WorldWideScience

Sample records for practical laboratory training

  1. Practical guidelines for setting up neurosurgery skills training cadaver laboratory in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Ashish; Roy, Tara Sankar; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Deo, Rama Chandra; Tripathi, Manjul; Dhingra, Renu; Bhardwaj, Daya Nand; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Though the necessity of cadaver dissection is felt by the medical fraternity, and described as early as 600 BC, in India, there are no practical guidelines available in the world literature for setting up a basic cadaver dissection laboratory for neurosurgery skills training. Hands-on dissection practice on microscopic and endoscopic procedures is essential in technologically demanding modern neurosurgery training where ethical issues, cost constraints, medico-legal pitfalls, and resident duty time restrictions have resulted in lesser opportunities to learn. Collaboration of anatomy, forensic medicine, and neurosurgery is essential for development of a workflow of cadaver procurement, preservation, storage, dissection, and disposal along with setting up the guidelines for ethical and legal concerns.

  2. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  3. [A Perspective on Innovation for Efficient Medical Practice in View of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Education and Training in Laboratory Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Tadashi

    2015-10-01

    Continuous advances in medical laboratory technology have driven major changes in the practice of laboratory medicine over the past two decades. The importance of the overall quality of a medical laboratory has been ever-increasing in order to improve and ensure the quality and safety of clinical practice by physicians in any type of medical facility. Laboratory physicians and professional staff should challenge themselves more than ever in various ways to cooperate and contribute with practicing physicians for the appropriate utilization of laboratory testing. This will certainly lead to a decrease in inappropriate or unnecessary laboratory testing, resulting in reducing medical costs. In addition, not only postgraduate, but also undergraduate medical education/training systems must be markedly innovated, considering recent rapid progress in electronic information and communication technologies.

  4. Applied Electronics and Optical Laboratory: an optimized practical course for comprehensive training on optics and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaiwei; Wang, Xiaoping

    2017-08-01

    In order to enhance the practical education and hands-on experience of optoelectronics and eliminate the overlapping contents that previously existed in the experiments section adhering to several different courses, a lab course of "Applied Optoelectronics Laboratory" has been established in the College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University. The course consists of two sections, i.e., basic experiments and project design. In section 1, basic experiments provide hands-on experience with most of the fundamental concept taught in the corresponding courses. These basic experiments including the study of common light sources such as He-Ne laser, semiconductor laser and solid laser and LED; the testing and analysis of optical detectors based on effects of photovoltaic effect, photoconduction effect, photo emissive effect and array detectors. In section 2, the course encourages students to build a team and establish a stand-alone optical system to realize specific function by taking advantage of the basic knowledge learned from section 1. Through these measures, students acquired both basic knowledge and the practical application skills. Moreover, interest in science has been developed among students.

  5. Educational and laboratory base for the expert training on physical protection of nuclear materials: the requirements and experience of practical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarev, P.V.; Pogozhin, N.S.; Ryzhukhin, D.V.; Tolstoy, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In expert training on physical protection of nuclear materials (NMPP) an educational and laboratory base has special importance. In these laboratories the students receive practical skills concerning physical protection systems (PPS). The basic requirements for creating such base are formulated in a certain educational program implemented at an educational institution. Thus it is necessary to take into account the following features of a modern nuclear object PPS: restriction of an object visiting with the purpose of acquaintance with features of a certain object PPS; dynamical change of PPS component nomenclature; increase of use of computer facilities for managing all PPS subsystems; increase of integration degree of separate subsystems in a uniform PPS complex; high cost of PPS components. Taking that into consideration a university, which assumes to begin the expert training on NMPP, is compelled to solve the following tasks: creation of its own laboratory base. The implementation of practical occupations with visiting a nuclear object cannot be executed practically; definition of quantity and structure of educational laboratories. Thus the features of the implemented educational plan should be taken into account in addition; optimization of expenses on laboratory creation. The regular updating of laboratory equipment structure is impossible in a practical manner. Therefore unique correct decision is to supply laboratories with the equipment, which uses the typical technological decisions on performing the basic PPS functions (detection, delay, estimation of a situation, neutralization); development of laboratory work conducting procedures (laboratory practical works); technical support of the created laboratories. The certain experience of solving the listed tasks is accumulated at the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University) (MEPhl) while implementing 'Physical Protection, Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials' master

  6. Policies and practices pertaining to the selection, qualification requirements, and training programs for nuclear-reactor operating personnel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culbert, W.H.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the policies and practices of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) regarding the selection of and training requirements for reactor operating personnel at the Laboratory's nuclear-reactor facilities. The training programs, both for initial certification and for requalification, are described and provide the guidelines for ensuring that ORNL's research reactors are operated in a safe and reliable manner by qualified personnel. This document gives an overview of the reactor facilities and addresses the various qualifications, training, testing, and requalification requirements stipulated in DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter VI (Safety of DOE-Owned Reactors); it is intended to be in compliance with this DOE Order, as applicable to ORNL facilities. Included also are examples of the documentation maintained amenable for audit.

  7. Policies and practices pertaining to the selection, qualification requirements, and training programs for nuclear-reactor operating personnel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbert, W.H.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the policies and practices of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) regarding the selection of and training requirements for reactor operating personnel at the Laboratory's nuclear-reactor facilities. The training programs, both for initial certification and for requalification, are described and provide the guidelines for ensuring that ORNL's research reactors are operated in a safe and reliable manner by qualified personnel. This document gives an overview of the reactor facilities and addresses the various qualifications, training, testing, and requalification requirements stipulated in DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter VI (Safety of DOE-Owned Reactors); it is intended to be in compliance with this DOE Order, as applicable to ORNL facilities. Included also are examples of the documentation maintained amenable for audit

  8. Sales Training: Effects of Spaced Practice on Training Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffeld, Simone; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The benefits of spaced training over massed training practice are well established in the laboratory setting. In a field study design with sales trainings, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of spaced compared with massed practice on transfer quantity and quality, sales competence, and key figures.…

  9. Improving communication skill training in patient centered medical practice for enhancing rational use of laboratory tests: The core of bioinformation for leveraging stakeholder engagement in regulatory science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Josemar de Almeida; Costa, Bruna Carvalho; de Faria, Rosa Malena Delbone; Soares, Taciana Figueiredo; Moura, Eliane Perlatto; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Requests for laboratory tests are among the most relevant additional tools used by physicians as part of patient's health problemsolving. However, the overestimation of complementary investigation may be linked to less reflective medical practice as a consequence of a poor physician-patient communication, and may impair patient-centered care. This scenario is likely to result from reduced consultation time, and a clinical model focused on the disease. We propose a new medical intervention program that specifically targets improving the patient-centered communication of laboratory tests results, the core of bioinformation in health care. Expectations are that medical students training in communication skills significantly improve physicians-patient relationship, reduce inappropriate use of laboratorial tests, and raise stakeholder engagement.

  10. A practical laboratory study simulating the percutaneous lumbar transforaminal epidural injection: training model in fresh cadaveric sheep spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslu, Husnu

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory training models are essential for developing and refining treatment skills before the clinical application of surgical and invasive procedures. A simple simulation model is needed for young trainees to learn how to handle instruments, and to perform safe lumbar transforaminal epidural injections. Our aim is to present a model of a fresh cadaveric sheep lumbar spine that simulates the lumbar transforaminal epidural injection. The material consists of a 2-year-old fresh cadaveric sheep spine. A 4-step approach was designed for lumbar transforaminal epidural injection under C-arm scopy. For the lumbar transforaminal epidural injection, the fluoroscope was adjusted to get a proper oblique view while the material was stabilized in a prone position. The procedure then begin, using the C-arm guidance scopy. The model simulates well the steps of standard lumbar transforaminal epidural injections in the human spine. The cadaveric sheep spine represents a good method for training and it simulates fluoroscopic lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injection procedures performed in the human spine.

  11. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    . Aims: The purpose of the project was • to develop practice oriented competences related to telemedicine in an inter-professional and a cross-sectoral context among health professional students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education. • to motivate...... and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology: The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated actively and the scenarios were filmed and enacted...

  12. Knowledge and practices of pharmaceutical laboratory workers on laboratory safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Emerce

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratories are classified as very hazardous workplaces. Objective: The aim of this descriptive study was to determine the knowledge and practice of laboratory safety by analysts and technicians in the laboratories of the Turkish Medicine and Medical Devices Agency. Methods:  85.0% (n=93 of the workers (n=109 was reached. A pre-tested, laboratory safety oriented, self-administered questionnaire was completed under observation. Results: Participants were mostly female (66,7%, had 12.8±8.2 years of laboratory experience and worked 24.6±10.3 hours per week. 53.8% of the employees generally worked with flammable and explosive substances, 29.0% with acute toxic or carcinogenic chemicals and 30.1% with physical dangers. Of all surveyed, 14.0% had never received formal training on laboratory safety. The proportion of ‘always use’ of laboratory coats, gloves, and goggles were 84.9%, 66.7%, and 6.5% respectively. 11.9% of the participants had at least one serious injury throughout their working lives and 24.7% had at least one small injury within the last 6 months. Among these injuries, incisions, bites and tears requiring no stiches (21.0% and the inhalation of chemical vapors (16.1% took first place. The mean value for the number of correct responses to questions on basic safety knowledge was 65.4±26.5, out of a possible 100. Conclusion: Overall, the participants have failed in some safety practices and have been eager to get regular education on laboratory safety.  From this point onwards, it would be appropriate for the employers to organize periodic trainings on laboratory safety.Keywords: Health personnel, laboratory personnel, occupational health, occupational safety, pharmacy

  13. Training practices of cell processing laboratory staff: analysis of a survey by the Alliance for Harmonization of Cellular Therapy Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keever-Taylor, Carolyn A; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Celluzzi, Christina; Loper, Kathy; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Schwartz, Joseph; Mcgrath, Eoin; Eldridge, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Methods for processing products used for hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation must ensure their safety and efficacy. Personnel training and ongoing competency assessment is critical to this goal. Here we present results from a global survey of methods used by a diverse array of cell processing facilities for the initial training and ongoing competency assessment of key personnel. The Alliance for Harmonisation of Cellular Therapy Accreditation (AHCTA) created a survey to identify facility type, location, activity, personnel, and methods used for training and competency. A survey link was disseminated through organizations represented in AHCTA to processing facilities worldwide. Responses were tabulated and analyzed as a percentage of total responses and as a percentage of response by region group. Most facilities were based at academic medical centers or hospitals. Facilities with a broad range of activity, product sources and processing procedures were represented. Facilities reported using a combination of training and competency methods. However, some methods predominated. Cellular sources for training differed for training versus competency and also differed based on frequency of procedures performed. Most facilities had responsibilities for procedures in addition to processing for which training and competency methods differed. Although regional variation was observed, training and competency requirements were generally consistent. Survey data showed the use of a variety of training and competency methods but some methods predominated, suggesting their utility. These results could help new and established facilities in making decisions for their own training and competency programs. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Training practices of cell processing laboratory staff : Analysis of a survey by the Alliance for Harmonization of Cellular Therapy Accreditation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keever-Taylor, Carolyn A.; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Celluzzi, Christina; Loper, Kathy; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Schwartz, Joseph; Mcgrath, Eoin; Eldridge, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background aims: Methods for processing products used for hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation must ensure their safety and efficacy. Personnel training and ongoing competency assessment is critical to this goal. Here we present results from a global survey of methods used by a

  15. 75 FR 80011 - Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    .... FDA-2010-N-0548] Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies AGENCY: Food and Drug... (FDA) is seeking comment on whether to amend the regulations governing good laboratory practices (GLPs..., 1978 (43 FR 60013). As stated in its scope (Sec. 58.1), this regulation prescribes good laboratory...

  16. Intercultural Training in Business Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Neznajová, Kateřina

    2012-01-01

    Master's thesis on Intercultural Training in Business Practice deals with the intercultural communication, opportunities for its improvement through intercultural training and actual practices in czech companies when using it. The theoretical part defines the concepts of culture, intercultural communication and intercultural training. The practical part includes research in firms in the czech market through a survey and case study in a chosen company. Based on the findings, the last part of t...

  17. Skills training in laboratory and clerkship: connections, similarities, and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Eika, MD, PhD

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: During the third semester of a 6 year long curriculum medical students train clinical skills in the skills laboratory (2 hours per week for 9 weeks as well as in an early, 8 week clinical clerkship at county hospitals. Objectives: to study students’ expectations and attitudes towards skills training in the skills laboratory and clerkship. Subjects: 126 medical students in their 3rd semester. Methods: During the fall of 2001 three consecutive, constructed questionnaires were distributed prior to laboratory training, following laboratory training but prior to clerkships, and following clerkships respectively. Results: Almost all (98% respondents found that training in skills laboratory improved the outcome of the early clerkship and 70% believed in transferability of skills from the laboratory setting to clerkship. Still, a majority (93% of students thought that the clerkship provided students with a better opportunity to learn clinical skills when compared to the skills laboratory. Skills training in laboratory as well as in clerkship motivated students for becoming doctors. Teachers in both settings were perceived as being committed to their teaching jobs, to demonstrate skills prior to practice, and to give students feed back with a small but significant more positive rating of the laboratory. Of the 22 skills that students had trained in the laboratory, a majority of students tried out skills associated with physical examination in the clerkship, whereas only a minority of students tried out more intimate skills. Female medical students tried significantly fewer skills during their clerkship compared to male students. Conclusions: Students believe that skills laboratory training prepare them for their subsequent early clerkship but favour the clerkship over the laboratory

  18. Quality in pathology laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S

    1995-06-01

    Quality refers not only to analytical quality control, a traditional area of laboratory excellence, but to the entire science of quality management. As measures of quality, structural indicators refer to staffing and physical facilities, process indicators to the institutions operations and, perhaps most importantly, outcome indicators address the ultimate patient care uses that pathology information is put to. Comparison of performance to peer laboratories, external quality control, is a practical, if limited, yardstick of performance. Customer satisfaction and turn-around-time of tests are receiving more recent attention as quality measures. Blood banking, because of its inherently complex cycle from donor phlebotomy to product infusion, requires special considerations with regard to quality management. Reporting of anatomical pathology, where the only gold standard is a consensus of experts, also does not lend itself to classical numerical quality assessment.

  19. Safeguards training at Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years considerable attention has been given to upgrading security education programs at facilities across the country. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), a Laboratory-wide Safeguard Awareness Training Program has been established in order to raise the cognizance of the entire staff with regard to safeguards issues and concerns. This aggressive safeguards program involves a strong interface of physical security measure and material control and accountability systems. Within PNL, four distinct audiences were defined and a needs assessment analysis performed for each to determine specific training requirements. The target audiences identified were: material balance area (MBA) custodians, managers of material balance areas, material handlers, and new employees. Five safeguards training courses were created to meet the needs of those audiences. This paper discusses the development of the Safeguards Awareness Program at PNL and its benefits to the Laboratory

  20. [Integrated skills laboratory concept for undergraduate training in internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, C; Schilling, T; Nawroth, P; Hensel, M; Ho, A D; Schwenger, V; Zeier, M; Herzog, W; Schellberg, D; Katus, H A; Dengler, T; Stremmel, W; Müller, M; Jünger, J

    2005-05-06

    An amendment to the German medical curriculum in April 2002 will place basic practical skills at the centre of medical training. We report here on the implementation and evaluation of an obligatory, tutor-guided, and integrated skills laboratory concept in the field of internal medicine. To test the effectiveness of a skills laboratory training on OSCE performance a pilot study was carried out. The experimental group, of 77 students, participated in seven sessions of communication training, skills laboratory training, and bedside teaching, each lasting one and a half hours. The control group of 66 students had as many sessions but was only offered bedside-teaching. The evaluation of acceptance of skills' training as well as the related increase in individual competence is on-going (summer term 2004: n = 176 students). The integrated skills laboratory concept was rated at 3.5 (SD = 1.2) on a 5-point scale and was acknowledged as practice-oriented (M = 4.2; SD = 1.0) and relevant for doctors' everyday lives (M = 3.6; SD = 1.1). Increased levels of competence according to individual self-evaluations proved to be highly significant (p<.001), and results of the pilot study showed that the experimental group had a significantly better OSCE performance than the control group (p<.001). This pilot study shows that curriculum changes promoting basic clinical skills are effective and lead to an improved practical education of tomorrow's physicians. The integrated skills laboratory concept is well accepted and leads to a relevant increase in competence in the practice of internal medical. The presented skills laboratory concept in internal medicine is proving to be a viable and efficient learning tool.

  1. Impact of laparoscopic surgery training laboratory on surgeon's performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Fabio C M; Barbosa, Joao Arthur B A; Marchini, Giovanni S

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been replacing the open standard technique in several procedures. Similar or even better postoperative outcomes have been described in laparoscopic or robot-assisted procedures when compared to open surgery. Moreover, minimally invasive surgery has been providing less postoperative pain, shorter hospitalization, and thus a faster return to daily activities. However, the learning curve required to obtain laparoscopic expertise has been a barrier in laparoscopic spreading. Laparoscopic surgery training laboratory has been developed to aid surgeons to overcome the challenging learning curve. It may include tutorials, inanimate model skills training (box models and virtual reality simulators), animal laboratory, and operating room observation. Several different laparoscopic courses are available with specific characteristics and goals. Herein, we aim to describe the activities performed in a dry and animal-model training laboratory and to evaluate the impact of different kinds of laparoscopic surgery training courses on surgeon’s performance. Several tasks are performed in dry and animal laboratory to reproduce a real surgery. A short period of training can improve laparoscopic surgical skills, although most of times it is not enough to confer laparoscopic expertise for participants. Nevertheless, this short period of training is able to increase the laparoscopic practice of surgeons in their communities. Full laparoscopic training in medical residence or fellowship programs is the best way of stimulating laparoscopic dissemination. PMID:27933135

  2. HUMAN RELATIONS LABORATORY TRAINING STUDENT NOTEBOOK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springport High School, MI.

    THE MAJOR OBJECTIVE OF THIS NOTEBOOK IS TO HELP THOSE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN TAKING PART IN THE SPRINGPORT HIGH SCHOOL HUMAN RELATIONS TRAINING LABORATORIES TO BETTER UNDERSTAND THEMSELVES, SOCIETY, AND HUMAN EMOTIONS SO THAT THEY MAY DEVELOP SOCIALLY AND EMOTIONALLY. THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THE NOTEBOOK IS DIVIDED INTO FOUR MAJOR AREAS--(1)…

  3. [Errors in laboratory daily practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrose, C; Le Carrer, D

    2007-01-01

    Legislation set by GBEA (Guide de bonne exécution des analyses) requires that, before performing analysis, the laboratory directors have to check both the nature of the samples and the patients identity. The data processing of requisition forms, which identifies key errors, was established in 2000 and in 2002 by the specialized biochemistry laboratory, also with the contribution of the reception centre for biological samples. The laboratories follow a strict criteria of defining acceptability as a starting point for the reception to then check requisition forms and biological samples. All errors are logged into the laboratory database and analysis report are sent to the care unit specifying the problems and the consequences they have on the analysis. The data is then assessed by the laboratory directors to produce monthly or annual statistical reports. This indicates the number of errors, which are then indexed to patient files to reveal the specific problem areas, therefore allowing the laboratory directors to teach the nurses and enable corrective action.

  4. Safeguards training at Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, D.A.

    1986-10-01

    Safeguarding our country's nuclear materials against theft or diversion is extremely important due to their significantly strategic value. In addition, nuclear materials also have an extremely high monetary value. The term ''safeguards'' is defined as an integrated system of physical protection, accountability, and material control measures designed to deter, prevent, detect, and respond to unauthorized possession and use of special nuclear materials. An aggressive Safeguards program, therefore, employs both good security measures and a strong material control and accountability system. For effective internal control of nuclear materials, having people qualified in the many aspects of safeguards and accountability is essential. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), this goal is accomplished through a Laboratory-wide Safeguards Awareness Program. All PNL staff members receive a level of Safeguards training appropriate to their particular function within the Laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the unique training opportunities this topic provides and how the training goals are accomplished through the various training courses given to the staff members

  5. Online general pre-laboratory training course for facilitating first year chemical laboratory use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Limniou

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In Chemistry, practical work is a highly demanding process in which students should be well-prepared before and alert during,laboratory sessions. Various general difficulties such as the limited laboratory time and the lack of connections between theoryand practicals often do not allow students to actively participate in the learning process. The aim of this investigation is to studyhow an online general pre-laboratory training course inspired by cognitive load theory influenced the teaching of first yearchemistry students engaged in laboratory work. Two different groups of chemistry students (experimental group (EG andcontrol group (CG from the University of Manchester participated in this investigation. The EG group participated in the onlinepre-laboratory course before entering the laboratory, while the CG group performed the experiments following the traditionalteaching procedure. The comparison of students’ responses to the same assessments of fundamental chemical and basiclaboratory knowledge showed that overall the performance of the EG group of students was higher than that of the CGstudents. Overall, the EG students valued the opportunity to have an online training course. By creating a flexible learningenvironment which included animations, simulations and self-assessments, the general laboratory difficulties were overcome.These interactive learning features gave students the opportunity to engage in independent study, by which restrictions of timeand place were overcome.

  6. Training at altitude in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, F W

    1992-10-01

    There can be little doubt that training at altitude is fundamental to preparing an athlete for competition at altitude. However the value of training at altitude for competition at sea level appears on the one hand to lack total acceptance amongst sports scientists; and on the other to hold some cloak of mystery for coaches who have yet to enjoy first hand experience. The fact is that very few endurance athletes will ignore the critical edge which altitude training affords. Each fraction of a percentage of performance advantage gained through methods which are within the rules of fair play in sport, may shift the balance between failure and achievement. Moreover, there is growing support for application of training at altitude for speed-related disciplines. This paper aims to demystify the subject by dealing with practical aspects of training at altitude. Such aspects include a checklist of what should and should not be done at altitude, when to use altitude relative to target competitions, and specific training examples.

  7. laboratory activities and students practical performance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unesco

    as necessary and important, very little justification was given for their .... Chemistry laboratory activities refer to the practical activities which students ..... equations, formulae, definitions, terminology, physical properties, hazards or disposal.

  8. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugaj, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills.In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II an outline of the underlying idea and (III an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training.

  9. Good Laboratory Practice. Part 3. Implementing Good Laboratory Practice in the Analytical Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlich, Richard C.; Pires, Amanda; Fazzino, Lisa; Fransen, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratories submitting experimental results to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in support of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) nonclinical laboratory studies must conduct such work in compliance with the GLP regulations. To consistently meet these requirements, lab managers employ a "divide…

  10. The Rwanda Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Rwanda Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (RFELTP) is a 2-year public health leadership development training program that provides applied epidemiology and public health laboratory training while the trainees provide public health service to the Ministry of Health. RFELTP is hosted at the National ...

  11. Continuous professional training of medical laboratory scientists in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Training and re-training of healthcare workers is pivotal to improved service delivery. Objective. To determine the proportion of practising medical laboratory scientists with in-service training in Benin City, Nigeria and areas covered by these programmes. Methods. Medical laboratory scientists from Benin City ...

  12. MODALITIES OF TRAINING PARAMETER ALTERNATION IN NOWADAYS STRENGTH TRAINING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANISAVLJEV IGOR

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Large number of variables could be alternated during the process of planning and programming in sports training. Superior training results in majority of sports are achieved by optimally manipulating training parameters in appropriate sequences and combinations. Additionally, in some sports they might be the result of appropriate periodization pattern. Today's tendency in strength training practice is training movements instead of training muscles. Exercise classification according to the dominant movement types, allows creating new modalities in training alternation. Additional variations in volume, intensity, rest brakes, repetition velocity andinter-repetition rest can be the important part of functional strength training program. Alternation and combination of different training parameters makes appropriate training stimulus for strength increase in the most of nowadays sports. Optimal alternation of basic training parameters should be the first part in the processof planning and programming. As a result, majority of athletes might not need advanced periodization patterns for optimal improvement in muscle strength and power

  13. Clinical Practice in Teacher Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayet Tok

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it seems that there has been a concept change in the aspect of teaching practice course which is regarded as one of the most significant course in teacher education program. This new concept requires the increase period of teaching practice in teacher education program and parallel to this, it also requires the change in the function of practice schools and highlighted “clinical practice in teacher education” concept. In this study, “clinical practice in teacher education” concept and its implementation processes were explained. Furthermore, clinical practice and traditional school practices were presented and the parallels between teaching and clinical practices were explained as well

  14. Resistance Training: Identifying Best Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    were too small to be important. That argument would be particularly powerful when coupled with the knowledge that training effects increase with...interpretation of those facts convert the evidence to reliable scientific knowledge (Ziman, 1978). No single meta-analysis is likely to establish a...Wisloff, U. (1999). Maximal strength training improves work economy in trained female cross-country skiers . Med Sci Sports Exerc, 31, 870- 877

  15. Radiological contamination control training for laboratory research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. The guide is to assist those individuals, both within the Department of Energy (DOE) and Managing and Operating (M and O) contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual. The management guide is divided into the following sections: introduction; instructional materials development; training program standards and policies; and course-specific information. The goal of the core training program is to provide a standardized, baseline knowledge for those individuals completing the core training. Standardization of the knowledge provides personnel with the information necessary to perform their assigned duties at a predetermined level of expertise. Implementing a core training program ensures consistent and appropriate training of personnel

  16. Framework for leadership and training of Biosafety Level 4 laboratory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, James W; Anderson, Kevin; Bloom, Marshall E; Estep, James E; Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Joan B; Geisbert, Thomas W; Hensley, Lisa; Holbrook, Michael; Jahrling, Peter B; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Korch, George; Patterson, Jean; Skvorak, John P; Weingartl, Hana

    2008-11-01

    Construction of several new Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) laboratories and expansion of existing operations have created an increased international demand for well-trained staff and facility leaders. Directors of most North American BSL-4 laboratories met and agreed upon a framework for leadership and training of biocontainment research and operations staff. They agreed on essential preparation and training that includes theoretical consideration of biocontainment principles, practical hands-on training, and mentored on-the-job experiences relevant to positional responsibilities as essential preparation before a person's independent access to a BSL-4 facility. They also agreed that the BSL-4 laboratory director is the key person most responsible for ensuring that staff members are appropriately prepared for BSL-4 operations. Although standardized certification of training does not formally exist, the directors agreed that facility-specific, time-limited documentation to recognize specific skills and experiences of trained persons is needed.

  17. Firm Size, Ownership, Training Duration and Training Evaluation Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadullah, Muhammad Ali; Peretti, Jean Marie; Ali, Arain Ghulam; Bourgain, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to test the mediating role of training duration in relationship between firm characteristics and training evaluation practices. In this paper, the authors also investigated if this mediating effect differs with respect to the size of the firm. Design/methodology/approach: The authors collected data from 260…

  18. Training Research: Practical Recommendations for Maximum Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Koerner, Kelly; Weingardt, Kenneth R.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This review offers practical recommendations regarding research on training in evidence-based practices for mental health and substance abuse treatment. When designing training research, we recommend: (a) aligning with the larger dissemination and implementation literature to consider contextual variables and clearly defining terminology, (b) critically examining the implicit assumptions underlying the stage model of psychotherapy development, (c) incorporating research methods from other disciplines that embrace the principles of formative evaluation and iterative review, and (d) thinking about how technology can be used to take training to scale throughout all stages of a training research project. An example demonstrates the implementation of these recommendations. PMID:21380792

  19. Knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of 'teaching laboratory' technicians towards laboratory safety and waste management: a pilot interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gilany, A-H; El-Shaer, S; Khashaba, E; El-Dakroory, S A; Omar, N

    2017-06-01

    A quasi-experimental study was performed on 20 technicians working in the Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Egypt. The knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of laboratory technicians was measured before and two months after enrolling them in an intervention programme about laboratory best practice procedures. The programme addressed laboratory safety and medical waste management. The assessment was performed using a validated Arabic self-administered questionnaire. Pre- and post-intervention scores were compared using non-parametric tests. There are significant increases in the scores of KAP after implementation of the training programme. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 38 CFR 21.4265 - Practical training approved as institutional training or on-job training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... approved as institutional training or on-job training. 21.4265 Section 21.4265 Pensions, Bonuses, and... training or on-job training. (a) Medical-dental internships and residencies. (1) Medical residencies (other...) of this section. If the course is not so accredited such practical or on-the-job training or...

  1. Promoting Good Clinical Laboratory Practices and Laboratory Accreditation to Support Clinical Trials in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shott, Joseph P.; Saye, Renion; Diakité, Moussa L.; Sanogo, Sintry; Dembele, Moussa B.; Keita, Sekouba; Nagel, Mary C.; Ellis, Ruth D.; Aebig, Joan A.; Diallo, Dapa A.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory capacity in the developing world frequently lacks quality management systems (QMS) such as good clinical laboratory practices, proper safety precautions, and adequate facilities; impacting the ability to conduct biomedical research where it is needed most. As the regulatory climate changes globally, higher quality laboratory support is needed to protect study volunteers and to accurately assess biological parameters. The University of Bamako and its partners have undertaken a comprehensive QMS plan to improve quality and productivity using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute standards and guidelines. The clinical laboratory passed the College of American Pathologists inspection in April 2010, and received full accreditation in June 2010. Our efforts to implement high-quality standards have been valuable for evaluating safety and immunogenicity of malaria vaccine candidates in Mali. Other disease-specific research groups in resource-limited settings may benefit by incorporating similar training initiatives, QMS methods, and continual improvement practices to ensure best practices. PMID:22492138

  2. Current safety practices in nano-research laboratories in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guoyu

    2014-06-01

    China has become a key player in the global nanotechnology field, however, no surveys have specifically examined safety practices in the Chinese nano-laboratories in depth. This study reports results of a survey of 300 professionals who work in research laboratories that handle nanomaterials in China. We recruited participants at three major nano-research laboratories (which carry out research in diverse fields such as chemistry, material science, and biology) and the nano-chemistry session of the national meeting of the Chinese Chemical Society. Results show that almost all nano-research laboratories surveyed had general safety regulations, whereas less than one third of respondents reported having nanospecific safety rules. General safety measures were in place in most surveyed nano-research laboratories, while nanospecific protective measures existed or were implemented less frequently. Several factors reported from the scientific literature including nanotoxicology knowledge gaps, technical limitations on estimating nano-exposure, and the lack of nano-occupational safety legislation may contribute to the current state of affairs. With these factors in mind and embracing the precautionary principle, we suggest strengthening or providing nanosafety training (including raising risk awareness) and establishing nanosafety guidelines in China, to better protect personnel in the nano-workplace.

  3. Rules for the certification of good practices in clinical laboratories. No regulation. 3-2009. Good Laboratory Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Regulation for Certification of Good Practices in clinical laboratories, hereinafter Regulation establishes the methodology and procedures for clinical laboratories to demonstrate their state of compliance with good practices, according to Regulation 3-2009, and that the CECMED can verify.

  4. A snapshot of training practices in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVIA HERNÁNDEZ POZAS; KETY LOURDES JAUREGUI

    2012-01-01

    Organizations need well trained employees in order to maintain a competitive advantage. The purpose of this paper is to describe current training practices in Peru and to provide recommendations for improving organizational performance. This paper also aims to set priorities for future research work. Human capital theory and contributions on need assessment, and training planning, implementation and evaluation served as theoretical framework. This is a cross-sectional, exploratory study that ...

  5. New Management Practices and Enterprise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Oczkowski, Eddie; Noble, Charles; Macklin, Robert

    The changing nature of the demand for training in Australian enterprises adopting new management practices and the implications of those changes for training providers were examined. More than 3,400 private sector enterprises were surveyed by mail, after which follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with 80 human resource practitioners from…

  6. Establishing a temporal bone laboratory: considerations for ENT specialist training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fennessy, B G

    2012-02-01

    Cadaveric temporal bone dissection in a temporal bone laboratory is a vital component in training safe, competent otorhinolaryngologists. Recent controversies pertaining to organ retention have resulted in a more limited supply of temporal bones. Consequently, current trainees are dissecting far fewer bones than their consultants. We discuss the establishment of a temporal bone laboratory in the Department of Anatomy in the University College Cork, from the timely preparation and preservation of the tissue to its disposal. Comparisons are drawn between our experience and that of the United States training schemes. The temporal bone laboratory in Cork is the only one in existence in Ireland. The exposure and experience obtained by registrars rotating through Cork, has resulted in noticeable improvements in their operative abilities. The temporal bone laboratory remains a core component to training. It is hoped that this article may facilitate other units overcoming obstacles to establish a temporal bone laboratory.

  7. Role of Skill Laboratory Training in Medical Education - Students Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, R.; Qamar, K.; Rehman, S.; Khan, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the perceptions of medical students regarding their training utilizing facilities provided in the skill laboratory of a public sector medical college. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from October to December 2014. Methodology: Students of final year MBBS who had underwent skill laboratory training were recruited through convenience purposive sampling. Students not exposed to skill laboratory training were excluded. Data collection tool was a questionnaire having 23 questions with responses on Likert Scale as strongly disagree, disagree, agree and strongly agree coded as 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Data was analysed on SPSS version 22. Results: There were 78 (57 percent) male and 59 (43 percent) female students out of 137, with mean age of 22.59 ± 0.74 years. The response rate was 68.5 percent. Cronbach's Alpha test was 0.84 showing high reliability. The mean of sum of all the 23 items was 63.85 ± 8.71, whereas item means was 2.78 ± 0.38, reflecting a high inclination of students towards skill laboratory training. Frequency of students responding in favour of skill laboratory training was significantly high (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Medical students perceived skill laboratory training as a favoured learning strategy as compared to practising on real patients for acquisition of various aspects of clinical skills, knowledge and attitude. (author)

  8. Hierarchy curriculum for practical skills training in optics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, XiaoDong; Wang, XiaoPing; Liu, Xu; Liu, XiangDong; Lin, YuanFang

    2017-08-01

    The employers in optical engineering fields hope to recruit students who are capable of applying optical principles to solve engineering problems and have strong laboratory skills. In Zhejiang University, a hierarchy curriculum for practical skill training has been constructed to satisfy this demand. This curriculum includes "Introductive practicum" for freshmen, "Opto-mechanical systems design", "Engineering training", "Electronic system design", "Student research training program (SRTP)", "National University Students' Optical-Science-Technology Competition game", and "Offcampus externship". Without cutting optical theory credit hours, this hierarchy curriculum provides a step-by-step solution to enhance students' practical skills. By following such a hierarchy curriculum, students can smoothly advance from a novice to a qualified professional expert in optics. They will be able to utilize optical engineering tools to design, build, analyze, improve, and test systems, and will be able to work effectively in teams to solve problems in engineering and design.

  9. A snapshot of training practices in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Hernández Pozas, Ph.D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizations need well trained employees in order to maintain a competitive advantage. The purpose of this paper is to describe current training practices in Peru and to provide recommendations for improving organizational performance. This paper also aims to set priorities for future research work. Human capital theory and contributions on need assessment, and training planning, implementation and evaluation served as theoretical framework. This is a cross-sectional, exploratory study that used information from surveys conducted in 24 Peru-vian companies. The findings reveal a strong interest in training, particularly with regard to the improvement of competencies, preference for face-to-face training, and the use of reaction evaluation methods. The recommendations include, among others, improving the provisions for internal support, policies, technology, behavioral evaluation, and resources.

  10. Clinical neuropsychology practice and training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Laura A; Guger, Sharon

    2016-11-01

    This invited paper provides information about professional neuropsychology issues in Canada and is part of a special issue addressing international perspectives on education, training, and practice in clinical neuropsychology. Information was gathered from literature searches and personal communication with other neuropsychologists in Canada. Canada has a rich neuropsychological history. Neuropsychologists typically have doctoral-level education including relevant coursework and supervised practical experience. Licensure requirements vary across the 10 provinces and there are regional differences in salary. While training at the graduate and internship level mirrors that of our American colleagues, completion of a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in neuropsychology is not required to obtain employment in many settings and there are few postdoctoral training programs in this country. The majority of neuropsychologists are employed in institutional settings (e.g. hospitals, universities, rehabilitation facilities), with a growing number entering private practice or other settings. There are challenges in providing neuropsychological services to the diverse Canadian population and a need for assessment measures and normative data in multiple languages. Canadian neuropsychologists face important challenges in defining ourselves as distinct from other professions and other psychologists, in maintaining funding for high-quality training and research, in establishing neuropsychology-specific training and practice standards at the provincial or national level, and ensuring the clinical care that we provide is efficient and effective in meeting the needs of our patient populations and consumers, both within and outside of the publically funded health care system.

