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Sample records for practice neonatal resuscitation

  1. Clinical practice: neonatal resuscitation. A Dutch consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dungen, F.A.M.; van Veenendaal, M.B.; Mulder, A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    The updated Dutch guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation assimilate the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the 2004 guidelines and controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed, and recommendations for daily practice are provided and

  2. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer T

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Taylor Sawyer, Rachel A Umoren, Megan M Gray Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Neonatal Education and Simulation-based Training (NEST Program, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. Keywords: neonatal resuscitation, Neonatal Resuscitation Program, NRP, simulation, deliberate practice, debriefing, eSIM

  3. Neonatal Resuscitation: Knowledge And Practice Of Nurses In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Appropriate resuscitation techniques are crucial to the survival of newborn infants. Objective. To assess knowledge of nurses in western Nigeria about neonatal resuscitation. Method. A cross-sectional survey of the nurses attached to secondary health facilities in western Nigeria was done using a ...

  4. The effect of a structured neonatal resuscitation program on delivery room practices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, C A

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This study evaluated the introduction of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association into the delivery room of an Irish maternity hospital. DESIGN: Prospective, controlled observational study of 51 deliveries before and 51 deliveries following the training of delivery room personnel in the NRP. SAMPLE: Participants were 33 nurse-midwives and 11 pediatric resident physicians. MAIN OUTCOME VARIABLE: Evaluation of postdelivery, newborn resuscitation practices. RESULTS: The introduction of the NRP was associated with significant improvements in delivery room preparation, in the evaluation and management of the newborn infant, and in thermal protection at birth. Although there was a trend to use more free-flow oxygen following the introduction of the NRP, this was not statistically significant. Bag and mask ventilation was also used more frequently following NRP training. However, there were no significant differences in the use of endotracheal intubation, chest compressions, and medications. Fifteen of the 51 infants became hypothermic prior to the introduction of the NRP; none of the infants developed hypothermia in the post-NRP part of the study.

  5. Initial Resuscitation at Delivery and Short Term Neonatal Outcomes in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Su Jin; Shin, Jeonghee; Namgung, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Survival of very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) depends on professional perinatal management that begins at delivery. Korean Neonatal Network data on neonatal resuscitation management and initial care of VLBWI of less than 33 weeks gestation born from January 2013 to June 2014 were reviewed to investigate the current practice of neonatal resuscitation in Korea. Antenatal data, perinatal data, and short-term morbidities were analyzed. Out of 2,132 neonates, 91.7% needed resuscitation at birt...

  6. Resuscitation of the Newborn: AN IMPROVED NEONATAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This places a unique demand on a resuscitator which can be used safely at birth. It must be able to achieve such pressures without injuring the lungs; yet once the FRC has been established, it must be able to adapt itself to the differing ventilatory requirements, without altering the blood chemistry of the neonate. S. Afr. Med.

  7. Iatrogenic burns injury complicating neonatal resuscitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of iatrogenic thermal injury in a newborn infant during resuscitation for perinatal asphyxia at a secondary health facility is described. The injury, with surface area coverage of about 4%, involved the lower limbs. This report highlights the poor newborn resuscitation skills of traditional medical practice. Un cas d'une ...

  8. Rescuer fatigue during simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, E S; Cheung, P-Y; O'Reilly, M; Aziz, K; Schmölzer, G M

    2015-02-01

    To assess development of fatigue during chest compressions (CCs) in simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Prospective randomized manikin crossover study. Thirty neonatal healthcare professionals who successfully completed the Neonatal Resuscitation Program performed CPR using (i) 3:1 compression:ventilation (C:V) ratio, (ii) continuous CC with asynchronous ventilation (CCaV) at a rate of 90 CC per min and (iii) CCaV at 120 CC per min for a duration of 10 min on a neonatal manikin. Changes in peak pressure (a surrogate of fatigue) and CC rate were continuously recorded and fatigue among groups was compared. Participants were blinded to pressure tracings and asked to rate their level of comfort and fatigue for each CPR trial. Compared with baseline, a significant decrease in peak pressure was observed after 72, 96 and 156 s in group CCaV-120, CCaV-90 and 3:1 C:V, respectively. CC depth decreased by 50% within the first 3 min during CCaV-120, 30% during CCaV-90 and 20% during 3:1 C:V. Moreover, 3:1 C:V and CCaV were similarly preferred by healthcare professionals. Similarly, 3:1 C:V and CCaV CPR were also fatiguing. We recommend that rescuers should switch after every second cycle of heart rate assessment during neonatal CPR.

  9. Neonatal resuscitation equipment: A hidden risk for our babies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckworth, Lucinda C; McLaren, Emma; Lingeswaran, Arvin; Kelsey, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal infections carry a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. Poor practice can result in unintentional colonisation of medical equipment with potentially pathogenic organisms. This study will determine the prevalence and type of bacterial contamination on exposed neonatal resuscitation equipment in different clinical settings and explore simple measures to reduce contamination risk. A survey determined the rates of resuscitation equipment usage. All environmentally exposed items were identified on resuscitaires hospital-wide and swabbed for bacterial contamination. A new cleaning and storage policy was implemented and the prevalence of environmentally exposed equipment re-measured post-intervention. Resuscitation equipment was used in 28% of neonatal deliveries. Bacterial colony forming units were present on 44% of the 236 exposed equipment pieces swabbed. There was no significant difference in contamination rates between equipment types. Coagulase negative staphylococcus was the most prevalent species (59 pieces, 25%) followed by Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae (20 pieces, 9% each). Opened items stored inside plastic remained sterile, whilst those in low-use areas had significantly less contamination than those in high-use areas (22% vs. 51%, P reducing microbial colonisation opportunities. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  10. Teamwork among midwives during neonatal resuscitation at a maternity hospital in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrammert, Johan; Sapkota, Sabitri; Baral, Kedar; Kc, Ashish; Målqvist, Mats; Larsson, Margareta

    2017-06-01

    The ability of health care providers to work together is essential for favourable outcomes in neonatal resuscitation, but perceptions of such teamwork have rarely been studied in low-income settings. Neonatal resuscitation is a proven intervention for reducing neonatal mortality globally, but the long-term effects of clinical training for this skill need further attention. Having an understanding of barriers to teamwork among nurse midwives can contribute to the sustainability of improved clinical practice. To explore nurse midwives' perceptions of teamwork when caring for newborns in need of resuscitation. Nurse midwives from a tertiary-level government hospital in Nepal participated in five focus groups of between 4 and 11 participants each. Qualitative Content Analysis was used for analysis. One overarching theme emerged: looking for comprehensive guidelines and shared responsibilities in neonatal resuscitation to avoid personal blame and learn from mistakes. Participants discussed the need for protocols relating to neonatal resuscitation and the importance of shared medical responsibility, and the importance of the presence of a strong and transparent leadership. The call for clear and comprehensive protocols relating to neonatal resuscitation corresponded with previous research from different contexts. Nurse midwives working at a maternity health care facility in Nepal discussed the benefits and challenges of teamwork in neonatal resuscitation. The findings suggest potential benefits can be made from clarifying guidelines and responsibilities in neonatal resuscitation. Furthermore, a structured process to deal with clinical incidents must be considered. Management must be involved in all processes. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Resuscitation of neonates at 23 weeks' gestational age: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, J Colin; Robertson, Kathryn R; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Landman, Geri Ottaviano; Allen, Allison J; Caughey, Aaron B

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation of infants at 23 weeks' gestation remains controversial; clinical practices vary. We sought to investigate the cost effectiveness of resuscitation of infants born 23 0/7-23 6/7 weeks' gestation. Decision-analytic modeling comparing universal and selective resuscitation to non-resuscitation for 5176 live births at 23 weeks in a theoretic U.S. cohort. Estimates of death (77%) and disability (64-86%) were taken from the literature. Maternal and combined maternal-neonatal utilities were applied to discounted life expectancy to generate QALYs. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated, discounting costs and QALYs. Main outcomes included number of survivors, their outcome status and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for the three strategies. A cost-effectiveness threshold of $100 000/QALY was utilized. Universal resuscitation would save 1059 infants: 138 severely disabled, 413 moderately impaired and 508 without significant sequelae. Selective resuscitation would save 717 infants: 93 severely disabled, 279 moderately impaired and 343 without significant sequelae. For mothers, non-resuscitation is less expensive ($19.9 million) and more effective (127 844 mQALYs) than universal resuscitation ($1.2 billion; 126 574 mQALYs) or selective resuscitation ($845 million; 125 966 mQALYs). For neonates, both universal and selective resuscitation were cost-effective, resulting in 22 256 and 15 134 nQALYS, respectively, versus 247 nQALYs for non-resuscitation. In sensitivity analyses, universal resuscitation was cost-effective from a maternal perspective only at utilities for neonatal death permissive response to parental requests for aggressive intervention at 23 weeks' gestation.

  12. Design of a Functional Training Prototype for Neonatal Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaramakrishnan Rajaraman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Birth Asphyxia is considered to be one of the leading causes of neonatal mortality around the world. Asphyxiated neonates require skilled resuscitation to survive the neonatal period. The project aims to train health professionals in a basic newborn care using a prototype with an ultimate objective to have one person at every delivery trained in neonatal resuscitation. This prototype will be a user-friendly device with which one can get trained in performing neonatal resuscitation in resource-limited settings. The prototype consists of a Force Sensing Resistor (FSR that measures the pressure applied and is interfaced with Arduino® which controls the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD and Light Emitting Diode (LED indication for pressure and compression counts. With the increase in population and absence of proper medical care, the need for neonatal resuscitation program is not well addressed. The proposed work aims at offering a promising solution for training health care individuals on resuscitating newborn babies under low resource settings.

  13. Default options and neonatal resuscitation decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haward, Marlyse Frieda; Murphy, Ryan O; Lorenz, John M

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether presenting delivery room management options as defaults influences decisions to resuscitate extremely premature infants. Adult volunteers recruited from the world wide web were randomised to receive either resuscitation or comfort care as the delivery room management default option for a hypothetical delivery of a 23-week gestation infant. Participants were required to check a box to opt out of the default. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of respondents electing resuscitation. Data were analysed using χ(2) tests and multivariate logistic regression. Participants who were told the delivery room management default option was resuscitation were more likely to opt for resuscitation (OR 6.54 95% CI 3.85 to 11.11, pmanipulation. Further, this effect may operate in ways that a decision maker is not aware of and this raises questions of patient autonomy. Presenting delivery room options for extremely premature infants as defaults may compromise autonomous decision-making.

  14. The key changes in pediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dyi-Shiang; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) were changed in 2005. There were some key changes in the recommendations for pediatric basic and advanced life support, and neonatal resuscitation. The key changes included: emphasis on effective compressions (push hard, push fast, allow full chest recoil and minimize interruptions in compressions), a single compression-ventilation ratio (30:2) CPR for all groups of ages (except neonate), confirmation of effective ventilations, medication given and defibrillator charged without interruption of CPR, not recommended to routine tracheal suction the vigorous meconium-stained baby in newborn resuscitation, etc. We illustrate the major key changes and hope everyone is well trained to perform high quality CPR.

  15. [Five years after the Spanish neonatal resuscitation survey. Are we improving?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriondo, M; Izquierdo, M; Salguero, E; Aguayo, J; Vento, M; Thió, M

    2016-05-01

    An analysis is presented of delivery room (DR) neonatal resuscitation practices in Spanish hospitals. A questionnaire was sent by e-mail to all hospitals attending deliveries in Spain. A total of 180 questionnaires were sent, of which 155 were fully completed (86%). Less than half (71, 46%) were level i or ii hospitals, while 84 were level iii hospital (54%). In almost three-quarters (74.2%) of the centres, parents and medical staff were involved in the decision on whether to start resuscitation or withdraw it. A qualified resuscitation team (at least two members) was available in 80% of the participant centres (63.9% level i-ii, and 94.0% level iii, PNeonatal resuscitation courses were held in 90.3% of the centres. The availability of gas blenders, pulse oximeters, manual ventilators, and plastic wraps was higher in level iii hospitals. Plastic wraps for pre-term hypothermia prevention were used in 63.9% of the centres (40.8% level i-iiand 83.3% level iii, PCPAP in preterm infants was applied in 91.7% of the tertiary hospitals. In last 5 years some practices have improved, such neonatal resuscitation training, pulse oximeter use, or early CPAP support. There is an improvement in some practices of neonatal resuscitation. Significant differences have been found as regards the equipment or practices in the DR, when comparing hospitals of different levels of care. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Resuscitation and emergency management for neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Kevin T T; Axon, Jane E

    2005-08-01

    Early intervention can dramatically alter outcome in foals. Cardio-pulmonary cerebral resuscitation can be successful and clinically worthwhile when applied to foals that arrest as part of the birthing process. Readily available equipment and an ordered plan starting with addressing the respiratory system (airway and breathing) followed by the circulatory system (circulation and drugs) are the keys to success. Hypoglycemia is common in foals that are not nursing and in septic foals. Support of serum glucose can be an important emergency treatment. Respiratory support with oxygen therapy should be considered in all foals following resuscitation and dystocia. Other foals that are likely to benefit from oxygen are those that are dyspneic, cyanotic, meconium-stained after birth,or recumbent. Emergency therapies, applied correctly, are expected to result in decreased mortality and morbidity.

  17. Cardiorespiratory monitoring during neonatal resuscitation for direct feedback and audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Johannes van Vonderen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal resuscitation is one of the most frequently performed procedures and it is often successful if the ventilation applied is adequate. Over the last decade, interest in seeking objectivity in evaluating the infant’s condition at birth or the adequacy and effect of the interventions applied has markedly increased. Clinical parameters such as heart rate, colour and chest excursions are difficult to interpret and can be very subjective and subtle. The use of ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography and respiratory function monitoring can add objectivity to the clinical assessment. These physiological parameters, with or without the combination of video recordings, can be used directly to guide care, but can also be used later for audit and teaching purposes. Further studies are needed to investigate whether this will improve the quality of delivery room management. In this review we will give an update of the current developments in monitoring neonatal resuscitation.

  18. Correlations between technical skills and behavioral skills in simulated neonatal resuscitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, T; Leonard, D; Sierocka-Castaneda, A; Chan, D; Thompson, M

    2014-10-01

    Neonatal resuscitation requires both technical and behavioral skills. Key behavioral skills in neonatal resuscitation have been identified by the Neonatal Resuscitation Program. Correlations and interactions between technical skills and behavioral skills in neonatal resuscitation were investigated. Behavioral skills were evaluated via blinded video review of 45 simulated neonatal resuscitations using a validated assessment tool. These were statistically correlated with previously obtained technical skill performance data. Technical skills and behavioral skills were strongly correlated (ρ=0.48; P=0.001). The strongest correlations were seen in distribution of workload (ρ=0.60; P=0.01), utilization of information (ρ=0.55; P=0.03) and utilization of resources (ρ=0.61; P=0.01). Teams with superior behavioral skills also demonstrated superior technical skills, and vice versa. Technical and behavioral skills were highly correlated during simulated neonatal resuscitations. Individual behavioral skill correlations are likely dependent on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

  19. Reanimación neonatal: actualización Neonatal resuscitation: up-date

    OpenAIRE

    E. Burón Martínez; A. Pino Vázquez

    2009-01-01

    Las últimas recomendaciones en reanimación neonatal fueron publicadas en el año 2005 por el ERC (European Resuscitation Council), el grupo ILCOR (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation) y la AHA (American Heart Association). En nuestro país estas normas fueron difundidas por el grupo de RCP Neonatal de la Sociedad Española de Neonatología, introduciendo algunas adaptaciones y ampliando algunos capítulos como la reanimación del recién naci...

  20. Initial Resuscitation at Delivery and Short Term Neonatal Outcomes in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Su Jin; Shin, Jeonghee; Namgung, Ran

    2015-10-01

    Survival of very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) depends on professional perinatal management that begins at delivery. Korean Neonatal Network data on neonatal resuscitation management and initial care of VLBWI of less than 33 weeks gestation born from January 2013 to June 2014 were reviewed to investigate the current practice of neonatal resuscitation in Korea. Antenatal data, perinatal data, and short-term morbidities were analyzed. Out of 2,132 neonates, 91.7% needed resuscitation at birth, chest compression was performed on only 104 infants (5.4%) and epinephrine was administered to 80 infants (4.1%). Infants who received cardiac compression and/or epinephrine administration at birth (DR-CPR) were significantly more acidotic (P CPR resulted in greater early mortality of less than 7 days (OR, 5.64; 95% CI 3.25-9.77) increased intraventricular hemorrhage ≥ grade 3 (OR, 2.71; 95% CI 1.57-4.68), periventricular leukomalacia (OR, 2.94; 95% CI 1.72-5.01), and necrotizing enterocolitis (OR, 2.12; 95% CI 1.15-3.91) compared with those infants who needed only PPV. Meticulous and aggressive management of infants who needed DR-CPR at birth and quality improvement of the delivery room management will result in reduced morbidities and early death for the vulnerable VLBWI.

  1. Evaluating Neonatal Resuscitation Skills of Nursing and Midwifery Students Using Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Malekzadeh

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: The students’ skills in neonatal resuscitation were lower than expected. As competence in this area is of high significance for the improvement of neonatal outcomes, holding training workshops through applying novel training methods is recommended.

  2. A Wireless Text Messaging System Improves Communication for Neonatal Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes Driscoll, Colleen A; Schub, Jamie A; Pollard, Kristi; El-Metwally, Dina

    Handoffs for neonatal resuscitation involve communicating critical delivery information (CDI). The authors sought to achieve ≥95% communication of CDI during resuscitation team requests. CDI included name of caller, urgency of request, location of delivery, gestation of fetus, status of amniotic fluid, and indication for presence of the resuscitation team. Three interventions were implemented: verbal scripted handoff, Spök text messaging, and Engage text messaging. Percentages of CDI communications were analyzed using statistical process control. Following implementation of Engage, the communication of all CDI, except for indication, was ≥95%; communication of indication occurred 93% of the time. Control limits for most CDI were narrower with Engage, indicating greater reliability of communication compared to the verbal handoff and Spök. Delayed resuscitation team arrival, a countermeasure, was not higher with text messaging compared to verbal handoff ( P = 1.00). Text messaging improved communication during high-risk deliveries, and it may represent an effective tool for other delivery centers.

  3. Comparison of training in neonatal resuscitation using self inflating bag and T-piece resuscitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, S.S.; Adhikari, K.M.; Rajeev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Both the self inflating bag and the T-piece resuscitator are recommended for neonatal resuscitation, but many health care workers are unfamiliar with using the latter. A prospective, comparative, observational study was done to determine the ease and effectiveness of training of health care personnel in the two devices using infant training manikins. Methods 100 health care workers, who had no prior formal training in neonatal resuscitation, were divided into small groups and trained in the use of the two devices by qualified trainers. Assessment of cognitive skills was done by pre and post MCQs. Psychomotor skill was assessed post training on manikins using a 10-point objective score. Acceptance by users was ascertained by questionnaire. Assessments were also done after 24 h and 3 months. Comparison was done by Chi square and paired t-tests. Results Pre-training cognitive tests increased from 3.77 (+1.58) to 6.99 (+1.28) on day of training which was significant. Post training assessment of psychomotor skills showed significantly higher initial scores for the T-piece group (7.07 + 2.57) on day of training. Reassessment after 24 h showed significant improvement in cognitive scores (9.89 + 1.24) and psychomotor scores in both groups (8.86 + 1.42 for self inflating bag and 9.70 + 0.57 for T-piece resuscitator). After 3–6 months the scores in both domains showed some decline which was not statistically significant. User acceptability was the same for both devices. Conclusion It is equally easy to train health care workers in both devices. Both groups showed good short term recall and both devices were equally acceptable to the users. PMID:25609858

  4. Opinions regarding neonatal resuscitation training for the obstetric physician: a survey of neonatal and obstetric training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, C J; Johnston, L; Lee, C; Bernstein, P S; Goffman, D

    2018-04-01

    Our goal was to garner opinions regarding neonatal resuscitation training for obstetric physicians. We sought to evaluate obstacles to neonatal resuscitation training for obstetric physicians and possible solutions for implementation challenges. We distributed a national survey via email to all neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship directors and obstetrics & gynecology residency program directors in the United States. This survey was designed by a consensus method. Ninety-eight (53%) obstetric and fifty-seven (51%) neonatal program directors responded to our surveys. Eighty-eight percent of neonatologists surveyed believe that obstetricians should be neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) certified. The majority of surveyed obstetricians (>89%) believe that obstetricians should have some neonatal resuscitation training. Eighty-six percent of obstetric residents have completed training in NRP, but only 19% of obstetric attendings are NRP certified. Major barriers to NRP training that were identified include time, lack of national requirement, lack of belief it is helpful, and cost. Most obstetric attendings are not NRP certified, but the majority of respondents believe that obstetric providers should have some neonatal resuscitation training. Our study demonstrates that most respondents support a modified neonatal resuscitation course for obstetric physicians.

  5. Neonatal Resuscitation in the Delivery Room from a Tertiary Level Hospital: Risk Factors and Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Afjeh, Seyyed-Abolfazl; Sabzehei, Mohammad-Kazem; Esmaili, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Objective Timely identification and prompt resuscitation of newborns in the delivery room may cause a decline in neonatal morbidity and mortality. We try to identify risk factors in mother and fetus that result in birth of newborns needing resuscitation at birth. Methods Case notes of all deliveries and neonates born from April 2010 to March 2011 in Mahdieh Medical Center (Tehran, Iran), a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, were reviewed; relevant maternal, fetal and perinatal data was e...

  6. Effect of material and training on guideline-compliant neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room

    OpenAIRE

    Dold, Simone Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life requires a complex physiological process, nevertheless most neonates manage to go through it on their own. Only 10% need respiratory assistance. Neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) including chest compressions (CC) is with < 1% a rare event in the delivery room. However medical staff needs to be proficient in neonatal CPR and in handling the different devices. Training, based on international resuscitation guidelin...

  7. Enhancing residents’ neonatal resuscitation competency through unannounced simulation-based training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surcouf, Jeffrey W.; Chauvin, Sheila W.; Ferry, Jenelle; Yang, Tong; Barkemeyer, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background Almost half of pediatric third-year residents surveyed in 2000 had never led a resuscitation event. With increasing restrictions on residency work hours and a decline in patient volume in some hospitals, there is potential for fewer opportunities. Purpose Our primary purpose was to test the hypothesis that an unannounced mock resuscitation in a high-fidelity in-situ simulation training program would improve both residents’ self-confidence and observed performance of adopted best practices in neonatal resuscitation. Methods Each pediatric and medicine–pediatric resident in one pediatric residency program responded to an unannounced scenario that required resuscitation of the high fidelity infant simulator. Structured debriefing followed in the same setting, and a second cycle of scenario response and debriefing occurred before ending the 1-hour training experience. Measures included pre- and post-program confidence questionnaires and trained observer assessments of live and videotaped performances. Results Statistically significant pre–post gains for self-confidence were observed for 8 of the 14 NRP critical behaviors (p=0.00–0.03) reflecting knowledge, technical, and non-technical (teamwork) skills. The pre–post gain in overall confidence score was statistically significant (p=0.00). With a maximum possible assessment score of 41, the average pre–post gain was 8.28 and statistically significant (psimulation-based training and significant positive gains in confidence and observed competency-related abilities. Results support the potential for other applications in residency and continuing education. PMID:23522399

  8. Resuscitation and Obstetrical Care to Reduce Intrapartum-Related Neonatal Deaths: A MANDATE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Griffin, Jennifer B; Moran, Katelin; Jones, Bonnie; Downs, Allan; McClure, Elizabeth M; Goldenberg, Robert L; Rouse, Doris; Jobe, Alan H

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of neonatal resuscitation and basic obstetric care on intrapartum-related neonatal mortality in low and middle-income countries, using the mathematical model, Maternal and Neonatal Directed Assessment of Technology (MANDATE). Using MANDATE, we evaluated the impact of interventions for intrapartum-related events causing birth asphyxia (basic neonatal resuscitation, advanced neonatal care, increasing facility birth, and emergency obstetric care) when implemented in home, clinic, and hospital settings of sub-Saharan African and India for 2008. Total intrapartum-related neonatal mortality (IRNM) was acute neonatal deaths from intrapartum-related events plus late neonatal deaths from ongoing intrapartum-related injury. Introducing basic neonatal resuscitation in all settings had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing facility births and scaling up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals also had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing prevalence and utilization of advanced neonatal care in hospital settings had limited impact on IRNM. The greatest improvement in IRNM was seen with widespread advanced neonatal care and basic neonatal resuscitation, scaled-up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals, and increased facility deliveries, resulting in an estimated decrease in IRNM to 2.0 per 1,000 live births in India and 2.5 per 1,000 live births in sub-Saharan Africa. With more deliveries occurring in clinics and hospitals, the scale-up of obstetric care can have a greater effect than if modeled individually. Use of MANDATE enables health leaders to direct resources towards interventions that could prevent intrapartum-related deaths. A lack of widespread implementation of basic neonatal resuscitation, increased facility births, and emergency obstetric care are missed opportunities to save newborn lives.

  9. A pilot randomized controlled trial of EKG for neonatal resuscitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Katheria

    Full Text Available The seventh edition of the American Academy of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation Program recommends the use of a cardiac monitor in infants that need resuscitation. Previous trials have shown that EKG heart rate is available before pulse rate from a pulse oximeter. To date no trial has looked at how the availability of electrocardiogram (EKG affects clinical interventions in the delivery room.To determine whether the availability of an EKG heart rate value and tracing to the clinical team has an effect on physiologic measures and related interventions during the stabilization of preterm infants.Forty (40 premature infants enrolled in a neuro-monitoring study (The Neu-Prem Trial: NCT02605733 who had an EKG monitor available were randomized to have the heart rate information from the bedside EKG monitor either displayed or not displayed to the clinical team. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, FiO2 and mean airway pressure from a data acquisition system were recorded every 2 seconds. Results were averaged over 30 seconds and the differences analyzed using two-tailed t-test. Interventions analyzed included time to first change in FiO2, first positive pressure ventilation, first increase in airway pressure, and first intubation.There were no significant differences in time to clinical interventions between the blinded and unblinded group, despite the unblinded group having access to a visible heart rate at 66 +/- 20 compared to 114 +/- 39 seconds for the blinded group (p < .0001. Pulse rate from oximeter was lower than EKG heart rate during the first 2 minutes of life, but this was not significant.EKG provides an earlier, and more accurate heart rate than pulse rate from an oximeter during stabilization of preterm infants, allowing earlier intervention. All interventions were started earlier in the unblinded EKG group but these numbers were not significant in this small trial. Earlier EKG placement before pulse oximeter placement may affect other

  10. Marked variation in newborn resuscitation practice: A national survey in the UK☆

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    Mann, Chantelle; Ward, Carole; Grubb, Mark; Hayes-Gill, Barrie; Crowe, John; Marlow, Neil; Sharkey, Don

    2012-01-01

    Background Although international newborn resuscitation guidance has been in force for some time, there are no UK data on current newborn resuscitation practices. Objective Establish delivery room (DR) resuscitation practices in the UK, and identify any differences between neonatal intensive care units (NICU), and other local neonatal services. Methods We conducted a structured two-stage survey of DR management, among UK neonatal units during 2009–2010 (n = 192). Differences between NICU services (tertiary level) and other local neonatal services (non-tertiary) were analysed using Fisher's exact and Student's t-tests. Results There was an 89% response rate (n = 171). More tertiary NICUs institute DR CPAP than non-tertiary units (43% vs. 16%, P = 0.0001) though there was no significant difference in frequency of elective intubation and surfactant administration for preterm babies. More tertiary units commence DR resuscitation in air (62% vs. 29%, P < 0.0001) and fewer in 100% oxygen (11% vs. 41%, P < 0.0001). Resuscitation of preterm babies in particular, commences with air in 56% of tertiary units. Significantly more tertiary units use DR pulse oximeters (58% vs. 29%, P < 0.01) and titrate oxygen based on saturations. Almost all services use occlusive wrapping to maintain temperature for preterm infants. Conclusions In the UK, there are many areas of good evidence based DR practice. However, there is marked variation in management, including between units of different designation, suggesting a need to review practice to fulfil new resuscitation guidance, which will have training and resource implications. PMID:22245743

  11. Supreme Laryngeal Mask Airway versus Face Mask during Neonatal Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; Cavallin, Francesco; Nguyen, Loi Ngoc; Nguyen, Tien Viet; Tran, Linh Dieu; Tran, Chien Dinh; Doglioni, Nicoletta; Micaglio, Massimo; Moccia, Luciano

    2015-08-01

    To assess the effectiveness of supreme laryngeal mask airway (SLMA) over face mask ventilation for preventing need for endotracheal intubation at birth. We report a prospective, randomized, parallel 1:1, unblinded, controlled trial. After a short-term educational intervention on SLMA use, infants ≥34-week gestation and/or expected birth weight ≥1500 g requiring positive pressure ventilation (PPV) at birth were randomized to resuscitation by SLMA or face mask. The primary outcome was the success rate of the resuscitation devices (SLMA or face mask) defined as the achievement of an effective PPV preventing the need for endotracheal intubation. We enrolled 142 patients (71 in SLMA and 71 in face mask group, respectively). Successful resuscitation rate was significantly higher with the SLMA compared with face mask ventilation (91.5% vs 78.9%; P = .03). Apgar score at 5 minutes was significantly higher in SLMA than in face mask group (P = .02). Neonatal intensive care unit admission rate was significantly lower in SLMA than in face mask group (P = .02). No complications related to the procedure occurred. In newborns with gestational age ≥34 weeks and/or expected birth weight ≥1500 g needing PPV at birth, the SLMA is more effective than face mask to prevent endotracheal intubation. The SLMA is effective in clinical practice after a short-term educational intervention. Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01963936. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating the effectiveness of a strategy for teaching neonatal resuscitation in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enweronu-Laryea, Christabel; Engmann, Cyril; Osafo, Alexandra; Bose, Carl

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a strategy for teaching neonatal resuscitation on the cognitive knowledge of health professionals who attend deliveries in Ghana, West Africa. Train-the-trainer model was used to train health professionals at 2-3 day workshops from 2003 to 2007. Obstetric Anticipatory Care and Basic Neonatal Care modules were taught as part of Neonatal Resuscitation Training package. American Neonatal Resuscitation Program was adapted to the clinical role of participants and local resources. Cognitive knowledge was evaluated by written pre- and post-training tests. The median pre-training and post-training scores were 38% and 71% for midwives, 43% and 81% for nurses, 52% and 90% for nurse anaesthetists, and 62% and 98% for physicians. All groups of the 271 professionals (18 nurse anaesthetists, 55 nurses, 68 physicians, and 130 midwives) who completed the course showed significant improvement (pfacilities were less likely to achieve passing post-test scores than midwives at secondary and tertiary facilities [35/53 vs. 24/26 vs. 45/51 (p=0.004)] respectively. Evidence-based neonatal resuscitation training adapted to local resources significantly improved cognitive knowledge of all groups of health professionals. Further modification of training for midwives working at primary level health facilities and incorporation of neonatal resuscitation in continuing education and professional training programs are recommended.

  13. Enhancing residents’ neonatal resuscitation competency through unannounced simulation-based training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W. Surcouf

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Almost half of pediatric third-year residents surveyed in 2000 had never led a resuscitation event. With increasing restrictions on residency work hours and a decline in patient volume in some hospitals, there is potential for fewer opportunities. Purpose: Our primary purpose was to test the hypothesis that an unannounced mock resuscitation in a high-fidelity in-situ simulation training program would improve both residents’ self-confidence and observed performance of adopted best practices in neonatal resuscitation. Methods: Each pediatric and medicine–pediatric resident in one pediatric residency program responded to an unannounced scenario that required resuscitation of the high fidelity infant simulator. Structured debriefing followed in the same setting, and a second cycle of scenario response and debriefing occurred before ending the 1-hour training experience. Measures included pre- and post-program confidence questionnaires and trained observer assessments of live and videotaped performances. Results: Statistically significant pre–post gains for self-confidence were observed for 8 of the 14 NRP critical behaviors (p=0.00–0.03 reflecting knowledge, technical, and non-technical (teamwork skills. The pre–post gain in overall confidence score was statistically significant (p=0.00. With a maximum possible assessment score of 41, the average pre–post gain was 8.28 and statistically significant (p<0.001. Results of the video-based assessments revealed statistically significant performance gains (p<0.0001. Correlation between live and video-based assessments were strong for pre–post training scenario performances (pre: r=0.64, p<0.0001; post: r=0.75, p<0.0001. Conclusions: Results revealed high receptivity to in-situ, simulation-based training and significant positive gains in confidence and observed competency-related abilities. Results support the potential for other applications in residency and continuing education.

  14. Neonatal Resuscitation in the Delivery Room from a Tertiary Level Hospital: Risk Factors and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afjeh, Seyyed-Abolfazl; Sabzehei, Mohammad-Kazem; Esmaili, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Objective Timely identification and prompt resuscitation of newborns in the delivery room may cause a decline in neonatal morbidity and mortality. We try to identify risk factors in mother and fetus that result in birth of newborns needing resuscitation at birth. Methods Case notes of all deliveries and neonates born from April 2010 to March 2011 in Mahdieh Medical Center (Tehran, Iran), a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, were reviewed; relevant maternal, fetal and perinatal data was extracted and analyzed. Findings During the study period, 4692 neonates were delivered; 4522 (97.7%) did not require respiratory assistance. One-hundred seven (2.3%) newborns needed resuscitation with bag and mask ventilation in the delivery unit, of whom 77 (1.6%) babies responded to bag and mask ventilation while 30 (0.65%) neonates needed endotracheal intubation and 15 (0.3%) were given chest compressions. Epinephrine/volume expander was administered to 10 (0.2%) newborns. In 17 patients resuscitation was continued for >10 mins. There was a positive correlation between the need for resuscitation and following risk factors: low birth weight, preterm labor, chorioamnionitis, pre-eclampsia, prolonged rupture of membranes, abruptio placentae, prolonged labor, meconium staining of amniotic fluid, multiple pregnancy and fetal distress. On multiple regression; low birth weight, meconium stained liquor and chorioamnionitis revealed as independent risk factors that made endotracheal intubation necessary. Conclusion Accurate identification of risk factors and anticipation at the birth of a high-risk neonate would result in adequate preparation and prompt resuscitation of neonates who need some level of intervention and thus, reducing neonatal morbidity and mortality. PMID:24910747

  15. Review of educational interventions to increase traditional birth attendants' neonatal resuscitation self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendhi, Marvesh M; Cartmell, Kathleen B; Newman, Susan D; Premji, Shahirose; Pope, Charlene

    2018-05-21

    Annually, up to 2.7 million neonatal deaths occur worldwide, and 25% of these deaths are caused by birth asphyxia. Infants born in rural areas of low-and-middle-income countries are often delivered by traditional birth attendants and have a greater risk of birth asphyxia-related mortality. This review will evaluate the effectiveness of neonatal resuscitation educational interventions in improving traditional birth attendants' knowledge, perceived self-efficacy, and infant mortality outcomes in low-and-middle-income countries. An integrative review was conducted to identify studies pertaining to neonatal resuscitation training of traditional birth attendants and midwives for home-based births in low-and-middle-income countries. Ten studies met inclusion criteria. Most interventions were based on the American Association of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation Program, World Health Organization Safe Motherhood Guidelines and American College of Nurse-Midwives Life Saving Skills protocols. Three studies exclusively for traditional birth attendants reported decreases in neonatal mortality rates ranging from 22% to 65%. These studies utilized pictorial and oral forms of teaching, consistent in addressing the social cognitive theory. Studies employing skill demonstration, role-play, and pictorial charts showed increased pre- to post-knowledge scores and high self-efficacy scores. In two studies, a team approach, where traditional birth attendants were assisted, was reported to decrease neonatal mortality rate from 49-43/1000 births to 10.5-3.7/1000 births. Culturally appropriate methods, such as role-play, demonstration, and pictorial charts, can contribute to increased knowledge and self-efficacy related to neonatal resuscitation. A team approach to training traditional birth attendants, assisted by village health workers during home-based childbirths may reduce neonatal mortality rates. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. Comparison of the T-piece resuscitator with other neonatal manual ventilation devices: A qualitative review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To review the literature surrounding various aspects of T-piece resuscitator use, with particular emphasis on the evidence comparing the device to other manual ventilation devices in neonatal resuscitation. DATA SOURCES: The Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane databases were searched in April 2011. Ongoing trials were identified using www.clinicaltrials.gov and www.controlled-trials.com. Additional studies from reference lists of eligible articles were considered. All studies including T-piece resuscitator use were eligible for inclusion. RESULTS: Thirty studies were included. There were two randomised controlled trials in newborn infants comparing the devices, one of which addressed short and intermediate term morbidity and mortality outcomes and found no difference between the T-piece resuscitator and self inflating bag. From manikin studies, advantages to the T-piece resuscitator include the delivery of inflating pressures closer to predetermined target pressures with least variation, the ability to provide prolonged inflation breaths and more consistent tidal volumes. Disadvantages include a technically more difficult setup, more time required to adjust pressures during resuscitation, a larger mask leak and less ability to detect changes in compliance. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for appropriately designed randomised controlled trials in neonates to highlight the efficacy of one device over another. Until these are performed, healthcare providers should be appropriately trained in the use of the device available in their departments, and be aware of its own limitations.

  17. Evaluation of the alert line of partogram in recognizing the need for neonatal resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Bolbol-Haghighi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In mothers who had normal vaginal delivery, with normal fetal heart rate, and with no oxytocin administration or omniotomy, the alert line showed appropriate sensitivity, specificity, and negative prediction value. So, it can assist in predicting the necessity of action for neonatal resuscitation 20–30 s after delivery.

  18. Are the current guideline recommendations for neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation safe and effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenberg, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    A recently published review of approaches to optimize chest compressions in the resuscitation of asphyxiated newborns discussed the current recommendations and explored potential determinants of effective neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, not all potential determinants of effective neonatal CPR were explored. Chest compression shallower than the current guideline recommendation of approximately 33% of the anterior-posterior (AP) chest diameter may be safer and more effective. From a physiological standpoint, high-velocity brief duration shallower compression may be more effective than current recommendations. The application of a 1- or 2-finger method of high-impulse CPR, which would depend on the size of the subject, may be more effective than using a 2-thumb (TT) encircling hands method of CPR. Adrenaline should not be used in the treatment of asphyxiated neonates and when necessary titrated vasopressin should be used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Simulation-based team training improved the self-assessed ability of physicians, nurses and midwives to perform neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, B; Nohlert, E; Ewald, U; Widarsson, M

    2017-08-01

    The use of simulation-based team training in neonatal resuscitation has increased in Sweden during the last decade, but no formal evaluation of this training method has been performed. This study evaluated the effect of simulation-based team training on the self-assessed ability of personnel to perform neonatal resuscitation. We evaluated a full-day simulation-based team training course in neonatal resuscitation, by administering a questionnaire to 110 physicians, nurses and midwives before and after the training period. The questionnaire focused on four important domains: communication, leadership, confidence and technical skills. The study was carried out in Sweden from 2005 to 2007. The response rate was 84%. Improvements in the participants' self-assessed ability to perform neonatal resuscitation were seen in all four domains after training (p technical skills domain compared to experienced personnel (p = 0.001). No differences were seen between professions or time since training in any of the four domains. Personnel with less previous experience with neonatal resuscitation showed improved confidence (p = 0.007) and technical skills (p = 0.003). A full-day course on simulation-based team training with video-supported debriefing improved the participants' self-assessed ability to perform neonatal resuscitation. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation standards for clinical practice and training in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbott, David; Smith, Gary; Mitchell, Sarah; Colquhoun, Michael; Nolan, Jerry; Soar, Jasmeet; Pitcher, David; Perkins, Gavin; Phillips, Barbara; King, Ben; Spearpoint, Ken

    2005-07-01

    The Royal College of Anaesthetists, the Royal College of Physicians, the Intensive Care Society and the Resuscitation Council (UK) have published new resuscitation standards. The document provides advice to UK healthcare organisations, resuscitation committees and resuscitation officers on all aspects of the resuscitation service. It includes sections on resuscitation training, resuscitation equipment, the cardiac arrest team, cardiac arrest prevention, patient transfer, post-resuscitation care, audit and research. The document makes several recommendations. Healthcare institutions should have, or be represented on, a resuscitation committee that is responsible for all resuscitation issues. Every institution should have at least one resuscitation officer responsible for teaching and conducting training in resuscitation techniques. Staff with patient contact should be given regular resuscitation training appropriate to their expected abilities and roles. Clinical staff should receive regular training in the recognition of patients at risk of cardiopulmonary arrest and the measures required for the prevention of cardiopulmonary arrest. Healthcare institutions admitting acutely ill patients should have a resuscitation team, or its equivalent, available at all times. Clear guidelines should be available indicating how and when to call for the resuscitation team. Cardiopulmonary arrest should be managed according to current national guidelines. Resuscitation equipment should be available throughout the institution for clinical use and for training. The practice of resuscitation should be audited to maintain and improve standards of care. A do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) policy should be compiled, communicated to relevant members of staff, used and audited regularly. Funding must be provided to support an effective resuscitation service.

  1. Simulation as a tool for improving acquisition of neonatal resuscitation skills for obstetric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, C J; Angert, R; Rosen, O; Lee, C; Vega, M; Kim, M; Yu, Y; Bernstein, P S; Goffman, D

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to compare the confidence, knowledge, and performance of obstetric residents taught initial neonatal resuscitation steps in a simulation-based versus lecture-based format. Our study was a prospective randomized controlled trial of 33 obstetric residents. Baseline confidence, knowledge, and clinical skills assessments were performed. Subjects were randomized to traditional lecture (n = 14) or simulation-based (n = 19) neonatal resuscitation curriculum with a focus on initial steps. Follow-up assessments were performed at 3 and 6 months. Total confidence, knowledge, and clinical performance scores and change from baseline in these scores were calculated and compared between groups. Both the lecture-based and simulated-based groups demonstrated significant improvement in confidence, knowledge, and performance over time. However, compared with the lecture group, the magnitude of the mean change from baseline in performance scores was significantly greater in the simulation group at 3 months (2.9 versus 10.1; p < 0.001), but not at 6 months (7.0 versus 9.3; p = 0.11). Our study demonstrates the superiority of simulation in teaching obstetric residents initial neonatal resuscitation steps compared with a traditional lecture format. Skills are retained for upwards of 3-6 months. Refresher instruction by 6 months post-instruction may be beneficial.

  2. Neonatal resuscitation and immediate newborn assessment and stimulation for the prevention of neonatal deaths: a systematic review, meta-analysis and Delphi estimation of mortality effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Of 136 million babies born annually, around 10 million require assistance to breathe. Each year 814,000 neonatal deaths result from intrapartum-related events in term babies (previously “birth asphyxia”) and 1.03 million from complications of prematurity. No systematic assessment of mortality reduction from tactile stimulation or resuscitation has been published. Objective To estimate the mortality effect of immediate newborn assessment and stimulation, and basic resuscitation on neonatal deaths due to term intrapartum-related events or preterm birth, for facility and home births. Methods We conducted systematic reviews for studies reporting relevant mortality or morbidity outcomes. Evidence was assessed using GRADE criteria adapted to provide a systematic approach to mortality effect estimates for the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Meta-analysis was performed if appropriate. For interventions with low quality evidence but strong recommendation for implementation, a Delphi panel was convened to estimate effect size. Results We identified 24 studies of neonatal resuscitation reporting mortality outcomes (20 observational, 2 quasi-experimental, 2 cluster randomized controlled trials), but none of immediate newborn assessment and stimulation alone. A meta-analysis of three facility-based studies examined the effect of resuscitation training on intrapartum-related neonatal deaths (RR= 0.70, 95%CI 0.59-0.84); this estimate was used for the effect of facility-based basic neonatal resuscitation (additional to stimulation). The evidence for preterm mortality effect was low quality and thus expert opinion was sought. In community-based studies, resuscitation training was part of packages with multiple concurrent interventions, and/or studies did not distinguish term intrapartum-related from preterm deaths, hence no meta-analysis was conducted. Our Delphi panel of 18 experts estimated that immediate newborn assessment and stimulation would reduce both intrapartum

  3. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE & ATTITUDE OF THE PEDIATRIC RESIDENT ABOUT NEONATAL & PEDIATRIC CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M KADIAVAR

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A high leve of skill & knowledge is required in circumstances of cardiopulmonary resucitation which represents the most urgent clinical situations. The difficulties for pediatric residents who are fronted with the most cases of pediatric & neonatal resucitation are due to different causes of cardiorespiratory arrest in camparison to adults. This study aimed to assess the knowledge & their personal attitude toward the neonatal & pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitatin. Methods: By cross - sectional multicenter study between the pediatric residents who were studied in the teaching hospitals in Tehran (1378-90. Data were gathered among 140 residents by self-completed questionnaires which were included three parts as. demographic information assessment of their attitude by summation of score via ranking list questions and total score from assessment to their knowledge by different scenarios which were formatted in the multiple choice questions. Results: 35.7% of the residents studied in the first year of residency 35.0% in the second year and the remainder (29/3% in the third year More than 90% of them considered their knowledge about neonatal and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation low & less than average. Net only 80% of the residents self - assessed their actual ability about this issue low but also declaired the insufficient education during the medical training. The total score of knowledge assessment was 14.7 + 1_0.54 from 30 without any significant relations among the residents in different hospitals or various levels of pediatric residency. (P value= 0.1 , 0.7 There was not significant correlation between the total score from their attitude & their knowledge. Conclusion: Pediatric residents as the key personnel in the management of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of the neonates and children should have enough knowledge and skills about this topic. This survey demonstrates a low level of the pediatric & neonatal

  4. Laryngeal mask airway versus bag-mask ventilation or endotracheal intubation for neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Mosarrat J; Kumar, Manoj

    2018-03-15

    Providing effective positive pressure ventilation is considered to be the single most important component of successful neonatal resuscitation. Ventilation is frequently initiated manually with bag and face mask (BMV) followed by endotracheal intubation if respiratory depression continues. These techniques may be difficult to perform successfully resulting in prolonged resuscitation or neonatal asphyxia. The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) may achieve initial ventilation and successful resuscitation faster than a bag-mask device or endotracheal intubation. Among newborns requiring positive pressure ventilation for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, is LMA more effective than BMV or endotracheal intubation for successful resuscitation? When BMV is either insufficient or ineffective, is effective positive pressure ventilation and successful resuscitation achieved faster with the LMA compared to endotracheal intubation? We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2017, Issue 1), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 15 February 2017), Embase (1980 to 15 February 2017), and CINAHL (1982 to 15 February 2017). We also searched clinical trials registers, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared LMA for neonatal resuscitation with either BMV or endotracheal intubation and reported on any outcomes related to neonatal resuscitation specified in this review. Two review authors independently evaluated studies for risk of bias assessments, and extracted data using Cochrane Neonatal criteria. Categorical treatment effects were described as relative risks and continuous treatment effects were described as the mean difference, with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of estimates. We included seven trials that involved a total of 794 infants. Five

  5. Neonatal resuscitation: a knowledge gap amongst obstetrical trainees. A cross-sectional survey amongst medical graduates of Civil Hospital Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Tooba; Raza, Natasha; Haq, Gulfishan

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the neonatal resuscitation competence of obstetrical trainees to assess the gap in knowledge and to determine training needs. The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from January to March 2013 and comprised House Officers and Postgraduate trainees. A questionnaire was used to test the evaluation skills of different conditions and choice of appropriate action required during neonatal resuscitation. Data was collected and analysed through SPSS 17.0. Of the 102 obstetrical trainees, 44 (43.1%) were House Officers and 58 (56.9%) were Postgraduate trainees with an overall mean age 25.69 +/- 2.3 years. Only 19 (18.6%) subjects cleared the test; 8 (42.1%) of them were House Officers and 11 (57.9%) were Postgraduate trainees. The result did not show any significant difference between those who had previous training or those who had performed neonatal resuscitation and those who had no such exposure. Majority, 92 (90.2%) considered their knowledge inadequate and 99 (97%) favoured that updated neonatal resuscitation programmes should be periodically arranged. The study showed inadequate level of knowledge on neonatal resuscitation amongst obstetrical trainees. There is urgent need of formal training programmes which can make doctors skilful enough to face any adverse neonatal outcome professionally.

  6. Standardisation of neonatal clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, Z A; Giuliani, F; Haroon, A; Knight, H E; Albernaz, E; Batra, M; Bhat, B; Bertino, E; McCormick, K; Ochieng, R; Rajan, V; Ruyan, P; Cheikh Ismail, L; Paul, V

    2013-09-01

    The International Fetal and Newborn Growth Consortium for the 21(st) Century (INTERGROWTH-21(st) ) is a large-scale, population-based, multicentre project involving health institutions from eight geographically diverse countries, which aims to assess fetal, newborn and preterm growth under optimal conditions. Given the multicentre nature of the project and the expected number of preterm births, it is vital that all centres follow the same standardised clinical care protocols to assess and manage preterm infants, so as to ensure maximum validity of the resulting standards as indicators of growth and nutrition with minimal confounding. Moreover, it is well known that evidence-based clinical practice guidelines can reduce the delivery of inappropriate care and support the introduction of new knowledge into clinical practice. The INTERGROWTH-21(st) Neonatal Group produced an operations manual, which reflects the consensus reached by members of the group regarding standardised definitions of neonatal morbidities and the minimum standards of care to be provided by all centres taking part in the project. The operational definitions and summary management protocols were developed by consensus through a Delphi process based on systematic reviews of relevant guidelines and management protocols by authoritative bodies. This paper describes the process of developing the Basic Neonatal Care Manual, as well as the morbidity definitions and standardised neonatal care protocols applied across all the INTERGROWTH-21(st) participating centres. Finally, thoughts about implementation strategies are presented. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  7. Práticas assistenciais em reanimação do recém-nascido no contexto de um centro de parto normal Prácticas asistenciales en reanimación neonatal en el contexto de un centro de parto normal Care practices on the resuscitation of newborns in the context of a delivery center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Fernandes

    2005-12-01

    neonatal.Approximately 10 to 15% of the neonates present difficulties in adapting to extra uterine life, which requires ability and readiness from the professional to intervene properly. This is an observational, cross-sectional study aimed at describing the care practices on the resuscitation of the newborn in the Delivery Center of a public hospital in the city of São Paulo. Data were obtained from the observation of 100 assistances given by health care professional staff and were recorded on a checklist instrument. Meconium-amniotic fluid was found in 24 (24.0% births and 47 (47.0% newborns were submitted to respiratory airways aspiration. Of these, 6.4% (3 had their trachea aspirated. 26 (26.0% newborns were ventilated, 5 (19.2% of which by mask plus positive pressure; 1 (1.0% newborn was submitted to a chest compression. After the initial resuscitation procedures, 6 (6.0% newborns were referred to the neonatal intensive care unit.

  8. Tele-education vs classroom training of neonatal resuscitation: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A; Agarwal, R; Chawla, D; Paul, V; Deorari, A

    2010-12-01

    To compare gain in knowledge and skills of neonatal resuscitation using tele-education instruction vs conventional classroom teaching. This randomized controlled trial was conducted in the tele-education facility of a tertiary care center. In-service staff nurses were randomized to receive training by tele-education instruction (TI, n=26) or classroom teaching (CT, n=22) method from two neonatology instructors using a standardized teaching module on neonatal resuscitation. Gain in knowledge and skill scores of neonatal resuscitation were measured using objective assessment methods. Age, educational qualification and professional experience of the participants in two groups were comparable. Pre-training mean knowledge scores were higher in TI group (8.3±1.7 vs 6.6±1.4, P=0.004). However, skill scores were comparable in the two groups (11.7±3 vs 10.3±2.9, P=0.13). Training resulted in a significant and comparable gain in knowledge scores (4.2±2.2 vs 5.3±1.7; P=0.06) and skills scores (4.5±3.3 vs 5.0±3.1, P=0.62) in both the groups. The post-training knowledge scores (TI: 12.5±1.7 vs CT: 12.0±1.7, P=0.37) and the post-training skill scores (TI: 16.0±0.5 vs CT: 15.6±2.5, P=0.55) were comparable in the two groups. However, the post-training scores, adjusted for baseline knowledge scores, were statistically higher in the in-person group compared with the telemedicine group (knowledge: 12.46±0.03 vs 12.16±0.01, P=0.00; skills: 15.6±2.5 vs 16.0±2.8, P=0.00). The quantum of lower scores in the telemedicine group was only 2% for knowledge and 6% for skills. This difference was felt to be of only marginal importance. Satisfaction scores among trainees and instructors were comparable in the two groups. Tele-education offers a feasible and effective alternative to conventional training in neonatal resuscitation among health-care providers.

  9. Early neonatal mortality and neurological outcomes of neonatal resuscitation in a resource-limited setting on the Thailand-Myanmar border: A descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Janet

    Full Text Available Of the 4 million neonatal deaths worldwide yearly, 98% occur in low and middle-income countries. Effective resuscitation reduces mortality and morbidity but long-term outcomes in resource-limited settings are poorly described. This study reports on newborn neurological outcomes following resuscitation at birth in a resource-limited setting where intensive newborn care including intubation is unavailable.Retrospective analysis of births records from 2008 to 2015 at Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU on the Thailand-Myanmar border.From 21,225 newbonrs delivered, 15,073 (71% met the inclusion criteria (liveborn, singleton, ≥28 weeks' gestation, delivered in SMRU. Neonatal resuscitation was performed in 460 (3%; 422 basic, 38 advanced cases. Overall early neonatal mortality was 6.6 deaths per 1000 live births (95% CI 5.40-8.06. Newborns receiving basic and advanced resuscitation presented an adjusted rate for death of 1.30 (95%CI 0.66-2.55; p = 0.442, and 6.32 (95%CI 3.01-13.26; p<0.001 respectively, compared to newborns given routine care. Main factors related to increased need for resuscitation were breech delivery, meconium, and fetal distress (p<0.001. Neurodevelopmental follow-up to one year was performed in 1,608 (10.5% of the 15,073 newborns; median neurodevelopmental scores of non-resuscitated newborns and those receiving basic resuscitation were similar (64 (n = 1565 versus 63 (n = 41; p = 0.732, while advanced resuscitation scores were significantly lower (56 (n = 5; p = 0.017.Newborns requiring basic resuscitation at birth have normal neuro-developmental outcomes at one year of age compared to low-risk newborns. Identification of risk factors (e.g., breech delivery associated with increased need for neonatal resuscitation may facilitate allocation of staff to high-risk deliveries. This work endorses the use of basic resuscitation in low-resource settings, and supports on-going staff training to maintain bag-and-mask ventilation skills.

  10. A new suction mask to reduce leak during neonatal resuscitation: a manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Laila; Maxfield, Dominic A; Dawson, Jennifer A; Kamlin, C Omar F; McGrory, Lorraine; Thio, Marta; Donath, Susan M; Davis, Peter G

    2016-09-01

    Leak around the face mask is a common problem during neonatal resuscitation. A newly designed face mask using a suction system to enhance contact between the mask and the infant's face might reduce leak and improve neonatal resuscitation. The aim of the study is to determine whether leak is reduced using the suction mask (Resusi-sure mask) compared with a conventional mask (Laerdal Silicone mask) in a manikin model. Sixty participants from different professional categories (neonatal consultants, fellows, registrars, nurses, midwives and students) used each face mask in a random order to deliver 2 min of positive pressure ventilation to a manikin. Delivered airway pressures were measured using a pressure line. Inspiratory and expiratory flows were measured using a flow sensor, and expiratory tidal volumes and mask leaks were derived from these values. A median (IQR) leak of 12.1 (0.6-39.0)% was found with the conventional mask compared with 0.7 (0.2-4.6)% using the suction mask (p=0.002). 50% of the participants preferred to use the suction mask and 38% preferred to use the conventional mask. There was no correlation between leak and operator experience. A new neonatal face mask based on the suction system reduced leak in a manikin model. Clinical studies to test the safety and effectiveness of this mask are needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Pulse oximeter sensor application during neonatal resuscitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Deepak; Sundaram, Venkataseshan; Kumar, Praveen

    2014-03-01

    This study was done to compare 2 techniques of pulse oximeter sensor application during neonatal resuscitation for faster signal detection. Sensor to infant first (STIF) and then to oximeter was compared with sensor to oximeter first (STOF) and then to infant in ≥28 weeks gestations. The primary outcome was time from completion of sensor application to reliable signal, defined as stable display of heart rate and saturation. Time from birth to sensor application, time taken for sensor application, time from birth to reliable signal, and need to reapply sensor were secondary outcomes. An intention-to-treat analysis was done, and subgroup analysis was done for gestation and need for resuscitation. One hundred fifty neonates were randomized with 75 to each technique. The median (IQR) time from sensor application to detection of reliable signal was longer in STIF group compared with STOF group (16 [15-17] vs. 10 [6-18] seconds; P signal did not differ between the 2 methods (STIF: 61 [52-76] seconds; STOF: 58 [47-73] seconds [P = .09]). Time taken for signal acquisition was longer with STIF than with STOF in both subgroups. In the delivery room setting, the STOF method recognized saturation and heart rate faster than the STIF method. The time from birth to reliable signal was similar with the 2 methods.

  12. Training neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation: can it be improved by playing a musical prompt? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, Simone K; Schmölzer, Georg M; Kelm, Marcus; Davis, Peter G; Schmalisch, Gerd; Roehr, Charles Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Effective neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) requires 3:1 coordinated manual inflations (MI) and chest compressions (CC). We hypothesized that playing a musical prompt would help coordinate CC and MI during CPR. In this pilot trial we studied the effect the "Radetzkymarsch" (110 beats per minute) on neonatal CPR. Thirty-six medical professionals performed CPR on a neonatal manikin. CC and MI were recorded with and without the music played, using a respiratory function monitor and a tally counter. Statistical analysis included Wilcoxon test. Without music, the median (interquartile range) rate of CC was 115 (100 to 129) per minute and the rate of MI was 38 (32 to 42) per minute. When listening to the auditory prompt, the rate of CC decreased significantly to 96 (96 to 100) per minute (p = 0.002) and the rate of MI to 32 (30 to 34) per minute (p = 0.001). The interquartile range of interoperator variability decreased up to 86%. Listening to an auditory prompt improved compliance with the recommended delivery rates of CC and MI during neonatal CPR. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Exhaled CO2 Parameters as a Tool to Assess Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatching during Neonatal Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott Shang-shun; Cheung, Po-Yin; O'Reilly, Megan; LaBossiere, Joseph; Lee, Tze-Fun; Cowan, Shaun; Bigam, David L.; Schmölzer, Georg Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), partial pressure of exhaled CO2 (PECO2), and volume of expired CO2 (VCO2) can be continuously monitored non-invasively to reflect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion status. Although ETCO2 ≥14mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and quantifying the PECO2 has the potential to serve as an indicator of resuscitation quality, there is little information regarding capnometric measurement of PECO2 and ETCO2 in detecting return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survivability in asphyxiated neonates receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods Seventeen newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-minute normocapnic hypoxia followed by apnea to induce asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters including ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, heart rate, cardiac output, and carotid artery flow were continuously measured and analyzed. Results There were no differences in respiratory and hemodynamic parameters between surviving and non-surviving piglets prior to CPR. Surviving piglets had significantly higher ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, cardiac index, and carotid artery flow values during CPR compared to non-surviving piglets. Conclusion Surviving piglets had significantly better respiratory and hemodynamic parameters during resuscitation compared to non-surviving piglets. In addition to optimizing resuscitation efforts, capnometry can assist by predicting outcomes of newborns requiring chest compressions. PMID:26766424

  14. Exhaled CO2 Parameters as a Tool to Assess Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatching during Neonatal Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Shang-shun Li

    Full Text Available End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2, partial pressure of exhaled CO2 (PECO2, and volume of expired CO2 (VCO2 can be continuously monitored non-invasively to reflect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion status. Although ETCO2 ≥14 mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and quantifying the PECO2 has the potential to serve as an indicator of resuscitation quality, there is little information regarding capnometric measurement of PECO2 and ETCO2 in detecting return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and survivability in asphyxiated neonates receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR.Seventeen newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-minute normocapnic hypoxia followed by apnea to induce asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters including ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, heart rate, cardiac output, and carotid artery flow were continuously measured and analyzed.There were no differences in respiratory and hemodynamic parameters between surviving and non-surviving piglets prior to CPR. Surviving piglets had significantly higher ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, cardiac index, and carotid artery flow values during CPR compared to non-surviving piglets.Surviving piglets had significantly better respiratory and hemodynamic parameters during resuscitation compared to non-surviving piglets. In addition to optimizing resuscitation efforts, capnometry can assist by predicting outcomes of newborns requiring chest compressions.

  15. Effect of a Neonatal Resuscitation Course on Healthcare Providers' Performances Assessed by Video Recording in a Low-Resource Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; Bertuola, Federica; Lanzoni, Paolo; Cavallin, Francesco; Matediana, Eduardo; Manzungu, Olivier Wingi; Gomez, Ermelinda; Da Dalt, Liviana; Putoto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effect of an adapted neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) course on healthcare providers' performances in a low-resource setting through the use of video recording. A video recorder, mounted to the radiant warmers in the delivery rooms at Beira Central Hospital, Mozambique, was used to record all resuscitations. One-hundred resuscitations (50 before and 50 after participation in an adapted NRP course) were collected and assessed based on a previously published score. All 100 neonates received initial steps; from these, 77 and 32 needed bag-mask ventilation (BMV) and chest compressions (CC), respectively. There was a significant improvement in resuscitation scores in all levels of resuscitation from before to after the course: for "initial steps", the score increased from 33% (IQR 28-39) to 44% (IQR 39-56), pproviders improved after participation in an adapted NRP course. Video recording was well-accepted by the staff, useful for objective assessment of performance during resuscitation, and can be used as an educational tool in a low-resource setting.

  16. Knowledge and Practice of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the knowledge and practice of the 2000 CPR guidelines of doctors and nurses in Benin City, Nigeria was evaluated. This cross sectional study was conducted in six health facilities in Benin City. A structured self administered questionnaire was used to test the knowledge and practice of CPR of 145 doctors and ...

  17. Intensity of delivery room resuscitation and neonatal outcomes in infants born at 33 to 36 weeks' gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Lyu, Y; Ye, X Y; Monterrosa, L; Shah, P S; Lee, S K

    2016-02-01

    Examine the relationship between delivery room resuscitation intensity and mortality, morbidities and resource use in late preterm infants. Retrospective cohort study of inborn infants born at 33 to 36 weeks' gestation and admitted to Canadian neonatal intensive care units during 2010 to 2013. The 13 619 infants were grouped according to delivery room resuscitation intensity: no or minimal resuscitation (64.5%); continuous positive airway pressure (10.2%); bag-mask ventilation (21.7%); endotracheal intubation (3.1%); and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (0.6%). Overall mortality, early mortality, respiratory distress, pneumothorax, late-onset sepsis and resource use increased with higher intensity resuscitation. Compared with no or minimal resuscitation, intubation and CPR were associated with increased odds of mortality (adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 50 (20 to 125) and 180 (63 to 518), respectively). Intubation or higher intensity delivery room resuscitation is associated with increased mortality, morbidities and resource use in late preterm infants. Extra intensive care is required for such infants, especially during the first week of life.

