediators between the groups. Analgesic consumption was lower at day seven in the pre-operative block group. Pain was described as very strong at block resolution in 27 (63%) patients and 26 (76%) had episodes of mild pain after 6 months. We conclude that a pre-operative ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block provides longer and better analgesia in the acute postoperative period compared with an identical postoperative block in patients undergoing surgery for fractured radius. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Implementation of environmental compliance for operating radioactive liquid waste systems at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooyman, J.H.; Robinson, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses methods being implemented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to continue operating while achieving compliance with new standards for liquid low level waste (LLLW) underground storage tank systems. The Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) required that the Department of Energy (DOE) execute a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) within 6 months of listing of the ORNL on the National Priorities List. An FFA for ORNL became effective January 1, 1992 among the EPA, DOE, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The agreement ensures that environmental impacts resulting from operations at the Oak Ridge Reservation are investigated and remediated to protect the public health, welfare, and environment

  7. The SISMA Project: A pre-operative seismic hazard monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimiliano Chersich, M. C.; Amodio, A. A. Angelo; Francia, A. F. Andrea; Sparpaglione, C. S. Claudio

    2009-04-01

    Galileian Plus is currently leading the development, in collaboration with several Italian Universities, of the SISMA (Seismic Information System for Monitoring and Alert) Pilot Project financed by the Italian Space Agency. The system is devoted to the continuous monitoring of the seismic risk and is addressed to support the Italian Civil Protection decisional process. Completion of the Pilot Project is planned at the beginning of 2010. Main scientific paradigm of SISMA is an innovative deterministic approach integrating geophysical models, geodesy and active tectonics. This paper will give a general overview of project along with its progress status and a particular focus will be put on the architectural design details and to the software implementation choices. SISMA is built on top of a software infrastructure developed by Galileian Plus to integrate the scientific programs devoted to the update of seismic risk maps. The main characteristics of the system may be resumed as follow: automatic download of input data; integration of scientific programs; definition and scheduling of chains of processes; monitoring and control of the system through a graphical user interface (GUI); compatibility of the products with ESRI ArcGIS, by mean of post-processing conversion. a) automatic download of input data SISMA needs input data such as GNSS observations, updated seismic catalogue, SAR satellites orbits, etc. that are periodically updated and made available from remote servers through FTP and HTTP. This task is accomplished by a dedicated user configurable component. b) integration of scientific programs SISMA integrates many scientific programs written in different languages (Fortran, C, C++, Perl and Bash) and running into different operating systems. This design requirements lead to the development of a distributed system which is platform independent and is able to run any terminal-based program following few simple predefined rules. c) definition and scheduling of

  8. Environmentalism and environmental change as it affects Canadian defence policy and operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, C M

    1989-12-01

    The greenhouse effect is described, along with the anthropogenic factors that are considered to influence climate. Various types of climatic models are outlined and critically compared, since much of the present debate about the possible impacts of the greenhouse effect is centered on which of the many forecasts is representative of what can be expected in the early 21st century. The central focus of this comparison is to summarize the findings of the models and arrive at an overall consensus on rates of climatic change. It is seen that models are, at their present state of development, only able to provide an internally consistent picture of a plausible future climate. A general consensus is that the annual global average temperature will rise to 16.8-19.8{degree}C by the year 2035. The largest sources of uncertainty in modelling appear to be the feedback from oceans, clouds, ice-albedo, and possibly lapse rate and water-vapor changes. The repercussions of climate change that may influence the Canadian Forces in their daily operations and in strategic planning are briefly discussed. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. C.T. scanning in the pre-operative assessment of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstraw, P.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of T.N.M. staging is now widely adopted, providing an international shorthand to describe tumour extent. Throughout this article the system referred to is that of the American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging and End Results Reporting. It is generally now accepted that Stage I and II patients with N.S.C.L.C. benefit from pulmonary resection, whilst those with Stage III tumours by virtue of T3 status, N2 disease or M stage other than zero, do not. There are exceptions to this rule and they are discussed in the relevant section. The authors therefore consider the role of C.T. scanning in pre-operative staging under the following headings. Tumour characteristics: 1) indicators of malignancy, 2) extra-pulmonary extension; Nodal metastases: 1) hilar, 2) mediastinal; Metastases to distant sites

  10. Sphincter preservation with pre-operative radiation therapy (RT) and coloanal anastomosis: long term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagman, Raquel; Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Guillem, Jose G.; Paty, Philip B.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long term follow-up of sphincter preservation with pre-operative RT and coloanal anastomosis for rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 36 pts (M:25, F:11) with invasive, clinically resectable, primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum were enrolled from 1/87 through 4/96 on a prospective Phase I/II trial. All patients were examined in the office by their operating surgeon prior to the start of RT and were judged clinically to require an abdominoperineal resection (APR) due to the proximity (but not invasion of) the tumor to the anal sphincter. By transrectal ultrasound, clinical T stage was T2:5, and T3:31. The median age was 55 years (range: 33-76 years), and the median distance from the anal verge was 4 cm (range: 3-7 cm). The median tumor size was 3.8 cm (range: 1.5-7 cm). Pts received 4680 cGy (180 cGy/day) to the whole pelvis followed by a boost to 5040 cGy followed by surgery 4-5 weeks later. Although no chemotherapy was delivered concurrently with RT, patients with pathologically positive pelvic nodes (13) or metastatic disease (6) received post-operative 5-FU based chemotherapy. All underwent fecal diversion which was closed 2-4 months post-op. Sphincter function was performed using a telephone survey according to the MSKCC sphincter function scale (Excellent: 1-2 bowel movements/day, no soilage, Good: 3-4 bowel movements/day, and/or mild soilage, fair: Episodic > 4 bowel movements/day, and/or moderate soilage, and Poor: incontinence). Actuarial calculations were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The median follow-up was 56 months (range: 4-121 months). RESULTS: Of the 35 patients who underwent surgery (1 pt with unresectable liver mets did not undergo surgery) (27(35)) (77%) were able to undergo a coloanal anastomosis and the pathological complete response rate was 14%. Post-operative complications included 1 (3%) partial anastamotic disruption, 2 (6%) rectal stenosis, and 1 (3%) pelvic abscess. For the total group of

  11. [Environmental factors and vocal habits regarding pre-school teachers and functionaries suffering voice disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrreto-Munévar, Deisy P; Cháux-Ramos, Oriana M; Estrada-Rangel, Mónica A; Sánchez-Morales, Jenifer; Moreno-Angarita, Marisol; Camargo-Mendoza, Maryluz

    2011-06-01

    Determining the relationship between vocal habits and environmental/ occupational conditions with the presence of vocal disturbance (dysphonia) in teachers and functionaries working at community-based, initial childhood education centres (kindergartens). This was a descriptive study which adopted across-sectional approach using 198 participants which was developed in three phases. Phase 1: consisted of identifying participants having the highest risk of presenting vocal disturbance. Phase 2consisted of observation-analysis concerning the voice use and vocal habits of participants who had been identified in phase 1. Phase 3consisted of perceptual and computational assessment of participants' voices using Wilson's vocal profile and the multidimensional voice program. Individuals having pitch breaks, throat clearing, increased voice intensity, and gastro-oesophageal reflux were found to present below standard fundamental frequency (FF). Subjects having altered breathing and increased voice intensity were identified as having above standard shimmer and jitter acoustic values. A high rate of inability to work was found due to vocal disturbance. It is thus suggested that there is a correlation between vocal habits and vocal disorders presented by preschool teachers in kindergarten settings.