  11. Evaluation of the status of laboratory practices and the need for continuing education in medical mycology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Eunice R; Reiss, Errol; Warren, Nancy G; Shadomy, H Jean; Lipman, Harvey B

    2002-08-01

    A survey to determine the need for training in medical mycology was sent to 605 US laboratories. Training needs were determined by comparing actual laboratory mycology practices with recommended practices, documenting the extent of mycology training reported by employees, and asking respondents to specify the fungi they considered most difficult to identify. The response rate was 56.7% (with only 316 laboratories providing sufficient information). Results showed a large degree of interlaboratory variation in practices and suggested that more judicious practices could lower costs and improve clinical relevance. Only 55.6% of laboratories reported that at least 1 employee attended a formal mycology continuing education program in the 4 years before the survey. Species of dermatophytes, dematiaceous fungi, and non-Candida yeasts were the most difficult to identify. Training may be needed in basic isolation procedures and in advanced topics such as identification of problematic molds and yeasts and antifungal susceptibility testing. Educators should consider clinical relevance and cost-containment without sacrificing quality when designing courses. Support for additional mycology training may improve if hospital and laboratory administrators are alerted to potential dangers and costs involved in treating patients with invasive fungal infections.

  12. Introducing Clicker Training as a Cognitive Enrichment for Laboratory Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidinger, Charlotte; Herrmann, Felix; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Baumgart, Nadine; Baumgart, Jan

    2017-03-06

    Establishing new refinement strategies in laboratory animal science is a central goal in fulfilling the requirements of Directive 2010/63/EU. Previous research determined a profound impact of gentle handling protocols on the well-being of laboratory mice. By introducing clicker training to the keeping of mice, not only do we promote the amicable treatment of mice, but we also enable them to experience cognitive enrichment. Clicker training is a form of positive reinforcement training using a conditioned secondary reinforcer, the "click" sound of a clicker, which serves as a time bridge between the strengthened behavior and an upcoming reward. The effective implementation of the clicker training protocol with a cohort of 12 BALB/c inbred mice of each sex proved to be uncomplicated. The mice learned rather quickly when challenged with tasks of the clicker training protocol, and almost all trained mice overcame the challenges they were given (100% of female mice and 83% of male mice). This study has identified that clicker training for mice strongly correlates with reduced fear in the mice during human-mice interactions, as shown by reduced anxiety-related behaviors (e.g., defecation, vocalization, and urination) and fewer depression-like behaviors (e.g., floating). By developing a reliable protocol that can be easily integrated into the daily routine of the keeping of laboratory mice, the lifetime experience of welfare in the mice can be improved substantially.

  13. Safety and health practice among laboratory staff in Malaysian education sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husna Che Hassan, Nurul; Rasdan Ismail, Ahmad; Kamilah Makhtar, Nor; Azwadi Sulaiman, Muhammad; Syuhadah Subki, Noor; Adilah Hamzah, Noor

    2017-10-01

    Safety is the most important issue in industrial sector such as construction and manufacturing. Recently, the increasing number of accident cases reported involving school environment shows the important of safety issues in education sector. Safety awareness among staff in this sector is crucial in order to find out the method to prevent the accident occurred in future. This study was conducted to analyze the knowledge of laboratory staff in term of safety and health practice in laboratory. Survey questionnaires were distributing among 255 of staff laboratory from ten District Education Offices in Kelantan. Descriptive analysis shows that the understanding of safety and health practice are low while doing some job activities in laboratory. Furthermore, some of the staff also did not implemented safety practice that may contribute to unplanned event occur in laboratory. Suggestion that the staff at laboratory need to undergo on Occupational Safety and Health training to maintain and create safe environment in workplaces.

  14. 30 years practical training in applied radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, H.; Bergmann, K.

    1986-01-01

    The education of radiophysicists and radiochemists was one of the prerequisites for the foundation of institutes and laboratories in the field of nuclear and isotope research in the GDR. Therefore, the first practical course on applied radioactivity was started at the Leipzig Institute of Aplied Radioactivity in 1956. At present more than 150 experiments are included in various practical courses which are intended for the postgraduate qualification of chemists and physicists of research and industry and graduate students of colleges and universities

  15. Virtual reality disaster training: translation to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, Sharon L; Miller, Elaine T; Hodgson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Disaster training is crucial to the mitigation of both mortality and morbidity associated with disasters. Just as clinical practice needs to be grounded in evidence, effective disaster education is dependent upon the development and use of andragogic and pedagogic evidence. Educational research findings must be transformed into useable education strategies. Virtual reality simulation is a teaching methodology that has the potential to be a powerful educational tool. The purpose of this article is to translate research findings related to the use of virtual reality simulation in disaster training into education practice. The Ace Star Model serves as a valuable framework to translate the VRS teaching methodology and improve disaster training of healthcare professionals. Using the Ace Star Model as a framework to put evidence into practice, strategies for implementing a virtual reality simulation are addressed. Practice guidelines, implementation recommendations, integration to practice and evaluation are discussed. It is imperative that health educators provide more exemplars of how research evidence can be moved through the various stages of the model to advance practice and sustain learning outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Medical physics practice and training in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuasi, John H; Kyere, Augustine K; Schandorf, Cyril; Fletcher, John J; Boadu, Mary; Addison, Eric K; Hasford, Francis; Sosu, Edem K; Sackey, Theophilus A; Tagoe, Samuel N A; Inkoom, Stephen; Serfor-Armah, Yaw

    2016-06-01

    Medical physics has been an indispensable and strategic stakeholder in the delivery of radiological services to the healthcare system of Ghana. The practice has immensely supported radiation oncology and medical imaging facilities over the years, while the locally established training programme continues to produce human resource to feed these facilities. The training programme has grown to receive students from other African countries in addition to local students. Ghana has been recognised by the International Atomic Energy Agency as Regional Designated Centre for Academic Training of Medical Physicists in Africa. The Ghana Society for Medical Physics collaborates with the School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences of the University of Ghana to ensure that training offered to medical physicists meet international standards, making them clinically qualified. The Society has also worked together with other bodies for the passage of the Health Profession's Regulatory Bodies Act, giving legal backing to the practice of medical physics and other allied health professions in Ghana. The country has participated in a number of International Atomic Energy Agency's projects on medical physics and has benefited from its training courses, fellowships and workshops, as well as those of other agencies such as International Organization for Medical Physics. This has placed Ghana's medical physicists in good position to practice competently and improve healthcare. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An Affordable Microsurgical Training System for a Beginning Neurosurgeon: How to Realize the Self-Training Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang-Bong; Ryu, Jiwook; Chung, Yeongu; Lee, Sung Ho; Choi, Seok Keun

    2017-09-01

    To provide detailed information about how to realize a self-training laboratory with cost-effective microsurgical instruments, especially pertinent for the novice trainee. Our training model is designed to allow the practice of the microsurgery skills in an efficient and cost-effective manner. A used stereoscopic microscope is prepared for microsurgical training. A sufficient working distance for microsurgical practice is obtained by attaching an auxiliary objective lens. The minimum instrument list includes 2 jeweler's forceps, iris scissors, and alligator clips. The iris scissors and alligator clip provide good alternatives to micro-scissors and microvascular clamp. The short time needed to set up the microscope and suture the gauze with micro-forceps makes the training model suitable for daily practice. It takes about 15 minutes to suture 10 neighboring fibers of the gauze with 10-0 nylon; thus, training can be completed more quickly. We have developed an inexpensive and efficient micro-anastomosis training system using a stereoscopic microscope and minimal micro-instruments. Especially useful for novice trainees, this system provides high accessibility for microsurgical training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Disturbing Practices: Training Workers to Be Lean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Keiko; Brown, Tony; Black, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibilities for expansive learning during organisational change. It considers the introduction of "lean production" as a disturbance to the existing work practices. Design/methodology/approach: The paper considers two case studies of "lean production" training with…

  19. Otolaryngology Training for Family Practice Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Rood, Stewart R.

    1980-01-01

    The faculty of the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, has designed a rotation in the otolaryngology service, that is a basic clinical orientation to ear, nose and throat medicine, to fit the one-month block committed by the local family practice residency training program. The program is described and its…

  20. Vascular training and endovascular practice in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, C.D.; Avgerinos, E.D.; Sillesen, H.

    2009-01-01

    specialties was distributed to a VS educator within 14 European countries. European Vascular and Endovascular Monitor (EVEM) data also were processed to correlate endovascular practice with training models. RESULTS: Fourteen questionnaires were gathered. Vascular training in Europe appears in 3 models: 1....... Mono-specialty (independence): 7 countries, 2. Subspecialty: 5 countries, 3. An existing specialty within general surgery: 2 countries. Independent compared to non-independent certification shortens overall training length (5.9 vs 7.9 years, p=0.006), while increasing overall training devoted......% respectively. Countries with independent vascular certification, despite their lower average endovascular index (procedures per 100,000 population), reported a higher growth rate of aortic endovascular procedures (VS independent 132% vs VS non-independent 87%), within a four-year period (2003-2007). Peripheral...

  1. Toilet training practices in Nigerian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A U Solarin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study reports on toilet training with a focus on the effect of age, methods used, and factors that can affect urinary incontinence in Nigerian children. Methods. This was a cross-sectional hospital-based study carried out in public and private hospitals in South-Western Nigeria. A questionnaire was used to obtain information about toilet training practices from 350 adults, who toilet trained 474 children. Results. The adults had previously toilet trained children 1 - 18 years old. In this study, toilet training commenced at ≤12 months, during the day and night in 40.6% and 33.4% of children, respectively. Of the 350 parents/guardians, 141 (47.7% commenced toilet training by waking children from their afternoon nap. The most common method was allowing the child to urinate at fixed time intervals, while the least common was a reward/punishment system. Furthermore, age was considered as the most common indicator to commence toilet training. For 36.9% of the children, training lasted 1 - 6 months. Daytime continence was achieved by 33.4% of children at ≤12 months old, and night-time continence was achieved in 29.7% of children between 12 and 18 months old. By 30 months, 91.1% and 86.9% had attained day- and night-time continence, respectively, and only 8.6% of the children were incontinent at night. Conclusion. Assisted infant toilet training is still practised among Nigerian parents despite the influence and the trends in the developed countries. The age at initiation and completion of toilet training was lower than those reported for developed countries.

  2. Good Laboratory Practice. Part 2. Recording and Retaining Raw Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlich, Richard C.; Libera, Agata E.; Pires, Amanda; Tellarini, Cassandra

    2013-01-01

    A clear understanding of how "raw data" is defined, recorded, and retained in the laboratory record is essential to the chemist employed in the laboratory compliant with the Good Laboratory Practices regulations. This article is intended to provide an understanding by drawing upon examples taken from the modern pharmaceutical analysis…

  3. Genomics Virtual Laboratory: A Practical Bioinformatics Workbench for the Cloud.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enis Afgan

    Full Text Available Analyzing high throughput genomics data is a complex and compute intensive task, generally requiring numerous software tools and large reference data sets, tied together in successive stages of data transformation and visualisation. A computational platform enabling best practice genomics analysis ideally meets a number of requirements, including: a wide range of analysis and visualisation tools, closely linked to large user and reference data sets; workflow platform(s enabling accessible, reproducible, portable analyses, through a flexible set of interfaces; highly available, scalable computational resources; and flexibility and versatility in the use of these resources to meet demands and expertise of a variety of users. Access to an appropriate computational platform can be a significant barrier to researchers, as establishing such a platform requires a large upfront investment in hardware, experience, and expertise.We designed and implemented the Genomics Virtual Laboratory (GVL as a middleware layer of machine images, cloud management tools, and online services that enable researchers to build arbitrarily sized compute clusters on demand, pre-populated with fully configured bioinformatics tools, reference datasets and workflow and visualisation options. The platform is flexible in that users can conduct analyses through web-based (Galaxy, RStudio, IPython Notebook or command-line interfaces, and add/remove compute nodes and data resources as required. Best-practice tutorials and protocols provide a path from introductory training to practice. The GVL is available on the OpenStack-based Australian Research Cloud (http://nectar.org.au and the Amazon Web Services cloud. The principles, implementation and build process are designed to be cloud-agnostic.This paper provides a blueprint for the design and implementation of a cloud-based Genomics Virtual Laboratory. We discuss scope, design considerations and technical and logistical constraints

  4. Genomics Virtual Laboratory: A Practical Bioinformatics Workbench for the Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afgan, Enis; Sloggett, Clare; Goonasekera, Nuwan; Makunin, Igor; Benson, Derek; Crowe, Mark; Gladman, Simon; Kowsar, Yousef; Pheasant, Michael; Horst, Ron; Lonie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing high throughput genomics data is a complex and compute intensive task, generally requiring numerous software tools and large reference data sets, tied together in successive stages of data transformation and visualisation. A computational platform enabling best practice genomics analysis ideally meets a number of requirements, including: a wide range of analysis and visualisation tools, closely linked to large user and reference data sets; workflow platform(s) enabling accessible, reproducible, portable analyses, through a flexible set of interfaces; highly available, scalable computational resources; and flexibility and versatility in the use of these resources to meet demands and expertise of a variety of users. Access to an appropriate computational platform can be a significant barrier to researchers, as establishing such a platform requires a large upfront investment in hardware, experience, and expertise. We designed and implemented the Genomics Virtual Laboratory (GVL) as a middleware layer of machine images, cloud management tools, and online services that enable researchers to build arbitrarily sized compute clusters on demand, pre-populated with fully configured bioinformatics tools, reference datasets and workflow and visualisation options. The platform is flexible in that users can conduct analyses through web-based (Galaxy, RStudio, IPython Notebook) or command-line interfaces, and add/remove compute nodes and data resources as required. Best-practice tutorials and protocols provide a path from introductory training to practice. The GVL is available on the OpenStack-based Australian Research Cloud (http://nectar.org.au) and the Amazon Web Services cloud. The principles, implementation and build process are designed to be cloud-agnostic. This paper provides a blueprint for the design and implementation of a cloud-based Genomics Virtual Laboratory. We discuss scope, design considerations and technical and logistical constraints, and explore the

  5. Integrating environment, safety and health training at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    In a multi-purpose research laboratory, innovation and creativity are required to satisfy the training requirements for hazards to people and the environment. A climate that encourages excellence in research and enhances hazard minimization skills is created by combining technical expertise with instructional design talent

  6. The West Africa Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The West Africa Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, a strategy to improve disease surveillance and epidemic control in West Africa. ... The program includes four countries: Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger, and Togo with an overarching goal to progressively cover all French speaking countries in West Africa ...

  7. Laboratory training manual on radioimmunoassay in animal reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Reproduction must always be regarded as one of the major limiting factors in animal production and many of the modern methods for improving reproduction rely heavily on the ability to measure hormone levels in blood and milk. This has produced a world-wide demand for laboratory facilities to carry out hormone assays and the need for specialist training to allow these assays to be undertaken. The need to measure nanogram and picogram quantities and the use of radionuclides require a good deal of skill and care and this Manual has been prepared to aid training and provide the sort of information that rarely appears in scientific papers. It represents a further step in the Joint FAO/IAEA Division's series of Laboratory Training Manuals, and has been designed to aid training programmes of the type carried out during the Joint FAO/IAEA Interregional Training Course on Radioimmunoassay and its Application in Research on Animal Reproduction at Cornell University in July 1982. Many of the laboratory exercises described in this Manual are based on those conducted during the course

  8. Laboratory Medicine is Faced with the Evolution of Medical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collinson Paul

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory medicine and clinical medicine are co-dependent components of medicine. Laboratory medicine functions most effectively when focused through a clinical lens. Me dical practice as a whole undergoes change. New drugs, treatments and changes in management strategies are introduced. New techniques, new technologies and new tests are developed. These changes may be either clinically or laboratory initiated, and so their introduction requires dialogue and interaction between clinical and laboratory medicine specialists. Treatment monitoring is integral to laboratory medicine, varying from direct drug measurement to monitoring cholesterol levels in response to treatment. The current trend to »personalised medicine« is an extension of this process with the development of companion diagnostics. Technological innovation forms part of modern laboratory practice. Introduction of new technology both facilitates standard laboratory approaches and permits introduction of new tests and testing strategies previously confined to the research laboratory only. The revolution in cardiac biomarker testing has been largely a laboratory led change. Flexibility in service provision in response to changing clinical practice or evolving technology provides a significant laboratory management challenge in the light of increasing expectations, shifts in population demographics and constraint in resource availability. Laboratory medicine practitioners are adept at meeting these challenges. One thing remains constant, that there will be a constant need laboratory medicine to meet the challenges of novel clinical challenges from infectious diseases to medical conditions developing from lifestyle and longevity.

  9. Instructor qualification for radiation safety training at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1994-10-01

    Prior to 1993, Health Physics Training (HPT) was conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) health physics group. The job requirements specified a Masters Degree and experience. In fact, the majority of Health Physicists in the group were certified by the American Board of Health Physics. Under those circumstances, it was assumed that individuals in the group were technically qualified and the HPT instructor qualification stated that. In late 1993, the Health Physics Group at the LLNL was restructured and the training function was assigned to the training group. Additional requirements for training were mandated by the Department of Energy (DOE), which would necessitate increasing the existing training staff. With the need to hire, and the policy of reassignment of employees during downsizing, it was imperative that formal qualification standards be developed for technical knowledge. Qualification standards were in place for instructional capability. In drafting the new training qualifications for instructors, the requirements of a Certified Health Physicists had to be modified due to supply and demand. Additionally, for many of the performance-based training courses, registration by the National Registry of Radiation Protection Technologists is more desirable. Flexibility in qualification requirements has been incorporated to meet the reality of ongoing training and the compensation for desirable skills of individuals who may not meet all the criteria. The qualification requirements for an instructor rely on entry-level requirements and emphasis on goals (preferred) and continuing development of technical and instructional capabilities

  10. PRACTICAL SIMULATION OF COMPOSTING IN THE LABORATORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A closed incubation system was developed for laboratory simulation of composting conditions at the interior of a large compost pile. A conductive heat flux control system (CHFC) was used to adjust the temperature of the internal wall to that of the compost center and compensate f...

  11. Inclusive practices in teacher training in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasthi Jocabed Flores Barrera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive practices include diversity as a resource that favors teaching-learning processes in the classroom, although they focus on the most vulnerable people by offering them higher-quality education. This descriptive study sought to identify the inclusive practices of teachers who train teachers in an Escuela Normal (teachers’ college in Mexico. Eight teachers and 247 students participated in the study; the Guidelines for the Evaluation of Inclusive Practices in the Classroom (observation formats and students, the Learning Strategies Questionnaire, and semi-structured interviews were used. The results suggest that, although the general perception is that participating teachers have high inclusive practices, they need greater support in the physical conditions of the classroom, methodology and teacher-student relationship. It was also identified the need for a refresher program for teachers to conceptually enrich the teaching staff and encourage the implementation of inclusive education within the Escuela Normal.

  12. Training and Practices of Cannabis Dispensary Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Nancy A; Kieschnick, Dustin; Sottile, James E; Babson, Kimberly A; Vandrey, Ryan; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The proliferation of cannabis dispensaries within the United States has emerged from patient demand for the legalization of cannabis as an alternative treatment for a number of conditions and symptoms. Unfortunately, nothing is known about the practices of dispensary staff with respect to recommendation of cannabis strains/concentrations for specific patient ailments. To address this limitation, the present study assessed the training and practices of cannabis dispensary staff. Materials and Methods: Medical and nonmedical dispensary staff ( n =55) were recruited via e-mail and social media to complete an online survey assessing their demographic characteristics, dispensary features, patient characteristics, formal training, and cannabis recommendation practices. Results: Fifty-five percent of dispensary staff reported some formal training for their position, with 20% reporting medical/scientific training. A majority (94%) indicated that they provide specific cannabis advice to patients. In terms of strains, dispensary staff trended toward recommendations of Indica for anxiety, chronic pain, insomnia, nightmares, and Tourette's syndrome. They were more likely to recommend Indica and hybrid plants for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)/trauma and muscle spasms. In contrast, staff were less likely to recommend Indica for depression; hybrid strains were most often recommended for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In terms of cannabinoid concentrations, dispensary staff were most likely to recommend a 1:1 ratio of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) for patients suffering from anxiety, Crohn's disease, hepatitis C, and PTSD/trauma, while patients seeking appetite stimulation were most likely to be recommended THC. Staff recommended high CBD for arthritis and Alzheimer's disease and a high CBD or 1:1 ratio for ALS, epilepsy, and muscle spasms. Conclusions: Although many dispensary staff are making recommendations consistent with

  13. Dermatology training and practice in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaratnam, Deshan F; Murrell, Dédée F

    2014-10-01

    Dermatology is a relatively young discipline in Australia compared to other specialities within the medical fraternity. From its humble beginnings, the profession has evolved significantly over the decades and is now represented by the Australasian College of Dermatologists which is charged with training the next generation of dermatologists and advocating for and advancing the profession. The authors reviewed and describe the history of dermatology training and practice in Australia. Despite the progress in education, there are only 415 dermatologists serving a population of 23.3 million (1 per 58 000) and yet it has the highest incidence and prevalence of skin cancer in the world. The scope of clinical practice is wide in Australia, with clinicians well versed in medical and procedural dermatology. It is hoped that Australian dermatology will continue to bolster the dermatology profession globally. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  14. Safety and health: Principles and practices in the laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhrul Razi Ahmadun; Guan, Chuan Teong; Mohd Halim Shah Ismail

    2005-01-01

    Ignorance, carelessness or improper practices in the laboratory or the improper handling of hazardous or toxic materials may lead to work accidents and work-related ill-health. Laboratory users and administrators cannot afford to overlook these possible consequences due to the misconduct of laboratory practices and should decide how best to manage the health and safety aspects in the laboratory. This book has been written for safety representatives of colleges and universities, for lectures, teachers and students, and for researchers working in laboratories. It is also for everyone responsible for laboratory safety, laboratory accidents and their consequences. The emphasis is on hazards to health and safety, with the focus on the general hazards in the laboratory, how they arise and how to prevent, how to eliminate and control them. Special hazards will also be discussed such as radiation hazards and human factors. This book also provides information on governmental and non-governmental agencies and authorities, emergency contact numbers of relevant authorities, a list of Malaysia occupational safety and health related legislation and some useful occupational safety and health web sites. Readers will find that the information contained in this book will serve as the foundation for laboratory users safety policy. A set of Laboratory Safety Forms for a typical laboratory is also available in the appendix for reference. Laboratory users can use and adapt these forms for their own laboratory requirements. (author)

  15. Infection control practice in private dental laboratories in Riyadh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlKheraif, Abdulaziz A; Mobarak, Fahmy A

    2008-01-01

    In view of the risk of infection of dental health care workers and patients, interruption of possible chains of infection is to be demanded. The objective of this study was to assess infection control practice in private dental laboratories in Riyadh City, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted on thirty-two private dental laboratories in Riyadh City regarding infection control practiced by these laboratories. The instrument of the study consisted of ten open-ended questions that were asked from the laboratories directors. A large percentage of the surveyed laboratories (87.5 %) did not implement any infection control protocol during their practice. The mean number of impressions received per week was 16. Most of the surveyed laboratories (90.6 %) had no way of communication with the clinics regarding the disinfection procedures. The results indicated that 62.5 % of the laboratories reported that they were aware that they may get infection from non-disinfected items. Only a small percentage (6.2%) of the laboratories added disinfecting agent to pumice slurry. Wearing laboratory coats was reported by 75% of the laboratory workers. The use of gloves during work was reported by 59.3% of the laboratories while 56.2% reported the use protective eyewear. Only 21.8% of the laboratories use face masks during work. Construction of infection control manuals that contain updated and recommended guidelines to ensure aseptic practice in private dental laboratories is highly recommended. Also, a way of communication between dentists and dental technicians regarding disinfection of laboratory items should be strongly encouraged. (author)

  16. Underwater laboratory: Teaching physics through diving practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favale, F.

    2013-01-01

    Diving education and diving science and technology may be a useful tool in teaching physics in non–physics-oriented High School courses. In this paper we present an activity which combines some simple theoretical aspects of fluid statics, fluid dynamics and gas behavior under pressure with diving experience, where the swimming pool and the sea are used as a laboratory. This topic had previously been approached in a pure experimental way in school laboratory, but some particular experiments became much more attractive and meaningful to the students when they could use their bodies to perform them directly in water. The activity was carried out with groups of students from Italian High School classes in different situations.

  17. A whole-process progressive training mode to foster optoelectronic students' innovative practical ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hairong; Xu, Wei; Hu, Haojun; Duan, Chengfang

    2017-08-01

    This article analyzes the features of fostering optoelectronic students' innovative practical ability based on the knowledge structure of optoelectronic disciplines, which not only reveals the common law of cultivating students' innovative practical ability, but also considers the characteristics of the major: (1) The basic theory is difficult, and the close combination of science and technology is obvious; (2)With the integration of optics, mechanics, electronics and computer, the system technology is comprehensive; (3) It has both leading-edge theory and practical applications, so the benefit of cultivating optoelectronic students is high ; (4) The equipment is precise and the practice is costly. Considering the concept and structural characteristics of innovative and practical ability, and adhering to the idea of running practice through the whole process, we put forward the construction of three-dimensional innovation and practice platform which consists of "Synthetically Teaching Laboratory + Innovation Practice Base + Scientific Research Laboratory + Major Practice Base + Joint Teaching and Training Base", and meanwhile build a whole-process progressive training mode to foster optoelectronic students' innovative practical ability, following the process of "basic experimental skills training - professional experimental skills training - system design - innovative practice - scientific research project training - expanded training - graduation project": (1) To create an in - class practical ability cultivation environment that has distinctive characteristics of the major, with the teaching laboratory as the basic platform; (2) To create an extra-curricular innovation practice activities cultivation environment that is closely linked to the practical application, with the innovation practice base as a platform for improvement; (3) To create an innovation practice training cultivation environment that leads the development of cutting-edge, with the scientific

  18. Promoting ergonomics in Algeria: activities of "the research and training laboratory" in the University of Oran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebarki, Bouhafs; El-Bachir, Tebboune Cheikh

    2012-01-01

    The growing need in Algeria to develop ergonomics knowledge and practice in industry was behind the initiative to develop a training and research project within the ergonomics laboratory at Oran University. Since 2005 the laboratory team is running an academic option master in work design and ergonomics. The evaluation of the academic master in 2010 revealed the acute need of the local industry for professional competences in ergonomic and work psychology. A professional training master program in "ergonomics & work psychology" was then developed in partnership with local industry, five European Universities and six Universities from three Maghreb countries. Research projects were initiated around the two training programs, in conjunction with a number of ergonomics dissemination and promotion activities. Preliminary results of the project are presented and discussed in relation to the local context, and in the light of similar cases in Industrially Developing Countries.

  19. Knowledge, attitude and practice of aspects of laboratory safety in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result: Gross deficiencies were found in the knowledge, attitudes and practice of laboratory safety by laboratory staff in areas of use of personal protective equipment, specimen collection and processing, centrifuge – related hazards, infective hazards waste disposal and provision and use of First Aid Kits. Conclusion: ...

  20. Electrical measurements in the laboratory practice

    CERN Document Server

    Bartiromo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the basic theory of electrical circuits, describes analog and digital instrumentation, and applies modern methods to evaluate uncertainties in electrical measurements. It is comprehensive in scope and is designed specifically to meet the needs of students in physics and electrical engineering who are attending laboratory classes in electrical measurements. The topics addressed in individual chapters include the analysis of continuous current circuits; sources of measurement uncertainty and their combined effect; direct current measurements; analysis of alternating current circuits; special circuits including resonant circuits, frequency filters and impedance matching networks; alternating current measurements; analog and digital oscilloscopes; non-sinusoidal waveforms and circuit excitation by pulses; distributed parameter components and transmission lines. Each chapter is equipped with a number of problems. A special appendix describes a series of nine experiments, in each case providing a p...

  1. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer T

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Taylor Sawyer, Rachel A Umoren, Megan M Gray Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Neonatal Education and Simulation-based Training (NEST Program, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. Keywords: neonatal resuscitation, Neonatal Resuscitation Program, NRP, simulation, deliberate practice, debriefing, eSIM

  2. Technical qualification requirements and training programs for radiation protection personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, E.D.; Houser, B.S.; Butler, H.M. Jr.; Bogard, J.S.; Fair, M.F.; Haynes, C.E.; Parzyck, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    This document deals with the policies and practices of the Environmental and Occupational Safety Division (EOSD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in regard to the selection, training, qualification, and requalification of radiation protection staff assigned to reactor and nonreactor nuclear facilities. Included are personnel at facilities that: (1) operate reactors or particle accelerators; (2) produce, process, or store radioactive liquid or solid waste; (3) conduct separations operations; (4) engage in research with radioactive materials and radiation sources; and (5) conduct irradiated materials inspection, fuel fabrication, deconamination, or recovery operations. The EOSD personnel also have environmental surveillance and operational and industrial safety responsibilities related to the total Laboratory

  3. Chromatographic monitoring procedures in laboratory practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplina, E G; Belova, O I; Lasunina, N A

    1976-01-01

    The Moscow Coke and Chemical Works consist of three plants in combination, viz., the coking plant, the synthetic ammonia plant using coke-oven-gas hydrogen and the oxygen plant. The plant requirements include daily analyses not only of the coke-oven gas but also of a rich gas and an ethylene fraction. The analyses are carried out in VTI-2 apparatus. The analytical data are used to calculate the calorific values and densities of the gases. The time requirements are very considerable and the laboratory has long been engaged in developing and introducing chromatographic procedures for the major constituents of coke-oven gas, rich gas and ethylene fraction. The procedure developed for the coke-oven and rich gases uses two parallel columns, one packed with molecular sieves and the other with grade KSM silica gel. Hydrogen was determined with argon as the carrier gas, and all other constituents with helium. The procedure was time-consuming and complicated. An attempt was made to separate the gases in an LKhM-7a chromatograph with a programme-controlled 50 to 250/sup 0/C heating cycle, but the procedure still had a number of serious defects and could not be recommended for regular quality control. The final variant involved two parallel columns and a procedure based on that in GOST 14920 (''Dry gas. Proximate analysis''). The chromatograph was a type KhL-69 with a 6-way cock in the gas line so that each of the columns could be brought on stream in succession. The analytical column packings were zeolite (in a 2 m column) and diatomaceous brick with 25% n-hexadecane (in a 6 m column).

  4. Audit of clinical-laboratory practices in haematology and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Tanzania, there is paucity of data for monitoring laboratory medicine including haematology. This therefore calls for audits of practices in haematology and blood transfusion in order to provide appraise practice and devise strategies that would result in improved quality of health care services. This descriptive ...

  5. Chemistry as the defining science: discipline and training in nineteenth-century chemical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Catherine M

    2011-06-01

    The institutional revolution has become a major landmark of late-nineteenth century science, marking the rapid construction of large, institutional laboratories which transformed scientific training and practice. Although it has served historians of physics well, the institutional revolution has proved much more contentious in the case of chemistry. I use published sources, mainly written by chemists and largely focused on laboratories built in German-speaking lands between about 1865 and 1900, to show that chemical laboratory design was inextricably linked to productive practice, large-scale pedagogy and disciplinary management. I argue that effective management of the novel risks inherent in teaching and doing organic synthesis was significant in driving and shaping the construction of late-nineteenth century institutional chemical laboratories, and that these laboratories were essential to the disciplinary development of chemistry. Seen in this way, the laboratory necessarily becomes part of the material culture of late-nineteenth century chemistry, and I show how this view leads not only to a revision of what is usually known as the laboratory revolution in chemistry but also to a new interpretation of the institutional revolution in physics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Laboratory-supported influenza surveillance in Victorian sentinel general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, H; Murphy, A; Leong, W; Leydon, J; Tresise, P; Gerrard, M; Chibo, D; Birch, C; Andrews, R; Catton, M

    2000-12-01

    Laboratory-supported influenza surveillance is important as part of pandemic preparedness, for identifying and isolating candidate vaccine strains, for supporting trials of anti-influenza drugs and for refining the influenza surveillance case definition in practice. This study describes the implementation of laboratory-supported influenza surveillance in Victorian sentinel general practices and provides an estimate of the proportion of patients with an influenza-like illness proven to have influenza. During 1998 and 1999, 25 sentinel general practices contributed clinical surveillance data and 16 metropolitan practices participated in laboratory surveillance. Serological, virus-antigen detection, virus culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures were used to establish the diagnosis of influenza. Two laboratories at major teaching hospitals in Melbourne provided additional data on influenza virus identification. General practice sentinel surveillance and laboratory identification of influenza provided similar data on the pattern of influenza in the community between May and September. The clinical suspicion of influenza was confirmed in 49 to 54 per cent of cases seen in general practice.

  7. Marketing and Distribution: What About Training Plans in the DE Project Laboratory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Ruth

    1977-01-01

    Managing a distributive education (DE) laboratory is a challenge. The laboratory is the simulated training station, with the instructor taking on the role of employer, managing student activities and learning. One tool to be utilized in managing a DE laboratory is a training plan. This article discusses the need for student training plans and the…

  8. Integrated management system best practices in radioecological laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Claudia Aparecida Zerbinatti de [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Dept. da Qualidade], e-mail: clau.zerbina@gmail.com; Zouain, Desiree Moraes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: dmzouain@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a Master dissertation advancements with the target of studying the best practices, in order to give support to an IMS conceptual model ?Integrated Management System (quality, environment, work safety and health), applied to radioecological laboratories. The planning of the proposed research comprises the following stages: first stage - the bibliographic and documental survey in IMS; a survey and study of the applied standards (QMS NBR ISO 9000 (2005), NBR ISO 9001 (2008), NBR ISO 9004 (2000), EMS 14001(2004) and OHSMS OHSAS 18001 (2007) and OHSAS 18002 (2008)); identification and characterization in radioecological laboratories processes; a methodological study of better practices and benchmarking is carried out. In the second stage of the research, the development of a case study is forecast (qualitative research, with electronic questionnaires and personal interviews, when possible), preceded by a survey and selection of international and national radioecological laboratories to be studied and, in sequence, these laboratories should be contacted and agree to participate in the research; in a third stage, the construction of a matrix of better practices, which incur in the results able to subside an IMS conceptual model proposition for radioecological laboratories; the fourth and last stage of the research comprises the construction of a conceptual proposal of an IMS structure for radioecological laboratories. The first stage of the research results are presented concisely, as well as a preliminary selection of laboratories to be studied. (author)

  9. Integrated management system best practices in radioecological laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Claudia Aparecida Zerbinatti de

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a Master dissertation advancements with the target of studying the best practices, in order to give support to an IMS conceptual model ?Integrated Management System (quality, environment, work safety and health), applied to radioecological laboratories. The planning of the proposed research comprises the following stages: first stage - the bibliographic and documental survey in IMS; a survey and study of the applied standards (QMS NBR ISO 9000 (2005), NBR ISO 9001 (2008), NBR ISO 9004 (2000), EMS 14001(2004) and OHSMS OHSAS 18001 (2007) and OHSAS 18002 (2008)); identification and characterization in radioecological laboratories processes; a methodological study of better practices and benchmarking is carried out. In the second stage of the research, the development of a case study is forecast (qualitative research, with electronic questionnaires and personal interviews, when possible), preceded by a survey and selection of international and national radioecological laboratories to be studied and, in sequence, these laboratories should be contacted and agree to participate in the research; in a third stage, the construction of a matrix of better practices, which incur in the results able to subside an IMS conceptual model proposition for radioecological laboratories; the fourth and last stage of the research comprises the construction of a conceptual proposal of an IMS structure for radioecological laboratories. The first stage of the research results are presented concisely, as well as a preliminary selection of laboratories to be studied. (author)

  10. Academic Training: Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500, TH Auditorium, bldg 4, 3rd floor, on 13 October Practical Statistics for Particle Physicists L. LYONS, University of Oxford, GB Lecture 1: Learning to love the errror matrix Introductory remarks. Conditional probability. Statistical and systematic errors. Combining results Binomial, Poisson and 1-D Gaussian 2-D Gaussian and the error matrix. Understanding the covariance. Using the error matrix. Estimating the error matrix. Combining correlated measurements Lecture 2: Parameter determination by likelihood: Do's and don'ts Introduction to likelihood. Error estimate. Simple examples: (1) Breit Wigner (2) Lifetime binned and unbinned likelihood several parameters extended maximum likelihood. Common misapprehensions: Normalisation delta(lnL) = 1/2 rule and coverage Integrating the likelihood Unbinned L_max as goodness of fit Punzi effect Lecture 3: Chi-squared and hypothesis test...