  18. Incidence, characteristics, and survival following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the quaternary neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, Elizabeth E; Langeveld, Robert; Heimall, Lauren; Deveney, Alyson; Ades, Anne; Jensen, Erik A; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2017-01-01

    The contemporary characteristics and outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are poorly described. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence, interventions, and outcomes of CPR in a quaternary referral NICU. Retrospective observational study of infants who received chest compressions for resuscitation in the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia NICU between April 1, 2011 and June 30, 2015. Patient, event, and survival characteristics were abstracted from the medical record and the hospital-wide resuscitation database. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify patient and event factors associated with survival to discharge. There were 1.2 CPR events per 1000 patient days. CPR was performed in 113 of 5046 (2.2%) infants admitted to the NICU during the study period. The median duration of chest compressions was 2min (interquartile range 1, 6min). Adrenaline was administered in 34 (30%) CPR events. Of 113 infants with at least one CPR event, 69 (61%) survived to hospital discharge. Factors independently associated with decreased survival to hospital discharge were inotrope treatment prior to CPR (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] 0.14, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.04, 0.54), and adrenaline administration during CPR (aOR 0.14, 95% CI 0.04, 0.50). Although it was not uncommon, the incidence of CPR was low (CPR and adrenaline administration during CPR were less likely to survive to hospital discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Post-cardiotomy extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonates with complex single ventricle: analysis of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimenakos, Anastasios C; Wojtyla, Patrice; Smith, Pamela J; Rizzo, Vincent; Nater, Melissa; El Zein, Chawki F; Ilbawi, Michel N

    2011-12-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) in children with cardiac arrest refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been reported with encouraging results. We sought to review outcomes of neonates with functional single ventricle (FSV) receiving post-cardiotomy ECPR. Forty-eight patients who required post-cardiotomy extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the introduction of our ECPR protocol (January 2007-December 2009) were identified. Twenty-seven were neonates. Review of records and survival analysis were conducted. Of 27 neonates receiving post-cardiotomy ECMO 20 had FSV. Fourteen had ECPR. Ten underwent Norwood operation (NO) for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Four had FSV other than HLHS. Three underwent Damus-Kay-Stansel or modified NO with systemic-to-pulmonary shunt (SPS) and one SPS with anomalous pulmonary venous connection repair. Mean age and weight were 7.8 ± 2.9 days and 3.44 ± 1.78 kg, respectively. ECMO median duration was 6 days (interquartile range (IQR) 3-14). Survival to ECMO discontinuation was 79% (11 of 14 patients) and at hospital discharge was 57% (8 of 14 patients). The most common cause of death was multi-organ failure (four of six deaths). At last follow-up (median: 11 months (1-34)) 43% of patients were alive. CPR mean duration for patients with favorable versus unfavorable outcome was 38.6 ± 6.3 versus 42.1 ± 7.7 min (p = 0.12). Previously reported determinants for poorer prognosis in conventional non-rescue ECMO (such as pre-ECMO pH0.05). ECMO support in neonates with FSV requiring ECPR can result in favorable outcome in more than half of patients at hospital discharge. Aggressive strategy toward timely application of ECPR is justified. Expeditious ECPR deployment after proper patients' selection, refinement of CPR quality and use of adjunctive neuroprotective interventions, such as induced hypothermia, might further improve outcomes. Copyright © 2011 European Association for

  20. Exhaled CO2 Parameters as a Tool to Assess Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatching during Neonatal Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Elliott Shang-shun; Cheung, Po-Yin; O'Reilly, Megan; LaBossiere, Joseph; Lee, Tze-Fun; Cowan, Shaun; Bigam, David L.; Schm?lzer, Georg Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), partial pressure of exhaled CO2 (PECO2), and volume of expired CO2 (VCO2) can be continuously monitored non-invasively to reflect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion status. Although ETCO2 ?14mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and quantifying the PECO2 has the potential to serve as an indicator of resuscitation quality, there is little information regarding capnometric measurement of PECO2 and ...

  1. Practice patterns in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, L M; Herrarias, C T; Sebring, R H

    1998-01-01

    To determine practice patterns of office-based pediatricians and neonatologists in the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in healthy, term newborns during 1992, before the publication of the practice guideline for treatment of neonatal jaundice by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The survey was undertaken to inform the AAP's Subcommittee on Hyperbilirubinemia on current practices and to aid it in its preparation of the guidelines. It was also anticipated that this survey would serve as a basis for comparison for a second survey to be performed several years after the publication of the practice guidelines. A self-administered questionnaire describing a single case of a jaundiced, breastfed 36-hour-old healthy, full-term infant with a total serum bilirubin concentration of 11.0 mg/dL (188 microM/L) was sent to a random sample of 600 office-based pediatricians and 606 neonatologists who were members of the AAP. The final response rate was 74%. Respondents were asked to answer questions regarding treatment of the case based on their actual practices. Ranges of total serum bilirubin concentration were provided as possible answers to questions on initiation of phototherapy and exchange transfusion, and interruption of breastfeeding. Respondents were also queried about frequency of serum bilirubin testing, locations of phototherapy administration, and factors influencing their therapeutic decisions. Four hundred forty-two office-based pediatricians and 444 neonatologists completed the survey. There was a tendency for neonatologists to initiate both phototherapy and exchange transfusions at lower serum bilirubin concentrations than office-based general pediatricians. At a serum bilirubin of 13 to 19 mg/dL (222 to 325 microM/L), 54% of office-based pediatricians stated they would initiate phototherapy whereas 76% of neonatologists would do so. Forty percent of office-based practitioners said they would perform exchange transfusions at serum bilirubin levels

  2. European cardiovascular nurses' and allied professionals' knowledge and practical skills regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Trond R; Mårtensson, Jan; Axelsson, Åsa; Jørgensen, Marianne; Strömberg, Anna; Thompson, David R; Norekvål, Tone M

    2018-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) remains a cornerstone in the treatment of cardiac arrest, and is directly linked to survival rates. Nurses are often first responders and need to be skilled in the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. As cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills deteriorate rapidly, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether there was an association between participants' cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and their practical cardiopulmonary resuscitation test results. This comparative study was conducted at the 2014 EuroHeartCare meeting in Stavanger ( n=133) and the 2008 Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing in Malmö ( n=85). Participants performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation for three consecutive minutes CPR training manikins from Laerdal Medical®. Data were collected with a questionnaire on demographics and participants' level of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Most participants were female (78%) nurses (91%) from Nordic countries (77%), whose main role was in nursing practice (63%), and 71% had more than 11 years' experience ( n=218). Participants who conducted cardiopulmonary resuscitation training once a year or more ( n=154) performed better regarding ventilation volume than those who trained less (859 ml vs. 1111 ml, p=0.002). Those who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation training offered at their workplace ( n=161) also performed better regarding ventilation volume (889 ml vs. 1081 ml, p=0.003) and compression rate per minute (100 vs. 91, p=0.04) than those who had not. Our study indicates a positive association between participants' performance on the practical cardiopulmonary resuscitation test and the frequency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation training was offered in the workplace. Large ventilation volumes were the most common error at both measuring points.

  3. A metronome for pacing manual ventilation in a neonatal resuscitation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocucci, Cecilia; Madorno, Matías; Aguilar, Adriana; Acha, Leila; Szyld, Edgardo; Musante, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    During manual positive pressure ventilation (PPV), delivering a recommended respiratory rate (RR) is operator dependent. We tested the efficacy of a metronome as a standardised method to improve the accuracy of delivered RR during manual PPV in a neonatal resuscitation simulation. We conducted a blinded simulation in two consecutive stages. Using a self-inflating bag, 36 CPR trained operators provided PPV to a modified neonatal manikin via an endotracheal tube. Pressure and flow signals were captured by a respiratory function monitor. In the first standard stage, participants delivered RR as they would in delivery room. Prior to the second stage, they were asked about what their target RR had been and a metronome was set to that target. Subsequently, operators repeated PPV attempting to coordinate their delivered RR with the metronome. To evaluate accuracy we generated the variable RR Gap as the absolute difference between delivered and target RR. The primary outcome was the difference in RR Gap between stages. Mean (SD) target RR was 50 (8.7) inflations/min. During the initial stage, median (IQR) RR Gap was 11.6 (4.7-18.3) inflations/min and 20/36 participants (55.5%) had a mean delivered RR beyond the recommended range. When paced by the metronome, RR Gap was reduced to 0.2 (0.1-0.4) inflations/min and 32/36 participants (89%) fell within the recommended range. The use of a metronome improved the accuracy of delivered RR during manual PPV. Novel approaches to deliver an accurate RR during manual PPV need to be tested in more realistic scenarios. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Human or monitor feedback to improve mask ventilation during simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Corinna; Schmölzer, Georg M; O'Reilly, Megan; Schwaberger, Bernhard; Urlesberger, Berndt; Pichler, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    To investigate if external chest compressions (ECC) increase mask leak, and if human or technical feedback improves mask ventilation during simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this observational study, 32 participants delivered positive pressure ventilation (PPV) to a modified, leak-free manikin via facemask. Mask leak, tidal volume (VT), positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and respiratory rate (RR) were measured with a respiratory function monitor (RFM). Participants had to perform four studies. In the first study, participants performed PPV alone as baseline. Thereafter, three studies were performed in random order. In the PPV+ECC+manometer group, participants had to observe the manometer while the RFM was covered; in the PPV+ECC+RFM group, the RFM was used while the manometer was covered; and in the PPV+ECC+verbal feedback group, the RFM and manometer were covered while a team leader viewed the RFM and provided verbal feedback to the participants. Median (IQR) mask leak of all studies was 15% (5-47%). Comparing the studies, PPV+ECC+RFM and PPV+ECC+verbal feedback had significantly less mask leak than PPV+ECC+manometer. Mean (SD) VT of all studies was 9.5±3.5 mL. Comparing all studies, PPV+ECC+RFM had a significantly higher VT than PPV and PPV+ECC+manometer. As well, PPV+ECC+verbal feedback had a significantly higher VT than PPV. PEEP and RR were within our target, mean (SD) PEEP was 6±2 cmH2O and RR was 36±13/min. During simulated neonatal CPR, ECCs did not influence mask leak, and a RFM and verbal feedback were helpful methods to reduce mask leak and increase VT significantly.

  5. Reliability of pulse oximetry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a piglet model of neonatal cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammad Ahmad; Mendler, Marc; Maurer, Miriam; Waitz, Markus; Huang, Li; Hummler, Helmut D

    2015-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is widely used in intensive care and emergency conditions to monitor arterial oxygenation and to guide oxygen therapy. To study the reliability of pulse oximetry in comparison with CO-oximetry in newborn piglets during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In a prospective cohort study in 30 healthy newborn piglets, cardiac arrest was induced, and thereafter each piglet received CPR for 20 min. Arterial oxygen saturation was monitored continuously by pulse oximetry (SpO2). Arterial blood was analyzed for functional oxygenation (SaO2) every 2 min. SpO2 was compared with coinciding SaO2 values and bias considered whenever the difference (SpO2 - SaO2) was beyond ±5%. Bias values were decreased at the baseline measurements (mean: 2.5 ± 4.6%) with higher precision and accuracy compared with values across the experiment. Two minutes after cardiac arrest, there was a marked decrease in precision and accuracy as well as an increase in bias up to 13 ± 34%, reaching a maximum of 45.6 ± 28.3% after 10 min over a mean SaO2 range of 29-58%. Pulse oximetry showed increased bias and decreased accuracy and precision during CPR in a model of neonatal cardiac arrest. We recommend further studies to clarify the exact mechanisms of these false readings to improve reliability of pulse oximetry during the marked desaturation and hypoperfusion found during CPR. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Menticoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1 the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2 the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner.

  7. End-tidal CO2 Detection of an Audible Heart Rate During Neonatal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Following Asystole in Asphyxiated Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalak, Lina F.; Barber, Chad A.; Hynan, Linda; Garcia, Damian; Christie, Lucy; Wyckoff, Myra H.

    2011-01-01

    Even brief interruption of cardiac compressions significantly reduces critical coronary perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) monitoring may provide a continuous non-invasive method of assessing return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) without stopping to auscultate for heart rate (HR). However, the ETCO2 value that correlates with an audible HR is unknown. Our objective was to determine the threshold ETCO2 that is associated with ROSC following asphyxia-induced asystole. Neonatal swine (n=46) were progressively asphyxiated until asystole occurred. Resuscitation followed current neonatal guidelines with initial ventilation with 100% O2 followed by cardiac compressions followed by epinephrine for continued asystole. HR was auscultated every 30 sec and ETCO2 was continuously recorded. A receiver operator curve was generated using the calculated sensitivity and specificity for various ETCO2 values where a positive test was defined as the presence of HR >60 bpm by auscultation. An ETCO2 cut off value of 14 mmHg is the most sensitive ETCO2 value with the least false positives. When using ETCO2 to guide uninterrupted CPR in this model of asphyxia-induced asystole, auscultative confirmation of return of an adequate HR should be performed when ETCO2 ≥14 mmHg is achieved. Correlation during human neonatal CPR needs further investigation. PMID:21283051

  8. End-tidal CO₂ detection of an audible heart rate during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after asystole in asphyxiated piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalak, Lina F; Barber, Chad A; Hynan, Linda; Garcia, Damian; Christie, Lucy; Wyckoff, Myra H

    2011-05-01

    Even brief interruption of cardiac compressions significantly reduces critical coronary perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). End-tidal CO₂ (ETCO₂) monitoring may provide a continuous noninvasive method of assessing return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) without stopping to auscultate for heart rate (HR). However, the ETCO₂ value that correlates with an audible HR is unknown. Our objective was to determine the threshold ETCO₂ that is associated with ROSC after asphyxia-induced asystole. Neonatal swine (n = 46) were progressively asphyxiated until asystole occurred. Resuscitation followed current neonatal guidelines with initial ventilation with 100% O₂ followed by cardiac compressions followed by epinephrine for continued asystole. HR was auscultated every 30 s, and ETCO₂ was continuously recorded. A receiver operator curve was generated using the calculated sensitivity and specificity for various ETCO₂ values, where a positive test was defined as the presence of HR >60 bpm by auscultation. An ETCO₂ cut-off value of 14 mm Hg is the most sensitive ETCO₂ value with the least false positives. When using ETCO₂ to guide uninterrupted CPR in this model of asphyxia-induced asystole, auscultative confirmation of return of an adequate HR should be performed when ETCO₂ ≥ 14 mm Hg is achieved. Correlation during human neonatal CPR needs further investigation.

  9. Effect of intrauterine resuscitation on umbilical cord blood parameters of full-term fetal distress and evaluation of neonatal nerve function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hao Luo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of intrauterine resuscitation on umbilical cord blood parameters of fullterm fetal distress and neonatal nerve function. Methods: A total of 74 cases of women who gave birth in Gynecology and Obstetrics Department of our hospital and had fetal distress during labor from February 2008 to October 2010 were selected for study and randomly divided into two groups, observation group received intrauterine resuscitation, control group received conventional treatment, and then contents of umbilical arterial blood gas parameters and cytokines of two groups of patients, contents of serum nerve injury molecules of neonates as well as neonatal asphyxia condition and nerve function were compared. Results: pH value, PO2 and HCO3- in umbilical cord blood of observation group were higher than those of control group, and PCO2 and BE absolute value were lower than those of control group; IL-6, IL-8 and IFN-γ contents in umbilical arterial blood and umbilical venous blood of observation group of patients were significantly lower than those of control group; 1 d, 3 d, 5 d and 7 d after birth, serum NSE and S-100 protein contents of observation group of neonates were significantly lower than those of control group; neonatal asphyxia condition and nerve function were better than those of control group. Conclusion: Intrauterine resuscitation can improve intrauterine fetal anoxia and reduce acidosis while reduce neonatal nerve function injury and prevent neonatal asphyxia, and it is an ideal method to treat full-term fetal distress.

  10. Neonatal resuscitation – knowledge and practice of nurses in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-04

    Nov 4, 2008 ... nurses' knowledge about NR at a secondary health care level in western Nigeria. Methods ... section II tested appropriate decisions and actions such as appropriate ... lying-in ward (17; 9.5%) and in other wards and clinics not.

  11. Survival of the very-low-birth-weight infants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelanetz, Anna S; Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy

    2004-05-01

    To assess whether advances in neonatal care in the last decade have altered the outcome of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Medical records of all VLBW infants (n=283, body weight (BW)=1066+/-281 g, gestational age (GA)=28.3+/-2.9 weeks) admitted to the NICU between 1999 and 2002 were reviewed. In all, 29 (10.25%) infants received CPR in the NICU. Only one of these infants survived. After adjusting for GA, the clinical variables significantly associated with the need for CPR in the NICU were (adjusted odds ratio; 95% CI): pulmonary hemorrhage (7.89; 3.06 to 20.28), pulmonary air leak syndrome (23.90; 7.58 to 75.4), and delivery by Cesarian section (0.26; 0.1 to 0.66). The results were similar when the data were reanalyzed matching the 28 infants in the CPR group with 28 infants of identical GA in the non-CPR group. Survival rate for the infants who require CPR in the NICU remains extremely poor. This poor outcome needs to be discussed with parents and the option of the "do not resuscitate" (DNR) order may be appropriate for these infants, especially for those infants with multiple organ failure unresponsive to therapy.

  12. Using adrenaline during neonatal resuscitation may have an impact on serum cardiac troponin-T levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Caroline; Skranes, Janne H; Liestøl, Knut; Fugelseth, Drude

    2015-09-01

    It has been suggested that serum cardiac troponin-T (cTnT) can predict the severity of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We evaluated whether cTnT was better correlated with adrenaline during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) than with the severity of the insult itself, based on the Apgar scores. Serum cTnT was analysed in 47 asphyxiated newborn infants treated with hypothermia. Blood samples and resuscitation data were collected from medical records, and multiple linear regressions were used to evaluate the effect of the treatment and the Apgar scores on cTnT levels. The infants were divided into three groups: the no CPR group (n = 29) just received stimulation and ventilation, the CPR minus adrenaline group (n = 9) received cardiac compression and ventilation and the CPR plus adrenaline group (n = 9) received complete CPR, including adrenaline. In the univariate analysis, the five and ten-minute Apgar scores were significantly lower in the CPR plus adrenaline group and the cTnT was significantly higher. Multiple regression analysis showed significantly higher cTnT values in the CPR plus adrenaline group, but no significant relationship between cTnT and the Apgar scores. Although cTnT correlated with the severity of the insult in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, the levels may have been affected by adrenaline administered during CPR. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Newborn ventilation: comparison between a T-piece resuscitator and self-infating bags in a neonatal preterm simulator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyld, Edgardo G; Aguilar, Adriana M; Musante, Gabriel A; Vain, Néstor E; Guerrero, Miriam N; Serra, María Elina; Prudent, Luis M; Carlo, Waldemar A

    2012-04-01

    Although the provision of effective assisted ventilation is the most effective intervention in delivery room resuscitation of depressed newborn infants, there is still limited evidence about which is the optimal device to deliver positive pressure ventilation (PPV). To compare the accuracy of pressures and ventilation rate (VR) delivered to a neonatal simulator with three devices: 240 ml and 450 ml self-infating bags (SIB) and a T-piece resuscitator, and to evaluate the variability in terms of providers' experience. 76 health care providers divided in two groups according to experience were asked to provide positive pressure ventilation to a neonatal simulator through a facial mask or an endotracheal tube with three ventilating devices: a T-piece resuscitator, a 240 ml and a 450 ml self-infating bags. Participants used each combination of device and interface randomly on 2 consecutive occasions. Mean and maximum PIP and respiratory rate were recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using two-factor analysis of variance for repeated measures. SIB 240 and 450 were similar in the mean target peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) but both were significantly different (p values were close to the target. Mean VR was over the target for all the devices (p bag when compared with the T-piece using a mask. Experienced operators were closer than novice operators to target VR, regardless of the device or interface. The accuracy for the devices was comparable in the variables measured regardless operator´s experience. Overall, the T-piece provided lower PIP while both SIB, higher than the target. The VR was over the target for all the devices. Both SIB and novice participants were associated with higher VR. The intraoperator consistency was comparable in the variables measured with all devices.

  14. 3:1 compression to ventilation ratio versus continuous chest compression with asynchronous ventilation in a porcine model of neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmölzer, Georg M; O'Reilly, Megan; Labossiere, Joseph; Lee, Tze-Fun; Cowan, Shaun; Nicoll, Jessica; Bigam, David L; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-02-01

    In contrast to the resuscitation guidelines of children and adults, guidelines on neonatal resuscitation recommend synchronized 90 chest compressions with 30 manual inflations (3:1) per minute in newborn infants. The study aimed to determine if chest compression with asynchronous ventilation improves the recovery of bradycardic asphyxiated newborn piglets compared to 3:1 Compression:Ventilation cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Term newborn piglets (n=8/group) were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented and exposed to 45-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Piglets were randomized to receive resuscitation with either 3:1 compressions to ventilations (3:1C:V CPR group) or chest compressions with asynchronous ventilations (CCaV) or sham. Continuous respiratory parameters (Respironics NM3(®)), cardiac output, mean systemic and pulmonary artery pressures, and regional blood flows were measured. Piglets in 3:1C:V CPR and CCaV CPR groups had similar time to return of spontaneous circulation, survival rates, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters during CPR. The systemic and regional hemodynamic recovery in the subsequent 4h was similar in both groups and significantly lower compared to sham-operated piglets. Newborn piglets resuscitated by CCaV had similar return of spontaneous circulation, survival, and hemodynamic recovery compared to those piglets resuscitated by 3:1 Compression:Ventilation ratio. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neonatal mannequin comparison of the Upright self-inflating bag and snap-fit mask versus standard resuscitators and masks: leak, applied load and tidal volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Anthony Richard; Johnson, Lucy; Davis, Peter G; Dawson, Jennifer Anne; Thio, Marta; Owen, Louise S

    2017-11-30

    Neonatal mask ventilation is a difficult skill to acquire and maintain. Mask leak is common and can lead to ineffective ventilation. The aim of this study was to determine whether newly available neonatal self-inflating bags and masks could reduce mask leak without additional load being applied to the face. Forty operators delivered 1 min episodes of mask ventilation to a mannequin using the Laerdal Upright Resuscitator, a standard Laerdal infant resuscitator (Laerdal Medical) and a T-Piece Resuscitator (Neopuff), using both the Laerdal snap-fit face mask and the standard Laerdal size 0/1 face mask (equivalent sizes). Participants were asked to use pressure sufficient to achieve 'appropriate' chest rise. Leak, applied load, airway pressure and tidal volume were measured continuously. Participants were unaware that load was being recorded. There was no difference in mask leak between resuscitation devices. Leak was significantly lower when the snap-fit mask was used with all resuscitation devices, compared with the standard mask (14% vs 37% leak, Pmask was preferred by 83% of participants. The device-mask combinations had no significant effect on applied load. The Laerdal Upright Resuscitator resulted in similar leak to the other resuscitation devices studied, and did not exert additional load to the face and head. The snap-fit mask significantly reduced overall leak with all resuscitation devices and was the mask preferred by participants. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Two-year survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonatal patients after complex cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gregory; Joffe, Ari R; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Robertson, Charlene M T; Biggs, Wayne S G; Ross, David B; Rebeyka, Ivan M

    2011-03-01

    To examine survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonates having post-operative cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This inception cohort study included all neonates (6 weeks old or less) who received postoperative CPR (Group 1) after cardiac surgery from 1996 to 2005, matched for heart defect, year of surgery, chromosomal abnormality, and socioeconomic status to two neonates who did not receive postoperative CPR (Group 2). Two-year neurodevelopment was prospectively assessed with Bayley Scales of Infant Development II and Adaptive Behavior Assessment System II. Pre-, intra-, and post-operative variables were collected prospectively. Cardiac arrest variables were collected retrospectively. Predictors of mortality were analyzed by univariate analysis and conditional multiple logistic regression. There were 29 patients in Group 1, and 58 patients in Group 2. In survivors, there were no significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 in outcomes [mean (SD)] of mental developmental index [84.5 (12.2) vs. 81.0 (18.9)], psychomotor developmental index [82.8 (13.8) vs. 80.1 (21.9)], General Adaptive Composite [84.6 (15.3) vs. 84.3 (19.2)], Motor scale [8.4 (3.2) vs. 8.0 (3.8)], or delay on any of these scales. Two-year mortality [58.6% Group 1; 8.6% Group 2], was associated on conditional multiple logistic regression with CPR (OR 26.6; 95% CI, 5.4, 129.5). In Group 1, on multiple logistic regression, 2-year mortality was associated with minutes of chest compressions (OR 1.04, 95% CI, 1.01, 1.08). Among neonates having cardiac surgery, CPR is associated with greater mortality. There is no evidence that CPR survivors have different 2-year neurodevelopmental outcomes than those neonates not having CPR. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Health care professionals' concerns regarding in-hospital family-witnessed cardiopulmonary resuscitation implementation into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak-Dankosky, Natalia; Andruszkiewicz, Paweł; Sherwood, Paula R; Kvist, Tarja

    2018-05-01

    In-hospital, family-witnessed cardiopulmonary resuscitation of adults has been found to help patients' family members deal with the short- and long-term emotional consequences of resuscitation. Because of its benefits, many national and international nursing and medical organizations officially recommend this practice. Research, however, shows that family-witnessed resuscitation is not widely implemented in clinical practice, and health care professionals generally do not favour this recommendation. To describe and provide an initial basis for understanding health care professionals' views and perspectives regarding the implementation of an in-hospital, family-witnessed adult resuscitation practice in two European countries. An inductive qualitative approach was used in this study. Finnish (n = 93) and Polish (n = 75) emergency and intensive care nurses and physicians provided written responses to queries regarding their personal observations, concerns and comments about in-hospital, family-witnessed resuscitation of an adult. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The study analysis yielded five themes characterizing health care professionals' main concerns regarding family-witnessed resuscitation: (1) family's horror, (2) disturbed workflow (3) no support for the family, (4) staff preparation and (5) situation-based decision. Despite existing evidence revealing the positive influence of family-witnessed resuscitation on patients, relatives and cardiopulmonary resuscitation process, Finnish and Polish health care providers cited a number of personal and organizational barriers against this practice. The results of this study begin to examine reasons why family-witnessed resuscitation has not been widely implemented in practice. In order to successfully apply current evidence-based resuscitation guidelines, provider concerns need to be addressed through educational and organizational changes. This study identified important implementation

  18. A resuscitation "dilemma" theory-practice-ethics. Is there a theory-practice-ethics gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortell, Manfred

    2009-07-01

    The theory-practice-ethics gap - a new paradigm to contemplate. Practices based on tradition, rituals and outdated information are placed into a nonscientific paradigm called the theory-practice gap. Within this paradigm there is often a gap between theoretical knowledge and its application in practice. This theory-practice gap has always existed [Allmark, P., 1995. A classical view of the theory-practice gap in nursing. J. Adv. Nurs. 22 (1), 18-23; Hewison, A. et al., 1996. The theory-practice gap in nursing: a new dimension. J. Adv. Nurs. 24 (4), 754-761]. Its creation is often sited as a culmination of theory being idealistic and impractical, even if practical and beneficial, are often ignored. Most of the evidence relating to the non integration of theory and practice makes the assumption that environmental factors are responsible and will affect learning and practice outcomes, hence the "gap". In fact, it is the author's belief, that to "bridge the gap" between theory and practice an additional component is required, called ethics. A moral duty and obligation ensuring theory and practice integrate. In order to effectively implement new practices, one must deem these practices are worthy and relevant to their role as healthcare providers. Otherwise, we fall victims to providing nothing more than a lip service. This introduces a new concept which the author refers to as the theory-practice-ethics gap. This theory-practice-ethics gap must be considered when reviewing some of the unacceptable outcomes in health care practice. The author believes that there is a crisis of ethics where theory and practice integrate, and as a consequence, malfeasance. We are failing to fulfill our duty as healthcare providers and as patient advocates. One practice of major concern, which the author will endeavor to unfold relates to adult and pediatric resuscitation.

  19. A comparison between the two methods of chest compression in infant and neonatal resuscitation. A review according to 2010 CPR guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvanas, Alexandros; Koulouglioti, Christina; Kalafati, Maria

    2018-03-01

    The quality of chest compression (CC) delivered during neonatal and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is identified as the most important factor to achieve the increase of survival rate without major neurological deficit to the patients. The objective of the study was to systematically review all the available studies that have compared the two different techniques of hand placement on infants and neonatal resuscitation, from 2010 to 2015 and to highlight which method is more effective. A review of the literature using a variety of medical databases, including Cochrane, MEDLINE, and SCOPUS electronic databases. The following MeSH terms were used in the search: infant, neonatal, CPR, CC, two-thumb (TT) technique/method, two-finger (TF) technique/method, rescuer fatigue, thumb/finger position/placement, as well as combinations of these. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria; nine observational studies and a randomized controlled trial. All providers performed either continuous TF or TT technique CCs and the majority of CPR performance was taken place in infant trainer manikin. The majority of the studies suggest the TT method as the more useful for infants and neonatal resuscitation than the TF.

  20. Optimal Chest Compression Rate and Compression to Ventilation Ratio in Delivery Room Resuscitation: Evidence from Newborn Piglets and Neonatal Manikins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solevåg, Anne Lee; Schmölzer, Georg M.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) influences survival and neurologic outcomes after delivery room (DR) CPR. High quality chest compressions (CC) improve cerebral and myocardial perfusion. Improved myocardial perfusion increases the likelihood of a faster ROSC. Thus, optimizing CC quality may improve outcomes both by preserving cerebral blood flow during CPR and by reducing the recovery time. CC quality is determined by rate, CC to ventilation (C:V) ratio, and applied force, which are influenced by the CC provider. Thus, provider performance should be taken into account. Neonatal resuscitation guidelines recommend a 3:1 C:V ratio. CCs should be delivered at a rate of 90/min synchronized with ventilations at a rate of 30/min to achieve a total of 120 events/min. Despite a lack of scientific evidence supporting this, the investigation of alternative CC interventions in human neonates is ethically challenging. Also, the infrequent occurrence of extensive CPR measures in the DR make randomized controlled trials difficult to perform. Thus, many biomechanical aspects of CC have been investigated in animal and manikin models. Despite mathematical and physiological rationales that higher rates and uninterrupted CC improve CPR hemodynamics, studies indicate that provider fatigue is more pronounced when CC are performed continuously compared to when a pause is inserted after every third CC as currently recommended. A higher rate (e.g., 120/min) is also more fatiguing, which affects CC quality. In post-transitional piglets with asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest, there was no benefit of performing continuous CC at a rate of 90/min. Not only rate but duty cycle, i.e., the duration of CC/total cycle time, is a known determinant of CC effectiveness. However, duty cycle cannot be controlled with manual CC. Mechanical/automated CC in neonatal CPR has not been explored, and feedback systems are under-investigated in this

  1. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of neonatal staff concerning neonatal pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizakele L.T. Khoza

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal pain management has received increasing attention over the past four decades. Research into the effects of neonatal pain emphasises the professional, ethical and moral obligations of staff to manage pain for positive patient outcomes. However, evaluation studies continuously report evidence of inadequate neonate pain management and a gap between theory and practice. Objective: This study reviewed current practice in neonatal pain management to describe the knowledge, attitudes and practices of nurses and doctors regarding pain management for neonates in two academic hospitals. Method: A non-experimental, prospective quantitative survey, the modified Infant Pain Questionnaire, was used to collect data from 150 nurses and doctors working in the neonatal wards of two academic hospitals in central Gauteng. Results: The response rate was 35.33% (n = 53, most respondents being professional nurses (88.68%; n = 47 working in neonatal intensive care units (80.77%; n = 42; 24 (45.28% had less than 5 years’ and 29 respondents 6 or more years’ working experience in neonatal care. A review of pain management in the study setting indicated a preference for pharmacological interventions to relieve moderate to severe pain. An association (p < 0.05 was found between pain ratings on 5 procedures and frequency of administration of pharmacological pain management. Two-thirds of respondents (64% reported that there were no pain management guidelines in the neonatal wards in which they worked. Conclusion: The interventions to manage moderate neonatal pain are in line with international guidelines. However, neonatal pain management may not occur systematically based on prior assessment of neonatal pain, choice of most appropriate intervention and evaluation. This study recommends implementation of a guideline to standardise practice and ensure consistent and adequate pain management in neonates.

  2. Chest compression during sustained inflation versus 3:1 chest compression:ventilation ratio during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomised feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmölzer, Georg M; O Reilly, Megan; Fray, Caroline; van Os, Sylvia; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2017-10-07

    Current neonatal resuscitation guidelines recommend 3:1 compression:ventilation (C:V) ratio. Recently, animal studies reported that continuous chest compressions (CC) during a sustained inflation (SI) significantly improved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The approach of CC during SI (CC+SI) has not been examined in the delivery room during neonatal resuscitation. It is a feasibility study to compare CC+SI versus 3:1 C:V ratio during neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room. We hypothesised that during neonatal resuscitation, CC+SI will reduce the time to ROSC. Our aim was to examine if CC+SI reduces ROSC compared with 3:1 C:V CPR in preterm infants rate of 90/min during an SI with a duration of 20 s (CC+SI). After 20 s, the SI was interrupted for 1 s and the next SI was started for another 20 s until ROSC. Infants in the '3:1 group' received CC using 3:1 C:V ratio until ROSC. Overall the mean (SD) time to ROSC was significantly shorter in the CC+SI group with 31 (9) s compared with 138 (72) s in the 3:1 C:V group (p=0.011). CC+SI is feasible in the delivery room. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02083705, pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Reliability of Pulse Oximetry during Progressive Hypoxia, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, and Recovery in a Piglet Model of Neonatal Hypoxic Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammad Ahmad; Weber, Claudia; Waitz, Markus; Huang, Li; Hummler, Helmut D; Mendler, Marc Robin

    2017-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is widely used in intensive care and emergency conditions to monitor arterial oxygenation and to guide oxygen therapy. To study the reliability of pulse oximetry in comparison with CO-oximetry in newborn piglets during progressive hypoxia, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Thirty-three newborn piglets were exposed to hypoxia until asystole occurred and then resuscitated until ROSC. Arterial oxygen saturation was monitored continuously by pulse oximetry (SpO2) with one sensor applied to the wrist of the right forelimb (FL) and another to the thigh of the left hind limb (HL). Arterial functional oxygen saturation (SaO2) was measured at baseline and at predefined intervals during each phase of the experiment. SpO2 was compared with coinciding SaO2 values and bias considered whenever the difference (SpO2 - SaO2) was beyond ±5%. Bias values were lower at the baseline measurements (-3.7 ± 2.3% in FL and -4.1 ± 3.4% in HL) as well as after ROSC (1.5 ± 4.2% in FL and 0.2 ± 4.6% in HL) with higher precision and accuracy than during other experiment phases. During hypoxia induction, cardiac arrest, and CPR, there was a marked decrease in precision and accuracy as well as an increase in bias up to 43 ± 26 and 56 ± 27% in FL and HL, respectively, over a range of SaO2 from 13 to 51%. Pulse oximetry showed increased bias and decreased accuracy and precision during marked hypoxemia in a model of neonatal hypoxic cardiac arrest. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    This publication presents the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of the pediatric patient and the 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics/AHA guidelines for CPR and ECC of the neonate. The guidelines are based on the evidence evaluation from the 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations, hosted by the American Heart Association in Dallas, Texas, January 23-30, 2005. The "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" contain recommendations designed to improve survival from sudden cardiac arrest and acute life-threatening cardiopulmonary problems. The evidence evaluation process that was the basis for these guidelines was accomplished in collaboration with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). The ILCOR process is described in more detail in the "International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations." The recommendations in the "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" confirm the safety and effectiveness of many approaches, acknowledge that other approaches may not be optimal, and recommend new treatments that have undergone evidence evaluation. These new recommendations do not imply that care involving the use of earlier guidelines is unsafe. In addition, it is important to note that these guidelines will not apply to all rescuers and all victims in all situations. The leader of a resuscitation attempt may need to adapt application of the guidelines to unique circumstances. The following are the major pediatric advanced life support changes in the 2005 guidelines: There is further caution about the use of endotracheal tubes. Laryngeal mask airways are acceptable when used by experienced

  5. Assessment of cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices in emergency departments for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA victims in Lebanon is low. A national policy on resuscitation practice is lacking. This survey explored the practices of emergency physicians related to the resuscitation of OHCA victims in Lebanon. Methods: A sample of 705 physicians working in emergency departments (EDs was recruited and surveyed using the LimeSurvey software (Carsten Schmitz, Germany. Seventy-five participants responded, yielding 10.64% response rate. Results: The most important factors in the participants' decision to initiate or continue resuscitation were presence of pulse on arrival (93.2%, underlying cardiac rhythm (93.1%, the physician's ethical duty to resuscitate (93.2%, transport time to the ED (89%, and down time (84.9%. The participants were optimistic regarding the survival of OHCA victims (58.1% reporting > 10% survival and reported frequent resuscitation attempts in medically futile situations. The most frequently reported challenges during resuscitation decisions were related to pressure or presence of victim's family (38.8% and lack of policy (30%. Conclusion: In our setting, physicians often rely on well-established criteria for initiating/continuing resuscitation; however, their decisions are also influenced by cultural factors such as victim's family wishes. The findings support the need for a national policy on resuscitation of OHCA victims.

  6. Resuscitation of Newborn Babies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Burgess

    in which neonatal resuscitation was a central component1. ... together with an umbilical catheter through which they are given, but if ... drugs: Insert an umbilical venous cannula, and ... Case history from Berega Hospital, Tanzania. Following a ...

  7. The 2010 Guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation (AHA, ERC, ILCOR): similarities and differences--what progress has been made since 2005?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehr, C C; Hansmann, G; Hoehn, T; Bührer, C

    2011-09-01

    In 2010, the American Heart Association (AHA), the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) issued new guidelines on newborn resuscitation. The new recommendations include: (1) pulse-oximetry for patient assessment during newborn resuscitation; (2) to start resuscitation of term infants with an FiO (2) of 0.21; (3) cardio-respiratory resuscitation with a 3:1 chest compression/inflation ratio for a heart rate ERC and ILCOR used nearly identical literature for their evidence evaluation process. While the AHA and ILCOR guidelines are almost identical, the ERC guidelines differ slightly from the latter with regards to (i) promoting sustained inflations at birth, (ii) promoting a wider range in applied inflations during resuscitation, and (iii) to suction the airways in infants born from meconium stained amniotic fluid, before inflations are given. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Translation of ERC resuscitation guidelines into clinical practice by emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Henrik; Bachmann, Kaspar; Strunk, Guido; Neuhold, Stephanie; Zapletal, Bernhard; Maurer, Claudia; Fast, Andrea; Stumpf, Dominik; Greif, Robert

    2014-01-30

    Austrian out-of-hospital emergency physicians (OOHEP) undergo mandatory biannual emergency physician refresher courses to maintain their licence. The purpose of this study was to compare different reported emergency skills and knowledge, recommended by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines, between OOHEP who work regularly at an out-of-hospital emergency service and those who do not currently work as OOHEP but are licenced. We obtained data from 854 participants from 19 refresher courses. Demographics, questions about their practice and multiple-choice questions about ALS-knowledge were answered and analysed. We particularly explored the application of therapeutic hypothermia, intraosseous access, pocket guide use and knowledge about the participants' defibrillator in use. A multivariate logistic regression analysed differences between both groups of OOHEP. Age, gender, years of clinical experience, ERC-ALS provider course attendance and the self-reported number of resuscitations were control variables. Licenced OOHEP who are currently employed in emergency service are significantly more likely to initiate intraosseous access (OR = 4.013, p ERC-ALS provider course since 2005 have initiated more mild therapeutic hypothermia after successful resuscitation (OR = 1.670, p ERC guidelines better into clinical practice, but more training on life-saving rescue techniques needs to be done to improve knowledge and to raise these rates of application.

  9. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR, European Society for Neonatology (ESN, Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS, European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNIORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann (President of ESPR, Morten Breindahl (President of ESN, Manuel Sánchez Luna (President of UENPS, Silke Mader (Chairwoman of the Executive Board and Co-Founder of EFCNISCIENTIFIC COMMITTEEVirgilio P. Carnielli (Congress President Chair, Pierre Gressens (Past Scientific President, Umberto Simeoni, Manon Benders, Neil Marlow, Ola D. Saugstad, Petra Hüppi, Agnes van den HoogenSession "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"ABS 1. HOW SAFE IS NASAL CANNULAE OXYGEN THERAPY DURING NEONATAL TRANSPORT? • A. Brunton, J. O’Shea, A. JacksonABS 2. WEANING PREMATURE INFANTS FROM NASAL CONTINUOUS POSITIVE AIRWAY PRESSURE – CURRENT PRACTICE IN GERMANY • A. Kidszun, C. Arnold, J. Winter, C. Whybra-Trümpler, E. MildenbergerABS 3. TIMING OF KEY EVENTS IN NEONATAL RE­SUSCITATION • A. Heathcote, J. Jones, P. ClarkeABS 4. COMPARING NON-INVASIVE VENTILATION METHODS IN RESPIRATORY SUPPORT OF PRETERM NEONATES WITH RESPIRATORY DISEASES • A.S. Farhat, A. Mohammadzadeh, G.A. Mamuri, R. Saeidi, S. NoorizadehABS 5. PREDICTORS AND OUTCOMES OF CONTINU­OUS POSITIVE AIRWAY PRESSURE AND NA­SAL HIGH-FLOW TREATMENT FAILURE IN PRE­TERM INFANTS: A SECONDARY ANALYSIS OF A RANDOMIZED TRIAL • B. Manley, C. Roberts, D. Frøisland, L. Doyle, P. Davis, L. OwenABS 6. NEONATAL NON-INVASIVE RESPIRATORY SUPPORT APPROACH: A TWO COUNTRIES COMPARISON • I. Bresesti, S. Zivanovic, G. Lista, C. RoehrABS 7. PREDICTORS OF EARLY CPAP FAILURE IN VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT PRETERM

  10. Simulation in resuscitation teaching and training, an evidence based practice review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sandeep; Lata, Indu

    2010-10-01

    In the management of a patient in cardiac arrest, it is sometimes the least experienced provider giving chest compressions, intubating the patient, and running the code during the most crucial moment in that patient's life. Traditional methods of educating residents and medical students using lectures and bedside teaching are no longer sufficient. Today's generation of trainees grew up in a multimedia environment, learning on the electronic method of learning (online, internet) instead of reading books. It is unreasonable to expect the educational model developed 50 years ago to be able to adequately train the medical students and residents of today. One area that is difficult to teach is the diagnosis and management of the critically ill patient, specifically who require resuscitation for cardiac emergencies and cardiac arrest. Patient simulation has emerged as an educational tool that allows the learner to practice patient care, away from the bedside, in a controlled and safe environment, giving the learner the opportunity to practice the educational principles of deliberate practice and self-refection. We performed a qualitative literature review of the uses of simulators in resuscitation training with a focus on their current and potential applications in cardiac arrest and emergencies.

  11. [Sedation and analgesia practices among Spanish neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alvarez, A; Carbajal, R; Courtois, E; Pertega-Diaz, S; Muñiz-Garcia, J; Anand, K J S

    2015-08-01

    Pain management and sedation is a priority in neonatal intensive care units. A study was designed with the aim of determining current clinical practice as regards sedation and analgesia in neonatal intensive care units in Spain, as well as to identify factors associated with the use of sedative and analgesic drugs. A multicenter, observational, longitudinal and prospective study. Thirty neonatal units participated and included 468 neonates. Of these, 198 (42,3%) received sedatives or analgesics. A total of 19 different drugs were used during the study period, and the most used was fentanyl. Only fentanyl, midazolam, morphine and paracetamol were used in at least 20% of the neonates who received sedatives and/or analgesics. In infusions, 14 different drug prescriptions were used, with the most frequent being fentanyl and the combination of fentanyl and midazolam. The variables associated with receiving sedation and/or analgesia were, to have required invasive ventilation (P3 (P=.023; OR=2.26), the existence of pain evaluation guides in the unit (Pneonates admitted to intensive care units receive sedatives or analgesics. There is significant variation between Spanish neonatal units as regards sedation and analgesia prescribing. Our results provide evidence on the "state of the art", and could serve as the basis of preparing clinical practice guidelines at a national level. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Chest Compressions during Sustained Inflations Improve Recovery When Compared to a 3:1 Compression:Ventilation Ratio during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Neonatal Porcine Model of Asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott S; Görens, Immanuel; Cheung, Po-Yin; Lee, Tze-Fun; Lu, Min; O'Reilly, Megan; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2017-01-01

    Recently, sustained inflations (SI) during chest compression (CC) (CC+SI) have been suggested as an alternative to the current approach during neonatal resuscitation. No previous study compared CC+SI using CC rates of 90/min to the current 3:1 compression:ventilation ratio (C:V). To determine whether CC+SI versus a 3:1 C:V reduces the time to the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and improves hemodynamic recovery in newborn piglets with asphyxia-induced bradycardia. Term newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated when the heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Piglets were randomized into 3 groups: CC during SI at a rate of 90 CC/min (SI+CC 90, n = 8), a 3:1 C:V using 90 CC and 30 inflations (3:1, n = 8), or a sham group (n = 6). Cardiac function, carotid blood flow, cerebral oxygenation, and respiratory parameters were continuously recorded throughout the experiment. CC+SI significantly reduced the median (IQR) time of ROSC, i.e., 34 s (28-156 s) versus 210 s (72-300 s) in the 3:1 group (p = 0.048). CC+SI also significantly reduced the requirement for 100% oxygen, improved respiratory parameters, and resulted in a similar hemodynamic recovery. CC+SI during CPR significantly improved ROSC in a porcine model of neonatal resuscitation. This is of considerable clinical relevance because improved respiratory and hemodynamic parameters potentially minimize morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Practical MRI atlas of neonatal brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkovich, A.J.; Truwit, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is an anatomical reference for cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in neonates and infants. It contains 122 clear, sharp MRI scans and drawings showing changes in the normal appearance of the brain and skull during development. Sections of the atlas depict the major processes of maturation: brain myelination, development of the corpus callosum, development of the cranial bone marrow, and iron deposition in the brain. High-quality scans illustrate how these changes appear on magnetic resonance images during various stages of development

  14. Comparison of Different Compression to Ventilation Ratios (2: 1, 3: 1, and 4: 1) during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Porcine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquin, Matteo P; Cheung, Po-Yin; Patel, Sparsh; Lu, Min; Lee, Tze-Fun; Wagner, Michael; O'Reilly, Megan; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2018-04-12

    High-quality chest compression is essential during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the optimal compression to ventilation ratio (C:V) that should be used during neonatal CPR to optimize coronary and cerebral perfusion while providing adequate ventilation remains unknown. We hypothesized that different C:V ratios (e.g., 2: 1 or 4: 1) will reduce the time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in severely asphyxiated piglets. Thirty-one newborn piglets (1-4 days old) were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 50-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia. Piglets were randomized into 4 groups: 2: 1 (n = 8), 3: 1 (n = 8), 4: 1 (n = 8) C:V ratio, or a sham group (n = 7). Cardiac function, carotid blood flow, cerebral oxygenation, and respiratory parameters were continuously recorded throughout the experiment. Thirty-one piglets were included in the study, and there was no difference in the duration of asphyxia or the degree of asphyxiation (as indicated by pH, PaCO2, and lactate) among the different groups. The median (IQR) time to ROSC was similar between the groups with 127 (82-210), 96 (88-126), and 119 (83-256) s in the 2: 1, 3: 1, and 4: 1 C:V ratio groups, respectively (p = 0.67 between groups). Similarly, there was no difference in 100% oxygen requirement or epinephrine administration between the experimental groups. Different C:V ratios resulted in similar ROSC, mortality, oxygen, and epinephrine administration during resuscitation in a porcine model of neonatal asphyxia. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Occupational affiliation does not influence practical skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for in-hospital healthcare professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoren Ann-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background D-CPR (Defibrillator Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is a technique for optimal basic life support during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Guidelines recommend that healthcare professionals can perform CPR with competence. How CPR training and provision is organized varies between hospitals, and it is our impression that in Sweden this has generally improved during the last 15-20 years. However, some hospitals still do not have any AED (Automated External Defibrillators. The aim was to investigate potential differences in practical skills between different healthcare professions before and after training in D-CPR. Methods Seventy-four healthcare professionals were video recorded and evaluated for adherence to a modified Cardiff Score. A Laerdal Resusci Anne manikin in connection to PC Skill reporting System was used to evaluate CPR quality. A simulated CPR situation was accomplished during a 5-10 min scenario of ventricular fibrillation. Paired and unpaired statistical methods were used to examine differences within and between occupations with respect to the intervention. Results There were no differences in skills among the different healthcare professions, except for compressions per minute. In total, the number of compression per minute and depth improved for all groups (P P Conclusion Nearly all healthcare professionals learned to use the AED. There were no differences in CPR skill performances among the different healthcare professionals.

  16. Basic model of quality and good practices in neonatal radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Janine H.; Goulart, Juliana M.; Lykawka, Rochelle; Bacelar, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal chest radiographs were evaluated and 3 variables were analyzed: collimation, positioning and presence of artifacts. This study is a pilot for develop a model of good practices in radiology, which is in development phase. The index of analyzed radiographs considered inadequate is expressive and it shows the need for a model that may be part of an optimization program to medical exposures. (author)

  17. Turn and face the strange - ch..ch..ch..changes to neonatal resuscitation guidelines in the past decade.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Colm P F

    2012-09-01

    Resuscitation of newborns has been described since ancient times and is among the most commonly performed emergency medical interventions. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation first made recommendations on resuscitation in newborns in 1999. Over the last decade, new research and careful review of the available evidence have resulted in substantial changes to these recommendations - in particular, regarding the assessment of colour, giving supplemental oxygen, suctioning infants born through meconium-stained liquor, confirming endotracheal tube position, the use of pulse oximetry, giving CPAP to premature infants, keeping preterm infants warm using polyethylene wrapping and cooling term infants with encephalopathy. This process has also highlighted the paucity of evidence to support much of the care given to infants in the delivery room and the need for research to refine our techniques.

  18. Continuous training and certification in neonatal resuscitation in remote areas using a multi-platform information and communication technology intervention, compared to standard training: A randomized cluster trial study protocol [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Delgado

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: About 10% of all newborns may have difficulty breathing and require support by trained personnel. In Peru, 90% of deliveries occur in health facilities. However, there is not a national neonatal resuscitation and certification program for the public health sector. In addition, the Andes and the Amazon regions concentrate large rural remote areas, which further limit the implementation of training programs and the accomplishment of continuous certification. Neonatal resuscitation training through the use of information, communication and technology (ICT tools running on computers, tablets or mobile phones, may overcome such limitations. This strategy allows online and offline access to educational resources, paving the way to more frequent and efficient training and certification processes. Objective: To evaluate the effects of a neonatal resuscitation training and certification program that uses a multi-platform ICT (MP-ICT strategy on neonatal health care in remote areas. Methods: We propose to conduct the study through a cluster-randomized trial, where the study and analysis unit is the health care facility. Eligible facilities will include primary and secondary health care level facilities that are located in provinces with neonatal mortality rates higher than 15 per 1,000 live births. We will compare the proportion of newborns with a heart rate ≥100 beats per minute at two minutes after birth in health care facilities that receive MP-ICT training and certification implementation, with those that receive standard training and certification. Discussion: We expect that the intervention will be shown as more effective than the current standard of care. We are prepared to include it within a national neonatal resuscitation training and certification program to be implemented at national scale together with policymakers and other key stakeholders.  Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Nº NCT03210194  Status of the study: This

  19. [Need for resuscitation in preterm neonates less than 32 weeks treated with antenatal magnesium sulphate for neuroprotection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloreda-Garcia, Jose María; Lorente-Nicolás, Ana; Bermejo-Costa, Francisca; Martínez-Uriarte, Juan; López-Pérez, Rocío

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium sulphate administration is recommended for foetal neuroprotection in pregnant women at imminent risk of early preterm birth. To evaluate the relationship between intrapartum magnesium sulphate for foetal neuroprotection and delivery room resuscitation of preterm infants less 32 weeks. A prospective observational study was conducted on preterm infants less 32 weeks exposed to magnesium sulphate for neuroprotection, and a comparison made with another historic group immediately before starting this treatment. Cases in both groups that had not reached lung maturity with corticosteroids were rejected. The rates of resuscitation, morbidity and mortality for each of the groups were analysed and compared. There was a total of 107 preterm, with 56 exposed to magnesium sulphate. Rate of advanced resuscitation were similar between the two groups. There were no other differences in mortality, invasive mechanical ventilation, time to first stool, and other comorbidities. Intrapartum magnesium sulphate for foetal neuroprotection was not associated with an increased need for intensive delivery room resuscitation and other morbidities in these cohorts of less than 32 weeks preterm infants. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Interhospital Transport of Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Practical and Ethical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noje, Corina; Fishe, Jennifer N; Costabile, Philomena M; Klein, Bruce L; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Pronovost, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    To discuss risks and benefits of interhospital transport of children in cardiac arrest undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Narrative review. Not applicable. Transporting children in cardiac arrest with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation between hospitals is potentially lifesaving if it enables access to resources such as extracorporeal support, but may risk transport personnel safety. Research is needed to optimize outcomes of patients transported with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reduce risks to the staff caring for them.

  1. Family presence during resuscitation (FPDR): Perceived benefits, barriers and enablers to implementation and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Joanne E; Cooper, Simon J; Sellick, Ken

    2014-04-01

    There are a number of perceived benefits and barriers to family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) in the emergency department, and debate continues among health professionals regarding the practice of family presence. This review of the literature aims to develop an understanding of the perceived benefits, barriers and enablers to implementing and practicing FPDR in the emergency department. The perceived benefits include; helping with the grieving process; everything possible was done, facilitates closure and healing and provides guidance and family understanding and allows relatives to recognise efforts. The perceived barriers included; increased stress and anxiety, distracted by relatives, fear of litigation, traumatic experience and family interference. There were four sub themes that emerged from the literature around the enablers of FPDR, these included; the need for a designated support person, the importance of training and education for staff and the development of a formal policy within the emergency department to inform practice. In order to ensure that practice of FPDR becomes consistent, emergency personnel need to understand the need for advanced FPDR training and education, the importance of a designated support person role and the evidence of FPDR policy as enablers to implementation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Eliminating Undesirable Variation in Neonatal Practice: Balancing Standardization and Customization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Maya; Raghavan, Aarti; Suresh, Gautham K

    2017-09-01

    Consistency of care and elimination of unnecessary and harmful variation are underemphasized aspects of health care quality. This article describes the prevalence and patterns of practice variation in health care and neonatology; discusses the potential role of standardization as a solution to eliminating wasteful and harmful practice variation, particularly when it is founded on principles of evidence-based medicine; and proposes ways to balance standardization and customization of practice to ultimately improve the quality of neonatal care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Care of the mother-infant dyad: a novel approach to conducting and evaluating neonatal resuscitation simulation training in Bihar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Brennan; Spindler, Hilary; Morgan, Melissa C; Cohen, Susanna R; Christmas, Amelia; Sah, Pramod; Shah, Malay B; Das, Aritra; Walker, Dilys M

    2017-07-28

    As the global under-five mortality rate declines, an increasing percentage is attributable to early neonatal mortality. A quarter of early neonatal deaths are due to perinatal asphyxia. However, neonatal resuscitation (NR) simulation training in low-resource settings, where the majority of neonatal deaths occur, has achieved variable success. In Bihar, India, the poorest region in South Asia, there is tremendous need for a new approach to reducing neonatal morality. This analysis aims to assess the impact of a novel in-situ simulation training program, developed by PRONTO International and implemented in collaboration with CARE India, on NR skills of nurses in Bihar. Skills were evaluated by clinical complexity of the simulated scenario, which ranged from level 1, requiring NR without a maternal complication, to level 3, requiring simultaneous management of neonatal and maternal complications. A total of 658 nurses at 80 facilities received training 1 week per month for 8 months. Simulations were video-recorded and coded for pre-defined clinical skills using Studiocode™. A total of 298 NR simulations were analyzed. As simulation complexity increased, the percentage of simulations in which nurses completed key steps of NR did not change, even with only 1-2 providers in the simulation. This suggests that with PRONTO training, nurses were able to maintain key skills despite higher clinical demands. As simulation complexity increased from level 1 to 3, time to completion of key NR steps decreased non-significantly. Median time to infant drying decreased by 7.5 s (p = 0.12), time to placing the infant on the warmer decreased by 21.7 s (p = 0.27), and time to the initiation of positive pressure ventilation decreased by 20.8 s (p = 0.12). Nevertheless, there remains a need for improvement in absolute time elapsed between delivery and completion of key NR tasks. PRONTO simulation training enabled nurses in Bihar to maintain core NR skills in simulation despite

  4. End-tidal CO2 Detection of an Audible Heart Rate During Neonatal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Following Asystole in Asphyxiated Piglets

    OpenAIRE

    Chalak, Lina F.; Barber, Chad A.; Hynan, Linda; Garcia, Damian; Christie, Lucy; Wyckoff, Myra H.

    2011-01-01

    Even brief interruption of cardiac compressions significantly reduces critical coronary perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) monitoring may provide a continuous non-invasive method of assessing return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) without stopping to auscultate for heart rate (HR). However, the ETCO2 value that correlates with an audible HR is unknown. Our objective was to determine the threshold ETCO2 that is associated with ROSC following ...

  5. Optimal Chest Compression Rate and Compression to Ventilation Ratio in Delivery Room Resuscitation: Evidence from Newborn Piglets and Neonatal Manikins

    OpenAIRE

    Solev?g, Anne Lee; Schm?lzer, Georg M.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) influences survival and neurologic outcomes after delivery room (DR) CPR. High quality chest compressions (CC) improve cerebral and myocardial perfusion. Improved myocardial perfusion increases the likelihood of a faster ROSC. Thus, optimizing CC quality may improve outcomes both by preserving cerebral blood flow during CPR and by reducing the recovery time. CC quality is determined by rate, CC to vent...

  6. Resuscitation of newborn in high risk deliveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, U.F.; Hayat, S.

    2015-01-01

    High risk deliveries are usually associated with increased neonatal mortality and morbidity. Neonatal resuscitation can appreciably affect the outcome in these types of deliveries. Presence of personnel trained in basic neonatal resuscitation at the time of delivery can play an important role in reducing perinatal complications in neonates at risk. The study was carried out to evaluate the effects of newborn resuscitation on neonatal outcome in high risk deliveries. Methods: This descriptive case series was carried out at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jinnah Hospital, Lahore. Ninety consecutive high risk deliveries were included and attended by paediatricians trained in newborn resuscitation. Babies delivered by elective Caesarean section, normal spontaneous vaginal deliveries and still births were excluded. Neonatal resuscitation was performed in babies who failed to initiate breathing in the first minute after birth. Data was analyzed using SPSS-16.0. Results: A total of 90 high risk deliveries were included in the study. Emergency caesarean section was the mode of delivery in 94.4% (n=85) cases and spontaneous vaginal delivery in 5.6% (n=5). Preterm pregnancy was the major high risk factor. Newborn resuscitation was required in 37.8% (n=34) of all high risk deliveries (p=0.013). All the new-borns who required resuscitation survived. Conclusion: New-born resuscitation is required in high risk pregnancies and personnel trained in newborn resuscitation should be available at the time of delivery. (author)

  7. The History and State of Neonatal Nursing Quality Improvement Practice and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Aniko; Dowling, Donna A; Dolansky, Mary A

    2018-03-01

    Quality improvement has evolved rapidly in neonatal nursing. This review outlines the history and current state of quality improvement practice and education in neonatal nursing. The future of neonatal nursing includes a stronger emphasis on quality improvement in advanced practice education that promotes doctoral projects that result in clinical improvements. A collective focus will ensure that neonatal nurses not only deliver evidence-based care, but also continually improve the care they deliver.

  8. The role of simulation in teaching pediatric resuscitation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Y

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Yiqun Lin,1 Adam Cheng2 1KidSIM-ASPIRE Simulation Research Program, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2KidSIM-ASPIRE Research Program, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: The use of simulation for teaching the knowledge, skills, and behaviors necessary for effective pediatric resuscitation has seen widespread growth and adoption across pediatric institutions. In this paper, we describe the application of simulation in pediatric resuscitation training and review the evidence for the use of simulation in neonatal resuscitation, pediatric advanced life support, procedural skills training, and crisis resource management training. We also highlight studies supporting several key instructional design elements that enhance learning, including the use of high-fidelity simulation, distributed practice, deliberate practice, feedback, and debriefing. Simulation-based training is an effective modality for teaching pediatric resuscitation concepts. Current literature has revealed some research gaps in simulation-based education, which could indicate the direction for the future of pediatric resuscitation research. Keywords: simulation, pediatric resuscitation, medical education, instructional design, crisis resource management, health care

  9. An evaluation of peak inspiratory pressure, tidal volume, and ventilatory frequency during ventilation with a neonatal self-inflating bag resuscitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Mariana Almada; Filho, Francisco Mezzacappa; de Carvalho Coppo, Maria Regina; Martins Marba, Sérgio Tadeu

    2012-04-01

    Although the self-inflating bag is widely used in the hospital setting, variability of delivered ventilatory parameters is usually high, which might result in both hypoventilation and lung injury. The aims of this study were to assess possible sources of the high variability and to evaluate the adequacy of obtained values in relation to the recommended values for neonatal resuscitation. This was an experimental study in which 172 health professionals (physicians, resident physicians, physiotherapists, nurses, and nursing technicians) who work with neonatal intensive care manually ventilated a test lung (adjusted to simulate the lungs of an intubated term newborn) with a self-inflating bag in 5 different handling techniques, using 10, 5, 4, 3, and 2 fingers. Delivered values of peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), tidal volume (V(T)), and ventilatory frequency (f) were compared, taking into account the different handling modalities and professions by analysis of variance for repeated measures. Chi-square, the Friedman test and the Fisher exact tests were performed to compare the delivered and standard values. PIP and V(T) were significantly affected by the handling technique, with higher values for a greater number of fingers used for ventilation. Profession also influenced V(T) and f significantly: physiotherapists tended to deliver higher volumes and lower rates. Nevertheless, we observed high variability of all studied ventilatory parameters and overall inadequacy of obtained values. Most volunteers delivered excessive pressures and volumes at insufficient ventilatory frequency. Delivered values seem to depend on operators' individual and professional differences, as well as on the number of fingers used to compress the bag. However, from the clinical point of view, it is important to point out the high occurrence of inadequate delivered values, regardless of handling technique and profession.