  12. Pre-operative blood donation versus acute normovolemic hemodilution in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezvan Nobahar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH and preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD have questionable efficacy, viral and bacterial infection risks, intermittent blood shortages as homeostasis problem, electrolyte and hemodynamic disturbances. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional survey, we studied 70 patients undergoing open heart coronary artery bypass grafts [CABG] and different valvular replacement 1 ml surgery (35 in ANH, 35 in PABD in Shaheed Modares - Hospital. We measured electrolytes and homeostatic factors to evaluate the influence of two transfusion methods on homeostatic function and hemodynamic balance. Results: We compared 70 patients (38 male [54.3%] and 32 female [45.7%] with mean age 54.8 years undergoing open heart surgery (CABG and valvular. In ANH group, significant decrease was detected in Na (28.5% K (2.5%, prothrombin time (PT (88.57%, partial thromboplastin time (PTT (94.28%, creatine phosphokinase (CPK (11.4%, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH (11.43%, albumin (Alb (17.14%, globulin (91.43% and total protein (80%. Mean initial and post-operative hemoglobin was 14.12 ± 1.06 versus 11.97 ± 0.98, hematocrit 42.22 ± 3.45 versus 35.40 ± 2.88, systolic blood pressure 124.1 ± 14.4 versus 110.88 ± 15.6 (reduction 22.86% diastolic blood pressure 76.02 ± 10 versus 69.26 ± 11 (reduction 3% and pulse rate was 75.45 ± 10 versus 84.45 ± 12 (12% in this case difference between two groups was strongly significant (P = 0.001. In PABD group, significant decrease was detected in Na (20%, K (2.5%, PT (91.43% PTT (80%, CPK (8.57%, LDH (5.72%, Alb (57.15%, globulin (71.43% and total-protein (62.85%, the value of hemodynamic changes were in normal range. Conclusion: Though autologous blood transfusion (ANH and PABD was preferable to allogeneic transfusion in cardiac surgical patients; but PABD offers more advantages in homeostasis, hemodynamic stability and electrolyte balance.

  13. Our experience with pre-operative haemostatic assessment of paediatric patients undergoing adenotonsillectomy at Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amali Adekwu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2-4% of all patients requiring adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy, pre-operative screening tests for coagulation disorders are indicated to detect surgical bleeding complications. However, because of cost effect on the patients, the usefulness of these tests is being challenged. We therefore highlight our experience in paediatric patients undergoing adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy or both in our centre. Patients and Methods: This is a 3½-year analysis of the data of 165 paediatric patients who had adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy or both over the study period. The data collected included age, sex, procedure done and detailed clinical bleeding history. Results: A total of 165 children had either adenoidectomy or tonsillectomy, or both. There were 76 males and 89 females giving a male to female ratio of 1:1.2. Their ages ranged from 10 months to 18 years. Eighty-five (51.5% patients had adenotonsillectomy, 48 (29.1% and 32 (19.4% had only tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies, respectively. Only 11 (6.7% families volunteered the history of either prolonged bleeding with minor injury on the skin or occasional slight nose bleeding. Six (3.6% patients including 3 of the children with positive family history had posttonsillectomy bleed, out of which 4 (66.7% were moderate whereas the remaining 2 (33.3% were severe bleeding, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.041. The two cases of severe bleeding had fresh whole blood transfused whereas the rest that had no bleeding issues were discharged home 48 h postoperatively. Conclusion: Our experience in this study suggests that detailed bleeding history is necessary as well as pre-operative haemostatic assessment, if available and affordable for paediatric patients undergoing adenotonsillectomy.

  14. Managing Environmental Impact Assessment for Construction and Operation in New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This publication describes the environmental impact assessment (EIA) process, its utilization and the necessary infrastructure for such a process in order to provide a holistic approach for EIA in new nuclear power programmes. It also emphasizes the environmental aspects unique to a nuclear power programme, assuming that a State embarking on such a programme already has an environmental regulatory framework for the industrial projects in place. This publication also describes the phased implementation of the EIA programme in accordance with the phases described in IAEA Nuclear Energy Series No. NG-G-3.1. This publication is addressed to senior managers, project managers or coordinators and technical specialists of government authorities and agencies, including regulatory bodies, operating organizations and supporting industries, and other organizations involved in environmental issues

  15. Real time observation system for monitoring environmental impact on marine ecosystems from oil drilling operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godø, Olav Rune; Klungsøyr, Jarle; Meier, Sonnich; Tenningen, Eirik; Purser, Autun; Thomsen, Laurenz

    2014-07-15

    Environmental awareness and technological advances has spurred development of new monitoring solutions for the petroleum industry. This paper presents experience from a monitoring program off Norway. To maintain operation within the limits of the government regulations Statoil tested a new monitoring concept. Multisensory data were cabled to surface buoys and transmitted to land via wireless communication. The system collected information about distribution of the drilling wastes and the welfare of the corals in relation to threshold values. The project experienced a series of failures, but the backup monitoring provided information to fulfil the requirements of the permit. The experience demonstrated the need for real time monitoring and how such systems enhance understanding of impacts on marine organisms. Also, drilling operations may improve by taking environmental information into account. The paper proposes to standardize and streamline monitoring protocols to maintain comparability during all phases of the operation and between drill sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Incorporation of environmental impact criteria in the design and operation of chemical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.E. Bauer

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental impact assessment is becoming indispensable for the design and operation of chemical plants. Structured and consistent methods for this purpose have experienced a rapid development. The more rigorous and sophisticated these methods become, the greater is the demand for convenient tools. On the other hand, despite the incredible advances in process simulators, some aspects have still not been sufficiently covered. To date, applications of these programs to quantify environmental impacts have been restricted to straightforward examples of steady-state processes. In this work, a life-cycle assessment implementation with the aim of process design will be described, with a brief discussion of a dynamic simulation for analysis of transient state operations, such as process start-up. A case study shows the importance of this analysis in making possible operation at a high performance level with reduced risks to the environment.

  17. Bechtel Hanford, Inc./ERC team health and safety plan Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, S.R.

    1996-02-01

    A comprehensive safety and health program is essential for reducing work-related injuries and illnesses while maintaining a safe and health work environment. This document establishes Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI)/Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) team requirements, policies, and procedures and provides preliminary guidance to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) subcontractor for use in preparing essential safety and health documents. This health and safety plan (HASP) defines potential safety and health issues associated with operating and maintaining the ERDF. A site-specific HASP shall be developed by the ERDF subcontractor and shall be implemented before operations and maintenance work can proceed. An activity hazard analysis (AHA) shall also be developed to provide procedures to identify, assess, and control hazards or potential incidents associated with specific operations and maintenance activities

  18. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix L: Soils, geology and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. This appendix addresses the study of geology, soils, and groundwater concerns relative to the System Operation Review (SOR). Chapter 1 provides an overview of the study, scope, and process for this resource area. In order, the respective sections of this chapter discuss the relevant issues for the study, and the means by which the SOR team carried out the study

  19. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Regents of the University of California (UC) propose the continued operation, including near-term proposed projects, of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition, DOE proposes the continued operation, including near-term proposed projects, of Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Continued operation plus proposed projects at the two Laboratories is needed so that the research and development missions established by Congress and the President can continue to be supported. As provided and encouraged by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), DOE and UC have prepared this document as a joint Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Environmental Impact Report (EIR) to analyze the impacts of the proposed action. In addition, this document discusses a no action alternative for continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative focused on specific adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative. This document also examines the alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. The environmental documentation process provides information to the public, government agencies, and decision makers about the environmental impacts of implementing the proposed and alternative actions. In addition, this environmental documentation identifies alternatives and possible ways to reduce or prevent environmental impacts. A list of the issues raised through the EIS/EIR scoping process is presented

  20. Pre-operative assessment of cancer in the elderly (PACE) : A comprehensive assessment of underlying characteristics of elderly cancer patients prior to elective surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, D.; Ramesh, H.; Gennari, R.; Corsini, G.; Maffezzini, M.; Hoekstra, H. J.; Mobarak, D.; Sunouchi, K.; Stotter, A.; West, C.; Audisio, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a disease that particularly affects the elderly and, although surgery is the first treatment choice, many elderly cancer patients do not receive standard surgery because they are considered unfit for treatment due to an inaccurate estimation of operative risk. Pre-operative

  1. Comparison of the effect of pre- and post-operative physical therapy versus post-operative physical therapy alone on pain and recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of pre-operative and post-operative physical therapy versus post-operative physical therapy alone on pain and recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty patients (18 males and 32 females) ranging in age from 48 to 80?years (mean 63.28, SD 9.44) participated in a 6-week two-arm randomized rater-blinded trial. One group received pre- and post-operative physical therapy whereas the other group ...