  11. Integrated management system best practices in radioecological laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Claudia Aparecida Zerbinatti de

    2010-01-01

    The research aims to study the best practices to support a conceptual proposal for IMS - Integrated Management System (quality, environment, safety and health) applicable to Radioecology laboratories. The research design is organized into the following steps: in a first step, it was developed the bibliographic and documentary research in IMS, survey and study of standards (QMS ISO 9000 (2005), ISO 9001 (2008), ISO 9004 (2000), EMS ISO 14001 (2004) and OHSMS OHSAS 18001 (2007) and OHSAS 18002 (2008)), identification and characterization of processes in Radioecology Laboratories and study of best practices methodology and benchmarking; in the second stage of the research it was developed a case study (qualitative research, with questionnaires via e-mail and interviews, when possible), preceded by a survey and selection of international and national radioecology laboratories and then these laboratories were contacted and some of them agreed to participate in this research; in the third stage of the research it was built the framework of best practices that showed results that could support the conceptual proposal for the IMS Radioecology Laboratory; the fourth and final stage of research consisted in the construction of the proposed conceptual framework of SGI for Radioecology Laboratory, being then achieved the initial objective of the research. (author)

  12. Proper laboratory notebook practices: protecting your intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickla, Jason T; Boehm, Matthew B

    2011-03-01

    A laboratory notebook contains a wealth of knowledge that can be critical for establishing evidence in support of intellectual property rights and for refuting claims of research misconduct. The proper type, organization, use, maintenance, and storage of laboratory notebooks should be a priority for everyone at research institutions. Failure to properly document research activities can lead to serious problems, including the loss of valuable patent rights. Consequences of improper laboratory notebook practices can be harsh; numerous examples are described in court cases and journal articles, indicating a need for research institutions to develop strict policies on the proper use and storage of research documentation.

  13. Safety Precautions and Operating Procedures in an (A)BSL-4 Laboratory: 2. General Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Steven; Holbrook, Michael R; Burdette, Tracey; Joselyn, Nicole; Barr, Jason; Pusl, Daniela; Bollinger, Laura; Coe, Linda; Jahrling, Peter B; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Wada, Jiro; Kuhn, Jens H; Janosko, Krisztina

    2016-10-03

    Work in a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratory requires time and great attention to detail. The same work that is done in a BSL-2 laboratory with non-high-consequence pathogens will take significantly longer in a BSL-4 setting. This increased time requirement is due to a multitude of factors that are aimed at protecting the researcher from laboratory-acquired infections, the work environment from potential contamination and the local community from possible release of high-consequence pathogens. Inside the laboratory, movement is restricted due to air hoses attached to the mandatory full-body safety suits. In addition, disinfection of every item that is removed from Class II biosafety cabinets (BSCs) is required. Laboratory specialists must be trained in the practices of the BSL-4 laboratory and must show high proficiency in the skills they are performing. The focus of this article is to outline proper procedures and techniques to ensure laboratory biosafety and experimental accuracy using a standard viral plaque assay as an example procedure. In particular, proper techniques to work safely in a BSL-4 environment when performing an experiment will be visually emphasized. These techniques include: setting up a Class II BSC for experiments, proper cleaning of the Class II BSC when finished working, waste management and safe disposal of waste generated inside a BSL-4 laboratory, and the removal of inactivated samples from inside a BSL-4 laboratory to the BSL-2 laboratory.

  14. Practice-oriented training of bachelors of philology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchenko Elena Vladimirovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with practice-oriented training of philology students in the context of the new educational standard. This kind of education concentrates on the specific role of teaching practice in the process of training bachelors with the high-level professional competence. The article observes some ways of overcoming pedagogical difficulties during the students’ teaching practice at school.

  15. Guidelines for Biosafety Training Programs for Workers Assigned to BSL-3 Research Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Lesley C; Alderman, T Scott; Blair, Heather Ann; Brocard, Anne-Sophie; Broussard, Elaine E; Ellis, Robert P; Frerotte, Jay; Low, Eleanor W; McCarthy, Travis R; McCormick, Jessica M; Newton, JeT'Aime M; Rogers, Francine C; Schlimgen, Ryan; Stabenow, Jennifer M; Stedman, Diann; Warfield, Cheryl; Ntiforo, Corrie A; Whetstone, Carol T; Zimmerman, Domenica; Barkley, Emmett

    2013-03-01

    The Guidelines for Biosafety Training Programs for Workers Assigned to BSL-3 Research Laboratories were developed by biosafety professionals who oversee training programs for the 2 national biocontainment laboratories (NBLs) and the 13 regional biocontainment laboratories (RBLs) that participate in the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) NBL/RBL Network. These guidelines provide a general training framework for biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) high-containment laboratories, identify key training concepts, and outline training methodologies designed to standardize base knowledge, understanding, and technical competence of laboratory personnel working in high-containment laboratories. Emphasis is placed on building a culture of risk assessment-based safety through competency training designed to enhance understanding and recognition of potential biological hazards as well as methods for controlling these hazards. These guidelines may be of value to other institutions and academic research laboratories that are developing biosafety training programs for BSL-3 research.

  16. Implementation of Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines within the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Christopher A; Sanchez, Ana M; Garcia, Ambrosia; Denny, Thomas N; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella

    2014-07-01

    The EQAPOL contract was awarded to Duke University to develop and manage global proficiency testing programs for flow cytometry-, ELISpot-, and Luminex bead-based assays (cytokine analytes), as well as create a genetically diverse panel of HIV-1 viral cultures to be made available to National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers. As a part of this contract, EQAPOL was required to operate under Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP) that are traditionally used for laboratories conducting endpoint assays for human clinical trials. EQAPOL adapted these guidelines to the management of proficiency testing programs while simultaneously incorporating aspects of ISO/IEC 17043 which are specifically designed for external proficiency management. Over the first two years of the contract, the EQAPOL Oversight Laboratories received training, developed standard operating procedures and quality management practices, implemented strict quality control procedures for equipment, reagents, and documentation, and received audits from the EQAPOL Central Quality Assurance Unit. GCLP programs, such as EQAPOL, strengthen a laboratory's ability to perform critical assays and provide quality assessments of future potential vaccines. © 2013.

  17. Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine: Is It Working in Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Christopher P

    2012-01-01

    The principles of Evidence-Based Medicine have been established for about two decades, with the need for evidence-based clinical practice now being accepted in most health systems around the world. These principles can be employed in laboratory medicine. The key steps in evidence-based practice, namely (i) formulating the question; (ii) searching for evidence; (iii) appraising evidence; (iv) applying evidence; and (v) assessing the experience are all accepted but, as yet, translation into dai...

  18. Simulation laboratories for training in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedonia, Christian R; Gherman, Robert B; Satin, Andrew J

    2003-08-01

    Simulations have been used by the military, airline industry, and our colleagues in other medical specialties to educate, evaluate, and prepare for rare but life-threatening scenarios. Work hour limits for residents in obstetrics and gynecology and decreased patient availability for teaching of students and residents require us to think creatively and practically on how to optimize their education. Medical simulations may address scenarios in clinical practice that are considered important to know or understand. Simulations can take many forms, including computer programs, models or mannequins, virtual reality data immersion caves, and a combination of formats. The purpose of this commentary is to call attention to a potential role for medical simulation in obstetrics and gynecology. We briefly describe an example of how simulation may be incorporated into obstetric and gynecologic residency training. It is our contention that educators in obstetrics and gynecology should be aware of the potential for simulation in education. We hope this commentary will stimulate interest in the field, lead to validation studies, and improve training in and the practice of obstetrics and gynecology.

  19. Peculiarities of pedagogical practice in professional training of preschool teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Kodirova Zokhida Sobirovna

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the preparation of the future educators for their professional activities. Pedagogical practice is an important stage of educators’ training for their further professional activities.

  20. Unlocking the Laboratory: Autonomous Wireless Sensor Authentication in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggard, Meriel; McGoldrick, Ciaran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate a practical laboratory task where final year undergraduate students design, implement and validate an inferred security wireless sensor access system. Design/methodology/approach: The quality of the learning and technical environment was evaluated from a number of perspectives using a mixed methods…

  1. Guide to good practices for on-the-job training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    This manual is intended to provide DOE reactor and nonreactor nuclear facilities with guidelines for the development and implementation of facility specific, performance-based, On-the-Job Training (OJT) programs. An OJT Instructor Training Course is included to train the first-line supervisor and other designated personnel as OJT instructors. The subject matter content and level of detail were determined based upon a review of material obtained from DOE documents, INPO Guidelines, and input from selected DOE contractors. The final draft version of the manual was reviewed for accuracy, clarity, and comprehensiveness by trainers from the following DOE Contractors/Laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory - West - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, E.I. DuPont - Savannah River Plant, EG and G Idaho, Inc. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Martin Marietta - Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Rockwell International - Rocky Flats Plant, and Westinghouse Hanford Co.

  2. Autoclaving practice in microbiology laboratories: report of a survey. The Public Health Laboratory Service Subcommittee on laboratory autoclaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The performance of autoclaves in 27 laboratories, operated in accordance with the normal routine of local practice, has been monitored using thermometric equipment. Sterilising performance was unsatisfactory on 10 of 62 occasions, and cooling was inadequate on 52 of 60 occasions. PMID:649767

  3. Training the Knowledge Worker: A Descriptive Study of Training Practices in Irish Software Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Thomas; Golden, Willie

    2003-01-01

    Employees (n=200) of 39 Irish software companies indicated the following about training practices: organizational commitment to and provision for training was positively associated with employee expectations; well-designed training increased job satisfaction and helped retain organizational knowledge. One-third believed training has not helped…

  4. Observations on Current Practices in Preceptor Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volberding, Jennifer L.; Richardson, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Preceptor education is a major focus for all athletic training programs. Clinical education is a required and fundamental component of an athletic training student's education, so it is imperative the preceptors delivering and supervising clinical experiences have the highest level of training. The purpose of this exploratory qualitative…

  5. Laboratory training manual on the use of nuclear techniques in animal parasitology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Manual is designed for specialist training in the use of nuclear techniques in animal parasitology. The theoretical part contains a general introduction to experimental work in this field. Laboratory exercises are divided into Basic Exercises (17) and Applied Exercises (25) oriented to research in the immunology and pathogenesis of host-parasite interactions using radioisotopic methods and to disease management through the use of radiation-attenuated vaccines. The closing part contains a number of practical guidelines and data for work with radioisotopes in general and for the use of radioisotopic methods in animal parasitology

  6. The role of general practice in postgraduate basic training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Kodal, Troels; Qvesel, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been growing interest in the role of primary care in postgraduate training. Relatively little has been published about benefits of early and sustained postgraduate basic training in general practice, especially for doctors with other ambitions than family...... scale and qualitative questions. We used a phenomenological approach. RESULTS: Almost all of the young Danish doctors responding felt that training in general practice is a necessary part of a postgraduate basic training programme. Early training in primary care not only gives doctors a broad...

  7. Family medicine training and practice in Malawi: History, progress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family medicine training and practice in Malawi: History, progress, and the anticipated role of the family physician in the Malawian health system. ... The idea of formal family medicine training and practice in Malawi started as early as 2001 but did not come to fruition until 2011, with the start of the undergraduate clerkship in ...

  8. Integrating Practice Guidelines into Professional Training: Implications for Diversity Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miville, Marie L.; Duan, Changming; Nutt, Roberta L.; Waehler, Charles A.; Suzuki, Lisa; Pistole, M. Carole; Arredondo, Patricia; Duffy, Michael; Mejia, Brenda X.; Corpus, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    The authors present the findings of a special task group (STG) organized to explore effective training strategies for the practice guidelines focused on diverse populations. They provide a brief literature review and summarize survey data from academic training directors regarding current use of practice guidelines. The authors then describe the…

  9. Teaching Laboratory Management Principles and Practices Through Mentorship and Graduated Responsibility: The Assistant Medical Directorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Timothy; Sowder, Aleksandra M; Palmer, Cheryl Ann; Weiss, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    With the changing landscape of medicine in general, and pathology in particular, a greater emphasis is being placed on laboratory management as a means of controlling spiraling medical costs and improving health-care efficiency. To meet this challenge, pathology residency programs have begun to incorporate formal laboratory management training into their curricula, using institutional curricula and/or online laboratory management courses offered by professional organizations. At the University of Utah, and its affiliated national reference laboratory, ARUP Laboratories, Inc, interested residents are able to supplement the departmental lecture-based and online laboratory management curriculum by participating in assistant medical directorship programs in one of several pathology subspecialty disciplines. The goals of many of the assistant medical directorship positions include the development of laboratory management skills and competencies. A survey of current and recent assistant medical directorship participants revealed that the assistant medical directorship program serves as an excellent means of improving laboratory management skills, as well as improving performance as a fellow and practicing pathologist.

  10. Revised guidelines for good practice in IVF laboratories (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De los Santos, Maria José; Apter, Susanna; Coticchio, Giovanni; Debrock, Sophie; Lundin, Kersti; Plancha, Carlos E; Prados, Fernando; Rienzi, Laura; Verheyen, Greta; Woodward, Bryan; Vermeulen, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Which recommendations can be provided by the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology Special Interest Group (ESHRE SIG) Embryology to support laboratory specialists in the organization and management of IVF laboratories and the optimization of IVF patient care? Structured in 13 sections, the guideline development group formulated recommendations for good practice in the organization and management of IVF laboratories, and for good practice of the specific procedures performed within the IVF laboratory. NA. The guideline was produced by a group of 10 embryologists representing different European countries, settings and levels of expertise. The group evaluated the document of 2008, and based on this assessment, each group member rewrote one or more sections. Two 2-day meetings were organized during which each of the recommendations was discussed and rewritten until consensus within the guideline group was reached. After finalizing the draft, the members of the ESHRE SIG embryology were invited to review the guideline. NA. The guideline provides recommendations on the general organization of an IVF laboratory (staffing and direction, quality management, laboratory safety), and on the specific aspects of the procedures performed in IVF laboratories (Identification of patients and traceability of their reproductive cells, consumables, handling of biological material, oocyte retrieval, sperm preparation, insemination of oocytes, scoring for fertilization, embryo culture and transfer, and cryopreservation). A last section provides recommendations regarding an Emergency plan for IVF laboratories. Evidence on most of the issues described is scarce, and therefore it was decided not to perform a formal search for and assessment of scientific evidence. However, recommendations published in the EUTCD and relevant and recent documents, manuals and consensus papers were taken into account when formulating the recommendations. Despite the limitations, the guideline

  11. Sandia National Laboratories ASCI Applications Software Quality Engineering Practices; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZEPPER, JOHN D.; ARAGON, KATHRYN MARY; ELLIS, MOLLY A.; BYLE, KATHLEEN A.; EATON, DONNA SUE

    2002-01-01

    This document provides a guide to the deployment of the software verification activities, software engineering practices, and project management principles that guide the development of Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) applications software at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia). The goal of this document is to identify practices and activities that will foster the development of reliable and trusted products produced by the ASCI Applications program. Document contents include an explanation of the structure and purpose of the ASCI Quality Management Council, an overview of the software development lifecycle, an outline of the practices and activities that should be followed, and an assessment tool. These sections map practices and activities at Sandia to the ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines, a Department of Energy document

  12. Drain Back Systems in Laboratory and in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perers, Bengt; Furbo, Simon; Fan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    in the collector loop to have a safe reliable operation. The components should also be designed and marked so that only one correct mounting option is possible, like forward and return pipes to/from the collector of slightly different sizes or color. Adapted installer education and training is a very important...... step to have success with drain back systems. Practices used in glycol systems may give serious failures. Key-words: Drain Back, Low Flow, Solar Combi System, ETC collectors....

  13. Guide to good practices for on-the-job training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    Training programs at DOE facilities should prepare personnel to safely and efficiently operate and maintain the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. This guide presents good practices for a systematic approach to on-the-job training (OJT) and OJT programs and should be used in conjunction with DOE Training Program Handbook: A Systematic Approach to Training, and with the DOE Handbook entitled Alternative Systematic Approaches to Training to develop performance-based OJT programs. DOE contractors may also use this guide to modify existing OJT programs that do not meet the systematic approach to training (SAT) objectives.

  14. Central African Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program: building and strengthening regional workforce capacity in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andze, Gervais Ondobo; Namsenmo, Abel; Illunga, Benoit Kebella; Kazambu, Ditu; Delissaint, Dieula; Kuaban, Christopher; Mbopi-Kéou, Francois-Xavier; Gabsa, Wilfred; Mulumba, Leopold; Bangamingo, Jean Pierre; Ngulefac, John; Dahlke, Melissa; Mukanga, David; Nsubuga, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Central African Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (CAFELTP) is a 2-year public health leadership capacity building training program. It was established in October 2010 to enhance capacity for applied epidemiology and public health laboratory services in three countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The aim of the program is to develop a trained public health workforce to assure that acute public health events are detected, investigated, and responded to quickly and effectively. The program consists of 25% didactic and 75% practical training (field based activities). Although the program is still in its infancy, the residents have already responded to six outbreak investigations in the region, evaluated 18 public health surveillance systems and public health programs, and completed 18 management projects. Through these various activities, information is shared to understand similarities and differences in the region leading to new and innovative approaches in public health. The program provides opportunities for regional and international networking in field epidemiology and laboratory activities, and is particularly beneficial for countries that may not have the immediate resources to host an individual country program. Several of the trainees from the first cohort already hold leadership positions within the ministries of health and national laboratories, and will return to their assignments better equipped to face the public health challenges in the region. They bring with them knowledge, practical training, and experiences gained through the program to shape the future of the public health landscape in their countries.

  15. Good laboratory practices guarantee biosafety in the Sierra Leone-China friendship biosafety laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhou, Wei-Min; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Huan-Yu; Du, Hai-Jun; Nie, Kai; Song, Jing-Dong; Xiao, Kang; Lei, Wen-Wen; Guo, Jian-Qiang; Wei, He-Jiang; Cai, Kun; Wang, Yan-Hai; Wu, Jiang; Kamara, Gerard; Kamara, Idrissa; Wei, Qiang; Liang, Mi-Fang; Wu, Gui-Zhen; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-06-23

    The outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa between 2014 and 2015 was the largest EDV epidemic since the identification of Ebola virus (EBOV) in 1976, and the countries most strongly affected were Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The Sierra Leone-China Friendship Biological Safety Laboratory (SLE-CHN Biosafety Lab), a fixed Biosafety Level 3 laboratory in the capital city of Sierra Leone, was established by the Chinese government and has been active in EBOV detection since 11 March 2015. Complete management and program documents were created for the SLE-CHN Biosafety Lab, and it was divided into four zones (the green, yellow, brown, and red zones) based on the risk assessment. Different types of safe and appropriate personnel protection equipment (PPE) are used in different zones of the laboratory, and it fully meets the Biosafety Level 3 laboratory standards of the World Health Organization. Good preparedness, comprehensive risk assessment and operation documents, appropriate PPE, effective monitoring and intensive training, together with well-designed and reasonable laboratory sectioning are essential for guaranteeing biosafety.

  16. Practical methodological guide for hydrometric inter-laboratory organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, David; Bertrand, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Discharge measurements performed by the French governmental hydrometer team feed a national database. This data is available for general river flows knowkedge, flood forecasting, low water survey, statistical calculations flow, control flow regulatory and many other uses. Regularly checking the measurements quality and better quantifying its accuracy is therefore an absolute need. The practice of inter-laboratory comparison in hydrometry particularly developed during the last decade. Indeed, discharge measurement can not easily be linked to a standard. Therefore, on-site measurement accuracy control is very difficult. Inter-laboratory comparison is thus a practical solution to this issue. However, it needs some regulations in order to ease its practice and legitimize its results. To do so, the French government hydrometrics teams produced a practical methodological guide for hydrometric inter-laboratory organisation in destination of hydrometers community in view of ensure the harmonization of inter-laboratory comparison practices for different materials (ADCP, current meter on wadind rod or gauging van, tracer dilution, surface speed) and flow range (flood, low water). Ensure the results formalization and banking. The realisation of this practice guide is grounded on the experience of the governmental teams & their partners (or fellows), following existing approaches (Doppler group especially). The guide is designated to validate compliance measures and identify outliers : Hardware, methodological, environmental, or human. Inter-laboratory comparison provides the means to verify the compliance of the instruments (devices + methods + operators) and provides methods to determine an experimental uncertainty of the tested measurement method which is valid only for the site and the measurement conditions but does not address the calibration or periodic monitoring of the few materials. After some conceptual definitions, the guide describes the different stages of an

  17. Dehydration treatment practices among pediatrics-trained and non-pediatrics trained emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Jeranil; Liu, Deborah R; Nager, Alan L

    2012-04-01

    We sought to survey emergency physicians in the United States regarding the management of pediatric dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis. We hypothesized that responses from physicians with dedicated pediatric training (PT), that is, board certification in pediatrics or pediatric emergency medicine, would differ from responses of physicians with no dedicated pediatric training (non-PT). An anonymous survey was mailed to randomly selected members of the American College of Emergency Physicians and sent electronically to enrollees of Brown University pediatric emergency medicine listserv. The survey consisted of 17 multiple-choice questions based on a clinical scenario depicting a 2-year-old with acute gastroenteritis and moderate dehydration. Questions asked related to treatment preferences, practice setting, and training information. One thousand sixty-nine surveys were received: 997 surveys were used for data analysis, including 269 PT physicians and 721 non-PT physicians. Seventy-nine percent of PT physicians correctly classified the scenario patient as moderately dehydrated versus 71% of non-PT physicians (P = 0.063). Among those who correctly classified the patient, 121 PT physicians (58%) and 350 non-PT physicians (68%) would initially hydrate the patient with intravenous fluids. Pediatrics-trained physicians were more likely to initially choose oral or nasogastric hydration compared with non-PT physicians (P = 0.0127). Pediatrics-trained physicians were less likely to perform laboratory testing compared with the non-PT group (n = 92, 45%, vs n = 337, 66%; P dehydrated children, significantly more PT physicians, compared with non-PT physicians, follow established guidelines.

  18. Designing easy DNA extraction: Teaching creativity through laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susantini, Endang; Lisdiana, Lisa; Isnawati; Tanzih Al Haq, Aushia; Trimulyono, Guntur

    2017-05-01

    Subject material concerning Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid (DNA) structure in the format of creativity-driven laboratory practice offers meaningful learning experience to the students. Therefore, a laboratory practice in which utilizes simple procedures and easy-safe-affordable household materials should be promoted to students to develop their creativity. This study aimed to examine whether designing and conducting DNA extraction with household materials could foster students' creative thinking. We also described how this laboratory practice affected students' knowledge and views. A total of 47 students participated in this study. These students were grouped and asked to utilize available household materials and modify procedures using hands-on worksheet. Result showed that this approach encouraged creative thinking as well as improved subject-related knowledge. Students also demonstrated positive views about content knowledge, social skills, and creative thinking skills. This study implies that extracting DNA with household materials is able to develop content knowledge, social skills, and creative thinking of the students. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(3):216-225, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. [Development and Effects of Assertiveness Training applying Dongsasub Training for Nursing Students in Clinical Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoungsuk

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to develop assertiveness training applying Dongsasub training for junior nursing students, and to verify effectiveness of the training on assertiveness behavior, self-esteem, clinical practice stress, and clinical competence. The study design was a non-equivalent control group non-synchronized design. Participants were 63 nursing students in clinical training (31 students in the experimental group and 32 students in the control group). The assertiveness training applying Dongsasub training consisted of four sessions. Outcome variables included assertiveness behavior, self-esteem, clinical practice stress, and clinical competence. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Fisher's exact test and independent samples t-test with SPSS/WIN 21.0. Scores of assertiveness behavior (t=-2.49, p=.015), self-esteem (t=-4.80, passertiveness training applying Dongsasub training can be used as a nursing intervention to lower clinical practice stress and improve the clinical competence of nursing students.

  20. DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A PRACTICAL PUBLIC HEALTH TRAINING SYSTEM IN CHINA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhang, Junyue; Chen, Guoyuan; Yang, Kedi

    2015-03-01

    Public health education is becoming an increasing priority among educators of medicine. In China, little attention has been paid to public health education reform. A new public health training system was introduced in China in 2007. We conducted this study during 2006-2012 to evaluate the graduate core competencies under the new system. Data were collected from 231 graduates and 49 public health agencies. The 144 graduates who enrolled in 2006 and were trained under the old system constituted the control group; the 87 graduates who enrolled in 2007 and were trained under the new system constituted the experimental group. Surveys of graduate core competencies found analyzing and solving problems in the laboratory, conducting on-site practice and learning new technologies were the top three abilities most expected by public health agencies. After 5-year practical ability training, the graduates in the experimental group had better performance; on-site practical ability and laboratory practical ability increased significantly by 24.5% and 20.0%, respectively. Three other important competencies also improved: designing epidemiologic surveys, collecting information from the literature and doing statistical analyses. However, preventing and controlling common diseases and dealing with emergencies remained weak. These results show the new training system should be continued, but revisions are needed to improve this training system, especially in the areas of preventing and controlling common diseases and dealing with emergencies.

  1. 78 FR 53151 - The Applicability of Good Laboratory Practice in Premarket Device Submissions: Questions and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ...] The Applicability of Good Laboratory Practice in Premarket Device Submissions: Questions and Answers... availability of the draft guidance entitled ``The Applicability of Good Laboratory Practice in Premarket Device... applicability of good laboratory practice (GLP) to nonclinical laboratory studies conducted in support of...

  2. The Impact of Reason for Training on the Relationship between "Best Practices" and Sexual Harassment Training Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Elissa L.; Kulik, Carol T.; Bustamante, Jennifer; Golom, Frank D.

    2010-01-01

    The current study explored the use of best training practices on human resources managers' perceptions of sexual harassment training success and frequency of sexual harassment complaints. Results revealed no main effects of best training practices on sexual harassment training success. However, effects of best training practices on sexual…

  3. EUROPRACTICE Training and Best Practice Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    .Among those should be mentioned intelligent use of internet, multimedia training and RF high speed low power training.TBPS is primarily a course broker negotiating with more than 45 course vendors to get highly qualified courses at different levels and at moderate prices in the 5 key microelectronics areas...... been organized to fill the gap, and information about the courses is distributed in different ways.Intelligent use of internet and multimedia technology promotes micro-electronics training in a very effective way.This is the most effective way to promote the large number of courses...

  4. Training in virtual environments: putting theory into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskaliuk, Johannes; Bertram, Johanna; Cress, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Virtual training environments are used when training in reality is challenging because of the high costs, danger, time or effort involved. In this paper we argue for a theory-driven development of such environments, with the aim of connecting theory to practice and ensuring that the training provided fits the needs of the trained persons and their organisations. As an example, we describe the development of VirtualPolice (ViPOL), a training environment for police officers in a federal state of Germany. We provided the theoretical foundation for ViPOL concerning the feeling of being present, social context, learning motivation and perspective-taking. We developed a framework to put theory into practice. To evaluate our framework we interviewed the stakeholders of ViPOL and surveyed current challenges and limitations of virtual training. The results led to a review of a theory-into-practice framework which is presented in the conclusion. Feeling of presence, social context, learning motivation and perspective-taking are relevant for training in virtual environments. The theory-into-practice framework presented here supports developers and trainers in implementing virtual training tools. The framework was validated with an interview study of stakeholders of a virtual training project. We identified limitations, opportunities and challenges.

  5. Farm practical training and job aspiration of undergraduates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Agricultural Extension ... The study investigated whether farm practical training (FPT) is significantly associated with job aspiration ... students comparing results of empirical evidence between two Universities in Kwara State, Nigeria.

  6. Post-Graduate Training in Private Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Birgitte; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2010-01-01

    is mainly theoretical. Thus, the clinical training is to be obtained after graduation. In order to obtain authorization as a psychologist the candidates must receive 160 hours of clinical supervision during fulltime occupation in at least two years. Until recently, this postgraduate training was mainly...... to research of evaluating. Thus, the present study is the first one focusing on the specific conditions in this context, i.e. being intimate together in a small unit; the need to make a living; dual or multiple relationships, etc. The status of this project; The research data (interviews) is currently being...

  7. Embodied Creativity Training Practice in East and West Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, ChaoYing; Hu, Weipin; Wang, Canming

    2016-01-01

    Embodied creativity training is action-based and aims to improve participants’ creative ability rather than delivery knowledge or information of creative theories. This paper introduced embodied creativity training practices in Denmark, United States, and China. This paper categorizes the related...

  8. Establishing Good Laboratory Practice at Small Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Meryl Bornstein-Forst

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Good Laboratory Practice (GLP and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs provide guidelines for proper operation of equipment, maintenance and sanitation, reporting structures, and related activities. These practices are routinely employed at large academic and research-based institutions. However, they are often overlooked or omitted at smaller colleges and universities where staff and resources are limited. Incorrect assumptions and presumed responsibilities can lead to safety hazards, damage to equipment, loss of infrastructure, and confusion regarding operations and oversight. This report addresses the development of the “who, what, when, how, and where” policies and SOPs that constitute GLP. Once established and utilized by all departmental members, these structures ensure that academic and research-related activities are conducted safely and efficiently.

  9. Scenistic Methods for Training: Applications and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to complement an earlier article (2010) in "Journal of European Industrial Training" in which the description and theory bases of scenistic methods were presented. This paper also offers a description of scenistic methods and information on theory bases. However, the main thrust of this paper is to describe, give suggested…

  10. Toilet training practices in Nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    physical and psychological consequences like a sense of failure through .... neurological problems, e.g. spinal dysraphism, hydrocephalus, and cerebral palsy, as well as those who had children with urogenital abnormalities. Variables ...... floor therapy and toilet training in young children with dysfunctional voiding.

  11. Guide to good practice in radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.; Schenley, C.; Smith, A.; Weseman, M.

    1988-10-01

    This set of guidelines applies to radiation protection training programs for all Department of Energy (DOE) contractors, subcontractors, and visitors to DOE contractor facilities. It is to be used as a self-evaluation tool by DOE contractors as they develop and evaluate their training programs. This document is based on good practice guidelines used by a variety of different facilities both within and outside of the DOE contractor system. Good practices are not requirements; they are guidelines that contractors should use as they develop and conduct training programs. The applicability of the contents of the Guide to Good Practice in Radiation Protection Training depends upon each DOE facility's scope and need for radiation safety training. Although the focus of this document is radiation protection training, it is important that the process by which training is developed and implemented be discussed. Therefore, the first section presents guidelines for performance-based training and ideas to be considered regarding the structure and documentation of the training function

  12. Students integrate knowledge acquisition and practical work in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, E I; Sánchez-Hermosín, P; Díz-Pérez, J; Tovar, P; Camacho, R; Escribano, B M

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to transfer a wider concept of teamwork and self-learning to the laboratory, encouraging students' capabilities when seeking, acquiring, and processing knowledge. This educational innovation was carried out with a total of 38 students (fourth year of degree in Biology) in the area of physiology (Advances in Reproduction course) at University of Córdoba in Córdoba, Spain. The design of the project's application methodology consisted of establishing a way in which problems would be tackled in the practical classes. For this purpose, the different tasks were set up so that students could relate them to the concepts learned in the theory classes. On the first day of class, the project was presented to the students. Groups of two to three students worked in the laboratory and set up an outline of the protocol of the practical work that they had done. This outline was performed individually and sent to the lecturers through a learning management system (Moodle). The teachers gave feedback and assessed student submissions. Upon finishing the course, students completed a survey. The project-based learning method promotes practical self-learning on the part of students. This methodology demonstrated to us that it stimulates a critical and self-critical capacity in students, both individually and in groups, and that writing didactic practical material helped students to enhance their theory knowledge. The experiment was a success in view of the scores obtained upon finishing the subject. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  13. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teresinska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bozena; Krolicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Miroslaw

    2014-01-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  14. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresinska, Anna [Institute of Cardiology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Birkenfeld, Bozena [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Szczecin (Poland); Krolicki, Leszek [Warsaw Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Dziuk, Miroslaw [Military Institute of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes

  15. Measurement uncertainty. A practical guide for Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-05-01

    necessary that they conform to given safety and performance criteria. The demonstration of the competence of calibration laboratories is achieved through comparisons and the establishment of a quality system following the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Guide 17025. One of the requirements of the quality system of a calibration laboratory is the assessment of the measurement uncertainty for all its calibration services. General guidance on the estimation of measurement uncertainty was published by ISO in 1995. However, that document addresses all calibration and testing laboratories and not specifically dosimetry calibration laboratories. To provide SSDLs of the IAEA/WHO Network with a practical guide on the assessment of the measurement uncertainty, two consultants meetings were held at IAEA Headquarters on 26-30 April, 2004 and 19-23 September 2005. The present publication was prepared during these meetings. It is addressed to scientists working in calibration laboratories and to physicists involved in radiation dosimetry measurement

  16. [Laboratory medicine in the obligatory postgraduate clinical training system--common clinical training program in the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yasuyuki

    2003-04-01

    I propose a postgraduate common clinical training program to be provided by the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital. The program has three purposes: first, mastering basic laboratory tests; second, developing the skills necessary to accurately interpret laboratory data; third, learning specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine. For the first purpose, it is important that medical trainees perform testing of their own patients at bedside or in the central clinical laboratory. When testing at the central clinical laboratory, instruction by expert laboratory technicians is helpful. The teaching doctors in the department of laboratory medicine are asked to advise the trainees on the interpretation of data. Consultation will be received via interview or e-mail. In addition, the trainees can participate in various conferences, seminars, and meetings held at the central clinical laboratory. Finally, in order to learn specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine, several special courses lasting a few months will be prepared. I think this program should be closely linked to the training program in internal medicine.

  17. STRUCTURED LEARNING AND TRAINING ENVIRONMENTS--A PREPARATION LABORATORY FOR ADVANCED MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FIEL, NICHOLAS J.; JOHNSTON, RAYMOND F.

    A PREPARATION LABORATORY WAS DESIGNED TO FAMILIARIZE STUDENTS IN ADVANCED MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES AND THUS SHORTEN THE TIME THEY SPEND IN SETTING UP ACTUAL EXPERIMENTS. THE LABORATORY LASTS 30 MINUTES, IS FLEXIBLE AND SIMPLE OF OPERATION, AND DOES NOT REQUIRE A PROFESSOR'S PRESENCE. THE BASIC TRAINING UNIT IS THE…

  18. Quality assurance of laboratory work and clinical use of laboratory tests in general practice in norway: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thue, Geir; Jevnaker, Marianne; Gulstad, Guri Andersen; Sandberg, Sverre

    2011-09-01

    Virtually all the general practices in Norway participate in the Norwegian Quality Improvement of Laboratory Services in Primary Care, NOKLUS. In order to assess and develop NOKLUS's services, it was decided to carry out an investigation in the largest participating group, general practices. In autumn 2008 a questionnaire was sent to all Norwegian general practices asking for feedback on different aspects of NOKLUS's main services: contact with medical laboratory technologists, sending of control materials, use and maintenance of practice-specific laboratory binders, courses, and testing of laboratory equipment. In addition, attitudes were elicited towards possible new services directed at assessing other technical equipment and clinical use of tests. Responses were received from 1290 of 1552 practices (83%). The great majority thought that the frequency of sending out control material should continue as at present, and they were pleased with the feedback reports and follow-up by the laboratory technologists in the counties. Even after many years of practical experience, there is still a need to update laboratory knowledge through visits to practices, courses, and written information. Practices also wanted quality assurance of blood pressure meters and spirometers, and many doctors wanted feedback on their use of laboratory tests. Services regarding quality assurance of point-of-care tests, guidance, and courses should be continued. Quality assurance of other technical equipment and of the doctor's clinical use of laboratory tests should be established as part of comprehensive quality assurance.

  19. Training transfer: scientific background and insights for practical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issurin, Vladimir B

    2013-08-01

    Training transfer as an enduring, multilateral, and practically important problem encompasses a large body of research findings and experience, which characterize the process by which improving performance in certain exercises/tasks can affect the performance in alternative exercises or motor tasks. This problem is of paramount importance for the theory of training and for all aspects of its application in practice. Ultimately, training transfer determines how useful or useless each given exercise is for the targeted athletic performance. The methodological background of training transfer encompasses basic concepts related to transfer modality, i.e., positive, neutral, and negative; the generalization of training responses and their persistence over time; factors affecting training transfer such as personality, motivation, social environment, etc. Training transfer in sport is clearly differentiated with regard to the enhancement of motor skills and the development of motor abilities. The studies of bilateral skill transfer have shown cross-transfer effects following one-limb training associated with neural adaptations at cortical, subcortical, spinal, and segmental levels. Implementation of advanced sport technologies such as motor imagery, biofeedback, and exercising in artificial environments can facilitate and reinforce training transfer from appropriate motor tasks to targeted athletic performance. Training transfer of motor abilities has been studied with regard to contralateral effects following one limb training, cross-transfer induced by arm or leg training, the impact of strength/power training on the preparedness of endurance athletes, and the impact of endurance workloads on strength/power performance. The extensive research findings characterizing the interactions of these workloads have shown positive transfer, or its absence, depending on whether the combinations conform to sport-specific demands and physiological adaptations. Finally, cross-training

  20. Organization of international practical training of students at the tourism university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirogova O.G.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available the article deals with organization of international practical training of students at the tourism university, provides a brief analysis of researchers on students’ practical training, makes the case for international practical training of students, gives classification of international practical training, shows advantages and disadvantages of students’ practical training abroad and the benefits of tourism university graduates as well who has experience in international practical training.