  10. Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation Guidelines 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Gene Yong Kwang; Chan, Irene Lai Yeen; Ng, Agnes Suah Bwee; Chew, Su Yah; Mok, Yee Hui; Chan, Yoke Hwee; Ong, Jacqueline Soo May; Ganapathy, Sashikumar; Ng, Kee Chong

    2017-07-01

    We present the revised 2016 Singapore paediatric resuscitation guidelines. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation's Pediatric Taskforce Consensus Statements on Science and Treatment Recommendations, as well as the updated resuscitation guidelines from the American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council released in October 2015, were debated and discussed by the workgroup. The final recommendations for the Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation Guidelines 2016 were derived after carefully reviewing the current available evidence in the literature and balancing it with local clinical practice. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  11. Termination of resuscitation in the prehospital setting: A comparison of decisions in clinical practice vs. recommendations of a termination rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaert, Dominique V M; Bonnes, Judith L; Nas, Joris; Keuper, Wessel; van Grunsven, Pierre M; Smeets, Joep L R M; de Boer, Menko Jan; Brouwer, Marc A

    2016-03-01

    Of the proposed algorithms that provide guidance for in-field termination of resuscitation (TOR) decisions, the guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) refer to the basic and advanced life support (ALS)-TOR rules. To assess the potential consequences of implementation of the ALS-TOR rule, we performed a case-by-case evaluation of our in-field termination decisions and assessed the corresponding recommendations of the ALS-TOR rule. Cohort of non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA)-patients who were resuscitated by the ALS-practising emergency medical service (EMS) in the Nijmegen area (2008-2011). The ALS-TOR rule recommends termination in case all following criteria are met: unwitnessed arrest, no bystander CPR, no shock delivery, no return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Of the 598 cases reviewed, resuscitative efforts were terminated in the field in 46% and 15% survived to discharge. The ALS-TOR rule would have recommended in-field termination in only 6% of patients, due to high percentages of witnessed arrests (73%) and bystander CPR (54%). In current practice, absence of ROSC was the most important determinant of termination [aOR 35.6 (95% CI 18.3-69.3)]. Weaker associations were found for: unwitnessed and non-public arrests, non-shockable initial rhythms and longer EMS-response times. While designed to optimise hospital transportations, application of the ALS-TOR rule would almost double our hospital transportation rate to over 90% of OHCA-cases due to the favourable arrest circumstances in our region. Prior to implementation of the ALS-TOR rule, local evaluation of the potential consequences for the efficiency of triage is to be recommended and initiatives to improve field-triage for ALS-based EMS-systems are eagerly awaited. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluid resuscitation practices in cardiac surgery patients in the USA: a survey of health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Aronson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluid resuscitation during cardiac surgery is common with significant variability in clinical practice. Our goal was to investigate current practice patterns of fluid volume expansion in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries in the USA. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 124 cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiovascular anesthesiologists, and perfusionists. Survey questions were designed to assess clinical decision-making patterns of intravenous (IV fluid utilization in cardiovascular surgery for five types of patients who need volume expansion: (1 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB without bleeding, (2 patients undergoing CPB with bleeding, (3 patients undergoing acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH, (4 patients requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO or use of a ventricular assist device (VAD, and (5 patients undergoing either off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCABG surgery or transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. First-choice fluid used in fluid boluses for these five patient types was requested. Descriptive statistics were performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and follow-up tests, including t tests, to evaluate differences among respondent groups. Results The most commonly preferred indicators of volume status were blood pressure, urine output, cardiac output, central venous pressure, and heart rate. The first choice of fluid for patients needing volume expansion during CPB without bleeding was crystalloids, whereas 5% albumin was the most preferred first choice of fluid for bleeding patients. For volume expansion during ECMO or VAD, the respondents were equally likely to prefer 5% albumin or crystalloids as a first choice of IV fluid, with 5% albumin being the most frequently used adjunct fluid to crystalloids. Surgeons, as a group, more often chose starches as an adjunct fluid to crystalloids for patients needing volume expansion during CPB without bleeding. Surgeons

  13. Neonatal outcomes following extensive cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the delivery room for infants born at less than 33 weeks gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soraisham, Amuchou Singh; Lodha, Abhay Kumar; Singhal, Nalini; Aziz, Khalid; Yang, Junmin; Lee, Shoo K; Shah, Prakesh S

    2014-02-01

    To examine the neonatal mortality and morbidity of infants born at CPR) immediately after birth. In this retrospective cohort study, we performed secondary analyses of data from infants born at Neonatal Network between January 2010 and December 2011. Infants were divided into two groups based on birth weight (neonatal morbidity and mortality compared using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Of the 8033 eligible infants, 419 (5.2%) received DR-CPR. For infants weighing CPR, whereas 3.4% (outborn: 9.6%, inborn: 2.2%) of those weighing ≥1000 g received DR-CPR. If infants received DR-CPR there was increased risk of mortality, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and severe brain injury. Logistic regression analysis showed DR-CPR was associated with increased mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.09, 95% CI [1.39, 3.14]) in infants born weighing CPR was associated with increased mortality (aOR: 7.16, 95% CI [3.88, 13.2]), severe brain injury (aOR: 3.08, 95% CI [1.82, 5.22]), BPD (aOR: 2.14, 95% CI [1.25, 3.65]), pneumothorax (aOR: 3.11, 95% CI [1.53, 6.31]) and intestinal perforation (aOR: 3.47, 95% CI [1.46, 8.24]). DR-CPR is associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity especially in preterm infants born weighing ≥1000 g. Long-term neurodevelopmental follow up is warranted for these infants.

  14. Delivery practices, hygiene, birth attendance and neonatal infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drawing attention to home birth conditions and subsequent neonatal infections is a key starting point to reducing neonatal morbidity which are a main cause of mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Objectives: To determine the proportion of respiratory, ophthalmic, and diarrhoeal infections in neonates; the proportion ...

  15. Neonatal transport practices in Ibadan, Nigeria | Abdulraheem | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Neonatal transport involves moving sick neonates in optimal conditions to ensure good outcomes. It is well organized in most developed countries but receives little attention in developing countries where the highest burden of neonatal mortality exists and a large number of newborns require referrals daily for ...

  16. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-related posterior rib fractures in neonates and infants following recommended changes in CPR techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, I; Pingen, A; Schiffmann, H; Vogel, M; Vlajnic, D; Ganschow, R; Born, M

    2014-07-01

    Posterior rib fractures are highly indicative of non-accidental trauma (NAT) in infants. Since 2000, the "two-thumbs" technique for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of newborns and infants has been recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). This technique is similar to the grip on an infant's thorax while shaking. Is it possible that posterior rib fractures in newborns and infants could be caused by the "two-thumbs" technique? Using computerized databases from three German children's hospitals, we identified all infants less than 12 months old who underwent professional CPR within a 10-year period. We included all infants with anterior-posterior chest radiographs taken after CPR. Exclusion criteria were sternotomy, osteopenia, various other bone diseases and NAT. The radiographs were independently reviewed by the Chief of Pediatric Radiology (MB) and a Senior Pediatrician, Head of the local Child Protection Team (IF). Eighty infants with 546 chest radiographs were identified, and 50 of those infants underwent CPR immediately after birth. Data concerning the length of CPR was available for 41 infants. The mean length of CPR was 11min (range: 1-180min, median: 3min). On average, there were seven radiographs per infant. A total of 39 infants had a follow-up radiograph after at least 10 days. No rib fracture was visible on any chest X-ray. The results of this study suggest rib fracture after the use of the "two-thumbs" CPR technique is uncommon. Thus, there should be careful consideration of abuse when these fractures are identified, regardless of whether CPR was performed and what technique used. The discovery of rib fractures in an infant who has undergone CPR without underlying bone disease or major trauma warrants a full child protection investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions in the emergency department: An ethnography of tacit knowledge in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, Stephen P; Seymour, Jane; Higginbottom, Gina

    2016-05-01

    Despite media images to the contrary, cardiopulmonary resuscitation in emergency departments is often unsuccessful. The purpose of this ethnographic study was to explore how health care professionals working in two emergency departments in the UK, make decisions to commence, continue or stop resuscitation. Data collection involved participant observation of resuscitation attempts and in-depth interviews with nurses, medical staff and paramedics who had taken part in the attempts. Detailed case examples were constructed for comparative analysis. Findings show that emergency department staff use experience and acquired tacit knowledge to construct a typology of cardiac arrest categories that help them navigate decision making. Categorisation is based on 'less is more' heuristics which combine explicit and tacit knowledge to facilitate rapid decisions. Staff then work as a team to rapidly assimilate and interpret information drawn from observations of the patient's body and from technical, biomedical monitoring data. The meaning of technical data is negotiated during staff interaction. This analysis was informed by a theory of 'bodily' and 'technical' trajectory alignment that was first developed from an ethnography of death and dying in intensive care units. The categorisation of cardiac arrest situations and trajectory alignment are the means by which staff achieve consensus decisions and determine the point at which an attempt should be withdrawn. This enables them to construct an acceptable death in highly challenging circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Basic model of quality and good practices in neonatal radiography; Modelo basico de qualidade e boas praticas em radiografia neonatal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Janine H.; Goulart, Juliana M.; Lykawka, Rochelle; Bacelar, Alexandre [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal chest radiographs were evaluated and 3 variables were analyzed: collimation, positioning and presence of artifacts. This study is a pilot for develop a model of good practices in radiology, which is in development phase. The index of analyzed radiographs considered inadequate is expressive and it shows the need for a model that may be part of an optimization program to medical exposures. (author)

  19. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017); Venice (Italy); October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"

    OpenAIRE

    --- Various Authors

    2017-01-01

    Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017); Venice (Italy); October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR), European Society for Neonatology (ESN), Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS), European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNI)ORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann...

  20. Opinions of Brazilian resuscitation instructors regarding resuscitation in the delivery room of extremely preterm newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Ribeiro Ambrósio

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Difficulty can be observed regarding the decision to not resuscitate a preterm infant with 23 weeks of gestational age. At the same time, a small percentage of pediatricians would not resuscitate neonates of unquestionable viability at 26 weeks of gestational age in the delivery room.

  1. A prospective study on medication and total parenteral nutrition practices at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Arumugam

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: TPN and medication practices at the NICU should be highly monitored for avoiding medication errors, drug interactions, and mortality rate in neonates. The most effective method can be achieved when a clinical pharmacist become a part of it.

  2. Documentation of resuscitation decision-making: a survey of practice in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Meredith; Fuld, Jonathan; Fritz, Zoë

    2014-05-01

    Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) orders have been in use since the 1990s. The Resuscitation Council UK (RCUK) provides guidance on the content and use of such forms in the UK but there is no national policy. To determine the content of DNACPR forms in the UK, and the geographical distribution of the use of different forms. All acute trusts within the United Kingdom were contacted via a combination of email and telephone, with a request for the current DNACPR form along with information about its development and use. Characteristics of the model RCUK DNACPR form were compared with the non-RCUK DNACPR forms which we received. Free text responses were searched for commonly occurring phrases. 118/161 English NHS Acute Trusts (accounting for 377 hospitals), 3/6 Northern Irish NHS Acute Trusts (accounting for 25 hospitals) and 3/7 Welsh Health Boards (accounting for 73 hospitals) responded. All Scottish hospitals have the same form. All responding trusts had active policies and have a DNACPR form in use. 38.9% of respondent hospitals have adopted the RCUK form with minor amendments. The remainder of the responding hospitals reported independent forms. 66.8% of non-RCUK forms include a transfer plan to ambulance staff and 48.4% of non-RCUK forms are valid in the community. Several independent trusts submitted DNACPR forms with escalation plans. There is wide variation in the forms used for indicating DNACPR decisions. Documentation is rapidly evolving to meet the needs of patients and to respond to new evidence. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Resuscitation training.

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, A.

    1995-01-01

    All physicians, dentists, nurses and health care personnel should be adequately and regularly trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Guidelines for acquiring the necessary skills in basic and advanced life support are now available.

  4. [Advanced resuscitation of adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, F.K.; Lauritsen, T.L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.

    2008-01-01

    International and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for Resuscitation 2005 implicate major changes in resuscitation, including new universal treatment algorithms. This brief summary of Guidelines 2005 for advanced resuscitation of adult cardiac arrest victims is based upon the ERC...

  5. Termination of resuscitation in the prehospital setting: A comparison of decisions in clinical practice vs. recommendations of a termination rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaert, D.V.; Bonnes, J.L.; Nas, J.; Keuper, W.; Grunsven, P.M. van; Smeets, J.L.; Boer, M.J. de; Brouwer, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Of the proposed algorithms that provide guidance for in-field termination of resuscitation (TOR) decisions, the guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) refer to the basic and advanced life support (ALS)-TOR rules. To assess the potential consequences of implementation of the

  6. Neonatal endocrine emergencies: a primer for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elizabeth; Pearson, Nadia M; Pillow, M Tyson; Toledo, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The resuscitation principles of securing the airway and stabilizing hemodynamics remain the same in any neonatal emergency. However, stabilizing endocrine disorders may prove especially challenging. Several organ systems are affected simultaneously and the clinical presentation can be subtle. Although not all-inclusive, the implementation of newborn screening tests has significantly reduced morbidity and mortality in neonates. Implementing routine screening tests worldwide and improving the accuracy of present tests remains the challenge for healthcare providers. With further study of these disorders and best treatment practices we can provide neonates presenting to the emergency department with the best possible outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta: promise, practice, and progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Zane B; Lendrum, Robbie A; Brohi, Karim

    2016-12-01

    Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) is a minimally invasive damage control procedure for life-threatening abdominal or pelvic haemorrhage. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current understanding and experience with REBOA, outline potential future applications of this technology, and highlight priority areas for further research. REBOA is a feasible method of achieving temporary aortic occlusion and can be performed rapidly, with a high degree of success, in the emergency setting (including at the scene of injury) by appropriately trained clinicians. The procedure supports central perfusion, controls noncompressible haemorrhage, and may improve survival in certain profoundly shocked patient groups; but is also associated with significant risks, including ischaemic tissue damage and procedural complications. Evolutions of this strategy are being explored, with promising proof-of-concept studies in the fields of partial aortic occlusion and the combination of REBOA with extracorporeal support. Noncompressible torso haemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable trauma deaths. The majority of these deaths occur soon after injury, often before any opportunity for definitive haemorrhage control. For a meaningful reduction in trauma mortality, novel methods of rapid haemorrhage control are required.

  8. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Araujo G. Ferreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%, in Medicine and Nursing (46%, and were surveys (72% with healthcare team members (67% as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c to develop a written institutional policy; d to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes.

  9. Sedation and analgesia practices in neonatal intensive care units (EUROPAIN): results from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Eriksson, Mats; Courtois, Emilie; Boyle, Elaine; Avila-Alvarez, Alejandro; Andersen, Randi Dovland; Sarafidis, Kosmas; Polkki, Tarja; Matos, Cristina; Lago, Paola; Papadouri, Thalia; Montalto, Simon Attard; Ilmoja, Mari-Liis; Simons, Sinno; Tameliene, Rasa; van Overmeire, Bart; Berger, Angelika; Dobrzanska, Anna; Schroth, Michael; Bergqvist, Lena; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S

    2015-10-01

    916 (30%) of 3017 neonates in the TV, NIV, and SV groups, respectively (pneonates given O-SH-GA in the TV group needed a longer duration of TV than did those who were not given O-SH-GA (mean 136.2 h [SD 173.1] vs 39.8 h [94.7] h; panalgesia practices occur between NICUs and countries. Widespread use of O-SH-GA in intubated neonates might prolong their need for mechanical ventilation, but further research is needed to investigate the therapeutic and adverse effects of O-SH-GA in neonates, and to develop new and safe approaches for sedation and analgesia. European Community's Seventh Framework Programme. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurology of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; Geocadin, R G

    2017-01-01

    This chapter aims to provide an up-to-date review of the science and clinical practice pertaining to neurologic injury after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The past two decades have seen a major shift in the science and practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, with a major emphasis on postresuscitation neurologic care. This chapter provides a nuanced and thoughtful historic and bench-to-bedside overview of the neurologic aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A particular emphasis is made on the anatomy and pathophysiology of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, up-to-date management of survivors of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and a careful discussion on neurologic outcome prediction. Guidance to practice evidence-based clinical care when able and thoughtful, pragmatic suggestions for care where evidence is lacking are also provided. This chapter serves as both a useful clinical guide and an updated, thorough, and state-of-the-art reference on the topic for advanced students and experienced practitioners in the field. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [The latest in paediatric resuscitation recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez, Antonio; Carrillo, Angel; de Lucas, Nieves; Calvo, Custodio; Civantos, Eva; Suárez, Eva; Pons, Sara; Manrique, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac arrest has a high mortality in children. To improve the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it is essential to disseminate the international recommendations and the training of health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article summarises the 2015 European Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, which are based on a review of the advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and consensus in the science and treatment by the International Council on Resuscitation. The Spanish Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, developed by the Spanish Group of Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation, are an adaptation of the European recommendations, and will be used for training health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article highlights the main changes from the previous 2010 recommendations on prevention of cardiac arrest, the diagnosis of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and post-resuscitation care, as well as reviewing the algorithms of treatment of basic life support, obstruction of the airway and advanced life support. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  12. A Pediatrician’s Practical Guide to Diagnosing and Treating Hereditary Spherocytosis in Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaish, Hassan M.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Newborn infants who have hereditary spherocytosis (HS) can develop anemia and hyperbilirubinemia. Bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction is less likely in these neonates if the diagnosis of HS is recognized and appropriate treatment provided. Among neonates listed in the USA Kernicterus Registry, HS was the third most common underlying hemolytic condition after glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and ABO hemolytic disease. HS is the leading cause of direct antiglobulin test (direct Coombs) negative hemolytic anemia requiring erythrocyte transfusion in the first months of life. We anticipate that as physicians become more familiar with diagnosing HS in the newborn period, fewer neonates with HS will develop hazardous hyperbilirubinemia or present to emergency departments with unanticipated symptomatic anemia. We predict that early suspicion, prompt diagnosis and treatment, and anticipatory guidance will prevent adverse outcomes in neonates with HS. The purpose of this article was to review the neonatal presentation of HS and to provide practical and up-to-date means of diagnosing and treating HS in neonates. PMID:26009624

  13. Family presence during trauma activations and medical resuscitations in a pediatric emergency department: an evidence-based practice project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsnorth, Jennifer; O'Connell, Karen; Guzzetta, Cathie E; Edens, Jacki Curreri; Atabaki, Shireen; Mecherikunnel, Anne; Brown, Kathleen

    2010-03-01

    The existing family presence literature indicates that implementation of a family presence policy can result in positive outcomes. The purpose of our evidence-based practice project was to evaluate a family presence intervention using the 6 A's of the evidence cycle (ask, acquire, appraise, apply, analyze, and adopt/adapt). For step 1 (ask), we propose the following question: Is it feasible to implement a family presence intervention during trauma team activations and medical resuscitations in a pediatric emergency department using national guidelines to ensure appropriate family member behavior and uninterrupted patient care? Regarding steps 2 through 4 (acquire, appraise, and apply), our demonstration project was conducted in a pediatric emergency department during the implementation of a new family presence policy. Our family presence intervention incorporated current appraisal of literature and national guidelines including family screening, family preparation, and use of family presence facilitators. We evaluated whether it was feasible to implement the steps of our intervention and whether the intervention was safe in ensuring uninterrupted patient care. With regard to step 5 (analyze), family presence was evaluated in 106 events, in which 96 families were deemed appropriate and chose to be present. Nearly all families (96%) were screened before entering the room, and all were deemed appropriate candidates. Facilitators guided the family during all events. One family presence event was terminated. In all cases patient care was not interrupted. Regarding step 6 (adopt/adapt), our findings document the feasibility of implementing a family presence intervention in a pediatric emergency department while ensuring uninterrupted patient care. We have adopted family presence as a standard practice. This project can serve as the prototype for others. Copyright (c) 2010 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [How to assess clinical practice guidelines with AGREE II: The example of neonatal jaundice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renesme, L; Bedu, A; Tourneux, P; Truffert, P

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a very frequent condition that occurs in approximately 50-70% of term or near-term (>35 GA) babies in the 1st week of life. In some cases, a high bilirubin blood level can lead to kernicterus. There is no consensus for the management of neonatal jaundice and few countries have published national clinical practice guidelines for the management of neonatal jaundice. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of these guidelines. We conducted a systematic review of the literature for national clinical practice guidelines for the management of neonatal jaundice in term or near-term babies. Four independent reviewers assessed the quality of each guideline using the AGREE II evaluation. For each of the clinical practice guidelines, the management modalities were analyzed (screening, treatment, follow-up, etc.). Seven national clinical practice guidelines were found (South Africa, USA AAP, UK NICE, Canada, Norway, Switzerland, and Israel). The AGREE II score showed widespread variation regarding the quality of these national guidelines. There was no major difference between the guidelines concerning the clinical management of these babies. The NICE guideline is the most valuable guideline regarding the AGREE II score. NICE showed that, despite a strong and rigorous methodology, there is no evidenced-based recommended code of practice (RCP). Comparing RCPs, we found no major differences. The NICE guideline showed the best quality. The AGREE II instrument should be used as a framework when developing clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of the future guideline. In France, a national guideline is needed for a more standardized management of neonatal jaundice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Neonatal outcomes of deliveries in occiput posterior position when delayed pushing is practiced: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, Kristina; Jonsson, Maria

    2017-11-14

    To examine the impact of occiput posterior position, compared to occiput anterior position, on neonatal outcomes in a setting where delayed pushing is practiced. The specific aim was to estimate the risk of acidaemia. Cohort study from a university hospital in Sweden between 2004 and 2012. Information was collected from a local database of 35,546 births. Umbilical artery sampling was routine. Outcomes were: umbilical artery pH pushing, birth in occiput posterior compared with anterior position is not associated with acidaemia. The higher risk of neonatal morbidity is of concern and any long-term consequences need to be investigated in future studies.

  16. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: clinical practices in five Portuguese neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, H; Rocha, G; Vasconcellos, G; Proença, E; Carreira, M L; Sossai, M R; Morais, B; Martins, I; Rodrigues, T; Severo, M

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of surfactant, prenatal corticosteroids (PNC) and advances in technology, the survival rate of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants has improved dramatically. Rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) vary widely among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and many studies using multiple interventions have shown some improvement in BPD rates. Implementing potentially better practices to reduce BPD has been an effort made over the last few decades. To compare five Portuguese NICUs in terms of clinical practices in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, in order to develop better practices to prevent BPD. 256 preterm neonates, gestational age (GA) NICU, must be addressed to increase the prescription of PNC, to use a lower FiO2, to be careful with fluid administration in the first weeks of life and to prevent PDA and sepsis. It is necessary to follow guidelines, recommendations or protocols to improve quality in the prevention of BPD.

  17. Trauma hemostasis and oxygenation research position paper on remote damage control resuscitation: definitions, current practice, and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Donald H; Rappold, Joseph F; Badloe, John F; Berséus, Olle; Blackbourne, Lorne; Brohi, Karim H; Butler, Frank K; Cap, Andrew P; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Davenport, Ross; DePasquale, Marc; Doughty, Heidi; Glassberg, Elon; Hervig, Tor; Hooper, Timothy J; Kozar, Rosemary; Maegele, Marc; Moore, Ernest E; Murdock, Alan; Ness, Paul M; Pati, Shibani; Rasmussen, Todd; Sailliol, Anne; Schreiber, Martin A; Sunde, Geir Arne; van de Watering, Leo M G; Ward, Kevin R; Weiskopf, Richard B; White, Nathan J; Strandenes, Geir; Spinella, Philip C

    2014-05-01

    The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network held its third annual Remote Damage Control Resuscitation Symposium in June 2013 in Bergen, Norway. The Trauma Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network is a multidisciplinary group of investigators with a common interest in improving outcomes and safety in patients with severe traumatic injury. The network's mission is to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality from traumatic hemorrhagic shock, in the prehospital phase of resuscitation through research, education, and training. The concept of remote damage control resuscitation is in its infancy, and there is a significant amount of work that needs to be done to improve outcomes for patients with life-threatening bleeding secondary to injury. The prehospital phase of resuscitation is critical in these patients. If shock and coagulopathy can be rapidly identified and minimized before hospital admission, this will very likely reduce morbidity and mortality. This position statement begins to standardize the terms used, provides an acceptable range of therapeutic options, and identifies the major knowledge gaps in the field.

  18. A comparison of Wisconsin neonatal intensive care units with national data on outcomes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Erika W; Sadek-Badawi, Mona; Albanese, Aggie; Palta, Mari

    2008-11-01

    Improvements in neonatal care over the past 3 decades have increased survival of infants at lower birthweights and gestational ages. However, outcomes and practices vary considerably between hospitals. To describe maternal and infant characteristics, neonatal intensive care units (NICU) practices, morbidity, and mortality in Wisconsin NICUs, and to compare outcomes in Wisconsin to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development network of large academic medical center NICUs. The Newborn Lung Project Statewide Cohort is a prospective observational study of all very low birthweight (< or =1500 grams) infants admitted during 2003 and 2004 to the 16 level III NICUs in Wisconsin. Anonymous data were collected for all admitted infants (N=1463). Major neonatal morbidities, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) were evaluated. The overall incidence of BPD was 24% (8%-56% between NICUs); IVH incidence was 23% (9%-41%); the incidence of NEC was 7% (0%-21%); and the incidence of grade III or higher ROP was 10% (0%-35%). The incidence rates of major neonatal morbidities in Wisconsin were similar to those of a national network of academic NICUs.

  19. [Basic and advanced resuscitation of children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, T.L.; Jensen, Tim; Greisen, G.

    2008-01-01

    The ERC Guidelines 2005 regarding the resuscitation of children and neonates recommend changes in treatment algorithms. Cardiac arrest in children is most often caused or worsened by hypoxic conditions. On confirmation of cardiac arrest in a child, treatment is initiated with 5 ventilations and c...

  20. [Basic and advanced resuscitation of children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, T.L.; Jensen, Tim; Greisen, G.

    2008-01-01

    The ERC Guidelines 2005 regarding the resuscitation of children and neonates recommend changes in treatment algorithms. Cardiac arrest in children is most often caused or worsened by hypoxic conditions. On confirmation of cardiac arrest in a child, treatment is initiated with 5 ventilations and c...... of basic life support, i.e. before a new attempt of defibrillation Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11/17...

  1. [Neonatal arterial ischemic stroke: Which thrombotic biological risk factors to investigate and which practical consequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, T; Valentin, J B; Saliba, E; Gruel, Y

    2017-09-01

    All biological risk factors that have been previously identified to increase the risk of thrombosis in adults, have also been studied in neonates with arterial Ischemic Stroke (NAIS), but most studies were retrospective and included relatively low numbers of affected children. We therefore could not suggest recommendations with a strong level of evidence and only expert proposals potentially useful for clinical practice will be presented in this text. Despite these limitations, the extensive analysis of published data supported that factor V Leiden (FVL) and increased levels of Lp(a) could be significant risk factors for NAIS. Importantly, these 2 risk factors cannot be considered as having provoked NAIS, and moreover, they do not influence the prognosis and the immediate treatment. However, since the FVL may have an impact for the prescription of a thromboprophylaxis when the neonate will become adult, to look for its presence in affected patients may be justified. For clinical practice, the following propositions can be applied: 1. Routine testing for thrombophilia (AT, PC PS deficiency, FV Leiden or FII20210A) or for detecting other biological risk factors such as antiphospholipid antibodies, high FVIII, homocystein or Lp(a) levels, MTHFR thermolabile variant, should not be considered in neonates with NAIS. 2. Testing for FV Leiden can be performed in case of documented family history of venous thromboembolic disease. 3. Testing neonates for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) is mandatory in case of clinical events suggesting antiphospholipid syndrome in the mother (vascular thrombosis, and/or pregnancy morbidity). 4. Routine testing for thrombophilia is not proposed in both parents in case of early death of the neonate, apart from APA in the mother. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  2. Advances and controversies in neonatal ICU platelet transfusion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    Some of the platelet transfusions currently given to NICU patients are unnecessary and convey no benefits. Although ordered with good intentions, unnecessary platelet transfusions carry known and unknown risks. Identifying and eliminating any unnecessary platelet transfusions in NICUs would be a step toward better care, lower costs, and more careful preservation of blood component resources. A renewed interest in platelet transfusion studies is needed, if essential data is to be gathered to improve NICU platelet transfusion practice. Retrospective studies can be of value: for instance, seeking associations between bleeding events and platelet counts can suggest the possibility of cause and effect relationships. Such studies might identify approximate platelet count levels that convey high hemorrhagic risk and might help focus future prospective trials. Prospective indirect studies also can be of value, for instance, measuring the template bleeding time and the PFA-100 closure time as a function of platelet count and perhaps as a function of circulating platelet mass, and would provide new information with relevance to platelet transfusion benefits. Such studies might give a better awareness of how low the platelet count can fall before platelet plug formation is impaired. It seems inescapable, however, that new, multicentered, randomized, prospective studies are needed, where NICU patients are assigned different platelet transfusion triggers and then carefully tracked for bleeding events and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. Only that type of study is likely to generate the evidence base needed for widespread implementation of improvements in NICU platelet transfusion practice.

  3. Effect of two additional interventions, test and reflection, added to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation training on seventh grade students' practical skills and willingness to act: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Anette; Hult, Håkan; Kreitz-Sandberg, Susanne; Herlitz, Johan; Svensson, Leif; Nilsson, Lennart

    2017-06-23

    The aim of this research is to investigate if two additional interventions, test and reflection, after standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training facilitate learning by comparing 13-year-old students' practical skills and willingness to act. Seventh grade students in council schools of two municipalities in south-east Sweden. School classes were randomised to CPR training only (O), CPR training with a practical test including feedback (T) or CPR training with reflection and a practical test including feedback (RT). Measures of practical skills and willingness to act in a potential life-threatening situation were studied directly after training and at 6 months using a digital reporting system and a survey. A modified Cardiff test was used to register the practical skills, where scores in each of 12 items resulted in a total score of 12-48 points. The study was conducted in accordance with current European Resuscitation Council guidelines during December 2013 to October 2014. 29 classes for a total of 587 seventh grade students were included in the study. The total score of the modified Cardiff test at 6 months was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were the total score directly after training, the 12 individual items of the modified Cardiff test and willingness to act. At 6 months, the T and O groups scored 32 (3.9) and 30 (4.0) points, respectively (ptraining improved the students' acquisition of practical CPR skills. Reflection did not increase further CPR skills. At 6-month follow-up, no intervention effect was found regarding willingness to make a life-saving effort. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Baby doe redux? The Department of Health and Human Services and the Born-Alive Infants Protection Act of 2002: a cautionary note on normative neonatal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeed, Sadath A

    2005-10-01

    The Born-Alive Infants Protection Act (BAIPA), passed by Congress in 2002, has attracted little publicity. Its purposes were, in part, "to repudiate the flawed notion that a child's entitlement to the protections of the law is dependent on whether that child's mother or others want him or her." Understood as antiabortion rhetoric, the bill raised little concern among physicians at the time of legislative hearings and passed in both Houses by overwhelming majorities, hardly suggesting contentious legislation. After its signing into law, the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) Steering Committee issued an opinion stating that "[BAIPA] should not in any way affect the approach that physicians currently follow with respect to the extremely premature infant." This interpretation of the law, however, may have been short sighted. In April 2005, the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) brought life to the BAIPA, announcing: "As a matter of law and policy, [DHHS] will investigate all circumstances where individuals and entities are reported to be withholding medical care from an infant born alive in potential violation of federal statutes." The agency issued instructions to state officials on how the definitional provision within the BAIPA interacts with the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) and the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA). These interagency memoranda potentially resurrect dormant governmental oversight of newborn-treatment decisions and thus may have influence over normative neonatal practice. Under the BAIPA, the DHHS interprets EMTALA to protect all "born-alive" infants; hospitals and physicians violating regulatory requirements face agency-sanctioned monetary penalties or a "private right of action by any individual harmed as a direct result." According to its memorandum, the DHHS will investigate allegations of EMTALA violations whenever it finds evidence that a newborn was not provided with at least a medical

  5. T-piece resuscitator versus self-inflating bag for preterm resuscitation: an institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Archana; Sima, Adam; Barker, Gail; Thacker, Leroy R

    2013-07-01

    Manual ventilation in the delivery room is provided with devices such as self-inflating bags (SIBs), flow-inflating bags, and T-piece resuscitators. To compare the effect of type of manual ventilation device on overall response to resuscitation among preterm neonates born at Apgar score. Secondary outcomes were incidence of air leaks, need for chest compressions/epinephrine, need for intubation, and surfactant use. We identified 294 resuscitations requiring ventilation. SIB was used for 135 neonates, and T-piece was used for 159 neonates. There was no significant difference between the 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores between SIB and T-piece (P = .77 and P = .11, respectively), nor were there significant differences in secondary outcomes. The rate of rise of Apgar score was higher, by 0.47, with T-piece, compared to SIB (95% CI 0.08-0.87, P = .02). Although some manikin studies favor T-piece for providing reliable and consistent pressures, our experience did not indicate significant differences in effectiveness of resuscitation between the T-piece and SIB in preterm resuscitations.

  6. Resuscitation at the limits of viability--an Irish perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, R A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Advances in neonatal care continue to lower the limit of viability. Decision making in this grey zone remains a challenging process. OBJECTIVE: To explore the opinions of healthcare providers on resuscitation and outcome in the less than 28-week preterm newborn. DESIGN\\/METHODS: An anonymous postal questionnaire was sent to health care providers working in maternity units in the Republic of Ireland. Questions related to neonatal management of the extreme preterm infant, and estimated survival and long-term outcome. RESULTS: The response rate was 55% (74% obstetricians and 70% neonatologists). Less than 1% would advocate resuscitation at 22 weeks, 10% of health care providers advocate resuscitation at 23 weeks gestation, 80% of all health care providers would resuscitate at 24 weeks gestation. 20% of all health care providers would advocate cessation of resuscitation efforts on 22-25 weeks gestation at 5 min of age. 65% of Neonatologists and 54% trainees in Paediatrics would cease resuscitation at 10 min of age. Obstetricians were more pessimistic about survival and long term outcome in newborns delivered between 23 and 27 weeks when compared with neonatologists. This difference was also observed in trainees in paediatrics and obstetrics. CONCLUSION: Neonatologists, trainees in paediatrics and neonatal nurses are generally more optimistic about outcome than their counterparts in obstetrical care and this is reflected in a greater willingness to provide resuscitation efforts at the limits of viability.

  7. Neonatal care in rural Karnataka: healthy and harmful practices, the potential for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleland John

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Every year four million babies die in the first month of life and a quarter of these take place in India. A package of essential newborn care practices exists, which has a proven impact on reducing mortality, and can be implemented in low resource settings. However, childbirth and the neonatal period are culturally important times, during which there is strong adherence to traditional practices. Successful implementation of the package therefore requires in-depth knowledge of the local context and tailored behaviour change communication. Methods This study was carried out in rural Karnataka, India. It uses quantitative data from a prospective survey following mothers through their experience of pregnancy and the postnatal period; and qualitative data from in depth interviews and focus group discussions conducted with mothers, grandmothers and birth attendants. It explores local newborn care practices and beliefs, analyses their harmful or beneficial characteristics and elucidates areas of potential resistance to behaviour change and implementation of the essential newborn care package. Results Findings show that many potentially harmful newborn care practices are being carried out in the study area, such as unhygienic cord cutting, delayed breastfeeding and early bathing. Some are more amenable to change than others, depending on the strength of the underlying beliefs, and acceptability of alternative care. However, movement away from traditional practices is already taking place, particularly amongst the more educated and better off, and there is a clear opportunity to broaden, direct and accelerate this process. Conclusion Community education should be a focus of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM and Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI program being implemented in Karnataka. The added capacity of the new Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs could enable more women to be reached. With

  8. Management and investigation of neonatal encephalopathy: 2017 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinello, Kathryn; Hart, Anthony R; Yap, Sufin; Mitra, Subhabrata

    2017-01-01

    This review discusses an approach to determining the cause of neonatal encephalopathy, as well as current evidence on resuscitation and subsequent management of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). Encephalopathy in neonates can be due to varied aetiologies in addition to hypoxic-ischaemia. A combination of careful history, examination and the judicious use of investigations can help determine the cause. Over the last 7 years, infants with moderate to severe HIE have benefited from the introduction of routine therapeutic hypothermia; the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome is 7 (95% CI 5 to 10). More recent research has focused on optimal resuscitation practices for babies with cardiorespiratory depression, such as delayed cord clamping after establishment of ventilation and resuscitation in air. Around a quarter of infants with asystole at 10 min after birth who are subsequently cooled have normal outcomes, suggesting that individualised decision making on stopping resuscitation is needed, based on access to intensive treatment unit and early cooling. The full benefit of cooling appears to have been exploited in our current treatment protocols of 72 hours at 33.5°C; deeper and longer cooling showed adverse outcome. The challenge over the next 5–10 years will be to assess which adjunct therapies are safe and optimise hypothermic brain protection in phase I and phase II trials. Optimal care may require tailoring treatments according to gender, genetic risk, injury severity and inflammatory status. PMID:28389438

  9. [European Resuscitation Council guidelines for resuscitation 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunyadi-Anticević, Silvija; Colak, Zeljko; Funtak, Ines Lojna; Lukić, Anita; Filipović-Grcić, Boris; Tomljanović, Branka; Kniewald, Hrvoje; Protić, Alen; Pandak, Tatjana; Poljaković, Zdravka; Canadija, Marino

    2011-01-01

    of 10-30 microg/kg. Newly born infants born at term or near-term with moderate to severe hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be treated with therapeutic hypothermia. PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION IN RESUSCITATION: The aim is to ensure that learners acquire and retain skill and knowledge that will enable them to act correctly in actual cardiac arrest and improve patient outcome. Short video/computer self-instruction courses, with minimal or no instructor coaching, combined with hands-on practice can be considered as an effective alternative to instructor-led basic life support (BLS and AED) courses. Ideally all citizens should be trained in standard CPR that includes compressions and ventilations. Basic and advanced life support knowledge and skills deteriorate in as little as three to six months. CPR prompt or feedback devices improve CPR skill acquisition and retention.

  10. Tracheal tube airleak in clinical practice and impact on tidal volume measurement in ventilated neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ramadan A; Proquitté, Hans; Fawzy, Naglaa; Bührer, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2011-03-01

    To determine the prevalence, size, and factors affecting tracheal tube (TT) leak in clinical practice and their influence on the displayed tidal volume (Vt) in ventilated newborn infants using uncuffed TTs. Monitoring of Vt is important for implementation of lung-protective ventilation strategies but becomes meaningless in the presence of large TT airleaks. Retrospective clinical study. Neonatal intensive care unit. Patient records of 163 neonates ventilated with Babylog 8000 for ≥ 5 hrs with a median (range) gestation age of 31.1 wks (23.3-41.9 wks) and a median birth weight of 1470 g (410-4475 g) were evaluated. : Ventilatory settings, TT leak, and Vt were recorded every 3 hrs. The lowest, median, and highest TT leaks were noted on the day the first TT leak (>5%) occurred, the day on which TT leak peaked, and the day of extubation. A TT leak of >5% was seen in 122 (75%) infants. Neonates with TT leak, compared with those without TT leak, had a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (p 40% commonly seen on the third day of mechanical ventilation. Regression analysis showed that a TT leak of 40% indicated that the displayed Vt was underestimated by 1.2 mL/kg (about 24% of target Vt). TT leak is highly variable, and TT leak of >40% with clinically relevant Vt errors occurred in nearly half of all ventilated neonates. Preterm infants of low birth weight and with small-diameter TTs ventilated for a long period were at greater risk of TT leak.

  11. Translating Neurodevelopmental Care Policies Into Practice: The Experience of Neonatal ICUs in France-The EPIPAGE-2 Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrat, Veronique; Coquelin, Anaëlle; Cuttini, Marina; Khoshnood, Babak; Glorieux, Isabelle; Claris, Olivier; Durox, Mélanie; Kaminski, Monique; Ancel, Pierre-Yves; Arnaud, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    To describe the implementation of neurodevelopmental care for newborn preterm infants in neonatal ICUs in France in 2011, analyze changes since 2004, and investigate factors associated with practice. Prospective national cohort study of all births before 32 weeks of gestation. Twenty-five French regions. All neonatal ICUs (n = 66); neonates surviving at discharge (n = 3,005). None. Neurodevelopmental care policies and practices were assessed by structured questionnaires. Proportions of neonates initiating kangaroo care during the first week of life and those whose mothers expressed breast milk were measured as neurodevelopmental care practices. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to investigate relationships between kangaroo care or breast-feeding practices and unit policies, taking into account potential confounders. Free visiting policies, bed availability for parents, and kangaroo care encouragement significantly improved between 2004 and 2011 but with large variabilities between units. Kangaroo care initiation varied from 39% for neonates in the most restrictive units to 68% in less restrictive ones (p neurodevelopmental care significantly influenced kangaroo care initiation (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.8-7.0 for Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program implementation compared with no training). Breast milk expression by mothers was greater in units with full-time availability professionals trained for breast-feeding support (60% vs 73%; p neurodevelopmental practices occurred between 2004 and 2011, but large variabilities between units persist. Practices increased in units with supportive policies. Specific neurodevelopmental care training with multifaceted interventions strengthened the implementation of policies.

  12. A reliable, practical, and economical protocol for inducing diarrhea and severe dehydration in the neonatal calf.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, P G; Constable, P D; Morin, D E; Drackley, J K; Foreman, J H; Thurmon, J C

    1998-01-01

    Fifteen healthy, colostrum-fed, male dairy calves, aged 2 to 7 d were used in a study to develop a diarrhea protocol for neonatal calves that is reliable, practical, and economical. After instrumentation and recording baseline data, diarrhea and dehydration were induced by administering milk replacer [16.5 mL/kg of body weight (BW), PO], sucrose (2 g/kg in a 20% aqueous solution, p.o.), spironolactone and hydrochlorothiazide (1 mg/kg, PO) every 8 h, and furosemide (2 mg/kg, i.m., q6h). Calves...

  13. Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock: 2007 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Joe; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Choong, Karen; Cornell, Tim; DeCaen, Allan; Deymann, Andreas; Doctor, Allan; Davis, Alan; Duff, John; Dugas, Marc-Andre; Duncan, Alan; Evans, Barry; Feldman, Jonathan; Felmet, Kathryn; Fisher, Gene; Frankel, Lorry; Jeffries, Howard; Greenwald, Bruce; Gutierrez, Juan; Hall, Mark; Han, Yong Y.; Hanson, James; Hazelzet, Jan; Hernan, Lynn; Kiff, Jane; Kissoon, Niranjan; Kon, Alexander; Irazusta, Jose; Lin, John; Lorts, Angie; Mariscalco, Michelle; Mehta, Renuka; Nadel, Simon; Nguyen, Trung; Nicholson, Carol; Peters, Mark; Okhuysen-Cawley, Regina; Poulton, Tom; Relves, Monica; Rodriguez, Agustin; Rozenfeld, Ranna; Schnitzler, Eduardo; Shanley, Tom; Skache, Sara; Skippen, Peter; Torres, Adalberto; von Dessauer, Bettina; Weingarten, Jacki; Yeh, Timothy; Zaritsky, Arno; Stojadinovic, Bonnie; Zimmerman, Jerry; Zuckerberg, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine calls for the use of clinical guidelines and practice parameters to promote “best practices” and to improve patient outcomes. Objective 2007 update of the 2002 American College of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Guidelines for Hemodynamic Support of Neonates and Children with Septic Shock. Participants Society of Critical Care Medicine members with special interest in neonatal and pediatric septic shock were identified from general solicitation at the Society of Critical Care Medicine Educational and Scientific Symposia (2001–2006). Methods The Pubmed/MEDLINE literature database (1966–2006) was searched using the keywords and phrases: sepsis, septicemia, septic shock, endotoxemia, persistent pulmonary hypertension, nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and American College of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. Best practice centers that reported best outcomes were identified and their practices examined as models of care. Using a modified Delphi method, 30 experts graded new literature. Over 30 additional experts then reviewed the updated recommendations. The document was subsequently modified until there was greater than 90% expert consensus. Results The 2002 guidelines were widely disseminated, translated into Spanish and Portuguese, and incorporated into Society of Critical Care Medicine and AHA sanctioned recommendations. Centers that implemented the 2002 guidelines reported best practice outcomes (hospital mortality 1%–3% in previously healthy, and 7%– 10% in chronically ill children). Early use of 2002 guidelines was associated with improved outcome in the community hospital emergency department (number needed to treat = 3.3) and tertiary pediatric intensive care setting (number needed to treat = 3.6); every hour that went by without guideline adherence was associated with a 1.4-fold increased mortality risk. The updated 2007 guidelines continue to recognize an increased likelihood that

  14. Acceptability of evidence-based neonatal care practices in rural Uganda – implications for programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiguli Juliet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evidence-based interventions to reach the Millennium Development Goals for Maternal and Neonatal mortality reduction exist, they have not yet been operationalised and scaled up in Sub-Saharan African cultural and health systems. A key concern is whether these internationally recommended practices are acceptable and will be demanded by the target community. We explored the acceptability of these interventions in two rural districts of Uganda. Methods We conducted 10 focus group discussions consisting of mothers, fathers, grand parents and child minders (older children who take care of other children. We also did 10 key informant interviews with health workers and traditional birth attendants. Results Most maternal and newborn recommended practices are acceptable to both the community and to health service providers. However, health system and community barriers were prevalent and will need to be overcome for better neonatal outcomes. Pregnant women did not comprehend the importance of attending antenatal care early or more than once unless they felt ill. Women prefer to deliver in health facilities but most do not do so because they cannot afford the cost of drugs and supplies which are demanded in a situation of poverty and limited male support. Postnatal care is non-existent. For the newborn, delayed bathing and putting nothing on the umbilical cord were neither acceptable to parents nor to health providers, requiring negotiation of alternative practices. Conclusion The recommended maternal-newborn practices are generally acceptable to the community and health service providers, but often are not practiced due to health systems and community barriers. Communities associate the need for antenatal care attendance with feeling ill, and postnatal care is non-existent in this region. Health promotion programs to improve newborn care must prioritize postnatal care, and take into account the local socio-cultural situation

  15. Acceptability of evidence-based neonatal care practices in rural Uganda - implications for programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiswa, Peter; Kemigisa, Margaret; Kiguli, Juliet; Naikoba, Sarah; Pariyo, George W; Peterson, Stefan

    2008-06-21

    Although evidence-based interventions to reach the Millennium Development Goals for Maternal and Neonatal mortality reduction exist, they have not yet been operationalised and scaled up in Sub-Saharan African cultural and health systems. A key concern is whether these internationally recommended practices are acceptable and will be demanded by the target community. We explored the acceptability of these interventions in two rural districts of Uganda. We conducted 10 focus group discussions consisting of mothers, fathers, grand parents and child minders (older children who take care of other children). We also did 10 key informant interviews with health workers and traditional birth attendants. Most maternal and newborn recommended practices are acceptable to both the community and to health service providers. However, health system and community barriers were prevalent and will need to be overcome for better neonatal outcomes. Pregnant women did not comprehend the importance of attending antenatal care early or more than once unless they felt ill. Women prefer to deliver in health facilities but most do not do so because they cannot afford the cost of drugs and supplies which are demanded in a situation of poverty and limited male support. Postnatal care is non-existent. For the newborn, delayed bathing and putting nothing on the umbilical cord were neither acceptable to parents nor to health providers, requiring negotiation of alternative practices. The recommended maternal-newborn practices are generally acceptable to the community and health service providers, but often are not practiced due to health systems and community barriers. Communities associate the need for antenatal care attendance with feeling ill, and postnatal care is non-existent in this region. Health promotion programs to improve newborn care must prioritize postnatal care, and take into account the local socio-cultural situation and health systems barriers including the financial burden. Male

  16. Pharmacology of pediatric resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushay, H M; Notterman, D A

    1997-02-01

    The resuscitation of children from cardiac arrest and shock remains a challenging goal. The pharmacologic principles underlying current recommendations for intervention in pediatric cardiac arrest have been reviewed. Current research efforts, points of controversy, and accepted practices that may not be most efficacious have been described. Epinephrine remains the most effective resuscitation adjunct. High-dose epinephrine is tolerated better in children than in adults, but its efficacy has not received full analysis. The preponderance of data continues to point toward the ineffectiveness and possible deleterious effects of overzealous sodium bicarbonate use. Calcium chloride is useful in the treatment of ionized hypocalcemia but may harm cells that have experienced asphyxial damage. Atropine is an effective agent for alleviating bradycardia induced by increased vagal tone, but because most bradycardia in children is caused by hypoxia, improved oxygenation is the intervention of choice. Adenosine is an effective and generally well-tolerated agent for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia. Lidocaine is the drug of choice for ventricular dysrhythmias, and bretylium, still relatively unexplored, is in reserve. Many pediatricians use dopamine for shock in the postresuscitative period, but epinephrine is superior. Most animal research on cardiac arrest is based on models with ventricular fibrillation that probably are not reflective of cardiac arrest situations most often seen in pediatrics.

  17. Consent for routine neonatal procedures: A study of practices in Irish neonatal units. How do we compare with the gold standard BAPM guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M A; Ryan, C A; Dempsey, E; O'Connell, R

    2017-06-09

    The Irish National Consent Policy (NCP) proposes that the legal requirement for consent extends to all forms of interventions, investigations and treatment, carried out on or behalf of the Health Service Executive (HSE). This study employs a quantitative descriptive approach to investigate the practices for obtaining consent for an identified group of routine neonatal procedures in neonatal facilities throughout Ireland. The BAPM (British Association of Perinatal Medicine) guidelines were identified as 'gold standard' for the purposes of this study. The results indicated a lack of consistency between participating units pertaining to the modes of consent utilised and notable variances from 'gold standard' guidelines. Unanimity was evident for 3 procedures only (administering BCG, 6-in-1, and donor breast milk to infant). Significant findings related to EEG with video recordings, MRI/CT and gastro intestinal imaging, screening of an infant with suspected substance abuse or retinopathy of prematurity screening (ROP), administration of Vitamin K, and the carrying out of a lumbar puncture.

  18. Trauma patients' rights during resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Bruce

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Doctors and nurses working in hospital emergency departments face ethical and moral conflicts more so than in other health care units. Traditional curricular approaches to health professional education have been embedded in a discriminatory societal context and as such have not prepared health professionals adequately for the ethical realities of their practice. Furthermore, the discourse on ethical theories and ethical principles do not provide clear-cut solutions to ethical dilemmas but rather serve as a guide to ethical decision- making. Within the arena of trauma and resuscitation, fundamental ethical principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice cannot be taken as absolutes as these may in themselves create moral conflict. Resuscitation room activities require a balance between what is “ ethically" correct and what is “pragmatically required” . Because of the urgent nature of a resuscitation event, this balance is often under threat, with resultant transgression of patients’ rights. This article explores the sources of ethical and moral issues in trauma care and proposes a culture of human rights to provide a context for preserving and protecting trauma patients’ rights during resuscitation. Recommendations for education and research are alluded to in concluding the article.

  19. Core measures for developmentally supportive care in neonatal intensive care units: theory, precedence and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Mary; Gibbins, Sharyn; Hoath, Steven

    2009-10-01

    This paper is a discussion of evidence-based core measures for developmental care in neonatal intensive care units. Inconsistent definition, application and evaluation of developmental care have resulted in criticism of its scientific merit. The key concept guiding data organization in this paper is the United States of America's Joint Commission's concept of 'core measures' for evaluating and accrediting healthcare organizations. This concept is applied to five disease- and procedure-independent measures based on the Universe of Developmental Care model. Electronically accessible, peer reviewed studies on developmental care published in English were culled for data supporting the selected objective core measures between 1978 and 2008. The quality of evidence was based on a structured predetermined format that included three independent reviewers. Systematic reviews and randomized control trials were considered the strongest level of evidence. When unavailable, cohort, case control, consensus statements and qualitative methods were considered the strongest level of evidence for a particular clinical issue. Five core measure sets for evidence-based developmental care were evaluated: (1) protected sleep, (2) pain and stress assessment and management, (3) developmental activities of daily living, (4) family-centred care, and (5) the healing environment. These five categories reflect recurring themes that emerged from the literature review regarding developmentally supportive care and quality caring practices in neonatal populations. This practice model provides clear metrics for nursing actions having an impact on the hospital experience of infant-family dyads. Standardized disease-independent core measures for developmental care establish minimum evidence-based practice expectations and offer an objective basis for cross-institutional comparison of developmental care programmes.

  20. Sedation and analgesia practices in neonatal intensive care units (EUROPAIN): results from a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Eriksson, Mats; Courtois, Emilie; Boyle, Elaine; Avila-Alvarez, Alejandro; Andersen, Randi Dovland; Sarafidis, Kosmas; Polkki, Tarja; Matos, Cristina; Lago, Paola; Papadouri, Thalia; Montalto, Simon Attard; Ilmoja, Mari-Liis; Simons, Sinno; Tameliene, Rasa; van Overmeire, Bart; Berger, Angelika; Dobrzanska, Anna; Schroth, Michael; Bergqvist, Lena; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Trinkl, Anna; Deindl, Philipp; Wald, Martin; Rigo, Vincent; Dussart, Anneliese; Dierckx, Elke; Coppens, Sophie; Kiilsapaa, Birgit; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Metsäranta, Marjo; Nikolajev, Kari; Saarela, Timo; Peltoniemi, Outi; Tammela, Outi; Lehtonen, Liisa; Savagner, Christophe; Sevestre, Anna; Alexandre, Cénéric; Bouchon-Guedj, Nathalie; Saumureau, Simone; Grosse, Camille; Jouvencel, Philippe; Ramful, Duksha; Clamadieu, Catherine; Mourdie, Julien; Montcho, Yannis; Cambonie, Gilles; Di Maio, Massimo; Patural, Hugues; Asrtuc, Dominique; Norbert, Karine; Bouchera, Kassis; Lang, Mathieu; Galene Gromez, Sophie; Hamon, Isabelle; Nolent, Paul; Ntwari, René-Christian; Lallemant, Carine; Chary Tardy, Anne Cécile; Pelluau, Sonia; Roue, Jean Michel; Picaud, Jean Charles; Camelio, Aurélie; Tourneux, Pierre; Saint-Faust, Marie; Morville, Patrice; David, Alexandra; Theret, Bernard; Frédérique, Martin; Topf, Georg; Menendez-Castro, Ricardo; Fujiwara-Pichler, Erhard; Deeg, Karl Heinz; Anatolitou, Fani; Baroutis, George; Papazafeiratou, Chrissoulan; Giannakopoulou, Christine; Baltogianni, Maria; Delivoria, Varvara; Sterpi, Magdalena; Saklamaki-Kontou, Melpomeni; Dimitriou, Gabriel; Charitou, Antonia; Thomaidou, Agathi; Chatziioannidis, Ilias; Salvanos, Iraklis; Pirelli, Anna; Poggiani, Carlo; Fasolato, Valeria; Cristofori, Gloria; Gomirato, Serena; Allegro, Antonella; Alfiero, Michela; Biban, Paolo; Bertolini, Alessandra; Golin, Rosanna; Franco, Elena; Molinaro, Grazia; Federica, Visintini; Rossini, Roberto; Garetti, Elisabetta; Faraoni, Maddalena; Dani, Carlo; Germini, Cristina; Braguglia, Annabella; Benigni, Gina; Azzali, Adriano; Santa, Barresi; Romoli, Raffaella; Carrera, Giuseppe; Miria, Natile; Savant, Patrizia; Cossu, Maria Antonia; Giancarlo, Gargano; Cassar, Robert; Bos, Annelis; van Kaam, Anton; Brouwer, Mieke; van Lingen, Richard; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; Sivertsen, Wiebke; Nakstad, Britt; Solhjell, Kari; Flagstad, Gro; Salvesen, Bodil; Nessestrand, Ingunn A. M.; Nordhov, Marianne; Anderssen, Sven-Harald; Wasland, Kristin; Danielsen, Kåre; Kristoffersen, Laila Marie; Ytterdahl Bergland, Unni; Borghild Stornes, Randi; Andresen, Jannicke; Solberg, Rønnaug; Hochnowski, Kristoffer; Terpinska, Ewa; Kociszewska-Najman, Bozena; Melka, Andrzej; Głuszczak, Ewa; Niezgoda, Anna; Borszewska-Kornacka, Maria Katarzyna; Witwicki, Jacek M.; Korbal, Piotr; Ramos, Helena; Garcia, Pedro; Machado, Cidália; Clemente, Fátima; Costa, Miguel; Trindade, Cristina; Salazar, Anabela; Martins Barroso, Laura; Resende, Cristine; Afonso, Maria Eulàlia; Torres, Jacinto; Maciel, Paula; Nunes, José Luis; Neve Dos Santos, Vera Alexandra; Melgar Bonis, Ana; Euba Lopez, Aintzane; Tapia Collados, Caridad; Jesus Ripalda, María; Solis Sanchez, Gonzalo; Martin Parra, Belén; Botet, Francesc; Fernandez Trisac, Jose Luis; Elorza Fernandez, María Dolores; Arriaga Redondo, María; Bargallo Ailagas, Eva; Saenz, Pilar; Lopez Ortego, Paloma; Ventura, Purificación; Galve, Zenaida; Perez Ocon, Amaya; Crespo Suarez, Pilar; Dianez Vega, Gloria; San Feliciano, Laura; Herranz Carillo, Gloria; Esteban Diez, Inés; Reyné, Mar; Garcia Borau, María José; de Las Cuevas, Isabel; Couce, María L.; González Carrasco, Ersilia; Montoro Exposito, Aurora; Concheiro Guisan, Ana; Luna Lagares, Salud; Sanchez Redondo, Maria Dolores; Hellström Westas, Lena; Moren, Stefan; Norman, Elisabeth; Olsson, Emma; Åberg, Emma; Printz, Gordana; Turner, Mark; McBride, Tim; Bomont, Robert; Webb, Delyth; Saladi, Murthy; Thirumurugan, Arumugavelu; Brooke, Nigel; Skene, Caryl; Bilolikar, Harsha; Noble, Vibert; Vora, Amish; Thompson, Fiona; Deorukhkar, Anjum; El-Refee, Sherif; McIntyre, John; Millman, Guy; Reed, Joanne; Babirecki, Matthew; Kumar, Dev; Yadav, Mahesh; O'Brien, Margaret; Gasiorowski, Edward Robert; Rawlingson, Chris; Shastri, Aravind; Tibby, Shane; Walsh, Sandra; Azzopardi, Denis; Soe, Aung; MaCrae, Duncan; Eyre, Elizabeth; Menon, Gopi; Gupta, Samir; James, Anitha; Surana, Pinki; Adams, Eleri; Wolf, Andrew; Maxwell, Nicola; Wagstaff, Miles; Mann, Rebecca; Kumar, Yadlapalli; Quinn, Michael; Jones Dyson, Steve; Mannix, Paul; Morris, Kevin; Ewer, Andrew; Gurusamy, Kalyana; Deshpande, Sanjeev; Alexander, John; Blake, Kathryn; Kumar, Siva; Oddie, Sam; Ohadike, Pamela; McKechnie, Liz; Gibson, David; Shirsalkar, Anand; Suryanarayanan, Balaji; Hubbard, Marie; Lal, Mithilesh; Ali, Imdad; Shah, Divyen; Sketchley, Suzanne; Gupta, Richa; Schofield, Joanne; Ezzat, Medhat; Mupanemunda, Richard; Gallagher, Andrew; Kronsberg, Shari

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonates who are in pain or are stressed during care in the intensive care unit (ICU) are often given sedation or analgesia. We investigated the current use of sedation or analgesia in neonatal ICUs (NICUs) in European countries. Methods EUROPAIN (EUROpean Pain Audit In Neonates) was a

  1. Practice variation in the management of intrapartum fetal distress in The Netherlands and the Western world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bullens, L.M.; Moors, S.; Runnard Heimel, van P.J.; van der Hout-van der Jagt, M.B.; Oei, G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Solid evidence on the effect of intrauterine resuscitation on neonatal outcome is limited, and superiority of one intervention over the others is not clear. We therefore surveyed the clinical practice variation in fetal monitoring and the management of fetal distress during labor, in

  2. Interventions for intrauterine resuscitation in suspected fetal distress during term labor : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bullens, L.; van Runnard Heimel, P.J.; van der Hout-van der Jagt, M.B.; Oei, G.