  2. Axillary fine needle aspiration cytology for pre-operative staging of patients with screen-detected invasive breast carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Brian D

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of radiologically abnormal axillary lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer can identify patients suitable for primary axillary clearance (AC) rather than sentinel node biopsy, enabling surgical axillary staging by a single operation. This study assessed the accuracy of FNAC in predicting positive axillary lymph nodes. METHODS: 161 patients with screen-detected invasive carcinoma and who had pre-operative FNAC of a radiologically abnormal axillary lymph node were identified from two screening units, The axillary FNAC reports were correlated with sentinel node biopsy and AC reports, and sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were calculated. RESULTS: FNAC had a moderate sensitivity (66.3%) and NPV (71.8%), and a high specificity (98.7%) and PPV (98.3%). Most patients (86%) had a single axillary operation. The sensitivity was highest in grade 3 (81.8%) and ductal type (77.8%) tumours. The sensitivity was lower in tumours of special type (34.8%), grade 1 tumours (50%) and those without lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (55.9%). The NPV was highest in pT1 (86.7%) and in grade 1 (84.5%) tumours, and lowest (44%) in tumours with LVI. The PPV was 100% in grade 1 and 3 tumours, stage pT2 and pT3 tumours and those without LVI, and was high (>96%) in all other groups. In lymph-node-positive patients, the mean number of lymph nodes involved was higher in the case of a positive (6.4) than negative FNAC (4.4). CONCLUSIONS: FNAC of ultrasonically abnormal axillary lymph nodes achieved surgical staging by a single operation in most patients with screen-detected invasive breast carcinoma, with moderate sensitivity and high specificity.

  3. Final Environmental Statement related to the operation of Beaver Valley Power Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-412)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    This Final Environmental Statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with Beaver Valley Power Station Unit 2 pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental benefits and costs, and concludes that the action called for is the issuance of an operating license for Beaver Valley Unit 2

  4. Draft environmental statement related to the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-423)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This Draft Environmental Statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 3, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs

  5. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Oil and Natural Gas Operations: Potential Environmental Contamination and Recommendations to Assess Complex Environmental Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Tillitt, Donald E; Lin, Chung-Ho; McElroy, Jane A; Nagel, Susan C

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technologies, developed over the last 65 years, have only recently been combined with horizontal drilling to unlock oil and gas reserves previously deemed inaccessible. Although these technologies have dramatically increased domestic oil and natural gas production, they have also raised concerns for the potential contamination of local water supplies with the approximately 1,000 chemicals that are used throughout the process, including many known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We discuss the need for an endocrine component to health assessments for drilling-dense regions in the context of hormonal and antihormonal activities for chemicals used. We discuss the literature on a) surface and groundwater contamination by oil and gas extraction operations, and b) potential human exposure, particularly in the context of the total hormonal and antihormonal activities present in surface and groundwater from natural and anthropogenic sources; we also discuss initial analytical results and critical knowledge gaps. In light of the potential for environmental release of oil and gas chemicals that can disrupt hormone receptor systems, we recommend methods for assessing complex hormonally active environmental mixtures. We describe a need for an endocrine-centric component for overall health assessments and provide information supporting the idea that using such a component will help explain reported adverse health trends as well as help develop recommendations for environmental impact assessments and monitoring programs.

  6. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and oil and natural gas operations: Potential environmental contamination and recommendations to assess complex environmental mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Lin, Chung-Ho; McElroy, Jane A.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hydraulic fracturing technologies, developed over the last 65 years, have only recently been combined with horizontal drilling to unlock oil and gas reserves previously deemed inaccessible. While these technologies have dramatically increased domestic oil and natural gas production, they have also raised concerns for the potential contamination of local water supplies with the approximately 1,000 chemicals used throughout the process, including many known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals.Objectives: We discuss the need for an endocrine component to health assessments for drilling-dense regions in the context of hormonal and anti-hormonal activities for chemicals used.Methods: We discuss the literature on 1) surface and ground water contamination by oil and gas extraction operations, and 2) potential human exposure, particularly in context of the total hormonal and anti-hormonal activities present in surface and ground water from natural and anthropogenic sources, with initial analytical results and critical knowledge gaps discussed.Discussion: In light of the potential for environmental release of oil and gas chemicals that can disrupt hormone receptor systems, we recommend methods for assessing complex hormonally active environmental mixtures.Conclusions: We describe a need for an endocrine-centric component for overall health assessments and provide supporting information that using this may help explain reported adverse health trends as well as help develop recommendations for environmental impact assessments and monitoring programs.

  7. Improvement of the environmental and operational characteristics of vehicles through decreasing the motor fuel density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaril, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The environmental and operational characteristics of motor transport, one of the main consumers of motor fuel and source of toxic emissions, soot, and greenhouse gases, are determined to a large extent by the fuel quality which is characterized by many parameters. Fuel density is one of these parameters and it can serve as an indicator of fuel quality. It has been theoretically substantiated that an increased density of motor fuel has a negative impact both on the environmental and operational characteristics of motor transport. The use of fuels with a high density leads to an increase in carbonization within the engine, adversely affecting the vehicle performance and increasing environmental pollution. A program of technological measures targeted at reducing the density of the fuel used was offered. It includes a solution to the problem posed by changes in the refining capacities ratio and the temperature range of gasoline and diesel fuel boiling, by introducing fuel additives and adding butanes to the gasoline. An environmental tax has been developed which allows oil refineries to have a direct impact on the production of fuels with improved environmental performance, taking into account the need to minimize the density of the fuel within a given category of quality.

  8. Strategies for reducing the environmental impact of gaseous detector operation at the CERN LHC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capeans, M.; Guida, R.; Mandelli, B., E-mail: beatrice.mandelli@cern.ch

    2017-02-11

    A wide range of gas mixtures is used for the operation of different gaseous detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. Nowadays some of these gases, as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}F{sub 4}, CF{sub 4} and SF{sub 6}, are indicated as greenhouse gases (GHG) and dominate the overall GHG emission from particle detectors at the LHC experiments. The release of GHG is an important subject for the design of future particle detectors as well as for the operation of the current experiments. Different strategies have been adopted at CERN for reducing the GHG emissions. The standard approach is the recirculation of the gas mixture with complex gas systems where system stability and the possible accumulation of impurities need to be attentively evaluated for the good operation and safety of the detectors. A second approach is based on the recuperation of the gas mixture exiting the detectors and the separation of its gas components for re-use. At long-term, the use of less invasive gases is being investigated, especially for the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) systems. Operation of RPC with environmentally friendly gas mixtures is demonstrated for streamer mode while avalanche mode operation needs more complex gas mixtures. - Highlights: • Greenhouse gases (GHG) emission in the LHC experiments and detectors. • Strategies to reduce the GHG emissions: gas recirculation and recuperation systems. • GHG emission: achievements from LHC Run1 to Run2. • Resistive Plate Chambers operation with new environmentally friendly gases.