  1. Entrustable professional activity (EPA) reshapes the practice of specialist training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi-Murola, Leila

    In addition to medical expertise, competence-based medical training comprises communication and collaboration skills, professionalism, and leadership skills. Continuous feedback is essential for learning and development, and feedback only from the medical specialist examination taken in the end of training does not ensure thorough specialist training. Entrustable professional activity (EPA) is a unit of professional practice, defined as tasks or responsibilities typical of the specialty. EPA translates competence-based training into manageable and meaningful entities and provides tools for the evaluation of medical competence.

  2. Selecting and training opinion leaders and best practice collaborators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussières, André E.; Maiers, Michele; Grondin, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the process for selecting and training chiropractic opinion leaders (OLs) and best practice collaborators (BPCs) to increase the uptake of best practice. Methods: In Phase 1, OLs were identified using a cross-sectional survey among Canadian chiropractic stakeholders. A 10......-member committee ranked nominees. Top-ranked nominees were invited to a training workshop. In Phase 2, a national e-survey was administered to 7200 Canadian chiropractors to identify additional OLs and BPCs. Recommended names were screened by OLs and final selection made by consensus. Webinars were...... utilized to train BPCs to engage peers in best practices, and facilitate guideline dissemination. Results: In Phase 1, 21 OLs were selected from 80 nominees. Sixteen attended a training workshop. In Phase 2, 486 chiropractors recommended 1126 potential BPCs, of which 133 were invited to participate and 112...

  3. 127 Field Practical Training Programme of Faculties of Agriculture in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Keywords: Practical training, students of agriculture faculty ... fertility, agronomy and horticultural practices, crop protection activities, ... and Frick (2004) submitted that companies of today want graduates with ... The State accounts for 2.3% of Nigeria's total population. ..... Carrying out appropriate husbandry measures for.

  4. Taking Working Memory Training from the Laboratory into Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Joni; Gathercole, Susan Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Working memory skills have been shown to be enhanced by adaptive training in several randomised controlled trials. Here, two field trials were conducted in which teachers administered working memory training to their own pupils in school. Twenty-two children aged 8-9?years participated in Trial 1. In Trial 2, 50 children aged 9-11?years with the…

  5. Errors in laboratory medicine: practical lessons to improve patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howanitz, Peter J

    2005-10-01

    Patient safety is influenced by the frequency and seriousness of errors that occur in the health care system. Error rates in laboratory practices are collected routinely for a variety of performance measures in all clinical pathology laboratories in the United States, but a list of critical performance measures has not yet been recommended. The most extensive databases describing error rates in pathology were developed and are maintained by the College of American Pathologists (CAP). These databases include the CAP's Q-Probes and Q-Tracks programs, which provide information on error rates from more than 130 interlaboratory studies. To define critical performance measures in laboratory medicine, describe error rates of these measures, and provide suggestions to decrease these errors, thereby ultimately improving patient safety. A review of experiences from Q-Probes and Q-Tracks studies supplemented with other studies cited in the literature. Q-Probes studies are carried out as time-limited studies lasting 1 to 4 months and have been conducted since 1989. In contrast, Q-Tracks investigations are ongoing studies performed on a yearly basis and have been conducted only since 1998. Participants from institutions throughout the world simultaneously conducted these studies according to specified scientific designs. The CAP has collected and summarized data for participants about these performance measures, including the significance of errors, the magnitude of error rates, tactics for error reduction, and willingness to implement each of these performance measures. A list of recommended performance measures, the frequency of errors when these performance measures were studied, and suggestions to improve patient safety by reducing these errors. Error rates for preanalytic and postanalytic performance measures were higher than for analytic measures. Eight performance measures were identified, including customer satisfaction, test turnaround times, patient identification

  6. Pulsed power safety and technical training at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, S.A.; Zawadzkas, G.A.; Donovan, G.L.; Mikkelson, K.A.; Sharpe, A.W.; Johnston, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    The expansion of pulsed power applications research at Sandia National Labs requires increasing technician-level support from individuals trained in high voltage, short pulse technology. Large superpower generators need a broad-based training curriculum in all aspects of accelerator operation to satisfy recent Department of Energy (DOE) desires for formal certification of accelerator operators. This paper discusses the status of Sandia's safety and technical training program in pulsed power technology directed mainly towards high school graduate and technical school level students. Present safety training methodology requires that hazards for experimental facilities are identified first, a specific curriculum is then tailored to individuals' background experiences and hazards involved with their current assignments. In the technical training program, certification requirements are being established and a coursework program has been initiated in which subjects are organized into two sections. The first covers electrical principles and physical properties of pulsed power components. The second presents various support-type subsystems for accelerators

  7. Diagnosis of tuberculosis in Ghana: The role of laboratory training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The laboratory is considered the cornerstone of tuberculosis (TB) control programme. International review of Ghana's programme in the late nineties identified the laboratory services as the weakest component. Sputum smear microscopy (SSM) being the main method of diagnosing pulmonary TB in Ghana, the ...

  8. Prepared for Practice? Interns’ Experiences of Undergraduate Clinical Skills Training in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Morris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Many previous studies on internship have reported a lack of preparedness for the role. More recently in Ireland, medical schools have introduced formal clinical skills training programmes. This study sought to evaluate the impact, if any, of formal skills training in the medical training on intern's preparedness for practice. Methods The study utilized a survey approach followed by focus group discussions. The aim was to identify the skills that were taught and assessed in medical training and the skills that were actually required in their intern year. Results Most interns had received skills training in designated skills laboratories. No intern had received training in all skills advised in the European guidelines. Skills taught to all interns were intravenous cannulation, basic life support, and basic suture. Skills required from all interns were intravenous cannulation, phlebotomy, and arterial blood sampling. Removal of peripherally inserted central line (PICC lines, central lines, and chest drains were commonly requested but not taught. Senior staff underestimated skill abilities and expected failure. Conclusion These findings identify discordance between the skills taught and the skills required in the job. There is a need for standardization in the clinical skills training to ensure that all interns enter practice with equal competencies. Consideration should be given to experiential learning opportunities such as subintern programmes to consolidate learning and improve preparedness. Improvement in communications with senior clinicians is indicated to ensure that expectations are realistic and reflective of actual training.

  9. Implementing portfolio in postgraduate general practice training. Benefits and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Fawaz S

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a review to explore the literature focusing on portfolio in postgraduate general practice (GP) training, and to examine the impact of implementation of portfolio on learning process, as well as proposing recommendations for its implementation in postgraduate GP training. An electronic search was carried out on several databases for studies addressing portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Six articles were included to address specifically the effectiveness of portfolio in postgraduate GP training. Five of them described successful experiences of portfolio-based learning implementation. Only one article addressed portfolio-based assessment in postgraduate GP training. The existing evidence provides various benefits of professional portfolio-based learning. It does appear to have advantages of stimulating reflective learning, promoting proactive learning, and bridging the hospital experiences of the learners to GP. Moreover, the challenges to implementation of portfolio-based learning are often based on orientation and training of stakeholders.

  10. Practical opto-electronics an illustrated guide for the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Protopopov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This book explains how to create opto-electronic systems in a most efficient way, avoiding typical mistakes. It covers light detection techniques, imaging, interferometry, spectroscopy, modulation-demodulation, heterodyning, beam steering, and many other topics common to laboratory applications. The focus is made on self-explanatory figures rather than on words. The book guides the reader through the entire process of creating problem-specific opto-electronic systems, starting from optical source, through beam transportation optical arrangement, to photodetector and data acquisition system. The relevant basics of beam propagation and computer-based raytracing routines are also explained, and sample codes are listed. the book teaches important know-how and practical tricks that are never disclosed in scientific publications.  The book can become the reader's personal adviser in the world of opto-electronics and navigator in the ocean of the market of optical components and systems. Succinct, well-illustrate...

  11. Practical aspects of operating a neutron activation analysis laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This book is intended to advise in everyday practical problems related to operating a neutron activation analysis (NAA) laboratory. It gives answers to questions like ''what to use NAA for'', ''how to find relevant research problems'', ''how to find users for the technique'', ''how to estimate the cost of the analysis and how to finance the work'', ''how to organize the work in a rational way'' and ''how to perform the quality control''. It gives advice in choosing staff, equipment, and consumables and how to design facilities and procedures according to need and available resources. Potential applications of economic or environmental importance, reactor facilities, counting and measuring equipment of the lab, cooperation with other analytical groups and competitiveness of NAA are discussed by experienced analysts. The compiled 8 tables of data useful for neutron activation analysts are a valuable asset for research labs as well as industrial quality control units. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Training Pathology Residents to Practice 21st Century Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Stephen Black-Schaffer MA, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific advances, open information access, and evolving health-care economics are disrupting extant models of health-care delivery. Physicians increasingly practice as team members, accountable to payers and patients, with improved efficiency, value, and quality. This change along with a greater focus on population health affects how systems of care are structured and delivered. Pathologists are not immune to these disruptors and, in fact, may be one of the most affected medical specialties. In the coming decades, it is likely that the number of practicing pathologists will decline, requiring each pathologist to serve more and often sicker patients. The demand for increasingly sophisticated yet broader diagnostic skills will continue to grow. This will require pathologists to acquire appropriate professional training and interpersonal skills. Today’s pathology training programs are ill designed to prepare such practitioners. The time to practice for most pathology trainees is typically 5 to 6 years. Yet, trainees often lack sufficient experience to practice independently and effectively. Many studies have recognized these challenges suggesting that more effective training for this new century can be implemented. Building on the strengths of existing programs, we propose a redesign of pathology residency training that will meet (and encourage a continuing evolution of American Board of Pathology and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements, reduce the time to readiness for practice, and produce more effective, interactive, and adaptable pathologists. The essence of this new model is clear definition and acquisition of core knowledge and practice skills that span the anatomic and clinical pathology continuum during the first 2 years, assessed by competency-based metrics with emphasis on critical thinking and skill acquisition, followed by individualized modular training with intensively progressive responsibility

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory JOWOG 31 Weapons Engineering Education & Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domzalski, Mark W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-03

    The objectives of this report are to recruit talented staff, invest in new and early/mid career staff, retain trained and talented staff and future leaders, and shorten the ~5-10 year time line to realize new Weaponeers.

  14. Outcome of a one-week intensive training workshop for veterinary diagnostic laboratory workers in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Julie A; Tornquist, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    There is a huge unmet need for veterinary diagnostic laboratory services in developing nations such as Liberia. One way of bridging the service gap is for visiting experts to provide veterinary laboratory training to technicians in a central location in a short-course format. An intensive 1-week training workshop was organized for 18 student and faculty participants from the College of Agriculture and Integrated Development Studies (CAIDS) at Cuttington University in rural central Liberia. The training was designed and delivered by the non-governmental organization Veterinarians Without Borders US and funded through a Farmer-to-Farmer grant provided by the United States Agency for International Development. Although at the start of training none of the students had any veterinary laboratory experience, by the end of the course over 80% of the students were able to discuss appropriate care and use of a microscope and name at least three important components of laboratory record keeping; over 60% were able to describe how to make and stain a blood smear and how to perform a passive fecal flotation; and over 30% were able to describe what a packed cell volume is and how it is measured and name at least three criteria for classifying bacteria. The intensive training workshop greatly improved the knowledge of trainees about veterinary diagnostic laboratory techniques. The training provided initial skills to students and faculty who are awaiting the arrival of additional grant-funded laboratory equipment to continue their training.

  15. Using Focused Laboratory Management and Quality Improvement Projects to Enhance Resident Training and Foster Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Bradley A.; Klutts, J. Stacey; Jensen, Chris S.; Briggs, Angela S.; Robinson, Robert A.; Bruch, Leslie A.; Karandikar, Nitin J.

    2017-01-01

    Training in patient safety, quality, and management is widely recognized as an important element of graduate medical education. These concepts have been intertwined in pathology graduate medical education for many years, although training programs face challenges in creating explicit learning opportunities in these fields. Tangibly involving pathology residents in management and quality improvement projects has the potential to teach and reinforce key concepts and further fulfill Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education goals for pursuing projects related to patient safety and quality improvement. In this report, we present our experience at a pathology residency program (University of Iowa) in engaging pathology residents in projects related to practical issues of laboratory management, process improvement, and informatics. In this program, at least 1 management/quality improvement project, typically performed during a clinical chemistry/management rotation, was required and ideally resulted in a journal publication. The residency program also initiated a monthly management/informatics series for pathology externs, residents, and fellows that covers a wide range of topics. Since 2010, all pathology residents at the University of Iowa have completed at least 1 management/quality improvement project. Many of the projects involved aspects of laboratory test utilization, with some projects focused on other areas such as human resources, informatics, or process improvement. Since 2012, 31 peer-reviewed journal articles involving effort from 26 residents have been published. Multiple projects resulted in changes in ongoing practice, particularly within the hospital electronic health record. Focused management/quality improvement projects involving pathology residents can result in both meaningful quality improvement and scholarly output. PMID:28913416

  16. Using Focused Laboratory Management and Quality Improvement Projects to Enhance Resident Training and Foster Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowski, Matthew D; Ford, Bradley A; Klutts, J Stacey; Jensen, Chris S; Briggs, Angela S; Robinson, Robert A; Bruch, Leslie A; Karandikar, Nitin J

    2017-01-01

    Training in patient safety, quality, and management is widely recognized as an important element of graduate medical education. These concepts have been intertwined in pathology graduate medical education for many years, although training programs face challenges in creating explicit learning opportunities in these fields. Tangibly involving pathology residents in management and quality improvement projects has the potential to teach and reinforce key concepts and further fulfill Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education goals for pursuing projects related to patient safety and quality improvement. In this report, we present our experience at a pathology residency program (University of Iowa) in engaging pathology residents in projects related to practical issues of laboratory management, process improvement, and informatics. In this program, at least 1 management/quality improvement project, typically performed during a clinical chemistry/management rotation, was required and ideally resulted in a journal publication. The residency program also initiated a monthly management/informatics series for pathology externs, residents, and fellows that covers a wide range of topics. Since 2010, all pathology residents at the University of Iowa have completed at least 1 management/quality improvement project. Many of the projects involved aspects of laboratory test utilization, with some projects focused on other areas such as human resources, informatics, or process improvement. Since 2012, 31 peer-reviewed journal articles involving effort from 26 residents have been published. Multiple projects resulted in changes in ongoing practice, particularly within the hospital electronic health record. Focused management/quality improvement projects involving pathology residents can result in both meaningful quality improvement and scholarly output.

  17. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Zehra; Bozkurt, M Fani; Erbas, Belkıs; Durak, Hatice

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before.

  18. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Zehra [Ege University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Izmir (Turkey); Bozkurt, M. Fani; Erbas, Belkis [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Durak, Hatice [Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Izmir (Turkey)

    2017-05-15

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozcan, Zehra; Bozkurt, M. Fani; Erbas, Belkis; Durak, Hatice

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before. (orig.)

  20. Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists.

    KAUST Repository

    Via, Allegra

    2013-06-25

    The mountains of data thrusting from the new landscape of modern high-throughput biology are irrevocably changing biomedical research and creating a near-insatiable demand for training in data management and manipulation and data mining and analysis. Among life scientists, from clinicians to environmental researchers, a common theme is the need not just to use, and gain familiarity with, bioinformatics tools and resources but also to understand their underlying fundamental theoretical and practical concepts. Providing bioinformatics training to empower life scientists to handle and analyse their data efficiently, and progress their research, is a challenge across the globe. Delivering good training goes beyond traditional lectures and resource-centric demos, using interactivity, problem-solving exercises and cooperative learning to substantially enhance training quality and learning outcomes. In this context, this article discusses various pragmatic criteria for identifying training needs and learning objectives, for selecting suitable trainees and trainers, for developing and maintaining training skills and evaluating training quality. Adherence to these criteria may help not only to guide course organizers and trainers on the path towards bioinformatics training excellence but, importantly, also to improve the training experience for life scientists.

  1. GOOD PRACTICES REGARDING PRESCHOOL AND PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS` INITIAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela V. KELEMEN

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The training of future preschool and primary school teachers at a high quality level is a main goal of our institution and all our efforts are channelled towards fulfilling it. Being a teacher is a science, a science based on competences acquired while attending well-structured lectures that mingle theoretical knowledge with practical assignments. Students acquire knowledge, abilities and develop field related competences during initial training but three years of study are not enough. The Law of Education regulates the following amendment: in order for a teacher to be well trained to meet the requirements of the third millennium it is necessary for him/her to continue the training in level II i.e. master degree, which provides additional competences. In this article we discuss a master programme developed within an European project that offers educational training according to the requirements of a high quality training both practical and theoretical. The components of the Master programme entitled Psychopedagogy of early education and young schooling containa curriculum adjusted to the requirements of a competitive higher education, the courses and seminars are the result of a thorough analysis of different educational models that have been implemented in other European countries. Currently, we are at the end of the first year and we want to share the good practices obtained so far.

  2. Training practices and ergogenic aids used by male bodybuilders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Daniel A; Johnson, Nathan A; Chow, Chin-Moi

    2013-06-01

    Bodybuilding involves performing a series of poses on stage where the competitor is judged on aesthetic muscular appearance. The purpose of this study was to describe training practices and ergogenic aids used by competitive bodybuilders and to determine whether training practices comply with current recommendations for muscular hypertrophy. A web-based survey was completed by 127 competitive male bodybuilders. The results showed that during the off-season phase of training (OFF), the majority of respondents performed 3-6 sets per exercise (95.3%), 7-12 repetition maximum (RM) per set (77.0%), and 61- to 120-seconds recovery between sets and exercises (68.6%). However, training practices changed 6 weeks before competition (PRE), where there was an increased number of respondents who reported undertaking 3-4 sets per exercise at the expense of 5-6 sets per exercise (p competitions (56 of 73 respondents), whereas dietary supplementation was used by all respondents. The findings of this study demonstrate that competitive bodybuilders comply with current resistance exercise recommendations for muscular hypertrophy; however, these changed before competition during which there is a reduction resistance training volume and intensity. This alteration, in addition to an increase in aerobic exercise volume, is purportedly used to increase muscle definition. However, these practices may increase the risk of muscle mass loss in natural compared with amateur bodybuilders who reportedly use drugs known to preserve muscle mass.

  3. Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Via, Allegra; Blicher, Thomas; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    their data efficiently, and progress their research, is a challenge across the globe. Delivering good training goes beyond traditional lectures and resource-centric demos, using interactivity, problem-solving exercises and cooperative learning to substantially enhance training quality and learning outcomes...... to environmental researchers, a common theme is the need not just to use, and gain familiarity with, bioinformatics tools and resources but also to understand their underlying fundamental theoretical and practical concepts. Providing bioinformatics training to empower life scientists to handle and analyse...

  4. The Effects of Practice-Based Training on Graduate Teaching Assistants’ Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Erin A.; Easlon, Erin J.; Potter, Sarah C.; Guzman-Alvarez, Alberto; Spear, Jensen M.; Facciotti, Marc T.; Igo, Michele M.; Singer, Mitchell; Pagliarulo, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based teaching is a highly complex skill, requiring repeated cycles of deliberate practice and feedback to master. Despite existing well-characterized frameworks for practice-based training in K–12 teacher education, the major principles of these frameworks have not yet been transferred to instructor development in higher educational contexts, including training of graduate teaching assistants (GTAs). We sought to determine whether a practice-based training program could help GTAs learn and use evidence-based teaching methods in their classrooms. We implemented a weekly training program for introductory biology GTAs that included structured drills of techniques selected to enhance student practice, logic development, and accountability and reduce apprehension. These elements were selected based on their previous characterization as dimensions of active learning. GTAs received regular performance feedback based on classroom observations. To quantify use of target techniques and levels of student participation, we collected and coded 160 h of video footage. We investigated the relationship between frequency of GTA implementation of target techniques and student exam scores; however, we observed no significant relationship. Although GTAs adopted and used many of the target techniques with high frequency, techniques that enforced student participation were not stably adopted, and their use was unresponsive to formal feedback. We also found that techniques discussed in training, but not practiced, were not used at quantifiable frequencies, further supporting the importance of practice-based training for influencing instructional practices. PMID:29146664

  5. A Practical MC and A Inspection Training Approach for Gosatomnadzor of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, Kenneth R.; Krupchatnikov, B.; Wright, T.; Key, C.; Coady, K.; Kilmartin, W.; Hawkins, R.; Kodman, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Russian nuclear materials control and accounting (MC and A) program has undergone many changes over the last five years. New technologies have been introduced; personnel have been trained; and new regulations are being developed. Gosatomnadzor of Russia (GAN), as the state oversight authority for the control and accounting of nuclear materials used for civil purposes, has the responsibility to assure that nuclear materials are controlled, accounted for, and used only for peaceful and defensive purposes. To ensure that GAN inspectors are fully capable and able to carry out this objective, an extensive training program has been developed. One activity under this program was a practical MC and A training exercise conducted in the U.S. at an Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) Category I nuclear material facility. This paper describes the development of the exercise in the U.S., the inspection activities conducted, an evaluation of the results, lessons learned, and recommendations for future inspector training programs

  6. Internal Quality Control Practices in Coagulation Laboratories: recommendations based on a patterns-of-practice survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, A; Aslan, B; Raby, A; Moffat, K A; Selby, R; Padmore, R

    2015-12-01

    Internal quality control (IQC) procedures are crucial for ensuring accurate patient test results. The IQMH Centre for Proficiency Testing conducted a web-based survey to gather information on the current IQC practices in coagulation testing. A questionnaire was distributed to 174 Ontario laboratories licensed to perform prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). All laboratories reported using two levels of commercial QC (CQC); 12% incorporate pooled patient plasma into their IQC program; >68% run CQC at the beginning of each shift; 56% following maintenance, with reagent changes, during a shift, or with every repeat sample; 6% only run CQC at the beginning of the day and 25% when the instruments have been idle for a defined period of time. IQC run frequency was determined by manufacturer recommendations (71%) but also influenced by the stability of test (27%), clinical impact of an incorrect test result (25%), and sample's batch number (10%). IQC was monitored using preset limits based on standard deviation (66%), precision goals (46%), or allowable performance limits (36%). 95% use multirules. Failure actions include repeating the IQC (90%) and reporting patient results; if repeat passes, 42% perform repeat analysis of all patient samples from last acceptable IQC. Variability exists in coagulation IQC practices among Ontario clinical laboratories. The recommendations presented here would be useful in encouraging standardized IQC practices. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Exploring accountability of clinical ethics consultants: practice and training implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Kathryn L; Daly, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Clinical ethics consultants represent a multidisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners with varied training backgrounds, who are integrated into a medical environment to assist in the provision of ethically supportable care. Little has been written about the degree to which such consultants are accountable for the patient care outcome of the advice given. We propose a model for examining degrees of internally motivated accountability that range from restricted to unbounded accountability, and support balanced accountability as a goal for practice. Finally, we explore implications of this model for training of clinical ethics consultants from diverse academic backgrounds, including those disciplines that do not have a formal code of ethics relating to clinical practice.

  8. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Asia and the Pacific. Workshop on training nuclear laboratory technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeed, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    The workshop was held to exchange information on existing facilities and programmes in Asia and the Pacific for training nuclear laboratory technicians, to identify future training needs and to assess the need for IAEA's involvement in this field. As the participants outlined the requirements for nuclear laboratory technician training and the facilities available in their respective countries, it became evident that, in addition to the training of radioisotope laboratory technicians, they also wished to review the need for technician training for the operation of nuclear power plants and industrial application of atomic energy. The terms of reference of the workshop were extended accordingly. The opening address by Chang Suk Lee, the Korean Vice Minister of Science and Technology, noted the valuable contribution to quality control and other industrial uses that nuclear techniques have made in his country. He also reviewed the application of nuclear techniques in Korean agriculture and medicine. The participants explored various forms of co-operation that could be established between countries of the region. Exchange programmes, not only for students but also for expert teachers, and the exchange or loan of equipment were suggested. It was felt that some generalized training courses could be organized on a regional basis, and two countries advocated the setting up of a regional training centre. One suggestion was to arrange regional training courses in special fields that would move from one country to another. The need was felt for periodic regional meetings on training methods, course content and other questions relating to training of laboratory technicians. The IAEA was requested to act as a clearinghouse for information on available training facilities in the region and to advise on the curricula for technician training courses. The Agency was also asked to organize short courses for the training of instructors of technicians in the various fields of atomic

  9. A Survey of Established Veterinary Clinical Skills Laboratories from Europe and North America: Present Practices and Recent Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilly, Marc; Read, Emma K; Baillie, Sarah

    Developing competence in clinical skills is important if graduates are to provide entry-level care, but it is dependent on having had sufficient hands-on practice. Clinical skills laboratories provide opportunities for students to learn on simulators and models in a safe environment and to supplement training with animals. Interest in facilities for developing veterinary clinical skills has increased in recent years as many veterinary colleges face challenges in training their students with traditional methods alone. For the present study, we designed a survey to gather information from established veterinary clinical skills laboratories with the aim of assisting others considering opening or expanding their own facility. Data were collated from 16 veterinary colleges in North America and Europe about the uses of their laboratory, the building and associated facilities, and the staffing, budgets, equipment, and supporting learning resources. The findings indicated that having a dedicated veterinary clinical skills laboratory is a relatively new initiative and that colleges have adopted a range of approaches to implementing and running the laboratory, teaching, and assessments. Major strengths were the motivation and positive characteristics of the staff involved, providing open access and supporting self-directed learning. However, respondents widely recognized the increasing demands placed on the facility to provide more space, equipment, and staff. There is no doubt that veterinary clinical skills laboratories are on the increase and provide opportunities to enhance student learning, complement traditional training, and benefit animal welfare.

  10. Open soundcard as a platform for practical, laboratory study of digital audio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Smilen; Serafin, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates how lacking suitable platforms for laboratory exercises becomes a learning problem, limiting the practical experience students gain. In engineering education, laboratory demonstration difficulty of issues like real-time streaming in digital signal and audio processing...... afforded by such laboratories, and their open nature, could testably improve the diversity of demonstrated practical topics, while maintaining engineering students' motivation....

  11. Implementation of specific strength training among industrial laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Andersen, Christoffer Højnicke; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown positive effects of physical exercise at the workplace on musculoskeletal disorders. However, long-term adherence remains a challenge. The present study evaluates long-term adherence and effects of a workplace strength training intervention on back, neck and upper extr...

  12. Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs in sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A competently trained public health workforce that can operate multi-disease surveillance and response systems is necessary to build upon and sustain these successes and to address other public health problems. Sub-Saharan Africa appears to have weathered the recent global economic downturn remarkably well and ...

  13. DUAL TRAINING IN RUSSIA: FROM THE CONCEPT TO PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Listvin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present article is to judge and justify the conditions of system elements application of dual training at implementation of programs of professional education for increase of efficiency of functioning and quality of preparation of qualified personnel by institutions of the secondary professional education (SPE. Methods. The methods used in work involve the comparative analysis of practice of application of dual training in system of professional education of Germany and regions of Russia for the purpose of identification of the existing problems and definition of optimum organizational and legal and didactic conditions. Results. The essence of system of dual training, its strong and weaknesses reveals. Necessary and indispensable conditions of application of dual training in modern regional systems of professional education are proved. Scientific novelty. According to the author, modern publications on problems and ways of development of professional education in Russia contain enough antinomy of standard and legal and organizational and administrative character. In particular, operating by the concept «dual education», an identification of the practice-focused and dual training introduction «the list 50 of the most demanded in labor market, the new and perspective professions that demand secondary professional education» as opposed to the existing list of professions and the constitutional guarantee of public and free secondary professional education. Standard and legal, and didactic conditions of application of elements of dual training in regional systems of professional education are proved theoretically. Practical significance. Implementation of the research outcomes can be useful to pedagogical staff of institutions of secondary professional education, representatives of employers and Chambers of Commerce and Industry to the organization and use of system of dual training in training of skilled workers (serving

  14. Water Quality & Pollutant Source Monitoring: Field and Laboratory Procedures. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on techniques and instrumentation used to develop data in field monitoring programs and related laboratory operations concerned with water quality and pollution monitoring. Topics include: collection and handling of samples; bacteriological, biological, and chemical field and laboratory methods; field…

  15. Occupational safety training and practices in selected vocational training institutions and workplaces in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintu, Denis; Kyakula, Michael; Kikomeko, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Several industrial accidents, some of them fatal, have been reported in Uganda. Causes could include training gaps in vocational training institutions (VTIs) and workplaces. This study investigated how occupational safety training in VTIs and workplaces is implemented. The study was carried out in five selected VTIs and workplaces in Kampala. Data were collected from instructors, workshop technicians, students, workshop managers, production supervisors, machine operators and new technicians in the workplaces. A total of 35 respondents participated in the study. The results revealed that all curricula in VTIs include a component of safety but little is practiced in VTI workshops; in workplaces no specific training content was followed and there were no regular consultations between VTIs and industry on safety skills requirements, resulting in a mismatch in safety skills training. The major constraints to safety training include inadequate funds to purchase safety equipment and inadequate literature on safety.

  16. Training Psychologists for Rural Practice: Exploring Opportunities and Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa Elena; Lin, Ching-Ching Claire; Morrissey, Joseph P; Ellis, Alan R; Fraher, Erin; Richman, Erica L; Thomas, Kathleen C; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2018-04-17

    To examine trends in the psychologist workforce and training opportunities, including factors that may influence the decision of clinical psychologists to practice in rural settings. We use a mixed-methods approach to examine the psychologist workforce nationally and in North Carolina (NC), including (1) an analysis of the location of programs awarding doctoral degrees; (2) an analysis of the practice, demographic, and educational characteristics of the psychologist workforce; and (3) interviews with directors of doctoral programs in clinical psychology to understand where current graduates are getting jobs and why they may or may not be choosing to practice in rural communities. Fewer than 1% of programs and institutions awarding doctoral degrees in psychology in the United States are located in rural areas. In NC, approximately 80% of practicing psychologists have out-of-state degrees and about 80% of recent NC graduates are not currently licensed in the state. This juxtaposition undermines the utility of adding more in-state degree programs. While expansion of training programs within rural areas could help alleviate the shortages of mental health providers, adding new degree-granting programs alone will not necessarily increase supply. We discuss complementary recruitment and retention strategies, including greater incentives for rural training and practice as well as training in emerging technologies that don't require providers to be physically located in underserved areas, such as telemedicine. Increasing the supply of psychologists practicing in rural areas will require a thoughtful, multipronged approach to training this critical part of the behavioral health workforce. © 2018 National Rural Health Association.

  17. Script Templates: A Practical Approach to Script Training in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Rosalind C.; Cherney, Leora R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Script training for aphasia involves repeated practice of relevant phrases and sentences that, when mastered, can potentially be used in other communicative situations. Although an increasingly popular approach, script development can be time-consuming. We provide a detailed summary of the evidence supporting this approach. We then…

  18. Effects of Training on Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Training on Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Malaria Prevention and Control among Community Role Model Care Givers in South Western Nigeria. ... Multistage sampling method was adopted in selecting study participants, while data was analyzed using the SPSS software version 17.0. RESULTS: Mean age ...

  19. Learning medical history in Oslo: training for medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, O

    1999-03-01

    The teaching in medical history at the University of Oslo, Norway, is given as an integrated part of the student training for practical work in health care and community health. I summarize here the underlying argumentation and the teaching experiences, concluding that this is felt as an effective way to convey relevant medical historical knowledge and skills to the future doctors.

  20. Appraisal of systematic training practices by building construction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was observed that 89.65% and 91.38% of the respondents agree that management and technical staff training is only embarked on when needed: that ITF ... of building construction workers serves a means of maintaining standards and ensuring that those who are newly engaged into existing jobs and practices are able ...

  1. Exploring Virtual Mental Practice in Maintenance Task Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, Tim; Brnich, Michael J.; Navoyski, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to contribute to a general understanding of mental practice by investigating the utility of and participant reaction to a virtual reality maintenance training among underground coal mine first responders. Design/Methodology/Approach: Researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's Office of Mine…

  2. Handbook of library training practice and development volume 3

    CERN Document Server

    Brine, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Librarians must now work at a different level from that required 20 years ago, but the training available is not always appropriate or accessible to all. The authors of this volume have responded to this significant and continuing change within the profession by offering a much-needed guide to best practice for staff training and development in library and information work. This handbook addresses new aspects of service provision both in the UK and abroad, and provides an up-to-date review of the current developments that are becoming increasingly important to librarians through the influence of the electronic age and the widening of areas of professional involvement. The Handbook of Library Training Practice and Development will be invaluable to those responsible for the development of staff and line managers as well as providing a crucial insight into the information profession for anyone new to this career path or looking to develop their knowledge within it.

  3. Training Graduate Teaching Assistants in the Geosciences: Our Practices vs. Perceived Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, R.; Ryker, K.; Bitting, K. S.

    2016-12-01

    Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) in the geosciences are responsible for teaching a large proportion of undergraduate students in many universities. Often, GTAs are primary instructors in small laboratory sections of large enrollment courses, putting them in the position of having a more personalized relationship with students, in what is often the most interactive portion of an introductory course. Anecdotally, geoscientists recognize that GTAs also have a broad range of responsibilities, but there is wide variation in the content and timing of the training they receive. Until now, no comprehensive survey has been conducted to capture and analyze this distribution in a systematic way. Data from a nationwide survey of 120 geoscientists is used here to characterize the ways GTAs are trained as well as respondents' priorities for GTA training. Respondents include faculty from PhD- and MS- granting institutions (81.4%) and MS-only granting institutions (18.5%). According to the survey, most GTAs teach laboratory sections (95.6%), and many teach lecture sections (38.9%). In many cases, GTAs support instructors during or outside of the "lecture" section (e.g. grading, 77.1%). Of GTAs who teach lecture or lab sections, most receive required training from their department or the university, commonly on a single day just before the start of the semester. GTA training typically includes logistical information (where to find materials, professionalism), but less than 40% of GTAs are required to participate in pedagogical training. In contrast, pedagogy was most often rated very important or important (74.2%) by survey respondents. The disconnect between the geoscience community's current practices in GTA training and our current values suggests that GTA training programs are needed, and that the community can benefit from reports on the success of existing programs and the dissemination of adaptable models for GTA pedagogical training.

  4. Variability of ethics education in laboratory medicine training programs: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, David E; Burtis, Carl A; Gronowski, Ann M; McQueen, Matthew J; Newman, Anthony; Jonsson, Jon J

    2015-03-10

    Ethical considerations are increasingly important in medicine. We aimed to determine the mode and extent of teaching of ethics in training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. We developed an on-line survey of teaching in areas of ethics relevant to laboratory medicine. Reponses were invited from directors of training programs who were recruited via email to leaders of national organizations. The survey was completed by 80 directors from 24 countries who directed 113 programs. The largest numbers of respondents directed postdoctoral training of scientists (42%) or physicians (33%), post-masters degree programs (33%), and PhD programs (29%). Most programs (82%) were 2years or longer in duration. Formal training was offered in research ethics by 39%, medical ethics by 31%, professional ethics by 24% and business ethics by 9%. The number of reported hours of formal training varied widely, e.g., from 0 to >15h/year for research ethics and from 0 to >15h for medical ethics. Ethics training was required and/or tested in 75% of programs that offered training. A majority (54%) of respondents reported plans to add or enhance training in ethics; many indicated a desire for online resources related to ethics, especially resources with self-assessment tools. Formal teaching of ethics is absent from many training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, with heterogeneity in the extent and methods of ethics training among the programs that provide the training. A perceived need exists for online training tools, especially tools with self-assessment components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Research in Architectural Education: Theory and Practice of Visual Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Jones

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, the significance of vision is often considered from multiple points of view including perceptual, cognitive, imaginative, historical, technical, ethical, cultural, and critical perspectives.  Visual Studies, Visual Communication and Visual Design are popular courses of study.  This paper brings to light a course in architectural education called Visual Training which aims to sharpen visual perception and enhance aesthetic judgment. The paper articulates the pedagogy of Visual Training linking the 78-year old practice with educational theory.  It describes the course structure, the conduct of the exercises and interpretation of course outcomes to inform teaching practice.  The discussion shows how Visual Training addresses enduring pedagogical concerns and establishes the grounds for architectural critique. The paper raises awareness of the role of vision in architectural education and brings attention to a program for developing the eye which acknowledges a connection between the sensory and the intellectual realms.  Looking at the grounds and potential of Visual Training in architectural education raises important questions about pedagogy in architecture that may stimulate further discussion and cause a rethinking of not only the importance of training the eye, but also the significance of the methods we use.

  6. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic. (orig.)

  7. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel [University Hospital Olomouc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic. (orig.)