    IMPORTANCE: Intrauterine resuscitation techniques during term labor are commonly used in daily clinical practice. Evidence, however, to support the beneficial effect of intrauterine resuscitation techniques on fetal distress during labor is limited and sometimes contradictory. In contrast, some of

  3. Tactical Damage Control Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Andrew D; Miles, Ethan A; Cap, Andrew P; Strandenes, Geir; Kane, Shawn F

    2015-08-01

    Recently the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care changed the guidelines on fluid use in hemorrhagic shock. The current strategy for treating hemorrhagic shock is based on early use of components: Packed Red Blood Cells (PRBCs), Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) and platelets in a 1:1:1 ratio. We suggest that lack of components to mimic whole blood functionality favors the use of Fresh Whole Blood in managing hemorrhagic shock on the battlefield. We present a safe and practical approach for its use at the point of injury in the combat environment called Tactical Damage Control Resuscitation. We describe pre-deployment preparation, assessment of hemorrhagic shock, and collection and transfusion of fresh whole blood at the point of injury. By approaching shock with goal-directed therapy, it is possible to extend the period of survivability in combat casualties. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Breast milk banking: current opinion and practice in Australian neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Eva Y; Kecskés, Zsuzsoka; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed E

    2012-09-01

    To find out the knowledge and attitudes of health-care professionals (HCPs) in Australian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) towards breast milk banking (BMBg) and pasteurised donated breast milk (PDBM). Cross-sectional structured survey of HCPs in all 25 NICUs in Australia. Response rate was 43.4% (n= 358 of 825). Participants included nurses and midwives (291, 81.3%) and the remainder were neonatologists and neonatal trainees (67, 18.7%). A variable number of HCPs agreed that PDBM would decrease the risk of necrotising enterocolitis (81%) and allergies (48.9%), 8.4% thought PDBM will carry risk of infections and 78.8% agreed that PDBM is preferable over formula, but only 67.5% thought that establishing breast milk banks (BMBs) are justifiable. Significant differences were found between doctors and nurses/midwives, with 19.4% of doctors compared with 5.8% of nurses/midwives agreed that PDBM carried an increased risk of infection. Although, over 90% of nurses/midwives and 70% of doctors agreed that the donation of breast milk is important, only 71% of nurses/midwives and 52.2% of doctors thought that setting up a BMB was justifiable. The opinions about BMBg differ widely between HCPs; however, the majority support the practice. HCPs had different knowledge gaps in regard to BMBg. Nurses/midwives positively view the practice of BMBg more strongly compared with neonatologists. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. Translating Neurodevelopmental Care Policies Into Practice: The Experience of Neonatal ICUs in France—The EPIPAGE-2 Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquelin, Anaëlle; Cuttini, Marina; Khoshnood, Babak; Glorieux, Isabelle; Claris, Olivier; Durox, Mélanie; Kaminski, Monique; Ancel, Pierre-Yves; Arnaud, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the implementation of neurodevelopmental care for newborn preterm infants in neonatal ICUs in France in 2011, analyze changes since 2004, and investigate factors associated with practice. Design: Prospective national cohort study of all births before 32 weeks of gestation. Setting: Twenty-five French regions. Participants: All neonatal ICUs (n = 66); neonates surviving at discharge (n = 3,005). Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Neurodevelopmental care policies and practices were assessed by structured questionnaires. Proportions of neonates initiating kangaroo care during the first week of life and those whose mothers expressed breast milk were measured as neurodevelopmental care practices. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to investigate relationships between kangaroo care or breast-feeding practices and unit policies, taking into account potential confounders. Free visiting policies, bed availability for parents, and kangaroo care encouragement significantly improved between 2004 and 2011 but with large variabilities between units. Kangaroo care initiation varied from 39% for neonates in the most restrictive units to 68% in less restrictive ones (p neurodevelopmental care significantly influenced kangaroo care initiation (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.8–7.0 for Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program implementation compared with no training). Breast milk expression by mothers was greater in units with full-time availability professionals trained for breast-feeding support (60% vs 73%; p neurodevelopmental practices occurred between 2004 and 2011, but large variabilities between units persist. Practices increased in units with supportive policies. Specific neurodevelopmental care training with multifaceted interventions strengthened the implementation of policies. PMID:27518584

  6. An advisory statement from the Pediatric Working Group of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattwinkel, J; Niermeyer, S; Nadkarni, V; Tibballs, J; Phillips, B; Zideman, D; Van Reempts, P; Osmond, M

    1999-04-01

    The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR), with representation from North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, and South America, was formed in 1992 to provide a forum for liaison between resuscitation organizations in the developed world. This consensus document on resuscitation extends previously published ILCOR advisory statements on resuscitation to address the unique and changing physiology of the newly born infant within the first few hours after birth and the techniques for providing advanced life support. After careful review of the international resuscitation literature and after discussion of key and controversial issues, consensus was reached on almost all aspects of neonatal resuscitation, and areas of controversy and high priority for additional research were delineated. Consensus on resuscitation for the newly born infant included the following principles: Common or controversial medications (epinephrine, volume expansion, naloxone, bicarbonate), special resuscitation circumstances affecting care of the newly born, continuing care of the newly born after resuscitation, and ethical considerations for initiation and discontinuation of resuscitation are discussed. There was agreement that insufficient data exist to recommend changes to current guidelines regarding the use of 21% versus 100% oxygen, neuroprotective interventions such as cerebral hypothermia, use of a laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and use of high-dose epinephrine. Areas of controversy are identified, as is the need for additional research to improve the scientific justification of each component of current and future resuscitation guidelines.

  7. Sedation and analgesia practices at Italian neonatal intensive care units: results from the EUROPAIN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Paola; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Baraldi, Eugenio; Pozzato, Roberta; Courtois, Emilie; Rambaud, Jérôme; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Carbajal, Ricardo

    2017-03-07

    We aimed to examine current bedside analgesia/sedation (A/S) and pain assessment (PA) practices in Italian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in relation to the findings of an epidemiological European study and recently-introduced national guidelines. We analyzed the Italian data from the EUROPAIN (EUROpean-Pain-Audit-In-Neonates) prospective observational study on A/S practices that involved 6680 newborns admitted to tertiary-level NICUs in 18 European countries. Demographics, type of assisted ventilation, type and mode of A/S administration and PA were analyzed. Multivariate linear regression models were used to identify factors predicting A/S and PA practices. From October 1 st , 2012 to June 30 th , 2013, thirty Italian NICUs gathered data on 422 newborn: 131 on invasive ventilation (IV); 150 on noninvasive ventilation (NIV); and 141 on spontaneous ventilation (SV). A/S was documented for 35.3% of all infants admitted (86.3% IV; 17.3% NIV; 7.1% SV [p = 0.0001]), and varied considerably between NICUs (as reported in other European countries). Strong analgesics were used in 32.5% of cases, sedatives in 10.2%, mild analgesics in 3.8%. Fentanyl was used in 78.6% of cases, morphine in 8.4%, neuromuscular blockers in 5.3%, midazolam in 22.1%. The performance of PA was documented in 67.5% of all newborn (85.5% IV; 67.3% NIV; 51.1% SV [p = 0.001]). Illness severity, type of ventilation, bedside PA, and number of NICU beds were all factors associated with A/S use on multivariate analysis, while gestational age ≤ 32 weeks, and type of ventilation and presence of a pain team were associated with PA. We documented a generally widespread, but still highly variable use of A/S and PA at Italian NICUs, despite the diffusion of national guidelines. There is an urgent need to improve routine PA to enable customized pain and stress control (and prevention) in all infants. Clinical Trials.gov # NCT01694745 .

  8. Haemostatic resuscitation in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Par I.

    2016-01-01

    of a ratio driven strategy aiming at 1 : 1 : 1, using tranexamic acid according to CRASH-2, and applying haemostatic monitoring enabling a switch to a goal-directed approach when bleeding slows. Haemostatic resuscitation is the mainstay of trauma resuscitation and is associated with improved survival...

  9. An unsuccessful resuscitation:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Breaking bad news, resuscitation, communication, emergency ... Twelve family members whose loved ones had died in the emergency room and ... There was no effective follow-up of the families and the doctors also ... be available for staff involved in unsuccessful resuscitations. .... ed with the healing process.

  10. An audit of some health facilities and equipment for neonatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neonatal Mortality rates continue to be high in spite of the general decline in under-5 mortality rates in Nigeria. Available evidence has shown that the availability of a skilled birth attendant and equipment for basic neonatal resuscitation is necessary for the prevention of early neonatal death which accounts for ...

  11. Perceptions of parents, nurses, and physicians on neonatal intensive care practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour, Jos M.; Hazelzet, Jan A.; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2010-01-01

    To identify satisfaction with neonatal intensive care as viewed by parents and healthcare professionals and to explore similarities and differences between parents and healthcare professionals. A 3-round Delphi method to identify neonatal care issues (round 1) and to determine the importance of

  12. Consent for routine neonatal procedures: A study of practices in Irish neonatal units. How do we compare with the gold standard BAPM guidelines?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, M A

    2017-06-01

    The Irish National Consent Policy (NCP)¹ proposes that the legal requirement for consent extends to all forms of interventions, investigations and treatment, carried out on or behalf of the Health Service Executive (HSE). This study employs a quantitative descriptive approach to investigate the practices for obtaining consent for an identified group of routine neonatal procedures in neonatal facilities throughout Ireland. The BAPM (British Association of Perinatal Medicine)² guidelines were identified as ‘gold standard’ for the purposes of this study. The results indicated a lack of consistency between participating units pertaining to the modes of consent utilised and notable variances from ‘gold standard’ guidelines. Unanimity was evident for 3 procedures only (administering BCG, 6-in-1, and donor breast milk to infant). Significant findings related to EEG with video recordings, MRI\\/CT and gastro intestinal imaging, screening of an infant with suspected substance abuse or retinopathy of prematurity screening (ROP), administration of Vitamin K, and the carrying out of a lumbar puncture.

  13. Teamwork during resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Peter; Halamek, Louis P

    2008-08-01

    Effective resuscitation requires the integration of several cognitive, technical, and behavioral skills. Because resuscitation is performed by teams of health care professionals, these individuals must be able to work together in a coordinated and efficient manner, making teamwork a critical skill for care of patients in distress. Despite the importance of teamwork in health care, little consensus exists as to what it is, how it can most effectively be learned, and how it should be assessed. This article reviews current knowledge on the measurement, training, and importance of teamwork in pediatric resuscitation.

  14. Neonatal retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero T Kivelä

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available From 7% to 10% of all retinoblastomas and from 44% to 71% of familial retinoblastomas in developed countries are diagnosed in the neonatal period, usually through pre- or post-natal screening prompted by a positive family history and sometimes serendipitously during screening for retinopathy of prematurity or other reasons. In developing countries, neonatal diagnosis of retinoblastoma has been less common. Neonatal retinoblastoma generally develops from a germline mutation of RB1, the retinoblastoma gene, even when the family history is negative and is thus usually hereditary. At least one-half of infants with neonatal retinoblastoma have unilateral tumors when the diagnosis is made, typically the International Intraocular Retinoblastoma Classification (Murphree Group B or higher, but most germline mutation carriers will progress to bilateral involvement, typically Group A in the fellow eye. Neonatal leukokoria usually leads to the diagnosis in children without a family history of retinoblastoma, and a Group C tumor or higher is typical in the more advanced involved eye. Almost all infants with neonatal retinoblastoma have at least one eye with a tumor in proximity to the foveola, but the macula of the fellow eye is frequently spared. Consequently, loss of reading vision from both eyes is exceptional. A primary ectopic intracranial neuroblastic tumor known as trilateral retinoblastoma is no more common after neonatal than other retinoblastoma. For many reasons, neonatal retinoblastoma may be a challenge to eradicate, and the early age at diagnosis and relatively small tumors do not guarantee the preservation of both eyes of every involved child. Oncology nurses can be instrumental in contributing to better outcomes by ensuring that hereditary retinoblastoma survivors receive genetic counseling, by referring families of survivors to early screening programs when they are planning for a baby, and by providing psychological and practical support

  15. Compliance with Prevention Practices and their Association with Central Line-Associated Blood Stream Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Philip; Furuya, E. Yoko; Edwards, Jeffrey; Dick, Andrew; Liu, Hangsheng; Herzig, Carolyn; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Stone, Patricia W.; Saiman, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Background Bundles and checklists have been shown to decrease CLABSIs, but implementation of these practices and association with CLABSI rates have not been described nationally. We describe implementation and levels of compliance with prevention practices in a sample of US Neonatal ICUs and assess their association with CLABSI rates. Methods An online survey assessing infection prevention practices was sent to hospitals participating in National Healthcare Safety Network CLABSI surveillance in October 2011. Participating hospitals permitted access to their NICU CLABSI rates. Multivariable regressions were used to test the association between compliance with NICU specific CLABSI prevention practices and corresponding CLABSI rates. Results Overall, 190 Level II/III and Level III NICUs participated. The majority of NICUs had written policies (84%-93%) and monitored compliance with bundles and checklists (88% - 91%). Reporting ≥ 95% compliance for any of the practices ranged from 50%- 63%. Reporting ≥ 95% compliance with insertion checklist and assessment of daily line necessity were significantly associated with lower CLABSI rates (pprevention policies and monitor compliance, although reporting compliance ≥ 95% was suboptimal. Reporting ≥ 95% compliance with select CLABSI prevention practices was associated with lower CLABSI rates. Further studies should focus on identifying and improving compliance with effective CLABSI prevention practices in neonates. PMID:25087136

  16. Using human rights to improve maternal and neonatal health: history, connections and a proposed practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruskin, Sofia; Cottingham, Jane; Hilber, Adriane Martin; Kismodi, Eszter; Lincetto, Ornella; Roseman, Mindy Jane

    2008-08-01

    We describe the historical development of how maternal and neonatal mortality in the developing world came to be seen as a public-health concern, a human rights concern, and ultimately as both, leading to the development of approaches using human rights concepts and methods to advance maternal and neonatal health. We describe the different contributions of the international community, women's health advocates and human rights activists. We briefly present a recent effort, developed by WHO with the Harvard Program on International Health and Human Rights, that applies a human rights framework to reinforce current efforts to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality.

  17. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: Clinical practices in five Portuguese neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guimarães

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of surfactant, prenatal corticosteroids (PNC and advances in technology, the survival rate of extremely low birth weight (ELBW infants has improved dramatically. Rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD vary widely among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs and many studies using multiple interventions have shown some improvement in BPD rates. Implementing potentially better practices to reduce BPD has been an effort made over the last few decades. Aim: To compare five Portuguese NICUs in terms of clinical practices in very low birth weight (VLBW infants, in order to develop better practices to prevent BPD. Patients and methods: 256 preterm neonates, gestational age (GA < 30 weeks and/or birthweight (BW < 1250g admitted to five Portuguese NICUs (centers 1 to 5 between 1st January 2004 and 31st December 2006, were studied. VLBW infants with major malformations, grade IV intraventricular haemorrhage in the first week of life and metabolic or neuromuscular disease were excluded. BPD was defined as oxygen dependency at 36 weeks of postconceptional age. We considered a practice to be improved as clinically significant whenever a decrease greater than 10% in the prevalence of BPD adjusted for the practice, GA and BW was achieved compared to BPD prevalence adjusted only for GA and BW. Results: The overall prevalence of BPD was 12.9%. Our results revealed that PNC use should be improved in centers 4 and 5; fluid policy in center 4; oxygen therapy and sepsis prevention in centers 1 and 2. Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA treatment should be improved in center 2. Conclusion: The implementation of potentially better practices to reduce lung injury in neonates in Portuguese NICUs, according to each NICU, must be addressed to increase the prescription of PNC, to use a lower FiO2, to be careful with fluid administration in the first weeks of life and to prevent PDA and sepsis. It is necessary to follow guidelines, recommendations or

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Andrés Vargas-Garzón

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reanimation’s guidelines dictated by the AHA (American Heart Association are the strategies to follow in the envi­ronment of any situation related to cardiac arrest. They are acquired after the analysis of the evidence available in reani­mation from higher to less quality, with the best neurological results. After years of observation, was achieved to establish that survival behind cardiac arrest is, in general, low (6%, except that any witness starts immediately cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR maneuvers; therefore, medical personal must know and practice these maneuvers. With these con­siderations, it’s necessary to emphasize in the theoretical training of CPR of all health professional and laity, which guarantee everybody be prepared to emergency system ac­tivation, brain’s preservation and defibrillate to recuperate heart and life. The actual approach that combines compres­sions and defibrillation to closed chest, rescue ventilation and cardio tonic drugs. The guidelines AHA 2010, focus on increase frequency and quality of CPR. The objective of this article is to recognize various changes in these guidelines in cardiopulmonary reanimation and promote the continued education’s importance in reanimation.

  19. New cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines 2010: managing the newly born in delivery room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biban, Paolo; Filipovic-Grcic, Boris; Biarent, Dominique; Manzoni, Paolo

    2011-03-01

    Most newborns are born vigorous and do not require neonatal resuscitation. However, about 10% of newborns require some type of resuscitative assistance at birth. Although the vast majority will require just assisted lung aeration, about 1% requires major interventions such as intubation, chest compressions, or medications. Recently, new evidence has prompted modifications in the international cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines for both neonatal, paediatric and adult patients. Perinatal and neonatal health care providers must be aware of these changes in order to provide the most appropriate and evidence-based emergency interventions for newborns in the delivery room. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the main recommended changes in neonatal resuscitation at birth, according to the publication of the international Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) in the CoSTR document (based on evidence of sciences) and the new 2010 guidelines released by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Association between clean delivery kit use, clean delivery practices, and neonatal survival: pooled analysis of data from three sites in South Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Seward

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis accounts for up to 15% of an estimated 3.3 million annual neonatal deaths globally. We used data collected from the control arms of three previously conducted cluster-randomised controlled trials in rural Bangladesh, India, and Nepal to examine the association between clean delivery kit use or clean delivery practices and neonatal mortality among home births.Hierarchical, logistic regression models were used to explore the association between neonatal mortality and clean delivery kit use or clean delivery practices in 19,754 home births, controlling for confounders common to all study sites. We tested the association between kit use and neonatal mortality using a pooled dataset from all three sites and separately for each site. We then examined the association between individual clean delivery practices addressed in the contents of the kit (boiled blade and thread, plastic sheet, gloves, hand washing, and appropriate cord care and neonatal mortality. Finally, we examined the combined association between mortality and four specific clean delivery practices (boiled blade and thread, hand washing, and plastic sheet. Using the pooled dataset, we found that kit use was associated with a relative reduction in neonatal mortality (adjusted odds ratio 0.52, 95% CI 0.39-0.68. While use of a clean delivery kit was not always accompanied by clean delivery practices, using a plastic sheet during delivery, a boiled blade to cut the cord, a boiled thread to tie the cord, and antiseptic to clean the umbilicus were each significantly associated with relative reductions in mortality, independently of kit use. Each additional clean delivery practice used was associated with a 16% relative reduction in neonatal mortality (odds ratio 0.84, 95% CI 0.77-0.92.The appropriate use of a clean delivery kit or clean delivery practices is associated with relative reductions in neonatal mortality among home births in underserved, rural populations.

  1. A reliable, practical, and economical protocol for inducing diarrhea and severe dehydration in the neonatal calf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, P G; Constable, P D; Morin, D E; Drackley, J K; Foreman, J H; Thurmon, J C

    1998-07-01

    Fifteen healthy, colostrum-fed, male dairy calves, aged 2 to 7 d were used in a study to develop a diarrhea protocol for neonatal calves that is reliable, practical, and economical. After instrumentation and recording baseline data, diarrhea and dehydration were induced by administering milk replacer [16.5 mL/kg of body weight (BW), PO], sucrose (2 g/kg in a 20% aqueous solution, p.o.), spironolactone and hydrochlorothiazide (1 mg/kg, PO) every 8 h, and furosemide (2 mg/kg, i.m., q6h). Calves were administered sucrose and diuretic agents for 48 h to induce diarrhea and severe dehydration. Clinical changes after 48 h were severe watery diarrhea, severe depression, and marked dehydration (mean, 14% BW loss). Cardiac output, stroke volume, mean central venous pressure, plasma volume, thiocyanate space, blood pH and bicarbonate concentration, base excess, serum chloride concentration, and fetlock temperature were decreased. Plasma lactate concentration, hematocrit, and serum potassium, creatinine, phosphorus, total protein and albumin concentrations were increased. This non-infectious calf diarrhea protocol has a 100% response rate, while providing a consistent and predictable hypovolemic state with diarrhea that reflects most of the clinicopathologic changes observed in osmotic/maldigestive diarrhea caused by infection with rotavirus, coronavirus or cryptosporidia. Limitations of the protocol, when compared to infectious diarrhea models, include failure to induce a severe metabolic acidosis, absence of hyponatremia, renal instead of enteric loss of chloride, renal as well as enteric loss of free water, absence of profound clinical depression and suspected differences in the morphologic and functional effect on intestinal epithelium. Despite these differences, the sucrose/diuretic protocol should be useful in the initial screening of new treatment modalities for calf diarrhea. To confirm their efficacy, the most effective treatment methods should then be examined in

  2. Anaesthetists' knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation | Ogboli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is an integral part of an anaesthetist's knowledge and practice. In Nigeria, these skills are taught mainly during medical school and postgraduate training. Objectives: The study sought to assess the knowledge of anaesthetists about CPR. Methodology: A structured ...

  3. [Neonatal herpes: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations and management. Guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (CNGOF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renesme, L

    2017-12-01

    To describe the epidemiology of neonatal herpes and its risk factors, clinical and paraclinic manifestations, propose guidelines for a newborn at risk of neonatal herpes, describe treatment modalities, describe post-natal transmission and its prevention. Bibliographic search from Medline, Cochrane Library databases and research of international clinical practice guidelines. Neonatal herpes is rare (about 20 cases per year in France) and mainly due to HSV 1 (level of evidence LE3). The main risk factors for mother-to-child transmission are maternal primary episode of genital herpes close to delivery and serotype HSV 1 (LE3). There are three clinical forms of neonatal herpes : SEM infection for skin, eyes and mucosa, central nervous system (CNS) associated infection, and the disseminated infection. Neurological mortality and morbidity depend on the clinical form and the HSV serotype (LE3). In most of the case of neonatal herpes, the mothers have no history of genital herpes (LE3). Fever and vesicular rash may be absent at the time of diagnosis (LE3). In case of suspicion of neonatal herpes, different samples (blood and cerebrospinal fluid) for HSV PCR must be carried out to confirm the diagnosis (Professional consensus). Any newborn suspected of neonatal herpes should be treated with intravenous aciclovir (Grade A) prior to the results of HSV PCR (Professional consensus). In case of maternal genital herpes at delivery, the management of an asymptomatic newborn depends on the evaluation of the risk of transmission. In case of maternal reactivation (low risk of transmission), HSV PCR samples are taken at 24hours of life and the newborn must be follow closely until results. In the case of maternal primary episode or non-primary infection first episode (high risk of transmission), the samples are taken at 24hours of life and intravenous treatment with aciclovir is started (Professional consensus). The treatment of neonatal herpes is based on intravenous aciclovir (60mg

  4. The clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderhahn, Mary Elizabeth; Fish, Anne Folta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the history and leadership dimensions of the role of resuscitation process manager and provide specific examples of how this role is implemented at a Midwest medical center. In 1992, a medical center in the Midwest needed a nurse to manage resuscitation care. This role designation meant that this nurse became central to all quality improvement efforts in resuscitation care. The role expanded as clinical resuscitation guidelines were updated and as the medical center grew. The role became known as the critical care clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager. This clinical care nurse specialist was called a manager, but she had no direct line authority, so she accomplished her objectives by forming a multitude of collaborative networks. Based on a framework by Finkelman, the manager role incorporated specific leadership abilities in quality improvement: (1) coordination of medical center-wide resuscitation, (2) use of interprofessional teams, (3) integration of evidence into practice, and (4) staff coaching to develop leadership. The manager coordinates resuscitation care with the goals of prevention of arrests if possible, efficient and effective implementation of resuscitation protocols, high quality of patient and family support during and after the resuscitation event, and creation or revision of resuscitation policies for in-hospital and for ambulatory care areas. The manager designs a comprehensive set of meaningful and measurable process and outcome indicators with input from interprofessional teams. The manager engages staff in learning, reflecting on care given, and using the evidence base for resuscitation care. Finally, the manager role is a balance between leading quality improvement efforts and coaching staff to implement and sustain these quality improvement initiatives. Revisions to clinical guidelines for resuscitation care since the 1990s have resulted in medical centers developing improved

  5. The Level Of Knowlege Guidelines Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation For Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Lukešová, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine the level of theoretical knowledge of the procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of selected non-medical staff members in VFN in Prague. The work is subdivided into a theoretical and a practical part. In the first part I comment on the history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the basic and widespread vital support to adults and children and the didactics of CPR. In the second- practical part I compare the theoretical knowledge of CPR of selected n...

  6. Invited review: Improving neonatal survival in small ruminants: science into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C M; Conington, J; Corbiere, F; Holmøy, I H; Muri, K; Nowak, R; Rooke, J; Vipond, J; Gautier, J-M

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal mortality in small ruminant livestock has remained stubbornly unchanging over the past 40 years, and represents a significant loss of farm income, contributes to wastage and affects animal welfare. Scientific knowledge about the biology of neonatal adaptation after birth has been accumulating but does not appear to have had an impact in improving survival. In this paper, we ask what might be the reasons for the lack of impact of the scientific studies of lamb and kid mortality, and suggest strategies to move forward. Biologically, it is clear that achieving a good intake of colostrum, as soon as possible after birth, is crucial for neonatal survival. This provides fuel for thermoregulation, passive immunological protection and is involved in the development of attachment between the ewe and lamb. The behaviour of the lamb in finding the udder and sucking rapidly after birth is a key component in ensuring sufficient colostrum is ingested. In experimental studies, the main risk factors for lamb mortality are low birthweight, particularly owing to poor maternal nutrition during gestation, birth difficulty, litter size and genetics, which can all be partly attributed to their effect on the speed with which the lamb reaches the udder and sucks. Similarly, on commercial farms, low birthweight and issues with sucking were identified as important contributors to mortality. In epidemiological studies, management factors such as providing assistance with difficult births, were found to be more important than risk factors associated with housing. Social science studies suggest that farmers generally have a positive attitude to improving neonatal mortality but may differ in beliefs about how this can be achieved, with some farmers believing they had no control over early lamb mortality. Facilitative approaches, where farmers and advisors work together to develop neonatal survival strategies, have been shown to be effective in achieving management goals, such as

  7. Cardiocerebral resuscitation: facts and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Dejan Kupnik; Miljenko Križmarić

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the prehospital setting still has to cope with poor lay-rescuer knowledge of resuscitation techniques, low public availability of automated external defi brillators, many detrimental interruptions of chest compressions during lay and professional resuscitation eff orts and suboptimal postresuscitation care. Th erefore the survival of patients aft er cardiac arrest remains poor. To address those fl aws, cardiopulmonary resuscitatio...

  8. Compliance With Protocols for Prevention of Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Sepsis: Practicalities and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendolyn L. Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare two protocols for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP against neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS sepsis, with respect to staff compliance, in a prospective cohort study in the obstetric units of a community hospital (A and a university teaching hospital (B.

  9. Fetal and neonatal brain injury: mechanisms, management, and the risks of practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stevenson, David K; Benitz, William E; Sunshine, Philip

    2003-01-01

    ..., imaging studies, and laboratory measurements can identify the timing and severity of the injury event. Despite these advances, fetal and neonatal brain injury remains a major concern with devastating consequences. It is hoped that this definitive account will provide the clinician not only with a better understanding of the mechanisms involved but also with...

  10. Repair of neonatal brain injury : bringing stem cell-based therapy into clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, Nienke; Nijboer, Cora H.; van Bel, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury is one of most important causes of neonatal mortality and long-term neurological morbidity in infants born at term. At present, only hypothermia in infants with perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy has shown benefit as a neuroprotective strategy. Otherwise,

  11. Acceptability of Bedside Resuscitation With Intact Umbilical Cord to Clinicians and Patients’ Families in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup C. Katheria

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWhile delayed umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants has shown to improve long-term neurological outcomes, infants who are thought to need resuscitation do not receive delayed cord clamping even though they may benefit the most. A mobile resuscitation platform allows infants to be resuscitated at the mother’s bedside with the cord intact. The newborn is supplied with placental blood during the resuscitation in view of the mother. The objective of the study is to assess the usability and acceptability of mobile resuscitation platform, LifeStart trolley, among the infants’ parents and perinatal providers.MethodsA resuscitation platform was present during every delivery that required advanced neonatal providers for high-risk deliveries. Perinatal providers and parents of the infants were given a questionnaire shortly after the delivery.Results60 neonatal subjects were placed on the trolley. The majority of deliveries were high risk for meconium-stained amniotic fluid (43%, and non-reassuring fetal heart rate (45%. About 50% of neonatal providers felt that there were some concerns regarding access to the baby. No parents were uncomfortable with the bedside neonatal interventions, and most parents perceived that communication was improved because of the proximity to the care team.ConclusionBedside resuscitation with umbilical cord intact through the use of a mobile resuscitation trolley is feasible, safe, and effective, but about half of the perinatal providers expressed concerns. Logistical issues such as improved space management and/or delivery setup should be considered in centers planning to perform neonatal resuscitation with an intact cord.

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hospitalized infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Christoph P; Graham, Eric M; Hill, Kevin; Li, Jennifer S; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Clark, Reese H; Smith, P Brian

    2016-10-01

    Hospitalized infants requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) represent a high-risk group. Recent data on risk factors for mortality following CPR in this population are lacking. We hypothesized that infant demographic characteristics, diagnoses, and levels of cardiopulmonary support at the time of CPR requirement would be associated with survival to hospital discharge following CPR. Retrospective cohort study. All infants receiving CPR on day of life 2 to 120 admitted to 348 Pediatrix Medical Group neonatal intensive care units from 1997 to 2012. We collected data on demographics, interventions, center volume, and death prior to NICU discharge. We evaluated predictors of death after CPR using multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to account for clustering of the data by center. Our cohort consisted of 2231 infants receiving CPR. Of these, 1127 (51%) survived to hospital discharge. Lower gestational age, postnatal age, 5-min APGAR, congenital anomaly, and markers of severity of illness were associated with higher mortality. Mortality after CPR did not change significantly over time (Cochran-Armitage test for trend p=0.35). Mortality following CPR in infants is high, particularly for less mature, younger infants with congenital anomalies and those requiring cardiopulmonary support prior to CPR. Continued focus on at risk infants may identify targets for CPR prevention and improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Variation in Perfusion Strategies for Neonatal and Infant Aortic Arch Repair: Contemporary Practice in the STS Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David B; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Hill, Kevin; Wallace, Amelia S; Bateson, Brian; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2016-09-01

    Regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) is used as an adjunct or alternative to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) for neonates and infants undergoing aortic arch repair. Clinical studies have not demonstrated clear superiority of either strategy, and multicenter data regarding current use of these strategies are lacking. We sought to describe the variability in contemporary practice patterns for use of these techniques. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2010-2013) was queried to identify neonates and infants whose index operation involved aortic arch repair with cardiopulmonary bypass. Perfusion strategy was classified as isolated DHCA, RCP (with less than or equal to ten minutes of DHCA), or mixed (RCP with more than ten minutes of DHCA). Data were analyzed for the entire cohort and stratified by operation subgroups. Overall, 4,523 patients (105 centers) were identified; median age seven days (interquartile range: 5.0-13.0). The most prevalent perfusion strategy was RCP (43%). Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and mixed perfusion accounted for 32% and 16% of cases, respectively. In all, 59% of operations involved some period of RCP. Regional cerebral perfusion was the most prevalent perfusion strategy for each operation subgroup. Neither age nor weight was associated with perfusion strategy, but reoperations were less likely to use RCP (31% vs 45%, P RCP and DHCA in the RCP group was longer than the DHCA time in the DHCA group (45 vs 36 minutes, P neonates and infants. In contemporary practice, RCP is the most prevalent perfusion strategy for these procedures. Use of DHCA is also common. Further investigation is warranted to ascertain possible relative merits of the various perfusion techniques. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal encephalopathy: a UK survey of opinion, practice and neuro-investigation at the end of 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Andrew; Azzopardi, Denis; Wyatt, John; Robertson, Nicola J

    2009-04-01

    The 2007 Cochrane review of therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal encephalopathy (NE) indicates a significant reduction in adverse outcome. UK National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines are awaited. To benchmark current opinion and practice to inform future strategies for optimal knowledge transfer for therapeutic hypothermia. A web based questionnaire (30 sections related to opinion and practice of management of NE) sent to the clinical leads of Level I, II and III neonatal units throughout the UK in November/December 2007. One hundred and twenty-five (out of 195) UK neonatal units responded (response rate 66%). Ten percent, 37.5% and 51.5% responses were from level I, II and III units respectively. Twenty eight percent of all units provided therapeutic hypothermia locally (52% of level III units), however 80% of responders would offer therapeutic hypothermia if there was the facility. Overall, 57% of responders considered therapeutic hypothermia effective or very effective - similar for all unit levels; 43% considered more data are required. Regional availability of therapeutic hypothermia exists in 55% of units and 41% of units offer transfer to a regional centre for therapeutic hypothermia. In the UK in 2007, access to therapeutic hypothermia was widespread although not universal. More than half of responders considered therapeutic hypothermia effective. Fifty-five percent of perinatal networks have the facility to offer therapeutic hypothermia. The involvement of national bodies may be necessary to ensure the adoption of therapeutic hypothermia according to defined protocols and standards; registration is important and will help ensure universal neurodevelopmental follow up.

  15. Neonatal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Loss & grief > Neonatal death Neonatal death E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... cope with your baby’s death. What is neonatal death? Neonatal death is when a baby dies in ...

  16. A pilot program of knowledge translation and implementation for newborn resuscitation using US Peace Corps Volunteers in rural Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Kristin; Karel, Michele; White, Michelle

    2016-11-16

    Prevention of adverse perinatal outcome using the Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) neonatal resuscitation algorithm can reduce perinatal mortality in low income settings. Mercy Ships is a non-governmental organisation providing free healthcare education in sub-Saharan Africa and in an attempt to reach more rural areas of Madagascar with our neonatal resuscitation training we designed a novel approach in collaboration with US Peace Corps Volunteers (PCV). PCVs work in rural areas and contribute to locally determined public health initiatives. We used a model of knowledge translation and implementation to train non-medical PCVs in HBB who would then train rural healthcare workers. Bulb suction and a self-inflating bag were donated to each health centre. We evaluated knowledge translation and behaviour change at 4 months using the Kirkpatrick model of evaluation. Ten PCVs received training and then trained 42 healthcare workers in 10 rural health centres serving a combined population of over 1 million. Both PCVs and rural healthcare workers showed significant increases in knowledge and skills (p patient outcome. Our novel method of training, including the provision of essential equipment, may be another tool in the armamentarium of those seeking to disseminate good practice to the most rural areas.

  17. Hydroxyethyl starch for resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Nicolai; Perner, Anders

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Resuscitation with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is controversial. In this review, we will present the current evidence for the use of HES solutions including data from recent high-quality randomized clinical trials. RECENT FINDINGS: Meta-analyses of HES vs. control fluids show clear...

  18. Associations of Hospital and Patient Characteristics with Fluid Resuscitation Volumes in Patients with Severe Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Fluid resuscitation is a key intervention in patients with sepsis and circulatory impairment. The recommendations for continued fluid therapy in sepsis are vague, which may result in differences in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate associations between hospital and patient characte....... The data indicate variations in clinical practice not explained by patient characteristics emphasizing the need for RCTs assessing fluid resuscitation volumes fluid in patients with sepsis.......PURPOSE: Fluid resuscitation is a key intervention in patients with sepsis and circulatory impairment. The recommendations for continued fluid therapy in sepsis are vague, which may result in differences in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate associations between hospital and patient...... characteristics and fluid resuscitation volumes in ICU patients with severe sepsis. METHODS: We explored the 6S trial database of ICU patients with severe sepsis needing fluid resuscitation randomised to hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.42 vs. Ringer's acetate. Our primary outcome measure was fluid resuscitation volume...

  19. Pulmonary air leak associated with CPAP at term birth resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Goishi, Keiji; Fujiwara, Takeo; Kaneshige, Masao; Ito, Yushi; Sago, Haruhiko

    2015-09-01

    The Japan Resuscitation Council (JRC) Guidelines 2010 for neonatal resuscitation introduced continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in delivery room. The present study evaluated the effect of CPAP for pulmonary air leak at term birth. This retrospective single-centre study used the data of term neonates who were born without major congenital anomalies at our centre between 2008 and 2009, and between 2011 and 2012. Resuscitation according to the JRC Guidelines 2010. We examined the association between the JRC Guidelines 2010, CPAP by face mask and pulmonary air leak. A total of 5038 infants were analysed. The frequency of CPAP by face mask increased after the update of the JRC Guidelines in 2010 (1.7% vs 11.1%; pneonates (37 weeks: adjusted OR (aOR) 4.37; 95% CI 1.40 to 17.45; 38 weeks: aOR 2.80; 95% CI 1.04 to 8.91), but this association disappeared while adjusting for face mask CPAP additionally (37 weeks: aOR 1.90; 95% CI 0.47 to 8.71; 38 weeks: aOR 1.66; 95% CI 0.54 to 5.77). Following the update of the JRC guidelines on neonatal resuscitation, we observed an increased use of CPAP via face mask, which was associated with a higher prevalence of pulmonary air leak in early-term neonates in our centre. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Providing safe surgery for neonates in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Emmanuel A; Ameh, Nkeiruka

    2003-07-01

    Advances in neonatal intensive care, total parenteral nutrition and improvements in technology have led to a greatly improved outcome of neonatal surgery in developed countries. In many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, however, neonatal surgery continues to pose wide-ranging challenges. Delivery outside hospital, delayed referral, poor transportation, and lack of appropriate personnel and facilities continue to contribute to increased morbidity and mortality in neonates, particularly under emergency situations. Antenatal supervision and hospital delivery needs to be encouraged in our communities. Adequate attention needs to be paid to providing appropriate facilities for neonatal transport and support and training of appropriate staff for neonatal surgery. Neonates with surgical problems should be adequately resuscitated before referral where necessary but surgery should not be unduly delayed. Major neonatal surgery should as much as possible be performed by those trained to operate on neonates. Appropriate research and international collaboration is necessary to improve neonatal surgical care in the environment.

  1. Acute spontaneous gastric perforation in neonates: A report of three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastric perforation in neonates is a rare, serious and life-threatening problem. The precise aetiology is obscure in most cases. By virtue of its high mortality rate, it requires prompt recognition and surgical intervention. We report three cases of neonatal gastric perforation managed by early resuscitation and primary repair.

  2. Management of neonatal abstinence syndrome: a national survey and review of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, M J; Hopewell, J; White, M J

    2009-07-01

    To ascertain the present management of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in neonatal units in the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland. Postal questionnaire to 235 neonatal units, with telephone follow-up of non-respondents. The response rate was 90%, and 96% of respondents had a formal NAS guideline. The median number of infants treated annually for NAS was 6 (range 1-100). The method of Finnegan was the most widely used scoring system (52%). Morphine sulphate was the most commonly used first line agent for both opiate (92%) and polysubstance (69%) withdrawal. Dosing regimens varied widely. Units using a maximum daily morphine dose of seizures secondary to both opiate and polydrug withdrawal in 73% and 81% of units, respectively. 29% of units allowed infants to be discharged home on medication. 58% of these allowed administration of opiates in the community and in almost half of cases this was managed by a parent. Mothers on methadone whose serology was positive for hepatitis B and/or C were four times more likely to be discouraged from breastfeeding. The majority of units currently use an opiate as the drug of first choice as recommended. Doses utilised and second agents added vary significantly between units. Many of our findings reflect the lack of high-quality randomised studies regarding management of NAS.

  3. Maternal nutritional status & practices & perinatal, neonatal mortality in rural Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamji, Mahtab S; V S Murthy, P V; Williams, Livia; Vardhana Rao, M Vishnu

    2008-01-01

    Despite a vast network of primary health centres and sub-centres, health care outreach in rural parts of India is poor. The Dangoria Charitable Trust (DCT), Hyderabad, has developed a model of health care outreach through trained Village Health and Nutrition Entrepreneur and Mobilisers (HNEMs) in five villages of Medak district in Andhra Pradesh, not serviced by the Integrated Child Development Scheme (ICDS) of the Government of India. Impact of such a link worker on perinatal/ neonatal mortality has been positive. The present study attempts to examine the association of maternal nutrition and related factors with perinatal, and neonatal mortality in these villages. Women from five selected villages who had delivered between June 1998 and September 2003, were identified. Those who had lost a child before one month (28 days), including stillbirths, (group 1- mortality group), who could be contacted and were willing to participate, were compared with those who had not lost a child (group II- no mortality), through a structured questionnaire and physical examination for anthropometric status and signs and symptoms of nutritional deficiency. Categorical data were analysed using Pearson chi square analysis. Continuous data were analysed using Student's t test. Mortality during perinatal, neonatal period was 8.2 per cent of all births. Malnutrition was rampant. Over 90 per cent women had 3 or more antenatal check-ups, had taken tetanus injections and had complied with regular consumption of iron-folic acid tablets. Higher percentage of women in group I (mortality group) tended to have height less than 145 cm (high risk) and signs and symptoms of micronutrient deficiencies. However, differences between groups I and II were not statistically significant. Pre-term delivery, difficult labour (use of forceps), first parity, birth asphyxia (no cry at birth) and day of initiating breastfeeding showed significant association with mortality. Significant association between signs

  4. Assessing the capacity for newborn resuscitation and factors associated with providers' knowledge and skills: a cross-sectional study in Afghanistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Y.M.; Ansari, N.; Kols, A.; Tappis, H.; Currie, S.; Zainullah, P.; Bailey, P.; Semba, R.; Sun, K.; van Roosmalen, J.; Stekelenburg, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Resuscitation with bag and mask is a high-impact intervention that can reduce neonatal deaths in resource-poor countries. This study assessed the capacity to perform newborn resuscitation at facilities offering comprehensive emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) in Afghanistan, as

  5. Practice variation in the transfer of premature infants from incubators to open cots in Australian and New Zealand neonatal nurseries: results of an electronic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Karen; Bogossian, Fiona; East, Christine; Davies, Mark William

    2010-06-01

    The incubator environment is essential for optimal physiological functioning and development of the premature infant but the infant is ultimately required to make a successful transfer from incubator to open cot in order to be discharged from hospital. Criteria for transfer lack a systematic approach because no clear, specific guideline predominates in clinical practice. Practice variation exists between continents, regions and nurseries in the same countries, but there is no recent review of current practices utilised for transferring premature infants from incubators to open cots. To document current practice for transferring premature infants to open cots in neonatal nurseries. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey. Twenty-two neonatal intensive care units and fifty-six high dependency special care baby units located in public hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. A sample of 78 key clinical nursing leaders (nurse unit managers, clinical nurse consultants or clinical nurse specialists) within neonatal nurseries identified through email or telephone contact. Data were collected using a web-based survey on practice, decision-making and strategies utilised for transferring premature infants from incubators to open cots. Descriptive statistics (frequencies and crosstabs) were used to analyse data. Comparisons between groups were tested for statistical significance using Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. Significant practice variation between countries was found for only one variable, nursing infants clothed (p=0.011). Processes and practices undertaken similarly in both countries include use of incubator air control mode, current weight criterion, thermal challenging, single-walled incubators and heated mattress systems. Practice variation was significant between neonatal intensive care units and special care baby units for weight range (p=0.005), evidence-based practice (p=0.004), historical nursery practice (p=0.029) and incubator air control mode (p=0

  6. The impact of a father's presence during newborn resuscitation: a qualitative interview study with healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Merryl E; Pattison, Helen M

    2013-03-27

    To explore healthcare professionals' experiences around the time of newborn resuscitation in the delivery room, when the baby's father was present. A qualitative descriptive, retrospective design using the critical incident approach. Tape-recorded semistructured interviews were undertaken with healthcare professionals involved in newborn resuscitation. Participants recalled resuscitation events when the baby's father was present. They described what happened and how those present, including the father, responded. They also reflected upon the impact of the resuscitation and the father's presence on themselves. Participant responses were analysed using thematic analysis. A large teaching hospital in the UK. Purposive sampling was utilised. It was anticipated that 35-40 participants would be recruited. Forty-nine potential participants were invited to take part. The final sample consisted of 37 participants including midwives, obstetricians, anaesthetists, neonatal nurse practitioners, neonatal nurses and paediatricians. Four themes were identified: 'whose role?' 'saying and doing' 'teamwork' and 'impact on me'. While no-one was delegated to support the father during the resuscitation, midwives and anaesthetists most commonly took on this role. Participants felt the midwife was the most appropriate person to support fathers. All healthcare professional groups said they often did not know what to say to fathers during prolonged resuscitation. Teamwork was felt to be of benefit to all concerned, including the father. Some paediatricians described their discomfort when fathers came to the resuscitaire. None of the participants had received education and training specifically on supporting fathers during newborn resuscitation. This is the first known study to specifically explore the experiences of healthcare professionals of the father's presence during newborn resuscitation. The findings suggest the need for more focused training about supporting fathers. There is also

  7. Resuscitation of the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilduff, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    All infants have some degree of hypoxia and respiratory acidosis at birth, but these conditions are more profound in the asphyxiated newborn. The newborn infant is very susceptible to cooling and may require warming. Skin temperature should be maintained between 36-36.5°.2 Resuscitation of the asphyxiated newborn must include both ventilatory and metabolic correction. Newborn infants may have cardiorespiratory problems due to asphyxia, drugs given to the mother, intrathoracic disease, anemia, hypovolemia (due to antepartum hemorrhage), hypotension, etc. There is no substitute for oxygen which is the drug of choice in respiratory depression of the newborn. The use of stimulating drugs like Coramine, picrotoxin, alphalobectine, and Megamide has no place in the resuscitation of the asphyxiated newborn. Imagesp74-ap74-bp74-cp74-d PMID:20469196

  8. Hemostatic resuscitation is neither hemostatic nor resuscitative in trauma hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sirat; Brohi, Karim; Chana, Manik; Raza, Imran; Stanworth, Simon; Gaarder, Christine; Davenport, Ross

    2014-03-01

    Trauma hemorrhage continues to carry a high mortality rate despite changes in modern practice. Traditional approaches to the massively bleeding patient have been shown to result in persistent coagulopathy, bleeding, and poor outcomes. Hemostatic (or damage control) resuscitation developed from the discovery of acute traumatic coagulopathy and increased recognition of the negative consequences of dilutional coagulopathy. These strategies concentrate on early delivery of coagulation therapy combined with permissive hypotension. The efficacy of hemostatic resuscitation in correcting coagulopathy and restoring tissue perfusion during acute hemorrhage has not been studied. This is a prospective cohort study of ROTEM and lactate measurements taken from trauma patients recruited to the multicenter Activation of Coagulation and Inflammation in Trauma (ACIT) study. A blood sample is taken on arrival and during the acute bleeding phase after administration of every 4 U of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), up to 12 U. The quantity of blood products administered within each interval is recorded. Of the 106 study patients receiving at least 4 U of PRBC, 27 received 8 U to 11 U of PRBC and 31 received more than 12 U of PRBC. Average admission lactate was 6.2 mEq/L. Patients with high lactate (≥5 mEq/L) on admission did not clear lactate until hemorrhage control was achieved, and no further PRBC units were required. On admission, 43% of the patients were coagulopathic (clot amplitude at 5 minutes ≤ 35 mm). This increased to 49% by PRBC 4; 62% by PRBC 8 and 68% at PRBC 12. The average fresh frozen plasma/PRBC ratio between intervals was 0.5 for 0 U to 4 U of PRBC, 0.9 for 5 U to 8 U of PRBC, 0.7 for 9 U to 12 U of PRBC. There was no improvement in any ROTEM parameter during ongoing bleeding. While hemostatic resuscitation offers several advantages over historical strategies, it still does not achieve correction of hypoperfusion or coagulopathy during the acute phase of trauma

  9. Predicting medical professionals' intention to allow family presence during resuscitation: A cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Meng-Kuan; Aritejo, Bayu Aji; Tang, Jing-Shia; Chen, Chien-Liang; Chuang, Chia-Chang

    2017-05-01

    Family presence during resuscitation is an emerging trend, yet it remains controversial, even in countries with relatively high acceptance of family presence during resuscitation among medical professionals. Family presence during resuscitation is not common in many countries, and medical professionals in these regions are unfamiliar with family presence during resuscitation. Therefore, this study predicted the medical professionals' intention to allow family presence during resuscitation by applying the theory of planned behaviour. A cross-sectional survey. A single medical centre in southern Taiwan. Medical staffs including physicians and nurses in a single medical centre (n=714). A questionnaire was constructed to measure the theory of planned behaviour constructs of attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, and behavioural intentions as well as the awareness of family presence during resuscitation and demographics. In total, 950 questionnaires were distributed to doctors and nurses in a medical centre. Among the 714 valid questionnaires, only 11 participants were aware of any association in Taiwan that promotes family presence during resuscitation; 94.7% replied that they were unsure (30.4%) or that their unit did not have a family presence during resuscitation policy (74.8%). Regression analysis was performed to predict medical professionals' intention to allow family presence during resuscitation. The results indicated that only positive attitudes and subjective norms regarding family presence during resuscitation and clinical tenure could predict the intention to allow family presence during resuscitation. Because Family presence during resuscitation practice is not common in Taiwan and only 26.19% of the participants agreed to both items measuring the intention to allow family presence during resuscitation, we recommend the implementation of a family presence during resuscitation education program that will enhance the positive beliefs

  10. Family presence at resuscitation attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, Helen

    UK resuscitation guidelines suggest that parents and carers should be allowed to be present during a resuscitation attempt in hospital but no guidance is available regarding family presence when resuscitation takes place out of hospital. A new research study has suggested that relatives who were offered the opportunity to witness resuscitation were less likely to develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder than those who were not given the chance. This article summarises the results of this study and provides an expert commentary on its conclusions.

  11. Paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program in Latin-America: the RIBEPCI experience

    OpenAIRE

    L?pez-Herce, Jes?s; Matamoros, Martha M.; Moya, Luis; Almonte, Enma; Coronel, Diana; Urbano, Javier; Carrillo, ?ngel; del Castillo, Jimena; Menc?a, Santiago; Moral, Ram?n; Ordo?ez, Flora; S?nchez, Carlos; Lagos, Lina; Johnson, Mar?a; Mendoza, Ovidio

    2017-01-01

    Background To describe the design and to present the results of a paediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program adapted to Latin-America. Methods A paediatric CPR coordinated training project was set up in several Latin-American countries with the instructional and scientific support of the Spanish Group for Paediatric and Neonatal CPR. The program was divided into four phases: CPR training and preparation of instructors; training for instructors; supervised tea...

  12. Neonatal jaundice and its management: knowledge, attitude and practice of community health workers in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olusoji J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal jaundice (NNJ is still a leading cause of preventable brain damage, physical and mental handicap, and early death among infants in many communities. Greater awareness is needed among all health workers. The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge of primary health care workers about the description, causes, effective treatment, and sequelae of NNJ. Methods The setting was a local government area i.e. an administrative district within the south-western part of Nigeria. Community health workers in this area were interviewed by means of a self-administered questionnaire which focused on awareness and knowledge of neonatal jaundice and its causes, treatment and complications. Results Sixty-six community health workers participated in the survey and male-to-female ratio was 1:5. Their work experience averaged 13.5 (SD 12.7 years. Only 51.5% of the respondents gave a correct definition of NNJ. 75.8 % knew how to examine for this condition while 84.9 % knew at least two of its major causes in our environment. Also, only 54.5 % had adequate knowledge of effective treatment namely, phototherapy and exchange blood transfusion. Rather than referring affected babies to hospitals for proper management, 13.4 %, 10.4 % and 3 % of the participants would treat with ineffective drugs, natural phototherapy and herbal remedies respectively. None of the participants knew any effective means of prevention. Conclusion Primary health care workers may have inadequate knowledge and misconceptions on NNJ which must be addressed concertedly before the impact of the condition on child health and well-being can be significantly reduced. We recommend regular training workshops and seminars for this purpose.

  13. Midwives' Experiences, Education, and Support Needs Regarding Basic Newborn Resuscitation in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Manal; Alnuaimi, Karimeh; Mohammad, Khitam; Creedy, Debra; Hamadneh, Shereen

    2016-06-01

    Newborns who are compromised at birth require rapid attention to stabilize their respiration attempts. Lack of knowledge regarding basic newborn resuscitation is a contributing factor to poor newborn health outcomes and increased mortality. The purpose of this study was to explore Jordanian midwives' experiences, education, and support needs to competently perform basic newborn resuscitation. Qualitative descriptive methodology was used to analyze a convenience sample of 20 midwives. A thematic approach was used to analyze the data. Participants discussed their experiences of basic newborn resuscitation including knowledge, skills, and barriers and suggested solutions to improve practice. Four themes were revealed: lack of knowledge and skills in newborn resuscitation, organizational constraints, inadequate teamwork, and educational needs. The midwives perceived that their ability to perform newborn resuscitation was hindered by lack of knowledge and skills in newborn resuscitation, organizational constraints (such as lack of equipment), and poor co-ordination and communication among team members. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Fluid resuscitation for major burn patients with the TMMU protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gaoxing; Peng, Yizhi; Yuan, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Wenguang; Wu, Jun; Tang, Jin; Huang, Yuesheng; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2009-12-01

    Fluid resuscitation is one of the critical treatments for the major burn patient in the early phases after injury. We evaluated the practice of fluid resuscitation for severely burned patients with the Third Military Medical University (TMMU) protocol, which is most widely used in many regions of China. Patients with major burns (>30% total body surface area (TBSA)) presenting to Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, between January 2005 and October 2007, were included in this study. Fluid resuscitation was initiated by the TMMU protocol. A total of 71 patients were (46 adults and 25 children) included in this study. All patients survived the first 48 h after injury smoothly and none developed abdominal compartment syndrome or other recognised complications associated with fluid resuscitation. The average quantity of fluid infused was 3.3-61.33% more than that calculated based on the TMMU protocol in both adult and paediatric groups. The average urine output during the first 24h after injury was about 1.2 ml per kg body weight per hour in the two groups, but reached 1.2 ml and 1.7 ml during the second 24h in adult and pediatric groups, respectively. This study indicates that the TMMU protocol for fluid resuscitation is a feasible option for burn patients. Individualised resuscitation - guided by the physiological response to fluid administration - is still important as in other protocols.

  15. Initial fluid resuscitation of patients with septic shock in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Sarah; Perner, A

    2011-01-01

    Fluid is the mainstay of resuscitation of patients with septic shock, but the optimal composition and volume are unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the current initial fluid resuscitation practice in patients with septic shock in the intensive care unit (ICU) and patient characteristics and outcome...

  16. Medical students’ experiences of resuscitation and discussions surrounding resuscitation status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal AR

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Asha R Aggarwal, Iqbal Khan Department of Medical Education, Northampton General Hospital, Northampton, UK Objectives: In the UK, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR should be undertaken in the event of cardiac arrest unless a patient has a “Do Not Attempt CPR” document. Doctors have a legal duty to discuss CPR with patients or inform them that CPR would be futile. In this study, final-year medical students were interviewed about their experiences of resuscitation on the wards and of observing conversations about resuscitation status to explore whether they would be equipped to have an informed discussion about resuscitation in the future. Methods: Twenty final-year medical students from two medical schools were interviewed about their experiences on the wards. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was undertaken.Results: Students who had witnessed CPR on the wards found that aspects of it were distressing. A significant minority had never seen resuscitation status being discussed with a patient. No students reported seeing a difficult conversation. Half of the students interviewed reported being turned away from difficult conversations by clinicians. Only two of the twenty students would feel comfortable raising the issue of resuscitation with a patient. Conclusion: It is vital that doctors are comfortable talking to patients about resuscitation. Given the increasing importance of this aspect of communication, it should be considered for inclusion in the formal communication skills teaching during medical school. Keywords: undergraduate, communication, DNACPR, palliative care, end of life care

  17. Prognostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in successfully resuscitated patients used in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søholm, Helle; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Cronberg, Tobias; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Wanscher, Michael; Hassager, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis and predicting outcome is complex with neurophysiological testing and repeated clinical neurological examinations as key components of the assessment. In this study we examine the association between different electroencephalography (EEG) patterns and mortality in a clinical cohort of OHCA-patients. From 2002 to 2011 consecutive patients were admitted to an intensive-care-unit after resuscitation from OHCA. Utstein-criteria for pre-hospital data and review of individual patients' charts for post-resuscitation care were used. EEG reports were analysed according to the 2012 American Clinical Neurophysiology Society's guidelines. A total of 1076 patients were included, and EEG was performed in 20% (n=219) with a median of 3(IQR 2-4) days after OHCA. Rhythmic Delta Activity (RDA) was found in 71 patients (36%) and Periodic Discharges (PD) in 100 patients (45%). Background EEG frequency of Alpha+ or Theta was noted in 107 patients (49%), and change in cerebral EEG activity to stimulation (reactivity) was found in 38 patients (17%). Suppression (all activity <10 μV) was found in 26 (12%) and burst-suppression in 17 (8%) patients. A favourable EEG pattern (reactivity, favourable background frequency and RDA) was independently associated with reduced mortality with hazard ratio (HR) 0.43 (95%CI: 0.24-0.76), p=0.004 (false positive rate: 31%) and a non-favourable EEG pattern (no reactivity, unfavourable background frequency, and PD, suppressed voltage or burst-suppression) was associated with higher mortality (HR=1.62(1.09-2.41), p=0.02) after adjustment for known prognostic factors (false positive rate: 9%). EEG may be useful in work-up in prognostication of patients with OHCA. Findings such as Rhythmic Delta Activity (RDA) seem to be associated with a better prognosis, whereas suppressed voltage and burst-suppression patterns were associated with poor prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland

  18. Neonatal mortality and prevalence of practices for newborn care in a squatter settlement of Karachi, Pakistan: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsheen Ayaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the past two decades there has been a sustained decline in child and infant mortality, however neonatal mortality has remained relatively unchanged. Almost all neonatal deaths (99% occur in developing countries, where the majority are delivered at homes. Evidence suggests that these deaths could be prevented by simple, inexpensive practices and interventions during the pregnancy, delivery and postnatal period. In Pakistan over the last decade extensive efforts have been made by the international donors and government to implement these practices. However, limited attempts have been made to explore if these efforts have made a difference at the grass root level. This study assessed the burden of neonatal mortality and prevalence of practices for newborn care in a squatter settlement of Karachi, Pakistan. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A community based cross-sectional study was performed. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was administered to 565 women who had recently delivered. Information was collected on neonatal morbidity, mortality and practices of women regarding care during pregnancy, child birth and for newborn, till 28th day of birth. Although 70% of women mentioned receiving antenatal care by a skilled provider, only 54.5% had four or more visits. Tetanus toxoid was received by 79% of women while only 56% delivered at a health care facility by a skilled attendant. Newborn care practices like bathing the baby immediately after birth (56%, giving pre-lacteals (79.5%, late initiation of breast feeding (80.3%, application of substances on umbilical cord (58% and body massage (89% were common. Most neonates (81.1% received BCG injection and polio drops after birth. Neonatal mortality rate was 27/1000 live births with the majority of deaths occurring during the first three days of life. CONCLUSION: Even after years of efforts by government and nongovernmental sector to reduce newborn morbidity and mortality, inadequate

  19. Qualitative exploration of practices to prevent medication errors in neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishoej, Rikke Mie; Lai Nielsen, Henriette; Strzelec, Stina Maria

    2018-01-01

    to prevent MEs involved technology, procedures, education, skills and hospital pharmacy services. Potential future practices to prevent MEs included customizing the computerized physician order entry systems to support optimal prescribing, standardizing the double-check process, training of calculation...

  20. A survey on training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Latin America, Spain, and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo, Angel

    2011-09-01

    To determine how training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation is provided in the Iberoamerican countries. Survey. Latin America, Spain, and Portugal. Experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation education. A questionnaire was sent to experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in 21 countries in Latin America, Spain, and Portugal; we received 15 replies. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is not included in medical undergraduate or nursing training in any of these countries and pediatric residents receive systematic cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in only four countries. Basic pediatric life support courses, pediatric advanced life support courses, and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructors courses are given in 13 of 15, 14 of 15, and 11 of 15 respondent countries, respectively. Course duration and the number of hours of practical training were variable: basic life support, 5 hrs (range, 4-8 hrs); practical training, 4 hrs (range, 2-5 hrs); advanced life support, 18 hrs (range, 10-30 hrs); and practical training, 14 hrs (range, 5-18 hrs). Only nine countries (60%) had a national group that organized pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Thirteen countries (86.6%) had fewer than five centers offering pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Respondents considered the main obstacles to the expansion of training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation to be the shortage of instructors (28.5%), students' lack of financial resources (21.4%), and deficiencies in educational organization (21.4%). Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is not uniform across the majority of Iberoamerican countries, with poor organization and little institutional involvement. National groups should be created in each country to plan and coordinate pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and to coordinate with other Iberoamerican countries.

  1. Neonatal care practices in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Margaret; Shiroor, Anushree; Hill, Zelee

    2018-04-16

    Recommended immediate newborn care practices include thermal care (immediate drying and wrapping, skin-to-skin contact after delivery, delayed bathing), hygienic cord care and early initiation of breastfeeding. This paper systematically reviews quantitative and qualitative data from sub-Saharan Africa on the prevalence of key immediate newborn care practices and the factors that influence them. Studies were identified by searching relevant databases and websites, contacting national and international academics and implementers and hand-searching reference lists of included articles. English-language published and unpublished literature reporting primary data from sub-Saharan Africa (published between January 2001 and May 2014) were included if it met the quality criteria. Quantitative prevalence data were extracted and summarized. Qualitative data were synthesized through thematic analysis, with deductive coding used to identify emergent themes within each care practice. A framework approach was used to identify prominent and divergent themes. Forty-two studies were included as well as DHS data - only available for early breastfeeding practices from 33 countries. Results found variation in the prevalence of immediate newborn care practices between countries, with the exception of skin-to-skin contact after delivery which was universally low. The importance of keeping newborn babies warm was well recognized, although thermal care practices were sub-optimal. Similar factors influenced practices across countries, including delayed drying and wrapping because the birth attendant focused on the mother; bathing newborns soon after delivery to remove the dirt and blood; negative beliefs about the vernix; applying substances to the cord to make it drop off quickly; and delayed breastfeeding because of a perception of a lack of milk or because the baby needs to sleep after delivery or does not showing signs of hunger. The majority of studies included in this review came

  2. Colostomy in neonates under local anaesthesia: indications, technique and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukong, Christopher Suiye; Jabo, Basheer Abdullahi; Mfuh, Anita Yafeh

    2012-01-01

    Colostomy is a resuscitative procedure in paediatric surgical practice. In critical patients, mortality may be high, if general anaesthesia is used. Local anaesthesia may be an alternative in this group of neonates. The aim of this article was to evaluate the indications, the technique and outcome of colostomy in neonates under local anaesthesia. A prospective analysis of 38 neonates who had colostomy under local anaesthesia, from July 2008 to September 2011, in our centre. There were 34 boys and 4 girls. The median age was 4 days (range 2-11 days),and all presented in a critical state. The indication for colostomy was anorectal malformation 37 (97.4%) and colonic atresia 1 (2.6%). COLOSTOMY: sigmoid 7 (18.4%), descending 29 (76.3%), transverse 2 (5.3%). The median duration of the procedure was 45 minutes (range 30-60 minutes). The hospital stay was 7-15 days (median 7 days) and cost of treatment 7000-7500 Naira (median 7500 Naira = $50). There were 5 (13.2%) early complications, namely, skin excoriation 2, superficial site infection 2, and bowel evisceration 1; mortality was 2 (5.3%). The late complications were stomal stenosis 1 (2.6%), colostomy diarrhoea 2 (5.3%), and parastomal hernia 2 (5.3%). 25 (65.7%) had colostomy takedown and 13 (34%) were yet to have colostomy takedown. Follow-up was for 1-2 years. None of the patients had a permanent colostomy. Colostomy in neonates under local anaesthesia is feasible, safe and cost-effective. The outcome is good and may be used when neonatal anaesthetic expertise and intensive care facilities are lacking.

  3. Resuscitation of preterm infants: delivery room interventions and their effect on outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Colm P F

    2012-12-01

    Despite advances in neonatal care, the rate of oxygen dependence at 36 weeks\\' postmenstrual age or bronchopulmonary dysplasia has not fallen. Neonatologists are increasingly careful to apply ventilation strategies that are gentle to the lung in the neonatal intensive care unit. However, there has not been the same emphasis applying gentle ventilation strategies immediately after birth. A lung-protective strategy should start immediately after birth to establish a functional residual capacity, reduce volutrauma and atelectotrauma, facilitate gas exchange, and improve oxygenation during neonatal transition. This article discusses techniques and equipment recommended by international resuscitation guidelines during breathing assistance in the delivery room.