  9. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix K: Resident fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. In this appendix the Resident Fish Work Group (RFWG) has attempted to characterize and evaluate impacts of dam operation on an extremely complex and diverse integrated resource. Not only is this required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for SOR, there are resident fish populations that have status under the Federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) or equivalent state regulations (Kootenai River white sturgeon, Snake River white sturgeon, sandroller, shorthead and torrent sculpins, bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, redband trout, and burbot). The RFWG has also attempted to develop operating alternatives that benefit not only resident fish, but anadromous fish, wildlife, and other human interests as well. The authors have recognized the co-evolution of resident fish, anadromous fish, and other integrated resources in the basin

  10. Environmental impact report addendum for the continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    An environmental impact statement/environmental impact report (ES/EIR) for the continued operation and management of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was prepared jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California (UC). The scope of the document included near-term (within 5-10 years) proposed projects. The UC Board of Regents, as state lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), certified and adopted the EIR by issuing a Notice of Determination on November 20, 1992. The DOE, as the lead federal agency under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), adopted a Record of Decision for the ES on January 27, 1993 (58 Federal Register [FR] 6268). The DOE proposed action was to continue operation of the facility, including near-term proposed projects. The specific project evaluated by UC was extension of the contract between UC and DOE for UC's continued operation and management of LLNL (both sites) from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1997. The 1992 ES/EIR analyzed impacts through the year 2002. The 1992 ES/EIR comprehensively evaluated the potential environmental impacts of operation and management of LLNL within the near-term future. Activities evaluated included programmatic enhancements and modifications of facilities and programs at the LLNL Livermore site and at LLNL's Experimental Test Site (Site 300) in support of research and development missions 2048 established for LLNL by Congress and the President. The evaluation also considered the impacts of infrastructure and building maintenance, minor modifications to buildings, general landscaping, road maintenance, and similar routine support activities

  11. Does Pre-Operative Multiple Immunosuppressive Therapy Associate with Surgical Site Infection in Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Motoi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Bando, Toshihiro; Hirose, Kei; Hirata, Akihiro; Chohno, Teruhiro; Sasaki, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Hida, Nobuyuki; Hori, Kazutoshi; Nakamura, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Almost all surgeries for ulcerative colitis (UC) are performed under immunosuppressive conditions. Immunomodulators or biologics, with the exception of corticosteroids, do not appear to be risk factors for post-operative infectious complications. However, many patients are on multiagent immunosuppressive therapy at the time of surgery. Therefore, we evaluated the influence of pre-operative multiple immunosuppressives on the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI) in UC. We reviewed surveillance data from 181 patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy between January 2012 and March 2014. The incidences of SSI and the possible risk factors among patients receiving different immunosuppressive therapies were compared and analyzed. The incidence of incisional (INC) SSI was 13.3% and that of organ/space (O/S) SSI was 7.2%. The number of immunosuppressives did not significantly correlate with each incidence. Total prednisolone administration ≥12,000 mg (OR 2.6) and an American Society of Anesthesiologists score ≥3 (OR 2.8) were shown to be independent risk factors for overall SSI, whereas corticosteroid use in INC SSI (OR 17.4) and severe disease (OR 5.2) and a large amount of blood loss (OR 3.9) in O/S SSI were identified as risk factors. Although a correlation between multiple immunosuppressive therapy and SSIs was not found, it is not recommended that all patients be treated with multiple immunosuppressive therapy. Treatment strategy should be applied based on the patient's condition. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Elective caesarean operation in the bitch using aglepristone before the pre-partum decline in peripheral progesterone concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, X; Fontaine, E; Segalini, V; Fontbonne, A

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate caesarean operation (CO) undertaken before the pre-partum decrease of progesterone but following administration of a progesterone receptor antagonist and to evaluate the innocuity of this procedure for the dam and pups. Thirty seven bitches of 15 different breeds, received an injection of 15 mg/kg aglepristone 59 or 60 days after the estimated day of ovulation, determined by progesterone quantitative assays, and caesarean section (CS) was performed between 20 and 24 h after administration. Progesterone remained above 6 nmol/l at the time of CS (mean = 15.75, SD = 3.84). No post-operative clinical complications were reported in any of the bitches. All bitches were able to nurse and feed their puppies in the first 24 h following surgery. No pups showed any signs of prematurity and 5 out of 188 pups (2.6) died in the first 2 weeks after delivery. This small study demonstrates that a CS may be safely and successfully performed an average of 2 days before the expected date of parturition following the administration of aglepristone, without any harmful consequence for the dam and her neonates.

  13. Status of existing federal environmental risk-based standards applicable to Department of Energy operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilyard, G.R.

    1991-09-01

    When conducting its environmental restoration, waste management, and decontamination and decommissioning activities, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must comply with a myriad of regulatory procedures and environmental standards. This paper assesses the status of existing federal risk-based standards that may be applied to chemical and radioactive substances on DOE sites. Gaps and inconsistencies among the existing standards and the technical issues associated with the application of those standards are identified. Finally, the implications of the gaps, inconsistencies, and technical issues on DOE operations are discussed, and approaches to resolving the gaps, inconsistencies, and technical issues are identified. 6 refs

  14. Influences of environmental and operational factors on dark fermentative hydrogen production: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Parviz; Ibrahim, Shaliza; Ghafari, Shahin; Annuar, Mohamad Suffian Mohamad; Vikineswary, Sabaratnam; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen (H 2 ) is one of renewable energy sources known for its non-polluting and environmentally friendly nature, as its end combustion product is water (H 2 O). The biological production of H 2 is a less energy intensive alternative where processes can be operated at ambient temperature and pressure. Dark fermentation by bacterial biomass is one of multitude of approaches to produce hydrogen which is known as the cleanest renewable energy and is thus receiving increasing attention worldwide. The present study briefly reviews the biohydrogen production process with special attention on the effects of several environmental and operational factors towards the process. Factors such as organic loading rate, hydraulic retention time, temperature, and pH studied in published reports were compared and their influences are discussed in this work. This review highlights the variations in examined operating ranges for the factors as well as their reported optimum values. Divergent values observed for the environmental/operational factors merit further exploration in this field. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Influences of environmental and operational factors on dark fermentative hydrogen production: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Parviz [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ibrahim, Shaliza; Ghafari, Shahin [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Annuar, Mohamad Suffian Mohamad; Vikineswary, Sabaratnam [Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Water and Wastewater Research Center (WWRC), Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) is one of renewable energy sources known for its non-polluting and environmentally friendly nature, as its end combustion product is water (H{sub 2}O). The biological production of H{sub 2} is a less energy intensive alternative where processes can be operated at ambient temperature and pressure. Dark fermentation by bacterial biomass is one of multitude of approaches to produce hydrogen which is known as the cleanest renewable energy and is thus receiving increasing attention worldwide. The present study briefly reviews the biohydrogen production process with special attention on the effects of several environmental and operational factors towards the process. Factors such as organic loading rate, hydraulic retention time, temperature, and pH studied in published reports were compared and their influences are discussed in this work. This review highlights the variations in examined operating ranges for the factors as well as their reported optimum values. Divergent values observed for the environmental/operational factors merit further exploration in this field. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Environmental program with operational cases to reduce risk to the marine environment significantly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.T.; Forde, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper Amoco Norway Oil Company's environmental program is detailed, followed by example operational programs and achievements aimed to minimize environmental risks to the marine environment at Valhall platform. With a corporate goal to be a leader in protecting the environment, the appropriate strategies and policies that form the basis of the environmental management system are incorporated in the quality assurance programs. Also, included in the program are necessary organizational structures, responsibilities of environmental affairs and line organization personnel, compliance procedures and a waste task force obliged to implement operations improvements. An internal environmental audit system has been initiated, in addition to corporate level audits, which, when communicated to the line organization closes the environmental management loop through experience feed back. Environmental projects underway are significantly decreasing the extent and/or risk of pollution from offshore activities. The cradle to grave responsibility is assumed with waste separated offshore and onshore followed by disposal in audited sites. A $5 MM program is underway to control produced oily solids and reduce oil in produced water aiming to less than 20 ppm. When oil-based mud is used in deeper hole sections, drill solids disposed at sea average less than 60 g oil/kg dry cuttings using appropriate shaker screens, and a washing/centrifuge system to remove fines. Certain oily liquid wastes are being injected down hole whereas previously they were burned using a mud burner. Finally, a program is underway with a goal to eliminate sea discharge of oil on cuttings through injection disposal of oily wastes, drilling with alternative muds such as a cationic water base mud, and/or proper onshore disposal of oily wastes

  17. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Operations System: Version 4.0 - system requirements specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashporenko, D.