  8. New teaching methods for practical training in nursing within the project Tempus IV – CCNURCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Kuriplachová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present new teaching methods for practical training in nursing within the project Tempus IV – CCNURCA (Competency based Curriculum Reform in Nursing and Healthcare in Western Balkan Universities No. 544169-TEMPUS-1-2013-1-BE-TEMPUS-JPCR. Implementation of new practical teaching methods, such as learning with simulator mannequins, practical workshop, nursing process, mind mapping, case studies and problem-based learning (PBL in practical training could help to improve the quality of the educational process in nursing at Universities of Western Balkan countries that have been involved in this project. The realistic conditions in simulation laboratories are reflecting real hospital and patient´s care, communication with patient and hospital staff, discussion and analysis of all student´s activities. The methods of next nursing generation in practical training that can help nurses to get used to the recognition and management of patients by using of simulated real life situations.

  9. Code of practice for safety in laboratory - non ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli Jaya; Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali; Khoo Boo Huat; Khatijah Hashim

    1995-01-01

    The code identifies the non-ionizing radiation encountered in laboratories and the associated hazards. The code is intended as a laboratory standard reference document for general information on safety requirements relating to the usage of non-ionizing radiations in laboratories. The nonionizing radiations cover in this code, namely, are ultraviolet radiation, visible light, radio-frequency radiation, lasers, sound waves and ultrasonic radiation. (author)

  10. The use of practicals in health physics training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, L.; Dutch, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    The authors are Health Physicists who, having worked at Nuclear Power Stations, are now experienced tutors employed at Nuclear Electric's Nuclear Training Centre at Oldbury-on-Severn. The Centre provides training at professional and technician levels in all aspects of nuclear and associated technologies to operating and support staff throughout Nuclear Electric. For many years the authors have lectured on radiological protection to groups with widely differing backgrounds: Engineers, Scientists and Industrial Staff, including Contractors. This paper will discuss the authors' experiences in using practicals and exercises to reinforce traditional lectures. (author)

  11. Practical Qualitative Research Strategies: Training Interviewers and Coders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, L Suzanne; Stage, Virginia C; Cooke, Natalie K

    2016-09-01

    The increased emphasis on incorporating qualitative methodologies into nutrition education development and evaluation underscores the importance of using rigorous protocols to enhance the trustworthiness of the findings. A 5-phase protocol for training qualitative research assistants (data collectors and coders) was developed as an approach to increase the consistency of the data produced. This training provides exposure to the core principles of qualitative research and then asks the research assistant to apply those principles through practice in a setting structured on critical reflection. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Value of a regional family practice residency training program site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Sarah; Mullett, Jennifer; Beerman, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the perceptions of residents, nurses, and physicians about the effect of a regional family practice residency site on the delivery of health services in the community, as well as on the community health care providers. Design Interviews and focus groups were conducted. Setting Nanaimo, BC. Participants A total of 16 residents, 15 nurses, and 20 physicians involved with the family practice residency training program at the Nanaimo site. Methods A series of semistructured interviews and focus groups was conducted. Transcripts of interviews and focus groups were analyzed thematically by the research team. Main findings Overall, participants agreed that having a family practice residency training site in the community contributed to community life and to the delivery of health services in the following ways: increased community capacity and social capital; motivated positive relationships and attitudes in the hospital and community settings; improved communication and teamwork, as well as accessibility and understanding of the health care system; increased the standard of care; and facilitated the recruitment and retention of family physicians. Conclusion This family practice residency training site was beneficial for the community it served. Future planning for distributed medical education sites should take into account the effects of these sites on the health care community and ensure that they continue to be positive influences. Further research in this area could focus on patients’ perceptions of how residency programs affect their care, as well as on the effect of residency programs on wait times and workload for physicians and nurses. PMID:25217693

  13. EEG Brain Activity in Dynamic Health Qigong Training: Same Effects for Mental Practice and Physical Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henz, Diana; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant uptake of meditation and related relaxation techniques, as a means of alleviating stress and fostering an attentive mind. Several electroencephalogram (EEG) studies have reported changes in spectral band frequencies during Qigong meditation indicating a relaxed state. Much less is reported on effects of brain activation patterns induced by Qigong techniques involving bodily movement. In this study, we tested whether (1) physical Qigong training alters EEG theta and alpha activation, and (2) mental practice induces the same effect as a physical Qigong training. Subjects performed the dynamic Health Qigong technique Wu Qin Xi (five animals) physically and by mental practice in a within-subjects design. Experimental conditions were randomized. Two 2-min (eyes-open, eyes-closed) EEG sequences under resting conditions were recorded before and immediately after each 15-min exercise. Analyses of variance were performed for spectral power density data. Increased alpha power was found in posterior regions in mental practice and physical training for eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Theta power was increased after mental practice in central areas in eyes-open conditions, decreased in fronto-central areas in eyes-closed conditions. Results suggest that mental, as well as physical Qigong training, increases alpha activity and therefore induces a relaxed state of mind. The observed differences in theta activity indicate different attentional processes in physical and mental Qigong training. No difference in theta activity was obtained in physical and mental Qigong training for eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state. In contrast, mental practice of Qigong entails a high degree of internalized attention that correlates with theta activity, and that is dependent on eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state.

  14. The EC4 European syllabus for post-graduate training in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine: version 4--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Gijsbert; Zerah, Simone; Jansen, Rob; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Queralto, José; Solnica, Bogdan; Gruson, Damien; Tomberg, Karel; Riittinen, Leena; Baum, Hannsjörg; Brochet, Jean-Philippe; Buhagiar, Gerald; Charilaou, Charis; Grigore, Camelia; Johnsen, Anders H; Kappelmayer, Janos; Majkic-Singh, Nada; Nubile, Giuseppe; O'Mullane, John; Opp, Matthias; Pupure, Silvija; Racek, Jaroslav; Reguengo, Henrique; Rizos, Demetrios; Rogic, Dunja; Špaňár, Július; Štrakl, Greta; Szekeres, Thomas; Tzatchev, Kamen; Vitkus, Dalius; Wallemacq, Pierre; Wallinder, Hans

    2012-08-01

    Laboratory medicine's practitioners across the European community include medical, scientific and pharmacy trained specialists whose contributions to health and healthcare is in the application of diagnostic tests for screening and early detection of disease, differential diagnosis, monitoring, management and treatment of patients, and their prognostic assessment. In submitting a revised common syllabus for post-graduate education and training across the 27 member states an expectation is set for harmonised, high quality, safe practice. In this regard an extended 'Core knowledge, skills and competencies' division embracing all laboratory medicine disciplines is described. For the first time the syllabus identifies the competencies required to meet clinical leadership demands for defining, directing and assuring the efficiency and effectiveness of laboratory services as well as expectations in translating knowledge and skills into ability to practice. In a 'Specialist knowledge' division, the expectations from the individual disciplines of Clinical Chemistry/Immunology, Haematology/Blood Transfusion, Microbiology/ Virology, Genetics and In Vitro Fertilisation are described. Beyond providing a common platform of knowledge, skills and competency, the syllabus supports the aims of the European Commission in providing safeguards to increasing professional mobility across European borders at a time when demand for highly qualified professionals is increasing and the labour force is declining. It continues to act as a guide for the formulation of national programmes supplemented by the needs of individual country priorities.

  15. Guide to good practices for on-the-job training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE) Guide to Good Practices for On-the-Job Training (OJT) is to provide DOE contractor organizations with information that can be used to modify existing programs or to develop new programs. This guide replaces the Guide to Good Practices for On-the-Job Training that was distributed to DOE and DOE contractors in 1987. DOE contractors should not feel obligated to adopt all parts of this guide. Rather, they can use the information in this guide to develop programs that apply to their facility. This guide can be used as an aid in the design and development of a facility's OJT programs and to assist the instructors who conduct OJT and performance tests in the areas of facility operations, maintenance, and technical supports.

  16. Summary of the East Africa Training Consortium Biorisk Management Practices and Training Needs Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Julie; Mancini, Giulio M.; Wakabi, Timothy; Boggs, Susan E.

    2017-03-01

    A survey was designed to query former Biorisk management (BRM) trainees in the East Africa region about their practices post-training and their perceived future training needs. A subset of those surveyed had been trained as BRM trainers. The survey was conducted to obtain a baseline of BRM practices that can serve as a benchmark for performance monitoring, to identify priorities for future BRM training and to gauge local BRM trainers' abilities to deliver effective training. The survey revealed that less than 50% of the respondents could identify evidence of a BRM system in their institute. Coaching and mentoring by BRM experts was identified as being of highest benefit to enable success as BRM practitioners. Local trainers reached 1538 trainees in the previous year and reported that trainings positively correlated with desired BRM behavior. Acknowledgements The authors wish to sincerely thank all of the former biorisk management trainees in East Africa who agreed to participate in this survey. Their candid and honest input was extremely insightful. We also thank Lora Grainger (06826) and Ben Brodsky (Manager, 06824) for careful and critical review of the report. We are grateful for the financial support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Cooperative Biological Engagement Program.

  17. Evaluation of a training program for device operators in the Australian Government's Point of Care Testing in General Practice Trial: issues and implications for rural and remote practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Mark D; Mazzachi, Beryl C; Watkinson, Les; Shephard, Anne K; Laurence, Caroline; Gialamas, Angela; Bubner, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    From September 2005 to February 2007 the Australian Government funded the Point of Care Testing (PoCT) in General Practice Trial, a multi-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial to determine the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and satisfaction of PoCT in General Practice. In total, 53 practices (23 control and 30 intervention) based in urban, rural or remote locations across three states (South Australia [SA], New South Wales [NSW] and Victoria [VIC]) participated in the Trial. Control practices had pathology testing performed by their local laboratory, while intervention practices conducted pathology testing by PoCT. In total, 4968 patients (1958 control and 3010 intervention) participated in the Trial. The point-of-care (PoC) tests performed by intervention practices were: haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) on patients with diabetes, total cholesterol, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol on patients with hyperlipidaemia, and international normalised ratio (INR) on patients on anticoagulant therapy. Three PoCT devices measured these tests: the Siemens DCA 2000 (Siemens HealthCare Diagnostics, Melbourne, VIC, Australia) for HbA1c and urine ACR; Point of Care Diagnostics Cholestech LDX analyser (Point of Care Diagnostics; Sydney, NSW, Australia) for lipids; and the Roche CoaguChek S (Roche Diagnostics; Sydney, NSW, Australia) for INR. Point-of-care testing in the General Practice Trial was underpinned by a quality management framework which included an on-going training and competency program for PoCT device operators. This article describes the design, implementation and results of the training and competency program. An education and training resource package was developed for the Trial consisting of a training manual, a set of A3 laminated posters and a CD ROM. Five initial training workshops were held for intervention practices from each geographic region between August and October 2005

  18. Secondary standard dosimetry laboratory Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center Ankara, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okruhlica, P.

    2014-01-01

    Turkish Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANA) was founded in 2005. In 2014 the company PTW Freiburg in cooperation with VF Cerna Hora started the construction of a comprehensive national metrology laboratories of ionizing radiation 'Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory' (SSDL). The laboratory will be located in the area of 'Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center' in Ankara in Turkey. SSDL will be equipped with metrology departments for calibration and measurement of standard required quantities of metrology of ionizing radiation: - Neutron workplace; Gamma workplace (low-energy X-ray, gamma Standard Cs-137 and high dose rate, Co-60); - Beta workplace; - Control system of metrology laboratories and irradiation VF DARS; - Radiation monitoring system VF RMS; - Camera and security system; - Measuring instruments (ionization chambers, electrometers, monitors for environmental measurements ...) with the appropriate phantoms and other systems.

  19. Group fellowship training in nuclear spectroscopy instrumentation maintenance at the Seibersdorf Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Y.; Abdel-Rassoul, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy instruments are important tools for nuclear research and applications. Several types of nuclear spectrometers are being sent to numerous laboratories in developing countries through technical co-operation projects. These are mostly sophisticated systems based on different radiation detectors, analogue and digital circuitry. In most cases, they use microprocessor or computer techniques involving software and hardware. Maintenance service and repair of these systems is a major problem in many developing countries because suppliers do not set up service stations. The Agency's Laboratories at Seibersdorf started conducting group fellowship training on nuclear spectroscopy instrumentation maintenance in 1987. This article describes the training programme

  20. Report on the International Society for Laboratory Hematology Survey on guidelines to support clinical hematology laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, C P M; Moffat, K A; George, T I; Proytcheva, M; Iorio, A

    2016-05-01

    Given the importance of evidence-based guidelines in health care, we surveyed the laboratory hematology community to determine their opinions on guideline development and their experience and interest in developing clinical hematology laboratory practice guidelines. The study was conducted using an online survey, distributed to members of the International Society for Laboratory Hematology (ISLH) in 2015, with analysis of collected, anonymized responses. A total of 245 individuals participated. Most worked in clinical and/or research laboratories (83%) or industry (11%). 42% felt there were gaps in current guidelines. The majority (58%) recommended that ISLH engages its membership in guideline development. Participants differed in their familiarity with, and use of, different organizations' guidelines. Participants felt it was important to follow best practice recommendations on guideline development, including engagement of experts, statement about conflict of interests and how they were managed, systematic review and grading evidence for recommendations, identifying recommendations lacking evidence or consensus, and public input and peer review of the guideline. Moreover, it was considered important to provide guidelines free of charge. Industry involvement in guidelines was considered less important. The clinical laboratory hematology community has high expectations of laboratory practice guidelines that are consistent with recent recommendations on evidence-based guideline development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Establishment of Next-Generation Neurosurgery Research and Training Laboratory with Integrated Human Performance Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Quality of neurosurgical care and patient outcomes are inextricably linked to surgical and technical proficiency and a thorough working knowledge of microsurgical anatomy. Neurosurgical laboratory-based cadaveric training is essential for the development and refinement of technical skills before their use on a living patient. Recent biotechnological advances including 3-dimensional (3D) microscopy and endoscopy, 3D printing, virtual reality, surgical simulation, surgical robotics, and advanced neuroimaging have proved to reduce the learning curve, improve conceptual understanding of complex anatomy, and enhance visuospatial skills in neurosurgical training. Until recently, few means have allowed surgeons to obtain integrated surgical and technological training in an operating room setting. We report on a new model, currently in use at our institution, for technologically integrated surgical training and innovation using a next-generation microneurosurgery skull base laboratory designed to recreate the setting of a working operating room. Each workstation is equipped with a 3D surgical microscope, 3D endoscope, surgical drills, operating table with a Mayfield head holder, and a complete set of microsurgical tools. The laboratory also houses a neuronavigation system, a surgical robotic, a surgical planning system, 3D visualization, virtual reality, and computerized simulation for training of surgical procedures and visuospatial skills. In addition, the laboratory is equipped with neurophysiological monitoring equipment in order to conduct research into human factors in surgery and the respective roles of workload and fatigue on surgeons' performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biosafety in the Laboratory: Prudent Practices for the Handling and Disposal of Infectious Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    psittacosis, lymphogranuloma animal disease diagnostic laboratory). Biosafety Level venereum (LGV), and trachoma are documented APPENDIX A I11 hazards and...127 see also Facilities Lymphogranuloma venereum , 110-111 Laboratory practices academic laboratories, 68-69 M Biosafety Level 1, 90 Biosafety Level

  3. Awareness and practice of safety precautions among healthcare workers in the laboratories of two public health facilities in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyi, A; Fowotade, A; Abiodun, M O; Jimoh, A K; Nwabuisi, C; Desalu, O O

    2011-06-01

    To determine the level of awareness and practice of SP among laboratory workers at two tertiary public health facilities in Nigeria. A semi-structured, self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the awareness, attitude and adherence to SP among laboratory workers. Information on the availability of safety equipment was also sought. The laboratory safety practice of respondents was assessed based on self-reported observance of basic principles of universal precautions in clinical settings. Study participants were 130, mean age: 28.2 years (SD±6.6), number of years in hospital employment: 3.7 years (SD±2.4) and the male to female ratio was 1.8:1. Many (41.5%) were unaware and 25.4% do not observe SP. Participants attest to availability of various safety devices and equipment including hand gloves (86.2%), disinfectants (84.6%), HBV immunisation (46.2%) and post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for HIV and HBV (79.6%). Attitude to safety is unsatisfactory as 60.0% eat and drink in the laboratory, 50.8% recap needles and 56.9% use sharps box. Even though 83.1% are willing to take PEP, only 1.5% will present self following laboratory injury. This study shows the deficit in the awareness of SP among laboratory personnel and demonstrates that attitude and practice of safety rules are unsatisfactory. Training and re-training on SP is therefore desired. Counselling to induce a positive attitudinal change on HBV immunisation and PEP is similarly necessary.

  4. Laboratory training manual on the use of nuclear techniques in pesticide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This is a laboratory training manual on the use of nuclear techniques, and in particular radioisotopes in pesticide research. It is designed to give the scientists involved in pesticide research the basic terms and principles for understanding ionizing radiation: detection and measurement its hazards and safety measures, and some of the more common applications. Laboratory exercises representing the types of experiments that are valuable in pesticide research programmes and field tests which demonstrate the use of radiolabelled pesticides are included

  5. Characterizing Instructional Practices in the Laboratory: The Laboratory Observation Protocol for Undergraduate STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Jonathan B.; Knedeisen, Adam; Xue, Dihua; Vickrey, Trisha L.; Abebe, Marytza; Stains, Marilyne

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry laboratories play an essential role in the education of undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) and non-STEM students. The extent of student learning in any educational environment depends largely on the effectiveness of the instructors. In chemistry laboratories at large universities, the instructors of…

  6. A training course on laboratory animal science: an initiative to implement the Three Rs of animal research in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Kunal; Singh, Vijay Pal

    2016-03-01

    There is a current need for a change in the attitudes of researchers toward the care and use of experimental animals in India. This could be achieved through improvements in the provision of training, to further the integration of the Three Rs concept into scientific research and into the regulations of the Committee for the Purpose of Control and Supervision of Experiments on Animals (CPCSEA). A survey was performed after participants undertook the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations (FELASA) Category C-based course on Laboratory Animal Science (in 2013 and 2015). It revealed that the participants subsequently employed, in their future research, the practical and theoretical Three Rs approaches that they had learned. This is of great importance in terms of animal welfare, and also serves to benefit their research outcomes extensively. All the lectures, hands-on practical sessions and supplementary elements of the courses, which also involved the handling of small animals and procedures with live animals, were well appreciated by the participants. Insight into developments in practical handling and welfare procedures, norms, directives, and ethical use of laboratory animals in research, was also provided, through the comparison of results from the 2013 and 2015 post-course surveys. 2016 FRAME.

  7. THE LABORATORY WOOD DRIER - FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela ŞOVA; Virgil-Barbu UNGUREANU; Adrian POSTELNICU

    2012-01-01

    Based on the principle of similarity, the wood drying process can be investigated on a scale model, which is the laboratory drier, instead of the full-size industrial drier. Thus, the investigation is simplified and the drying time reduced. The laboratory drying kiln, developed by the research team, is a controlled climate air duct with closed circuit, fitted with a rectangular test section. The air flow is circulated by a centrifugal fan and the air heating is carried out by a set of electri...

  8. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 3 - Statement of Acceptable Practices With Respect to Ethics Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Practices With Respect to Ethics Training B Appendix B to Part 3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Practices With Respect to Ethics Training (a) The provisions of Section 4p(b) of the Act (7 U.S.C. 6p(b... ethics training sessions within six months of registration, and all registrants to attend such training...

  9. Good laboratory practices guarantee biosafety in the Sierra Leone-China friendship biosafety laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qin; Zhou, Wei-Min; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Huan-Yu; Du, Hai-Jun; Nie, Kai; Song, Jing-Dong; Xiao, Kang; Lei, Wen-Wen; Guo, Jian-Qiang; Wei, He-Jiang; Cai, Kun; Wang, Yan-Hai; Wu, Jiang; Kamara, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Background The outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa between 2014 and 2015 was the largest EDV epidemic since the identification of Ebola virus (EBOV) in 1976, and the countries most strongly affected were Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. Findings The Sierra Leone-China Friendship Biological Safety Laboratory (SLE-CHN Biosafety Lab), a fixed Biosafety Level 3 laboratory in the capital city of Sierra Leone, was established by the Chinese government and has been active in EBOV ...

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory Training Capabilities (Possible Applications in the Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-04

    The briefing provides an overview of the training capabilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that can be applied to nonproliferation/responsible science education at nuclear institutes in the Former Soviet Union, as part of the programmatic effort under the Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention program (GIPP).

  11. Theatre and laboratory workers' awareness of and safety practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The consistent use of barrier protection among theatre workers is low in this region, so also is hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination. We assessed the level of awareness of HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV), HBV vaccination and adoption of safety measures by theatre and laboratory workers. Methods: Structured ...

  12. THE LABORATORY WOOD DRIER - FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela ŞOVA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the principle of similarity, the wood drying process can be investigated on a scale model, which is the laboratory drier, instead of the full-size industrial drier. Thus, the investigation is simplified and the drying time reduced. The laboratory drying kiln, developed by the research team, is a controlled climate air duct with closed circuit, fitted with a rectangular test section. The air flow is circulated by a centrifugal fan and the air heating is carried out by a set of electric resistances. The selection of the fan and of the heating resistances was performed according to the aerodynamic and thermal calculations, presented in the paper. For the air humidification, in accordance to the drying schedule requirements, the drier has a steam generator that prepares steam which is injected in the air. The wood sample is placed within the drier on a device conceived for both sample support and vertical motion and also, for continuous weighing. By applying the principle of similarity for both, the industrial kiln and the laboratory drier, the required air velocity for the laboratory drier is determined, for constant values of the temperature and relative humidity of air. Different invariants,characteristic to the drying schedule that was applied, have been also calculated.

  13. [Software for illustrating a cost-quality balance carried out by clinical laboratory practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibori, Masahiro; Asayama, Hitoshi; Kimura, Satoshi; Takagi, Yasushi; Hagihara, Michio; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Yoneyama, Akiko; Watanabe, Takashi

    2010-09-01

    We have no proper reference indicating the quality of clinical laboratory practice, which should clearly illustrates that better medical tests require more expenses. Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine was concerned about recent difficult medical economy and issued a committee report proposing a guideline to evaluate the good laboratory practice. According to the guideline, we developed software that illustrate a cost-quality balance carried out by clinical laboratory practice. We encountered a number of controversial problems, for example, how to measure and weight each quality-related factor, how to calculate costs of a laboratory test and how to consider characteristics of a clinical laboratory. Consequently we finished only prototype software within the given period and the budget. In this paper, software implementation of the guideline and the above-mentioned problems are summarized. Aiming to stimulate these discussions, the operative software will be put on the Society's homepage for trial

  14. Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) / Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) Review and Applicability for Chemical Security Enhancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iveson, Steven W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). International Chemical Security Threat Reduction

    2014-11-01

    Global chemical security has been enhanced through the determined use and integration of both voluntary and legislated standards. Many popular standards contain components that specifically detail requirements for the security of materials, facilities and other vital assets. In this document we examine the roll of quality management standards and how they affect the security culture within the institutions that adopt these standards in order to conduct business within the international market place. Good manufacturing practices and good laboratory practices are two of a number of quality management systems that have been adopted as law in many nations. These standards are designed to protect the quality of drugs, medicines, foods and analytical test results in order to provide the world-wide consumer with safe and affective products for consumption. These standards provide no established security protocols and yet manage to increase the security of chemicals, materials, facilities and the supply chain via the effective and complete control over the manufacturing, the global supply chains and testing processes. We discuss the means through which these systems enhance security and how nations can further improve these systems with additional regulations that deal specifically with security in the realm of these management systems. We conclude with a discussion of new technologies that may cause disruption within the industries covered by these standards and how these issues might be addressed in order to maintain or increase the level of security within the industries and nations that have adopted these standards.

  15. Pediatric hospitalists: training, current practice, and career goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Gary L; Dunham, Kelly M

    2009-03-01

    To determine the range and frequency of experiences, clinical and nonclinical roles, training, work expectations, and career plans of practicing pediatric hospitalists. Mail survey study of a national sample of 530 pediatric hospitalists of whom 67% (N = 338) were from teaching hospitals, 71% (N = 374) were from children's hospitals, 43% (N = 230) were from freestanding children's hospitals, and 69% (N = 354) were from hospitals with >or=250 beds. The response rate was 84%. The majority (54%; N = 211) had been practicing as hospitalists for at least 3 years. Most reported that the pediatric inpatient unit (94%) and inpatient consultation service (51%) were a part of their regular clinical assignment. Most did not provide service in the normal newborn nursery (58%), subspecialty inpatient service (52%), transports (85%), outpatient clinics (66%), or as part of an emergency response team (53%). Many participated in quality improvement (QI) initiatives (84%) and practice guideline development (81%). This study provides the most comprehensive information available regarding the clinical and nonclinical roles, training, work expectations, and career plans of pediatric hospitalists. However, the field is currently a moving target; there is significant flux in the hospitalist workforce and variation in the roles of these professionals in their clinical and nonclinical work environment. (c) 2009 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. Register of practices and teacher training: reflection, memory and authorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Cristina Teagno Lopes Marques

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at analyzing the contribution of the register of practices in the process of inservice training and teacher development. It is organized in three parts: first, we elucidateconcepts of different authors about our object (FREIRE, 1996; GUARNIERI, 2001; SÁ-CHAVES, 2004, WARSCHAUER, 1993, 2001; ZABALZA, 1994, 2004, in the second part, we analyze some register of practices produced by a professor of early childhood education, seeking to highlight elements that indicate the relationship between register, reflection and training; inthe end, we indicate the need to move the register as individual attitude to the register as a collective process, as suggested by the perspective of pedagogical documentation describedin Italian literature (BALSAMO, 1998; BENZONI, 2001; BORGHI, APOSTOLI, 2001; GANDINI, GOLDHABER, 2002. The register of practices can contribute to the processes of professional and organizational development, in a reflective school (ALARCÃO, 2002, 2003 and trulypublic because it makes visible to society by documentation of the experiences that teachersand children build together (MALAGUZZI, 1999.

  17. Development and Testing of a Remote Laboratory for Practical Work ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... interact with the remote Practical Work through a web page, developed using ... I. INTRODUCTION ... Automation, electronics, industrial computing, instrumentation ... This part is developed thanks to the Python Framework.

  18. General practice training and virtual communities of practice - a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen; Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Bonney, Andrew

    2012-08-21

    Good General Practice is essential for an effective health system. Good General Practice training is essential to sustain the workforce, however training for General Practice can be hampered by a number of pressures, including professional, structural and social isolation. General Practice trainees may be under more pressure than fully registered General Practitioners, and yet isolation can lead doctors to reduce hours and move away from rural practice. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs) in business have been shown to be effective in improving knowledge sharing, thus reducing professional and structural isolation. This literature review will critically examine the current evidence relevant to virtual communities of practice in General Practice training, identify evidence-based principles that might guide their construction and suggest further avenues for research. Major online databases Scopus, Psychlit and Pubmed were searched for the terms "Community of Practice" (CoP) AND (Online OR Virtual OR Electronic) AND (health OR healthcare OR medicine OR "Allied Health"). Only peer-reviewed journal articles in English were selected. A total of 76 articles were identified, with 23 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no studies on CoP or VCoP in General Practice training. The review was structured using a framework of six themes for establishing communities of practice, derived from a key study from the business literature. This framework has been used to analyse the literature to determine whether similar themes are present in the health literature and to identify evidence in support of virtual communities of practice for General Practice training. The framework developed by Probst is mirrored in the health literature, albeit with some variations. In particular the roles of facilitator or moderator and leader whilst overlapping, are different. VCoPs are usually collaborations between stakeholders rather than single company VCoPs. Specific goals are important

  19. Core courses in public health laboratory science and practice: findings from 2006 and 2011 surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoy, John M; Beck, Angela J; Boulton, Matthew L; Kim, Deborah H; Wichman, Michael D; Luedtke, Patrick F

    2013-01-01

    We identified academic training courses or topics most important to the careers of U.S. public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratory (PHEAL) scientist-managers and directors, and determined what portions of the national PHEAL workforce completed these courses. We conducted electronic national surveys in 2006 and 2011, and analyzed data using numerical ranking, Chi-square tests comparing rates, and Spearman's formula measuring rank correlation. In 2006, 40 of 50 PHEAL directors identified 56 course topics as either important, useful, or not needed for someone in their position. These course topics were then ranked to provide a list of 31 core courses. In 2011, 1,659 of approximately 5,555 PHEAL scientific and technical staff, using a subset of 25 core courses, evidenced higher core course completion rates associated with higher-level job classification, advanced academic degree, and age. The 2011 survey showed that 287 PHEAL scientist-managers and directors, on average, completed 37.7% (n=5/13) of leadership/managerial core courses and 51.7% (n=6/12) of scientific core courses. For 1,659 laboratorians in all scientific and technical classifications, core-subject completion rates were higher in local laboratories (42.8%, n=11/25) than in state (36.0%, n=9/25), federal (34.4%, n=9/25), and university (31.2%, n=8/25) laboratories. There is a definable range of scientific, leadership, and managerial core courses needed by PHEAL scientist-managers and directors to function effectively in their positions. Potential PHEAL scientist-managers and directors need greater and continuing access to these courses, and academic and practice entities supporting development of this workforce should adopt curricula and core competencies aligned with these course topics.

  20. Continuing professional development training needs of medical laboratory personnel in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasvosve, Ishmael; Ledikwe, Jenny H; Phumaphi, Othilia; Mpofu, Mulamuli; Nyangah, Robert; Motswaledi, Modisa S; Martin, Robert; Semo, Bazghina-Werq

    2014-08-18

    Laboratory professionals are expected to maintain their knowledge on the most recent advances in laboratory testing and continuing professional development (CPD) programs can address this expectation. In developing countries, accessing CPD programs is a major challenge for laboratory personnel, partly due to their limited availability. An assessment was conducted among clinical laboratory workforce in Botswana to identify and prioritize CPD training needs as well as preferred modes of CPD delivery. A self-administered questionnaire was disseminated to medical laboratory scientists and technicians registered with the Botswana Health Professions Council. Questions were organized into domains of competency related to (i) quality management systems, (ii) technical competence, (iii) laboratory management, leadership, and coaching, and (iv) pathophysiology, data interpretation, and research. Participants were asked to rank their self-perceived training needs using a 3-point scale in order of importance (most, moderate, and least). Furthermore, participants were asked to select any three preferences for delivery formats for the CPD. Out of 350 questionnaires that were distributed, 275 were completed and returned giving an overall response rate of 79%. The most frequently selected topics for training in rank order according to key themes were (mean, range) (i) quality management systems, most important (79%, 74-84%); (ii) pathophysiology, data interpretation, and research (68%, 52-78%); (iii) technical competence (65%, 44-73%); and (iv) laboratory management, leadership, and coaching (60%, 37-77%). The top three topics selected by the participants were (i) quality systems essentials for medical laboratory, (ii) implementing a quality management system, and (iii) techniques to identify and control sources of error in laboratory procedures. The top three preferred CPD delivery modes, in rank order, were training workshops, hands-on workshops, and internet-based learning

  1. Guide to good practices for training and qualification of instructors. DOE handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this guide is to provide contractor training organizations with information that can be used to verify the adquacy and/or modify existing instructor training programs, or to develop new training programs. It contains good practices for the training and qualification of technical instructors and instructional technologists at DOE reactor and non-reactor nuclear facilities. It addresses the content of initial and continuing instructor training programs, evaluation of instructor training programs, and maintenance of instructor training records.

  2. A pilot study of the utility of a laboratory-based spinal fixation training program for neurosurgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Swetha J; Healy, Andrew T; Kshettry, Varun R; Mroz, Thomas E; Schlenk, Richard; Benzel, Edward C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle and lateral mass screw placement is technically demanding due to complex 3D spinal anatomy that is not easily visualized. Neurosurgical and orthopedic surgery residents must be properly trained in such procedures, which can be associated with significant complications and associated morbidity. Current training in pedicle and lateral mass screw placement involves didactic teaching and supervised placement in the operating room. The objective of this study was to assess whether teaching residents to place pedicle and lateral mass screws using navigation software, combined with practice using cadaveric specimens and Sawbones models, would improve screw placement accuracy. METHODS This was a single-blinded, prospective, randomized pilot study with 8 junior neurosurgical residents and 2 senior medical students with prior neurosurgery exposure. Both the study group and the level of training-matched control group (each group with 4 level of training-matched residents and 1 senior medical student) were exposed to a standardized didactic education regarding spinal anatomy and screw placement techniques. The study group was exposed to an additional pilot program that included a training session using navigation software combined with cadaveric specimens and accessibility to Sawbones models. RESULTS A statistically significant reduction in overall surgical error was observed in the study group compared with the control group (p = 0.04). Analysis by spinal region demonstrated a significant reduction in surgical error in the thoracic and lumbar regions in the study group compared with controls (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively). The study group also was observed to place screws more optimally in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions (p = 0.02, p = 0.04, and p = 0.04, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Surgical resident education in pedicle and lateral mass screw placement is a priority for training programs. This study demonstrated that compared with a

  3. Clinical neuropsychology in Israel: history, training, practice and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Eli; Hoofien, Dan

    2016-11-01

    This is an invited paper for a special issue on international perspectives on training and practice in clinical neuropsychology. We provide a review of the status of clinical neuropsychology in Israel, including the history of neuropsychological, educational, and accreditation requirements to become a clinical neuropsychologist and to practice clinical neuropsychology. The information is based primarily on the personal knowledge of the authors who have been practicing clinical neuropsychology for over three decades and hold various administrative and academic positions in this field. Second, we conducted three ad hoc surveys among clinical and rehabilitation psychologists; heads of academic programs for rehabilitation and neuropsychology; and heads of accredited service providers. Third, we present a literature review of publications by clinical neuropsychologists in Israel. Most of the clinical neuropsychologists are graduates of either rehabilitation or clinical training programs. The vast majority of neuropsychologists are affiliated with rehabilitation psychology. The training programs (2-3 years of graduate school) provide solid therapeutic and diagnostic skills to the students. Seventy-five percent of the participants in this survey are employed at least part-time by public or state-funded institutions. Israeli neuropsychologists are heavily involved in case management, including vocational counseling, and rehabilitation psychotherapy. Conclusions and future goals: Although clinical neuropsychologists in Israel are well educated and valued by all health professionals, there are still several challenges that must be addressed in order to further advance the field and the profession. These included the need for Hebrew-language standardized and normalized neuropsychological tests and the application of evidence-based interventions in neuropsychological rehabilitation.

  4. General practice training and virtual communities of practice - a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Stephen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good General Practice is essential for an effective health system. Good General Practice training is essential to sustain the workforce, however training for General Practice can be hampered by a number of pressures, including professional, structural and social isolation. General Practice trainees may be under more pressure than fully registered General Practitioners, and yet isolation can lead doctors to reduce hours and move away from rural practice. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs in business have been shown to be effective in improving knowledge sharing, thus reducing professional and structural isolation. This literature review will critically examine the current evidence relevant to virtual communities of practice in General Practice training, identify evidence-based principles that might guide their construction and suggest further avenues for research. Methods Major online databases Scopus, Psychlit and Pubmed were searched for the terms “Community of Practice” (CoP AND (Online OR Virtual OR Electronic AND (health OR healthcare OR medicine OR “Allied Health”. Only peer-reviewed journal articles in English were selected. A total of 76 articles were identified, with 23 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no studies on CoP or VCoP in General Practice training. The review was structured using a framework of six themes for establishing communities of practice, derived from a key study from the business literature. This framework has been used to analyse the literature to determine whether similar themes are present in the health literature and to identify evidence in support of virtual communities of practice for General Practice training. Results The framework developed by Probst is mirrored in the health literature, albeit with some variations. In particular the roles of facilitator or moderator and leader whilst overlapping, are different. VCoPs are usually collaborations between stakeholders

  5. Good laboratory practices for biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening for inherited metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    Biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening are essential laboratory services for the screening, detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of inborn errors of metabolism or inherited metabolic disorders. Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) regulations, laboratory testing is categorized on the basis of the level of testing complexity as either waived (i.e., from routine regulatory oversight) or nonwaived testing (which includes tests of moderate and high complexity). Laboratories that perform biochemical genetic testing are required by CLIA regulations to meet the general quality systems requirements for nonwaived testing and the personnel requirements for high-complexity testing. Laboratories that perform public health newborn screening are subject to the same CLIA regulations and applicable state requirements. As the number of inherited metabolic diseases that are included in state-based newborn screening programs continues to increase, ensuring the quality of performance and delivery of testing services remains a continuous challenge not only for public health laboratories and other newborn screening facilities but also for biochemical genetic testing laboratories. To help ensure the quality of laboratory testing, CDC collaborated with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Food and Drug Administration, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the National Institutes of Health to develop guidelines for laboratories to meet CLIA requirements and apply additional quality assurance measures for these areas of genetic testing. This report provides recommendations for good laboratory practices that were developed based on recommendations from the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, with additional input from the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society; the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children; and representatives of newborn

  6. Survey of safety practices among hospital laboratories in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewunet, Tsegaye; Kebede, Wakjira; Wondafrash, Beyene; Workalemau, Bereket; Abebe, Gemeda

    2014-10-01

    Unsafe working practices, working environments, disposable waste products, and chemicals in clinical laboratories contribute to infectious and non-infectious hazards. Staffs, the community, and patients are less safe. Furthermore, such practices compromise the quality of laboratory services. We conducted a study to describe safety practices in public hospital laboratories of Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia. Randomly selected ten public hospital laboratories in Oromia Regional State were studied from Oct 2011- Feb 2012. Self-administered structured questionnaire and observation checklists were used for data collection. The respondents were heads of the laboratories, senior technicians, and safety officers. The questionnaire addressed biosafety label, microbial hazards, chemical hazards, physical/mechanical hazards, personal protective equipment, first aid kits and waste disposal system. The data was analyzed using descriptive analysis with SPSS version16 statistical software. All of the respondents reported none of the hospital laboratories were labeled with the appropriate safety label and safety symbols. These respondents also reported they may contain organisms grouped under risk group IV in the absence of microbiological safety cabinets. Overall, the respondents reported that there were poor safety regulations or standards in their laboratories. There were higher risks of microbial, chemical and physical/mechanical hazards. Laboratory safety in public hospitals of Oromia Regional State is below the standard. The laboratory workers are at high risk of combined physical, chemical and microbial hazards. Prompt recognition of the problem and immediate action is mandatory to ensure safe working environment in health laboratories.