  4. Novel Resuscitation from Lethal Hemorrhage - Suspended Animation for Delayed Resuscitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Safar, Peter

    2002-01-01

    .... We have conceived and documented "suspended animation for delayed resuscitation" with the use of hypothermic saline flush into the aorta within the first 5 minute of no blood flow, using novel...

  5. Practice guideline summary: Reducing brain injury following cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geocadin, Romergryko G; Wijdicks, Eelco; Armstrong, Melissa J; Damian, Maxwell; Mayer, Stephan A; Ornato, Joseph P; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Suarez, José I; Torbey, Michel T; Dubinsky, Richard M; Lazarou, Jason

    2017-05-30

    To assess the evidence and make evidence-based recommendations for acute interventions to reduce brain injury in adult patients who are comatose after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Published literature from 1966 to August 29, 2016, was reviewed with evidence-based classification of relevant articles. For patients who are comatose in whom the initial cardiac rhythm is either pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), therapeutic hypothermia (TH; 32-34°C for 24 hours) is highly likely to be effective in improving functional neurologic outcome and survival compared with non-TH and should be offered (Level A). For patients who are comatose in whom the initial cardiac rhythm is either VT/VF or asystole/pulseless electrical activity (PEA) after OHCA, targeted temperature management (36°C for 24 hours, followed by 8 hours of rewarming to 37°C, and temperature maintenance below 37.5°C until 72 hours) is likely as effective as TH and is an acceptable alternative (Level B). For patients who are comatose with an initial rhythm of PEA/asystole, TH possibly improves survival and functional neurologic outcome at discharge vs standard care and may be offered (Level C). Prehospital cooling as an adjunct to TH is highly likely to be ineffective in further improving neurologic outcome and survival and should not be offered (Level A). Other pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies (applied with or without concomitant TH) are also reviewed. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Transport Risk Index of Physiologic Stability, version II (TRIPS-II): a simple and practical neonatal illness severity score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shoo K; Aziz, Khalid; Dunn, Michael; Clarke, Maxine; Kovacs, Lajos; Ojah, Cecil; Ye, Xiang Y

    2013-05-01

    Derive and validate a practical assessment of infant illness severity at admission to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Prospective study involving 17,075 infants admitted to 15 NICUs in 2006 to 2008. Logistic regression was used to derive a prediction model for mortality comprising four empirically weighted items (temperature, blood pressure, respiratory status, response to noxious stimuli). This Transport Risk Index of Physiologic Stability, version II (TRIPS-II) was then validated for prediction of 7-day and total NICU mortality. TRIPS-II discriminated 7-day (receiver operating curve [ROC] area, 0.90) and total NICU mortality (ROC area, 0.87) from survival. Furthermore, there was a direct association between changes in TRIPS-II at 12 and 24 hours and mortality. There was good calibration across the full range of TRIPS-II scores and the gestational age at birth, and addition of TRIPS-II improved performance of prediction models that use gestational age and baseline population risk variables. TRIPS-II is a validated benchmarking tool for assessing infant illness severity at admission and for up to 24 hours after. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Remifentanil analgesia during laser treatment for retinopathy of prematurity: a practical approach in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Nihal; Bas, Ahmet Y; Kavurt, Sumru; Celik, Istemi H; Yucel, Husniye; Turkbay, Dursun; Hekimoğlu, Emre; Koc, Orhan

    2014-11-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a significant cause of childhood blindness. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of remifentanil analgesia during laser treatment of ROP performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Remifentanil was infused continuously during the procedure starting with a dose of 0.2 µg/kg/min and increased gradually to 0.6 µg/kg/min to provide an adequate level of analgesia. We enrolled 64 infants. Remifentanil was infused continuously at a mean rate of 0.4 ± 0.1 μg/kg/min. No major adverse effects were observed except in two patients with reversible bradycardia and hypotension. Premature infant pain profile (PIPP) scores revealed no pain. Patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia had similar remifentanil dosage, intubation duration, and extubation time. Remifentanil analgesia for ROP treatment performed in the NICU by pediatricians is a safe and effective modality. This modality offers a practical solution in hospitals without readily available pediatric anesthetists. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Using Statistical Process Control to Drive Improvement in Neonatal Care: A Practical Introduction to Control Charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Munish; Kaplan, Heather C

    2017-09-01

    Quality improvement (QI) is based on measuring performance over time, and variation in data measured over time must be understood to guide change and make optimal improvements. Common cause variation is natural variation owing to factors inherent to any process; special cause variation is unnatural variation owing to external factors. Statistical process control methods, and particularly control charts, are robust tools for understanding data over time and identifying common and special cause variation. This review provides a practical introduction to the use of control charts in health care QI, with a focus on neonatology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk Factors for Neonatal Mortality Among Very Low Birth Weight Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Nayeri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine risk factors causing increase in very low birth way (VLBW neonatal mortality. The medical files of all neonates weighing ≤1500 g, born in Vali-e-Asr hospital (2001-2004 were studied. Two groups of neonates (living and dead were compared up to the time of hospital discharge or death. A total of 317 neonates were enrolled. A meaningful relationship existed between occurrence of death and low gestational age (P=0.02, low birth weight, lower than 1000 g (P=0.001, Apgar score <6 at 5th minutes (P=0.001, resuscitation at birth (P=0.001, respiratory distress syndrome (P=0.001 need for mechanical ventilation (P=0.001, neurological complications (P=0.001 and intraventricular hemorrhage (P=0.001. Regression analysis indicated that each 250 g weight increase up to 1250 g had protective effect, and reduced mortality rate. The causes of death of those neonates weighting over 1250 g should be sought in factors other than weight. Survival rate was calculated to be 80.4% for neonates weighing more than 1000 g. The most important high risk factors affecting mortality of neonates are: low birth weight, need for resuscitation at birth, need for ventilator use and intraventricular hemorrhage.

  10. [Recombinant human erythropoietin in neonates: guidelines for clinical practice from the French Society of Neonatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, E; Beuchée, A; Truffert, P; Pouvreau, N; Patkai, J; Baud, O; Boubred, F; Flamant, C; Jarreau, P-H

    2015-10-01

    1/To assess the effectiveness and safety of EPO in reducing red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in preterm infants. 2/To provide guidelines for clinical practice in France. 1/This systematic evidence review is based on PubMed search, Cochrane library. 2/Using French National Authority for Health methods concerning guidelines for clinical practice. Early EPO reduced the risk of RBC transfusions, donor exposure, and the number of transfusions in very preterm infants (LE2). Late EPO reduced the risk of RBC transfusions and the number of transfusions in very preterm infants (LE2). There is no difference between the effectiveness of early and late EPO (LE2). There is no difference between high-dose and low-dose EPO (LE2). The level of evidence is too low to recommend the intravenous route. EPO has no impact on the rate of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis (LE3), and retinopathy of prematurity (LE2). The level of evidence is too low to recommend EPO for neuroprotection in very preterm or term infants. EPO to reduce RBC transfusion in very preterm infants is recommended (Level A). The optimal time to start therapy is unknown (Level B). The recommended dose is 750IU/kg/week via three subcutaneous injections for 6weeks (Level B). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Pediatric Cardiac Population: In Search of a Standard of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Javier J; Jain, Parag; Raymond, Tia T; Minard, Charles G; Topjian, Alexis; Nadkarni, Vinay; Gaies, Michael; Bembea, Melania; Checchia, Paul A; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Thiagarajan, Ravi

    2018-02-01

    Although clinical and pharmacologic guidelines exist for the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children (Pediatric Advanced Life Support), the practice of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pediatric cardiac patients remains without universally accepted standards. We aim to explore variation in extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures by surveying clinicians who care for this high-risk patient population. A 28-item cross-sectional survey was distributed via a web-based platform to clinicians focusing on cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation team dynamics immediately prior to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannulation. Pediatric hospitals providing extracorporeal mechanical support services to patients with congenital and/or acquired heart disease. Critical care/cardiology specialist physicians, cardiothoracic surgeons, advanced practice nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation specialists. None. Survey web links were distributed over a 2-month period with critical care and/or cardiology physicians comprising the majority of respondents (75%). Nearly all respondents practice at academic/teaching institutions (97%), 89% were from U.S./Canadian institutions and 56% reported less than 10 years of clinical experience. During extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a majority of respondents reported adherence to guideline recommendations for epinephrine bolus dosing (64%). Conversely, 19% reported using only one to three epinephrine bolus doses regardless of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration. Inotropic support is held after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannulation "most of the time" by 58% of respondents and 94% report using afterload reducing/antihypertensive agents "some" to "most of the time" after achieving full extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. Interruptions in chest compressions are common

  12. Implementing knowledge into practice for improved neonatal survival; a cluster-randomised, community-based trial in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Tran Q

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, almost 4 million newborns die during the first 4 weeks of life every year. By increased use of evidence-based knowledge in the healthcare system a large proportion of these neonatal deaths could be prevented. But there is a severe lack of knowledge on effective methods for successful implementation of evidence into practice, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Recent studies have demonstrated promising results with increased survival among both mothers and newborns using community-based approaches. In Vietnam evidence-based guidelines on reproductive health were launched in 2003 and revised in 2009. The overall objective of the current project is to evaluate if a facilitation intervention on the community level, with a problem-solving approach involving local representatives if the healthcare system and the community, results in improvements of neonatal health and survival. Methods/Design The study, which has been given the acronym NeoKIP (Neonatal Health - Knowledge Into Practice, took place in 8 districts composed by 90 communes in a province in northern Vietnam, where neonatal mortality rate was 24/1000 in 2005. A cluster randomised design was used, allocating clusters, as defined as a commune and its correponding Commune Health Center (CHC to either intervention or control arm. The facilitation intervention targeted staff at healthcare centres and key persons in the communes. The facilitator role was performed by lay women (Women's Union representatives using quality improvement techniques to initiate and sustain improvement processes targeting identified problem areas. The intervention has been running over 3 years and data were collected on the facilitation process, healthcare staff knowledge in neonatal care and their behaviour in clinical practice, and reproductive and perinatal health indicators. Primary outcome is neonatal mortality. Discussion The intervention is participatory and dynamic

  13. Impact of Implementing 5 Potentially Better Respiratory Practices on Neonatal Outcomes and Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Leslie A.; LaPierre, Justine; Welch, Maureen; Porter, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We implemented 5 potentially better practices to limit mechanical ventilation (MV), supplemental oxygen, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in newborn infants born before 33 weeks' gestation. METHODS: The methods used in this study included (1) exclusive use of bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP), (2) provision of bCPAP in the delivery room, (3) strict intubation criteria, (4) strict extubation criteria, and (5) prolonged CPAP to avoid supplemental oxygen. We excluded outborn infants and those with major anomalies and obstetric complications from analysis. RESULTS: Demographics were similar in 61 infants born before and 60 born after implementation. For infants born at 26 to 3267 weeks' gestation, intubation (first 72 hours) decreased from 52% to 11% (P < .0001) and surfactant use decreased from 48% to 14% (P = .0001). In all infants, the mean ± SD fraction of inspired oxygen requirement (first 24 hours) decreased from 0.27 ± 0.08 to 0.24 ± 0.05 (P = .0005), days of oxygen decreased from 23.5 ± 44.5 to 9.3 ± 22.0 (P = .04), and days of MV decreased from 8.8 ± 27.8 to 2.2 ± 6.2 (P = .005). Hypotension decreased from 33% to 15% (P = .03). The percentage of infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia was 17% before and 8% after (P = .27). Nurse staffing ratios remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of these potentially better practices reduced the need for MV, surfactant, and supplemental oxygen as well as reduced hypotension among infants born before 33 weeks' gestation without adverse consequences. The costs for equipment and surfactant were lower. PMID:21669893

  14. Agreement between Cochrane Neonatal reviews and clinical practice guidelines for newborns in Denmark a cross sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Jesper; Greisen, Gorm; Madsen, Lars P

    2007-01-01

    for disagreement were numerous; usage of evidence with higher bias risks than randomised trials in guidelines development was the most frequent one. Cochrane reviews were rarely (10%) used during guideline development. Nine guideline topics (5%) revealed diversity among the departments' recommendations....... CONCLUSIONS: There is good agreement between Cochrane reviews and neonatal guidelines in Denmark. The disagreements are few. Cochrane reviews were rarely used for guideline development. Guideline heterogeneity among neonatal departments seems moderate....

  15. Neonatal Near Miss: the need for a standard definition and appropriate criteria and the rationale for a prospective surveillance system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana P. Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Latin American, there is currently a regional action with the main purposes of putting the concept of severe neonatal morbidity in practice and formulating proposals for interventions. A general overview of neonatal health conditions, including morbidity and mortality, is provided to update regional knowledge on the topic. An example of the development and implementation of the concept of maternal near miss is also provided, followed by results from a systematic review covering all previously published studies on Neonatal Near Miss. Finally, some proposals for building a common concept on the topic and for launching a prospective surveillance study are presented. A Neonatal Near Miss is a neonate who had a severe morbidity (organ dysfunction or failure but who survived this condition within the first 27 days of life. The pragmatic criteria recommended to be used are as follows: birth weight below 1700 g, Apgar score below 7 at 5 minutes of life and gestational age below 33 weeks. As a proxy for organ dysfunction, the following management criteria are also confirmed: parenteral therapeutic antibiotics; nasal continuous positive airway pressure; any intubation during the first 27 days of life; phototherapy within the first 24 h of life; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; the use of vasoactive drugs, anticonvulsants, surfactants, blood products and steroids for refractory hypoglycemia and any surgical procedure. Although this study starts from a regional perspective, this topic is clearly globally relevant. All nations, especially low and middle-income countries, could benefit from the proposed standardization.

  16. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Perinatal Practices"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR, European Society for Neonatology (ESN, Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS, European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNIORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann (President of ESPR, Morten Breindahl (President of ESN, Manuel Sánchez Luna (President of UENPS, Silke Mader (Chairwoman of the Executive Board and Co-Founder of EFCNISCIENTIFIC COMMITTEEVirgilio P. Carnielli (Congress President Chair, Pierre Gressens (Past Scientific President, Umberto Simeoni, Manon Benders, Neil Marlow, Ola D. Saugstad, Petra Hüppi, Agnes van den HoogenSession "Perinatal Practices"ABS 1. VACUUM EXTRACTION AND RISK OF NEONATAL COMPLICATIONS: A POPULATION-BASED COHORT STUDY • D. Rossetti, A.S. Laganà, G. Valenti, B. Chiofalo, S. Butticè, G. Sanpietro, A.M.C. Rapisarda, F. Sapia, M. Noventa, A. Vitagliano, S.G. VitaleABS 2. ELECTIVE CAESAREAN SECTION AND RES­PIRATORY MORBIDITIES IN TERM INFANTS • P. Mallya, S. GargABS 3. RISK FACTORS AND OUTCOME IN PRE­VIABLE PPROM AND CURRENT TREATMENT PRACTICE • A. van Gennip, E.E.M. Mulder, R.M. Brohet, J. van Eyck, R.A. van LingenABS 4. ASSESSMENT OF FUNCTIONAL STATUS IN PRETERM INFANTS: ONLINE SURVEY TO INFORM SCORING OF A CLINICIAN-REPORTED OUTCOMES (CLINRO TOOL • M. Turner, I. Hansen-Pupp, J. Higginson, R. Ward, M. Vanya, E. Flood, E. Schwartz, H. Doll, A. Tocoian, A. Mangili, N. Barton, S. SardaABS 5. INFANTS AND MATERNAL OUTCOME OF PREGNANCIES COMPLICATED BY H1N1 INFECTION NEEDING ECMO THERAPY: A UK ECMO CENTRE EXPERIENCE • N. Singh, J. Behrsin, F. Siddiqui, R. Porter, M. Charlton, A. Akuma, S. MittalABS 6. THE ASSOCIATION OF NEONATAL MORBIDITIES AND MORTALITY OF PRETERM INFANTS WITH

  17. Latin American Consensus for Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 2017: Latin American Pediatric Critical Care Society Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Almonte, Enma; Alvarado, Manuel; Bogado, Norma Beatriz; Cyunel, Mariana; Escalante, Raffo; Finardi, Christiane; Guzmán, Gustavo; Jaramillo-Bustamante, Juan C; Madrid, Claudia C; Matamoros, Martha; Moya, Luis Augusto; Obando, Grania; Reboredo, Gaspar; López, Lissette R; Scheu, Christian; Valenzuela, Alejandro; Yerovi, Rocío; Yock-Corrales, Adriana

    2018-03-01

    To develop a Latin American Consensus about Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. To clarify, reinforce, and adapt some specific recommendations for pediatric patients and to stimulate the implementation of these recommendations in clinical practice. Expert consensus recommendations with Delphi methodology. Latin American countries. Experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation from 19 Latin American countries. Delphi methodology for expert consensus. The goal was to reach consensus with all the participating experts for every recommendation. An agreement of at least 80% of the participating experts had to exist in order to deliver a recommendation. Two Delphi voting rounds were sent out electronically. The experts were asked to score between 1 and 9 their level of agreement for each recommendation. The score was then classified into three groups: strong agreement (score 7-9), moderate agreement (score 4-6), and disagreement (score 1-3). Nineteen experts from 19 countries participated in both voting rounds and in the whole process of drafting the recommendations. Sixteen recommendations about organization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, prevention, basic resuscitation, advanced resuscitation, and postresuscitation measures were approved. Ten of them had a consensus of 100%. Four of them were agreed by all the participants except one (94.7% consensus). One recommendation was agreed by all except two experts (89.4%), and finally, one was agreed by all except three experts (84.2%). All the recommendations reached a level of agreement. This consensus adapts 16 international recommendations to Latin America in order to improve the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children. Studies should be conducted to analyze the effectiveness of the implementation of these recommendations.

  18. Neonatal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Dessì

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper on neonatal sepsis, after a short presentation of etiopathogenesis and physiopathology, we will briefly present the clinical picture, the diagnosis and the therapy. Concerning diagnosis, we will focus our attention on procalcitonin (PCT, serum amyloid A (SAA, presepsin (sCD14 and metabolomics. Three practical tables complete the review. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  19. Neonatal Mortality in an Urban Population in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony O. Adetola

    2011-10-01

    Conclusion: NMR is high among hospital live births in Ibadan. There is a need for programs encouraging the use of antenatal care, improving skills on neonatal resuscitation and care of LBW infants; as well as implementation of community-based newborn survival strategies.

  20. A Standardized Needs Assessment Tool to Inform the Curriculum Development Process for Pediatric Resuscitation Simulation-Based Education in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Shilkofski

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionUnder five mortality rates (UFMR remain high for children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs in the developing world. Education for practitioners in these environments is a key factor to improve outcomes that will address United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 3 and 10 (good health and well being and reduced inequalities. In order to appropriately contextualize a curriculum using simulation, it is necessary to first conduct a needs assessment of the target learner population. The World Health Organization (WHO has published a tool to assess capacity for emergency and surgical care in LMICs that is adaptable to this goal.Materials and methodsThe WHO Tool for Situational Analysis to Assess Emergency and Essential Surgical Care was modified to assess pediatric resuscitation capacity in clinical settings in two LMICs: Uganda and Myanmar. Modifications included assessment of self-identified learning needs, current practices, and perceived epidemiology of disease burden in each clinical setting, in addition to assessment of pediatric resuscitation capacity in regard to infrastructure, procedures, equipment, and supplies. The modified tool was administered to 94 respondents from the two settings who were target learners of a proposed simulation-based curriculum in pediatric and neonatal resuscitation.ResultsInfectious diseases (respiratory illnesses and diarrheal disease were cited as the most common causes of pediatric deaths in both countries. Self-identified learning needs included knowledge and skill development in pediatric airway/breathing topics, as well as general resuscitation topics such as CPR and fluid resuscitation in shock. Equipment and supply availability varied substantially between settings, and critical shortages were identified in each setting. Current practices and procedures were often limited by equipment availability or infrastructural considerations.Discussion and conclusionEpidemiology of disease

  1. Translating continuing professional development education to nursing practice in Rwanda: Enhancing maternal and newborn health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Kasine

    Full Text Available Introduction: Approximately 99% of the three million neonatal deaths that occur annually are in developing countries. In Rwanda, neonatal asphyxia is the leading cause of neonatal mortality accounting for 38% of all neonatal deaths. The Helping Babies Breathe (HBB© course was initiated by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP in 2010 to reduce neonatal mortality in resource limited areas. Despite the provision of HBB© courses to practicing nurses in Rwanda, little is known about nurses’ experiences of applying the knowledge and skills acquired from those courses to practice. This study was conducted in 2014 in five district hospitals (Nyamata, Rwamagana, Gahini, Kiziguro, and Kibungo located in the Eastern Province of Rwanda. Purpose: Explore nurses’ experiences of translating continuing professional development (CPD education utilizing the HBB© course to nursing practice in Rwanda. Methods: Qualitative descriptive design. A purposive sample of 10 nurses participated in individual interviews. NVIVO computer software was used to manage qualitative data. Content analysis was used for generating categories from the data. Findings: Three categories emerged from the analysis: 1 application of competencies acquired from education sessions to practice, 2 benefits of CPD, and 3 facilitators and barriers to the application of competencies into practice. Qualitative interviews revealed that Nurses’ perceived confidence in performing newborn resuscitation improved after taking part in HBB© courses. Nonetheless, nurses voiced the existence of conditions in their work environment that hindered their ability to apply the acquired knowledge and skills including insufficient materials, shortages of nurses, and potential inadequate human resource allocation. Recommendations and conclusion: Regular offerings of newborn resuscitation CPD courses to health professionals in developing countries could increase their knowledge and skills, which could

  2. Neonatal transfusion practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindern, Jeannette Susanne von

    2011-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are probably the most frequently used drug given to very preterm infants; more than 90% of infants with a birth weight <1000 grams receive one or more RBC transfusions. Except for reduction of the amount of blood drawn for laboratory tests and use of a single donor program, no

  3. Neonatal mortality in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, F R; Schuman, K L; Lyon, J L

    1982-09-01

    A cohort study of neonatal mortality (N = 106) in white singleton births (N = 14,486) in Utah for January-June 1975 was conducted. Using membership and activity in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon) as a proxy for parental health practices, i.e., tobacco and alcohol abstinence, differential neonatal mortality rates were calculated. The influence of potential confounding factors was evaluated. Low activity LDS members were found to have an excess risk of neonatal death five times greater than high activity LDS, with an upper bound of a two-sided 95% confidence interval of 7.9. The data consistently indicate a lower neonatal mortality rate for active LDS members. Non-LDS were found to have a lower rate than either medium or low activity LDS.

  4. Neonatal pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Bhalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions.

  5. The two-thumb technique using an elevated surface is preferable for teaching infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trang K; Hemway, Rae Jean; Perlman, Jeffrey M

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether the two-thumb technique is superior to the two-finger technique for administering chest compressions using the floor surface and the preferred location for performing infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (ie, floor, table, or radiant warmer). Twenty Neonatal Resuscitation Program trained medical personnel performed CPR on a neonatal manikin utilizing the two-thumb vs two-finger technique, a compression to ventilation ratio of 30:2 for 2 minutes in random order on the floor, table, and radiant warmer. Compression depth favored the two-thumb over two-finger technique on the floor (27 ± 8 mm vs 23 ± 7), table (26 ± 7 mm vs 22 ± 7), and radiant warmer (29 ± 4 mm vs 23 ± 4) (all P CPR preferably using an elevated firm surface. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Conflicting perspectives compromising discussions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J

    2010-09-01

    Healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives are expected to discuss resuscitation together. This study aims to identify the differences in the knowledge base and understanding of these parties. Questionnaires examining knowledge and opinion on resuscitation matters were completed during interviews of randomly selected doctors, nurses and the general public. 70% doctors, 24% nurses and 0% of a public group correctly estimated survival to discharge following in-hospital resuscitation attempts. Deficiencies were identified in doctor and nurse knowledge of ethics governing resuscitation decisions. Public opinion often conflicts with ethical guidelines. Public understanding of the nature of cardiopulmonary arrests and resuscitation attempts; and of the implications of a \\'Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)\\' order is poor. Television medical dramas are the primary source of resuscitation knowledge. Deficiencies in healthcare professionals\\' knowledge of resuscitation ethics and outcomes may compromise resuscitation decisions. Educational initiatives to address deficiencies are necessary. Parties involved in discussion on resuscitation do not share the same knowledge base reducing the likelihood of meaningful discussion. Public misapprehensions surrounding resuscitation must be identified and corrected during discussion.

  7. [Bioethics, deontology, and law in neonatal intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, G

    2002-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care has greatly improved the survival chances but, at the same time, it has also given rise to serious ethical problems. Different contexts influence both physicians attitude and end-of-life practices in neonatology. The clinicians can not ever follow the principles of bioethics, as they are sometimes in conflict. Also, the strategies or guidelines proposed as approaches to neonatal decision-making are difficult to practise. Probably a neonatologist makes his decision even on the basis of his interior conviction and it is well known that in Italy the debate on bioethics is the subject of confrontation between Roman Catholic and secular viewpoint, expressing two positions: the so-called sanctity and the quality of life. However, a clinician has also an obligation to follow the Code of Professional Medical Ethics which cautions against therapeutic aggressiveness; but this document has not legal status. In addition, Italian law is strongly protective of infant life and any discrimination on the basis of malformation or poor prognosis violates constitutional law; moreover, the resuscitation of a preterm infant is mandatory even when the birth is the result of induced late abortion. The author concludes emphasizing the importance, in decision making, of accepting difference as opposed to the logic of the absoluteness of normality, because many handicaps may be accepted and a society expresses its moral richness also by the solidarity reserved to its weakest sons.

  8. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: knowledge and opinions among the U.S. general public. State of the science-fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Catherine A; Larkin, Gregory L

    2008-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is undertaken more than 250,000 times annually in the United States. This study was undertaken to determine knowledge and opinions of the general public regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Validated multisite community-based cross-sectional survey. Knowledge and opinions about resuscitative practices and outcomes, using hypothetical clinical scenarios and other social, spiritual, and environmental considerations. Among 1831 participants representing 38 states, markedly inaccurate perceptions of cardiac arrest were reported. Participants' mean estimate of predicted survival rate after cardiac arrest was 54% (median 50%, IQR 35-75%), and mean estimated duration of resuscitative efforts in the ED was 28min (median 15min; IQR 10-30). Projected age and health status were independent predictors of resuscitation preferences in a series of 4 hypothetical scenarios. Participants indicated that physicians should consider patient and family wishes as the most important factors when making resuscitation decisions. Participants considered advanced technology and physician communication to be the most important actions during attempted resuscitation. Inaccurate perceptions regarding resuscitation and survival rates exist among the lay public. Participants indicated strong preferences regarding resuscitation and advance directives.

  9. The future of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion in combat operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shane A; Hilsden, R; Beckett, A; McAlister, V C

    2017-08-09

    Damage control resuscitation and early thoracotomy have been used to increase survival after severe injury in combat. There has been a renewed interest in resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) in both civilian and military medical practices. REBOA may result in visceral and limb ischaemia that could be harmful if use of REBOA is premature or prolonged. The purpose of this paper is to align our experience of combat injuries with the known capability of REBOA to suggest an implementation strategy for the use of REBOA in combat care. It may replace the resuscitative effect of thoracotomy; can provide haemostasis of non-compressible torso injuries such as the junctional and pelvic haemorrhage caused by improvised explosive devices. However, prehospital use of REBOA must be in the context of an overall surgical plan and should be restricted to deployment in the distal aorta. Although REBOA is technically easier than a thoracotomy, it requires operator training and skill to add to the beneficial effect of damage control resuscitation and surgery. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. [Neonatal and pediatirc intensive care in developing countries. Myth or reality? Luxury or necessity? From theory to practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui, I

    2003-01-01

    Neonatal and pediatric intensive care poses a major challenge in developing countries where the socio-economic level is low and health care resources are limited. Given the large size of the pediatric population as well as of great socio-cultural and symbolic importance of the child, there is a natural, compelling need for management of serious diseases in newborns and infants. The lack of timely disease prevention and treatment accounts in part for the frequency and severity of cases. Thus the status of intensive care units can exist in this setting is a pertinent question. The purpose of this study was to attempt to answer this question by surveying neonatal and pediatric care in developing countries based on experience in Morocco over the last 25 years.

  11. The challenges of neonatal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J.; Graves, Martin J.; Lomas, David J.; Edwards, Andrea; Austin, Topun

    2012-01-01

    Improved neonatal survival rates and antenatal diagnostic imaging is generating a growing demand for postnatal MRI examinations. Neonatal brain MRI is now becoming standard clinical care in many settings, but with the exception of some research centres, the technique has not been optimised for imaging neonates and small children. Here, we review some of the challenges involved in neonatal MRI, including recent advances in overall MR practicality and nursing practice, to address some of the ways in which the MR experience could be made more neonate-friendly. (orig.)

  12. Tuberculosis neonatal

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor Durán, Xavier

    1986-01-01

    PROTOCOLOS TERAPEUTICOS. TUBERCULOSIS NEONATAL 1. CONCEPTO La tuberculosis neonatal es la infección del recién nacido producida por el bacilo de Koch. Es una situación rara pero grave que requiere un diagnóstico precoz y un tratamiento enérgico..

  13. Resuscitation Prior to Emergency Endotracheal Intubation: Results of a National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Green

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Respiratory failure is a common problem in emergency medicine (EM and critical care medicine (CCM. However, little is known about the resuscitation of critically ill patients prior to emergency endotracheal intubation (EETI. Our aim was to describe the resuscitation practices of EM and CCM physicians prior to EETI. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was developed and tested for content validity and retest reliability by members of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group. The questionnaire was distributed to all EM and CCM physician members of three national organizations. Using three clinical scenarios (trauma, pneumonia, congestive heart failure, we assessed physician preferences for use and types of fluid and vasopressor medication in pre-EETI resuscitation of critically ill patients. Results: In total, 1,758 physicians were surveyed (response rate 50.2%, 882/1,758. Overall, physicians would perform pre-EETI resuscitation using either fluids or vasopressors in 54% (1,193/2,203 of cases. Most physicians would “always/often” administer intravenous fluid pre-EETI in the three clinical scenarios (81%, 1,484/1,830. Crystalloids were the most common fluid physicians would “always/often” administer in congestive heart failure (EM 43%; CCM 44%, pneumonia (EM 97%; CCM 95% and trauma (EM 96%; CCM 96%. Pre-EETI resuscitation using vasopressors was uncommon (4.9%. Training in CCM was associated with performing pre-EETI resuscitation (odds ratio, 2.20; 95% CI, [1.44-3.36], p<0.001. Conclusion: Pre-EETI resuscitation is common among Canadian EM and CCM physicians. Most physicians use crystalloids pre-EETI as a resuscitation fluid, while few would give vasopressors. Physicians with CCM training were more likely to perform pre-EETI resuscitation.

  14. An exploratory study of factors influencing resuscitation skills retention and performance among health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon; Fleet, Lisa; Greene, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Resuscitation and life support skills training comprises a significant proportion of continuing education programming for health professionals. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and attitudes of certified resuscitation providers toward the retention of resuscitation skills, regular skills updating, and methods for enhancing retention. A mixed-methods, explanatory study design was undertaken utilizing focus groups and an online survey-questionnaire of rural and urban health care providers. Rural providers reported less experience with real codes and lower abilities across a variety of resuscitation areas. Mock codes, practice with an instructor and a team, self-practice with a mannequin, and e-learning were popular methods for skills updating. Aspects of team performance that were felt to influence resuscitation performance included: discrepancies in skill levels, lack of communication, and team leaders not up to date on their skills. Confidence in resuscitation abilities was greatest after one had recently practiced or participated in an update or an effective debriefing session. Lowest confidence was reported when team members did not work well together, there was no clear leader of the resuscitation code, or if team members did not communicate. The study findings highlight the importance of access to update methods for improving providers' confidence and abilities, and the need for emphasis on teamwork training in resuscitation. An eclectic approach combining methods may be the best strategy for addressing the needs of health professionals across various clinical departments and geographic locales. Copyright © 2012 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  15. Time matters – Realism in resuscitation training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Kristian; Høyer, Christian Bjerre; Østergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    -based resuscitation training, the recommended 2-min CPR cycles are often deliberately decreased in order to increase the number of scenarios. The aim of this study was to test if keeping 2-min CPR cycles during resuscitation training ensures better adherence to time during resuscitation in a simulated setting......Background: The advanced life support guidelines recommend 2 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and minimal hands-off time to ensure sufficient cardiac and cerebral perfusion. We have observed doctors who shorten the CPR intervals during resuscitation attempts. During simulation....... Methods: This study was designed as a randomised control trial. Fifty-four 4th-year medical students with no prior advanced resuscitation training participated in an extra-curricular one-day advanced life support course. Participants were either randomised to simulation-based training using real-time (120...

  16. Neonatal nutrition and metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thureen, Patti J; Hay, William W

    2006-01-01

    ..., the volume highlights the important longterm effects of fetal and neonatal growth on health in later life. In addition, there are very practical chapters on methods and techniques for assessing nutritional status, body composition, and evaluating metabolic function. Written by an authoritative, international team of cont...

  17. Neonatal euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Alexander A

    2009-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of infants, there remain many newborns whose medical conditions are incompatible with sustained life. At times, healthcare providers and parents may agree that prolonging life is not an appropriate goal of care, and they may redirect treatment to alleviate suffering. While pediatric palliative treatment protocols are gaining greater acceptance, there remain some children whose suffering is unrelenting despite maximal efforts. Due to the realization that some infants suffer unbearably (ie, the burdens of suffering outweigh the benefits of life), the Dutch have developed a protocol for euthanizing these newborns. In this review, I examine the ethical aspects of 6 forms of end of life care, explain the ethical arguments in support of euthanasia, review the history and verbiage of the United States regulations governing limiting and withdrawing life-prolonging interventions in infants, describe the 3 categories of neonates for whom the Dutch provide euthanasia, review the published analyses of the Dutch protocol, and finally present some practical considerations should some form of euthanasia ever be deemed appropriate.

  18. Educational Purpose Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGHICIU Nicolae

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of computers and other sciences we can use in our personal projects complex structures built with microcontrollers. They miniaturise and simplify the final project, instead they depend/rely on the computer, through the programming of the microcontroller/s/them. This project presents the application of electronics in order to achieve a resuscitation mannequin for didactic purpose, using Arduino Prototyping Platform.

  19. Pharmacotherapy In Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNAYDIN, Berrin

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is defined as cessation of cardiac mechanical activity. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through several maneuvers and techniques. Although the two interventions, which are competent basic life support and prompt defibrillation, improve the survival rate, several adjuvant cardiac medication drugs are advocated to treat cardiac arrest during advanced cardiac life support. Since the introduction of modern CPR there have been man...

  20. A paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training project in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Javier; Matamoros, Martha M; López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo, Angel P; Ordóñez, Flora; Moral, Ramón; Mencía, Santiago

    2010-04-01

    It is possible that the exportation of North American and European models has hindered the creation of a structured cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training programme in developing countries. The objective of this paper is to describe the design and present the results of a European paediatric and neonatal CPR training programme adapted to Honduras. A paediatric CPR training project was set up in Honduras with the instructional and scientific support of the Spanish Group for Paediatric and Neonatal CPR. The programme was divided into four phases: CPR training and preparation of instructors; training for instructors; supervised teaching; and independent teaching. During the first phase, 24 Honduran doctors from paediatric intensive care, paediatric emergency and anaesthesiology departments attended the paediatric CPR course and 16 of them the course for preparation as instructors. The Honduran Paediatric and Neonatal CPR Group was formed. In the second phase, workshops were given by Honduran instructors and four of them attended a CPR course in Spain as trainee instructors. In the third phase, a CPR course was given in Honduras by the Honduran instructors, supervised by the Spanish team. In the final phase of independent teaching, eight courses were given, providing 177 students with training in CPR. The training of independent paediatric CPR groups with the collaboration and scientific assessment of an expert group could be a suitable model on which to base paediatric CPR training in Latin American developing countries. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Low Volume Resuscitation with Cell Impermeants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    of 10% Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), a prototypical oncotic agent (n = 6). The outcomevariables for the study includedLVR time, plasma lactate, mean...re- quirement of bicarbonate administration to correct acidosis during resuscitation. The impermeant effect in LVR solutions is greatly aug- mented...resuscitation exacerbates TICS, acidosis , hypothermia, and coagulopathy (3, 4). Other resuscitation solutions such as hypertonic saline or starch have had

  2. Neonatal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Shastri, Sweta; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-03-01

    Neonatal hypertension (HT) is a frequently under reported condition and is seen uncommonly in the intensive care unit. Neonatal HT has defined arbitrarily as blood pressure more than 2 standard deviations above the base as per the age or defined as systolic BP more than 95% for infants of similar size, gestational age and postnatal age. It has been diagnosed long back but still is the least studied field in neonatology. There is still lack of universally accepted normotensive data for neonates as per gestational age, weight and post-natal age. Neonatal HT is an important morbidity that needs timely detection and appropriate management, as it can lead to devastating short-term effect on various organs and also poor long-term adverse outcomes. There is no consensus yet about the treatment guidelines and majority of treatment protocols are based on the expert opinion. Neonate with HT should be evaluated in detail starting from antenatal, perinatal, post-natal history, and drug intake by neonate and mother. This review article covers multiple aspects of neonatal hypertension like definition, normotensive data, various etiologies and methods of BP measurement, clinical features, diagnosis and management.

  3. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation already in Egypt 5,000 years ago?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocklitz, A

    1997-06-06

    In light of the medically relevant features of the ancient Egyptian mouth-opening ceremony, the question of the effectiveness of medical practices in Egypt thousands of years ago is examined, whereby the religious and cultural framework also plays a significant role. In the Land on the Nile myth and reality clearly generated special conditions which favoured the systematic treatment of questions of resuscitation. Numerous examples show that this had practical consequences in the area of everyday medicine. In addition, rebirth and resurrection were central elements of the cult of the dead which had exact medical equivalents. These equivalents may demonstrate the advanced state of resuscitation practices in Egypt at that time. In this context, a reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mouth-opening instrument is presented. In the cult of the dead, this instrument played a role which can be compared to the function of a modern laryngoscope. It appears possible that at the time of the pyramids the Egyptians already had an understanding of the technology required to perform instrument-aided artificial respiration. Whether or not they actually possessed a fundamental knowledge of the principles of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation remains unclear. Nevertheless, the astonishingly functional characteristics of the reconstructed mouth-opening instrument suggest that it was developed for more than purely symbolic purposes.

  4. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nurses' knowledge and skill retention following cardiopulmonary resuscitation training: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Rosemary

    2005-08-01

    -based guidelines, including recognition of sick patients, and should be taught using simulations of a variety of cardiac arrest scenarios. This will ensure that the training reflects the potential situations that nurses may face in practice. Nurses in clinical areas, who rarely see cardiac arrests, should receive automated external defibrillation training and have access to defibrillators to prevent delays in resuscitation. Staff should be formally assessed using a manikin with a feedback mechanism or an expert instructor to ensure that chest compressions and ventilations are adequate at the time of training. Remedial training must be provided as often as required. Resuscitation training equipment should be made available at ward/unit level to allow self-study and practice to prevent deterioration between updates. Video self-instruction has been shown to improve competence in resuscitation. An in-hospital scenario-based video should be devised and tested to assess the efficacy of this medium in resuscitation training for nurses.

  6. [Basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation courses for parents of newborns and infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez, Diego; Castro, Adriana; Rabasa, Cecilia; Capelli, Carola; Cores Ponte, Florencia; Gutiérrez, Susana; Mariani, Gonzalo; Pacchioni, Sergio; Pardo, Amorina; Pérez, Gastón; Sorgetti, Mariana; Szyld, Edgardo

    2014-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) courses meet all the definitions of an educational activity for prevention of cardiac arrest death by risk patients' parents and/or the general population. The aim is to improve patients' home care and turn parents confident before their children are discharged from hospital, mainly from intensive care units. Currently these courses are part of discharge protocols in many neonatologist services although there are offers that exceed this target, and extend to other areas such as education and caregivers. Locally the experience of neonatal CPR at the Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría stands out in connection with delivering courses to high risk patients' parents as well as designing and spreading learning material.

  7. Neonatal Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Doreen; Morris, Maryke

    1994-01-01

    "Neonatal Nursing" offers a systematic approach to the nursing care of the sick newborn baby. Nursing actions and responsibilities are the focus of the text with relevant research findings, clinical applications, anatomy, physiology and pathology provided where necessary. This comprehensive text covers all areas of neonatal nursing including ethics, continuing care in the community, intranatal care, statistics and pharmokinetics so that holistic care of the infant is described. This book shou...

  8. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice.

  9. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice

  10. The effect of professional-led guideline workshops on clinical practice for the management of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm neonates in Japan: a controlled before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Tetsuya; Ye, Xiang Y; Tokumasu, Hironobu; Chiba, Hiroo; Mitsuhashi, Hideko; Shahrook, Sadequa; Kusuda, Satoshi; Fujimura, Masanori; Toyoshima, Katsuaki; Mori, Rintaro

    2015-05-08

    Clinical guidelines assist physicians to make decisions about suitable healthcare. We conducted a controlled before-and-after study to investigate the impact of professional-led guideline workshops for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) management on physicians' clinical practices, discharge mortality, and associated morbid conditions among preterm neonates. We recruited physicians practicing at two neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Japan and used the data of all neonates weighing less than or equal to 1,500 g admitted to 90 NICUs (2 intervention NICUs and 88 control NICUs) in the Neonatal Research Network of Japan from April 2008 to March 2010. We held 1-day workshops for physicians on PDA clinical practice guidelines at the two intervention NICUs. Physicians' skills assessed by confidence rating (CR) scores and the Sheffield Peer Review Assessment Tool (SPRAT) were compared between pre- and post-workshop month at the intervention NICUs using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Neonatal discharge mortality and morbidity were compared between pre- and post-workshop year at both the intervention and control NICUs using multivariable regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders. Fifteen physicians were included in the study. Physicians' CR scores (2.14 vs. 2.47, p = 0.02) and SPRAT (4.14 vs. 4.50, p = 0.05) in PDA management improved after the workshops. The analyses of neonatal outcomes included 294 and 6,234 neonates in the intervention and control NICUs, respectively. Neonates' discharge mortality declined sharply at the intervention NICUs (from 15/146 to 5/148, relative risk reduction -0.67; adjusted odds ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.10 to 0.89) during the post-workshop period. The mortality reduction was much greater than that in the control NICUs (from 207/3,322 to 147/2,912, relative risk reduction -0.19; adjusted odds ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.95), although the difference between the intervention and control NICUs were not

  11. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: the essential of 2015 guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudet, Ludovic; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Trueb, Lionel

    2016-02-10

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines have been updated in October 2015. The 2010 guidelines are reaffirmed: immediate call for help via the local dispatch center, high quality CPR (frequency between 100 and 120/min, compression depth between 5 and 6 cm) and early defibrillation improve patient's survival chances. This article reviews the essential elements of resuscitation and recommended advanced measures.

  12. Use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in neonatal units--a survey of current preferences and practice in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehr, C C; Schmalisch, G; Khakban, A; Proquitté, H; Wauer, R R

    2007-04-26

    There is only limited evidence regarding the equipment or the settings (pressure and flow) at which CPAP should be applied in neonatal care. Aims of this nationwide survey of German neonatal units were to investigate (1) for which clinical indications CPAP was employed, (2) which CPAP equipment was used, (3) which CPAP settings were applied. A questionnaire on the use of CPAP was sent to all children's hospitals in Germany. Data were stratified and compared by level of medical care provided (non-academic children's hospital, academic teaching hospital and university children's hospital). 274 institutions were contacted by mailed questionnaire. The response rate was 86%, 90 non-academic children's hospitals, 119 academic teaching hospitals and 26 university children's hospitals replied. (1) There were no statistically significant difference in CPAP use between the institutions: 231 (98%) used CPAP for treating respiratory distress syndrome, 225 (96%) for treating apnoea-bradycardia-syndrome and 230 (98%) following extubation. (2) Commercial CPAP systems were employed by 71% of units, the others used a combination of different devices. Respirator generated CPAP was most commonly used. Exclusively mononasal CPAP was used by only 9%, and binasal CPAP by 55% of institutions. (3) Median CPAP was 4.5 cm H2O (range 3-7), median maximum CPAP was 7 cm H2O (range 4-10), with no statistically significant differences between the hospitals. Between units, CPAP was given via a broad range of CPAP systems and at varying pressure settings. The reported differences reflects personal experiences and preferences, rather than sound evidence from clinical trials.

  13. Neonatal aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Nigel E; Veldtman, Gruschen R; Benson, Lee N

    2005-09-01

    Neonatal aortic stenosis is a complex and heterogeneous condition, defined as left ventricular outflow tract obstruction at valvular level, presenting and often requiring treatment in the first month of life. Initial presentation may be catastrophic, necessitating hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic resuscitation. Subsequent management is focused on maintaining systemic blood flow, either via a univentricular Norwood palliation or a biventricular route, in which the effective aortic valve area is increased by balloon dilation or surgical valvotomy. In infants with aortic annular hypoplasia but adequately sized left ventricle, the Ross-Konno procedure is also an attractive option. Outcomes after biventricular management have improved in recent years as a consequence of better patient selection, perioperative management and advances in catheter technology. Exciting new developments are likely to significantly modify the natural history of this disorder, including fetal intervention for the salvage of the hypoplastic left ventricle; 3D echocardiography providing better definition of valve morphology and aiding patient selection for a surgical or catheter-based intervention; and new transcutaneous approaches, such as duel beam echo, to perforate the valve.

  14. Evaluation of a Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation Curriculum for Junior and Senior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschmidt, Hannelore Falk

    An adaptation of the standard American Heart Association training program was utilized to teach secondary school students cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) procedures. Students, at both junior and senior high levels, were randomly assigned to practice and no-practice groups, of ten students each. All were taught CPR procedures didactically, but…

  15. How do clinicians practise the principles of beneficence when deciding to allow or deny family presence during resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Tracey; de Lacey, Sheryl; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2018-03-01

    To examine how clinicians practise the principles of beneficence when deciding to allow or deny family presence during resuscitation. Family presence during resuscitation has important benefits for family and is supported by professional bodies and the public. Yet, many clinicians restrict family access to patients during resuscitation, and rationales for decision-making are unclear. Secondary analysis of an existing qualitative data set using deductive category application of content analysis. We analysed 20 interview transcripts from 15 registered nurses, two doctors and three paramedics who had experienced family presence during resuscitation in an Australian hospital. The transcripts were analysed for incidents of beneficent decision-making when allowing or denying family presence during resuscitation. Decision-making around family presence during resuscitation occurred in time poor environments and in the absence of local institutional guidelines. Clinicians appeared to be motivated by doing "what's best" for patients and families when allowing or denying family presence during resuscitation. However, their individual interpretations of "what's best" was subjective and did not always coincide with family preferences or with current evidence that promotes family presence during resuscitation as beneficial. The decision to allow or deny family presence during resuscitation is complex, and often impacted by personal preferences and beliefs, setting norms and tensions between clinicians and consumers. As a result, many families are missing the chance to be with their loved ones at the end of life. The introduction of institutional guidelines and policies would help to establish what safe and effective practice consists of, reduce value-laden decision-making and guide beneficent decision-making. These findings highlight current deficits in decision-making around FPDR and could prompt the introduction of clinical guidelines and policies and in turn promote the

  16. Neonatal neurosonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccabona, Michael, E-mail: michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at

    2014-09-15

    Paediatric and particularly neonatal neurosonography still remains a mainstay of imaging the neonatal brain. It can be performed at the bedside without any need for sedation or specific monitoring. There are a number of neurologic conditions that significantly influence morbidity and mortality in neonates and infants related to the brain and the spinal cord; most of them can be addressed by ultrasonography (US). However, with the introduction of first CT and then MRI, neonatal neurosonography is increasingly considered just a basic first line technique that offers only orienting information and does not deliver much relevant information. This is partially caused by inferior US performance – either by restricted availability of modern equipment or by lack of specialized expertise in performing and reading neurosonographic scans. This essay tries to highlight the value and potential of US in the neonatal brain and briefly touching also on the spinal cord imaging. The common pathologies and their US appearance as well as typical indication and applications of neurosonography are listed. The review aims at encouraging paediatric radiologists to reorient there imaging algorithms and skills towards the potential of modern neurosonography, particularly in the view of efficacy, considering growing economic pressure, and the low invasiveness as well as the good availability of US that can easily be repeated any time at the bedside.

  17. Neonatal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  18. Different Techniques of Respiratory Support Do Not Significantly Affect Gas Exchange during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Newborn Piglet Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendler, Marc R; Maurer, Miriam; Hassan, Mohammad A; Huang, Li; Waitz, Markus; Mayer, Benjamin; Hummler, Helmut D

    2015-01-01

    There are no evidence-based recommendations on the use of different techniques of respiratory support and chest compressions (CC) during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We studied the short-term effects of different ventilatory support strategies along with CC representing clinical practice on gas exchange [arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2)], hemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation. We hypothesized that in newborn piglets with cardiac arrest, use of a T-piece resuscitator (TPR) providing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves gas exchange as measured by SaO2 during CPR as compared to using a self-inflating bag (SIB) without PEEP. Furthermore, we explored the effects of a mechanical ventilator without synchrony to CC. Thirty newborn piglets with asystole were randomized into three groups and resuscitated for 20 min [fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.21 for 10 min and 1.0 thereafter]. Group 1 received ventilation using a TPR [peak inspiratory pressure (PIP)/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min] with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 2 received ventilation using a SIB (PIP of 20 cm H2O without PEEP, rate 30/min) with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 3 received ventilation using a mechanical ventilator (PIP/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min). CC were applied with a rate of 120/min without synchrony to inflations. We found no significant differences in SaO2 between the three groups. However, there was a trend toward a higher SaO2 [TPR: 28.0% (22.3-40.0); SIB: 23.7% (13.4-52.3); ventilator: 44.1% (39.2-54.3); median (interquartile range)] and a lower PaCO2 [TPR: 95.6 mm Hg (82.1-113.6); SIB: 100.8 mm Hg (83.0-108.0); ventilator: 74.1 mm Hg (68.5-83.1); median (interquartile range)] in the mechanical ventilator group. We found no significant effect on gas exchange using different respiratory support strategies

  19. Hand hygiene practices in a neonatal intensive care unit: a multimodal intervention and impact on nosocomial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Barbara C C; Lee, Josephine; Lau, Y L

    2004-11-01

    Health care-associated infections persist as a major problem in most neonatal intensive care units. Hand hygiene has been singled out as the most important measure in preventing hospital-acquired infection. However, hand hygiene compliance among health care workers (HCWs) remains low. The objective of this study was to assess the frequency and nature of patient contacts in neonatal intensive care units and observe the compliance and technique of hand hygiene among HCWs before and after the implementation of a multimodal intervention program. The nature and frequency of patient contacts, the hand hygiene compliance, and hand-washing techniques of HCWs were observed unobtrusively to reflect the baseline compliance and to investigate factors for noncompliance. The intervention consisted of problem-based and task-orientated hand hygiene education, enhancement of minimal handling protocol and clustering of nursing care, liberal provision of alcohol-based hand antiseptic, improvement in hand hygiene facilities, ongoing regular hand hygiene audit, and implementation of health care-associated infection surveillance. The observational study was repeated 6 months after the completion of the intervention program, which extended over 1-year period. Overall hand hygiene compliance increased from 40% to 53% before patient contact and 39% to 59% after patient contact. More marked improvement was observed for high-risk procedures (35%-60%). The average number of patient contacts also decreased from 2.8 to 1.8 per patient per hour. There was improvement in most aspects of hand-washing technique in the postintervention stage. The health care-associated infection rate decreased from 11.3 to 6.2 per 1000 patient-days. A problem-based and task-orientated education program can improve hand hygiene compliance. Enhancement of minimal handling and clustering of nursing procedures reduced the total patient contact episodes, which could help to overcome the major barrier of time constraints

  20. Human factors in resuscitation teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Elizabeth M; Lockey, Andrew S

    2012-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in human factors within the healthcare environment reflecting the understanding of their impact on safety. The aim of this paper is to explore how human factors might be taught on resuscitation courses, and improve course outcomes in terms of improved mortality and morbidity for patients. The delivery of human factors training is important and this review explores the work that has been delivered already and areas for future research and teaching. Medline was searched using MESH terms Resuscitation as a Major concept and Patient or Leadership as core terms. The abstracts were read and 25 full length articles reviewed. Critical incident reporting has shown four recurring problems: lack of organisation at an arrest, lack of equipment, non functioning equipment, and obstructions preventing good care. Of these, the first relates directly to the concept of human factors. Team dynamics for both team membership and leadership, management of stress, conflict and the role of debriefing are highlighted. Possible strategies for teaching them are discussed. Four strategies for improving human factors training are discussed: team dynamics (including team membership and leadership behaviour), the influence of stress, debriefing, and conflict within teams. This review illustrates how human factor training might be integrated further into life support training without jeopardising the core content and lengthening the courses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Prehospital thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spöhr, F; Böttiger, B W

    2005-02-01

    Although prehospital cardiac arrest has an incidence of 40-90/100,000 inhabitants per year, there has been a lack of therapeutic options to improve the outcome of these patients. Of all cardiac arrests, 50-70% are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Thrombolysis has been shown to be a causal and effective therapy in patients with AMI or PE who do not suffer cardiac arrest. In contrast, experience with the use of thrombolysis during cardiac arrest has been limited. Thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) acts directly on thrombi or emboli causing AMI or PE. In addition, experimental studies suggest that thrombolysis causes an improvement in microcirculatory reperfusion after cardiac arrest. In-hospital and prehospital case series and clinical studies suggest that thrombolysis during CPR may cause a restoration of spontaneous circulation and survival even in patients that have been resuscitated conventionally without success. In addition, there is evidence for an improved neurological outcome in patients receiving a thrombolytic therapy during during CPR. A large randomized, double-blind multicenter trial that has started recently is expected to show if this new therapeutic option can generally improve the prognosis of patients with cardiac arrest.

  2. Neonatal hypoglycaemia: learning from claims

    OpenAIRE

    Hawdon, Jane M; Beer, Jeanette; Sharp, Deborah; Upton, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Neonatal hypoglycaemia is a potential cause of neonatal morbidity, and on rare but tragic occasions causes long-term neurodevelopmental harm with consequent emotional and practical costs for the family. The organisational cost to the NHS includes the cost of successful litigation claims. The purpose of the review was to identify themes that could alert clinicians to common pitfalls and thus improve patient safety. Design The NHS Litigation Authority (NHS LA) Claims Management Syste...

  3. Comparison of two different neonatal skin care practices and their influence on transepidermal water loss in healthy newborns within first 10 days of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboni, R; Roberta, R; Patrizi, A; Cocchi, G; Faldella, G; Raone, B

    2014-10-01

    Physiologic post-partum skin adaptation to the relative dry extra-uterine environment is a dynamic process which begins immediately after birth. Considering the differences from adult skin, the neonatal skin is more prone to damage by environmental factors; therefore, skin care regimens should be age adapted to ensure a good epidermal maturation. The effects of two different skin care practices were evaluated by transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurement in 94 newborns aged ≤ 10 days: group 1 (G1), newborns washed only with a cotton washcloth moistened with water; group 2 (G2), newborns washed with liquid baby cleansers and hydrated with moisturizers. These recordings were compared to TEWL baseline values of the same neonates and to adults' values. A prospective study was conducted in healthy full-term newborns, measuring TEWL with TEWAMETER® TM300. The areas tested were the volar forearm and the popliteal fossa. In G1 (52 subjects), TEWL mean values were 6.65 ± 2.81 SD (g/m2/h) at volar forearm and 7.49 ± 2.47 SD (g/m2/h) at popliteal fossa. In G2 (42 subjects), TEWL mean values were 8.83 ± 3.05 SD (g/m2/h) at volar forearm and 10.18 ± 3.64 SD (g/m2/h) at popliteal fossa. There were statistically significant differences of TEWL mean values between G1 and G2, newborns and adults, baseline and post-skin care procedures. Tested skin care regimens could influence the process of functional adaptation of skin, in the early postnatal period. We could hypothesize that daily washing with liquid baby cleansers and moisturizing may delay the natural maturation of skin barrier function.

  4. Improvement in neonatal intensive care unit care: a cluster randomised controlled trial of active dissemination of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acolet, Dominique; Allen, Elizabeth; Houston, Rosie; Wilkinson, Andrew R; Costeloe, Kate; Elbourne, Diana

    2011-11-01

    Research findings are not rapidly or fully implemented into policies and practice in care. To assess whether an 'active' strategy was more likely to lead to changes in policy and practice in preterm baby care than traditional information dissemination. Cluster randomised trial. 180 neonatal units (87 active, 93 control) in England; clinicians from active arm units; babies born Dissemination of research report; slides; information about newborn care position statement. ACTIVE ARM: As above plus offer to become 'regional 'champion' (attend two workshops, support clinicians to implement research evidence regionally), or attend one workshop, promote implementation of research evidence locally. timing of surfactant administration; admission temperature; staffing of resuscitation team present at birth. 48/87 Lead clinicians in the active arm attended one or both workshops. There was no evidence of difference in post-intervention policies between trial arms. Practice outcomes based on babies in the active (169) and control arms (186), in 45 and 49 neonatal units respectively, showed active arm babies were more likely to have been given surfactant on labour ward (RR=1.30; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.70); p=0.06); to have a higher temperature on admission to neonatal intensive care unit (mean difference=0.29(o)C; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.55; p=0.03); and to have had the baby's trunk delivered into a plastic bag (RR=1.27; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.60; p=0.04) than the control group. The effect on having an 'ideal' resuscitation team at birth was in the same direction of benefit for the active arm (RR=1.18; 95% CI 0.97 to 1.43; p=0.09). The costs of the intervention were modest. This is the first trial to evaluate methods for transferring information from neonatal research into local policies and practice in England. An active approach to research dissemination is both feasible and cost-effective. Current controlled trials ISRCTN89683698.

  5. Ictericia Neonatal

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco de la Fuente, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    El motivo que ha llevado a la realización de este trabajo fin de grado sobre el tema de la ICTERICIA NEONATAL se debe a la elevada frecuencia de su aparición en la población. Un porcentaje elevado de RN la padecen al nacer siendo, en la mayor parte de los casos, un proceso fisiológico resuelto con facilidad debido a una inmadurez del sistema hepático y a una hiperproducción de bilirrubina. La ictericia neonatal es la pigmentación de color amarillo de la piel y mucosas en ...

  6. Time matters--realism in resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Kristian B; Høyer, Christian B; Ostergaard, Doris; Eika, Berit

    2014-08-01

    The advanced life support guidelines recommend 2min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and minimal hands-off time to ensure sufficient cardiac and cerebral perfusion. We have observed doctors who shorten the CPR intervals during resuscitation attempts. During simulation-based resuscitation training, the recommended 2-min CPR cycles are often deliberately decreased in order to increase the number of scenarios. The aim of this study was to test if keeping 2-min CPR cycles during resuscitation training ensures better adherence to time during resuscitation in a simulated setting. This study was designed as a randomised control trial. Fifty-four 4th-year medical students with no prior advanced resuscitation training participated in an extra-curricular one-day advanced life support course. Participants were either randomised to simulation-based training using real-time (120s) or shortened CPR cycles (30-45s instead of 120s) in the scenarios. Adherence to time was measured using the European Resuscitation Council's Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest) in retention tests conducted one and 12 weeks after the course. The real-time group adhered significantly better to the recommended 2-min CPR cycles (time-120s) (mean 13; standard derivation (SD) 8) than the shortened CPR cycle group (mean 45; SD 19) when tested (ptraining to optimise outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementation and execution of military forward resuscitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Timothy J; Nadler, Roy; Badloe, John; Butler, Frank K; Glassberg, Elon

    2014-05-01

    Through necessity, military medicine has been the driver of medical innovation throughout history. The battlefield presents challenges, such as the requirement to provide care while under threat, resource limitation, and prolonged evacuation times, which must be overcome to improve casualty survival. Focus must also be placed on identifying the causes, and timing, of death within the battlefield. By doing so, military medical doctrine can be shaped, appropriate goals set, new concepts adopted, and relevant technologies investigated and implemented. The majority of battlefield casualties still die in the prehospital environment, before reaching a medical treatment facility, and hemorrhage remains the leading cause of potentially survivable death. Many countries have adopted policies that push damage control resuscitation forward into the prehospital setting, while understanding the need for timely medical evacuation. Although these policies vary according to country, the majority share many common principles. These include the need for early catastrophic hemorrhage control at point-of-wounding, judicious use of fluid resuscitation, use of blood products as far forward as possible, and early evacuation to a surgical facility. Some countries place medical providers with the ability, and resources, for advanced resuscitation with the forward fighting units (perhaps at company level), whereas others have established en route resuscitation capabilities. If we are to continue to improve battlefield casualty survival, we must continue to work together and learn from each other. We must also carry on working alongside our civilian colleagues so that the benefits of translational experience are not lost. This review describes several countries current military approaches to prehospital trauma care. These approaches, refined through a decade of experience, merit consideration for integration into civilian prehospital care practice.