    1996-07-01

    This document is intended to provide an operations standard for the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory OPerations System (EMSL OPS). It is directed toward three primary audiences: (1) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) facility and operations personnel; (2) laboratory line managers and staff; and (3) researchers, equipment operators, and laboratory users. It is also a statement of system requirements for software developers of EMSL OPS. The need for a finely tuned, superior research environment as provided by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory has never been greater. The abrupt end of the Cold War and the realignment of national priorities caused major US and competing overseas laboratories to reposition themselves in a highly competitive research marketplace. For a new laboratory such as the EMSL, this means coming into existence in a rapidly changing external environment. For any major laboratory, these changes create funding uncertainties and increasing global competition along with concomitant demands for higher standards of research product quality and innovation. While more laboratories are chasing fewer funding dollars, research ideas and proposals, especially for molecular-level research in the materials and biological sciences, are burgeoning. In such an economically constrained atmosphere, reduced costs, improved productivity, and strategic research project portfolio building become essential to establish and maintain any distinct competitive advantage. For EMSL, this environment and these demands require clear operational objectives, specific goals, and a well-crafted strategy. Specific goals will evolve and change with the evolution of the nature and definition of DOE`s environmental research needs. Hence, EMSL OPS is designed to facilitate migration of these changes with ease into every pertinent job function, creating a facile {open_quotes}learning organization.{close_quotes}

  18. A New Tool for Environmental and Economic Optimization of Hydropower Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S.; Hayse, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    As part of a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, researchers from Argonne, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Sandia National Laboratories collaborated on the development of an integrated toolset to enhance hydropower operational decisions related to economic value and environmental performance. As part of this effort, we developed an analytical approach (Index of River Functionality, IRF) and an associated software tool to evaluate how well discharge regimes achieve ecosystem management goals for hydropower facilities. This approach defines site-specific environmental objectives using relationships between environmental metrics and hydropower-influenced flow characteristics (e.g., discharge or temperature), with consideration given to seasonal timing, duration, and return frequency requirements for the environmental objectives. The IRF approach evaluates the degree to which an operational regime meets each objective and produces a score representing how well that regime meets the overall set of defined objectives. When integrated with other components in the toolset that are used to plan hydropower operations based upon hydrologic forecasts and various constraints on operations, the IRF approach allows an optimal release pattern to be developed based upon tradeoffs between environmental performance and economic value. We tested the toolset prototype to generate a virtual planning operation for a hydropower facility located in the Upper Colorado River basin as a demonstration exercise. We conducted planning as if looking five months into the future using data for the recently concluded 2012 water year. The environmental objectives for this demonstration were related to spawning and nursery habitat for endangered fishes using metrics associated with maintenance of instream habitat and reconnection of the main channel with floodplain wetlands in a representative reach of the river. We also applied existing mandatory operational constraints for the

  19. The potential usefulness of the Response Index in positron emission tomography assessing the therapeutic effect of pre-operative chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Matsuda, Chu; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Murata, Kohei; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Mizushima, Tsunekazu

    2017-12-01

    Pre-operative chemotherapy is an option for patients with local advanced rectal cancer, but the response rate to pre-operative chemotherapy with oxaliplatin is still low. If the therapeutic effect of pre-operative chemotherapy could be assessed, we may be able to convert to surgery early. The purpose of the present study was to validate the correlation between the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) in 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) of the primary tumor and the therapeutic effect of pre-operative chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer. Retrospective cohort study from January 2011 to October 2015. We examined 28 patients with pathologically confirmed sigmoid or rectal cancer that underwent pre-operative chemotherapy and surgery. The correlation between Response Index (RI), calculated as (SUV max after chemotherapy)/(SUV max before chemotherapy), and the therapeutic effect on the primary tumor in advanced colorectal cancer. The degree of differentiation (p = 0.04), SUV max in the primary tumor after chemotherapy (p = 0.02), and RI (p = 0.008) were significant predictors of the therapeutic effect in univariate analysis. The areas under the ROC curve constructed with RI and therapeutic effect was 0.77. The optimal cut-off values for the RI in the responder group was effect of chemotherapy on advanced colorectal cancer. Thus, RI is potentially useful for predicting the therapeutic effect in advanced colorectal cancer.

  20. The impact of pre-operative weight loss on incidence of surgical site infection and readmission rates after total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inacio, Maria C S; Kritz-Silverstein, Donna; Raman, Rema; Macera, Caroline A; Nichols, Jeanne F; Shaffer, Richard A; Fithian, Donald C

    2014-03-01

    This study characterized a cohort of obese total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients (1/1/2008-12/31/2010) and evaluated whether a clinically significant amount of pre-operative weight loss (5% decrease in body weight) is associated with a decreased risk of surgical site infections (SSI) and readmissions post-surgery. 10,718 TKAs and 4066 THAs were identified. During the one year pre-TKA 7.6% of patients gained weight, 12.4% lost weight, and 79.9% remained the same. In the one year pre-THA, 6.3% of patients gained weight, 18.0% lost weight, and 75.7% remained the same. In TKAs and THAs, after adjusting for covariates, the risk of SSI and readmission was not significantly different in the patients who gained or lost weight pre-operatively compared to those who remained the same. © 2013.

  1. Effects of individual pre-fledging traits and environmental conditions on return patterns in juvenile king penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraux, Claire; Viblanc, Vincent A; Hanuise, Nicolas; Le Maho, Yvon; Le Bohec, Céline

    2011-01-01

    Despite the importance of early life stages in individuals' life history and population dynamics, very few studies have focused on the constraints to which these juvenile traits are subjected. Based on 10 years of automatic monitoring of over 2500 individuals, we present the first study on the effects of environmental conditions and individual pre-fledging traits on the post-fledging return of non-banded king penguins to their natal colony. Juvenile king penguins returned exclusively within one of the three austral summers following their departure. A key finding is that return rates (range 68-87%) were much higher than previously assumed for this species, importantly meaning that juvenile survival is very close to that of adults. Such high figures suggest little juvenile dispersal, and selection occurring mostly prior to fledging in king penguins. Pre-fledging conditions had a strong quadratic impact on juvenile return rates. As expected, cohorts reared under very unfavourable years (as inferred by the breeding success of the colony) exhibited low return rates but surprisingly, so did those fledged under very favourable conditions. Juvenile sojourns away from the colony were shorter under warm conditions and subsequent return rates higher, suggesting a positive effect of climate warming. The longer the post-fledging trip (1, 2 or 3 years), the earlier in the summer birds returned to their natal colony and the longer they stayed before leaving for the winter journey. The presence of juveniles in the colony was more than twice the duration required for moulting purposes, yet none attempted breeding in the year of their first return. Juvenile presence in the colony may be important for acquiring knowledge on the social and physical colonial environment and may play an important part in the learning process of mating behaviour. Further studies are required to investigate its potential implications on other life-history traits such as recruitment age.

  2. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix E: Flood control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The Corps of Engineers, Bonneville Power Administration, and Bureau of Reclamation conducted a scoping process consisting of a series of regionwide public meetings and solicitation of written comments in the summer of 1990. Comments on flood control issues were received from all parts of the Columbia river basin. This appendix includes issues raised in the public scoping process, as well as those brought for consideration by members of the Flood Control Work Group

  3. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix M: Water quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. Analysis of water quality begins with an account of the planning and evaluation process, and continues with a description of existing water quality conditions in the Columbia River Basin. This is followed by an explanation how the analysis was conducted. The analysis concludes with an assessment of the effects of SOR alternatives on water quality and a comparison of alternatives

  4. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix T: Comments and responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. This appendix documents the public and agency review of the SOR Draft EIS and how the SOR agencies used the review to formulate the FINAL EIS. The appendix includes a summary of the review process, a discussion of the nature of the comments, a list of all commentors, reproductions of comment letters, and responses to all comments. Changes in the EIS text in response to comments are noted in the responses

  5. Comparison of environmental radiation doses estimated for Hanford Operations, 1977 through 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormack, W.D.; Carlile, J.M.V.; Peloquin, R.A.; Napier, B.A.