  7. Safety in the mountaineering practices: training in Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Palacio

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Physical Education Teaching with Orientation in Regional Mountain Activities at the Universidad Nacional del Comahue (PEF-CRUB-UNCo is the only one in the country that has a history with over 20 years of training physical education teachers with a particular orientation. It was through dynamic and continuous work over the years that theoretical and practical appropriate contents could be defined for this career.(Palacios, Lopez, Schneider, 2011 Coincidences with those experiences made in other countries such as Spain and Germany where the climbing activities are part of the teacher training and educational curricula have been noticed. (Saez Padilla, Gimenez, Fuentes Guerra 2005; Arribas Cubero 2008; Winter, 2000. It was determined together with other authors (Hepp, Güllich and Heidorn, 2001 that the contents related to Trekking and Climbing are the correct ones to develop a Teaching Program with these characteristics. The handling of safety conditions as an educational content is a permanent concern that challenges the activity. This paper will explain the conditions of safety that had been compiled over the years from experience, permanent research, consultation of specialized literature and actions carried out in teacher training

  8. [Healthy eating: implementation of a practice-oriented training program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakova, E N; Nastausheva, T L; Usacheva, E A

    2016-01-01

    Health professionals need to have current knowledge and skills in nutrition. The knowledge and skills have to be acquired in programs of continuing medical education, but also in undergraduate medical education. The main purpose of this work was to develop and implement a practice-oriented training program in nutrition and healthy eating for medical students. The subject named "Nutrition" was implemented into second-year medical curriculum. We defined a theoretical framework and terms such as nutrition, healthy eating, and evidence-based nutrition. In order to get learning outcomes we constructed a method of patients counseling and training "Individual food pyramid". The making of "Individual food pyramid" is a key integrate element of the program. It helps to memorize, understand and apply the basic principles of healthy eating in real life contexts. The final program consists of two sections: "General Nutrition" and "Special Nutrition". The most important intended learning outcome is student's lifestyle improvement. The program is practice-oriented and outcome-based.

  9. A study of cultural diversity training practices in company-owned franchise restaurants

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chang-Uk Charles

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cultural diversity training practices and to determine the deterrence factors associated instituting cultural diversity training. It attempted to measure the overall effectiveness of cultural diversity training in franchise restaurants. A total of 300 franchise restaurants were surveyed. Three practicing and fiftyeight non-practicing cultural diversity training companies participated in the study. The findings indicated that high tur...

  10. how can i improve my students' ability in doing laboratory practical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    LABORATORY PRACTICAL WORK ON ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY-I? A CASE ON CLASS N23 AT ... rules while working in lab independently or being in groups. In this study ...... Understanding digital kids: Teachings & learning in the new.

  11. A Laboratory Practical on the House Building Behaviour of Caddis Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a laboratory practical on animal behavior suitable for senior secondary school or university biology classes. Several separate exercises relating to the house building behavior of caddis fly larvae are detailed, together with the time required for preparation. (JR)

  12. Laboratory Activity Worksheet to Train High Order Thinking Skill of Student on Surface Chemistry Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonata, B.; Nasrudin, H.

    2018-01-01

    A worksheet has to be a set with activity which is help students to arrange their own experiments. For this reason, this research is focused on how to train students’ higher order thinking skills in laboratory activity by developing laboratory activity worksheet on surface chemistry lecture. To ensure that the laboratory activity worksheet already contains aspects of the higher order thinking skill, it requires theoretical and empirical validation. From the data analysis results, it shows that the developed worksheet worth to use. The worksheet is worthy of theoretical and empirical feasibility. This conclusion is based on the findings: 1) Assessment from the validators about the theoretical feasibility aspects in the category is very feasible with an assessment range of 95.24% to 97.92%. 2) students’ higher thinking skill from N Gain values ranges from 0.50 (enough) to 1.00 (high) so it can be concluded that the laboratory activity worksheet on surface chemistry lecture is empirical in terms of worth. The empirical feasibility is supported by the responses of the students in very reasonable categories. It is expected that the laboratory activity worksheet on surface chemistry lecture can train students’ high order thinking skills for students who program surface chemistry lecture.

  13. Experimental Psychopathology: From laboratory studies to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Philippot

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, David Barlow (2004, a pioneer in the field of anxiety disorders, has proposed that psychologists should abandon the concept of psychotherapy and rather use the one of “psychological treatment”. The provoking idea behind this proposal is that the concept of psychotherapy, relying on the notion of “therapeutic school” should be discarded by professional psychologists because it relies too much on conceptions based on pre-scientific models. Barlow (2004 insists that, today, psychology as an empirical science has gathered sufficient knowledge and know-how to found clinical practice. It is no longer necessary to rely on pre-scientific theories. Further, Barlow’s perspective opens clinical practice to the entire field of psychology, i.e. to the advances accomplished by research on emotion, cognition, learning, development, etc.

  14. Practices for Identifying and Rejecting Hemolyzed Specimens Are Highly Variable in Clinical Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howanitz, Peter J; Lehman, Christopher M; Jones, Bruce A; Meier, Frederick A; Horowitz, Gary L

    2015-08-01

    Hemolysis is an important clinical laboratory quality attribute that influences result reliability. To determine hemolysis identification and rejection practices occurring in clinical laboratories. We used the College of American Pathologists Survey program to distribute a Q-Probes-type questionnaire about hemolysis practices to Chemistry Survey participants. Of 3495 participants sent the questionnaire, 846 (24%) responded. In 71% of 772 laboratories, the hemolysis rate was less than 3.0%, whereas in 5%, it was 6.0% or greater. A visual scale, an instrument scale, and combination of visual and instrument scales were used to identify hemolysis in 48%, 11%, and 41% of laboratories, respectively. A picture of the hemolysis level was used as an aid to technologists' visual interpretation of hemolysis levels in 40% of laboratories. In 7.0% of laboratories, all hemolyzed specimens were rejected; in 4% of laboratories, no hemolyzed specimens were rejected; and in 88% of laboratories, some specimens were rejected depending on hemolysis levels. Participants used 69 different terms to describe hemolysis scales, with 21 terms used in more than 10 laboratories. Slight and moderate were the terms used most commonly. Of 16 different cutoffs used to reject hemolyzed specimens, moderate was the most common, occurring in 30% of laboratories. For whole blood electrolyte measurements performed in 86 laboratories, 57% did not evaluate the presence of hemolysis, but for those that did, the most common practice in 21 laboratories (24%) was centrifuging and visually determining the presence of hemolysis in all specimens. Hemolysis practices vary widely. Standard assessment and consistent reporting are the first steps in reducing interlaboratory variability among results.

  15. Spectroscopy 101: A Practical Introduction to Spectroscopy and Analysis for Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Lucas A.; Kammeyer, Jacquelin K.; Garg, Neil K.

    2017-01-01

    An undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory that provides an introduction to various spectroscopic techniques is reported. Whereas organic spectroscopy is most often learned and practiced in the context of reaction analyses, this laboratory experiment allows students to become comfortable with [superscript 1]H NMR, [superscript 13]C NMR, and IR…

  16. Canadian Laboratory Standards for Sexually Transmitted Infections: Best Practice Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max A Chernesky

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections (STI continue to spread, and show no international boundaries. Diseases such as gonorrhea and syphilis, which we thought were under control in Canadian populations, have increased in incidence. Sexually transmitted or associated syndromes such as cervicitis, enteric infections, epididymitis, genital ulcers, sexually related hepatitis, ophthalmia neonatorum, pelvic inflammatory disease, prostatitis and vulvovaginitis present a challenge for the physician to identify the microbial cause, treat the patient and manage contacts. During the past 10 years, new technologies developed for the diagnosis of STIs have provided a clearer understanding of the real accuracy of traditional tests for the diagnosis of infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex viruses, hepatitis B virus, human papillomaviruses, HIV, Haemophilus ducreyi, Trichomonas vaginalis and mycoplasmas. This has presented a major challenge to the diagnostic laboratory, namely, selecting the most sensitive and specific test matched with the most appropriate specimens to provide meaningful and timely results to facilitate optimal patient care.

  17. Education, training, and practice among nordic neuropsychologists. Results from a professional practices survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, A; Egeland, Jens; Løvstad, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    disability were the most common conditions seen by neuropsychologists. A mean income of 53,277 Euros was found. Neuropsychologists expressed greater job satisfaction than income satisfaction. Significant differences were found between the Nordic countries. Finnish neuropsychologists were younger and worked......OBJECTIVE: To investigate sociodemographic characteristics, clinical and academic training, work setting and salary, clinical activities, and salary and job satisfaction among practicing neuropsychologists in four Nordic countries. METHODS: 890 neuropsychologists from Denmark, Finland, Norway...

  18. A Profile of Current Employee Training Practices in Selected Businesses and Industries in Southwest Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Hundley, Katrina M.

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) establish a profile of the current training practices of selected businesses and industries in Southwest Virginia; (b) identify the type of training methods these companies are choosing -- such as traditional classroom training or web-based training programs, and (c) identify how the training methods are selected. This profile established baseline data for current business and industry employee training programs. The population of this study include...

  19. Game-Based Practice versus Traditional Practice in Computer-Based Writing Strategy Training: Effects on Motivation and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proske, Antje; Roscoe, Rod D.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving sustained student engagement with practice in computer-based writing strategy training can be a challenge. One potential solution is to foster engagement by embedding practice in educational games; yet there is currently little research comparing the effectiveness of game-based practice versus more traditional forms of practice. In this…

  20. Lasting effects of workplace strength training for neck/shoulder/arm pain among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Larsen, Anders I; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study investigated long-term effects and implementation processes of workplace strength training for musculoskeletal disorders. Methods. 333 and 140 laboratory technicians from private and public sector companies, respectively, replied to a 3-year follow-up questionnaire subseque...... be implemented successfully at different companies during working hours on a long-term basis with lasting effects on pain in neck, shoulder, and arm....

  1. Formal training program for nuclear material custodians at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.D.

    1979-01-01

    Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) has established a formal training program for nuclear material (NM) custodians. The program, designed to familiarize the custodian with the fundamental concepts of proper nuclear materials control and accountability, is conducted on a semiannual basis. The program is prepared and presented by the Safeguards and Materials Management Section of HEDL and covers 14 subjects on accountability, documentation, transportation, custodian responsibilities, and the safeguarding of nuclear material

  2. Appropriate practice of anesthesia: A plea for better training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O P Adudu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of the anesthesiologist is often unknown among patients. But, the situation where the anesthesiologist is uncertain of his/her function gives more cause for concern. Methods: A questionnaire survey on the appraisal of anesthetic practices was carried out over 5 months using the style of clinical practice. Results: One-third of the anesthesiologists who responded to the survey attached little importance to the work they did by not communicating the same to their patients while 45.2% did not discuss the intraoperative findings with the surgeons. Although 57 (59.4% of the respondents usually visit their patients on the ward preoperatively, only 16 (21.6% discussed the proposed anesthetic procedure with the patients. Thirty-nine (40.2% respondents claimed that they do not wear ward coats to the ward at the preoperative visit. Less than 20% consistently conducted a postoperative visit. The majority of the respondents would treat all patients as important, irrespective of social status, while 74.5% of them considered obtaining informed consent for anesthesia from patients as significantly important. Conclusion: The current practice of anesthesia has been found wanting in several aspects. Knowledgeable discussion by anesthesiologists with surgeons as well as enlightenment of patients and their relatives about their work will improve the quality of anesthesia care remarkably. Changes in the anesthesia training curriculum to reflect these deficiencies would be helpful.

  3. Nationwide survey of policies and practices related to capillary blood sampling in medical laboratories in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krleza, Jasna Lenicek

    2014-01-01

    Capillary sampling is increasingly used to obtain blood for laboratory tests in volumes as small as necessary and as non-invasively as possible. Whether capillary blood sampling is also frequent in Croatia, and whether it is performed according to international laboratory standards is unclear. All medical laboratories that participate in the Croatian National External Quality Assessment Program (N = 204) were surveyed on-line to collect information about the laboratory's parent institution, patient population, types and frequencies of laboratory tests based on capillary blood samples, choice of reference intervals, and policies and procedures specifically related to capillary sampling. Sampling practices were compared with guidelines from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Of the 204 laboratories surveyed, 174 (85%) responded with complete questionnaires. Among the 174 respondents, 155 (89%) reported that they routinely perform capillary sampling, which is carried out by laboratory staff in 118 laboratories (76%). Nearly half of respondent laboratories (48%) do not have a written protocol including order of draw for multiple sampling. A single puncture site is used to provide capillary blood for up to two samples at 43% of laboratories that occasionally or regularly perform such sampling. Most respondents (88%) never perform arterialisation prior to capillary blood sampling. Capillary blood sampling is highly prevalent in Croatia across different types of clinical facilities and patient populations. Capillary sampling procedures are not standardised in the country, and the rate of laboratory compliance with CLSI and WHO guidelines is low.

  4. Evolving towards better architectures for remote laboratories: a practical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Orduña

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A WebLab is a remote laboratory controlled via Internet. Traditionally, the focus on WebLab design has been placed on the hardware side and the communication link between the controlling PC (WebLab server and the hardware prototype. Little attention has been paid to the other communication segment going from the WebLab server to the remote users’ PCs, since this has been regarded as a “solved software problem”. Consequently, aspects such as security, scalability, accessibility, or user friendliness have often been disregarded in WebLabs. This situation may be solved if a serious effort is placed on the definition of proper distributed software architectures for WebLabs. In this paper, we describe such ideal software architecture, resulted from an iterative process seeking a web-based, secure, scalable, multi-user, multi-device WebLab.

  5. Effect of 11 months of yoga training on cardiorespiratory responses during the actual practice of Surya Namaskar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Biswajit; Sinha, Tulika Dasgupta

    2014-01-01

    Surya Namaskar (SN), a popular traditional Indian yogic practice, includes practicing 12 physical postures with alternate forward and backward bending movement of the body along with deep breathing maneuvers. The practice of SN has become popular among yoga practitioners and other fitness conscious people. The long-term effect of practicing SN and other yogic practices on cardiorespiratory responses during SN are lacking. The present study was conducted to study the effect of yogic training on various cardiorespiratory responses during the SN practice in yoga trainees after a time interval of 3, 6, and 11 months. The present study was conducted on 9 healthy male Army soldiers who underwent training in various yoga postures including SN, meditation, and pranayama for 1 h daily for 11 months. First, second, and third phase of the study was conducted in the laboratory after completion of 3, 6, and 11 months of the yoga training. The participants performed SN along with other yogic practices in the laboratory as per their daily practice schedule. The cardiorespiratory responses of the volunteers were recorded during actual practice of SN. One-way repeated measure ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD. Oxygen consumption and heart rate during actual practice of SN was 0.794 ± 0.252, 0.738 ± 0.229, and 0.560 ± 0.165 L/min and 92.1 ± 11.6, 97.9 ± 7.3 and 87.4 ± 9.2 beats/min respectively at 1(st) , 2(nd) , and 3(rd) phase of yoga training. Minute ventilation and tidal volume also reduced from 19.9 ± 4.65 to 17.8 ± 4.41 L/min and 1.091 ± 0.021 to 0.952 L/breath from 1(st) phase to 3(rd) phase of yoga training. However, respiratory parameters like breathing rate (fR) did not show any reduction across the three phases. The results of the present study indicated that yogic training caused conditioning of cardiorespiratory parameters except fR, which did not reduce across three phases of training.

  6. Effect of 11 months of yoga training on cardiorespiratory responses during the actual practice of Surya Namaskar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surya Namaskar (SN, a popular traditional Indian yogic practice, includes practicing 12 physical postures with alternate forward and backward bending movement of the body along with deep breathing maneuvers. The practice of SN has become popular among yoga practitioners and other fitness conscious people. The long-term effect of practicing SN and other yogic practices on cardiorespiratory responses during SN are lacking. Aim: The present study was conducted to study the effect of yogic training on various cardiorespiratory responses during the SN practice in yoga trainees after a time interval of 3, 6, and 11 months. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 9 healthy male Army soldiers who underwent training in various yoga postures including SN, meditation, and pranayama for 1 h daily for 11 months. First, second, and third phase of the study was conducted in the laboratory after completion of 3, 6, and 11 months of the yoga training. The participants performed SN along with other yogic practices in the laboratory as per their daily practice schedule. The cardiorespiratory responses of the volunteers were recorded during actual practice of SN. Statistical Analysis: One-way repeated measure ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD. Results: Oxygen consumption and heart rate during actual practice of SN was 0.794 ± 0.252, 0.738 ± 0.229, and 0.560 ± 0.165 L/min and 92.1 ± 11.6, 97.9 ± 7.3 and 87.4 ± 9.2 beats/min respectively at 1 st , 2 nd , and 3 rd phase of yoga training. Minute ventilation and tidal volume also reduced from 19.9 ± 4.65 to 17.8 ± 4.41 L/min and 1.091 ± 0.021 to 0.952 L/breath from 1 st phase to 3 rd phase of yoga training. However, respiratory parameters like breathing rate (f R did not show any reduction across the three phases. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that yogic training caused conditioning of cardiorespiratory parameters except f R, which did not reduce across three

  7. Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories, Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    This guide provides general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments. Specific technology applications, general performance information, and cost data are provided to educate and encourage laboratory energy managers to consider onsite power generation or combined heat and power (CHP) systems for their facilities. After conducting an initial screening, energy managers are encouraged to conduct a detailed feasibility study with actual cost and performance data for technologies that look promising. Onsite distributed generation systems are small, modular, decentralized, grid-connected, or off-grid energy systems. These systems are located at or near the place where the energy is used. These systems are also known as distributed energy or distributed power systems. DG technologies are generally considered those that produce less than 20 megawatts (MW) of power. A number of technologies can be applied as effective onsite DG systems, including: (1) Diesel, natural gas, and dual-fuel reciprocating engines; (2) Combustion turbines and steam turbines; (3) Fuel cells; (4) Biomass heating; (5) Biomass combined heat and power; (6) Photovoltaics; and (7) Wind turbines. These systems can provide a number of potential benefits to an individual laboratory facility or campus, including: (1) High-quality, reliable, and potentially dispatchable power; (2) Low-cost energy and long-term utility cost assurance, especially where electricity and/or fuel costs are high; (3) Significantly reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Typical CHP plants reduce onsite GHG by 40 to 60 percent; (4) Peak demand shaving where demand costs are high; (5) CHP where thermal energy can be used in addition to electricity; (6) The ability to meet standby power needs, especially where utility-supplied power is interrupted frequently or for long periods and where standby power is required for safety or emergencies; and (7) Use for standalone or off

  8. Institutional training programs for research personnel conducted by laboratory-animal veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Melissa C; Rush, Howard G

    2012-01-01

    Research institutions are required by federal law and national standards to ensure that individuals involved in animal research are appropriately trained in techniques and procedures used on animals. Meeting these requirements necessitates the support of institutional authorities; policies for the documentation and enforcement of training; resources to support and provide training programs; and high-quality, effective educational material. Because of their expertise, laboratory-animal veterinarians play an essential role in the design, implementation, and provision of educational programs for faculty, staff, and students in biomedical research. At large research institutions, provision of a training program for animal care and use personnel can be challenging because of the animal-research enterprise's size and scope. At the University of Michigan (UM), approximately 3,500 individuals have direct contact with animals used in research. We describe a comprehensive educational program for animal care and use personnel designed and provided by laboratory-animal veterinarians at UM and discuss the challenges associated with its implementation.

  9. eLearning Hands-On: Blending Interactive eLearning with Practical Engineering Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiravu, Cheddi; Yanev, Kamen M.; Tunde, Moses O.; Jeffrey, Anna M.; Schoenian, Dirk; Renner, Ansel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Integrating laboratory work into interactive engineering eLearning contents augments theory with practice while simultaneously ameliorating the apparent theory-practice gap in traditional eLearning. The purpose of this paper is to assess and recommend media that currently fulfil this desirable dual pedagogical goal.…

  10. Practice for characterization and performance of a high-dose radiation dosimetry calibration laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This practice addresses the specific requirements for laboratories engaged in dosimetry calibrations involving ionizing radiation, namely, gamma-radiation, electron beams or X-radiation (bremsstrahlung) beams. It specifically describes the requirements for the characterization and performance criteria to be met by a high-dose radiation dosimetry calibration laboratory. The absorbed-dose range is typically between 10 and 10 5 Gy. This practice addresses criteria for laboratories seeking accreditation for performing high-dose dosimetry calibrations, and is a supplement to the general requirements described in ISO/IEC 17025. By meeting these criteria and those in ISO/IEC 17025, the laboratory may be accredited by a recognized accreditation organization. Adherence to these criteria will help to ensure high standards of performance and instill confidence regarding the competency of the accredited laboratory with respect to the services it offers

  11. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-10-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  12. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Haswani Embong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  13. Practicing the Test Produces Strength Equivalent to Higher Volume Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kevin T; Buckner, Samuel L; Jessee, Matthew B; Dankel, Scott J; Mouser, J Grant; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-09-01

    To determine if muscle growth is important for increasing muscle strength or if changes in strength can be entirely explained from practicing the strength test. Thirty-eight untrained individuals performed knee extension and chest press exercise for 8 wk. Individuals were randomly assigned to either a high-volume training group (HYPER) or a group just performing the one repetition maximum (1RM) strength test (TEST). The HYPER group performed four sets to volitional failure (~8RM-12RM), whereas the TEST group performed up to five attempts to lift as much weight as possible one time each visit. Data are presented as mean (90% confidence interval). The change in muscle size was greater in the HYPER group for both the upper and lower bodies at most but not all sites. The change in 1RM strength for both the upper body (difference of -1.1 [-4.8, 2.4] kg) and lower body (difference of 1.0 [-0.7, 2.8] kg for dominant leg) was not different between groups (similar for nondominant). Changes in isometric and isokinetic torque were not different between groups. The HYPER group observed a greater change in muscular endurance (difference of 2 [1,4] repetitions) only in the dominant leg. There were no differences in the change between groups in upper body endurance. There were between-group differences for exercise volume (mean [95% confidence interval]) of the dominant (difference of 11,049.3 [9254.6-12,844.0] kg) leg (similar for nondominant) and chest press with the HYPER group completing significantly more total volume (difference of 13259.9 [9632.0-16,887.8] kg). These findings suggest that neither exercise volume nor the change in muscle size from training contributed to greater strength gains compared with just practicing the test.

  14. Effects of Training and Feedback on Teachers' Use of Classroom Preventive Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artman-Meeker, Kathleen M.; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of in-service training with performance feedback on preschool teachers' use of classroom preventive practices. Three practices designed to prevent challenging behavior were selected: transition preparations, rule reminders, and social-emotional teaching strategies. Following a brief training on each practice,…

  15. Innovative Approach to the Organization of Future Social Workers' Practical Training: Foreign Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Vira; Slozanska, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Innovative approaches to practical training of future social workers in higher educational establishments have been defined. Peculiarities of foreign experience of social workers' practical training in higher educational establishments have been analyzed. Experience of organizing practice for bachelor students studying at "Social Work"…

  16. High acceptability of a newly developed urological practical skills training program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, A.H. de; Luijk, S.J. van; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Hendrikx, A.J.M.; Koldewijn, E.L.; Wagner, C.; Schout, B.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benefits of simulation training are widely recognized, but its structural implementation into urological curricula remains challenging. This study aims to gain insight into current and ideal urological practical skills training and presents the outline of a newly developed skills

  17. High acceptability of a newly developed urological practical skills training program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A.H.; van Luijk, S.J.; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Hendrikx, A.J.M.; Koldewijn, E.L.; Wagner, C.; Schout, B.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benefits of simulation training are widely recognized, but its structural implementation into urological curricula remains challenging. This study aims to gain insight into current and ideal urological practical skills training and presents the outline of a newly developed skills

  18. A Remote PLC Laboratory (RLab) for Distance Practical Work of Industrial Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haritman, E.; Somantri, Y.; Wahyudin, D.; Mulyana, E.

    2018-02-01

    A laboratory is an essential equipment for engineering students to do a useful practical work. Therefore, universities should provide an adequate facility for practical work. On the other hand, industrial automation laboratory would offer students beneficial experience by using various educational PLC kits. This paper describes the development of Web-based Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) remote laboratory called RLab. It provides an environment for learners to study PLC application to control the level of the non-interacting tank. The RLab architecture is based on a Moodle and Remote Desktop, which also manages the booking system of the schedule of practical work in the laboratory. The RLab equipped by USB cameras providing a real-time view of PLC environment. To provide a secured system, the RLab combines Moodle and Remote Desktop application for the authentication system and management of remote users. Moodle will send PartnerID and password to connect to TeamViewer. It has been examined that the laboratory requirement, time and flexibility restrictions constitute a significant obstacle facing traditional students desiring to finish the course. A remote access laboratory can be eliminating time and flexibility restrictions. The preliminary study of RLab usability proved that such system is adequate to give the learners a distance practical work environment.

  19. Going GLP: Conducting Toxicology Studies in Compliance with Good Laboratory Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Erica Eggers

    2016-01-01

    Good laboratory practice standards are US federal regulations enacted as part of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (40 CFR Part 160), the Toxic Substance Control Act (40 CFR Part 792), and the Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies (21 CFR Part 58) to support protection of public health in the areas of pesticides, chemicals, and drug investigations in response to allegations of inaccurate data acquisition. Essentially, good laboratory practices (GLPs) are a system of management controls for nonclinical research studies involving animals to ensure the uniformity, consistency, reliability, reproducibility, quality, and integrity of data collected as part of chemical (including pharmaceuticals) tests, from in vitro through acute to chronic toxicity tests. The GLPs were established in the United States in 1978 as a result of the Industrial Bio-Test Laboratory scandal which led to congressional hearings and actions to prevent fraudulent data reporting and collection. Although the establishment of infrastructure for GLPs compliance is labor-intensive and time-consuming, achievement and maintenance of GLP compliance ensures the accuracy of the data collected from each study, which is critical for defending results, advancing science, and protecting human and animal health. This article describes how and why those in the US Army Medical Department responsible for protecting the public health of US Army and other military personnel made the policy decision to have its toxicology laboratory achieve complete compliance with GLP standards, the first such among US Army laboratories. The challenges faced and how they were overcome are detailed.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF SOME COPPER BASED FUNGICIDES ACCORDING TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marga GRĂDILĂ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data demonstrating the functionality of biological systems reconstituted with aquatic organisms developed under Good Laboratory Practice testing facility within Research - Development Institute for Plant Protection Bucharest for environmental risk assessment of four fungicides based on copper, according to Good Laboratory Practice requirements. For risk assessment, according to GLP were made the following steps: Good Laboratory Practice test facility was established, we have ensured adequate space for growth, acclimatization and testing for each test species, it was installed a complex water production instalation needed to perform tests, it was achieved control system for checking environmental conditions and have developed specific operating procedures that have been accredited according to Good Laboratory Practice.The results showed that biological systems model of the Good Laboratory Practice test facility in Research - Development Institute for Plant Protection meet the requirements of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Guidelines regarding GLP, and after testing copper-based fungicides in terms of acute toxicity Cyprinus carpio and to Daphnia magna revealed that three of them (copper oxychloride, copper hydroxide and copper sulphate showed ecological efficiency, ie low toxicity. Metallic copper based fungicides showed a higher toxicity, resulting in fish toxicity symptoms: sleep, sudden immersion, faded, weakness, swimming in spiral, lack of balance, breathing slow and cumbersome, spasms and mortality.

  1. Adapting United States training practices to European utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    The factors which must be considered in the process of adapting United States nuclear utility training programs to the needs of a European utility are discussed. Following a review of the present situation and drawing up of a new training program, the management commitments in terms of personnel and finance must be considered. Short term, medium and long term programs are outlined. The long term objectives should include the establishment of a total training centre. This facility should be capable of providing all the training necessary to operate a power plant safely. This would include specific simulator training, classroom training for operators, technician training, staff training, management training etc. In addition to a simulator, it should include an emergency response facility to train personnel. (U.K.)

  2. Quality assurance practices in Europe: a survey of molecular genetic testing laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwouts, Sarah; Fanning, Katrina; Morris, Michael A; Barton, David E; Dequeker, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    In the 2000s, a number of initiatives were taken internationally to improve quality in genetic testing services. To contribute to and update the limited literature available related to this topic, we surveyed 910 human molecular genetic testing laboratories, of which 291 (32%) from 29 European countries responded. The majority of laboratories were in the public sector (81%), affiliated with a university hospital (60%). Only a minority of laboratories was accredited (23%), and 26% was certified. A total of 22% of laboratories did not participate in external quality assessment (EQA) and 28% did not use reference materials (RMs). The main motivations given for accreditation were to improve laboratory profile (85%) and national recognition (84%). Nearly all respondents (95%) would prefer working in an accredited laboratory. In accredited laboratories, participation in EQA (Pquality assurance (Pquality implementation score (QIS), we showed that accredited laboratories (average score 92) comply better than certified laboratories (average score 69, Pquality indicators. We conclude that quality practices vary widely in European genetic testing laboratories. This leads to a potentially dangerous situation in which the quality of genetic testing is not consistently assured. PMID:22739339

  3. A pilot study on quantification of training load: The use of HRV in training practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboul, Damien; Balducci, Pascal; Millet, Grégoire; Pialoux, Vincent; Hautier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Recent laboratory studies have suggested that heart rate variability (HRV) may be an appropriate criterion for training load (TL) quantification. The aim of this study was to validate a novel HRV index that may be used to assess TL in field conditions. Eleven well-trained long-distance male runners performed four exercises of different duration and intensity. TL was evaluated using Foster and Banister methods. In addition, HRV measurements were performed 5 minutes before exercise and 5 and 30 minutes after exercise. We calculated HRV index (TLHRV) based on the ratio between HRV decrease during exercise and HRV increase during recovery. HRV decrease during exercise was strongly correlated with exercise intensity (R = -0.70; p HRV changes during exercise and recovery phase are affected by both intensity and physiological impact of the exercise. Since the TLHRV formula takes into account the disturbance and the return to homeostatic balance induced by exercise, this new method provides an objective and rational TL index. However, some simplification of the protocol measurement could be envisaged for field use.

  4. Laboratory training manual on the use of isotopes and radiation in soil-plant relations research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in co-operation with local authorities in various countries have jointly sponsored international laboratory training courses on the use of isotopes and radiation in specialized fields of agriculture. Outstanding scientists from various countries have given lectures and devised and conducted the laboratory exercises; research workers from all over the world have attended these courses. In addition, under the United Nations Expanded Programme of Technical Assistance the IAEA in co-operation with host governments has conducted similar regional courses. This laboratory manual is a natural outgrowth of these activities. The contents represents the efforts not only of the IAEA and FAO Secretariats but also of the various instructors who have participated in the courses, a Special Consultant, Victor Middelboe, and a panel of scientists who met in Vienna from 3 to 7 September 1962 and revised the initial version assembled by Hans Broeshart and Chai Moo Cho of the IAEA Secretariat. The present manual consists of two parts: a basic part which contains general information and laboratory exercises on the properties of radiation and the principles of use of radioactive tracers, and a second part which contains a series of detailed laboratory exercises in the field of soil-plant relationships. It is intended to publish at least four additional parts on the subjects of the use of isotopes and radiation in animal science, agricultural biochemistry, entomology and plant pathology. This manual, dealing with an important aspect of the peaceful application and use of atomic energy, should prove helpful not only to those working with the IAEA and FAO training programmes but to other research scientists dealing with the development and use of new information in agricultural science all over the world

  5. Knowledge, attitude and practice of aspects of laboratory safety in Pathology Laboratories at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejilemele, A A; Ojule, A C

    2005-12-01

    To assess current knowledge, attitudes and practice of aspects of laboratory safety in pathology laboratories at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital in view of perceived inadequacies in safety practices in clinical laboratories in developing countries. Sixty (60) self- administered questionnaires were distributed to all cadres of staff in four (4) different laboratories (Chemical Pathology, Haematology, Blood bank and Medical Microbiology) at the Hospital. Gross deficiencies were found in the knowledge, attitudes and practice of laboratory safety by laboratory staff in areas of use of personal protective equipment, specimen collection and processing, centrifuge--related hazards, infective hazards waste disposal and provision and use of First Aid Kits. Issues pertaining to laboratory safety are not yet given adequate attention by both employers and employees in developing countries in this ear of resurgence of diseases such as HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Band C, is emphasized.

  6. Strategies for combining physics videos and virtual laboratories in the training of physics teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Adriana; Vertchenko, Lev; Martins, Maria Inés

    2007-03-01

    Among the multimedia resources used in physics education, the most prominent are virtual laboratories and videos. On one hand, computer simulations and applets have very attractive graphic interfaces, showing an incredible amount of detail and movement. On the other hand, videos, offer the possibility of displaying high quality images, and are becoming more feasible with the increasing availability of digital resources. We believe it is important to discuss, throughout the teacher training program, both the functionality of information and communication technology (ICT) in physics education and, the varied applications of these resources. In our work we suggest the introduction of ICT resources in a sequence integrating these important tools in the teacher training program, as opposed to the traditional approach, in which virtual laboratories and videos are introduced separately. In this perspective, when we introduce and utilize virtual laboratory techniques we also provide for its use in videos, taking advantage of graphic interfaces. Thus the students in our program learn to use instructional software in the production of videos for classroom use.

  7. The Initial Training of Geography Teachers at the University of Porto: Model and Training, Practices and Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Felisbela

    2015-01-01

    Since 2008, the initial training of Geography teachers in Portugal was combined with the initial training of History teachers. This forced union has led to implications in the practices and teaching of geography. This paper intends to explore the thoughts and actions of the student teachers at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University of…

  8. Rural general practice training: experience of a rural general practice team and a postgraduate year two registrar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott-Jones J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Undertaking training in rural areas is a recognised way of helping recruit staff to work in rural communities. Postgraduate year two medical doctors in New Zealand have been able to undertake a three-month placement in rural practice as part of their pre-vocational training experience since November 2010. AIM: To describe the experience of a rural general practice team providing training to a postgraduate year two medical trainee, and to describe the teaching experience and range of conditions seen by the trainee. METHODS: A pre- and post-placement interview with staff, and analysis of a logbook of cases and teaching undertaken in the practice. RESULTS: The practice team's experience of having the trainee was positive, and the trainee was exposed to a wide range of conditions over 418 clinical encounters. The trainee received 22.5 hours of formal training over the three-month placement. DISCUSSION: Rural general practice can provide a wide range of clinical experience to a postgraduate year two medical trainee. Rural practices in New Zealand should be encouraged to offer teaching placements at this training level. Exposure to rural practice at every level of training is important to encourage doctors to consider rural practice as a career.

  9. Rural general practice training: experience of a rural general practice team and a postgraduate year two registrar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Jones, Joseph; Lucas, Sarah

    2013-09-01

    Undertaking training in rural areas is a recognised way of helping recruit staff to work in rural communities. Postgraduate year two medical doctors in New Zealand have been able to undertake a three-month placement in rural practice as part of their pre-vocational training experience since November 2010. To describe the experience of a rural general practice team providing training to a postgraduate year two medical trainee, and to describe the teaching experience and range of conditions seen by the trainee. A pre- and post-placement interview with staff, and analysis of a logbook of cases and teaching undertaken in the practice. The practice team's experience of having the trainee was positive, and the trainee was exposed to a wide range of conditions over 418 clinical encounters. The trainee received 22.5 hours of formal training over the three-month placement. Rural general practice can provide a wide range of clinical experience to a postgraduate year two medical trainee. Rural practices in New Zealand should be encouraged to offer teaching placements at this training level. Exposure to rural practice at every level of training is important to encourage doctors to consider rural practice as a career.