  8. Updates in small animal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Daniel J; Boller, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    For dogs and cats that experience cardiopulmonary arrest, rates of survival to discharge are 6% to 7%, as compared with survival rates of 20% for people. The introduction of standardized cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines and training in human medicine has led to substantial improvements in outcome. The Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation initiative recently completed an exhaustive literature review and generated a set of evidence-based, consensus cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines in 5 domains: preparedness and prevention, basic life support, advanced life support, monitoring, and postcardiac arrest care. This article reviews some of the most important of these new guidelines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Damage control resuscitation for abdominal war injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-wei DING

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the concept of comprehensive treatment for military trauma has been comprehensively updated. The application of damage control surgery has significantly improved the clinical outcome of severe abdominal injury. With appropriate surgical intervention, post-trauma fluid resuscitation plays an increasingly important role in the treatment of abdominal injury. The damage control resuscitation strategy addresses the importance of permissive hypotension and haemostatic resuscitation for patients with severe trauma, under the guidance of damage control surgical principle. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.03.02

  10. Monitoring Cerebral and Renal Oxygenation Status during Neonatal Digestive Surgeries Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Beck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDepending on the initial pathology, hypovolemia, intra-abdominal hypertension, and sepsis are often encountered in neonatal digestive surgery. Accurate newborn monitoring during and after surgery is essential to adapt resuscitation protocols. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is non-invasive and can detect hypoperfusion which indicates a low circulatory blood flow, regardless of the cause.ObjectiveEvaluating changes in cerebral and renal regional oxygen saturation during neonatal digestive surgeries, conducted according to normal practices, with commonly used monitoring parameters. Analyzing retrospectively the inter-relationships between NIRS values and mean arterial pressure (MAP values as well as pre-ductal SpO2.MethodsProspective, descriptive, monocentric study. All neonates referred for surgery were included. NIRS allows the measurement of cerebral and renal oxygenation fluctuations, as well as calculating difference in intraoperative and postoperative values.ResultsNineteen patients were included. Cerebral regional oxygen saturation (C rSO2 values were stable while renal regional oxygen saturation (R rSO2 values tended to decrease with time during surgery. Indeed, 72% of rSO2 decline episodes occurred after the first 30 min of surgery, without any significant statistical differences for the next 90 min of surgery. After surgery, the lowest average C and R rSO2 values were evidenced during the first 6 h, with 60% of C rSO2 and R rSO2 anomalies occurring in that time frame. There was no significant statistical difference observed in the following 18 h. There was a significant correlation between R rSO2 and SpO2 values (p < 0.01, but not with C rSO2 values. There was no correlation with the MAP either for the C rSO2 values or R rSO2 ones.ConclusionNIRS is a promising non-invasive bedside tool to monitor cerebral and tissue perfusion, analyzing tissue microcirculation. NIRS has its interest to guide neonatal digestive

  11. Effects of Community-Based Newborn Care Intervention on Neonate Health Status in a District of Tehran (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Nayeri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the effects of community-based interventions on the Neonatal Health Index in one district of Tehran-Iran.Materials and methods: A community and healthcare center-based study was carried out from January 2011 through September 2014. The population of the study included newborns from mothers residing in the 4th district of Tehran, Iran. Demographic data of mothers and infants were recorded in questionnaires before and after intervention. Interventions were implemented in hospitals, participants' homes, and health centers. The primary outcomes were comparison of mean birth weight, weight gain during the first 3-7 days, first week visit rate, hospitalization rate between the before and after intervention groups.Results: The populations in the before and after intervention groups were 274 and 250, respectively. A significant difference was seen between the gestational ages (P value = 0.007 of the two groups. Mean birth height in the first group was 50.35 ± 3.48 and in the second group was 55 ± 5.32 cm (P value = 0.04. Neonatal complications in the second group were 6.9% lower than in the first group (P value = 0.048. In the first group 41 neonates (15% were hospitalized in the NICU while in the second group 12 cases (4.8% were hospitalized (P value = 0.018. Seven cases (2.6% in the first group and one case (0.4% in the second group were resuscitated (P value = 0.0001.Conclusion: The results of implementing community-based newborn care strategies witnessed at the first week postnatal visit included improvements inneonatal gestational growth, management of neonates with potentially serious illnesses, diagnosis of warning signs and neonatal care practices.

  12. Neonatal Jaundice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Væth, Michael; Schendel, Diana

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that infants transferred to a neonatal ward after delivery had an almost twofold increased risk of being diagnosed with infantile autism later in childhood in spite of extensive controlling of obstetric risk factors. We therefore decided to investigate other reasons ...

  13. Neonates need tailored drug formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegaert, Karel

    2013-02-08

    Drugs are very strong tools used to improve outcome in neonates. Despite this fact and in contrast to tailored perfusion equipment, incubators or ventilators for neonates, we still commonly use drug formulations initially developed for adults. We would like to make the point that drug formulations given to neonates need to be tailored for this age group. Besides the obvious need to search for active compounds that take the pathophysiology of the newborn into account, this includes the dosage and formulation. The dosage or concentration should facilitate the administration of low amounts and be flexible since clearance is lower in neonates with additional extensive between-individual variability. Formulations need to be tailored for dosage variability in the low ranges and also to the clinical characteristics of neonates. A specific focus of interest during neonatal drug development therefore is a need to quantify and limit excipient exposure based on the available knowledge of their safety or toxicity. Until such tailored vials and formulations become available, compounding practices for drug formulations in neonates should be evaluated to guarantee the correct dosing, product stability and safety.

  14. Termination of prehospital resuscitative efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Caroline; Binderup, Lars Grassmé

    2017-01-01

    -and-death decision-making in the patient's medical records is required. We suggest that a template be implemented in the prehospital medical records describing the basis for any ethical decisions. This template should contain information regarding the persons involved in the deliberations and notes on ethical......BACKGROUND: Discussions on ethical aspects of life-and-death decisions within the hospital are often made in plenary. The prehospital physician, however, may be faced with ethical dilemmas in life-and-death decisions when time-critical decisions to initiate or refrain from resuscitative efforts...... need to be taken without the possibility to discuss matters with colleagues. Little is known whether these considerations regarding ethical issues in crucial life-and-death decisions are documented prehospitally. This is a review of the ethical considerations documented in the prehospital medical...

  15. [Neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, E; de Courtivron, B; Saliba, E

    2015-12-01

    To describe neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia. This systematic evidence review is based on PubMed search, Cochrane library and experts' recommendations. The risks of brachial plexus birth injury, clavicle and humeral fracture, perinatal asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and perinatal mortality are increased after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to provide neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room in case of perinatal asphyxia following shoulder dystocia, according to national and international guidelines. The initial clinical examination should search for complications such as brachial plexus birth injury or clavicle fracture. The risk of perinatal complications is increased in newborn after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to manage these complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carveth, Stephen W.

    1979-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a key part of emergency cardiac care. It is a basic life support procedure that can be taught in the schools with the assistance of the American Heart Association. (JMF)

  17. The Evolving Science of Trauma Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tim; Davenport, Ross; Mak, Matthew; Brohi, Karim

    2018-02-01

    This review summarizes the evolution of trauma resuscitation from a one-size-fits-all approach to one tailored to patient physiology. The most dramatic change is in the management of actively bleeding patients, with a balanced blood product-based resuscitation approach (avoiding crystalloids) and surgery focused on hemorrhage control, not definitive care. When hemostasis has been achieved, definitive resuscitation to restore organ perfusion is initiated. This approach is associated with decreased mortality, reduced duration of stay, improved coagulation profile, and reduced crystalloid/vasopressor use. This article focuses on the tools and methods used for trauma resuscitation in the acute phase of trauma care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A SOF Damage Control Resuscitation Cocktail

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    resuscitation (DCR) cocktail for use by SOF’s that is capable of improving survival from polytrauma in austere settings. The cocktail components...components are tested in a combat-relevant swine polytrauma model of hemorrhagic shock with traumatic brain injury, free internal bleeding from an aortic...from polytrauma in austere settings. The cocktail components include Hextend for volume resuscitation and tissue perfusion, fibrinogen concentrate

  19. Amitriptyline Intoxication Responded to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güldem Turan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The most severe effects in amitriptiline intoxications are related with central nervous system and cardiovascular system. Amitriptiline intoxication especially with high doses has severe cardiac effects and can result in cardiac arrest. Most favorable responses can be achieved with efficient and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We wanted to present a case ingested high dose of amitriptiline for attempt to suicide and responded to prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  20. Fluid Creep and Over-resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffle, Jeffrey R

    2016-10-01

    Fluid creep is the term applied to a burn resuscitation, which requires more fluid than predicted by standard formulas. Fluid creep is common today and is linked to several serious edema-related complications. Increased fluid requirements may accompany the appropriate resuscitation of massive injuries but dangerous fluid creep is also caused by overly permissive fluid infusion and the lack of colloid supplementation. Several strategies for recognizing and treating fluid creep are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The importance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Benjamin S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a fundamental component of initial care for the victim of cardiac arrest. In the past few years, increasing quantitative evidence has demonstrated that survival from cardiac arrest is dependent on the quality of delivered CPR. This review will focus on this body of evidence and on a range of practical approaches to improving CPR performance. A number of strategies to improve CPR quality have been evaluated recently, during both prehospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest care. These strategies have included the use of real-time CPR sensing and feedback, the employment of physiologic monitoring such as end-tidal CO(2) measurement and the use of metronome prompting. The use of mechanical CPR devices to avoid the challenges of manual CPR performance has also represented a topic of great current interest. Additional approaches have focused on both prearrest training (e.g. high-fidelity simulation education and CPR refreshers) and postarrest training (e.g. debriefing). A number of strategies have been evaluated to improve CPR performance. While many questions remain surrounding the relative value of each approach, it is likely that combinations of these methods may be useful in a variety of care settings to improve care for cardiac arrest victims.

  2. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional simulation-based educational module: communication, teamwork, and confidence performing cardiac resuscitation skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Luctkar-Flude

    2010-11-01

    leader component of the resuscitation skills lab and identifying learners who may benefit from additional practice in the role of team leader and with other skills where they lack confidence.Keywords: interprofessional education, undergraduate education, medical education, nursing education, simulation

  3. Redirecting treatment during neonatal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulkerian, Susan J; Douglas, Webra Price; Taylor, Renee McCraine

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal transport teams comprise multidisciplinary health care providers who are skilled in patient care, communication and customer service, and equipment mechanics. They are extensively trained in resuscitation and stabilization, preparing for accelerating care, and their focus is preservation of life. In any situation focused on caring for critically ill patients, ethical issues and questions may arise. For instance, is it compassionate and/or cost-effective to separate mothers and infants when continuing/accelerating care is futile, and when and how should care be redirected from acute and lifesaving care to comfort care and bereavement support for the family? The knowledge and skills required to address such situations and communicate and participate in a redirection of care may not be adequately emphasized in the preparation of the professionals responsible for stabilizing and transporting critically ill newborns. This article raises issues relating to transport and redirecting care such as eligibility for transport, parental request and consent, separation of mothers and infants, palliative and bereavement care, ethical considerations, competitive transport environment, and customer service. A shared mental model is essential. The focus of this article is not to provide answers to all of these issues, but to highlight the complexity of the topic of redirecting treatment during neonatal transport. Redirecting treatment needs to be discussed, and health care professionals should be prepared during their transport team training. Each family and situation must be approached individually, with the acceptance that there will always be more questions than answers.

  4. [Neonatal cholestasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquete, M L

    2000-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To warn pediatricians about the early recognition of cholestasis in newborns and infants. METHODS: A bibliographic research about cholestasis was performed using Medline, and emphasizing the most relevant publications of the last 30 years. RESULTS: The concept of cholestasis and the causes of cholestatic tendency in newborns and infants are described. Several causes of intra and extrahepatic cholestasis are reported as well. In this review, only the diseases with diagnostic, therapeutic or prognostic peculiarities are commented, including extrahepatic biliary atresia, idiopathic neonatal hepatitis, galactosemia, and Alagille s syndrome. Furthermore, several resources are discussed for the diagnosis of cholestasis. CONCLUSIONS: The establishment of the diagnosis of cholestasis through the detection of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns who present jaundice after 14 days of life is a goal that could change the prognosis of several diseases responsible for neonatal cholestasis.

  5. Neonatal Kraniefraktur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine Marie Harries; Stantchev, Hristo

    2015-01-01

    During the latest decades the incidence of birth traumas has decreased significantly. Even so the traumas still contribute to an increased mortality and morbidity. We present a case of spontaneous neonatal skull fracture following a normal vaginal delivery. Abnormal facial structure was seen, and......, and the fracture was identified with an MRI. The fractures healed without neurosurgical intervention. Case reports show that even in uncomplicated vaginal deliveries skull fractures can be seen and should be suspected in children with facial abnormalities....

  6. Neonatal Listeriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yu Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In Western developed countries, Listeria monocytogenes is not an uncommon pathogen in neonates. However, neonatal listeriosis has rarely been reported in Taiwan. We describe two cases collected from a single medical institute between 1990 and 2005. Case 1 was a male premature baby weighing 1558 g with a gestational age of 31 weeks whose mother had fever with chills 3 days prior to delivery. Generalized maculopapular rash was found after delivery and subtle seizure developed. Both blood and cerebrospinal fluid culture collected on the 1st day yielded L. monocytogenes. In addition, he had ventriculitis complicated with hydrocephalus. Neurologic development was normal over 1 year of follow-up after ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation. Case 2 was a 28-weeks' gestation male premature baby weighing 1180 g. Endotracheal intubation and ventilator support were provided after delivery due to respiratory distress. Blood culture yielded L. monocyto-genes. Cerebrospinal fluid showed pleocytosis but the culture was negative. Brain ultrasonography showed ventriculitis. Sudden deterioration with cyanosis and bradycardia developed on the 8th day and he died on the same day. Neonatal listeriosis is uncommon in Taiwan, but has significant mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis of perinatal infection relies on high index of suspicion in perinatal health care professionals. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2:161-164

  7. A review of simulation-enhanced, team-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onan, Arif; Simsek, Nurettin; Elcin, Melih; Turan, Sevgi; Erbil, Bülent; Deniz, Kaan Zülfikar

    2017-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is an essential element of clinical skill development for healthcare providers. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation has described issues related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care education. Educational interventions have been initiated to try to address these issues using a team-based approach and simulation technologies that offer a controlled, safe learning environment. The aim of the study is to review and synthesize published studies that address the primary question "What are the features and effectiveness of educational interventions related to simulation-enhanced, team-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation training?" We conducted a systematic review focused on educational interventions pertaining to cardiac arrest and emergencies that addressed this main question. The findings are presented together with a discussion of the effectiveness of various educational interventions. In conclusion, student attitudes toward interprofessional learning and simulation experiences were more positive. Research reports emphasized the importance of adherence to established guidelines, adopting a holistic approach to training, and that preliminary training, briefing, deliberate practices, and debriefing should help to overcome deficiencies in cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Patterns of intravenous fluid resuscitation use in adult intensive care patients between 2007 and 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Naomi E; Taylor, Colman; Finfer, Simon

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2007, the Saline versus Albumin Fluid Evaluation-Translation of Research Into Practice Study (SAFE-TRIPS) reported that 0.9% sodium chloride (saline) and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) were the most commonly used resuscitation fluids in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Evidence has e...

  9. An MR-compatible neonatal incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, M N J; Hart, A R; Lait, M; Griffiths, P D

    2012-07-01

    To develop a neonatal MR-compatible incubator for transporting babies between a neonatal intensive care unit and an MRI unit that is within the same hospital but geographically separate. The system was strapped to a standard MR-compatible patient trolley, which provides space for resuscitation outside the incubator. A constant-temperature exothermic heat pad was used to maintain temperature together with a logging fluoro-optic temperature monitor and alarm system. The system has been designed to accommodate standard knee-sized coils from the major MR manufacturers. The original incubator was constructed from carbon fibre, but this required modification to prevent radiofrequency shading artefacts due to the conducting properties of the carbon fibre. A high-tensile polyester material was used, which combined light weight with high impact strength. The system could be moved onto the patient bed with the coils and infant in place by one technologist. Studies in eight neonatal patients produced high quality 1.5 T MR images with low motion artefacts. The incubator should also be compatible with imaging in 3 T MR systems, although further work is required to establish this. Images were acquired using both rapid and high-resolution sequences, including three-dimensional volumes, proton spectra and diffusion weighting. The incubator provides a safe, quiet environment for neonates during transport and imaging, at low cost.

  10. Colloid normalizes resuscitation ratio in pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraklas, Iris; Lam, Uyen; Cochran, Amalia; Stoddard, Gregory; Saffle, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation of burned children is challenging because of their small size and intolerance to over- or underresuscitation. Our American Burn Association-verified regional burn center has used colloid "rescue" as part of our pediatric resuscitation protocol. With Institutional Review Board approval, the authors reviewed children with ≥15% TBSA burns admitted from January 1, 2004, to May 1, 2009. Resuscitation was based on the Parkland formula, which was adjusted to maintain urine output. Patients requiring progressive increases in crystalloid were placed on a colloid protocol. Results were expressed as an hourly resuscitation ratio (I/O ratio) of fluid infusion (ml/kg/%TBSA/hr) to urine output (ml/kg/hr). We reviewed 53 patients; 29 completed resuscitation using crystalloid alone (lactated Ringer's solution [LR]), and 24 received colloid supplementation albumin (ALB). Groups were comparable in age, gender, weight, and time from injury to admission. ALB patients had more inhalation injuries and larger total and full-thickness burns. LR patients maintained a median I/O of 0.17 (range, 0.08-0.31), whereas ALB patients demonstrated escalating ratios until the institution of albumin produced a precipitous return of I/O comparable with that of the LR group. Hospital stay was lower for LR patients than ALB patients (0.59 vs 1.06 days/%TBSA, P = .033). Twelve patients required extremity or torso escharotomy, but this did not differ between groups. There were no decompressive laparotomies. The median resuscitation volume for ALB group was greater than LR group (9.7 vs 6.2 ml/kg/%TBSA, P = .004). Measuring hourly I/O is a helpful means of evaluating fluid demands during burn shock resuscitation. The addition of colloid restores normal I/O in pediatric patients.

  11. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhwan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  12. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhwan; Villarroel, José Paul Perales; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Hong, Angela; Lampe, Joshua W; Becker, Lance B

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  13. Hipotermia terapêutica pós-reanimação cardiorrespiratória: evidências e aspectos práticos Therapeutical hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation: evidences and practical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Soares Feitosa-Filho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Os sobreviventes de parada cardiorrespiratória freqüentemente apresentam lesão cerebral isquêmica associada a piores desfechos neurológicos e óbito. A hipotermia terapêutica melhora os desfechos entre os sobreviventes comatosos após manobras de reanimação. Considerando sua recomendação formal para emprego terapêutico pós-recuperação da circulação espontânea na parada cardiorrespiratória, o objetivo deste estudo foi rever os principais aspectos clínicos relativos à hipotermia terapêutica. Foi feita revisão através de pesquisa não-sistemática de artigos através das palavras-chave "parada cardiorrespiratória, resfriamento, hipotermia, síndrome pós-reanimação" na base de dados MedLine. Adicionalmente, referências destes artigos foram igualmente avaliadas. Pacientes adultos inconscientes com circulação espontânea após parada cardiorrespiratória extra-hospitalar devem ser resfriados quando o ritmo inicial for fibrilação ventricular ou taquicardia ventricular. Este resfriamento pode ser benéfico para os outros ritmos e para o ambiente intra-hospitalar. Existem várias formas diferentes de induzir a hipotermia. O sistema de resfriamento deve atingir a temperatura alvo o mais rápido possível. O reaquecimento para 36º C deve ser realizado em não menos do que 8 horas. Quando a temperatura aumenta para mais de 35º C, sedação, analgesia e paralisia podem ser descontinuadas. As complicações esperadas da hipotermia terapêutica podem incluir pneumonia, sepse, disritmias cardíacas e coagulopatias. A despeito de potenciais complicações que necessitam de cuidadosa monitoração, apenas seis pacientes precisam ser tratados com hipotermia induzida pós- parada cardiorrespiratória para salvar uma vida.Cardiac arrest survivors frequently suffer from ischemic brain injury associated with poor neurological outcome and death. Therapeutic hypothermia improves outcomes in comatose survivors after resuscitation from

  14. A multi-center study on the attitudes of Malaysian emergency health care staff towards allowing family presence during resuscitation of adult patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Chew Keng; Lim, Chee Kean; Rashidi, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Abstracts Background The practice of allowing family members to witness on-going active resuscitation has been gaining ground in many developed countries since it was first introduced in the early 1990s. In many Asian countries, the acceptability of this practice has not been well studied. Aim We conducted a multi-center questionnaire study to determine the attitudes of health care professionals in Malaysia towards family presence to witness ongoing medical procedures during resuscitation. Me...

  15. Are We Successful in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Kozaci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we aimed to determine the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed in the patients with diagnosis of cardiac arrest, and demographic characteristics of these patients. Material and Methods: The patients admitted to Adana Numune Education and Research Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine between 01.01.2011 and 31.12.2012, and who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation were included to this study planned as retrospectively. The age, gender, status of judicial cases, causes and time of cardiac arrest, first observed arrest rhythm, the diseases prior to the arrest, means of arrival to emergency department, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the name of the hospitalised clinic, the existence of the operation, and outcome of the patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation in accordance with current advanced life support protocols were recorded in standard data entry form. Results: A total of 290 patients with completely accessible data were included to the study. Most of these patients were men (65.2%. The mean ages were 61 ± 19 years for men, 67 ± 14 years for women (p = 0.018. The most common diagnosis were ischemic heart disease and heart failure according to the analysis of the patient's medical history. 92 patients (31.7% were brought to the emergency department after death, and all of these patients were unsuccessful following to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 198 patients (68.3% had cardiac arrest in the emergency department, and we determined that cardiopulmonary resuscitation application of 102 patients were successful. The most common causes of cardiac arrest were myocardial infarction and heart failure. Mostly first observed rhythm in the monitor was asystole. The response rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia was higher. Most patients were hospitalised to the

  16. Family presence during resuscitation: A Canadian Critical Care Society position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oczkowski, Simon John Walsh; Mazzetti, Ian; Cupido, Cynthia; Fox-Robichaud, Alison E

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that patient outcomes are not affected by the offering of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR), and that psychological outcomes are neutral or improved in family members of adult patients. The exclusion of family members from the resuscitation area should, therefore, be reassessed. The present Canadian Critical Care Society position paper is designed to help clinicians and institutions decide whether to incorporate FPDR as part of their routine clinical practice, and to offer strategies to implement FPDR successfully. The authors conducted a literature search of the perspectives of health care providers, patients and families on the topic of FPDR, and considered the relevant ethical values of beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy and justice in light of the clinical evidence for FPDR. They reviewed randomized controlled trials and observational studies of FPDR to determine strategies that have been used to screen family members, select appropriate chaperones and educate staff. FPDR is an ethically sound practice in Canada, and may be considered for the families of adult and pediatric patients in the hospital setting. Hospitals that choose to implement FPDR should develop transparent policies regarding which family members are to be offered the opportunity to be present during the resuscitation. Experienced chaperones should accompany and support family members in the resuscitation area. Intensive educational interventions and increasing experience with FPDR are associated with increased support for the practice from health care providers. FPDR should be considered to be an important component of patient and family-centred care.

  17. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Odd Jarle; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg

    2013-02-19

    The criteria for refraining from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients are based on patients' right to refuse treatment and the duty of the treating personnel not to exacerbate their suffering and not to administer futile treatment. When is cardiopulmonary resuscitation futile in these patients? Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed for the period 1989-2010 on the results of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in advanced cancer patients and on factors that affected the results of CPR when special mention was made of cancer. The searches yielded 333 hits and 18 included articles: four meta-analyses, eight retrospective clinical studies, and six review articles. Cancer patients had a poorer post-CPR survival than non-cancer patients. Survival declined with increasing extent of the cancer disease. Widespread and therapy-resistant cancer disease coupled with a performance status lower than WHO 2 or a PAM score (Pre-Arrest Morbidity Index) of above 8 was regarded as inconsistent with survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is futile for in-hospital cancer patients with widespread incurable disease and poor performance status.

  18. Process evaluation of a community-based intervention promoting multiple maternal and neonatal care practices in rural Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silwal Ram C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The challenge of delivering multiple, complex messages to promote maternal and newborn health in the terai region of Nepal was addressed through training Female Community Health Volunteers (FCHVs to counsel pregnant women and their families using a flipchart and a pictorial booklet that was distributed to clients. The booklet consists of illustrated messages presented on postcard-sized laminated cards that are joined by a ring. Pregnant women were encouraged to discuss booklet content with their families. Methods We examined use of the booklet and factors affecting adoption of practices through semi-structured interviews with district and community-level government health personnel, staff from the Nepal Family Health Program, FCHVs, recently delivered women and their husbands and mothers-in-law. Results The booklet is shared among household members, promotes discussion, and is referred to when questions arise or during emergencies. Booklet cards on danger signs and nutritious foods are particularly well-received. Cards on family planning and certain aspects of birth preparedness generate less interest. Husbands and mothers-in-law control decision-making for maternal and newborn care-seeking and related household-level behaviors. Conclusions Interpersonal peer communication through trusted community-level volunteers is an acceptable primary strategy in Nepal for promotion of household-level behaviors. The content and number of messages should be simplified or streamlined before being scaled-up to minimize intervention complexity and redundant communication.

  19. Comparison of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques using video camera recordings.

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, C J; Heyworth, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To use video recordings to compare the performance of resuscitation teams in relation to their previous training in cardiac resuscitation. METHODS--Over a 10 month period all cardiopulmonary resuscitations carried out in an accident and emergency (A&E) resuscitation room were videotaped. The following variables were monitored: (1) time to perform three defibrillatory shocks; (2) time to give intravenous adrenaline (centrally or peripherally); (3) the numbers and grade of medical an...

  20. SURVEI KEMATIAN NEONATAL (STUDI AUTOPSI VERBAL DI KABUPATEN CIREBON, 2004

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    Sarimawar Djaja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In its attempt to realize the intervention program to saving newborn babies with asphyxia, the Ministry of Health will initiate to train midwives in the village in order to that they know how to operate resuscitation equipment to save neonatal baby with asphyxia. The intervention program his dubbed successful if the mortality proportion due if asphyxia decreased to half as targeted. The survey was conducted in the rural area of Cirebon district. The sample was 200 neonatal death babies, calculated using the hypothesis test with different proportion; p1 0.3 (30% neonatal death cause of asphyxia, according household health survey 2001, p2 0.15, α 0.05, β 0.2, (l-β 0.8. Neonatal dead cases happened within 12 months prior to the survey were identified by rural midwives out of their personal records. The death cases were followed up by interviewing the mother of the neonatal baby concerning its birth, illness or disorder histories before death. The diagnosis of the diseases were based on the International Classification of Diseases 10 and Wigglesworth classification, determined in union by NIHRD researchers and neonatologists. The neonatal mortality rate was 13 out of 1,000 live births. The major cause of early neonatal mortality was respiration disorder mainly caused by birth asphyxia (45%, of which 90 percent could be intervened by doing resuscitation (for babies weighed more than 1.000 gram. The second and third order of the mortality causes was infection (22% and congenital disorders (11% respectively. The major cause of late neonatal mortality was infection (56%, followed by low birth weight and prematurely born, as well as neonatal jaundice (14 percent each, and congenital disorder comes in the third place. The option to handle asphyxia with the early neonatal babies is the right effort to decrease the neonatal mortality rate. And to achieve the utmost result, it is necessary that the rural midwives maintain their standard performance (in

  1. Neonatal hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straussman, Sharon; Levitsky, Lynne L

    2010-02-01

    Hypoglycemia in the newborn may be associated with both acute decompensation and long-term neuronal loss. Studies of the cause of hypoglycemic brain damage and the relationship of hypoglycemia to disorders associated with hyperinsulinism have aided in our understanding of this common clinical finding. A recent consensus workshop concluded that there has been little progress toward a precise numerical definition of neonatal hypoglycemia. Nonetheless, newer brain imaging modalities have provided insight into the relationship between neuronal energy deficiency and central nervous system damage. Laboratory studies have begun to reveal the mechanism of hypoglycemic damage. In addition, there is new information about hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of genetic, environmental, and iatrogenic origin. The quantitative definition of hypoglycemia in the newborn remains elusive because it is a surrogate marker for central nervous system energy deficiency. Nonetheless, the recognition that hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, which produces profound central nervous system energy deficiency, is most likely to lead to long-term central nervous system damage, has altered management of children with hypoglycemia. In addition, imaging studies on neonates and laboratory evaluation in animal models have provided insight into the mechanism of neuronal damage.

  2. Liver laceration related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Beydilli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is recognized as a medical procedure performed to maintain vital functions of a person whose cardiac and respiratory functions have stopped. Chest compression is the most essential component of CPR and it is performed on the lower half of the sternum. During CPR, many complications may occur because of chest compressions, especially chest injuries including sternum and rib fractures. Rarely tracheal injury, rupture of the stomach, or liver or spleen injury may also occur as complications.In this study, we present two cases of liver injury caused by resuscitation. With this article, we want to emphasize the importance of making correct chest compressions. Keywords: Resuscitation complications, Emergency service, Liver laceration, Autopsy

  3. Persisting effect of community approaches to resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Isbye, Dan Lou; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On the Danish island of Bornholm an intervention was carried out during 2008-2010 aiming at increasing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival. The intervention included mass media focus on resuscitation and widespread educational activities. The aim of this study was to compare....... There was no significant change in all-rhythm 30-day survival for non-EMS witnessed OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology (6.7% [95% CI 3-13] in the follow-up period; vs. 4.6% [95% CI 1-12], p=0.76). CONCLUSION: In a 3-year follow-up period after an intervention engaging laypersons in resuscitation through mass education...... in BLS combined with a media focus on resuscitation, we observed a persistent significant increase in the bystander BLS rate for all OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology. There was no significant difference in 30-day survival....

  4. Shenfu injection provides protection for perinatal asphyxia in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of shenfu injection for the protection of neonates with asphyxia. Eighty neonates with asphyxia were randomly divided into two groups, treatment group and control group (n=40. Both groups received interventions such as ventilation, oxygen, and circulation support. Treatment group was administrated with shenfu injection additionally. Serum levels of creatine kinase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, and neuron-specific enolase were significantly lower but the oxygenation index was significantly higher in treatment group on day 7 and day 14. The neurobehavioral score was significantly higher in treatment group than in control group. On the 14th day, the survival rate of treatment group (77.5% was higher than that of control group (55%. Shenfu injection could protect the function of the brain, heart, lung, liver and kidney by attenuating ischemia reperfusion after severe asphyxia resuscitation, improve neurobehavioral ability and increase the survival of neonates.

  5. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Infants and Children With Cardiac Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Bradley S; Tabbutt, Sarah; MacLaren, Graeme; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Adatia, Ian; Atkins, Dianne L; Checchia, Paul A; DeCaen, Allan; Fink, Ericka L; Hoffman, George M; Jefferies, John L; Kleinman, Monica; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Licht, Daniel J; Macrae, Duncan; Ravishankar, Chitra; Samson, Ricardo A; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Toms, Rune; Tweddell, James; Laussen, Peter C

    2018-04-23

    Cardiac arrest occurs at a higher rate in children with heart disease than in healthy children. Pediatric basic life support and advanced life support guidelines focus on delivering high-quality resuscitation in children with normal hearts. The complexity and variability in pediatric heart disease pose unique challenges during resuscitation. A writing group appointed by the American Heart Association reviewed the literature addressing resuscitation in children with heart disease. MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases were searched from 1966 to 2015, cross-referencing pediatric heart disease with pertinent resuscitation search terms. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association classification of recommendations and levels of evidence for practice guidelines were used. The recommendations in this statement concur with the critical components of the 2015 American Heart Association pediatric basic life support and pediatric advanced life support guidelines and are meant to serve as a resuscitation supplement. This statement is meant for caregivers of children with heart disease in the prehospital and in-hospital settings. Understanding the anatomy and physiology of the high-risk pediatric cardiac population will promote early recognition and treatment of decompensation to prevent cardiac arrest, increase survival from cardiac arrest by providing high-quality resuscitations, and improve outcomes with postresuscitation care. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program in Latin-America: the RIBEPCI experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Matamoros, Martha M; Moya, Luis; Almonte, Enma; Coronel, Diana; Urbano, Javier; Carrillo, Ángel; Del Castillo, Jimena; Mencía, Santiago; Moral, Ramón; Ordoñez, Flora; Sánchez, Carlos; Lagos, Lina; Johnson, María; Mendoza, Ovidio; Rodriguez, Sandra

    2017-09-12

    To describe the design and to present the results of a paediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program adapted to Latin-America. A paediatric CPR coordinated training project was set up in several Latin-American countries with the instructional and scientific support of the Spanish Group for Paediatric and Neonatal CPR. The program was divided into four phases: CPR training and preparation of instructors; training for instructors; supervised teaching; and independent teaching. Instructors from each country participated in the development of the next group in the following country. Paediatric Basic Life Support (BLS), Paediatric Intermediate (ILS) and Paediatric Advanced (ALS) courses were organized in each country adapted to local characteristics. Five Paediatric Resuscitation groups were created sequentially in Honduras (2), Guatemala, Dominican Republican and Mexico. During 5 years, 6 instructors courses (94 students), 64 Paediatric BLS Courses (1409 students), 29 Paediatrics ILS courses (626 students) and 89 Paediatric ALS courses (1804 students) were given. At the end of the program all five groups are autonomous and organize their own instructor courses. Training of autonomous Paediatric CPR groups with the collaboration and scientific assessment of an expert group is a good model program to develop Paediatric CPR training in low- and middle income countries. Participation of groups of different countries in the educational activities is an important method to establish a cooperation network.

  7. Extensive cardiopulmonary resuscitation for VLBW and ELBW infants: a systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P S

    2009-10-01

    Studies of the outcomes of preterm infants after the receipt of extensive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at birth or in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have yielded varied results. A systematic review of the outcomes of very low birth weight (VLBW) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants who received extensive resuscitation at birth or in the NICU was carried out. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL databases were searched for studies of extensive CPR in the delivery room (DR-CPR) and in NICU (NICU-CPR) that have reported neonatal or long-term outcomes. A total of 20 eligible studies were identified (11 of DR-CPR, 7 of NICU-CPR and 2 had combined data). DR-CPR was associated with an increased risk of mortality (odds ratio (OR) 2.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.92, 4.16) and severe neurological injury (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.40, 3.67) compared with infants who did not receive extensive CPR. NICU-CPR was associated with an increased risk of mortality (OR 55, 95% CI 15, 195) compared with infants who did not receive CPR; however, confidence limits were wide. The long-term outcome of survivors was reported in a limited number of studies. Extensive CPR at birth or in the NICU for VLBW or ELBW infants was associated with higher risk of mortality.

  8. Review of a fluid resuscitation protocol: "fluid creep" is not due to nursing error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraklas, Iris; Cochran, Amalia; Saffle, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Recent reviews of burn resuscitation have included the suggestion that "fluid creep" may be influenced by practitioner error. Our center uses a nursing-driven resuscitation protocol that permits titration of fluid based on hourly urine output, including the addition of colloid when patients fail to respond appropriately. The purpose of this study was to examine protocol compliance. We reviewed 140 patients (26 children) with burns of ≥20% TBSA who received protocol-directed resuscitation from 2005 to 2010. We compared each patient's actual hourly fluid infusion with that predicted by the protocol. Sixty-seven patients (48%) completed resuscitation using crystalloid alone, whereas 73 patients required colloid supplementation. Groups did not differ in age, gender, weight, or time from injury to admission. Patients requiring colloid had larger median total burns (33.0 vs 23.5% TBSA) and full-thickness burns (15.5 vs 4.5% TBSA) and more inhalation injuries (60.3 vs 28.4%; P patients had median predicted requirements of 5.4 ml/kg/%TBSA. Crystalloid-only patients required fluid volumes close to Parkland predictions (4.7 ml/kg/%TBSA), whereas patients who received colloid required more fluid than the predicted volume (7.5 ml/kg/%TBSA). However, the hourly difference between the predicted and received fluids was a median of only 1.0% (interquartile range: -6.1 to 11.1%) and did not differ between groups. Pediatric patients had greater calculated differences than adults. Crystalloid patients exhibited higher urine outputs than colloid patients until colloid was started, suggesting that early over-resuscitation did not contribute to fluid creep. Adherence to our protocol for burn shock resuscitation was excellent overall. Fluid creep exhibited by more seriously injured patients was not due to nurses' failure to follow the protocol. This review has illuminated some opportunities for practice improvement, possibly using a computerized decision support system.

  9. Year in Review 2015: Neonatal Respiratory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Sherry E

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal respiratory care practices have changed with breathtaking speed in the past few years. It is critical for the respiratory therapist and others caring for neonates to be up to date with current recommendations and evolving care practices. The purpose of this article is to review papers of particular note that were published in 2015 and address important aspects of newborn respiratory care. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  10. Sustained versus intermittent lung inflation for resuscitation of preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Chimi, Mohamed S; Awad, Hisham A; El-Gammasy, Tarek M; El-Farghali, Ola G; Sallam, Mohamed T; Shinkar, Dina M

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of delivery room (DR) sustained lung inflation (SLI) in resuscitation of preterm neonates. Randomized Controlled Trial including 112 preterm infants randomized to either SLI (n = 57) using T-piece resuscitator [maximum three inflations with maximum pressure of 30 cmH 2 O for 15 s followed by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) of 5-7 cmH 2 O] or conventional bag/mask inflation (CBMI) (n = 55) using traditional self-inflating bag (maximum pressure of 40 cmH 2 O at a rate of 40-60 per min). Failure was defined as the need for DR or first 72 h intubation. Cord and 2-h post-resuscitation blood samples were collected to measure interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels before and after intervention. SLI was associated with significantly higher success rate compared to CBMI [75.4 versus 54.5%; p = 0.017], lower need for DR intubation [5.3% versus 23.6%; (X 2  =   7.7; p = 0.005)], higher 5-min-Apgar score (median 8 versus 7; p = 0.018), shorter duration on nasal-CPAP (p = 0.017), and non-significantly different air leak (7% versus 11%; p = 0.3) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia rates among survivors (2% versus 11%; p = 0.09). Post-resuscitation IL-1β plasma levels increased significantly in CBMI (p = 0.009) and not in SLI group. Delivery room SLI is more effective than intermittent bag and mask inflation for improving short-term respiratory outcome in preterm infants, without significant adverse effects.

  11. [2018 National consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixiang; Meng, Qingyi; Yu, Tao

    2018-05-01

    To promote the technical training and scientific popularization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in China, the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Specialized Committee of Chinese Research Hospital Association combined with the Science Popularization Branch of the Chinese Medical Association wrote "2018 National consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in China". The formation was based on the general outline about "2016 National consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation in China", and to implement the important strategies included the "three pre" policy, prevention, precognition, and pre-warning, before the cardiac arrest (CA); the "three modernization" methods, standardized, diversified and individualized, during the CA; and the "three life" strategies, the rebirth, the extra and the extended, after the CA; and also combined with the concrete National conditions and clinical practice of China area. The document summarized the evidence of published science about CPR training till now, and recommend the establishment of "the CPR Training Triangle" according to the Chinese National conditions. The bases of the triangle were system, training and person, the core of which was CPR science. The main contents were: (1) The "three training" policy for CPR training: the cultivation of a sound system, which included professional credibility, extensive mobilization and continuous driving force, and the participation of the whole people and continuous improvement; the cultivation of scientific guidelines, which included scientific content, methods and thinking; and the cultivation of a healthy culture, which included the enhancement of civic quality, education of rescue scientifically, and advocate of healthy life. (2) The "three training" program of CPR training: training professional skills, which included standard, multiple, and individual skills; training multidimensional, which included time, space, and human; and training flexible, including problem, time

  12. Failure to thrive among neonates, associated factors and early neonatal outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Erica; Manji, Karim; Mpembeni Rose

    2005-01-01

    Failure to thrive or growth failure is an important feature of problems prevalent in the neonate. It remains one of the greatest challenges for the practicing pediatrician and it is a common pathway or outcome of several different underlaying infant and maternal conditions. To determine the prevalence, possible causes and early neonatal outcome of failure to thrive among young infants admitted to the Neonatal Unit in this hospital. A cross-sectional descriptive hospital based study, was carried for 10 months from April 2001 to January 2002 at the Neonatal Unit at Muhimbili National Hospital. (author)

  13. Novel Resuscitation from Lethal Hemorrhage-Suspended Animation for Delayed Resuscitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Safar, Peter

    2003-01-01

    ...). We have conceived and documented the concept of "suspended animation (SA) for delayed resuscitation" using a hypothermic saline flush into the aorta within the first 5 min of CA, using novel clinically relevant outcome models in dogs...

  14. Novel Resuscitation From Lethal Hemorrhage Suspended Animation for Delayed Resuscitation, Year 7

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kochanek, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    ...). We have conceived and documented the concept of "suspended animation (SA) for delayed resuscitation" using a hypothermic saline flush into the aorta after rapid (over 5 min) exsanguination (Ex...

  15. Brain computed tomographic findings in post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Tsuguharu; Yoshinaga, Kazumasa; Horibe, Takashi; Kokubu, Kiyokazu; Kokura, Yoshihiro; Matsui, Konosuke; Inamoto, Kazuo.

    1986-01-01

    We retrospectively assessed the brain computed tomographic (CT) findings in 22 post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) patients excluding neonatal cases. On the basis of the CT findings, the patients were divided into two groups. Eight patients (36.4 %) had bilateral abnormal lowdensity areas in the basal ganglia (Group I). The remaining 14 patients (63.6 %) had no abnormalities in that area (Group II). In Group I, the incidence of primary cardiac arrest and duration of advanced life support (ALS) was significantly different (p < 0.05) from Group II. Sex, age, duration of basic life support (BLS), time elapsed from initiation of BLS to initial CT and from initiation of ALS to initial CT was not significantly different between the two groups. Outcome was very poor in both groups and no significant difference was noted between them. We conclude that primary cardiac arrest and long duration of ALS were predictors of abnormal bilateral low-density areas in the basal ganglia in post-CPR patients. However, their appearance was not related to outcome. (author)

  16. Survival predictors of preterm neonates: Hospital based study in Iran (2010-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Ladan; Nojomi, Marzieh; Mohabbatian, Behnaz; Najmi, Zahra

    2013-12-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is responsible for 70% of neonatal mortalities. Various factors influence the risk of neonatal mortality in different populations. Our objective was to evaluate neonatal survival rate of preterm infants, and to define its predictors in Iranian population. This retrospective cohort study included all preterm (26-37 weeks) infants (n=1612) born alive in Shahid Akbar-abadi university hospital, during one year period (April 2010-2011). These infants were evaluated for fetal-neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy data. Survival analysis was performed and viability threshold and risk factors of neonatal mortality were evaluated. Total overall mortality rate was 9.1%. Survival rate were 11.11% for extremely low birth weights (LBW) and 45.12% for very early PTBs. The smallest surviving infant was a 750 gr female with gestational age (GA) of 30 weeks and the youngest infants was a 970 gram female with GA of 25weeks plus 2 days. History of previous dead neonate, need to cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR), need to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, postnatal administration of surfactant, presence of anomalies, Apgar score <7, multiple pregnancy, non-cephalic presentation, early PTB, very early PTB, LBW, very low birth weight (VLBW) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW), were risk factors for mortality in preterm neonates. Our study revealed that neonatal survival rate is dramatically influenced by birth weight especially under 1000grams, GA especially below 30 weeks, neonatal anomalies, history of previous dead fetus, multiple pregnancy, non- cephalic presentation, and need for NICU admission, resuscitation and respiratory support with surfactant.

  17. New insights for adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Up-coming resuscitation guidelines 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Pranskūnas, Andrius; Dobožinskas, Paulius; Pilvinis, Vidas; Pranskūnienė, Živilė; Jasinskas, Nedas; Stašaitis, Kęstutis; Vaitkaitienė, Eglė; Vaitkaitis, Dinas

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in cardiac arrest care, the overall survival to hospital discharge remains poor. The objective of this paper was to review the innovations in cardiopulmonary resuscitation that could influence survival or change our understanding about cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We have performed a search in the MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases for randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, expert reviews from December 2005 to March 2010 using the terms cardiac arrest, basic life supp...

  18. Do not attempt resuscitation: the importance of consensual decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Lorenz; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Janisch, Christine; Kesselring, Annemarie; Zuercher Zenklusend, Regula

    2011-02-03

    To describe the involvement and input of physicians and nurses in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR / do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) decisions; to analyse decision patterns; and understand the practical implications. A Qualitative Grounded Theory study using one-time open-ended interviews with 40 volunteer physicians and 52 nurses drawn from acute care wards with mixes of heterogeneous cases in seven different hospitals in German-speaking Switzerland. Establishing DNAR orders in the best interests of patients was described as a challenging task requiring the leadership of senior physicians and nurses. Implicit decisions in favour of CPR predominated at the beginning of hospitalisation; depending on the context, they were relieved/superseded by explicit DNAR decisions. Explicit decisions were the result of hierarchical medical expertise, of multilateral interdisciplinary expertise, of patient autonomy and/or of negotiated patient autonomy. Each type of decision, implicit or explicit, potentially represented a team consensus. Non-consensual decisions were prone to precipitate personal or team conflicts, and, occasionally, led to non-compliance. Establishing DNAR orders is a demanding task. Reaching a consensus is of crucial importance in guaranteeing teamwork and good patient care. Communication and negotiation skills, professional and personal life experience and empathy for patients and colleagues are pivotal. Therefore, leadership by experienced senior physicians and nurses is needed and great efforts should be made with regard to multidisciplinary education.

  19. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwes, Aline; van Poppelen, Daniel; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Tromp, Selma C.; Zandbergen, Eveline G. J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Horn, Janneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM) can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of

  20. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: Clinical practices in five Portuguese neonatal intensive care units Displasia broncopulmonar: Práticas clínicas em cinco unidades de cuidados intensivos neonatais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Guimarães

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of surfactant, prenatal corticosteroids (PNC and advances in technology, the survival rate of extremely low birth weight (ELBW infants has improved dramatically. Rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD vary widely among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs and many studies using multiple interventions have shown some improvement in BPD rates. Implementing potentially better practices to reduce BPD has been an effort made over the last few decades. Aim: To compare five Portuguese NICUs in terms of clinical practices in very low birth weight (VLBW infants, in order to developbetter practices to prevent BPD. Patients and methods: 256 preterm neonates, gestational age (GA Com o advento do surfactante, dos corticosteróides prénatais e dos avanços na tecnologia, a sobrevida dos recém-nascidos de extremo baixo peso tem melhorado dramaticamente. As taxas de displasia broncopulmonar (DBP variam amplamente entre unidades, e vários estudos, avaliando resultados de múltiplas intervenções, têm mostrado alguma melhoria na prevalência da DBP. A implementação de potenciais boas práticas na DBP tem sido adoptada por muitos serviços nas últimas décadas. Objectivo: Comparar cinco unidades portuguesas de cuidados intensivos neonatais no que se refere as práticas clínicas no tratamento dos recém-nascidos de muito baixo peso, para desenvolver e melhorar as boas práticas na prevenção da DBP. População e métodos: Foram estudados 256 recém-nascidos com a idade gestacional inferior a 30 semanas e/ou peso ao nascer inferior a 1250 g, admitidos nas cinco unidades portuguesas (centros 1 a 5 entre 1 de Janeiro de 2004 e 31 de Dezembro de 2006. Foram excluídos os recém-nascidos com malformações major, hemorragia intraventricular grau IV na primeira semana de vida e com doença metabólica ou neuromuscular. Definimos DBP como a dependência do oxigénio às 36 semanas de idade pós-concepcional. A ecessidade de melhorar

  1. Effects of an Interdisciplinary Practice Bundle for Second-Stage Labor on Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garpiel, Susan J

    2018-04-09

    There is renewed interest in second-stage labor practices as recent evidence has challenged historical perspectives on safe duration of secondstage labor. Traditional practices and routine interventions during second-stage have uncertain benefit for low-risk women and may result in cesarean birth. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to implement an interdisciplinary second-stage practice bundle to promote safe outcomes including method of birth and women's birth experience. Standardized second-stage labor evidence-based practice recommendations structured into a 5 Ps practice bundle (patience, positioning, physiologic resuscitation, progress, preventing urinary harm) were implemented across 34 birthing hospitals in Trinity Health system. Significant improvements were observed in second-stage practices. Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses' perinatal nursing care quality measure Second-Stage of Labor: Mother-Initiated Spontaneous Pushing significantly improved [pre-implementation 43% (510/1,195), post-implementation 76% (1,541/2,028), p labor practices derived from the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses and American College of Nurse-Midwives professional guidelines achieved our goals of safely reducing primary cesarean birth among low-risk nulliparous women, and optimizing maternal and fetal outcomes associated with labor and birth. By minimizing routine interventions, nurses support physiologic birth and improve women's birth satisfaction.

  2. Procedural pain in neonatal units in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyololo, O'Brien Munyao; Stevens, Bonnie; Gastaldo, Denise; Gisore, Peter

    2014-11-01

    To determine the nature and frequency of painful procedures and procedural pain management practices in neonatal units in Kenya. Cross-sectional survey. Level I and level II neonatal units in Kenya. Ninety-five term and preterm neonates from seven neonatal units. Medical records of neonates admitted for at least 24 h were reviewed to determine the nature and frequency of painful procedures performed in the 24 h period preceding data collection (6:00 to 6:00) as well as the pain management interventions (eg, morphine, breastfeeding, skin-to-skin contact, containment, non-nutritive sucking) that accompanied each procedure. Neonates experienced a total of 404 painful procedures over a 24 h period (mean=4.3, SD 2.0; range 1-12); 270 tissue-damaging (mean=2.85, SD 1.1; range 1-6) and 134 non-tissue-damaging procedures (mean=1.41, SD 1.2; range 0-6). Peripheral cannula insertion (27%) and intramuscular injections (22%) were the most common painful procedures. Ventilated neonates and neonates admitted in level II neonatal units had a higher number of painful procedures than those admitted in level I units (mean 4.76 vs 2.96). Only one procedure had a pain intensity score documented; and none had been performed with any form of analgesia. Neonates in Kenya were exposed to numerous tissue-damaging and non-tissue-damaging procedures without any form of analgesia. Our findings suggest that education is needed on how to assess and manage procedural pain in neonatal units in Kenya. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. The effects of risk factors on the improvement of hypothermia neonatal using fuzzy transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Salmani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Neonatal hypothermia is a major risk factor for mortality after delivery. This study aims to identify the risk factors associated with transition in hypothermia state with new definition of hypothermia states.Methods:  Four hundred and seventy nine (479 neonates hospitalized in NICU of Valiasr in Tehran, Iran in 2005 participated in this study. The rectal temperature of neonatal was measured immediately after delivery and every 30 min afterwards, until neonates became normal.Results: The mean weight of neonatal was 2580±882.9 g and mean of delivery room temperature was 29.2±1.45 °C. Most of the neonatal were mild hypothermia. There were significant associations between weight of neonatal, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and Apgar score with hypothermia state (P<0.05.  Death of neonatal was related to hypothermia state.Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that a major risk factor for hypothermia was low weight of neonatal.

  4. Attitude of elderly patients towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chliara, Daphne; Chalkias, Athanasios; Horopanitis, Evaggelos E; Papadimitriou, Lila; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-10-01

    Although researchers in several countries have investigated patients' points of view regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there has been no research investigating this issue in Greece. The present study aimed at identifying the attitude of older Greek patients regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation. One basic questionnaire consisting of 34 questions was used in order to identify patients' opinions regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation in five different hospitals from June to November 2011. In total, 300 questionnaires were collected. Although patients' knowledge regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation was poor, most of them would like to be resuscitated in case they suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest. Also, they believe that they should have the right to accept or refuse treatment. However, the legal and sociocultural norms in Greece do not support patients' choice for the decision to refuse resuscitation. The influence of several factors, such as their general health status or the underlying pathology, could lead patients to give a "do not attempt resuscitation" order. The attitudes of older Greek patients regarding resuscitation are not different from others', whereas the legal and sociocultural norms in Greece do not support patient choice in end-of-life decisions, namely the decision to refuse resuscitation. We advocate the introduction of advanced directives, as well as the establishment and implementation of specific legislation regarding the ethics of resuscitation in Greece. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Neonatal hypokalemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarici D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dilek Sarici1, S Umit Sarici21Kecioren Research and Education Hospital, Kecioren, Ankara, 2Chief of Division of Neonatology, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: In this article, distribution of potassium (K+ in body fluids, pathophysiology, causes, clinical signs and symptoms, and the evaluation and treatment of neonatal hypokalemia are reviewed. K+ is the most important intracellular cation and normal serum K+ is stabilized between 3.5 and 5.5 mEq/L. Hypokalemia may be caused by increased renal losses, increased extrarenal (gastrointestinal losses, redistribution or prolonged insufficient K+ intake. Clinical signs and symptoms occur as the result of functional changes in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and the heart. Hypokalemia is usually asymptomatic when K+ levels are between 3.0 and 3.5 mEq/L; however, there may sometimes be slight muscle weakness. Moderate hypokalemia is observed when serum K+ is between 2.5 and 3.0 mEq/L. Proximal muscle weakness is observed most commonly in lower extremities; cranial muscles are normal, but constipation and distention are prominent. Severe hypokalemia develops when serum K+ falls below 2.5 mEq/L. Rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria, severe muscle weakness, paralysis, respiratory distress, and respiratory arrest are observed. The clinical signs and symptoms may be unremarkable in cases of chronically developing hypokalemia; however, appropriate treatment is essential when serum K+ level falls below 2.5 mEq/L as the most dangerous complication of hypokalemia is fatal cardiac arrythmia, and changes visible with electrocardiography may not always correlate with the level of hypokalemia. Sodium (Na+, K+, chloride (Cl-, bicarbonate, creatinine, blood sugar, magnesium (Mg, plasma renin activity, aldosterone, and blood gases should be investigated by laboratory testing. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatinine kinase, and

  6. The neonatal brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flodmark, O.

    1987-01-01

    The clinical examination of the CNS in the neonate is often difficult in cases of complex pathology. Diagnostic imaging of the neonatal brain has become extremely useful and in the last decade has developed in two main directions: CT and US. MR imaging has been used recently with varying success in the diagnosis of pathology in the neonatal brain. Despite technical difficulties, this imaging method is likely to become increasingly important in the neonate. The paper examines the normal neonatal brain anatomy as seen with the different modalities, followed by pathologic conditions. Attention is directed to the common pathology, in asphyxiated newborns, the patholphysiology of intraventicular hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia in the preterm neonate, and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the term neonate. Pitfalls, artifacts, and problems in image interpretation are illustrated. Finally, the subsequent appearance of neonatal pathology later in infancy and childhood is discussed

  7. The impact of post-resuscitation feedback for paramedics on the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleijenberg, Eduard; Koster, Rudolph W; de Vries, Hendrik; Beesems, Stefanie G

    2017-01-01

    The Guidelines place emphasis on high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study aims to measure the impact of post-resuscitation feedback on the quality of CPR as performed by ambulance personnel. Two ambulances are dispatched for suspected cardiac arrest. The crew (driver and paramedic) of the first arriving ambulance is responsible for the quality of CPR. The crew of the second ambulance establishes an intravenous access and supports the first crew. All resuscitation attempts led by the ambulance crew of the study region were reviewed by two research paramedics and structured feedback was given based on defibrillator recording with impedance signal. A 12-months period before introduction of post-resuscitation feedback was compared with a 19-months period after introduction of feedback, excluding a six months run-in interval. Quality parameters were chest compression fraction (CCF), chest compression rate, longest peri-shock pause and longest non-shock pause. In the pre-feedback period 55 cases were analyzed and 69 cases in the feedback period. Median CCF improved significantly in the feedback period (79% vs 86%, presuscitation feedback improves the quality of resuscitation, significantly increasing CCF and decreasing the duration of longest non-shock pauses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Haemostatic Control Resuscitation on mortality in massively bleeding patients: a before and after study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P I; Stensballe, J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Evidence supporting the use of platelets and plasma in resuscitation of massive bleedings is questionable. Current consensus guidelines recommend restrictive use. Our aim was to determine the effect of changing the transfusion practice on 30-day survival in massively...... bleeding patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Consecutive adult patients receiving more than 10 units of red blood cells (RBC) within 24 h 2 years prior to (2002-2003) and 2 years after (2005-2006) a change in transfusion practice were included. In 2004, we implemented Haemostatic Control Resuscitation (HCR......) with preemptive use of platelets and plasma, administered in transfusion packages, comprising 5 units of RBCs, 5 units of fresh-frozen plasma and 2 units of platelet concentrates (PC), when massive bleeding occurred or upon arrival at the emergency room and thereafter directed by thrombelastography throughout...

  9. Personalised fluid resuscitation in the ICU: still a fluid concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haren, Frank

    2017-12-28

    The administration of intravenous fluid to critically ill patients is one of the most common, but also one of the most fiercely debated, interventions in intensive care medicine. Even though many thousands of patients have been enrolled in large trials of alternative fluid strategies, consensus remains elusive and practice is widely variable. Critically ill patients are significantly heterogeneous, making a one size fits all approach unlikely to be successful.New data from basic, animal, and clinical research suggest that fluid resuscitation could be associated with significant harm. There are several important limitations and concerns regarding fluid bolus therapy as it is currently being used in clinical practice. These include, but are not limited to: the lack of an agreed definition; limited and short-lived physiological effects; no evidence of an effect on relevant patient outcomes; and the potential to contribute to fluid overload, specifically when fluid responsiveness is not assessed and when targets and safety limits are not used.Fluid administration in critically ill patients requires clinicians to integrate abnormal physiological parameters into a clinical decision-making model that also incorporates the likely diagnosis and the likely risk or benefit in the specific patient's context. Personalised fluid resuscitation requires careful attention to the mnemonic CIT TAIT: context, indication, targets, timing, amount of fluid, infusion strategy, and type of fluid.The research agenda should focus on experimental and clinical studies to: improve our understanding of the physiological effects of fluid infusion, e.g. on the glycocalyx; evaluate new types of fluids; evaluate novel fluid minimisation protocols; study the effects of a no-fluid strategy for selected patients and scenarios; and compare fluid therapy with other interventions. The adaptive platform trial design may provide us with the tools to evaluate these types of interventions in the intrinsically

  10. Australasian Resuscitation In Sepsis Evaluation trial statistical analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Anthony; Peake, Sandra L; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cameron, Peter; Holdgate, Anna; Howe, Belinda; Higgins, Alisa; Presneill, Jeffrey; Webb, Steve

    2013-10-01

    The Australasian Resuscitation In Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) study is an international, multicentre, randomised, controlled trial designed to evaluate the effectiveness of early goal-directed therapy compared with standard care for patients presenting to the ED with severe sepsis. In keeping with current practice, and taking into considerations aspects of trial design and reporting specific to non-pharmacologic interventions, this document outlines the principles and methods for analysing and reporting the trial results. The document is prepared prior to completion of recruitment into the ARISE study, without knowledge of the results of the interim analysis conducted by the data safety and monitoring committee and prior to completion of the two related international studies. The statistical analysis plan was designed by the ARISE chief investigators, and reviewed and approved by the ARISE steering committee. The data collected by the research team as specified in the study protocol, and detailed in the study case report form were reviewed. Information related to baseline characteristics, characteristics of delivery of the trial interventions, details of resuscitation and other related therapies, and other relevant data are described with appropriate comparisons between groups. The primary, secondary and tertiary outcomes for the study are defined, with description of the planned statistical analyses. A statistical analysis plan was developed, along with a trial profile, mock-up tables and figures. A plan for presenting baseline characteristics, microbiological and antibiotic therapy, details of the interventions, processes of care and concomitant therapies, along with adverse events are described. The primary, secondary and tertiary outcomes are described along with identification of subgroups to be analysed. A statistical analysis plan for the ARISE study has been developed, and is available in the public domain, prior to the completion of recruitment into the

  11. [High-Flow Nasal Cannulae (HFNC) in Neonates: A Survey of Current Practice in Level 1 Perinatal Centres in the German State of North Rhine-Westphalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepping, N; Garbe, W; Schneider, K

    2015-12-01

    High-flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) is a kind of non-invasive respiratory support. In recent years, its application has gained increasing popularity for treating neonates with respiratory failure. Within this study, neonatologists employed at high level perinatal centres within the region of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany were interviewed. We evaluated their personal experience as well as the underlying indication for using HFNC. We undertook an online survey. 93% of the interviewed participants use HFNC systems in their NICU. The most prominent indications were CPAP-weaning, nasal trauma, and apnoea of prematurity. Both initial flow and maximum and minimum flow rates varied widely. The primary benefit of HFNC vs. conventional CPAP was the improved neonate tolerance, less nasal traumata and ease of application and care. A common disadvantage was the inability to conduct PEEP measurements. The application of the HFNC system is increasing for specific neonatal indications, thereby increasing the data for the evaluation of effectivity and safety. Nevertheless, detailed investigations of the appropriate flow rate settings are still lacking. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Round-the-table teaching: a novel approach to resuscitation education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Kathryn; Scott, Karen; O'Leary, Fenton

    2014-10-01

    Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation saves lives. Health professionals who care for acutely unwell children need to be prepared to care for a child in arrest. Hospitals must ensure that their staff have the knowledge, confidence and ability to respond to a child in cardiac arrest. RESUS4KIDS is a programme designed to teach paediatric resuscitation to health care professionals who care for acutely unwell children. The programme is delivered in two components: an e-learning component for pre-learning, followed by a short, practical, face-to-face course that is taught using the round-the-table teaching approach. Round-the-table teaching is a novel, evidence-based small group teaching approach designed to teach paediatric resuscitation skills and knowledge. Round-the-table teaching uses a structured approach to managing a collapsed child, and ensures that each participant has the opportunity to practise the essential resuscitation skills of airway manoeuvres, bag mask ventilation and cardiac compressions. Round-the-table teaching is an engaging, non-threatening approach to delivering interdisciplinary paediatric resuscitation education. The methodology ensures that all participants have the opportunity to practise each of the different essential skills associated with the Danger, Response, Send for help, Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Defibrillation or rhythm recognition (DRSABCD) approach to the collapsed child. Round-the-table teaching is based on evidence-based small group teaching methods. The methodology of round-the-table teaching can be applied to any topic where participants must demonstrate an understanding of a sequential approach to a clinical skill. Round-the-table teaching uses a structured approach to managing a collapsed child. © 2014 The Authors. The Clinical Teacher published by Association for the Study of Medical Education and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of etiologic and prognostic factors in neonatal convulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Edibe Pembegul; Tatlı, Burak; Ekici, Barış; Eraslan, Emine; Aydınlı, Nur; Calışkan, Mine; Ozmen, Meral

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated etiologic and risk factors affecting long-term prognoses of neurologic outcomes in newborns with neonatal seizures. We enrolled patients at chronologic ages of 23-44 months, referred to the Department of Pediatric Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, from January 1, 2007-December 31, 2009, after manifesting seizures in their first postnatal 28 days. Of 112 newborns, 41 were female, 71 were male, 33 were preterm, and 79 were full-term. Perinatal asphyxia (28.6%) and intracranial hemorrhage (17%) were the most common causes of neonatal seizures. Cerebral palsy developed in 27.6% of patients during follow-up. The incidence of epilepsy was 35.7%. Almost 50% of patients manifested developmental delay in one or more areas. Global developmental delay was the most common (50.8%) neurologic disorder. The correlation between gestational age or birth weight and adverse outcomes was nonsignificant. Etiology, Apgar score, need for resuscitation at birth, background electroencephalogram, neonatal status epilepticus, cranial imaging findings, type/duration of antiepileptic treatment, and response to acute treatment were all strong prognostic factors in neurologic outcomes. Neonatal seizures pose a threat of neurologic sequelae for preterm and full-term infants. Although the number of recognized etiologic factors in neonatal seizures has increased because of improvements in neonatology and diagnostic methods, perinatal asphyxia remains the most common factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Phase II trial of isotonic fluid resuscitation in Kenyan children with severe malnutrition and hypovolaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boga Mwanamvua

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with severe malnutrition who develop shock have a high mortality. Contrary to contemporaneous paediatric practice, current guidelines recommend use of low dose hypotonic fluid resuscitation (half-strength Darrows/5% dextrose (HSD/5D. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of this guideline compared to resuscitation with a standard isotonic solution. Methods A Phase II randomised controlled, safety and efficacy trial in Kenyan children aged over 6 months with severe malnutrition and shock including children with severe dehydration/shock and presumptive septic shock (non-diarrhoeal shock. Eligible children were randomised to HSD/5D or Ringer's Lactate (RL. A maximum of two boluses of 15 ml/kg of HSD/5D were given over two hours (as recommended by guidelines while those randomised to RL received 10 ml/kg aliquots half hourly (maximum 40 ml/kg. Primary endpoint was resolution of shock at 8 and 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included resolution of acidosis, adverse events and mortality. Results 61 children were enrolled: 41 had shock and severe dehydrating diarrhoea, 20 had presumptive septic shock; 69% had decompensated shock. By 8 hours response to volume resuscitation was poor with shock persisting in most children:-HSD/5D 15/22 (68% and RL14/25 (52%, p = 0.39. Oliguria was more prevalent at 8 hours in the HSD/5D group, 9/22 (41%, compared to RL-3/25 (12%, p = 0.02. Mortality was high, HSD/5D-15/26(58% and RL 13/29(45%; p = 0.42. Most deaths occurred within 48 hours of admission. Neither pulmonary oedema nor cardiogenic failure was detected. Conclusions Outcome was universally poor characterised by persistence of shock, oliguria and high case fatality. Isotonic fluid was associated with modest improvement in shock and survival when compared to HSD/5D but inconclusive due to the limitations of design and effectiveness of either resuscitation strategy. Although isotonic fluid resuscitation did not result in cardiogenic heart

  15. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    I ntroduction: Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ ATLS course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. D...