    1983-12-01

    Offsite environmental radiation dose equivalents based on Hanford operations are compared for the years 1977 through 1981 to those calculated for 1982. The comparison revealed a downward trend in calculated offsite doses over the period 1977 through 1982, due primarily to reported reduced effluent releases, changes in effluent reporting methods, and increased Columbia River flow over this period. The calculated doses verify the surveillance program findings that potential offsite radiation doses due to Hanford Operations are small and well below our ability to detect in the environment. 11 references, 23 tables

  6. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report Exhibits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    This Volume is a part of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System. This volume contains technical exhibits of cultural resources and commentary on the (System Operation Review) SOR process. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation comment is the majority of the material in the volume, in the Consultation Plan, Identification of trust resources; Criteria for the selection of a System Operating Strategy; comment on rights protection and implementation of Federal Trust responsibility; analysis of the draft EIS. Comment by other Native American Tribes and groups is also included: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Spokane Tribe of Indians; Coeur d` Alene tribe.

  7. Mobilizing First-Line Managers as Organizational Strategy Makers: The Case of Environmentally Sustainable Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Gjøsæter, Åge

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to investigate how first-line managers are mobilized as organizational strategy makers. The research case is a campaign launched by a Norwegian shipping company servicing the petroleum industry. The strategic idea on which the campaign was based was to operate the company`s fleet of offshore service vessels in an environmentally sustainable way, to be realized by carrying out fuel-saving operations on board the vessels. A strategic idea is supposed to set out a vie...

  8. Columbia River system operation review: Final environmental impact statement. Main report exhibits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This Volume is a part of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System. This volume contains technical exhibits of cultural resources and commentary on the (System Operation Review) SOR process. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation comment is the majority of the material in the volume, in the Consultation Plan, Identification of trust resources; Criteria for the selection of a System Operating Strategy; comment on rights protection and implementation of Federal Trust responsibility; analysis of the draft EIS. Comment by other Native American Tribes and groups is also included: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Spokane Tribe of Indians; Coeur d' Alene tribe

  9. A team leadership approach to managing the transition from construction to operations for an environmental project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.W.

    1994-06-01

    This presentation describes a team approach, at the totalproject level that focused team members with common objectives, for the transition to start-up and operation of the project. The Integrated Management Team (IMT) approach has been successful for this US Department of Energy (DOE) environmental restoration project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The $53.8-million project will collect, treat, and dispose of low-level mixed waste water discharges from the Hanford Site. Construction is scheduled for completion in September 1994 and facility start-up in June 1995. The project challenge is for leadership that is committed to the transition from construction to operation of the environmental restoration project

  10. Analysis of Environmental Data During TRIGA 2000 Reactor Operation in PTNBR-BATAN Bandung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulfakhri

    2009-01-01

    The radioactivity data of grass and soil obtained from environmental monitoring during 2000-2008 have been quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed. The data were analyzed using statistical method of the population homogeneity varians test and the average equality test, whereas qualitative analysis have been carried out by gamma spectrometry. From the data analysis, using homogeneity varians test (X 2 test) and average equality test (F test) it was obtained that X 2 calculation , F calculation > X 2 table , F table , so it can be assumed that operation of TRIGA 2000 reactor has no effect to the radioactivity of the environment. The qualitative analysis of grass and soil samples shows no visible peak of gamma ray from fission or activation products from the reactor, but the natural radionuclide such as 214 Bi, 228 Ac, 212 Bi, and 40 K were detected. It can be concluded that reactor operation have no effect to the environmental radioactivity. (author)

  11. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  12. Framework and operational procedure for implementing Strategic Environmental Assessment in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Cunkuan; Lu Yongsen; Shang Jincheng

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) has been implemented and become an important instrument for decision-making in development projects in China. The Environmental Impact Assessment Law of the P.R. China was promulgated on 28 October 2002 and will be put into effect on 1 September of 2003. The law provides that Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is required in regional and sector plans and programs. This paper introduces the research achievements and practice of SEA in China, discusses the relationship of SEA and 'integrating of environment and development in decision-making (IEDD)', and relevant political and legal basis of SEA. The framework and operational procedures of SEA administration and enforcement are presented. Nine cases are analyzed and some proposals are given

  13. Some problems of evaluating environmental impacts of nuclear power installation building and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uvirova, E.

    1984-01-01

    The impacts of the construction and operation of a nuclear power installation on the natural environment is discussed, namely on changes in the landscape profile, in the structure of settlement and large-scale agricultural production, the requisition of agricultural land, changes in transport systems, etc., as well as approaches to the evaluation of these environmental impacts with the aim of preserving the optimal state of inter-relations between man and the natural environment. (author)

  14. Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 1. Annual operation report: January-December 1977 (including environmental report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    Net electrical energy generated in 1977 was 2,922,683.7 MWH with the generator on line 6,959.8 hours. Information is presented concerning operations, power generation, shutdowns, maintenance, changes, tests, experiments, occupational personnel radiation exposures, and primary coolant chemistry. Data on radioactive effluent releases, meteorology, environmental monitoring, and potential radiation doses to individuals for July 7, 1977 to December 31, 1977 are also included

  15. Green Warriors: Army Environmental Considerations for Contingency Operations from Planning through Post-Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    vehicles, thereby limiting pollu- tion of surface streams and aquifers in the host nation. But the lack of adequate racks can often delay redeployment of...support is central to operations in Iraq, has established high standards for U.S. environmental behavior. By con- trast, Qatar seems less concerned about...2007: http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/MG321/ Kinnevan, Kurt, “Trip Report for Kuwait and Qatar , 11-22 May 2005,” Memorandum for Record

  16. An Investigation of the dependence of CMS RPC operation on environmental parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assran, Y. [Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Eng., Suez Canal University (Egypt); Colafranceschi, S. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Doninck, W.A. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Sharma, A. [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva (Switzerland); Wickramage, N., E-mail: nwickram@cern.ch [EHEP, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India)

    2011-06-15

    In this paper an analysis is presented on performance of RPC chambers installed in the cosmic ray test stand at ISR, CERN. The currents of RPC chambers are studied as a function of environmental parameters such as temperature, humidity and pressure, which are important for the operation of the RPC detector system at CMS. A neural network approach has been used to analyze the data and to build a model using experimental measurements and combining the results of the simulations.

  17. How to Get Data from NOAA Environmental Satellites: An Overview of Operations, Products, Access and Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoho, N.; Graumann, A.; McNamara, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we will highlight access and availability of NOAA satellite data for near real time (NRT) and retrospective product users. The presentation includes an overview of the current fleet of NOAA satellites and methods of data distribution and access to hundreds of imagery and products offered by the Environmental Satellite Processing Center (ESPC) and the Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS). In particular, emphasis on the various levels of services for current and past observations will be presented. The National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is dedicated to providing timely access to global environmental data from satellites and other sources. In special cases, users are authorized direct access to NESDIS data distribution systems for environmental satellite data and products. Other means of access include publicly available distribution services such as the Global Telecommunication System (GTS), NOAA satellite direct broadcast services and various NOAA websites and ftp servers, including CLASS. CLASS is NOAA's information technology system designed to support long-term, secure preservation and standards-based access to environmental data collections and information. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) is responsible for the ingest, quality control, stewardship, archival and access to data and science information. This work will also show the latest technology improvements, enterprise approach and future plans for distribution of exponentially increasing data volumes from future NOAA missions. A primer on access to NOAA operational satellite products and services is available at http://www.ospo.noaa.gov/Organization/About/access.html. Access to post-operational satellite data and assorted products is available at http://www.class.noaa.gov

  18. Prognostic influence of pre-operative C-reactive protein in node-negative breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Sicking