  10. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES AS THE TOOL OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVING OF FUTURE PHYSICS TEACHERS TRAINING TO LABORATORY SESSION IN OPTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharenko T.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the problem of the use of information technologies implementation as the tool of the efficiency improving of future physics teachers training to execution of laboratory session in Optics is considered in the article. The problems and contradictions concerning ICT tools use in higher education institutions, the work of which is aimed at future physics teachers training are described. Due to the specifics of future teachers training in higher education institutions, labor market requirements and public procurement, the main ICT tools are identified, that are effective in students’ self-activity work to laboratory session execution. The developed list of electronic resources is divided into blocks according to the topics of laboratory works in Optics. The methodology of using of ICT tools at future students training for laboratory session on the example of individual topics is considered.

  11. A comparison of designer activity using core design situations in the laboratory and practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cash, Philip; Hicks, Ben J.; Culley, Steve J.

    2013-01-01

    using a mixed methods approach. Based on this it is concluded that laboratory studies are important research tools and that clear and definable relationships do exist between design activity in practice and the laboratory. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....... situations commonly studied by design researchers: information seeking, ideation and design review. This comparison is instantiated through three complementary studies: an observational study of practice and two experimental studies. These reveal a range of similarities and differences that are described......In 2011 one quarter of all articles published in Design Studies and the Journal of Engineering Design used experimental studies. However, there is little work exploring the relationship between laboratory and practice. This paper addresses this by detailing an analysis of designer activity in three...

  12. Best practice in communications training for public engagement with science, technology, engineering and mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bultitude

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective training in key communications skills is critical for successful public engagement. However, what are the secrets to designing and delivering an effectual training course? This paper outlines key findings from a research study into communication training programmes for public engagement with STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The research focused on training in direct communication methods, (as separate from media training and encompassed both trainers and trainees, the latter group spanning across both scientists and explainers. The findings indicated that training courses are effective at increasing involvement in science communication events and trainees feel more confident and able to engage due to training. An interactive style was found to be a key element of training courses. Demonstrations of good practice followed by own performance with feedback were also important, preferably involving a ‘real’ audience. A list of guidelines on best practice has been developed which offers practical advice.

  13. Regionalisation of general practice training--are we meeting the needs of rural Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, David G; Greacen, Jane H; Giddings, Patrick H; Skinner, Lesley P

    2011-06-06

    The concept of "social accountability" has underpinned the development of many medical education programs over the past decade. Success of the regionalisation of the general practice training program in Australia will ultimately be measured by the ability of the program to deliver a sufficient rural general practice workforce to meet the health needs of rural communities. Regionalisation of general practice training in Australia arose from the 1998 recommendations of the Ministerial Review of General Practice Training. The resultant competitive structure adopted by government was not the preferred option of the Review Committee, and may be a negative influence on rural workforce, as the competitive corporate structure of regional training providers has created barriers to meaningful vertical integration. Available data suggest that the regionalised training program is not yet providing a sustainable general practice workforce to rural Australia. The current increase in medical student and general practice training places provides an opportunity to address some of these issues. In particular, it is recommended that changes be made to registrar selection processes, the rural pipeline and vertical integration of training, and training for procedural rural practice. To achieve these goals, perhaps it is time for another comprehensive ministerial review of general practice training in Australia.

  14. Effects of physical randomness training on virtual and laboratory golf putting performance in novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, T C; Lamb, P F

    2018-06-01

    External randomness exists in all sports but is perhaps most obvious in golf putting where robotic putters sink only 80% of 5 m putts due to unpredictable ball-green dynamics. The purpose of this study was to test whether physical randomness training can improve putting performance in novices. A virtual random-physics golf-putting game was developed based on controlled ball-roll data. Thirty-two subjects were assigned a unique randomness gain (RG) ranging from 0.1 to 2.0-times real-world randomness. Putter face kinematics were measured in 5 m laboratory putts before and after five days of virtual training. Performance was quantified using putt success rate and "miss-adjustment correlation" (MAC), the correlation between left-right miss magnitude and subsequent right-left kinematic adjustments. Results showed no RG-success correlation (r = -0.066, p = 0.719) but mildly stronger correlations with MAC for face angle (r = -0.168, p = 0.358) and clubhead path (r = -0.302, p = 0.093). The strongest RG-MAC correlation was observed during virtual training (r = -0.692, p golf putting kinematics. Adaptation to external physical randomness during virtual training may therefore help golfers adapt to external randomness in real-world environments.

  15. Effect of skill laboratory training on academic performance of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Alamgir; Shabbir, Faizania; Qamar, Khadija; Rajput, Tausif Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    To observe the effect of skill lab training on academic performance of final year medical students in terms of marks obtained in long case, short case, objective structured clinical examination and viva. The cross-sectional comparative study was conducted at Army Medical College, Rawalpindi from February to April 2015. Two batches of final year MBBS were recruited for the study. Batch 1 received conventional training, and Batch 2 received skill lab training. The performance of students was assessed by comparing the marks obtained in long case, short case, objective structured clinical examination and viva. Data was analysed using SPSS 23. Of the 335 subjects, 168(50.1%) were male and 167(49.9%) were female students with a mean age of 21.79±1.02 years. Batch 1 had 151(45%) students and Batch 2 had 184(55%). Batch 2 got significantly higher marks in long case, short case and objective structured clinical examination (p0.05). Acquisition of clinical skills significantly improved when medial students were trained in skill laboratories.

  16. Best practices in bioinformatics training for life scientists.

    KAUST Repository

    Via, Allegra; Blicher, Thomas; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Brazas, Michelle D; Brooksbank, Cath; Budd, Aidan; De Las Rivas, Javier; Dreyer, Jacqueline; Fernandes, Pedro L; van Gelder, Celia; Jacob, Joachim; Jimenez, Rafael C; Loveland, Jane; Moran, Federico; Mulder, Nicola; Nyrö nen, Tommi; Rother, Kristian; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Attwood, Teresa K

    2013-01-01

    concepts. Providing bioinformatics training to empower life scientists to handle and analyse their data efficiently, and progress their research, is a challenge across the globe. Delivering good training goes beyond traditional lectures and resource

  17. The practical training of students - x-ray technicians and requirements to mentors in clinical bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagova, P; Boninska, N.; Jovchev, D.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Training of X-ray technicians in Bulgaria takes place in the Medical Colleges to Medical Universities. It's purpose is providing professional training of students in the area of diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Practical training is based on the scientific and theoretical knowledge and skills and is organized in pedagogic environment, adequate to regularities for a gradual formation of practical skills and habits. The practical training and pre-graduation internship are performed in 1895 from total of 3810 hours, which represents about fifty percent of all training of X-ray technicians. Students are in groups of 2-4 students. Practical training is organized, accomplished and monitored by the teacher training practice with the help of a mentor in the clinical base. Purpose: To present the tasks of practical training of students - X-ray technicians and the requirements for the personal characteristics and activity of mentors. Materials and methods: Documentary method has been used. Literature and normative documents related to the practical training of students in 'X-ray technician' of Medical Colleges have been studied. The job descriptions of senior clinical X-ray technicians have been examined carefully. Results: By analyzing literature sources, we have structured the tasks of practical training and pre-graduation internship of students - X-ray technicians, also we have described the requirements for personal qualities of mentors and systematize the activities they perform. Conclusion: Practical training plays an important role in adaptation of young X-ray technicians to the conditions of medical work, improving their skills and habits, and to the development of specific practical skills for being able to respond to emergency conditions and to solve complicated practical situations. The mentor is the supervisor and the controller of interns who helps this happen through his own example, qualities and attitudes towards

  18. Training family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Murdoch, William; Markova, Tsveti; Kimbrough, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe a training curriculum for family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology (doctoral) trainees at the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency program. The collaborative care curriculum involves a series of patient care and educational activities that require collaboration between family medicine residents and psychology trainees. Activities include: (1) clinic huddle, (2) shadowing, (3) pull-ins and warm handoffs, (4) co-counseling, (5) shared precepting, (6) feedback from psychology trainees to family medicine residents regarding consults, brief interventions, and psychological testing, (7) lectures, (8) video-observation and feedback, (9) home visits, and (10) research. The activities were designed to teach the participants to work together as a team and to provide a reciprocal learning experience. In a brief three-item survey of residents at the end of their academic year, 83% indicated that they had learned new information or techniques from working with the psychology trainees for assessment and intervention purposes; 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their patient care; and 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their ability to work as part of a team. Informal interviews with the psychology trainees indicated that reciprocal learning had taken place. Family medicine residents can learn to work collaboratively with psychology trainees through a series of shared patient care and educational activities within a primary care clinic where an integrated approach to care is valued.

  19. Systematic Approach to Research Training: Benefits for Counseling Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughead, Teri A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Synthesizes developments concerning research training in graduate counselor education and presents a systematic approach for training master's and doctoral students in mental health counseling to assimilate, use, and perform research. Suggests diversity of research training strategies for implementation in counselor preparation programs.…

  20. Employment and Training for America's Homeless: Best Practices Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Susan Kessler; Trutko, John W.; Isbell, Kellie; Rothstein, Frances; Barnow, Burt S.

    This document is a how-to guide to help employment and training agencies tailor their delivery systems to be more effective in training, placing, and retaining homeless individuals in gainful employment. The guide is written from the perspective of an employment and training agency and based largely on the experiences of 63 organizations from…

  1. Extension of general practice training from three to four years: experiences of a vocational training programme in Southern Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowling, Stephanie

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the experiences of trainees taking part in an extended (four-year) general practice training programme introduced in the South Eastern region of the Republic of Ireland to replace the previous traditional (three-year) programme. In a qualitative design, eight homogeneous focus groups were held to determine the value of the additional year of training. The first cohort of trainees was interviewed towards the start and at the end of their fourth year. Trainees finishing the following year were also interviewed, as were graduates from the final three-year programme. GP trainers and the four members of the programme directing team comprised two further independent focus groups. Trainees reported that the integration of hospital posts and general practice attachments over the four years was particularly beneficial. The exposure to a variety of different general practices and the opportunity to take part in specialty clinics were considered extremely useful. The fourth year of training was felt to be less pressurised than previous years. Professional and personal development was enhanced; improved readiness to practise and confidence were noted. Perceived disadvantages of extended training included a lack of acknowledgment for doctors in their fourth year and excessive emphasis placed on research during the final year of training. The addition of an extra year of vocational training improves professional and personal development and changes the learning experience for doctors. Doctors felt more confident and ready to enter independent practice at the end of the fourth year of training.

  2. Industrial Provision of Practice Skills of Students Training Gastronomy Education (Case of Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarioglan, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to determine to what extent practice skills of students, training in gastronomy education, meet the expectations of food and beverage industry. In the study, 197 students training internship in 27 different firms of total 1540 students training in gastronomy education at higher education level in Turkey were reached by…

  3. Psychosocial Training in U.S. Internal Medicine and Family Practice Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaufberg, Elizabeth H.; Joseph, Robert C.; Pels, Richard J.; Wyshak, Grace; Wieman, Dow; Nadelson, Carol C.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed directors of internal medicine (IM) and family practice (FP) residency programs regarding the format, content, and quantity of psychosocial training in their programs, their opinions on topics related to such training, and program demographics. Found considerable variation in content and time devoted to psychosocial training within and…

  4. The efficacy of unsupervised home-based exercise regimens in comparison to supervised laboratory-based exercise training upon cardio-respiratory health facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, James; Atherton, Philip J; Smith, Kenneth; Doleman, Brett; Williams, John P; Lund, Jonathan N; Phillips, Bethan E

    2017-09-01

    Supervised high-intensity interval training (HIIT) can rapidly improve cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). However, the effectiveness of time-efficient unsupervised home-based interventions is unknown. Eighteen volunteers completed either: laboratory-HIIT (L-HIIT); home-HIIT (H-HIIT) or home-isometric hand-grip training (H-IHGT). CRF improved significantly in L-HIIT and H-HIIT groups, with blood pressure improvements in the H-IHGT group only. H-HIIT offers a practical, time-efficient exercise mode to improve CRF, away from the laboratory environment. H-IHGT potentially provides a viable alternative to modify blood pressure in those unable to participate in whole-body exercise. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  5. Laboratory Medicine Best Practice Guideline: Vitamins A, E and the Carotenoids in Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Ronda F; Woollard, Gerald A; Hoad, Kirsten E; Walmsley, Trevor A; Johnson, Lambro A; Briscoe, Scott; Koetsier, Sabrina; Harrower, Tamantha; Gill, Janice P

    2014-01-01

    Despite apparent method similarities between laboratories there appear to be confounding factors inhibiting uniform reporting and standardisation of vitamin assays. The Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) Vitamins Working Party, in conjunction with The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Programs, has formulated a guideline to improve performance, reproducibility and accuracy of fat-soluble vitamin results. The aim of the guideline is to identify critical pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical components of the analysis of vitamins A, E and carotenoids in blood to promote best practice and harmonisation. This best practice guideline has been developed with reference to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) “Laboratory Medicine Best Practices: Developing an Evidence-Based Review and Evaluation Process”. The CDC document cites an evaluation framework for generating best practice recommendations that are specific to laboratory medicine. These 50 recommendations proposed herein, were generated from a comprehensive literature search and the extensive combined experience of the AACB Vitamins Working Party members. They were formulated based on comparison between an impact assessment rating and strength of evidence and were classified as either: (1) strongly recommend, (2) recommend, (3) no recommendation for or against, or (4) recommend against. These best practice recommendations represent the consensus views, in association with peer reviewed evidence of the AACB Vitamins Working Party, towards best practice for the collection, analysis and interpretation of vitamins A, E and carotenoids in blood. PMID:25210208

  6. How Does Education and Training Impact on Management Practices? CRLRA Discussion Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue

    A study examined the impact of agricultural education and training on farm business practice and the influence of training on changes to farming practice in Australia. Data were from an additional set of questions on the Australian Bureau of Statistics' 1993-94 Agricultural Financial Survey and an interview survey of 65 Tasmanian farmers. Findings…

  7. Gestalt Practice and Arts-Based Training for Leadership, Innovation and Change Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotas, Naoum

    2014-01-01

    Gestalt practice and arts-based training has been examined and evaluated using evidence from the literature and personal experience. Gestalt practice allows the training and learning process to take into account the intrapersonal as well as the interpersonal aspects of the group and the individuals involved: the resulting knowledge and…

  8. Barriers Encountered in the Transfer of Educational Training to Workplace Practice in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almannie, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a critical issue in the practicality of training programs, not only in Saudi Arabia, but also in other developing countries where billions of dollars are spent on training human resources without evaluation of these programs on workplace practice and organization development. This study investigates barriers encountered in…

  9. Nationwide survey of policies and practices related to capillary blood sampling in medical laboratories in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krleza, Jasna Lenicek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Capillary sampling is increasingly used to obtain blood for laboratory tests in volumes as small as necessary and as non-invasively as possible. Whether capillary blood sampling is also frequent in Croatia, and whether it is performed according to international laboratory standards is unclear. Materials and methods: All medical laboratories that participate in the Croatian National External Quality Assessment Program (N = 204) were surveyed on-line to collect information about the laboratory’s parent institution, patient population, types and frequencies of laboratory tests based on capillary blood samples, choice of reference intervals, and policies and procedures specifically related to capillary sampling. Sampling practices were compared with guidelines from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Results: Of the 204 laboratories surveyed, 174 (85%) responded with complete questionnaires. Among the 174 respondents, 155 (89%) reported that they routinely perform capillary sampling, which is carried out by laboratory staff in 118 laboratories (76%). Nearly half of respondent laboratories (48%) do not have a written protocol including order of draw for multiple sampling. A single puncture site is used to provide capillary blood for up to two samples at 43% of laboratories that occasionally or regularly perform such sampling. Most respondents (88%) never perform arterialisation prior to capillary blood sampling. Conclusions: Capillary blood sampling is highly prevalent in Croatia across different types of clinical facilities and patient populations. Capillary sampling procedures are not standardised in the country, and the rate of laboratory compliance with CLSI and WHO guidelines is low. PMID:25351353

  10. An empirical identification and categorisation of training best practices for ERP implementation projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Jose Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Although training is one of the most cited critical success factors in Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems implementations, few empirical studies have attempted to examine the characteristics of management of the training process within ERP implementation projects. Based on the data gathered from a sample of 158 respondents across four stakeholder groups involved in ERP implementation projects, and using a mixed method design, we have assembled a derived set of training best practices. Results suggest that the categorised list of ERP training best practices can be used to better understand training activities in ERP implementation projects. Furthermore, the results reveal that the company size and location have an impact on the relevance of training best practices. This empirical study also highlights the need to investigate the role of informal workplace trainers in ERP training activities.

  11. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for use of tumor markers in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Hoffman, Barry R; Chan, Daniel W

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This report presents updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines summarizing quality requirements for the use of tumor markers. METHODS: One subcommittee developed guidelines for analytical quality relevant to serum and tissue-based tumor...... questions to ensure selection of the appropriate test, adherence to good clinical and laboratory practices (e.g., minimization of the risk of incorrect patient and/or specimen identification, tube type, or timing), use of internationally standardized and well-characterized methods, careful adherence...... records. Also mandatory is extensive validation encompassing all stages of analysis before introduction of new technologies such as microarrays and mass spectrometry. Provision of high-quality tumor marker services is facilitated by dialogue involving researchers, diagnostic companies, clinical...

  12. Nuclear criticality safety staff training and qualifications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monahan, S.P.; McLaughlin, T.P.

    1997-01-01

    Operations involving significant quantities of fissile material have been conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory continuously since 1943. Until the advent of the Laboratory's Nuclear Criticality Safety Committee (NCSC) in 1957, line management had sole responsibility for controlling criticality risks. From 1957 until 1961, the NCSC was the Laboratory body which promulgated policy guidance as well as some technical guidance for specific operations. In 1961 the Laboratory created the position of Nuclear Criticality Safety Office (in addition to the NCSC). In 1980, Laboratory management moved the Criticality Safety Officer (and one other LACEF staff member who, by that time, was also working nearly full-time on criticality safety issues) into the Health Division office. Later that same year the Criticality Safety Group, H-6 (at that time) was created within H-Division, and staffed by these two individuals. The training and education of these individuals in the art of criticality safety was almost entirely self-regulated, depending heavily on technical interactions between each other, as well as NCSC, LACEF, operations, other facility, and broader criticality safety community personnel. Although the Los Alamos criticality safety group has grown both in size and formality of operations since 1980, the basic philosophy that a criticality specialist must be developed through mentoring and self motivation remains the same. Formally, this philosophy has been captured in an internal policy, document ''Conduct of Business in the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group.'' There are no short cuts or substitutes in the development of a criticality safety specialist. A person must have a self-motivated personality, excellent communications skills, a thorough understanding of the principals of neutron physics, a safety-conscious and helpful attitude, a good perspective of real risk, as well as a detailed understanding of process operations and credible upsets

  13. A Simple Laboratory Practical to Illustrate RNA Mediated Gene Interference Using Drosophila Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buluwela, Laki; Kamalati, Tahereh; Photiou, Andy; Heathcote, Dean A.; Jones, Michael D.; Ali, Simak

    2010-01-01

    RNA mediated gene interference (RNAi) is now a key tool in eukaryotic cell and molecular biology research. This article describes a five session laboratory practical, spread over a seven day period, to introduce and illustrate the technique. During the exercise, students working in small groups purify PCR products that encode "in vitro"…

  14. Laboratory containment practices for arthropod vectors of human and animal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Walter J

    2006-03-01

    Arthropod-borne pathogens have an impact on the health and well-being of humans and animals throughout the world. Research involving arthropod vectors of disease is often dependent on the ability to maintain the specific arthropod species in laboratory colonies. The author reviews current arthropod containment practices and discusses their importance from public health and ecological perspectives.

  15. Code of practice for the design of laboratories using radioactive substances for medical purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This Code has been prepared to supplement the radioactive substances acts and regulations implemented in Australia. It is intended as a guide to safe practices but is not legislation. Areas covered include siting, layout, surface finishes, laboratory furniture and fittings, ventilation, containment and release of airborne effluent and storage of radioactive substances

  16. Mozambique field epidemiology and laboratory training program: a pathway for strengthening human resources in applied epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar, Cynthia Semá; Taibo, Cátia; Sacarlal, Jahit; Gujral, Lorna; Salomão, Cristolde; Doyle, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, Mozambique has been undergoing demographic, epidemiological, economic and social transitions, which have all had a notable impact on the National Health System. New challenges have emerged, causing a need to expand the preparation and response to emerging disease threats and public health emergencies. We describe the structure and function of the Mozambique Field Epidemiology Training Program (MZ-FELTP) and the main outputs achieved during the first 6 years of program implementation (consisting of 3 cohorts). We also outline the contribution of the program to the National Health System and assess the retention of the graduates. The MZ-FELTP is a post-graduate in-service training program, based on the acquisition of skills, within two tracks: applied epidemiology and laboratory management. The program was established in 2010, with the objective of strengthening capacity in applied epidemiology and laboratory management, so that events of public health importance can be detected and investigated in a timely and effective manner. The program is in its seventh year, having successfully trained 36 health professionals in the advanced course. During the first six years of the program, more than 40 outbreaks were investigated, 37 surveillance system evaluations were conducted and 39 descriptive data analyses were performed. Surveillance activities were implemented for mass events and emergency situations. In addition, more than 100 oral and poster presentations were given by trainees at national and international conferences. The MZ-FELTP has helped provide the Ministry of Health with the human and technical resources and operational capacity, to rapidly and effectively respond to major public health challenges in the country. The continuous involvement of key stakeholders is necessary for the continuation, expansion and ongoing sustainability of the program.

  17. First training course about protection and radiological safety for responsible in radiation protection in nuclear medicine and /or radiotherapy practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    The Training course provide guidance of the detection and radiation measurement, radioactivity elements and dosimetry, regulatory standards, regulatory organization and practices works and the diary training course

  18. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 4, Facility practical training attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    At DOE sites with more than one facility, and where RCT tasks at each facility may differ, site and facility tasks should be separated. The tasks that are common to all the facilities on the site should be included in Phase II training with the core tasks. Tasks unique to a facility should be added to the training program qualification standard, as an attachment, as Phase IV training. Not all the DOE sites will include Phase IV training in their programs. Phase IV training allows each site to qualify technicians to a select facility. Since the core training for the technicians is standardized, the transfer of technicians between facilities requires that only facility tasks be taught, provided the core qualification is current

  19. Emerging technologies in education and training: applications for the laboratory animal science community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Niemi, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    This article examines several new and exciting communication technologies. Many of the technologies were developed by the entertainment industry; however, other industries are adopting and modifying them for their own needs. These new technologies allow people to collaborate across distance and time and to learn in simulated work contexts. The article explores the potential utility of these technologies for advancing laboratory animal care and use through better education and training. Descriptions include emerging technologies such as augmented reality and multi-user virtual environments, which offer new approaches with different capabilities. Augmented reality interfaces, characterized by the use of handheld computers to infuse the virtual world into the real one, result in deeply immersive simulations. In these simulations, users can access virtual resources and communicate with real and virtual participants. Multi-user virtual environments enable multiple participants to simultaneously access computer-based three-dimensional virtual spaces, called "worlds," and to interact with digital tools. They allow for authentic experiences that promote collaboration, mentoring, and communication. Because individuals may learn or train differently, it is advantageous to combine the capabilities of these technologies and applications with more traditional methods to increase the number of students who are served by using current methods alone. The use of these technologies in animal care and use programs can create detailed training and education environments that allow students to learn the procedures more effectively, teachers to assess their progress more objectively, and researchers to gain insights into animal care.

  20. The Influence of Ergonomics Training on Employee Behavior at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puckett, Leslie Guthrie [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2001-01-01

    A survey of employee behavior was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of ergonomic behavior that decreased the chance of having a work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) among employees. The null hypothesis was tested to determine if there was a significant difference in ergonomic behavior between trained and untrained employees. The LANL employees were stratified by job series and then randomly selected to participate. The data were gathered using an electronic self-administered behavior questionnaire. The study population was composed of 6931 employees, and the response rate was 48%. The null hypothesis was rejected for twelve out of fifteen questions on the questionnaire. Logistic regression results indicate that the trained participants were more likely to report the risk-avoiding behavior, which supported the rejection of the null hypothesis for 60% of the questions. There was a higher frequency that the beneficial or risk-avoiding behavior was reported by the uninjured participants. Job series analysis revealed that ergonomics is an important issue among participants from all the job series. It also identified the occupational specialist classification (an administrative job), as the job series with the most occurrences of undesired ergonomic behaviors. In conclusion, there was a significant difference between the trained and untrained participants of the beneficial ergonomic behavior in the reported risk reducing behaviors.

  1. Standard practice for conducting and evaluating laboratory corrosions tests in soils

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for conducting laboratory corrosion tests in soils to evaluate the corrosive attack on engineering materials. 1.2 This practice covers specimen selection and preparation, test environments, and evaluation of test results. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Haemophilia Laboratory diagnosis training and care in Rural communities in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathelrahman M. Hassan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sixty nine per cent of people with hemophilia symptoms in rural areas were accessed to laboratory diagnosis and care support in Sudan, where technical expertise and health care facilities was less than optimal. There were many reasons for the inadequate care of hemophilic patients: the perception of rarity of the disease; lacked of laboratory facilities to diagnose the disorder; lacked of understanding of the disorder by patients, their relatives, and even healthcare providers; poorly developed blood bank facilities; and lacked of adequate factor supply were just some examples. The Sudanese Hemophilia Care Association (SHCA was attempted to address many of these issues by establishing hemophilia care programs and by educating and training healthcare practitioners so that a healthcare team could be organized that attempts to ameliorate these problems and provides treatment options. However, it was possible to manage hemophiliac’s patients with limited resources. Strategies for conserving factor concentrates were included education of doctors and patients, prenatal diagnosis, increasing the use of anti fibrinolytic agents, physiotherapy, the use of fibrin glue, and simple orthotics and prosthetic measures. An outreach program would be initiated to ensure that hemophilia care and diagnosis was available outside the capital city. Official recognition of hemophilia laboratory diagnosis and treatment centers and designated centers by the government could also be very beneficial in ensuring adequate care in rural areas in Sudan.

  3. LASCO: a performance assessment and training laboratory for containment and surveillance techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuypers, M.; Landat, D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of Containment and Surveillance (C/S) techniques for the implementation of nuclear safeguards has increased substantially in recent years. Sealing and identification systems are used on a large scale and video surveillance is replacing gradually film camera systems. Furthermore many C/S systems are operated in an unattended mode. In order to evaluate the performances and assurance which can be obtained from C/S systems, JRC has installed a laboratory, called LaSCo, for testing C/S components and systems, simulating, where possible, field conditions. This laboratory includes facilities for training inspectors, for instance for reviewing aid of video pictures, use of integrated multisensor systems, evaluation of ultrasonic sealing methods. Several years ago, JRC installed a performance laboratory for NDA, called PERLA, which is now extensively used. LaSCo is expected to play the same role as PERLA but in the field of Containment and Surveillance and by extension to non nuclear measurements (e.g. Weighing, volume determinations). The newly built facilities and the first experimental lay-out of LaSCo are described. It is expected that industry and inspectors will make extensive use of LaSCo

  4. Practical experience with graphical user interfaces and object-oriented design in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, I G; Cartwright, R Y; Farnan, L P

    1993-12-15

    The computing strategy in our laboratories evolved from research in Artificial Intelligence, and is based on powerful software tools running on high performance desktop computers with a graphical user interface. This allows most tasks to be regarded as design problems rather than implementation projects, and both rapid prototyping and an object-oriented approach to be employed during the in-house development and enhancement of the laboratory information systems. The practical application of this strategy is discussed, with particular reference to the system designer, the laboratory user and the laboratory customer. Routine operation covers five departments, and the systems are stable, flexible and well accepted by the users. Client-server computing, currently undergoing final trials, is seen as the key to further development, and this approach to Pathology computing has considerable potential for the future.

  5. EC4 European Syllabus for Post-Graduate Training in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: version 3 - 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerah, Simone; McMurray, Janet; Bousquet, Bernard; Baum, Hannsjorg; Beastall, Graham H; Blaton, Vic; Cals, Marie-Josèphe; Duchassaing, Danielle; Gaudeau-Toussaint, Marie-Françoise; Harmoinen, Aimo; Hoffmann, Hans; Jansen, Rob T; Kenny, Desmond; Kohse, Klaus P; Köller, Ursula; Gobert, Jean-Gérard; Linget, Christine; Lund, Erik; Nubile, Giuseppe; Opp, Matthias; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinon, Georges; Queralto, José M; Reguengo, Henrique; Rizos, Demetrios; Szekeres, Thomas; Vidaud, Michel; Wallinder, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The EC4 Syllabus for Postgraduate Training is the basis for the European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The syllabus: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. The syllabus is not primarily meant to be a training guide, but on the basis of the overview given (common minimal programme), national societies should formulate programmes that indicate where knowledge and experience is needed. The main points of this programme are: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. Knowledge in biochemistry, haematology, immunology, etc.; Pre-analytical conditions; Evaluation of results; Interpretations (post-analytical phase); Laboratory management; and Quality insurance management. The aim of this version of the syllabus is to be in accordance with the Directive of Professional Qualifications published on 30 September 2005. To prepare the common platforms planned in this directive, the disciplines are divided into four categories: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. Knowledge in biochemistry, haematology, immunology, etc.; Pre-analytical conditions; Evaluation of results; Interpretations (post-analytical phase); Laboratory

  6. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping accurate inventory control procedures

  7. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping

  8. Traditional Birth Attendant Training and Local Birthing Practices in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Sheela; Turrell, Gavin; Johnson, Helen; Fraser, Jenny; Patterson, Carla

    2011-01-01

    Training birth attendants (TBAs) to provide essential maternal and infant health care services during delivery and ongoing community care in developing countries. Despite inadequate evidence of relevance and effectiveness of TBA training programmes, there has been a policy shift since the 1990s in that many donor agencies funding TBA training…

  9. Partnering through Training and Practice to Achieve Performance Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a partnership effort among managers, trainers, and employees to spring to life performance improvement using the performance templates (P-T) approach. P-T represents a process model as well as a method of training leading to performance improvement. Not only does it add to our repertoire of training and performance management…

  10. Craft Training in Russia: Theory and Practice of Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsev, Gennadij M.; Efanov, Andrei V.; Moiseev, Andrei V.; Bychkova, Ekaterina Yu.; Karpova, Natalia P.; Tidemann, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research topic is substantiated by the social commitment to the establishment of a system of craft training focused on training personnel for craft enterprises. The purpose of the article is to provide theoretical and methodological substantiation of the necessity to provide organizational and pedagogical foundations for the…

  11. Implementation of a digital preparation validation tool in dental skills laboratory training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarovska, A; Larsson, C

    2018-05-01

    To describe the implementation of a digital tool for preparation validation and evaluate it as an aid in students' self-assessment. Students at the final semester of skills laboratory training were asked to use a digital preparation validation tool (PVT) when performing two different tasks; preparation of crowns for teeth 11 and 21. The students were divided into two groups. Group A self-assessed and scanned all three attempts at 21 ("prep-and-scan"). Group B self-assessed all attempts chose the best one and scanned it ("best-of-three"). The situation was reversed for 11. The students assessed five parameters of the preparation and marked them as approved (A) or failed (F). These marks were compared with the information from the PVT. The students also completed a questionnaire. Each question was rated from 1 to 5. Teachers' opinions were collected at staff meetings throughout the project. Most students in the "prep-and-scan" groups showed an increase in agreement between their self-assessment and the information from the PVT, whereas students in the "best-of-three" groups showed lower levels of agreement. All students rated the PVT positively. Most strongly agreed that the tool was helpful in developing skills (mean 4.15), easy to use (mean 4.23) and that it added benefits in comparison to existing assessment tools (mean 4.05). They did not however, fully agree that the tool is time efficient (mean 2.55), and they did not consider it a substitute for verbal teacher feedback. Teachers' feedback suggested advantages of the tool in the form of ease of use, visual aid and increasing interest and motivation during skills laboratory training however, they did not notice a reduction in need of verbal feedback. Within the limitations of the study, our conclusion is that a digital PVT may be a valuable adjunct to other assessment tools in skills laboratory training. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Training practices to support decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourassa, J.; Clark, C.R.; Kazennov, A.; Laraia, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Scott, A.; Yoder, J.

    2006-01-01

    Adequate numbers of competent personnel must be available during any phase of a nuclear facility life cycle, including the decommissioning phase. While a significant amount of attention has been focused on the technical aspects of decommissioning and many publications have been developed to address technical aspects, human resource management issues, particularly the training and qualification of decommissioning personnel, are becoming more paramount with the growing number of nuclear facilities of all types that are reaching or approaching the decommissioning phase. One of the keys to success is the training of the various personnel involved in decommissioning in order to develop the necessary knowledge and skills required for specific decommissioning tasks. The operating organisations of nuclear facilities normally possess limited expertise in decommissioning and consequently rely on a number of specialized organisations and companies that provide the services related to the decommissioning activities. Because of this there is a need to address the issue of assisting the operating organisations in the development and implementation of human resource management policies and training programmes for the facility personnel and contractor personnel involved in various phases of decommissioning activities. The lessons learned in the field of ensuring personnel competence are discussed in the paper (on the basis of information and experiences accumulated from various countries and organizations, particularly, through relevant IAEA activities). Particularly, the following aspects are addressed: transition of training from operational to decommissioning phase; knowledge management; target groups, training needs analysis, and application of a systematic approach to training (SAT); content of training for decommissioning management and professional staff, and for decommissioning workers; selection and training of instructors; training facilities and tools; and training as

  13. Effect of virtual analytical chemistry laboratory on enhancing student research skills and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Bortnik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to determine the effect of a virtual chemistry laboratory on university student achievement. The article describes a model of a laboratory course that includes a virtual component. This virtual component is viewed as a tool of student pre-lab autonomous learning. It presents electronic resources designed for a virtual laboratory and outlines the methodology of e-resource application. To find out how virtual chemistry laboratory affects student scientific literacy, research skills and practices, a pedagogical experiment has been conducted. Student achievement was compared in two learning environments: traditional – in-class hands-on – learning (control group and blended learning – online learning combined with in-person learning (experimental group. The effectiveness of integrating an e-lab in the laboratory study was measured by comparing student lab reports of the two groups. For that purpose, a set of 10 criteria was developed. The experimental and control student groups were also compared in terms of test results and student portfolios. The study showed that the adopted approach blending both virtual and hands-on learning environments has the potential to enhance student research skills and practices in analytical chemistry studies.

  14. [Effects of practical training to increase motivation for learning and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takumi; Akiyama, Shinji; Sagara, Hidenori; Tanaka, Akihiro; Miyauchi, Yoshirou; Araki, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Izushi, Fumio; Namba, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Under the six-year pharmaceutical education system that was initiated in April 2006, students who had completed the course in March 2012 became the first graduates. The six-year system encourages students to develop a well-rounded personality, a deep sense of ethics, knowledge required for health care professionals, abilities to identify and solve problems, and practical skills required in clinical settings, as well as basic knowledge and skills. Under the new education system based on the "pharmaceutical education model core curriculums" and "practical training model core curriculums", general pharmaceutical education is implemented in each college, and five-month practical training is conducted in clinical settings. Clinical tasks experienced by students for the first time are expected to significantly influence their motivation to learn and future prospects. In the present survey research, students who had completed practical training evaluated the training program, and correspondence and logistic regression analyses of the results were conducted to examine the future effects and influences of the training on the students. The results suggest that the students viewed the practical training program positively. In addition, clinical experience during the training sessions not only influenced their decisions on future careers, but also significantly increased their motivation to learn. Furthermore, their motivation for learning was increased most by the enthusiasm of pharmacists who advised them in clinical settings, rather than the training program itself. To improve pharmaceutical clinical learning, it is important to develop teaching and working environments for pharmacists in charge of advising students in clinical training.

  15. Pedagogical Practice of Training Teachers in Elementary School and Social Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miraida Josefina-Linares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In educational practice of training teachers of elementary school, in Venezuela, it emphasizes meaningful interactions in teaching learning process; which they do not always answer to the demands of reflexive educational practice to make teachers redefine their role, functions and learn training to their students. The objective of this research consists of assessing socio-educative contradictions of pedagogical practice of the training teachers in elementary school and its social impact. As a result of it, the training teachers achieved sensitization for its educative practical ; an organized and qualified plan of Learning Projects; going through three levels of training: low, middle and high, as well as, discreet transformations in way of thinking, feeling, and acting, corresponding with contexts.