  16. Brief compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation training video and simulation with homemade mannequin improves CPR skills

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Gregory K.; Osborne, Arayel; Greene, Charlotte H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training has traditionally involved classroom-based courses or, more recently, home-based video self-instruction. These methods typically require preparation and purchase fee; which can dissuade many potential bystanders from receiving training. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching compression-only CPR to previously untrained individuals using our 6-min online CPR training video and skills practice on a homemade mannequin, r...

  17. Mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation 99--survey results of a multi-organisational effort in public education in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Y T; Anantharaman, V; Lim, S H; Leong, K F; Pokkan, G

    2001-05-01

    Mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) 99 in Singapore was a large-scale multi-organisational effort to increase awareness and impart basic cardiac life support skills to the lay public. Mass CPR demonstrations followed by small group manikin practice with instructor guidance was conducted simultaneously in three centres, four times a day. The exercise enlisted 15 community organisations and received the support of 19 other organisations. Three hundred and ninety-eight manikins and 500 instructors ('I's) were mobilised to teach an audience of 6000 participants ('P's). Two surveys, for 'I's and 'P's were conducted with respondent rates of 65.8% and 50%, respectively. 73.6% of the P-respondents ('P-R's) indicated that they attended the event to increase their knowledge. 66.9% were willing to attend a more comprehensive CPR course. Concerns and perceptions in performing bystander CPR were assessed.

  18. Resuscitating the tracheostomy patient in the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2016-06-01

    Emergency physicians must be masters of the airway. The patient with tracheostomy can present with complications, and because of anatomy, airway and resuscitation measures can present several unique challenges. Understanding tracheostomy basics, features, and complications will assist in the emergency medicine management of these patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the basics and features of the tracheostomy, along with an approach to managing tracheostomy complications. This review provides background on the reasons for tracheostomy placement, basics of tracheostomy, and tracheostomy tube features. Emergency physicians will be faced with complications from these airway devices, including tracheostomy obstruction, decannulation or tube dislodgement, stenosis, tracheoinnominate fistula, and tracheoesophageal fistula. Critical patients should be evaluated in the resuscitation bay, and consultation with ENT should be completed while the patient is in the department. This review provides several algorithms for management of complications. Understanding these complications and an approach to airway management during cardiac arrest resuscitation is essential to optimizing patient care. Tracheostomy patients can present unique challenges for emergency physicians. Knowledge of the basics and features of tracheostomy tubes can assist physicians in managing life-threatening complications including tube obstruction, decannulation, bleeding, stenosis, and fistula. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: update, controversies and new advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre C. Zago

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest is a medical emergency in which the lapse of time between event onset and the initiation of measures of basic and advanced support, as well as the correct care based on specific protocols for each clinical situation, constitute decisive factors for a successful therapy. Cardiopulmonary arrest care cannot be restricted to the hospital setting because of its fulminant nature. This necessitates the creation of new concepts, strategies and structures, such as the concept of life chain, cardio-pulmonary resuscitation courses for professionals who work in emergency medical services, the automated external defibrillator, the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, and mobile intensive care units, among others. New concepts, strategies and structures motivated by new advances have also modified the treatment and improved the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the hospital setting. Among them, we can cite the concept of cerebral resuscitation, the application of the life chain, the creation of the universal life support algorithm, the adjustment of drug doses, new techniques - measure of the end-tidal carbon dioxide levels and of the coronary perfusion pressure - and new drugs under research.

  20. Protocol compliance and time management in blunt trauma resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanjersberg, W R; Bergs, E A; Mushkudiani, N; Klimek, M; Schipper, I B

    2009-01-01

    To study advanced trauma life support (ATLS) protocol adherence prospectively in trauma resuscitation and to analyse time management of daily multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation at a level 1 trauma centre, for both moderately and severely injured patients. All victims of severe blunt trauma were consecutively included. Patients with a revised trauma score (RTS) of 12 were resuscitated by a "minor trauma" team and patients with an RTS of less than 12 were resuscitated by a "severe trauma" team. Digital video recordings were used to analyse protocol compliance and time management during initial assessment. From 1 May to 1 September 2003, 193 resuscitations were included. The "minor trauma" team assessed 119 patients, with a mean injury severity score (ISS) of 7 (range 1-45). Overall protocol compliance was 42%, ranging from 0% for thoracic percussion to 93% for thoracic auscultation. The median resuscitation time was 45.9 minutes (range 39.7-55.9). The "severe team" assessed 74 patients, with a mean ISS of 22 (range 1-59). Overall protocol compliance was 53%, ranging from 4% for thoracic percussion to 95% for thoracic auscultation. Resuscitation took 34.8 minutes median (range 21.6-44.1). Results showed the current trauma resuscitation to be ATLS-like, with sometimes very low protocol compliance rates. Timing of secondary survey and radiology and thus time efficiency remains a challenge in all trauma patients. To assess the effect of trauma resuscitation protocols on outcome, protocol adherence needs to be improved.

  1. Some Medicolegal Aspects of the Russian Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Kuksinsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the Russian legislation to identify the medicolegal aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are most significant for an intensive care anesthesiologist. Statutory acts concerning human health care, including those pertinent to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and those providing for the responsibility of medical workers in some cases were analyzed. A number of discrepancies in various legal acts concerning human death verification and resuscitative measures were identified. The analysis has revealed the aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are, from the point of view of legislation, most important for the physician.

  2. Major Differences in Implementation Strategies of the European Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2015 in Danish Hospitals - A Nationwide Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Mathilde; Glerup Lauridsen, Kasper; Mygind-Klausen, Troels

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Implementation of guidelines into clinical practice is important to provide quality of care. Implementation of clinical guidelines is known to be poor. This study aimed to investigate awareness, expected time frame and strategy for implementation of the European Resuscitation Council...... 2015 and time frame and strategy for implementation.Results: In total, 41 hospitals replied (response rate: 87%) between October 22nd and December 22nd 2015. Overall, 37% of hospital resuscitation committees were unaware of the content of the guidelines. The majority of hospitals (80%) expected...... completion of guideline implementation within 6 months and 93% of hospitals expected the staff to act according to the ERC Guidelines 2015 within 6 months. In contrast, 78% of hospitals expected it would take between 6 months to 3 years for all staff to have completed a resuscitation course based on ERC...

  3. Feeding premature neonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Mie S.; Juhl, Sandra M.; Sangild, Per T.

    2017-01-01

    Kinship, understood as biogenetic proximity, between a chosen animal model and a human patient counterpart, is considered essential to the process of ‘translating’ research from the experimental animal laboratory to the human clinic. In the Danish research centre, NEOMUNE, premature piglets are fed...... a novel milk diet (bovine colostrum) to model the effects of this new diet in premature infants. Our ethnographic fieldwork in an experimental pig laboratory and a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in 2013–2014 shows that regardless of biogenetics, daily practices of feeding, housing, and clinical care...... the researchers refer to as the ‘translatability’ of the results. In the NICU, parents of premature infants likewise imagine a kind of interspecies kinship when presented with the option to supplement mother's own milk with bovine colostrum for the first weeks after birth. However, in this setting the NICU...

  4. Development of Reliable and Validated Tools to Evaluate Technical Resuscitation Skills in a Pediatric Simulation Setting: Resuscitation and Emergency Simulation Checklist for Assessment in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faudeux, Camille; Tran, Antoine; Dupont, Audrey; Desmontils, Jonathan; Montaudié, Isabelle; Bréaud, Jean; Braun, Marc; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Bérard, Etienne; Berlengi, Noémie; Schweitzer, Cyril; Haas, Hervé; Caci, Hervé; Gatin, Amélie; Giovannini-Chami, Lisa

    2017-09-01

    To develop a reliable and validated tool to evaluate technical resuscitation skills in a pediatric simulation setting. Four Resuscitation and Emergency Simulation Checklist for Assessment in Pediatrics (RESCAPE) evaluation tools were created, following international guidelines: intraosseous needle insertion, bag mask ventilation, endotracheal intubation, and cardiac massage. We applied a modified Delphi methodology evaluation to binary rating items. Reliability was assessed comparing the ratings of 2 observers (1 in real time and 1 after a video-recorded review). The tools were assessed for content, construct, and criterion validity, and for sensitivity to change. Inter-rater reliability, evaluated with Cohen kappa coefficients, was perfect or near-perfect (>0.8) for 92.5% of items and each Cronbach alpha coefficient was ≥0.91. Principal component analyses showed that all 4 tools were unidimensional. Significant increases in median scores with increasing levels of medical expertise were demonstrated for RESCAPE-intraosseous needle insertion (P = .0002), RESCAPE-bag mask ventilation (P = .0002), RESCAPE-endotracheal intubation (P = .0001), and RESCAPE-cardiac massage (P = .0037). Significantly increased median scores over time were also demonstrated during a simulation-based educational program. RESCAPE tools are reliable and validated tools for the evaluation of technical resuscitation skills in pediatric settings during simulation-based educational programs. They might also be used for medical practice performance evaluations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Training Zambian traditional birth attendants to reduce neonatal mortality in the Lufwanyama Neonatal Survival Project (LUNESP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Christopher J; Guerina, Nicholas G; Mulenga, Charity; Knapp, Anna B; Mazala, Grace; Hamer, Davidson H

    2012-07-01

    To provide relevant details on how interventions in the Lufwanyama Neonatal Survival Project (LUNESP) were developed and how Zambian traditional birth attendants (TBAs) were trained to perform them. The study tested 2 interventions: a simplified version of the American Academy of Pediatrics' neonatal resuscitation protocol (NRP); and antibiotics with facilitated referral (AFR). Key elements that enabled the positive study result were: focusing on common and correctible causes of mortality; selecting a study population with high unmet public health need; early community mobilization to build awareness and support; emphasizing simplicity in the intervention technology and algorithms; using a traditional training approach appropriate to students with low literacy rates; requiring TBAs to demonstrate their competence before completing each workshop; and minimizing attrition of skills by retraining and reassessing the TBAs regularly throughout the study. An effective NRP training model was created that is suitable for community-based neonatal interventions, in research or programmatic settings, and by practitioners with limited obstetric skills and low rates of literacy. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00518856. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puyvelde, Tim; Ameloot, Koen; Roggen, Mieke; Troost, Els; Gewillig, Marc; Budts, Werner; Van De Bruaene, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with underlying congenital heart disease is uncertain. This study aimed at evaluating outcome after CPR in patients with underlying congenital heart disease, factors related to worse outcome after CPR and whether survivors of sudden cardiac death (SCD) have a worse outcome when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control population. Between 1984 and 2015, all patients with congenital heart disease who received in or out-of-hospital CPR were identified from the database of congenital heart disease from the University Hospitals Leuven. Postoperative and neonatal (CPR was excluded. For each survivor of SCD, two control patients matched for gender, age and underlying heart defect were included in the study. Thirty-eight patients (66% men; median age 25 years (interquartile range 9-40); 68% out-of-hospital) were identified, of which 27 (66%) survived the event. The main cause of SCD was ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation ( n=21). Heart defect complexity (odds ratio (OR) 5.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-21.9; P=0.027), pulmonary hypertension (OR 13.8; 95% CI 2.1-89.5; P=0.006) and time to return of spontaneous circulation (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.1; P=0.046) were related to worse outcome. Survivors of SCD had a worse prognosis when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control group (5-year survival 76% vs. 98%; P=0.002). The complexity of underlying heart defect, pulmonary hypertension and time to return of spontaneous circulation are related to worse outcome in the case of CPR. Survivors of SCD have a worse outcome when compared to matched controls, indicating the need for adequate implantable cardioverter defibrillator indication assessment and for stringent follow-up of patients with worsening haemodynamics.

  7. Prevalence of systemic air-embolism after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation in newborns: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbertsma, Feico J J; Mohns, Thilo; Bok, Levinus A; Niemarkt, Hendrik J; Kramer, Boris W

    2015-08-01

    Chest compressions (CC) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are the cornerstone of adult CPR protocols and are meant to restore circulation and improve outcome. Although adverse effects such as air-embolisms have been reported, these are rare and considered to be outweighed by beneficial effect. In newborns, however, the lung tissue is more fragile. Thus, the high intra-thoracic pressures resulting from CC may make the newborns more vulnerable for air-embolisms. We studied the postmortem prevalence of air-embolism in neonates that have received CPR. Prospective cohort analysis of newborns receiving CC during CPR. CPR was performed by trained staff according to ILCOR guidelines, in a tertiary hospital. Air-embolisms were sought after using CT/MRI and autopsy. During a 61/2 year period (2007-2014), n = 56 newborns received CC. Newborns were resuscitated following severe perinatal hypoxia, or due to complications during NICU treatment. In n = 14 (25.0%) circulation could not be restored (mean CPR duration: 32.7 ± 15.2 min). Post-mortem CT/MRI was performed in n = 9, of whom n = 8 (88.9%) had air-embolisms. Autopsy was performed in n = 9. The air-embolisms could not be retraced on autopsy except for n = 1 patient. In patients with CPR resulting in restored circulation (n = 42), no CT or MRI was performed for comparison due to radiation and/or hemodynamic instability. Cerebral ultrasound could not identify or exclude air-embolisms in this subgroup. Post-mortem CT after prolonged resuscitation showed a high prevalence of intravascular air-embolism. Autopsy was not suited to detect air-embolism. The clinical importance of air-embolisms on the lethal outcome needs further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiopulmonary arrest in a geriatric chinchilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Christina M; Peyton, Jamie L; Miller, Mona; Johnson, Eric G; Kovacic, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    To describe the successful application of CPR in a geriatric chinchilla employing basic and advanced life support measures during cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). A 13-year-old female intact chinchilla presented to a general and multispecialty referral hospital for a dental procedure. During recovery from anesthesia the patient suffered CPA and CPR was initiated. Noninvasive positive pressure mask ventilation was initiated and external chest compressions were performed. An 18-Ga needle was introduced into the medullary cavity of the right humerus as an intraosseous catheter and provided access for administration of drugs and fluids. After return of spontaneous circulation was noted mannitol was administered via the intraosseous catheter to alleviate suspected increased intracranial pressure. Clinical improvement was noted shortly after administration. Monitoring during the recovery period showed a normal sinus cardiac rhythm and a SpO₂ of 100% while on supplemental oxygen. Neurologic function continued to improve over the following hours. Oxygen therapy was provided via an oxygen cage, and administration of antimicirobials, gastrointestinal protectants, and nutritional supplementation were part of the post resuscitation care. Oxygen therapy was discontinued after 24 hours, during which time normal behaviors were observed and neurologic status was considered appropriate. The patient was discharged 48 hours after CPA. Published reports from clinical practice on the outcomes of CPR for exotic small mammals are limited. This report details the successful outcome of the use of combined basic and advanced life support measures for the provision of CPR in a chinchilla. This report also highlights the utility of an intraosseous catheter for administration of drugs and fluids novel to this species during resuscitation and recovery. To the authors' knowledge this is the first published report of successful CPR following CPA in a geriatric chinchilla. © Veterinary Emergency

  9. The National Resuscitation Council, Singapore, and 34 years of resuscitation training: 1983 to 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, Venkataraman

    2017-07-01

    Training in the modern form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) started in Singapore in 1983. For the first 15 years, the expansion of training programmes was mainly owing to the interest of a few individuals. Public training in the skill was minimal. In an area of medical care where the greatest opportunity for benefit lies in employing core resuscitation skills in the prehospital environment, very little was being done to address such a need. In 1998, a group of physicians, working together with the Ministry of Health, set up the National Resuscitation Council (NRC). Over the years, the NRC has created national guidelines on resuscitation and reviewed them at five-yearly intervals. Provider training manuals are now available for most programmes. The NRC has set up an active accreditation system for monitoring and maintaining standards of life support training. This has led to a large increase in the number of training centres, as well as recognition and adoption of the council's guidelines in the country. The NRC has also actively promoted the use of bystander CPR through community-based programmes, resulting in a rise in the number of certified providers. Improving the chain of survival, through active community-based training programmes, will likely lead to more lives being saved from sudden cardiac arrest. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  10. Basic cardiopulmonary life support (BCLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained paramedics and medics outside the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation guideline of Basic Cardiopulmonary Life Support (BCLS for management of adult victims with cardiopulmonary arrest outside the hospital provides an algorithmic stepwise approach for optimal outcome of the victims by trained medics and paramedics. This guideline has been developed considering the need to have a universally acceptable practice guideline for India and keeping in mind the infrastructural limitations of some areas of the country. This guideline is based on evidence elicited in the international and national literature. In the absence of data from Indian population, the excerpts have been taken from international data, discussed with Indian experts and thereafter modified to make them practically applicable across India. The optimal outcome for a victim with cardiopulmonary arrest would depend on core links of early recognition and activation; early high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation and early transfer to medical facility. These links are elaborated in a stepwise manner in the BCLS algorithm. The BCLS also emphasise on quality check for various steps of resuscitation.

  11. Resuscitation and post resuscitation care of the very old after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is worthwhile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Nielsen, Niklas; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Wanscher, Michael; Søholm, Helle

    2015-12-15

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. As comorbidity and frailty increase with age; ethical dilemmas may arise when OHCA occur in the very old. We aimed to investigate mortality, neurological outcome and post resuscitation care in octogenarians (≥80) to assess whether resuscitation and post resuscitation care should be avoided. During 2007-2011 consecutive OHCA-patients were attended by the physician-based Emergency Medical Services-system in Copenhagen. Pre-hospital data based on Utstein-criteria, and data on post resuscitation care were collected. Primary outcome was successful resuscitation; secondary endpoints were 30-day mortality and neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category (CPC)). 2509 OHCA-patients with attempted resuscitation were recorded, 22% (n=558) were octogenarians/nonagenarians. 166 (30% of all octogenarians with resuscitation attempted) octogenarians were successfully resuscitated compared to 830 (43% with resuscitation attempted) patients <80 years. 30-day mortality in octogenarians was significantly higher after adjustment for prognostic factors (HR=1.61 CI: 1.22-2.13, p<0.001). Octogenarians received fewer coronary angiographies (CAG) (14 vs. 37%, p<0.001), and had lower odds of receiving CAG by multivariate logistic regression (OR: 0.19, CI: 0.08-0.44, p<0.001). A favorable neurological outcome (CPC 1/2) in survivors to discharge was found in 70% (n=26) of octogenarians compared to 86% (n=317, p=0.03) in the younger patients. OHCA in octogenarians was associated with a significantly higher mortality rate after adjustment for prognostic factors. However, the majority of octogenarian survivors were discharged with a favorable neurological outcome. Withholding resuscitation and post resuscitation care in octogenarians does not seem justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Practical measurement of radiation dose in pediatric radiology: use of the dose-area product on digital fluoroscopy and neonatal chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateil, J.F.; Rouby, C.; Brun, M.; Labessan, C.; Diard, F.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. Control of radiation dose in pediatric radiology requires knowledge of the reference levels for all examinations. These data are useful for daily quality assessment, but are not perfectly known for some radiographic examinations. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the dose related to voiding cysto-urethrograms (VCUG), upper GI (UGI) and intravenous urography (IVU). Neonatal chest radiographs in the intensive care unit were also evaluated. Material and methods. For examinations with contrast material (478VCUG, 220UGI, 80IVU), the children were divided in groups based on their weight, from 5 to 30 Kg. Measurements were performed using an ionization chamber and expressed with the-dose-area product (DAP). For chest radiographs, a direct measurement of the entrance-skin dose was performed, with secondary calculation of the DAP. Results. For-VCUGs, the DAP ranged between 42.89 cGy.cm 2 and 125.41 cGy.cm 2 . The range was between 76.43, and 150.62 cGy.cm 2 for UGIs and between 49.06 and 83.33 cGy.cm 2 for IVUs. For neonate chest radiographs, DAP calculations were between 0.29 and 0.99 cGy.cm 2 . Conclusion. These values represent our reference doses. They allow continuous monitoring of our radiographic technical parameters and radiographic equipment and help to correct and improve them if necessary. (author)

  13. Social workers' experiences as the family support person during cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firn, Janice; DeVries, Keli; Morano, Dawnielle; Spano-English, Toni

    2017-07-01

    During inhospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts, a designated family support person (FSP) may provide guidance and support to family members. Research on nurses and chaplains in this role has been published. Social workers also regularly fulfill this service, however, little is known about how they perceive and enact this role. To explore their experiences, qualitative interviews (n = 10) were conducted with FSP social workers. Critical realist thematic analysis identified five themes: walking in cold, promoting family presence, responding to the whole spectrum of grief, going beyond the family support role, and repercussions of bearing witness. Social workers perform a variety of tasks to promote family presence during resuscitation attempts and provide psychosocial support over the continuum of care. The FSP role impacts social workers emotionally and professionally. Implications for hospital policy, staffing, and clinical practice are discussed.

  14. Knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of clinicians at a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... patients and recognising cardiac arrest, to assess clinicians' ... programmes that are accessible, innovative and inexpensive. .... well as, and sometimes better than, traditional CPR.16 In ... resuscitation training programme resulted in a noticeable ... 31 physicians in Canada whose resuscitation skills were.

  15. Rapid Resuscitation with Small Volume Hypertonic Saline Solution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid Resuscitation with Small Volume Hypertonic Saline Solution for Patients in Traumatic Haemorrhagic Shock. ... The data were entered into a computer data base and analysed. Results: Forty five patients were enrolled and resuscitated with 250 mls 7.5% HSS. Among the studied patients, 88.9% recovered from shock ...

  16. Endothelial Dysfunction in Resuscitated Cardiac Arrest (ENDO-RCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Kjærgaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morbidity and mortality following initial survival of cardiac arrest remain high despite great efforts to improve resuscitation techniques and post-resuscitation care, in part due to the ischemia-reperfusion injury secondary to the restoration of the blood circulation. Patients resusc...

  17. Successful Resuscitation of a three month old Child with Intralipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetic agents used locally can be toxic especially if given as an inappropriate dose or route. Lipid infusion has been demonstrated in several animal models to successfully resuscitate bupivacaine induced toxicity. We present a case of successful use of 26% lipid infusion to resuscitate a paediatric patient with a ...

  18. Protocol compliance and time management in blunt trauma resuscitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, W.R.; Bergs, E.A.; Mushkudiani, N.; Klimek, M.; Schipper, I.B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study advanced trauma life support (ATLS) protocol adherence prospectively in trauma resuscitation and to analyse time management of daily multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation at a level 1 trauma centre, for both moderately and severely injured patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All

  19. The art of providing resuscitation in Greek mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siempos, Ilias I; Ntaidou, Theodora K; Samonis, George

    2014-12-01

    We reviewed Greek mythology to accumulate tales of resuscitation and we explored whether these tales could be viewed as indirect evidence that ancient Greeks considered resuscitation strategies similar to those currently used. Three compendia of Greek mythology: The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology, The Greek Myths by Robert Graves, and Greek Mythology by Ioannis Kakridis were used to find potentially relevant narratives. Thirteen myths that may suggest resuscitation (including 1 case of autoresuscitation) were identified. Methods to attempt mythological resuscitation included use of hands (which may correlate with basic life support procedures), a kiss on the mouth (similar to mouth-to-mouth resuscitation), application of burning torches (which might recall contemporary use of external defibrillators), and administration of drugs (a possible analogy to advanced life support procedures). A careful assessment of relevant myths demonstrated that interpretations other than medical might be more credible. Although several narratives of Greek mythology might suggest modern resuscitation techniques, they do not clearly indicate that ancient Greeks presaged scientific methods of resuscitation. Nevertheless, these elegant tales reflect humankind's optimism that a dying human might be restored to life if the appropriate procedures were implemented. Without this optimism, scientific improvement in the field of resuscitation might not have been achieved.

  20. [Real-time feedback systems for improvement of resuscitation quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, R P; Van Aken, H; Engel, P; Bohn, A

    2011-07-01

    The quality of chest compression is a determinant of survival after cardiac arrest. Therefore, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 guidelines on resuscitation strongly focus on compression quality. Despite its impact on survival, observational studies have shown that chest compression quality is not reached by professional rescue teams. Real-time feedback devices for resuscitation are able to measure chest compression during an ongoing resuscitation attempt through a sternal sensor equipped with a motion and pressure detection system. In addition to the electrocardiograph (ECG) ventilation can be detected by transthoracic impedance monitoring. In cases of quality deviation, such as shallow chest compression depth or hyperventilation, feedback systems produce visual or acoustic alarms. Rescuers can thereby be supported and guided to the requested quality in chest compression and ventilation. Feedback technology is currently available both as a so-called stand-alone device and as an integrated feature in a monitor/defibrillator unit. Multiple studies have demonstrated sustainable enhancement in the education of resuscitation due to the use of real-time feedback technology. There is evidence that real-time feedback for resuscitation combined with training and debriefing strategies can improve both resuscitation quality and patient survival. Chest compression quality is an independent predictor for survival in resuscitation and should therefore be measured and documented in further clinical multicenter trials.

  1. Decision to resuscitate or not in patients with chronic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltbæk, Lena; Tvedegaard, Erling

    2012-01-01

    Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) decisions are frequently made without informing the patients. We attempt to determine whether patients and physicians wish to discuss the DNR decision, who they think, should be the final decision maker and whether they agree on the indication for cardiopulmonary...... resuscitation (CPR) in case of cardiac arrest....

  2. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Unusual Techniques for Unusual Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhu Bhatnagar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in prone position has been dealt with in 2010 American Heart Association (AHA guidelines but have not been reviewed in 2015 guidelines. The guidelines for patients presenting with cardiac arrest under general anesthesia in lateral decubitus position and regarding resuscitation in confined spaces like airplanes are also not available in AHA guidelines. This article is an attempt to highlight the techniques adopted for resuscitation in these unusual situations. Aims: This study aims to find out the methodology and efficacy in nonconventional CPR approaches such as CPR in prone, CPR in lateral position, and CPR in confined spaces. Methods: We conducted a literature search using MeSH search strings such as CPR + Prone position, CPR + lateral Position, and CPR + confined spaces. Results: No randomized controlled trials are available. The literature search gives a handful of case reports, some simulation- and manikin-based studies but none can qualify for class I evidence. The successful outcome of CPR performed in prone position has shown compressions delivered on the thoracic spine with the same rate and force as they were delivered during supine position. A hard surface is required under the patient to provide uniform force and sternal counter pressure. Two rescuer technique for providing successful chest compression in lateral position has been documented in the few case reports published. Over the head CPR and straddle (STR, CPR has been utilized for CPR in confined spaces. Ventilation in operating rooms was taken care by an advanced airway in situ. Conclusion: A large number of studies of high quality are required to be conducted to determine the efficacy of CPR in such positions.

  3. Persisting effect of community approaches to resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Isbye, Dan Lou; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2014-11-01

    On the Danish island of Bornholm an intervention was carried out during 2008-2010 aiming at increasing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival. The intervention included mass media focus on resuscitation and widespread educational activities. The aim of this study was to compare the bystander BLS rate and survival after OHCA on Bornholm in a 3-year follow-up period after the intervention took place. Data on OHCA on Bornholm were collected from September 28th, 2010 to September 27th, 2013 and compared to data from the intervention period, September 28th, 2008 to September 27th, 2010. The bystander BLS rate for non-EMS witnessed OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology was significantly higher in the follow-up period (70% [95% CI 61-77] vs. 47% [95% CI 37-57], p=0.001). AEDs were deployed in 22 (18%) cases in the follow-up period and a shock was provided in 13 cases. There was no significant change in all-rhythm 30-day survival for non-EMS witnessed OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology (6.7% [95% CI 3-13] in the follow-up period; vs. 4.6% [95% CI 1-12], p=0.76). In a 3-year follow-up period after an intervention engaging laypersons in resuscitation through mass education in BLS combined with a media focus on resuscitation, we observed a persistent significant increase in the bystander BLS rate for all OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology. There was no significant difference in 30-day survival. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient and doctor attitudes and beliefs concerning perioperative do not resuscitate orders: anesthesiologists' growing compliance with patient autonomy and self determination guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Christopher M; Swetz, Keith M; Armstrong, Matthew H; Keegan, Mark T

    2013-01-15

    In 1993, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) published guidelines stating that automatic perioperative suspension of Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders conflicts with patients' rights to self-determination. Almost 20 years later, we aimed to explore both patient and doctor views concerning perioperative DNR status. Five-hundred consecutive patients visiting our preoperative evaluation clinic were surveyed and asked whether they had made decisions regarding resuscitation and to rate their agreement with several statements concerning perioperative resuscitation. Anesthesiologists, surgeons and internists at our tertiary referral institution were also surveyed. They were asked to assess their likelihood of following a hypothetical patient's DNR status and to rate their level of agreement with a series of non-scenario related statements concerning ethical and practical aspects of perioperative resuscitation. Over half of patients (57%) agreed that pre-existing DNR requests should be suspended while undergoing a surgical procedure under anesthesia, but 92% believed a discussion between the doctor and patient regarding perioperative resuscitation plans should still occur. Thirty percent of doctors completing the survey believed that DNR orders should automatically be suspended intraoperatively. Anesthesiologists (18%) were significantly less likely to suspend DNR orders than surgeons (38%) or internists (34%) (p < 0.01). Although many patients agree that their DNR orders should be suspended for their operation, they expect a discussion regarding the performance and nature of perioperative resuscitation. In contrast to previous studies, anesthesiologists were least likely to automatically suspend a DNR order.

  5. Patient and doctor attitudes and beliefs concerning perioperative do not resuscitate orders: anesthesiologists’ growing compliance with patient autonomy and self determination guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkle Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1993, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA published guidelines stating that automatic perioperative suspension of Do Not Resuscitate (DNR orders conflicts with patients’ rights to self-determination. Almost 20 years later, we aimed to explore both patient and doctor views concerning perioperative DNR status. Methods Five-hundred consecutive patients visiting our preoperative evaluation clinic were surveyed and asked whether they had made decisions regarding resuscitation and to rate their agreement with several statements concerning perioperative resuscitation. Anesthesiologists, surgeons and internists at our tertiary referral institution were also surveyed. They were asked to assess their likelihood of following a hypothetical patient’s DNR status and to rate their level of agreement with a series of non-scenario related statements concerning ethical and practical aspects of perioperative resuscitation. Results Over half of patients (57% agreed that pre-existing DNR requests should be suspended while undergoing a surgical procedure under anesthesia, but 92% believed a discussion between the doctor and patient regarding perioperative resuscitation plans should still occur. Thirty percent of doctors completing the survey believed that DNR orders should automatically be suspended intraoperatively. Anesthesiologists (18% were significantly less likely to suspend DNR orders than surgeons (38% or internists (34% (p  Conclusions Although many patients agree that their DNR orders should be suspended for their operation, they expect a discussion regarding the performance and nature of perioperative resuscitation. In contrast to previous studies, anesthesiologists were least likely to automatically suspend a DNR order.

  6. “Putting It All Together” to Improve Resuscitation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Abella, Benjamin S.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is a major public health problem affecting thousands of individuals each year in both the before hospital and in-hospital settings. However, although the scope of the problem is large, the quality of care provided during resuscitation attempts frequently does not meet quality of care standards, despite evidence-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines, extensive provider training, and provider credentialing in resuscitation medicine. Although this fact may be disappointing, it should not be surprising. Resuscitation of the cardiac arrest victim is a highly complex task requiring coordination between various levels and disciplines of care providers during a stressful and relatively infrequent clinical situation. Moreover, it requires a targeted, high-quality response to improve clinical outcomes of patients. Therefore, solutions to improve care provided during resuscitation attempts must be multifaceted and targeted to the diverse number of care providers to be successful. PMID:22107978

  7. Simulation technology for resuscitation training: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, William C; Kennedy, Cassie C; Szostek, Jason H; Cook, David A

    2013-09-01

    To summarize current available data on simulation-based training in resuscitation for health care professionals. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, Web of Science, Scopus and reference lists of published reviews. Published studies of any language or date that enrolled health professions' learners to investigate the use of technology-enhanced simulation to teach resuscitation in comparison with no intervention or alternative training. Data were abstracted in duplicate. We identified themes examining different approaches to curriculum design. We pooled results using random effects meta-analysis. 182 studies were identified involving 16,636 participants. Overall, simulation-based training of resuscitation skills, in comparison to no intervention, appears effective regardless of assessed outcome, level of learner, study design, or specific task trained. In comparison to no intervention, simulation training improved outcomes of knowledge (Hedges' g) 1.05 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.29), process skill 1.13 (0.99-1.27), product skill 1.92 (1.26-2.60), time skill 1.77 (1.13-2.42) and patient outcomes 0.26 (0.047-0.48). In comparison with non-simulation intervention, learner satisfaction 0.79 (0.27-1.31) and process skill 0.35 (0.12-0.59) outcomes favored simulation. Studies investigating how to optimize simulation training found higher process skill outcomes in courses employing "booster" practice 0.13 (0.03-0.22), team/group dynamics 0.51 (0.06-0.97), distraction 1.76 (1.02-2.50) and integrated feedback 0.49 (0.17-0.80) compared to courses without these features. Most analyses reflected high between-study inconsistency (I(2) values >50%). Simulation-based training for resuscitation is highly effective. Design features of "booster" practice, team/group dynamics, distraction and integrated feedback improve effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of education on provider attitudes toward family-witnessed resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagan, Lori M; Fisher, Nancy J

    2011-05-01

    The majority of acute care facilities have not developed policies or guidelines to facilitate family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Prior studies have shown that the personal beliefs and attitudes of hospital personnel involved in resuscitation efforts are the primary reasons family presence is not offered. This 2-phase, before/after study was conducted in a 388-bed academic trauma center, and in a 143-bed community hospital in eastern Washington State in 2008. In phase I, a convenience sample of physicians and registered nurses from both facilities were surveyed about their opinions and beliefs regarding family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR). Spearman's rho and independent t-tests were used to compare support of FWR between and within roles and practice location subgroups. In phase II of the study, clinician subgroups in the community hospital were re-surveyed following an educational program that used evidence-based information. Independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to compare pre and post-education mean scores of subgroups on indicators of effective teaching strategies and improved FWR support. Opinions on FWR vary within and between practice roles and locations, with the strongest variable of support being prior experience with FWR. Following FWR education, mean scores improved for survey variables chosen as indicators of FWR support and teaching effectiveness. When CPR providers are presented with FWR education, their opinion-based beliefs may be modified, decreasing barriers to family witnessed resuscitation and improving overall support of FWR as an extension of family-centered care. Copyright © 2011 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Post resuscitation management of cardiac arrest patients in the critical care environment: A retrospective audit of compliance with evidence based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milonas, Annabel; Hutchinson, Ana; Charlesworth, David; Doric, Andrea; Green, John; Considine, Julie

    2017-11-01

    There is a clear relationship between evidence-based post resuscitation care and survival and functional status at hospital discharge. The Australian Resuscitation Council (ARC) recommends protocol driven care to enhance chance of survival following cardiac arrest. Healthcare providers have an obligation to ensure protocol driven post resuscitation care is timely and evidence based. The aim of this study was to examine adherence to best practice guidelines for post resuscitation care in the first 24h from Return of Spontaneous Circulation for patients admitted to the intensive care unit from the emergency department having suffered out of hospital or emergency department cardiac arrest and survived initial resuscitation. A retrospective audit of medical records of patients who met the criteria for survivors of cardiac arrest was conducted at two health services in Melbourne, Australia. Criteria audited were: primary cardiac arrest characteristics, oxygenation and ventilation management, cardiovascular care, neurological care and patient outcomes. The four major findings were: (i) use of fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 ) of 1.0 and hyperoxia was common during the first 24h of post resuscitation management, (ii) there was variability in cardiac care, with timely 12 lead Electrocardiograph and majority of patients achieving systolic blood pressure (SBP) greater than 100mmHg, but delays in transfer to cardiac catheterisation laboratory, (iii) neurological care was suboptimal with a high incidence of hyperglycaemia and failure to provide therapeutic hypothermia in almost 50% of patients and (iv) there was an association between in-hospital mortality and specific elements of post resuscitation care during the first 24h of hospital admission. Evidence-based context-specific guidelines for post resuscitation care that span the whole patient journey are needed. Reliance on national guidelines does not necessarily translate to evidence based care at a local level, so

  10. Proposta educacional virtual sobre atendimento da ressuscitação cardiopulmonar no recém-nascido Propuesta educativa virtual para la atención de la reanimación cardiopulmonar en el recién nacido Virtual educational proposal in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for the neonate care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilciane Ribeiro Gonçalves

    2010-06-01

    - Fundamentos de anatomía y fisiología cardiaca del recién nacido; Módulo 2 - Factores de riesgo para la ocurrencia de paro cardiorrespiratorio en el recién nacido; Módulo 3 - Planeamiento de los cuidados de enfermería; Módulo 4 - Medicamentos utilizados en el paro cardiorrespiratorio del recién nacido, y Módulo 5 - Atención del paro cardiorrespiratorio en el recién nacido. Este estudio puede contribuir a la innovación en la enseñanza de la enfermería a partir de una propuesta educativa virtual referida a un tema de alta relevancia como lo es la atención de la resucitación cardiopulmonar del recién nacido.The purpose of this study was to develop an educational proposal using virtual multimedia resources, to innovate, stimulate and diversify areas of communication and interaction, facilitating nurses' autonomous and reflexive process of teaching and learning. This is an applied research, following the cyclical and interactive phases of designing, planning, developing and implementing. The educational proposal was developed on the TelEduc platform, using specific tools for content organization and communication between students and administrator. The teaching modules were on the following themes: Module 1 - Fundamentals of the heart anatomy and physiology in newborns; Module 2 - Risk factors for the occurrence of cardiorespiratory arrest in newborns; Module 3 - Planning nursing care; Module 4 - Medications used in cardiopulmonary arrests in newborns; and Module 5 - Cardiorespiratory arrest care in newborns. This study may contribute to innovating teaching in nursing from a virtual educational proposal on the important issue of newborn cardiopulmonary resuscitation care.

  11. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. We searched the PubMed database using the keywords "leadership" and then either "trauma" or "resuscitation" as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching followed by simulations. Although programs

  12. Neonatal pustular dermatosis: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal pustular eruption is a group of disorders characterized by various forms of pustulosis seen in first 4 weeks of life. Its presentation is often similar with some subtle differences, which can be further established by few simple laboratory aids, to arrive at a definite diagnosis. Given their ubiquitous presentation, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among self-limiting, noninfectious, pustular dermatosis such as erythema toxicum neonatorum, transient neonatal pustular melanosis, miliaria pustulosa, etc., and potentially life threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections. This review article tries to address the chronological, clinical, morphological, and histological differences among the various pustular eruptions in a newborn, in order to make it easier for a practicing dermatologist to diagnose and treat these similar looking but different entities of pustulation with a clear demarcation between the physiological benign pustular rashes and the infectious pustular lesions.

  13. Bystander initiated actions in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: results from the Amsterdam Resuscitation Study (ARRESUST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalewijn, R. A.; Tijssen, J. G.; Koster, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the functioning of the first two links of the chain of survival: 'access' and 'basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)'. In a prospective study, all bystander witnessed circulatory arrests resuscitated by emergency medical service (EMS) personnel, were

  14. Incidence of Newborn Stabilization and Resuscitation Measures and Guideline Compliance during the First Minutes of Life in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skåre, Christiane; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Steen, Thorbjørn; Ødegaard, Silje; Niles, Dana E; Nakstad, Britt; Solevåg, Anne L; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2015-01-01

    Most newborns manage the transition from intra- to extrauterine life without interventions, yet neonatal morbidity caused by failure of transition remains an important health problem. To determine the incidence of neonatal stabilization and resuscitation measures and guideline compliance during the first minutes after birth. This is a prospective, observational study of all births in three Norwegian hospitals. All interventions performed, including suctioning, use of pulse oximetry, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), positive pressure ventilation (PPV), supplemental oxygen, intubation, and administration of drugs, were registered at every on-call team shift during the study period. A total of 1,507 live-born infants were included, of whom 264 (18%) were brought to the resuscitation crib. Oropharyngeal suctioning was performed in 77 (5%), deep blind suctioning was carried out in 10 (1%) and 84 (6%) were monitored using pulse oximetry. PPV was provided in 58 cases (4%) - 8 (21%) of <34 weeks and 50 (3%) of ≥34 weeks of gestation. Sustained inflation is not routinely used in these departments. CPAP (without PPV) was provided in 17 cases (1%) - 4 (0.3%) were intubated and ventilated through the endotracheal tube. Supplemental oxygen was given to 39 infants (3%) - 9 without pulse oximetry monitoring. The median (interquartile range) birth weight and gestational age of the newborns requiring PPV and/or CPAP were 3,220 g (2,643-3,858) and 39 weeks (37-41), respectively. In this study, the need for resuscitation and/or stabilization measures was commonly considered, and 4% of all newborns received PPV. Despite strong guideline emphasis on the use of pulse oximetry to guide oxygen administration, many infants received oxygen treatment without pulse oximetry monitoring. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Born not breathing: A randomised trial comparing two self-inflating bag-masks during newborn resuscitation in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallinger, Monica; Ersdal, Hege Langli; Francis, Fortunata; Yeconia, Anita; Mduma, Estomih; Kidanto, Hussein; Linde, Jørgen Erland; Eilevstjønn, Joar; Gunnes, Nina; Størdal, Ketil

    2017-07-01

    Effective ventilation is crucial to save non-breathing newborns. We compared standard equipment for newborn resuscitation to a new Upright bag, in an area with high neonatal mortality. Newborns requiring resuscitation at Haydom Lutheran Hospital, Tanzania, were ventilated with 230ml standard or 320ml Upright bag-mask by weekly non-blinded block randomisation. A Laerdal Newborn Resuscitation Monitor collected ventilation data through a flow sensor between mask and bag and heart rate with electrocardiography electrodes. Primary outcome was expiratory tidal volume per birth weight. Of 6110 babies born, 136 randomised to standard bag-mask and 192 to Upright, both groups had similar birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores, gender, and mode of delivery. Compared to standard bag-mask, Upright gave higher median expiratory tidal volume (8.6ml/kg (IQR: 3.5-13.8) vs. 10.0ml/kg (IQR: 4.3-16.8) difference ratio 1.29, 95%CI 1.05, 1.58, p=0.014)), increased mean airway and peak inspiratory pressures, and higher early expired CO 2 (median at 20s 4.2% vs. 3.2%, p=0.0099). Clinical outcome 30min post-delivery was normal in 44% with standard versus 57% with Upright (p=0.016), but similar at 24h. Upright provided higher expired tidal volume, MAP, PIP and early ECO 2 than the standard bag. Clinical outcome differed at 30min, but not at 24h. Larger volume of Upright than standard bag can be an important factor. The results are relevant for low- and high-income settings as ventilatory and heart rate parameters during resuscitation of newborns are rarely reported. Trial registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01869582. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Emergency Medical Technicians Are Often Consulted on Termination of Resuscitation, and Will Terminate Resuscitation Based on Controversial Single Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klausen, Troels; Glerup Lauridsen, Kasper; Bødtker, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Many out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempts have to be terminated. Previous studies have investigated knowledge on abandoning resuscitation among physicians. In the prehospital setting emergency medical technicians (EMTs) may be involved in the decision......: 100%) participated. Median clinical experience was 12 (IQR: 6-22) years. All EMTs had performed resuscitation (median time since last resuscitation attempt: 1 (IQR: 0.5-2.8) month). Overall, 68% of EMTs had been consulted on termination of CPR, 74% felt it was important to be consulted, and 74% felt...... arrest (12%), witnessed cardiac arrest without bystander CPR within 10 minutes (30%), age above 80 years (20%), age above 90 years (62%), living at a nursing home (62%), known cancer (24%) and absence of pupillary light reflex (54%) during resuscitation. Conclusion: The majority of EMTs have been...

  17. [Uncommon neonatal case of hypoglycemia: ACTH resistance syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, O; Marrec, C; Caietta, E; Simonin, G; Morel, Y; Girard, N; Roucher, F; Sarles, J; Chabrol, B; Reynaud, R

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring of blood glucose is usually reported to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia in term newborns with high risk factors and for prematurity in neonatal intensive care unit patients. Differential diagnosis has rarely been discussed. In the eutrophic term newborn, hypoglycemia remains rare and an etiological diagnosis must be made. Intensive management of neonatal hypoglycemia is required to prevent neurodevelopmental defects. Without evident cause or if hypoglycemia persists, a systematic review of possible causes should be made. We report isolated glucocorticoid deficiency diagnosed in an infant at 10 months of age. This boy had neonatal hypoglycemia and mild jaundice that had not been investigated. During his first 9 months of life, he presented frequent infections. At 10 months of age, febrile seizures occurred associated with shock, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, mild hyperpigmentation, and coma. He was diagnosed with hypocortisolemia and elevated ACTH levels. Brain injury was revealed by MRI after resuscitation, with hypoxic-ischemic and hypoglycemic encephalopathy. The molecular studies demonstrated the presence of p.Asp107Asn and previously unreported frameshift p.Pro281GlnfsX9 MC2R gene mutations. A substitutive hormone therapy was provided and during a follow-up of 12 months no adrenal crisis was noted. We report an unusual case of familial glucocorticoid deficiency with severe neurological injury. This case demonstrates the importance of an appropriate etiological diagnosis in neonatal hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Neonatal pressure ulcers: prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Molina P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pablo García-Molina,1,2 Alba Alfaro-López,1 Sara María García-Rodríguez,1 Celia Brotons-Payá,1 Mari Carmen Rodríguez-Dolz,1,2 Evelin Balaguer-López1,2 1Department of Nursing, University of Valencia, 2Research Group of Pediatric Nutrition, INCLIVA Foundation, Valencia, Spain Abstract: Health professionals should be prepared to respond to the needs of hospitalized neonates. The health team must consider multiple situations, where the neonate is at risk of having an adverse effect. One of the main interventions that health professionals must practice when interacting with hospitalized newborns is skin care. Neonates often suffer from diaper rash or intravenous drugs extravasation. Recently, hospitalized neonates and especially those in an unstable clinical situation are also at a risk of developing pressure ulcers. The presence of a pressure ulcer in a neonate can lead to serious problems to survival (eg, sepsis, clinical instability. This is the reason why, with this literature review, we attempt to answer questions from health professionals caring for neonates about the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Keywords: infant, pressure ulcer, treatment, prevention, wound, assessment

  19. Acute symptomatic neonatal seizures in preterm neonates: etiologies and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Francesco; Spagnoli, Carlotta

    2017-12-15

    Acute symptomatic neonatal seizures in preterm newborns are a relevant clinical challenge due to the presence of many knowledge gaps. Etiology-wise, acute symptomatic seizures have an age-specific epidemiology, with intraventricular hemorrhage and its complications representing the first cause in extremely and very preterm neonates, whereas other etiologies have similar occurrence rates as in full-term infants. Specific treatment strategies for the premature neonates are not yet available. Studies suggest a similarly low response rate with even more unfavorable prognosis than in full-term infants. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic changes are likely under way during the preterm period, with the potential to affect both effectiveness and safety of antiepileptic drugs in these patients. However, due to the lack of clear evidence to guide prioritization of second-line drugs, off-label medications are frequently indicated by review papers and flow-charts, and are prescribed in clinical practice. We therefore conclude by exploring potential future lines of research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Resuscitation of asphyxiated newborn infants with room air or oxygen: an international controlled trial: the Resair 2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, O D; Rootwelt, T; Aalen, O

    1998-07-01

    abnormal neurologic examination at 4 weeks. The existing routines for resuscitation in each participating unit were followed, and the ventilation techniques described by the American Heart Association were used as guidelines aiming at a frequency of manual ventilation of 40 to 60 breaths per minute. Forms for 703 enrolled infants from 11 centers were received by the steering committee. All 94 patients from one of the centers were excluded because of violation of the inclusion criteria in 86 of these. Therefore, the final number of infants enrolled in the study was 609 (from 10 centers), with 288 in the room air group and 321 in the oxygen group. Median (5 to 95 percentile) gestational ages were 38 (32.0 to 42.0) and 38 (31.1 to 41.5) weeks (NS), and birth weights were 2600 (1320 to 4078) g and 2560 (1303 to 3900) g (NS) in the room air and oxygen groups, respectively. There were 46% girls in the room air and 41% in the oxygen group (NS). Mortality in the first 7 days of life was 12.2% and 15.0% in the room air and oxygen groups, respectively; adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.82 with 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 0.50-1.35. Neonatal mortality was 13.9% and 19.0%; adjusted OR = 0. 72 with 95% CI = 0.45-1.15. Death within 7 days of life and/or moderate or severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (primary outcome measure) was seen in 21.2% in the room air group and in 23.7% in the oxygen group; OR = 0.94 with 95% CI = 0.63-1.40. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  2. A review of neonatal tetanus in University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, North-eastern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Alhaji, M. A.; Bello, M. A.; Elechi, H. A.; Akuhwa, R. T.; Bukar, F. L.; Ibrahim, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neonatal tetanus is a vaccine preventable disease and is a leading cause of neonatal mortality in developing countries. The effectiveness of immunization and hygienic umbilical cord care practices in the prevention of the disease has been established. Objective: The objective of this study was to audit the scourge of neonatal tetanus in a tertiary health facility in a resource-limited setting. Materials and Methods: The study was a retrospective study. Case notes of neonates admit...

  3. Real-Time Mobile Device-Assisted Chest Compression During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Satyam; Bucuti, Hakiza; Chitnis, Anurag; Klacman, Alex; Dantu, Ram

    2017-07-15

    Prompt administration of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a key determinant of survival from cardiac arrest. Strategies to improve CPR quality at point of care could improve resuscitation outcomes. We tested whether a low cost and scalable mobile phone- or smart watch-based solution could provide accurate measures of compression depth and rate during simulated CPR. Fifty health care providers (58% intensive care unit nurses) performed simulated CPR on a calibrated training manikin (Resusci Anne, Laerdal) while wearing both devices. Subjects received real-time audiovisual feedback from each device sequentially. Primary outcome was accuracy of compression depth and rate compared with the calibrated training manikin. Secondary outcome was improvement in CPR quality as defined by meeting both guideline-recommend compression depth (5 to 6 cm) and rate (100 to 120/minute). Compared with the training manikin, typical error for compression depth was mobile device feedback (60% vs 50%; p = 0.3). Sessions that did not meet guideline recommendations failed primarily because of inadequate compression depth (46 ± 2 mm). In conclusion, a mobile device application-guided CPR can accurately track compression depth and rate during simulation in a practice environment in accordance with resuscitation guidelines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neonatal Tele-Homecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne

    Neonatal homecare (NH) implies that parents manage tube feeding and care of their preterm infant at home supported by home visits from neonatal nurses, to monitor infant growth and the well-being of the family. Home visits are costly and time consuming in rural areas. The overall aim of this study...

  5. MRI of neonatal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P.L.; Lam, B.C.C.; Tung, H.K.S.; Wong, V.; Chan, F.L.; Ooi, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonatal encephalopathy, including hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, perinatal/neonatal stroke, metabolic encephalopathy from inborn errors of metabolism, congenital central nervous system infections and birth trauma. The applications of advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are emphasized

  6. NEONATAL TOBACCO SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A.Kireev

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is to study neonatal adaptation in new-born children from the tobacco abused mothers. A comparative analysis of clinical and neuroendochnal status and lipid metabolism in new-born children from smoking and non-smoking mothers was carried out Neonatal adaptation disorders were revealed in new-born children from the smoking mothers.

  7. Respiratory function and near infrared spectroscopy recording during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an extremely preterm newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott S; Cheung, Po-Yin; Pichler, Gerhard; Aziz, Khalid; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case highlighting several controversial and important topics regarding neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Current neonatal guidelines recommend a 3:1 compression:ventilation ratio; however, the most effective ratio of delivering chest compressions (CC) remains controversial. We report a case of a male infant at 24 weeks' postmenstrual age weighing 650 g on a background of preterm labor. At initial assessment the infant appeared floppy and apneic with a heart rate (HR) of 50-60 beats/min. Mask ventilation was ineffective, thus continuous CC (90/min) with asynchronous ventilations (60/min) was started. HR, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, cerebral oxygenation, respiratory function, and exhaled carbon dioxide (ECO2) were continuously measured during CPR. Return of spontaneous circulation defined as HR >60/min was achieved after 90 s of CPR. Mask leak significantly increased during CC. During bradycardia (HR ∼50/min), ECO2 indicated correct tube placement and an increase of ECO2 >12 mm Hg was associated with rapid increase in HR >60/min. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Neonatal intensive care in a Karen refugee camp: a 4 year descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Turner

    Full Text Available A third of all deaths in children aged <5 years occur in the neonatal period. Neonatal intensive care is often considered too complex and expensive to be implemented in resource poor settings. Consequently the reductions that have been made in infant mortality in the poorest countries have not been made in the neonatal period. This manuscript describes the activities surrounding the introduction of special care baby unit (SCBU in a refugee setting and the resulting population impact.A SCBU was developed in Maela refugee camp on the Thailand-Myanmar border. This unit comprised of a dedicated area, basic equipment, drugs and staff training. Training was built around neonatal guidelines, comprising six clinical steps: recognition, resuscitation, examination, supportive medical care, specialised medical care, and counselling of parents with sick newborns.From January 2008 until December 2011, 952 infants were admitted to SCBU. The main admission diagnoses were early onset neonatal sepsis, jaundice and prematurity. Early prematurity (<34 weeks carried the highest risk of mortality (OR 9.5, 95% CI 5.4-16.5, p<0.001. There was a significant decrease in mortality from 19.3% (2008 to 4.8% (2011 among the infants admitted for prematurity (p=0.03. The neonatal mortality in Maela camp as a whole declined by 51% from 21.8 to 10.7 deaths per 1000 live births over the corresponding period (p=0.04. Staff expressed more confidence in their ability to take care of neonates and there was a more positive attitude towards premature infants.Neonatal mortality can be reduced in a resource poor setting by introduction of a simple low cost unit specialising in care of sick neonates and run by local health workers following adequate training. Training in recognition and provision of simple interventions at a high standard can increase staff confidence and reduce fatalistic attitudes towards premature neonates.

  9. Ethics and medico legal aspects of "Not for Resuscitation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Sulakshan Salins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not for resuscitation in India still remains an abstract concept with no clear guidelines or legal frame work. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a complex medical intervention which is often used inappropriately in hospitalized patients and usually guided by medical decision making rather than patient-directed choices. Patient autonomy still remains a weak concept and relatives are expected to make this big decision in a short time and at a time of great emotional distress. This article outlines concepts around ethics and medico legal aspects of not for resuscitation, especially in Indian setting.

  10. Applying lessons from commercial aviation safety and operations to resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornato, Joseph P; Peberdy, Mary Ann

    2014-02-01

    Both commercial aviation and resuscitation are complex activities in which team members must respond to unexpected emergencies in a consistent, high quality manner. Lives are at stake in both activities and the two disciplines have similar leadership structures, standard setting processes, training methods, and operational tools. Commercial aviation crews operate with remarkable consistency and safety, while resuscitation team performance and outcomes are highly variable. This commentary provides the perspective of two physician-pilots showing how commercial aviation training, operations, and safety principles can be adapted to resuscitation team training and performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Poor practice and knowledge among traditional birth attendants in Eastern Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A A; Siddig, M F

    2012-11-01

    To identify and understand knowledge and practice among traditional birth attendants (TBAs), a total of 111 TBAs were interviewed at Kassala, Eastern Sudan between March and April 2011. Hand-washing prior to the delivery was a universal practice but only 25.2% of the interviewed TBAs used sterilised equipment. TBAs in this study appeared to have a low level of awareness about when a mother should be referred to hospital, and lacked basic information on family planning and HIV/AIDS. None of these 111 TBAs knew or used equipment for neonatal resuscitation (such as bag, tube and mask) or knew neonatal signs that needed extra attention such as change in skin colour, weak suckling and respiratory distress, and nearly one-third (28.8%) of the respondents believed in a few days delay in milk production. Thus, substantial effort is needed to improve the knowledge and practice among TBAs in Eastern Sudan, including training programmes, and this might be the best hope to achieve the Millennium Development Goals.

  12. Basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation - guidelines of the Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, James; Aickin, Richard; Nuthall, Gabrielle

    2012-07-01

    Guidelines for basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have been revised by Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils. Changes encourage CPR out-of-hospital and aim to improve the quality of CPR in-hospital. Features of basic CPR include: omission of abdominal thrusts for foreign body airway obstruction; commencement with chest compression followed by ventilation in a ratio of 30:2 or compression-only CPR if the rescuer is unwilling/unable to give expired-air breathing when the victim is 'unresponsive and not breathing normally'. Use of automated external defibrillators is encouraged. Features of advanced CPR include: prevention of cardiac arrest by rapid response systems; restriction of pulse palpation to 10 s to diagnosis cardiac arrest; affirmation of 15:2 compression-ventilation ratio for children and for infants other than newly born; initial bag-mask ventilation before tracheal intubation; a single direct current shock of 4 J/kg for ventricular fibrillation (VF) and pulseless ventricular tachycardia followed by immediate resumption of CPR for 2 min without analysis of cardiac rhythm and avoidance of unnecessary interruption of continuous external cardiac compressions. Monitoring of exhaled carbon dioxide is recommended to detect non-tracheal intubation, assess quality of CPR, and to help match ventilation to reduced cardiac output. The intraosseous route is recommended if immediate intravenous access is impossible. Amiodarone is strongly favoured over lignocaine for refractory VF and adrenaline over atropine for severe bradycardia, asystole and pulseless electrical activity. Family presence at resuscitation is encouraged. Therapeutic hypothermia is acceptable after resuscitation to improve neurological outcome. Extracorporeal circulatory support for in-hospital cardiac arrest may be used in equipped centres. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal

  13. Neonatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnest, G; de la Fuente Fonnest, I; Weber, Tom

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent neonatal herpes, women in labor with genital herpes infection are still delivered by Cesarean section. This policy is currently being debated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal herpes in Denmark and to evaluate the prevention practice. METHODS...... herpes recurrence. Four infants had a serious infection in spite of Cesarean section. This study does not support a policy of Cesarean section in case of maternal recurrent herpes simplex infection at delivery.......BACKGROUND: To prevent neonatal herpes, women in labor with genital herpes infection are still delivered by Cesarean section. This policy is currently being debated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal herpes in Denmark and to evaluate the prevention practice. METHODS......: All newborns with perinatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991 were identified from hospital-records. RESULTS: Of 862,298 deliveries 136 possible cases were found but only 30 (22%) fulfilled the criteria for neonatal herpes. The incidence increased from 2.36 to 4.56 per 100,000 live births during 1977...

  14. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for Medical Students in Anesthesiology Rotation in Ardabil Medical University (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Isazadehfar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training for undergraduate medical students has been noted to be poor in the past. Attempts have been made The aim of this study is to determine effect of CPR training in the anesthetic ward to improve knowledge and practice undergraduate medical student of CPR.Methods: A 12 month Educational experimental study with self control was done on all undergraduate medical student (n=30 at the medical university of Ardabil in 2006-2007. During I month of program allthis students have undergone CPR training including basic life support (BLS , advanced cardiac life support (ACLS and practical skills. Data were collected via questionnaire, demographic, pre/post knowledge and practice.Results: After training the acceptable score (good and very good about knowledge of BLS, ACLS and practical skill significantly increased %6.7 to %50 (p=0.0001 , %13.3 to %53.4 (p=0.001 and %3.3 to %100 (p=0.001 respectively. A significant relationship between knowledge of ACLS and practical skills was shown (p=0.005.Conclusion: The CPR training course in anesthetic ward leads to a significant increased in skills and knowledge. Adding this course to undergraduate curriculum of medical students especially in operaticallywards (e.g. Anesthetic ward is essential.Keywords: CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION; TRAINING; BASIC LIFE SUPPORT; ADVANCED CARDIAC LIFE SUPPORT

  15. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Menchine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders.  Methods: We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1 how leadership affects patient care; 2 which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3 methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results: We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs

  16. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. Methods We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching

  17. A description of the "event manager" role in resuscitations: A qualitative study of interviews and focus groups of resuscitation participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Katherine L; Parshuram, Christopher S; Ferri, Susan; Mema, Briseida

    2017-06-01

    Communication during resuscitation is essential for the provision of coordinated, effective care. Previously, we observed 44% of resuscitation communication originated from participants other than the physician team leader; 65% of which was directed to the team, exclusive of the team leader. We called this outer-loop communication. This institutional review board-approved qualitative study used grounded theory analysis of focus groups and interviews to describe and define outer-loop communication and the role of "event manager" as an additional "leader." Participants were health care staff involved in the medical management of resuscitations in a quaternary pediatric academic hospital. The following 3 domains were identified: the existence and rationale of outer-loop communication; the functions fulfilled by outer-loop communication; and the leadership and learning of event manager skills. The role was recognized by all team members and evolved organically as resuscitation complexity increased. A "good" manager has similar qualities to a "good team leader" with strong nontechnical skills. Event managers were not formally identified and no specific training had occurred. "Outer-loop" communication supports resuscitation activities. An event manager gives direction to the team, coordinates activities, and supports the team leader. We describe a new role in resuscitation in light of structural organizational theory and cognitive load with a view to incorporating this structure into resuscitation training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. To resuscitate or not to resuscitate: a logistic regression analysis of physician-related variables influencing the decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Sharon; Alon, Gady; Kaufman, Nechama; Braunstein, Rony; Carmel, Sara; Varon, Joseph; Hersch, Moshe

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether variables in physicians' backgrounds influenced their decision to forego resuscitating a patient they did not previously know. Questionnaire survey of a convenience sample of 204 physicians working in the departments of internal medicine, anaesthesiology and cardiology in 11 hospitals in Israel. Twenty per cent of the participants had elected to forego resuscitating a patient they did not previously know without additional consultation. Physicians who had more frequently elected to forego resuscitation had practised medicine for more than 5 years (p=0.013), estimated the number of resuscitations they had performed as being higher (p=0.009), and perceived their experience in resuscitation as sufficient (p=0.001). The variable that predicted the outcome of always performing resuscitation in the logistic regression model was less than 5 years of experience in medicine (OR 0.227, 95% CI 0.065 to 0.793; p=0.02). Physicians' level of experience may affect the probability of a patient's receiving resuscitation, whereas the physicians' personal beliefs and values did not seem to affect this outcome.