    Full Text Available The importance of inflammation is increasingly noticed in cancer. The aim of this study was to analyze the prognostic influence of pre-operative serum C-reactive protein (CRP in a cohort of 148 lymph node-negative breast cancer patients. The prognostic significance of CRP level for disease-free survival (DFS, metastasis-free survival (MFS and overall survival (OS was evaluated using univariate and multivariate Cox regression, also including information on age at diagnosis, tumor size, tumor grade, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 status, proliferation index (Ki67 and molecular subtype, as well as an assessment of the presence of necrosis and inflammation in the tumor tissue. Univariate analysis showed that CRP, as a continuous variable, was significantly associated with DFS (P = 0.002, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02-1.07 and OS (P = 0.036, HR= 1.03, 95% CI = 1.00-1.06, whereas a trend was observed for MFS (P = 0.111. In the multivariate analysis, CRP retained its significance for DFS (P = 0.033, HR= 1.01, 95% CI = 1.00-1.07 as well as OS (P = 0.023, HR= 1.03, 95% CI = 1.00-1.06, independent of established prognostic factors. Furthermore, large-scale gene expression analysis by Affymetrix HG-U133A arrays was performed for 72 (48.6% patients. The correlations between serum CRP and gene expression levels in the corresponding carcinoma of the breast were assessed using Spearman's rank correlation, controlled for false-discovery rate. No significant correlation was observed between CRP level and gene expression indicative of an ongoing local inflammatory process. In summary, pre-operatively elevated CRP levels at the time of diagnosis were associated with shorter DFS and OS independent of established prognostic factors in node-negative breast cancer, supporting a possible link between inflammation and

  19. A comparative study of MR imaging scores and MR perfusion imaging in pre-operative grading of intracranial gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Honglin; Chen Junkun; Zhang Zongjun; Lu Guangming; Chen Ziqian; Wang Wei; Ji Xueman; Tang Xiaojun; Li Lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of MR imaging scores with MR perfusion imaging in pre-operative grading of intracranial gliomas. Methods: Thirty patients with intracranial gliomas (8 low-grade and 22 high-grade, according to WHO criteria) were examined with MR perfusion imaging pre-operatively. The lesions were evaluated by using an MR imaging score based on nine criteria. rCBV of the lesions were calculated by comparing the CBV of the lesion and that of contralateral normal white matter. The scores and ratios in high-grade and low-grade tumours were compared. Results: The MR imaging score of low grade (grades I and II) gliomas (0.67±0.29) were significantly lower than that of grades III (1.32 ± 0.47) (t=-3.48, P=0.003) and IV (1.56 ± 0.20) (t=-7.36, P=0.000) gliomas. There was no statistical difference when MR imaging scores of grades III and IV gliomas (t=-1.39, P=0.182) were compared. The maximum rCBV ratio of low grade (grades I and II) gliomas (2.38 ± 0.66 ) were significantly lower than that of grades III (5.81 ± 3.20) (t=-3.57, P=0.003) and IV (6.99 ± 2.47) (t=-5.09, P=0.001). There was no statistical difference when rCBV ratios of grades III and IV (t =-0.93, P=0.365) gliomas were compared. The accuracy of MR imaging scores in the noninvasive grading of untreated gliomas was all most the same as that of MR perfusion imaging (90.00% vs 89.29%). Conclusion: The MR imaging scores and MR perfusion imaging are two very useful tools in the evaluation of the histopathologic grade of cerebral gliomas. The overall accuracy in the noninvasive grading of gliomas may be imp roved if MR imaging scores and MR perfusion imaging are combined. (authors)

  20. Variations in the pre-operative status of patients coming to primary hip replacement for osteoarthritis in European orthopaedic centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhl Wofhart

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total hip joint replacement (THR is a high volume, effective intervention for hip osteoarthritis (OA. However, indications and determinants of outcome remain unclear. The 'EUROHIP consortium' has undertaken a cohort study to investigate these questions. This paper describes the variations in disease severity in this cohort and the relationships between clinical and radiographic severity, and explores some of the determinants of variation. Methods A minimum of 50 consecutive, consenting patients coming to primary THR for primary hip OA in each of the 20 participating orthopaedic centres entered the study. Pre-operative data included demographics, employment and educational attainment, drug utilisation, and involvement of other joints. Each subject completed the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC – Likert version 3.1. Other data collected at the time of surgery included the prosthesis used and American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA status. Pre-operative radiographs were read by the same three readers for Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L grading and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI atlas features. Regression analyses were carried out. Results Data from 1327 subjects has been analysed. The mean age of the group was 65.7 years, and there were more women (53.4% than men. Most (79% were ASA status 1 or 2. Reported disease duration was 5 years or less in 69.2%. Disease in other joint sites was common. Radiographs were available in 1051 subjects and the K&L grade was 3 or 4 in 95.8%. There was much more variation in clinical severity (WOMAC score; the mean total WOMAC score was 59.2 (SD 16.1. The radiographic severity showed no correlation with WOMAC scores. Significantly higher WOMAC scores (worse disease were seen in older people, women, those with obesity, those with worse general health, and those with lower educational attainment. Conclusion 1. Clinical disease severity

  1. 76 FR 70169 - Draft Supplement 2 to Final Environmental Statement Related to the Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... Environmental Statement Related to the Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 2; Tennessee Valley Authority... on NUREG-0498, ``Final Environmental Statement, Supplement 2, Related to the Operation of Watts Bar... the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Stephen J. Campbell, Chief, Watts Bar Special Projects Branch...

  2. Research on evaluation of third-party governance operation services for environmental pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingsheng; Ling, Lin; Jin, Huang

    2017-11-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of third-party governance operation services for environmental pollution, and determines the evaluation indicator system composed of 5 primary indicators as the basic competence of enterprise, operation of equipment, technique economics, environmental benefit and management level, and 26 secondary indicators via policies and regulations, standards, literature research and expert consultation in combination with the composition elements, service value judgment factors and full-life cycle of the work, providing theoretical support for the effect evaluation of third-governance over the environmental pollution in China. Then, the hierarchical analytic matrix is formed by analyzing the environmental pollution governance evaluation indicator system via analytic hierarchy process and scoring the importance of various indicators by experts by applying the Delphi method. The feature vector of the matrix is then calculated to obtain the weight of each indicator and verify the effectiveness of the Delphi method and obtain the comprehensive weight by judging the consistency of the matrix, so as to finally determine the overall ordering level of the importance of secondary indicators.

  3. Structural damage detection for in-service highway bridge under operational and environmental variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chenhao; Li, Jingcheng; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong; Christenson, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Structural health monitoring has drawn significant attention in the past decades with numerous methodologies and applications for civil structural systems. Although many researchers have developed analytical and experimental damage detection algorithms through vibration-based methods, these methods are not widely accepted for practical structural systems because of their sensitivity to uncertain environmental and operational conditions. The primary environmental factor that influences the structural modal properties is temperature. The goal of this article is to analyze the natural frequency-temperature relationships and detect structural damage in the presence of operational and environmental variations using modal-based method. For this purpose, correlations between natural frequency and temperature are analyzed to select proper independent variables and inputs for the multiple linear regression model and neural network model. In order to capture the changes of natural frequency, confidence intervals to detect the damages for both models are generated. A long-term structural health monitoring system was installed on an in-service highway bridge located in Meriden, Connecticut to obtain vibration and environmental data. Experimental testing results show that the variability of measured natural frequencies due to temperature is captured, and the temperature-induced changes in natural frequencies have been considered prior to the establishment of the threshold in the damage warning system. This novel approach is applicable for structural health monitoring system and helpful to assess the performance of the structure for bridge management and maintenance.

  4. 75 FR 67996 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer... regarding whether those effects have significant impacts. Environmental Assessments are used to evaluate.... ACTION: Notice of the Availability of Environmental Documents Prepared for OCS Mineral Proposals by the...

  5. An Australian perspective on environmental protection at uranium mines during the operational and post-operational phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, S.