  19. Immediate newborn care practices delay thermoregulation and breastfeeding initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Howard L; Silvestre, Maria Asuncion A; Mantaring, Jacinto Blas V; Oliveros, Yolanda E; Nyunt-U, Soe

    2011-01-01

    Aim A deadly nosocomial outbreak in a Philippine hospital drew nationwide attention to neonatal sepsis. Together with specific infection control measures, interventions that protect newborns against infection-related mortality include drying, skin-to-skin contact, delayed cord clamping, breastfeeding initiation and delayed bathing. This evaluation characterized hospital care in the first hours of life with the intent to drive policy change, strategic planning and hospital reform. Methods Trained physicians observed 481 consecutive deliveries in 51 hospitals using a standardized tool to record practices and timing of immediate newborn care procedures. Results Drying, weighing, eye care and vitamin K injections were performed in more than 90% of newborns. Only 9.6% were allowed skin-to-skin contact. Interventions were inappropriately sequenced, e.g. immediate cord clamping (median 12 sec), delayed drying (96.5%) and early bathing (90.0%). While 68.2% were put to the breast, they were separated two minutes later. Unnecessary suctioning was performed in 94.9%. Doctors trained in neonatal resuscitation were 2.5 (1.1–5.7) times more likely to unnecessarily suction vigorous newborns. Two per cent died and 5.7% developed sepsis/pneumonia. Conclusions This minute-by-minute observational assessment revealed that performance and timing of immediate newborn care interventions are below WHO standards and deprive newborns of basic protections against infection and death. PMID:21375583

  20. USE OF DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR REVEALING HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN LESIONS IN NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Shimchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents advantages of use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI for revealing hypoxic-ischemic brain lesions in neonates. The trial included 97 neonates with perinatal brain lesion who had been undergoing treatment at a resuscitation department or neonatal pathology department in the first month of life. The article shows high information value of diffusion-weighted images (DWI for diagnostics of hypoxic-ischemic lesions in comparison with regular standard modes. In the event of no structural brain lesions of neonates, pronounced increase in signal characteristics revealed by DWI indicated considerable pathophysiological alterations. Subsequently, children developed structural alterations in the form of cystic encephalomalacia with expansion of cerebrospinal fluid spaces manifested with pronounced neurological deficit. DW MRI has been offered as a method of prognosticating further neurological development of children on early stages. 

  1. Barriers to Effective Teamwork Relating to Pediatric Resuscitations: Perceptions of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Joshua M; Chang, Todd P; Ziv, Nurit; Nager, Alan L

    2017-10-09

    In the pediatric emergency department (PED), resuscitations require medical teams form ad hoc, rarely communicating beforehand. Literature has shown that the medical community has deficiencies in communication and teamwork. However, we as medical providers do not know or understand the perceived barriers of our colleagues. Physicians may perceive a barrier that is different from nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, or technicians. Perhaps we do not know in which area of teamwork and communication we are deficient. Only when we understand the perceptions of our fellow coworkers can we take steps toward improvement in quality resuscitations and therefore patient safety. The primary objectives of this study were to describe and understand the perceived barriers to effective communication and teamwork among different disciplines forming spontaneous resuscitation teams at a tertiary urban PED and to determine if providers of different disciplines perceived these barriers differently. This was a mixed-methods study conducted in a single, tertiary care freestanding children's hospital emergency department. Survey questions were iteratively developed to measure the construct of barriers and best practices within resuscitation teamwork, which was administered to staff among 5 selected roles: physicians, nurses, respiratory technicians, PED technicians, and PED pharmacists. It contained open-ended questions to provide statements on specific barriers or goals in effective teamwork, as well as a priority ranking on 25 different statements on teamwork extracted from the literature. From the participant data, 9 core themes related to resuscitation teamwork were coalesced using affinity diagramming by the authors. All statements from the survey were coded to the 9 core themes by 2 authors, with high reliability (κ = 0.93). Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the prevalence of themes mentioned by survey participants. A χ test was used to determine differences

  2. [Chest compression without ventilation during basic life support? Confirmation of the validity of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimeier, U; Dirks, B; Arntz, R; Bahr, J; Goldschmidt, P; Roessler, M; Sasse, M; Toursarkissian, M

    2008-08-01

    Basic life support (BLS) refers to maintaining airway patency and supporting breathing and the circulation, without the use of equipment other than infection protection measures. The scientific advisory committee of the American Heart Association (AHA) published recommendations (online-first) on March 31 2008, which promote a call to action for bystanders who are not or not sufficiently trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and witness an adult out-of-hospital sudden collapse probably of cardiac origin. These bystanders should provide chest compression without ventilation (so-called compression-only CPR). If bystanders were previously trained and thus confident with CPR, they should decide between conventional CPR (chest compression plus ventilation at a ratio of 30:2) and chest compression alone. However, considering current evidence-based medicine and latest scientific data both the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the German Resuscitation Council (GRC) do not at present intend to change or supplement the current resuscitation guidelines "Basic life support for adults". Both organisations do not see any need for change or amendments in central European practice and continue to recommend that only those lay rescuers that are not willing or unable to give mouth-to-mouth ventilation should provide CPR solely by uninterrupted chest compressions until professional help arrives. It is also stressed that the training of young people especially teenagers as lay rescuers should be promoted and the establishment of training programs through emergency medical organizations and in schools should be encouraged.

  3. Failure mode effects and criticality analysis: innovative risk assessment to identify critical areas for improvement in emergency department sepsis resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Emilie S; O'Connor, Lanty M; Nannicelli, Anna P; Barker, Lisa T; Khare, Rahul K; Seivert, Nicholas P; Holl, Jane L; Vozenilek, John A

    2014-06-01

    Sepsis is an increasing problem in the practice of emergency medicine as the prevalence is increasing and optimal care to reduce mortality requires significant resources and time. Evidence-based septic shock resuscitation strategies exist, and rely on appropriate recognition and diagnosis, but variation in adherence to the recommendations and therefore outcomes remains. Our objective was to perform a multi-institutional prospective risk-assessment, using failure mode effects and criticality analysis (FMECA), to identify high-risk failures in ED sepsis resuscitation. We conducted a FMECA, which prospectively identifies critical areas for improvement in systems and processes of care, across three diverse hospitals. A multidisciplinary group of participants described the process of emergency department (ED) sepsis resuscitation to then create a comprehensive map and table listing all process steps and identified process failures. High-risk failures in sepsis resuscitation from each of the institutions were compiled to identify common high-risk failures. Common high-risk failures included limited availability of equipment to place the central venous catheter and conduct invasive monitoring, and cognitive overload leading to errors in decision-making. Additionally, we identified great variability in care processes across institutions. Several common high-risk failures in sepsis care exist: a disparity in resources available across hospitals, a lack of adherence to the invasive components of care, and cognitive barriers that affect expert clinicians' decision-making capabilities. Future work may concentrate on dissemination of non-invasive alternatives and overcoming cognitive barriers in diagnosis and knowledge translation.

  4. Nationwide survey of resuscitation education in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäntti, H; Silfvast, T; Turpeinen, A; Paakkonen, H; Uusaro, A

    2009-09-01

    Good-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is highlighted in the International Resuscitation Guidelines, but clinically the quality of CPR is often poor. Education of CPR has a major role in the primary skills imparted to students. Different methods can be used to teach CPR quality. We evaluated the current status of their usage in Finland institutes teaching students of emergency medicine at different levels. The following institutes were included in an anonymous survey: medical schools (teaching future physicians), universities of applied sciences (paramedics), colleges (emergency medical technicians) and emergency services college (fire-fighters). Hours of teaching theory lessons of CPR and hours of small group training were evaluated. In particular, we focussed on the teaching methods for adequate chest compression rate and depth. Twenty-one of 30 institutes responded to the questionnaire. The median for hours of theory lessons of CPR was 8h (range: 2-28 h). The median for hours of small group training was 10 (range: 3-40 h). The methods of teaching adequate chest compression rate were instructors' visual estimation in 28.5% of the institutions, watch in 33.3%, metronome in 9.5% and manikins' graphic in 28.5% of institutions. The methods of teaching adequate chest compression depth were instructors' visual estimation in 33.3%, in manikins light indicators in 23.8% and manikins' graphics in 52.3% of institutions. The hours of theoretic lessons and small group training vary widely among different institutes. In one-third of institutions, the instructor's visual estimation was a sole method used to teach adequate chest compression rate and depth. Different technical methods were surprisingly seldom used.

  5. Brain Resuscitation in the Drowning Victim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Bierens, Joost J. L. M.; Branche, Christine M.; Clark, Robert S.; Friberg, Hans; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W. E.; Holzer, Michael; Katz, Laurence M.; Knape, Johannes T. A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Nadkarni, Vinay; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.

    2013-01-01

    Drowning is a leading cause of accidental death. Survivors may sustain severe neurologic morbidity. There is negligible research specific to brain injury in drowning making current clinical management non-specific to this disorder. This review represents an evidence-based consensus effort to provide recommendations for management and investigation of the drowning victim. Epidemiology, brain-oriented prehospital and intensive care, therapeutic hypothermia, neuroimaging/monitoring, biomarkers, and neuroresuscitative pharmacology are addressed. When cardiac arrest is present, chest compressions with rescue breathing are recommended due to the asphyxial insult. In the comatose patient with restoration of spontaneous circulation, hypoxemia and hyperoxemia should be avoided, hyperthermia treated, and induced hypothermia (32–34 °C) considered. Arterial hypotension/hypertension should be recognized and treated. Prevent hypoglycemia and treat hyperglycemia. Treat clinical seizures and consider treating non-convulsive status epilepticus. Serial neurologic examinations should be provided. Brain imaging and serial biomarker measurement may aid prognostication. Continuous electroencephalography and N20 somatosensory evoked potential monitoring may be considered. Serial biomarker measurement (e.g., neuron specific enolase) may aid prognostication. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of any specific brain-oriented neuroresuscitative pharmacologic therapy other than that required to restore and maintain normal physiology. Following initial stabilization, victims should be transferred to centers with expertise in age-specific post-resuscitation neurocritical care. Care should be documented, reviewed, and quality improvement assessment performed. Preclinical research should focus on models of asphyxial cardiac arrest. Clinical research should focus on improved cardiopulmonary resuscitation, re-oxygenation/reperfusion strategies, therapeutic hypothermia

  6. Decrease in delivery room intubation rates after use of nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation in the delivery room for resuscitation of very low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biniwale, Manoj; Wertheimer, Fiona

    2017-07-01

    The literature supports minimizing duration of invasive ventilation to decrease lung injury in premature infants. Neonatal Resuscitation Program recommended use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in delivery room for infants requiring prolonged respiratory support. To evaluate the impact of implementation of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) using nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) for resuscitation in very low birth infants. Retrospective study was performed after NIPPV was introduced in the delivery room and compared with infants receiving face mask to provide positive pressure ventilation for resuscitation of very low birth weight infants prior to its use. Data collected from 119 infants resuscitated using NIPPV and 102 infants resuscitated with a face mask in a single institution. The primary outcome was the need for endotracheal intubation in the delivery room. Data was analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics software version 24. A total of 31% of infants were intubated in the delivery room in the NIPPV group compared to 85% in the Face mask group (p=rates were 11% in the NIPPV group and 31% in the Face mask group (p<0.001). Epinephrine administration was also lower in NIPPV group (2% vs. 8%; P=0.03). Only 38% infants remained intubated at 24hours of age in the NIPPV group compared to 66% in the Face mask group (p<0.001). Median duration of invasive ventilation in the NIPPV group was shorter (2days) compared to the Face mask group (11days) (p=0.01). The incidence of air-leaks was not significant between the two groups. NIPPV was safely and effectively used in the delivery room settings to provide respiratory support for VLBW infants with less need for intubation, chest compressions, epinephrine administration and subsequent invasive ventilation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: state of the art in 2011

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... knowledge and science of resuscitation and offer treatment recommendations. .... anaesthesia falls into one of two categories: medication related and ..... manual pads, or by pressing the button on the defibrillator. Check the ...

  8. Evolution of Burn Resuscitation in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Kevin K; Blackbourne, Lorne H; Wolf, Steven E; White, Chrsitopher E; Renz, Evan M; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Holcomb, John B; Barillo, David J

    2006-01-01

    ... of the burn resuscitation. Critical advances in air evacuation of the war wounded, thorough prewar planning, and sustained burn care education of deployed personnel have proven vital in the optimal care of our injured soldiers...

  9. Novel Resuscitation from Lethal Hemorrhage. Increasing Survival of Combat Casualties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Safar, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Using our novel animal models of severe hemorrhage, focusing on evaluation of outcome to 3-10 days, the following strategies were found superior in terms of intact survival compared to standard resuscitation...

  10. "Maternal and neonatal outcome in teenage pregnancy in Tehran Valiasr Hospital "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Nili F

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Among 2357 prenant women at Tehran Valiasr hospital, 99 women under 18 years with their 102 neonates were evaluated retrospectively during Aprill 1999 to April 2000. frequency of adolescent pregnancy was detected in 41.5 per 1000 live birth 7 (7.1% of mothers had preeclampisa, 7 thyroidal diseases, 3 valvular heart diseases, 2 urinary tract infections and 20.3% of women had prolonged rupture of membrane (more than 24 hrs. the route of delivery in 21.2% of women was cesarean section. 32% of neonates were low birth weight and the gestational age in 38.2% of neonates was lower than 37 weeks. Intrauterine growth retardiation was detected in 11.8% of patients 38.2% of babies were admitted into neonatal care unit. Perinatal resuscitation and ventilator care were needed in 9.8% and 3.9% of neonates respectively. Nonatal mortality occurred in 6.9% of patients. Compared with total deliveries the frequency of variables was higher than could be expected except for cesarean section. Our adolescent pregnancy rate is lower than worldwide range but rates for prematurity and low birth weight are the same as other reports from developed and developing countries. Frequency of cesarean section was lower than expected range in this group as in developed countries.With respect to higher rates for rheumatic heart disease, premature labor, prolonged rupture o membrane and low birth weight, it seems that lower socioeconomic factors may result in these adverse outcomes.Higher neonatal ICU admissions, artificial ventilation and resuscitation in adolescent pregnancies suggest that confinement in hospitals with level III nurseries is advisable in these high risk group

  11. Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Process and Lower Frequency of Medical Staff Visit Predicts Independently In-hospital Resuscitation Success in the Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chen Tsai

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Although the initial resuscitation success rate was not affected by age, a longer time interval between the last medical staffs’ visit and the onset of resuscitation did result in a worse success rate in elderly patients. Our data suggest that more frequent staff visits to the elderly population during hospitalization could alter initial resuscitation results.

  12. Use of Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles to decrease incidence of neonatal hypothermia in the labor room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Subhash Chandra; Devgan, Amit; Anila, Sushila; Anushree, Neha; Debnath, Himadri

    2018-04-01

    Body temperature of a neonate continues to be under-documented, under-recognized, and under-managed, even though studies have shown that neonatal hypothermia increases mortality and morbidity. We aimed to reduce neonatal hypothermia (body temperature improvement (QI) initiative using the rapid-cycle Plan-Do-Study-Act approach (PDSA) improvement model and the project was conducted from 15 Jan 2017 to 25 Feb 2017. All singleton neonates with gestational ages above 34 completed weeks born by vaginal delivery were targeted. Exclusion criteria included neonates needing any form of resuscitation, those developing respiratory distress after birth needing any form of respiratory support or observation in NICU. We ran PDSA cycles (including pre-warmed cloths, skin to skin care with mother, early breast feeding, delaying weight check by 1 h and checklist of planned steps), every week, after taking the baseline data in the first week. A total of 46 neonates were studied. After 4 PDSA cycles, incidence of neonatal hypothermia at 1 h of birth dropped to zero from 50% at baseline and we were able to sustain 100% normal temperature (36.5-37.5 °C) since then. This QI project has significantly reduced the incidence of hypothermia in term and late preterm neonates born by vaginal delivery in our institute.

  13. Role of massage therapy on reduction of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in term and preterm neonates: a review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhawan Deep; Kabra, Nandkishor S; Balasubramanian, Haribalakrishna

    2017-09-13

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (NNH) is one of the leading causes of admissions in nursery throughout the world. It affects approximately 2.4-15% of neonates during the first 2 weeks of life. To evaluate the role of massage therapy for reduction of NNH in both term and preterm neonates. The literature search was done for various randomized control trials (RCTs) by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE. This review included total of 10 RCTs (two in preterm neonates and eight in term neonates) that fulfilled inclusion criteria. In most of the trials, Field massage was given. Six out of eight trials reported reduction in bilirubin levels in term neonates. However, only one trial (out of two) reported significant reduction in bilirubin levels in preterm neonates. Both trials in preterm neonates and most of the trials in term neonates (five trials) reported increased stool frequencies. Role of massage therapy in the management of NNH is supported by the current evidence. However, due to limitations of the trials, current evidences are not sufficient to use massage therapy for the management of NNH in routine practice.

  14. Compliance with barrier precautions during paediatric trauma resuscitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Deirdre C; Carter, Elizabeth A; Waterhouse, Lauren J; Burd, Randall S

    2013-03-01

    Barrier precautions protect patients and providers from blood-borne pathogens. Although barrier precaution compliance has been shown to be low among adult trauma teams, it has not been evaluated during paediatric resuscitations in which perceived risk of disease transmission may be low. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with compliance with barrier precautions during paediatric trauma resuscitations. Video recordings of resuscitations performed on injured children (compliance with an established policy requiring gowns and gloves. Depending on activation level, trauma team members included up to six physicians, four nurses, and a respiratory therapist. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the effect of team role, resuscitation factors, and injury mechanism on barrier precaution compliance. Over twelve weeks, 1138 trauma team members participated in 128 resuscitations (4.7% penetrating injuries, 9.4% highest level activations). Compliance with barrier precautions was 81.3%, with higher compliance seen among roles primarily at the bedside compared to positions not primarily at the bedside (90.7% vs. 65.1%, pcompliance, while surgical attendings (20.8%) had the lowest (prole, increased compliance was observed during resuscitations of patients with penetrating injuries (OR=3.97 [95% CI: 1.35-11.70], p=0.01), during resuscitations triaged to the highest activation level (OR=2.61 [95% CI: 1.34-5.10], p=0.005), and among team members present before patient arrival (OR=4.14 [95% CI: 2.29-7.39], pCompliance with barrier precautions varies by trauma team role. Team members have higher compliance when treating children with penetrating and high acuity injuries and when arriving before the patient. Interventions integrating barrier precautions into the workflow of team members are needed to reduce this variability and improve compliance with universal precautions during paediatric trauma resuscitations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  15. Kids save lives: a six-year longitudinal study of schoolchildren learning cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Who should do the teaching and will the effects last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Roman-Patrik; Van Aken, Hugo; Mölhoff, Thomas; Weber, Thomas; Rammert, Monika; Wild, Elke; Bohn, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This prospective longitudinal study over 6 years compared schoolteachers and emergency physicians as resuscitation trainers for schoolchildren. It also investigated whether pupils who were trained annually for 3 years retain their resuscitation skills after the end of this study. A total of 261 pupils (fifth grade) at two German grammar schools received resuscitation training by trained teachers or by emergency physicians. The annual training events stopped after 3 years in one group and continued for 6 years in a second group. We measured knowledge about resuscitation (questionnaire), chest compression rate (min(-1)), chest compression depth (mm), ventilation rate (min(-1)), ventilation volume (mL), self-efficacy (questionnaire). Their performance was evaluated after 1, 3 and 6 years. The training events increased the pupils' knowledge and practical skills. When trained by teachers, the pupils achieved better results for knowledge (92.86% ± 8.38 vs. 90.10% ± 8.63, P=0.04) and ventilation rate (4.84/min ± 4.05 vs. 3.76/min ± 2.37, P=0.04) than when they were trained by emergency physicians. There were no differences with regard to chest compression rate, depth, ventilation volume, or self-efficacy at the end of the study. Knowledge and skills after 6 years were equivalent in the group with 6 years training compared with 3 years training. Trained teachers can provide adequate resuscitation training in schools. Health-care professionals are not mandatory for CPR training (easier for schools to implement resuscitation training). The final evaluation after 6 years showed that resuscitation skills are retained even when training is interrupted for 3 years. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was $1000 US, and the yearly maintenance cost was <$500 with funds typically allocated from existing school resources. The facilitator was a school official or volunteer for 81% of schools. Average estimated training time commitment per student was <2 hours. Automated external defibrillators are available in 98% of schools, and 61% include automated external defibrillator training in their curriculum. Despite perceived barriers, school CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Trainers’ Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mäkinen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers’ attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D, Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N=185 focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree. Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse’s Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation. Cronbach’s alphas were 0.92–0.51. Statistics were Student’s t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p<0.01. Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p<0.01 were less confident about their Nurse’s Role (p<0.01 and Nontechnical Skills (p<0.01. Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills.

  18. Hematopoietic growth factors in neonatal medicine: the use of enterally administered hematopoietic growth factors in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Darlene A; Christensen, Robert D

    2004-03-01

    The practice of complete bowel rest in prematurely delivered neonates and those who have undergone surgery for congenital anomalies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is common in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). However, increased recognition of the critical role of growth factors in GI development suggests that this practice might be modified to include the administration of synthetic amniotic fluid-like solutions designed to bridge the neonate between their intra-uterine environment and that of the NICU. This article reviews advances in administering synthetic amniotic fluid-like solutions in the NICU.

  19. The definition of massive transfusion in trauma: a critical variable in examining evidence for resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Biswadev; Cameron, Peter A; Gruen, Russell L; Mori, Alfredo; Fitzgerald, Mark; Street, Alison

    2011-06-01

    'Massive' transfusion is a poorly defined inclusion criteria for studies examining the blood and blood product that are used during trauma resuscitation. We aimed to compare the traditional definition of massive transfusion (≥10 units in 24 h) to a more acute definition of at least 5 units in 4 h. Multitrauma patients were subgrouped according to the traditional definition and compared with the acute definition. Demographics, presenting vital signs and blood results, management including transfusion practice and outcomes were retrospectively studied. Associations of transfused fresh frozen plasma:packed red blood cells (PRBC) ratios with mortality were studied. There were 927 patients who received PRBCs in the first 24 h, with 314 patients identified using the traditional definition and 303 patients using the acute definition. The patients identified using the traditional definition received 18 (12-29) units of PRBC in 24 h, significantly higher than those identified using the acute definition [15 (9-29) units, Pdefinition excluded a significant proportion of patients who died in the emergency department. By using the acute definition to select a study sample, there seems to be an increase in mortality with fresh frozen plasma:PRBC ratio of 1 : 1 ratio compared with a 1 : 2 ratio. The traditional 'massive' transfusion definition not only 'dilutes' the potential study samples with a less acute group of patients, but also further excludes patients who die early. This latter group is most likely to be benefitted from any change to resuscitation practice. An acute definition of massive transfusion should be adopted when examining clinical practice during initial trauma resuscitation.

  20. Effect of intrapartum fetal stress associated with obstetrical interventions on viability and survivability of canine neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik V. Kuttan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted with the objective of identifying and evaluating intrapartum fetal stress in connection with the type of delivery in bitches. Materials and Methods: A total of 26 bitches between 1 and 5 years, belonging to 10 different breeds were evaluated. Bitches were subjected to detailed clinico-gynecological examination based on history. Neonatal stress associated with spontaneous whelping (SW, assisted whelping (AW, and emergency cesarean section (EC was evaluated using umbilical vein lactate (UL estimation by collecting the blood from umbilical vein. Results: A high umbilical vein lactate value was associated with fetal distress. The mean umbilical lactate value was highest in EC (12.54±0.8 mmol/L followed by AW (8.86±0.9 mmol/L and the lowest value was found in SW (7.56±0.58 mmol/L. A significant increase (p<0.05 in umbilical lactate level was observed in EC group of canine neonates compared with AW and SW groups. Overall mean umbilical lactate values of neonates which died within 24 h (13.31±1.08 mmol/L and the neonates which survived beyond 24 h (8.87±0.55 mmol/L differed significantly at 5% level. Conclusion: Immediate identification of neonatal distress by use of umbilical vein lactate estimation is helpful for the clinician to undertake resuscitation or medical therapy to ensure better neonatal survivability.

  1. Neonatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnest, G; de la Fuente Fonnest, I; Weber, Tom

    1997-01-01

    : All newborns with perinatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991 were identified from hospital-records. RESULTS: Of 862,298 deliveries 136 possible cases were found but only 30 (22%) fulfilled the criteria for neonatal herpes. The incidence increased from 2.36 to 4.56 per 100,000 live births during 1977...... herpes recurrence. Four infants had a serious infection in spite of Cesarean section. This study does not support a policy of Cesarean section in case of maternal recurrent herpes simplex infection at delivery.......BACKGROUND: To prevent neonatal herpes, women in labor with genital herpes infection are still delivered by Cesarean section. This policy is currently being debated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal herpes in Denmark and to evaluate the prevention practice. METHODS...

  2. Neonatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnest, G; de la Fuente Fonnest, I; Weber, Tom

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent neonatal herpes, women in labor with genital herpes infection are still delivered by Cesarean section. This policy is currently being debated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal herpes in Denmark and to evaluate the prevention practice. METHODS......: All newborns with perinatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991 were identified from hospital-records. RESULTS: Of 862,298 deliveries 136 possible cases were found but only 30 (22%) fulfilled the criteria for neonatal herpes. The incidence increased from 2.36 to 4.56 per 100,000 live births during 1977......-1984 through 1984-1991. Three mothers (10%) had recurrent herpes at delivery, three (10%) had primary herpes, and five (17%) had oral herpes. Seven infants (23%) were delivered by Cesarean section. Nine (30%) only had cutaneous herpes, four (13%) had CNS herpes, nine (30%) had disseminated disease. Six (20...

  3. Status of neonatal intensive care units in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality in India accounts for 50% of infant mortality, which has declined to 84/1000 live births. There is no prenatal care for over 50% of pregnant women, and over 80% deliver at home in unsafe and unsanitary conditions. Those women who do deliver in health facilities are unable to receive intensive neonatal care when necessary. Level I and Level II neonatal care is unavailable in most health facilities in India, and in most developing countries. There is a need in India for Level III care units also. The establishment of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in India and developing countries would require space and location, finances, equipment, staff, protocols of care, and infection control measures. Neonatal mortality could be reduced by initially adding NICUs at a few key hospitals. The recommendation is for 30 NICU beds per million population. Each bed would require 50 square feet per cradle and proper climate control. Funds would have to be diverted from adult care. The largest expenses would be in equipment purchase, maintenance, and repair. Trained technicians would be required to operate and monitor the sophisticated ventilators and incubators. The nurse-patient ratio should be 1:1 and 1:2 for other infants. Training mothers to work in the NICUs would help ease the problems of trained nursing staff shortages. Protocols need not be highly technical; they could include the substitution of radiant warmers and room heaters for expensive incubators, the provision of breast milk, and the reduction of invasive procedures such as venipuncture and intubation. Nocosomial infections should be reduced by vacuum cleaning and wet mopping with a disinfectant twice a day, changing disinfectants periodically, maintaining mops to avoid infection, decontamination of linen, daily changing of tubing, and cleaning and sterilizing oxygen hoods and resuscitation equipment, and maintaining an iatrogenic infection record book, which could be used to

  4. National neonatal weight policy survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, B

    2012-02-01

    This survey was conducted to review the current practice regarding frequency of weight measurement in neonatal units in the Republic of Ireland, and whether these practices are in keeping with best practice as described in the literature. There was an 88.5% (23 of 26) response rate to this survey. 6 (26%) units had a written policy, and 16 (70%) had an unwritten agreed practice. In the Vermont Oxford Network\\'s potentially better practices daily weight measurements on newborn infants are recommended until the infant is stable and growing and then alternate day measurements The most common practices in this survey were to weigh infants on alternate days, this occurred in 9 (39%) units, and twice weekly in 6 (26%). Less than 31% of units had a separate policy for those less than 30 weeks, on assisted ventilation, or transitioning to enteral feeds. Most weigh infants on alternate days, and plot weights weekly, which is in keeping with best practice. Few units have separate policies for specific subgroups as is recommended in the limited literature. Consensus guidelines should be developed and promoted nationally.

  5. National neonatal weight policy survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, B

    2009-06-01

    This survey was conducted to review the current practice regarding frequency of weight measurement in neonatal units in the Republic of Ireland, and whether these practices are in keeping with best practice as described in the literature. There was an 88.5% (23 of 26) response rate to this survey. 6 (26%) units had a written policy, and 16 (70%) had an unwritten agreed practice. In the Vermont Oxford Network\\'s potentially better practices daily weight measurements on newborn infants are recommended until the infant is stable and growing and then alternate day measurements The most common practices in this survey were to weigh infants on alternate days, this occurred in 9 (39%) units, and twice weekly in 6 (26%). Less than 31% of units had a separate policy for those less than 30 weeks, on assisted ventilation, or transitioning to enteral feeds. Most weigh infants on alternate days, and plot weights weekly, which is in keeping with best practice. Few units have separate policies for specific subgroups as is recommended in the limited literature. Consensus guidelines should be developed and promoted nationally.

  6. Correction of Neonatal Hypovolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moskalev

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of hydroxyethyl starch solution (6% refortane, Berlin-Chemie versus fresh frozen plasma used to correct neonatal hypovolemia.Materials and methods. In 12 neonatal infants with hypoco-agulation, hypovolemia was corrected with fresh frozen plasma (10 ml/kg body weight. In 13 neonates, it was corrected with 6% refortane infusion in a dose of 10 ml/kg. Doppler echocardiography was used to study central hemodynamic parameters and Doppler study was employed to examine regional blood flow in the anterior cerebral and renal arteries.Results. Infusion of 6% refortane and fresh frozen plasma at a rate of 10 ml/hour during an hour was found to normalize the parameters of central hemodynamics and regional blood flow.Conclusion. Comparative analysis of the findings suggests that 6% refortane is the drug of choice in correcting neonatal hypovolemia. Fresh frozen plasma should be infused in hemostatic disorders. 

  7. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a newborn who was exposed to addictive opiate drugs while in the mother’s womb. Causes Neonatal ... Increased muscle tone Irritability Poor feeding Rapid breathing Seizures Sleep problems Slow weight gain Stuffy nose, sneezing ...

  8. Quantitative topographic differentiation of the neonatal EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Karel; Krajca, Vladimír; Roth, Zdenek; Melichar, Jan; Petránek, Svojmil

    2006-09-01

    To test the discriminatory topographic potential of a new method of the automatic EEG analysis in neonates. A quantitative description of the neonatal EEG can contribute to the objective assessment of the functional state of the brain, and may improve the precision of diagnosing cerebral dysfunctions manifested by 'disorganization', 'dysrhythmia' or 'dysmaturity'. 21 healthy, full-term newborns were examined polygraphically during sleep (EEG-8 referential derivations, respiration, ECG, EOG, EMG). From each EEG record, two 5-min samples (one from the middle of quiet sleep, the other from the middle of active sleep) were subject to subsequent automatic analysis and were described by 13 variables: spectral features and features describing shape and variability of the signal. The data from individual infants were averaged and the number of variables was reduced by factor analysis. All factors identified by factor analysis were statistically significantly influenced by the location of derivation. A large number of statistically significant differences were also established when comparing the effects of individual derivations on each of the 13 measured variables. Both spectral features and features describing shape and variability of the signal are largely accountable for the topographic differentiation of the neonatal EEG. The presented method of the automatic EEG analysis is capable to assess the topographic characteristics of the neonatal EEG, and it is adequately sensitive and describes the neonatal electroencephalogram with sufficient precision. The discriminatory capability of the used method represents a promise for their application in the clinical practice.

  9. Neopuff T-piece resuscitator mask ventilation: Does mask leak vary with different peak inspiratory pressures in a manikin model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Rajesh; Tracy, Mark; Hinder, Murray; Wright, Audrey

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare mask leak with three different peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) settings during T-piece resuscitator (TPR; Neopuff) mask ventilation on a neonatal manikin model. Participants were neonatal unit staff members. They were instructed to provide mask ventilation with a TPR with three PIP settings (20, 30, 40 cm H 2 O) chosen in a random order. Each episode was for 2 min with 2-min rest period. Flow rate and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) were kept constant. Airway pressure, inspiratory and expiratory tidal volumes, mask leak, respiratory rate and inspiratory time were recorded. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. A total of 12 749 inflations delivered by 40 participants were analysed. There were no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) in the mask leak with the three PIP settings. No statistically significant differences were seen in respiratory rate and inspiratory time with the three PIP settings. There was a significant rise in PEEP as the PIP increased. Failure to achieve the desired PIP was observed especially at the higher settings. In a neonatal manikin model, the mask leak does not vary as a function of the PIP when the flow rate is constant. With a fixed rate and inspiratory time, there seems to be a rise in PEEP with increasing PIP. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  10. Hiperbilirrubinemia neonatal agravada Aggravated neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Campo González

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. La mayoría de las veces la ictericia en el recién nacido es un hecho fisiológico, causado por una hiperbilirrubinemia de predominio indirecto, secundario a inmadurez hepática e hiperproducción de bilirrubina. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar el comportamiento de la hiperbilirrubinemia neonatal en el Hospital Docente Ginecoobstétrico de Guanabacoa en los años 2007 a 2009. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo y retrospectivo de 173 recién nacidos que ingresaron al Departamento de Neonatología con diagnóstico de hiperbilirrubinemia agravada. RESULTADOS. La incidencia de hiperbilirrubinemia neonatal agravada fue del 3,67 % y predominó en hermanos con antecedentes de ictericia (56,65 %. El tiempo de aparición fue de 48 a 72 h (76,87 % y entre los factores agravantes se hallaron el nacimiento pretérmino y el bajo peso al nacer. La mayoría de los pacientes fueron tratados con luminoterapia (90,17 %. CONCLUSIÓN. La hiperbilirrubinemia neonatal agravada constituye un problema de salud. Los factores agravantes son la prematuridad y el bajo peso al nacer. La luminoterapia es una medida terapéutica eficaz para su tratamiento.INTRODUCTION. Most of times jaundice in newborn is a physiological fact due to hyperbilirubinemia of indirect predominance, secondary to liver immaturity and to bilirubin hyperproduction. The aim of present of present study was to determine the behavior of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in the Gynecology and Obstetrics Teaching Hospital of Guanabacoa municipality from 2007 to 2009. METHODS. A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted in 173 newborn patients admitted in the Neonatology Department diagnosed with severe hyperbilirubinemia. RESULTS. The incidence of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia was of 3,67% with predominance in brothers with a history of jaundice (56,65%. The time of appearance was of 48 to 72 hrs (76,87% and among the aggravating factors were the preterm birth and

  11. Quality of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during paediatric resuscitation training: time to stop the blind leading the blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshid, Muhammad; Lo, Tsz-Yan Milly; Reynolds, Fiona

    2009-05-01

    Recent evidence suggested that the quality of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during adult advanced life support training was suboptimal. This study aimed to assess the CPR quality of a paediatric resuscitation training programme, and to determine whether it was sufficiently addressed by the trainee team leaders during training. CPR quality of 20 consecutive resuscitation scenario training sessions was audited prospectively using a pre-designed proforma. A consultant intensivist and a senior nurse who were also Advanced Paediatric Life Support (APLS) instructors assessed the CPR quality which included ventilation frequency, chest compression rate and depth, and any unnecessary interruption in chest compressions. Team leaders' response to CPR quality and elective change of compression rescuer during training were also recorded. Airway patency was not assessed in 13 sessions while ventilation rate was too fast in 18 sessions. Target compression rate was not achieved in only 1 session. The median chest compression rate was 115 beats/min. Chest compressions were too shallow in 10 sessions and were interrupted unnecessarily in 13 sessions. More than 50% of training sessions did not have elective change of the compression rescuer. 19 team leaders failed to address CPR quality during training despite all team leaders being certified APLS providers. The quality of CPR performance was suboptimal during paediatric resuscitation training and team leaders-in-training had little awareness of this inadequacy. Detailed CPR quality assessment and feedback should be integrated into paediatric resuscitation training to ensure optimal performance in real life resuscitations.

  12. Neonatal orbital abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil M Al-Salem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital complications due to ethmoiditis are rare in neonates. A case of orbital abscess due to acute ethmoiditis in a 28-day-old girl is presented. A Successful outcome was achieved following antimicrobial therapy alone; spontaneous drainage of the abscess occurred from the lower lid without the need for surgery. From this case report, we intend to emphasize on eyelid retraction as a sign of neonatal orbital abscess, and to review all the available literature of similar cases.

  13. [Training program on cardiopulmonary resuscitation with the use of automated external defibrillator in a university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Ana Paula; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue

    2012-03-01

    Early defibrillation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) receives increasing emphasis on its priority and rapidity. This is an experience report about the implementation of a training program in CPR using a defibrillator in a private university. The training program in basic CPR maneuvers was based on global guidelines, including a theorical course with practical demonstration of CPR maneuvers with the defibrillator, individual practical training and theoretical and practical assessments. About the performance of students in the practical assessment the mean scores obtained by students in the first stage of the course was 26.4 points, while in the second stage the mean was 252.8 points, in the theoretical assessment the mean in the first stage was 3.06 points and in the second 9.0 points. The implementation of programs like this contribute to the effective acquisition of knowledge (theory) and skill (pratice) for the care of CPR victims.

  14. A model for emergency department end-of-life communications after acute devastating events--part II: moving from resuscitative to end-of-life or palliative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limehouse, Walter E; Feeser, V Ramana; Bookman, Kelly J; Derse, Arthur

    2012-11-01

    The model for emergency department (ED) end-of-life communications after acute devastating events addresses decision-making capacity, surrogates, and advance directives, including legal definitions and application of these steps. Part II concerns communications moving from resuscitative to palliative and end-of-life treatments. After completing the steps involved in determining decision-making, emergency physicians (EPs) should consider starting palliative measures versus continuing resuscitative treatment. As communications related to these end-of-life decisions increasingly fall within the scope of emergency medicine (EM) practice, we need to become educated about and comfortable with them. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  15. PRONTO training for obstetric and neonatal emergencies in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dilys M; Cohen, Susanna R; Estrada, Fatima; Monterroso, Marcia E; Jenny, Alisa; Fritz, Jimena; Fahey, Jenifer O

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the acceptability, feasibility, rating, and potential impact of PRONTO, a low-tech and high-fidelity simulation-based training for obstetric and neonatal emergencies and teamwork using the PartoPants low-cost birth simulator. A pilot project was conducted from September 21, 2009, to April 9, 2010, to train interprofessional teams from 5 community hospitals in the states of Mexico and Chiapas. Module I (teamwork, neonatal resuscitation, and obstetric hemorrhage) was followed 3 months later by module II (dystocia and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia) and an evaluation. Four elements were assessed: acceptability; feasibility and rating; institutional goal achievement; teamwork improvement; and knowledge and self-efficacy. The program was rated highly both by trainees and by non-trainees who completed a survey and interview. Hospital goals identified by participants in the module I strategic-planning sessions were achieved for 65% of goals in 3 months. Teamwork, knowledge, and self-efficacy scores improved. PRONTO brings simulation training to low-resource settings and can empower interprofessional teams to respond more effectively within their institutional limitations to emergencies involving women and newborns. Further study is warranted to evaluate the potential impact of the program on obstetric and neonatal outcome. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Labor stimulation with oxytocin: effects on obstetrical and neonatal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Hidalgo-Lopezosa

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to evaluate the effects of labor stimulation with oxytocin on maternal and neonatal outcomes. Method: descriptive and analytical study with 338 women who gave birth at a tertiary hospital. Obstetric and neonatal variables were measured and compared in women submitted and non-submitted to stimulation with oxytocin. Statistics were performed using Chi-square test, Fisher exact test, Student t-test; and crude Odds Ratio with 95% confidence interval were calculated. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: stimulation with oxytocin increases the rates of cesarean sections, epidural anesthesia and intrapartum maternal fever in primiparous and multiparous women. It has also been associated with low pH values of umbilical cord blood and with a shorter duration of the first stage of labor in primiparous women. However, it did not affect the rates of 3rd and 4th degree perineal lacerations, episiotomies, advanced neonatal resuscitation, 5-minute Apgar scores and meconium. Conclusion: stimulation with oxytocin should not be used systematically, but only in specific cases. These findings provide further evidence to health professionals and midwives on the use of oxytocin during labor. Under normal conditions, women should be informed of the possible effects of labor stimulation with oxytocin.

  17. Distance education in neonatal nursing scenarios: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Machado Freire

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Identify resources that support learning mediated by technology in the field of neonatal nursing. METHOD Systematic review with searches conducted in MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO. Titles and abstracts were independently evaluated by two experts. RESULTS Of the 2,051 references, 203 full-text articles were analyzed, resulting in the inclusion of nine studies on semiotics and semiology, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, general aspects of neonatal care, diagnostic reasoning and assessment of pain. Only two articles addressed the development of educational strategies and seven papers described the assessment of these strategies by experts and/or users. CONCLUSION Distance education is an important resource for education, and its improvement and updating, and it particularly adds advantages for neonatal nursing by approximating teaching and real-life situations and by minimizing the exposure of newborns for teaching purposes. The lack of educational initiatives mediated by technology suggests the need for the development, evaluation and dissemination of educational resources focused on nursing care of newborns and their families.

  18. [Distance education in neonatal nursing scenarios: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Laís Machado; Paula, Mariane Andreza de; Duarte, Elysangela Dittz; Bueno, Mariana

    2015-06-01

    Identify resources that support learning mediated by technology in the field of neonatal nursing. Systematic review with searches conducted in MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO. Titles and abstracts were independently evaluated by two experts. Of the 2,051 references, 203 full-text articles were analyzed, resulting in the inclusion of nine studies on semiotics and semiology, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, general aspects of neonatal care, diagnostic reasoning and assessment of pain. Only two articles addressed the development of educational strategies and seven papers described the assessment of these strategies by experts and/or users. Distance education is an important resource for education, and its improvement and updating, and it particularly adds advantages for neonatal nursing by approximating teaching and real-life situations and by minimizing the exposure of newborns for teaching purposes. The lack of educational initiatives mediated by technology suggests the need for the development, evaluation and dissemination of educational resources focused on nursing care of newborns and their families.

  19. Two denominators for one numerator: the example of neonatal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Quaker E; Basso, Olga; Weinberg, Clarice R; Wilcox, Allen J

    2018-06-01

    Preterm delivery is one of the strongest predictors of neonatal mortality. A given exposure may increase neonatal mortality directly, or indirectly by increasing the risk of preterm birth. Efforts to assess these direct and indirect effects are complicated by the fact that neonatal mortality arises from two distinct denominators (i.e. two risk sets). One risk set comprises fetuses, susceptible to intrauterine pathologies (such as malformations or infection), which can result in neonatal death. The other risk set comprises live births, who (unlike fetuses) are susceptible to problems of immaturity and complications of delivery. In practice, fetal and neonatal sources of neonatal mortality cannot be separated-not only because of incomplete information, but because risks from both sources can act on the same newborn. We use simulations to assess the repercussions of this structural problem. We first construct a scenario in which fetal and neonatal factors contribute separately to neonatal mortality. We introduce an exposure that increases risk of preterm birth (and thus neonatal mortality) without affecting the two baseline sets of neonatal mortality risk. We then calculate the apparent gestational-age-specific mortality for exposed and unexposed newborns, using as the denominator either fetuses or live births at a given gestational age. If conditioning on gestational age successfully blocked the mediating effect of preterm delivery, then exposure would have no effect on gestational-age-specific risk. Instead, we find apparent exposure effects with either denominator. Except for prediction, neither denominator provides a meaningful way to define gestational-age-specific neonatal mortality.

  20. Obstacles to bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, K; Taniguchi, T; Yoshida, M; Yamamoto, K

    2000-05-01

    bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is performed infrequently in Japan. We conducted this study to identify Japanese attitudes toward the performance of bystander CPR. participants were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with varying scenarios and CPR techniques (mouth-to-mouth ventilation plus chest compression (MMV plus CC) versus chest compression alone (CC)). a total of 1302/1355 individuals completed the questionnaire, including high school students, teachers, emergency medical technicians, medical nurses, and medical students. About 2% of high school students, 3% of teachers, 26% of emergency medical technicians, 3% of medical nurses and 16% of medical students claimed they would 'definitely' perform MMV plus CC on a stranger. However, 21-72% claimed they would prefer the alternative of performing CC alone. Respondents claimed their unwillingness to perform MMV is not due to the fear of contracting a communicable disease, but the lack of confidence in their ability to perform CPR properly. in all categories of respondents, willingness to perform MMV plus CC for a stranger was disappointingly low. Better training in MMV together with teaching awareness that CC alone can be given should be instituted to maximize the number of potential providers of CPR in the community, even in communities where the incidence of HIV is very low.

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: what cost to cheat death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Angus, D C; Abramson, N S

    1996-12-01

    To review the various outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the factors that influence these outcomes, the costs associated with CPR, and the application of cost-analyses to CPR. Data used to prepare this article were drawn from published articles and work in progress. Articles were selected for their relevance to the subjects of CPR and cost-analysis by MEDLINE keyword search. The authors extracted all applicable data from the English literature. Cost-analysis studies of CPR programs are limited by the high variation in resources consumed and attribution of cost to these resources. Furthermore, cost projections have not been adjusted to reflect patient-dependent variation in outcome. Variation in the patient's underlying condition, presenting cardiac rhythm, time to provision of definitive CPR, and effective perfusion all influence final outcome and, consequently, influence the cost-effectiveness of CPR programs. Based on cost data from previous studies, preliminary estimates of the cost-effectiveness of CPR programs for all 6-month survivors of a large international multicenter collaborative trial are $406,605.00 per life saved (range $344,314.00 to $966,759.00), and $225,892.00 per quality-adjusted-life-year (range $191,286.00 to $537,088.00). Reported outcome from CPR has varied from reasonable rates of good recovery, including return to full employment to 100% mortality. Appropriate CPR is encouraged, but continued widespread application appears extremely expensive.

  2. Follow-up into young adulthood after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in term and near-term newborn infants. II. Neuropsychological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggedal, G; Lundälv, E; Carlsson, G; Kjellmer, I

    2002-01-01

    Brain injury after neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the term baby is often described as an all-or-nothing phenomenon, but little is known about possible late cognitive consequences. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate whether children who needed cardiopulmonary resuscitation because of presumed mild and moderate intra-partum asphyxia with no evidence of neurological impairments at 18 mo of age may display neuropsychological impairments later in life. A long-term follow-up of young adults was carried out. A blinded comprehensive neuropsychological assessment of the main aspects of cognitive functions was made. The subjects who were resuscitated were divided into two groups according to the clinical course: 20 cases with mild asphyxia and 11 cases with moderate asphyxia, all followed prospectively and compared with 18 healthy controls. The 31 subjects were born at term or near-term and selected randomly from 59 infants born in 1969-1978 at Sahlgren's Hospital, Göteborg. All infants with early neurological impairments were excluded. No major differences could be established between the two clinical groups and normal controls in any aspects of cognitive function or intelligence. All the groups performed within the normal range in all tests. A tendency toward minor deficits in verbal ability in the mild group compared to the controls was found. Only one subject had a clear, defined memory deficit. Infants who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitatation at birth without neurological deficits at 18 mo of age did not show any cognitive deficits or neuropsychological impairments in adulthood even though inferior performance on some verbal subtests was observed compared to the control group.

  3. Evaluation of Neonates with Ventriculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferda Ozlu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud: Neonatal meningitis and ventriculitis still remain a problem with high mortality in spite of systemic and intraventricular antibiotics. Ventriculitis due to repeated taps is a serious problem of posthemorragic hydrocephalus in preterm infants. Methods: In this study, we evaluated 16 infants with ventriculitis followed at Cukurova University Faculty of Medicine Neonatal Intensive Care Unit between January 1999-December 2004. Results: Mean gestational week was 33± 5 (25-40 weeks and mean birth weight was 2096 ± 912 (980-3500 grams. Venticulitis was diagnosed at 38 ± 22 days. Eleven of the infants had intraventricular hemorrhage and 15 had hydrocephalus, 5 of whom had congenital hydrocephalus. Drainage of CSF was performed by taps in 13 infants. Gram negative microorganisms (Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were predominating in cultures. Both intravenous and intraventricular antibiotic treatment was performed according to the cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Vancomycine and amicasine as intraventricular therapy were performed for 28 ±17 days. Cerebrospinal fluid protein levels increased significantly at 8 infant during intraventricular therapy. Mean cerebrospinal fluid protein at the begining of intraventricular treatment was 624.1± 429.1 (109-1330 mg/dl while on 14th day of treatment it was 993.7± 582.2 (89-1750 mg/dl. Seven of the infants were ventriculoperitoneal shunted 6 of them were reinfected. Seven of the infants were died during treatment, 1 infant with ventriculoperitoneal shunt was treated and 8 infants were discharged during treatment because of parents’ refusal of therapy. Conclusion: Despite the new treatment regimens, the ventriculitis still remains a problem because of nonstandardized practice in neonatal care. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 553-558

  4. Association between public cardiopulmonary resuscitation education and the willingness to perform bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a metropolitan citywide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jeong Woo; Ryoo, Hyun Wook; Moon, Sungbae; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Ahn, Jae Yun; Park, Jeong Bae; Seo, Kang Suk; Kim, Jong Kun; Kim, Yun Jeong

    2017-06-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important factor associated with improved survival rates and neurologic prognoses in cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We assessed how factors related to CPR education including timing of education, period from the most recent education session, and content, affected CPR willingness. In February 2012, trained interviewers conducted an interview survey of 1,000 Daegu citizens through an organized questionnaire. The subjects were aged ≥19 years and were selected by quota sampling. Their social and demographic characteristics, as well as CPR and factors related to CPR education, were investigated. Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate how education-related factors affected the willingness to perform CPR. Of total 1,000 cases, 48.0% were male. The multivariate analyses revealed several factors significantly associated with CPR willingness: didactic plus practice group (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3 to 5.0), group with more than four CPR education session (AOR, 7.68; 95% CI, 3.21 to 18.35), interval of less than 6 months from the last CPR education (AOR, 4.47; 95% CI 1.29 to 15.52), and education with automated external defibrillator (AOR, 5.98; 95% CI 2.30 to 15.53). The following were associated with increased willingness to perform CPR: practice sessions and automated electrical defibrillator training in public CPR education, more frequent CPR training, and shorter time period from the most recent CPR education sessions.

  5. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using the cardio vent device in a resuscitation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suner, Selim; Jay, Gregory D; Kleinman, Gary J; Woolard, Robert H; Jagminas, Liudvikas; Becker, Bruce M

    2002-05-01

    To compare the "Bellows on Sternum Resuscitation" (BSR) device that permits simultaneous compression and ventilation by one rescuer with two person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation in a single blind crossover study performed in the laboratory setting. Tidal volume and compression depth were recorded continuously during 12-min CPR sessions with the BSR device and two person CPR. Six CPR instructors performed a total of 1,894 ventilations and 10,532 compressions in 3 separate 12-min sessions. Mean tidal volume (MTV) and compression rate (CR) with the BSR device differed significantly from CPR with the BVM group (1242 mL vs. 1065 mL, respectively, p = 0.0018 and 63.2 compressions per minute (cpm) vs. 81.3 cpm, respectively, p = 0.0076). Error in compression depth (ECD) rate of 9.78% was observed with the BSR device compared to 8.49% with BMV CPR (p = 0.1815). Error rate was significantly greater during the second half of CPR sessions for both BSR and BVM groups. It is concluded that one-person CPR with the BSR device is equivalent to two-person CPR with BVM in all measured parameters except for CR. Both groups exhibited greater error rate in CPR performance in the latter half of 12-min CPR sessions.

  6. Do-not-resuscitate order: The experiences of iranian cardiopulmonary resuscitation team members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghader Assarroudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One dilemma in the end-of-life care is making decisions for conducting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. This dilemma is perceived in different ways due to the influence of culture and religion. This study aimed to understand the experiences of CPR team members about the do-not-resuscitate order. Methods: CPR team members were interviewed, and data were analyzed using a conventional content analysis method. Results: Three categories and six subcategories emerged: “The dilemma between revival and suffering” with the subcategories of “revival likelihood” and “death as a cause for comfort;” “conflicting situation” with the subcategories of “latent decision” and “ambivalent order;” and “low-quality CPR” with the subcategories of “team member demotivation” and “disrupting CPR performance.” Conclusion: There is a need for the development of a contextual guideline, which is required for respecting the rights of patients and their families and providing legal support to health-care professionals during CPR.

  7. EMuRgency - New approaches for resuscitation support and training in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Skorning, Max; Haberstroh, Max; Gorgels, Ton; Klerkx, Joris; Vergnion, Michel; Van Poucke, Sven; Lenssen, Niklas; Biermann, Henning; Schuffelen, Petra; Pijls, Ruud; Ternier, Stefaan; De Vries, Fred; Van der Baaren, John; Parra, Gonzalo; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Kalz, M., Skorning, M., Haberstroh, M., Gorgels, T., Klerkx, J., Vergnion, M., ...Specht, M. (2012). EMuRgency – New approaches for resuscitation support and training in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine. Resuscitation, 83 (S1). e37.

  8. The effect of resuscitation strategy on the longitudinal immuno-inflammatory response to blunt trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Alexander; Nordestgaard, Ask Tybjærg; Kirial, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Resuscitation strategies following blunt trauma have been linked to immuno-inflammatory complications leading to systemic inflammatory syndrome (SIRS), sepsis and multiple organ failure (MOF). The effect of resuscitation strategy on longitudinal inflammation marker trajectories is...

  9. Closed-Loop Resuscitation of Hemorrhagic Shock: Novel Solutions Infused to Hypotensive and Normotensive Endpoints

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kramer, George C

    2007-01-01

    .... Our long-term goal is to develop efficient and efficacious resuscitation regimens for combat casualty care and to develop a microprocessor controlled closed-loop resuscitation system that will...

  10. Team-focused Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Prehospital Principles Adapted for Emergency Department Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Blake; Runyon, Michael; Weekes, Anthony; Pearson, David

    2018-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has high rates of morbidity and mortality, and a growing body of evidence is redefining our approach to the resuscitation of these high-risk patients. Team-focused cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TFCPR), most commonly deployed and described by prehospital care providers, is a focused approach to cardiac arrest care that emphasizes early defibrillation and high-quality, minimally interrupted chest compressions while de-emphasizing endotracheal intubation and intravenous drug administration. TFCPR is associated with statistically significant increases in survival to hospital admission, survival to hospital discharge, and survival with good neurologic outcome; however, the adoption of similar streamlined resuscitation approaches by emergency physicians has not been widely reported. In the absence of a deliberately streamlined approach, such as TFCPR, other advanced therapies and procedures that have not shown similar survival benefit may be prioritized at the expense of simpler evidence-based interventions. This review examines the current literature on cardiac arrest resuscitation. The recent prehospital success of TFCPR is highlighted, including the associated improvements in multiple patient-centered outcomes. The adaptability of TFCPR to the emergency department (ED) setting is also discussed in detail. Finally, we discuss advanced interventions frequently performed during ED cardiac arrest resuscitation that may interfere with early defibrillation and effective high-quality chest compressions. TFCPR has been associated with improved patient outcomes in the prehospital setting. The data are less compelling for other commonly used advanced resuscitation tools and procedures. Emergency physicians should consider incorporating the TFCPR approach into ED cardiac arrest resuscitation to optimize delivery of those interventions most associated with improved outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy of Feed Forward and Feedback Signaling for Inflations and Chest Compression Pressure During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Newborn Mannequin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriessen, Peter; Oetomo, Sidarto Bambang; Chen, Wei; Feijs, Loe MG

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to evaluate a device that supports professionals during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The device features a box that generates an audio-prompted rate guidance (feed forward) for inflations and compressions, and a transparent foil that is placed over the chest with marks for inter nipple line and sternum with LED’s incorporated in the foil indicating the exerted force (feedback). Methods Ten pairs (nurse/doctor) performed CPR on a newborn resuscitation mannequin. All pairs initially performed two sessions. Thereafter two sessions were performed in similar way, after randomization in 5 pairs that used the device and 5 pairs that performed CPR without the device (controls). A rhythm score was calculated based on the number of CPR cycles that were performed correctly. Results The rhythm score with the device improved from 85 ± 14 to 99 ± 2% (P CPR device compared to the controls. Conclusion Feed forward and feedback signaling leads to a more constant rhythm and chest compression pressure during CPR. PMID:22870175

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, John M.; McBride, Kieran D.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000

  13. Human factors in resuscitation: Lessons learned from simulator studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunziker S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical algorithms, technical skills, and repeated training are the classical cornerstones for successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Increasing evidence suggests that human factors, including team interaction, communication, and leadership, also influence the performance of CPR. Guidelines, however, do not yet include these human factors, partly because of the difficulties of their measurement in real-life cardiac arrest. Recently, clinical studies of cardiac arrest scenarios with high-fidelity video-assisted simulations have provided opportunities to better delineate the influence of human factors on resuscitation team performance. This review focuses on evidence from simulator studies that focus on human factors and their influence on the performance of resuscitation teams. Similar to studies in real patients, simulated cardiac arrest scenarios revealed many unnecessary interruptions of CPR as well as significant delays in defibrillation. These studies also showed that human factors play a major role in these shortcomings and that the medical performance depends on the quality of leadership and team-structuring. Moreover, simulated video-taped medical emergencies revealed that a substantial part of information transfer during communication is erroneous. Understanding the impact of human factors on the performance of a complex medical intervention like resuscitation requires detailed, second-by-second, analysis of factors involving the patient, resuscitative equipment such as the defibrillator, and all team members. Thus, high-fidelity simulator studies provide an important research method in this challenging field.

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, John M.; McBride, Kieran D

    2001-04-01

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000.

  15. Analysis of Medication Errors in Simulated Pediatric Resuscitation by Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Porter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of our study was to estimate the incidence of prescribing medication errors specifically made by a trainee and identify factors associated with these errors during the simulated resuscitation of a critically ill child. Methods: The results of the simulated resuscitation are described. We analyzed data from the simulated resuscitation for the occurrence of a prescribing medication error. We compared univariate analysis of each variable to medication error rate and performed a separate multiple logistic regression analysis on the significant univariate variables to assess the association between the selected variables. Results: We reviewed 49 simulated resuscitations . The final medication error rate for the simulation was 26.5% (95% CI 13.7% - 39.3%. On univariate analysis, statistically significant findings for decreased prescribing medication error rates included senior residents in charge, presence of a pharmacist, sleeping greater than 8 hours prior to the simulation, and a visual analog scale score showing more confidence in caring for critically ill children. Multiple logistic regression analysis using the above significant variables showed only the presence of a pharmacist to remain significantly associated with decreased medication error, odds ratio of 0.09 (95% CI 0.01 - 0.64. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the presence of a clinical pharmacist during the resuscitation of a critically ill child reduces the medication errors made by resident physician trainees.

  16. delta-Opioid-induced pharmacologic myocardial hibernation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiangshao; Tang, Wanchun; Sun, Shijie; Weil, Max Harry

    2006-12-01

    Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an event of global myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, which is associated with severe postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and fatal outcome. Evidence has demonstrated that mammalian hibernation is triggered by cyclic variation of a delta-opiate-like compound in endogenous serum, during which the myocardial metabolism is dramatically reduced and the myocardium tolerates the stress of ischemia and reperfusion without overt ischemic and reperfusion injury. Previous investigations also proved that the delta-opioid agonist elicited the cardioprotection in a model of regional ischemic intact heart or myocyte. Accordingly, we were prompted to search for an alternative intervention of pharmacologically induced myocardial hibernation that would result in rapid reductions of myocardial metabolism and therefore minimize the myocardial ischemic and reperfusion injury during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Prospective, controlled laboratory study. University-affiliated research laboratory. In the series of studies performed in the established rat and pig model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the delta-opioid receptor agonist, pentazocine, was administered during ventricular fibrillation. : The myocardial metabolism reflected by the concentration of lactate, or myocardial tissue PCO2 and PO2, is dramatically reduced during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. These are associated with less severe postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and longer duration of postresuscitation survival. delta-Opioid-induced pharmacologic myocardial hibernation is an option to minimize the myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  17. Clinical skills training in obstetrics - a descriptive survey of current practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathilde Maagaard; Johansen, Marianne; Lottrup, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    -based training was conducted in 26/28 obstetrical departments. Settings for the training programs were mainly local. Training was provided for shoulder dystocia, postpartum bleeding and basic neonatal resuscitation in almost all the departments, but was not organized in a uniform way. Neither the program itself...

  18. Transient neonatal diabetes or neonatal hyperglycaemia: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transient neonatal diabetes and neonatal hyperglycaemia both present in the neonatal period with features of hyperglycaemia, dehydration and weight loss. Differentiating these conditions clinically is difficult. We describe the case of a 13 day old female whom we managed recently who could have had either condition.

  19. New architectural design of delivery room reduces morbidity in preterm neonates: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrin, Gianluca; Conte, Francesca; Scipione, Antonella; Aleandri, Vincenzo; Di Chiara, Maria; Bacchio, Erica; Messina, Francesco; De Curtis, Mario

    2016-03-23

    A multidisciplinary committee composed of a panel of experts, including a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics and American Institute of Architects, has suggested that the delivery room (DR) and the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) room should be directly interconnected. We aimed to investigate the impact of the architectural design of the DR and the NICU on neonatal outcome. Two cohorts of preterm neonates born at architectural renovation of the DR realized in accordance with specific standards (Cohort 2: "new concept of DR"). In Cohort 1, neonates were initiall