    1996-01-01

    A high level of public interest surrounds uranium mining in Australia near Kakadu National Park, and government regulatory and audit systems are in place to deliver a high level of environmental protection. There is considered to be no significant level of radiological risk of the environment, although there is evidence of radio accumulation in some organisms which is relevant to calculation of radiological dose to Aboriginal communities pursuing a traditional lifestyle in the region. Assessment of environmental risk focuses mainly on water chemistry, where the main contaminants are uranium, sulphate, and magnesium. Assessment of ecosystem health are made mainly on the basis of whole effluent tests. Post-operational protection is aimed at achieving rehabilitation compatible with likely future land use: mainly wilderness and traditional Aboriginal foraging and occasional occupation. Passive management systems with landscapes and vegetation similar to the preexisting condition, and a high degree of chemical, radiological and physiographic stability for the long term (<10000 years) are key objectives in rehabilitation planning and execution

  6. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories' operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR, which in part relies on the detailed information in the appendices, and comprehensively discusses the proposed action, the alternatives, and the existing conditions and impacts of the proposed action and the alternatives

  7. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories' operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains copies of the written comments and transcripts of individual statements at the public hearing and the responses to them

  8. Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories' operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR technical appendices which provide technical support for the analyses in Volume 1 and also provide additional information and references

  9. U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, environmental data report for the Nevada Test Site -- 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.; Kinnison, R.R.

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` establishes environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for DOE operations. These mandates require compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection regulations. During calendar year (CY) 1995 environmental protection and monitoring programs were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) managed sites in Nevada and across the United States. A detailed discussion of these environmental protection and monitoring programs, and summary data and assessments for environmental monitoring results at these sites in CY 1995 are provided in the DOE/NV, Annual Site Environmental Report--1995, (ASER) DOE/NV/11718-037. A brief description of the scope of this environmental monitoring is provided below, categorized by ``on-NTS`` and ``off-NTS`` monitoring.

  10. Role of pre-operative multimedia video information in allaying anxiety related to spinal anaesthesia: A randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Raylene; Baliarsing, Lipika; Barnwal, Neeraj Kumar; Mogal, Shweta; Gujjar, Pinakin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: A high incidence of anxiety has been reported in patients in the operation theatre set up. We developed a short visual clip of 206 s duration depicting the procedure of spinal anaesthesia (SAB) and aimed to compare the effect of this video on perioperative anxiety in patients undergoing procedures under SAB. Methods: A prospective randomised study of 200 patients undergoing surgery under SAB was conducted. Patients were allotted to either the nonvideo group (Group NV - those who were not shown the video) or the video group (Group V - those who were shown the video). Anxiety was assessed using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory during the pre-anaesthetic check-up and before surgery. Haemodynamic parameters such as heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were also noted. Student's t-test was used for normally distributed and Mann–Whitney U-test for nonnormally distributed quantitative data. Chi-square test was used for categorical data. Results: Both groups were comparable with respect to baseline anxiety scores and haemodynamic parameters. The nonvideo group showed a significant increase in state anxiety scores before administration of SAB (P Multimedia information in the form of a short audiovisual clip is an effective and feasible method to reduce perioperative anxiety related to SAB. PMID:27942059

  11. 3D surface rendering of images from multiple MR pulse sequences in the pre-operative evaluation of hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerner, T.; Johansson, L.; Ahlstroem, H.; Haglund, U.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for making three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of liver vessels and hepatic lesions from different MR data sets. Material and Methods: To reduce the time required for segmentation and reconstructions, we used T1, T2 and phase contrast angiography, optimised for liver, lesion and vessels respectively. Following segmentation and reconstruction, the different volumes were combined on the same workstation and presented to the surgeon. Results and Conclusion: Segmentation and reconstruction took 1-2 h. To be able to combine the volumes from the different data sets, certain criteria had to be fulfilled: (a) the field of view had to be constant; (b) the same volume had to be scanned every time which meant that the slice thickness and the number of slices could be adjusted as long as the volume covered was the same; and (c) the positioning of each volume had to be identical between every scan. The resulting 3D reconstruction gave the surgeon a clear appreciation of the different lesions and their relation to the different liver segments in the pre-operative planning of hepatic resections. (orig.)

  12. Pre-operational HTO/HT surveys in the vicinity of the Chalk River Laboratories tritium extraction plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workman, W.J.G.; Brown, R.M.

    1993-08-01

    Surveys of the concentrations of HT and HTO in the atmosphere downwind of the Chalk River Laboratories reactor facilities were carried out in 1986 November, and in 1989 March, April and September under different conditions of air temperature, wind direction, and snow or vegetative cover. HT usually amounted to 1-5% of total tritium, but values up to 20% were observed, probably resulting from preferential removal of HTO. In all of the surveys, the greater persistence in the atmosphere of HT than of HTO was evident. The existing levels of HT are such that they will not be augmented significantly by chronic releases from the Tritium Extraction Plant (TEP) when it comes into operation. Hence, operation of the TEP will not facilitate studies of the environmental behaviour of chronically released HT. However, longer term studies of the distribution of HT from the existing facilities would be worthwhile. Soil and vegetation HTO levels in the study area are reported. Further studies of the distribution of tritium between the air, soil and vegetation in areas subjected to chronic exposure would be valuable

  13. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Final Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of Revised PACBAR III Radar Station Saipan, CNMI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1987-01-01

    ...). Many project design features have already incorporated environmental concerns. In addition, discussions with Saipan environmental agencies have resulted in mitigation measures, which have been added to the design...

  14. A study of survival rate of the patients with esophageal carcinoma treated by pre- and/or post-operative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eida, Koichiro

    1986-01-01

    So far there is still considerable disagreement as to the evaluation of the pre- and postoperative irradiation effects on the survival rate of the patients with esophageal carcinoma. From April 1973 to December 1983, 138 cases of thoracic esophageal carcinoma were surgically operated upon at our Department; 68 cases were irradiated and 70 cases were not irradiated prior to the surgical operation. Followup study was done and its result has been reported in this communication. A few cases treated by pre-operative irradiation survived longer than the expected longevity in spite of their low curative operation rates. Prognosis was better in the cases with well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, when marked or good responses to pre-operative irradiation with the calculated total dose of 30 Gy were recorded. There were differences in responsibility in the various histological types of esophageal carcinomas; good response in the group of well differentiated squamous carcinoma, less marked response in the groups of moderately and poorly differentiated squamous carcinomas, minor response in the types of undifferentiated and unclassifed carcinomas. From our observation it seems reasonable to say that prognosis of the patients with pre- and postoperative irradiation was better than that of those who received postoperative irradiation only. (author)

  15. Completion plug design provides improved operational efficiency and safety while minimizing environmental risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dum, Frank [T.D. Williamson, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Pipeline repair standards have been raised with recent improvements for completion plugs when used with a brand new setting tool, resulting in lower environmental risks, improved operational efficiency and safety. The design changes were originally made to serve in an offshore environment in order to minimize the diver's time in the water and simplify steps by the diver to execute pipeline repair operations in cold, dark conditions. Enhancements in the design include fewer number of fittings, plugs, o-rings and gaskets isolating the pipeline product found inside the pipe. The new design is a step toward meeting strict operational and safety standards demanded in the field of pipeline maintenance and repair. (author)

  16. Pre-Operative Skin Antisepsis with Chlorhexidine Gluconate and Povidone-Iodine to Prevent Port-Site Infection in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaziani, Erasmo; Di Filippo, Annalisa; Orelli, Simone; Fiorini, Flavia; Spaziani, Martina; Tintisona, Orlando; Torcasio, Angelo; De Cesare, Alessandro; Picchio, Marcello

    2018-04-01

    Skin preparation with antiseptic agents is commonly recommended for incisional site cleansing before surgery. We present the result of a prospective case series submitted to a scheduled pre-operative antiseptic procedure combining chlorhexidine gluconate and povidone-iodine before elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Consecutive patients underwent pre-operative standardized cleansing of the operation site combining chlorhexidine gluconate and povidone-iodine. Patients were reviewed one week and four weeks post-operatively. Post-operative infection was observed in seven patients (4.3%). All observed infections were port-site infections, always located at the level of the umbilical incision. In all cases infections involved skin and subcutaneous tissue. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in five patients (71.4%) and miscellaneous aerobic gram-positive bacteria in two subjects (28.6%). Post-operative hospital stay was the only factor significantly associated with the development of port-site infections. Port-site infections are a common complication after elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The proposed pre-operative disinfection procedure is effective in reducing port-site infections. Reducing hospital stay may contribute to limiting the occurrence of this complication.

  17. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix Q: Regional forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)