  16. Assembly and evaluation of an inventory of guidelines that are available to support clinical hematology laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, C P M; Moffat, K A; George, T I; Proytcheva, M

    2015-05-01

    Practice guidelines provide helpful support for clinical laboratories. Our goal was to assemble an inventory of publically listed guidelines on hematology laboratory topics, to create a resource for laboratories and for assessing gaps in practice-focused guidelines. PubMed and website searches were conducted to assemble an inventory of hematology laboratory-focused guidelines. Exclusions included annual, technical, or collaborative study reports, clinically focused guidelines, position papers, nomenclature, and calibration documents. Sixty-eight guidelines were identified on hematology laboratory practice topics from 12 organizations, some as joint guidelines. The median year of publication was 2010 and 15% were >10 years old. Coagulation topics had the largest numbers of guidelines, whereas some areas of practice had few guidelines. A minority of guidelines showed evidence of periodic updates, as some organizations did not remove or identify outdated guidelines. This inventory of current practice guidelines will encourage awareness and uptake of guideline recommendations by the worldwide hematology laboratory community, with the International Society for Laboratory Hematology facilitating ongoing updates. There is a need to encourage best guideline development practices, to ensure that hematology laboratory community has current, high-quality, and evidence-based practice guidelines that cover the full scope of hematology laboratory practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Deliberate Practice of Creativity Training Set Series - A Creativity Training Material for Education (work in progress)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrge, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Five training sets including 450 unique thinking direction cards and 120 exercise cards. Designed for Educational Purposes.......Five training sets including 450 unique thinking direction cards and 120 exercise cards. Designed for Educational Purposes....

  18. Praktikum Medizinische Recherche: Erfahrungen mit einer curricular integrierten Schulungsveranstaltung / Medical Information Retrieval Training: a practical training integrated into the curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner, Christiane

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available n June 2004 a course problem oriented learning (POL has been introduced at the medical faculty of the University Leipzig. The course on the topic „Infectology and Immunology“ takes place once a year and lasts for four weeks. It consists of a series of lectures and tutorials, in which small groups of students work on clinical case examples. Also part of the course are some practical training sessions. One of them is a 90 minutes practical training on searching for medical literature, which is organized by the medical library. In 2006 the practical training took place for the third time. The article tells about the development within the three years and the experiences that have been made.

  19. DOE handbook: Guide to good practices for training and qualification of maintenance personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide contractor training organizations with information that can be used to verify the adequacy of and/or modify existing maintenance training programs, or to develop new training programs. This guide, used in conjunction with facility-specific job analyses, provides a framework for training and qualification programs for maintenance personnel at DOE reactor and nonreactor nuclear facilities. Recommendations for qualification are made in four areas: education, experience, physical attributes, and training. The functional positions of maintenance mechanic, electrician, and instrumentation and control technician are covered by this guide. Sufficient common knowledge and skills were found to include the three disciplines in one guide to good practices. Contents include: qualifications; on-the-job training; trainee evaluation; continuing training; training effectiveness evaluation; and program records. Appendices are included which relate to: administrative training; industrial safety training; fundamentals training; tools and equipment training; facility systems and component knowledge training; facility systems and component skills training; and specialized skills training.

  20. DOE handbook: Guide to good practices for training and qualification of maintenance personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide contractor training organizations with information that can be used to verify the adequacy of and/or modify existing maintenance training programs, or to develop new training programs. This guide, used in conjunction with facility-specific job analyses, provides a framework for training and qualification programs for maintenance personnel at DOE reactor and nonreactor nuclear facilities. Recommendations for qualification are made in four areas: education, experience, physical attributes, and training. The functional positions of maintenance mechanic, electrician, and instrumentation and control technician are covered by this guide. Sufficient common knowledge and skills were found to include the three disciplines in one guide to good practices. Contents include: qualifications; on-the-job training; trainee evaluation; continuing training; training effectiveness evaluation; and program records. Appendices are included which relate to: administrative training; industrial safety training; fundamentals training; tools and equipment training; facility systems and component knowledge training; facility systems and component skills training; and specialized skills training

  1. Best practice guide for radioactivity measurement laboratories in a post-accident situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Published for laboratories likely to be asked to perform radioactivity measurements at the time of or after a radiological or nuclear accident in France or abroad, this guide aims at defining the best practices in terms of laboratory organisation (sample flow management, personnel radioprotection, sample identification and recording, sample cross-contamination risks, result transmission, archiving of data, results and samples, waste dismissal), and in terms of metrology (adaptation to needs in terms of detection limit and measurement uncertainty, preferred use of gamma spectrometry, analysis strategies)

  2. The role of practical training in educating future cadre in hotel industry and tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekulić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism stimulates the work of a large number of small and medium companies, who provide increase of the number of employees. By following the trends, high education institutions try to provide expert cadre who will be future transmitters of trends in the field. In order to preserve and enhance the quality of education in this area it is necessary to take care of the quality of the program of practical training as the bridge between formal education and work in tourism. In that context, the aim of the research was to explore the role and importance of practical training in the education of students in hotel industry and tourism. The research included 134 respondents, divided in two groups depending upon whether they had any experience in practical training in hotels and tourist agencies. The result shows that there are no significant differences in the perception of the importance of practical training and the factors which influence the selection of the company in which students perform practical training. On the other hand, the results show that there are significant differences, related to the role of hotels and tourist agencies in their practical education and competencies they should master at the end of the training, between those students who had practical training and those who have not had it yet.

  3. Exodus of clergy: A practical theological grounded theory exploration of Hatfield Training Centre trained pastors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Joynt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a shortage of clergy, at least in the Roman Catholic Church. Protestant churches in general are experiencing more of a distribution or placement challenge than a shortage. The two greatest hindrances to addressing the Protestant clergy distribution challenge are a lack of adequate compensation for clergy and the undesirable geographical location of a number of churches, as perceived by clergy. Influences such as secularisation, duality of vocation, time management, change in type of ministry, family issues, congregational and denominational conflict, burnout, sexual misconduct, divorce or marital problems, and suicide, affect clergy. Studies on the shortage of clergy have been conducted mostly in the USA and Europe and not in South Africa. This article focuses on the research gap by means of a practical theological grounded theory exploration of the exodus of clergy. Grounded theory methodology is used to identify the reasons why clergy trained at a Bible college of a Protestant charismatic mega church leave full-time pastoral ministry. Findings correspond to previous studies with two reasons appearing more frequently than others: responding to a call and leadership related issues. Firstly, respondents differed in their replies with respect to reconciling their exit from full-time pastoral ministry with their call. The replies included not being called, a dual call, or called but left anyway. Secondly, respondents indicated that leadership influence was mostly negative with regard to affirming their call.

  4. A national survey of terrorism preparedness training among pediatric, family practice, and emergency medicine programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shelly D; Bush, Anneke C; Lynch, Julia A

    2006-09-01

    Domestic terrorism is a real threat focusing on a need to engage in effective emergency preparedness planning and training. Front-line physicians are an important component of any emergency preparedness plan. Potential victims of an attack include children who have unique physiologic and psychological vulnerabilities in disasters. Front-line providers need to have adequate training to effectively participate in local planning initiatives and to recognize and treat casualties including children. The goal of the survey was to assess the current state of terrorism preparedness training, including child victims, by emergency medicine, family practice, and pediatric residency programs in the United States and to assess methods of training and barriers to establishing effective training. A survey was e-mailed to a comprehensive list of all US pediatric, family practice, and emergency medicine residency programs 3 times between September 2003 and January 2004. The survey measured the perceived risk of terrorist attack, level of training by type of attack, level of training regarding children, method of training, and barriers to training. Overall, 21% of programs responded (46 of 182 pediatric, 75 of 400 family practice, and 29 of 125 emergency medicine programs). Across all of the event types, emergency medicine programs were more likely to report adequate/comprehensive training. However, terrorism preparedness funding, these data suggest that we are failing to provide adequate training to front-line providers who may care for children in a catastrophic domestic terrorist event.

  5. Conditions for building a community of practice in an advanced physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Paul W.; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2014-06-01

    We use the theory of communities of practice and the concept of accountable disciplinary knowledge to describe how a learning community develops in the context of an upper-division physics laboratory course. The change in accountable disciplinary knowledge motivates students' enculturation into a community of practice. The enculturation process is facilitated by four specific structural features of the course and supported by a primary instructional choice. The four structural features are "paucity of instructor time," "all in a room together," "long and difficult experiments," and "same experiments at different times." The instructional choice is the encouragement of the sharing and development of knowledge and understanding by the instructor. The combination of the instructional choice and structural features promotes the development of the learning community in which students engage in authentic practices of a physicist. This results in a classroom community that can provide students with the opportunity to have an accelerated trajectory towards being a more central participant of the community of a practice of physicists. We support our claims with video-based observations of laboratory classroom interactions and individual, semistructured interviews with students about their laboratory experiences and physics identity.

  6. Continuity and Change: Employers' Training Practices and Partnerships with Training Providers. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erica; Smith, Andy; Tuck, Jacqueline; Callan, Victor

    2017-01-01

    A number of factors influence the motivations of employers to train their workforce and the ways in which they engage with the training system. This study combines a national survey and interviews with Australian employers and registered training organisations (RTOs) to provide a comprehensive picture of the way in which employers navigate the…

  7. Launching a Laboratory Testing Process Quality Improvement Toolkit: From the Shared Networks of Colorado Ambulatory Practices and Partners (SNOCAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Douglas; Hamer, Mika; James, Kathy; Tutt, Brandon; West, David

    2015-01-01

    Family medicine and internal medicine physicians order diagnostic laboratory tests for nearly one-third of patient encounters in an average week, yet among medical errors in primary care, an estimated 15% to 54% are attributed to laboratory testing processes. From a practice improvement perspective, we (1) describe the need for laboratory testing process quality improvements from the perspective of primary care practices, and (2) describe the approaches and resources needed to implement laboratory testing process quality improvements in practice. We applied practice observations, process mapping, and interviews with primary care practices in the Shared Networks of Colorado Ambulatory Practices and Partners (SNOCAP)-affiliated practice-based research networks that field-tested in 2013 a laboratory testing process improvement toolkit. From the data collected in each of the 22 participating practices, common testing quality issues included, but were not limited to, 3 main testing process steps: laboratory test preparation, test tracking, and patient notification. Three overarching qualitative themes emerged: practices readily acknowledge multiple laboratory testing process problems; practices know that they need help addressing the issues; and practices face challenges with finding patient-centered solutions compatible with practice priorities and available resources. While practices were able to get started with guidance and a toolkit to improve laboratory testing processes, most did not seem able to achieve their quality improvement aims unassisted. Providing specific guidance tools with practice facilitation or other rapid-cycle quality improvement support may be an effective approach to improve common laboratory testing issues in primary care. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  8. New Ways for EUROPRACTICE Training and Best Practice Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    .Among those should be mentioned intelligent use of internet, multimedia training and RF high speed low power training.TBPS is primarily a course broker negotiating with more than 45 course vendors to get highly qualified courses at different levels and at moderate prices in the 5 key microelectronics areas...... been organized to fill the gap, and information about the courses is distributed in different ways.Intelligent use of internet and multimedia technology promotes micro-electronics training in a very effective way.This is the most effective way to promote the large number of courses...

  9. Laboratory training manual on the use of nuclear techniques in insect research and control. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Isotopes are commonly used in agricultural research in developed countries, but because of a lack of both training and equipment isotopic techniques are not frequently used in developing countries. This manual has been prepared with the aim of helping entomologists and others responsible for the control of insects in developing countries become familiar with the potential uses of isotopes and radiation in solving some of their research and insect control problems. After chapters dealing with radiation safety, the general properties of radiation and isotopes (especially those used by entomologists), and radiation detection and assay of radioactivity, two further chapters discuss applications to entomological problems and the sterile insect technique. Numerous case studies are described, and the final chapter also includes a description of eight laboratory exercises to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation and chemosterilants on insects. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Designing a clinical skills training laboratory with focus on video for better learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Toftgård, Rie Castella; Nørgaard, Cita

    resources of varying quality on the internet if this is not made available during teaching. The objective of this project was to design a new clinical skills laboratory with IT and video facilities to support learning processes. Methods Teaching principles were described before decisions on the design......Objective The principles of apprenticeship in clinical skills training are increasingly being challenged. First, most students are proficient in learning from visual multimedia and will expect this to be part of a modern university education. Second, students will often find visual teaching...... on a priori described teaching and learning designs related to active learning principles. This was a complex process involving teachers, IT-experts, e-learning specialists and a variety of university employees....

  11. General practice vocational training and public health medicine: a novel collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, H; Money, P; Quinn, R

    1994-06-01

    The incorporation of a module of public health teaching into a general practice vocational training programme is described. This programme is itself innovative in that in addition to the 2 years of hospital-based training, it provides 2 years of community-based training. While the curriculum of the public health module is evolving with time, the objectives have remained the same, and are being met. The module has been appraised by external observers, and has been evaluated by participating trainees. The public health module is now an established feature of the Sligo general practice training programme.

  12. An innovative blended learning approach using virtual patients as preparation for skills laboratory training: perceptions of students and tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently only a few reports exist on how to prepare medical students for skills laboratory training. We investigated how students and tutors perceive a blended learning approach using virtual patients (VPs) as preparation for skills training. Methods Fifth-year medical students (N=617) were invited to voluntarily participate in a paediatric skills laboratory with four specially designed VPs as preparation. The cases focused on procedures in the laboratory using interactive questions, static and interactive images, and video clips. All students were asked to assess the VP design. After participating in the skills laboratory 310 of the 617 students were additionally asked to assess the blended learning approach through established questionnaires. Tutors’ perceptions (N=9) were assessed by semi-structured interviews. Results From the 617 students 1,459 VP design questionnaires were returned (59.1%). Of the 310 students 213 chose to participate in the skills laboratory; 179 blended learning questionnaires were returned (84.0%). Students provided high overall acceptance ratings of the VP design and blended learning approach. By using VPs as preparation, skills laboratory time was felt to be used more effectively. Tutors perceived students as being well prepared for the skills laboratory with efficient uses of time. Conclusion The overall acceptance of the blended learning approach was high among students and tutors. VPs proved to be a convenient cognitive preparation tool for skills training. PMID:23402663

  13. Best Practices in the Design of Aerobic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    analysis. Orlando, FL: Academic Press. *Helgerud, J., Engen , L. C., Wisloff, U., & Hoff, J. (2001). Aerobic endurance training improves soccer...Cavanagh, P. R. (1996). Six weeks of training does not change running mechanics or improve running economy. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 28(7), 860-869...1986). Effects of selective and nonselective beta-adrenergic blockade on mechanisms of exercise conditioning. Circulation, 74(4), 664-674. *Woods, N

  14. Acute care simulation training for foundation doctors: the perceived impact on practice in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, P; Sockalingam, I

    2013-01-01

    High fidelity simulation allows training of foundation doctors in a safe, structured environment. We explored the perceived impact of such training on subsequent clinical practice. 82 doctors attended and 52% responded to a follow up questionnaire sent two months after their training. 88% felt better able to manage the acutely ill patient than they did before their training. All cited simulation training as a reason for this and 44% felt simulation training was the main contributor. The remainder cited clinical experience as the main contributor. 53% gave real clinical examples where they applied skills attributed to simulation training. Doctors reflected positively on simulation training sometime after the experience, demonstrated transference of learnt skills and felt more confident at work.

  15. Making In-Class Skills Training More Effective: The Scope for Interactive Videos to Complement the Delivery of Practical Pedestrian Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, James; Cherrett, Tom; Waterson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Skills and awareness of young pedestrians can be improved with on-street practical pedestrian training, often delivered in schools in the UK by local authorities with the intention of improving road safety. This training is often supplemented by in-class paper-based worksheet activities that are seen to be less effective than practical training in…

  16. FEATURES OF TECHNOLOGIES CREATE INTERACTIVE ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT FOR SUPPORT OF LABORATORY PRACTICAL PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola A. Meleshko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the content of the «flash-book» construct, defining its properties and possible components. There are presented some examples of components programming steps of “authoring flash – book”, considered the possibility of using such an electronic document to optimize the learning process at the Technical University in the performance of laboratory training on general physics. The technique of its using to provide individualized approach to learning and the use of various experimental base from classical to digital equipment laboratories is proposed. It was carried out the analysis of ways to improve such interactive electronic document for the development of information technology competence of engineering students.

  17. Laser training courses: new purpose-built room for practical exercises

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2015-01-01

    CERN’s Safety Training Centre, on the Prévessin site, now features a new facility for the “Laser - Expert” and “Laser - User” training courses: a dedicated room for practical exercises, near the theoretical training room. From now on, participants will be able to move from theory to practice in just a few steps!   The new room, equipped with real lasers ranging from levels 1 to 4, allows the participants to put their training into practice in real-life situations, solidifying the principles and lessons learned during the theory part – and all in complete safety, since the room was of course designed to allow the control of dangers posed by lasers. The participants and instructors are also provided with the required personal protective equipment (goggles, etc.) during the sessions. Efforts are being made to make the Centre's infrastructure more useful to improve the quality of training on offer. For example, the la...

  18. Crossing the barrier between the laboratory working model and the practicable production model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curby, William A.

    1992-12-01

    Transforming apparatus that has developed into a successfully working laboratory system into a system that is ready, or nearly ready for production, distribution and general use is not always accomplished in a cost effective or timely fashion. Several design elements must be considered interactively during the planning, construction, use and servicing of the final production form of the system. The basic design elements are: Operating Specifications, Reliability Factors, Safety Factors, Precision Limits, Accuracy Limits, Uniformity Factors, Cost Limits and Calibration Requirements. Secondary elements including: Human Engineering, Documentation, Training, Maintenance, Proprietary Rights, Protection, Marketing, Replacement of Parts, and Packing and Shipping must also be considered during the transition.

  19. CONTINUOUS TRAINING OF ARCHITECTS AND A PRACTICAL COURSE IN ARCHITECTURAL COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogoleva Natal'ya Arkad'evna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of training of architects in architectural composition is relevant at each stages of the training process. Continuous training in architectural composition is to assure better mastering of fundamentals of composition. Specialized training courses is to be incorporated into each stage of the training process, namely, into each specialized discipline that shapes up the compositional thinking in the field of architecture and town planning patterns. The fundamental course is entitled "Three-dimensional spatial composition"; it is based on the theory of architecture and urban development, as well as practical classes in architectural analysis and modeling. The author proposes new methods of teaching three-dimensional composition through a cycle of exercises and term papers. The systemic approach contemplates a good knowledge of the theory to serve as the basis for workshops and practical classes, as well as a new idea of continuous training.

  20. Youth resistance training: past practices, new perspectives, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; Lloyd, Rhodri S; Myer, Gregory D

    2013-11-01

    Since the publication of the seminal review on youth resistance training by Kraemer and colleagues in 1989, a compelling body of evidence has found that resistance training can be a safe, effective, and worthwhile method of conditioning for children and adolescents. New perspectives for promoting resistance exercise as part of a long-term approach to youth physical development highlight the importance of integrating resistance training into youth fitness programs. Youth who do not enhance their muscular strength and motor skill proficiency early in life may not develop the prerequisite skills and abilities that would allow them to participate in a variety of activities and sports with confidence and vigor later in life. The identification of asymptomatic children with muscular weaknesses or imbalances may facilitate the development of a management plan which should rectify movement limitations and educate children and their families about the importance of daily physical activity.

  1. Testing an empirically derived mental health training model featuring small groups, distributed practice and patient discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrihy, Rachael C; Byrne, Mitchell K; Gonsalvez, Craig J

    2009-02-01

    Internationally, family doctors seeking to enhance their skills in evidence-based mental health treatment are attending brief training workshops, despite clear evidence in the literature that short-term, massed formats are not likely to improve skills in this complex area. Reviews of the educational literature suggest that an optimal model of training would incorporate distributed practice techniques; repeated practice over a lengthy time period, small-group interactive learning, mentoring relationships, skills-based training and an ongoing discussion of actual patients. This study investigates the potential role of group-based training incorporating multiple aspects of good pedagogy for training doctors in basic competencies in brief cognitive behaviour therapy (BCBT). Six groups of family doctors (n = 32) completed eight 2-hour sessions of BCBT group training over a 6-month period. A baseline control design was utilised with pre- and post-training measures of doctors' BCBT skills, knowledge and engagement in BCBT treatment. Family doctors' knowledge, skills in and actual use of BCBT with patients improved significantly over the course of training compared with the control period. This research demonstrates preliminary support for the efficacy of an empirically derived group training model for family doctors. Brief CBT group-based training could prove to be an effective and viable model for future doctor training.

  2. Laboratory Diagnosis and Characterization of Fungal Disease in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF): A Survey of Current UK Practice in a Cohort of Clinical Microbiology Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Maeve; Moore, John E; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Bilton, Diana; Downey, Damian G

    2018-03-02

    There is much uncertainty as to how fungal disease is diagnosed and characterized in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A 19-question anonymous electronic questionnaire was developed and distributed to ascertain current practice in clinical microbiology laboratories providing a fungal laboratory service to CF centres in the UK. Analyses of responses identified the following: (1) current UK laboratory practice, in general, follows the current guidelines, but the scope and diversity of what is currently being delivered by laboratories far exceeds what is detailed in the guidelines; (2) there is a lack of standardization of fungal tests amongst laboratories, outside of the current guidelines; (3) both the UK CF Trust Laboratory Standards for Processing Microbiological Samples from People with Cystic Fibrosis and the US Cumulative Techniques and Procedures in Clinical Microbiology (Cumitech) Guidelines 43 Cystic Fibrosis Microbiology need to be updated to reflect both new methodological innovations, as well as better knowledge of fungal disease pathophysiology in CF; (4) there is a need for clinical medicine to decide upon a stratification strategy for the provision of new fungal assays that will add value to the physician in the optimal management of CF patients; (5) there is also a need to rationale what assays should be performed at local laboratory level and those which are best served at National Mycology Reference Laboratory level; and (6) further research is required in developing laboratory assays, which will help ascertain the clinical importance of 'old' fungal pathogens, as well as 'emerging' fungal pathogens.

  3. General educational disciplines practice-oriented training in intermediate vocational education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya G. Skorobogatova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns crucial issues of practice-oriented training in Russia's intermediate vocational education, designates directions of general educational disciplines study in intermediate vocational education.

  4. A Practical Risk Assessment Methodology for Safety-Critical Train Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This project proposes a Practical Risk Assessment Methodology (PRAM) for analyzing railroad accident data and assessing the risk and benefit of safety-critical train control systems. This report documents in simple steps the algorithms and data input...

  5. [Feedback in relation to training of practical clinical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.S.; Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    Feedback has been identified as an essential component of motor learning. However, feedback principles derived from motor learning theories cannot uncritically be applied to clinical skills training because this knowledge is based primarily on the study of very simple motor skills. Research...... into feedback in relation to clinical skills training is currently limited. Theories on motor learning can serve as the basis for designing research in this domain, especially the importance of including retention tests when measuring permanent learning outcomes Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10/27...

  6. Formation of the research competence of future breeder-geneticists during the practical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Павлівна Антіпова

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article were analyzed content, structure and special features of the practical training of the future breeder-geneticists. There was specified that for bachelor breeder-geneticists of the 6.090101 “Agronomy” training direction are provided the following practices: botany, tractors and cars, soil science, agricultural machines, fruit growing, vegetable growing, agriculture, agrochemistry, plant growing, entomology, phytopathology, technology of retreatment and preservation of plant growing production, selection and seed growing of agricultural crops; work practice on agronomy.In the article was grounded the structural-logic scheme of organization of practices of the future breeder-geneticists for forming their professional research competences. There were analyzed functions and methods of scientific-cognitive activity, forms, means and methods of the practical education. According to the types of practices there were elucidated and grounded the structure of practical training of the future breeder-geneticists – natural-technical and special-professional – educational and work practices.The natural-technical, special-professional and production-technological practices form in bachelor agronomists breeder-geneticists professional scientific-research competences: theoretical-analytical ones – geosphere, bio-geo-physical-chemical, meteorological-climatological, informative, fundamental and applied ecological, fundamental-scientific agrosphere; professional competences of professionally oriented and special practical training – agricultural, branch, techno-service, technological, selective, special-genetic-engineering ones; managerial ones

  7. Do they practice what we teach? Follow-up evaluation of a Schema Therapy training programme

    OpenAIRE

    Kingston, Deborah; Moghaddam, Nima; Beckley, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated a three-day Schema Therapy training programme for trainee clinical psychologists. The training used an experiential model of learning, which was intended to encourage the transfer of knowledge and techniques from the learning environment into clinical practice. Using a mixed-methods approach, the training programme was evaluated in terms of: (1) self-reported changes in knowledge, confidence and willingness to use Schema Therapy-informed techniques; (2) whether the tra...

  8. A Focus Group Study of Child Nutrition Professionals' Attitudes about Food Allergies and Current Training Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Ming; Kwon, Junehee; Sauer, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore child nutrition professionals' (CNPs) attitudes about food allergies, current practices of food allergy training, and operational issues related to food allergy training in school foodservice operations. Methods: Three focus groups were conducted with 21 CNPs with managerial…

  9. Practical Recommendations to Improve the Quality of Training and Methodical Support of Professional Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Valery V.; Grudtsina, Ludmila Yu.; Marchuk, Nikolay N.; Sangadgiev, Badma V.; Kudyashev, Nail K.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by the transition to the knowledge society and new demands for training and methodical provision of professional pedagogical education. The purpose of this paper is to develop practical recommendations to improve the quality of training and methodical support of professional pedagogical education. The leading…

  10. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery: Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.T. Velde (Te); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); S.H.A.J. Tytgat; J.R. de Jong (Justin); D.V. Travassos (Vieira); W.L.M. Kramer; D.C. van der Zee (David)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A

  11. The Effectiveness of a Training Program Based on Practice of Careers in Vocational Interests Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasneh, Omar. M.; Farajat, Amani. M.

    2015-01-01

    The present research was conducted to identify the effectiveness of a training program based on practice of careers in vocational interests development, to answer questions about the study and test its hypothesis the training program had been prepared and the adoption of a measure of vocational interests, as validity and reliability of each of…

  12. Animating Research with Counseling Values: A Training Model to Address the Research-to-Practice Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kristi A.; Dewell, John A.; Holmes, Courtney M.

    2014-01-01

    The persistent research-to-practice gap poses a problem for counselor education. The gap may be caused by conflicts between the humanistic values that guide much of counseling and the values that guide research training. In this article, the authors address historical concerns regarding research training for students and the conducting of research…

  13. Teacher training of secondary - Orient from the point of view practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Tuong Duy; Huong, Nguyen Thanh

    2018-01-01

    The article presents the point of view about teacher training based on analysis of practices of teaching/learning in disciplinary in high school. Basing on analysis results of teaching faculty and the learning process of students in the disciplinary in high school to offer tags referred to the ongoing training of secondary teachers to adapt to educational.

  14. STRATEGIC TRAINING PRACTICES AND TURNOVER INTENTION: THE MEDIATING ROLE OF ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Anvari, Roya; Amin, Salmiah Mohamad

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at determining the relationships between strategic training practices, turnover intention, and organizational commitment. The study sample comprised 301 employees from universities of medical sciences in Iran. Multiple and simple linear regression and path analysis were used to test the direct and mediated relationships among the variables. The survey results further demonstrated that organizational commitment is a partial mediator between strategic training practices and turn...

  15. Reflections on the newly qualified social worker's journey : From university training to qualified practice

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Clare

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research study explores the experience of graduating social workers making the transition from university training into work as qualified social work practitioners. Most studies in this area look at the practice readiness of the newly qualified professional. This study looks at the participants’ experience in the work place. How do participants experience this journey of transition? What skills, particularly reflective practice and supervision, learned in training, are import...

  16. Perceptions of gender-based discrimination during surgical training and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce, Adrienne N.; Battista, Alexis; Plankey, Michael W.; Johnson, Lynt B.; Marshall, M. Blair

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women represent 15% of practicing general surgeons. Gender-based discrimination has been implicated as discouraging women from surgery. We sought to determine women’s perceptions of gender-based discrimination in the surgical training and working environment.Methods: Following IRB approval, we fielded a pilot survey measuring perceptions and impact of gender-based discrimination in medical school, residency training, and surgical practice. It was sent electronically to 1,065 indiv...

  17. Laboratory medicine handoff gaps experienced by primary care practices: A report from the shared networks of collaborative ambulatory practices and partners (SNOCAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, David R; James, Katherine A; Fernald, Douglas H; Zelie, Claire; Smith, Maxwell L; Raab, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    The majority of errors in laboratory medicine testing are thought to occur in the pre- and postanalytic testing phases, and a large proportion of these errors are secondary to failed handoffs. Because most laboratory tests originate in ambulatory primary care, understanding the gaps in handoff processes within and between laboratories and practices is imperative for patient safety. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand, based on information from primary care practice personnel, the perceived gaps in laboratory processes as a precursor to initiating process improvement activities. A survey was used to assess perceptions of clinicians, staff, and management personnel of gaps in handoffs between primary care practices and laboratories working in 21 Colorado primary care practices. Data were analyzed to determine statistically significant associations between categorical variables. In addition, qualitative analysis of responses to open-ended survey questions was conducted. Primary care practices consistently reported challenges and a desire/need to improve their efforts to systematically track laboratory test status, confirm receipt of laboratory results, and report results to patients. Automated tracking systems existed in roughly 61% of practices, and all but one of those had electronic health record-based tracking systems in place. One fourth of these electronic health record-enabled practices expressed sufficient mistrust in these systems to warrant the concurrent operation of an article-based tracking system as backup. Practices also reported 12 different procedures used to notify patients of test results, varying by test result type. The results highlight the lack of standardization and definition of roles in handoffs in primary care laboratory practices for test ordering, monitoring, and receiving and reporting test results. Results also identify high-priority gaps in processes and the perceptions by practice personnel that practice improvement

  18. From Theory to Practice: Faculty Training in Business Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Claims that training business faculty in ethics is a critical component of including ethics in the business curriculum. Includes suggestions concerning what business faculty should know about ethical theory, how to include theory, and curricular and teaching issues. Describes research projects, publications, and workshops. (DK)

  19. Surviving Troubled Times: Five Best Practices for Training Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villachica, Steven W.; Stepich, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    With the current economic downturn and signs of an emerging recovery, executives are trying to determine how to best use their organizations' funds and resources. This may mean downsizing human resource departments and eliminating positions for training personnel. The authors offer five strategies drawn from the professional literature to survive…

  20. Enabling SMEs to Deliver Synchronous Online Training--Practical Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: While synchronous and asynchronous distance education options have fulfilled the promise to reduce travel costs and decrease the number of human resources necessary for training delivery, many corporations are faced with the need to produce learning even at a faster pace in order to gain and sustain competitive advantage. This means a…

  1. Toilet training practices in Nigerian children | Solarin | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. This study reports on toilet training with a focus on the effect of age, methods used, and factors that can affect urinary incontinence in Nigerian children. Methods. This was a cross-sectional hospital-based study carried out in public and private hospitals in South-Western Nigeria. A questionnaire was used to ...

  2. Training and Health. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles programs in the fields of health and medicine that are offered through the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program. The following programs are profiled: (1) CYTOTRAIN (a transnational vocational training program in cervical cancer screening); (2) Apollo (a program of open and distance learning for paramedical…

  3. Simulation training in neurosurgery: advances in education and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konakondla S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sanjay Konakondla, Reginald Fong, Clemens M Schirmer Department of Neurosurgery and Neuroscience Institute, Geisinger Medical Center, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA, USA Abstract: The current simulation technology used for neurosurgical training leaves much to be desired. Significant efforts are thoroughly exhausted in hopes of developing simulations that translate to give learners the “real-life” feel. Though a respectable goal, this may not be necessary as the application for simulation in neurosurgical training may be most useful in early learners. The ultimate uniformly agreeable endpoint of improved outcome and patient safety drives these investments. We explore the development, availability, educational taskforces, cost burdens and the simulation advancements in neurosurgical training. The technologies can be directed at achieving early resident milestones placed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We discuss various aspects of neurosurgery disciplines with specific technologic advances of simulation software. An overview of the scholarly landscape of the recent publications in the realm of medical simulation and virtual reality pertaining to neurologic surgery is provided. We analyze concurrent concept overlap between PubMed headings and provide a graphical overview of the associations between these terms. Keywords: residency education, simulation, neurosurgery training, virtual reality, haptic feedback, task analysis, ACGME 

  4. Robotic technologies in surgical oncology training and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvieto, Marcelo A; Marchetti, Pablo; Castillo, Octavio A; Coelho, Rafael F; Chauhan, Sanket; Rocco, Bernardo; Ardila, Bobby; Mathe, Mary; Patel, Vipul R

    2011-09-01

    The modern-day surgeon is frequently exposed to new technologies and instrumentation. Robotic surgery (RS) has evolved as a minimally invasive technique aimed to improve clinical outcomes. RS has the potential to alleviate the inherent limitations of laparoscopic surgery such as two dimensional imaging, limited instrument movement and intrinsic human tremor. Since the first reported robot-assisted surgical procedure performed in 1985, the technology has dramatically evolved and currently multiple surgical specialties have incorporated RS into their daily clinical armamentarium. With this exponential growth, it should not come as a surprise the ever growing requirement for surgeons trained in RS as well as the interest from residents to receive robotic exposure during their training. For this reason, the establishment of set criteria for adequate and standardized training and credentialing of surgical residents, fellows and those trained surgeons wishing to perform RS has become a priority. In this rapidly evolving field, we herein review the past, present and future of robotic technologies and its penetration into different surgical specialties. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Surviving Troubled Times: Five Best Practices for Training Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villachica, Steven W.; Stepich, Donald A.; Rist, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    The business of training and performance improvement has always been cyclical, with the fortunes of human resource development (HRD) and performance improvement professionals rising and falling with the economic fortunes of the workplace. The current economic downturn and nascent recovery represent an opportunity for HRD and performance…

  6. Disability Awareness and University Staff Training in Ireland (Practice Brief)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padden, Lisa; Ellis, Carol

    2015-01-01

    It is vital that all university staff have awareness of the difficulties that may be experienced by students with disabilities. Staff must be given the knowledge and resources to support these students effectively. University College Dublin (UCD) Access & Lifelong Learning has developed a communication and training strategy to improve…

  7. Varied Practice in Laparoscopy Training: Beneficial Learning Stimulation or Cognitive Overload?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit, Edward N; Kleijweg, Luca; Band, Guido P H; Hamming, Jaap F

    2016-01-01

    Determining the optimal design for surgical skills training is an ongoing research endeavor. In education literature, varied practice is listed as a positive intervention to improve acquisition of knowledge and motor skills. In the current study we tested the effectiveness of a varied practice intervention during laparoscopy training. Twenty-four trainees (control group) without prior experience received a 3 weeks laparoscopic skills training utilizing four basic and one advanced training task. Twenty-eight trainees (experimental group) received the same training with a random training task schedule, more frequent task switching and inverted viewing conditions on the four basic training tasks, but not the advanced task. Results showed inferior performance of the experimental group on the four basic laparoscopy tasks during training, at the end of training and at a 2 months retention session. We assume the inverted viewing conditions have led to the deterioration of learning in the experimental group because no significant differences were found between groups on the only task that had not been practiced under inverted viewing conditions; the advanced laparoscopic task. Potential moderating effects of inter-task similarity, task complexity, and trainee characteristics are discussed.

  8. Self-efficacy perception in high school students with mild intellectual disability in practical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović-Dobrota Biljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to determine how students with mild intellectual disability perceive self-efficacy in practical training, with regard to the intellectual level, gender, work field and professional level for which they are being trained. The sample consists of 120 students with mild intellectual disability, of both genders, undergoing vocational training in five work fields for the second and third level professions. Adapted Self-Efficacy to Regulate Training Scale (Bandura, 2006 was used to assess the influence of negative internal and external factors on the students' efficacy at performing tasks in practical training. It was determined that there is a statistically significant difference among the examinees of the same disability category, but different level of intellectual functioning. Girls with lower and higher levels of intellectual functioning were found to perceive self-efficacy in practical training with lower level of confidence than boys with the same levels of intellectual functioning. The examinees undergoing the third level vocational training are more confident in their abilities to coordinate knowledge and skills in training regardless of different distracting factors. There we no statistically significant differences determined with regard to the work field. Assessing self-efficacy in training can direct the development of self-efficacy, help individuals gain a sense of control over their career development, and for professionals involved in finding jobs for persons with intellectual disability provide a predictive success/failure role at work.

  9. Varied Practice in Laparoscopy Training: Beneficial Learning Stimulation or Cognitive Overload?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward N. eSpruit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDetermining the optimal design for surgical skills training is an ongoing research endeavor. In education literature, varied practice is listed as a positive intervention to improve acquisition of knowledge and motor skills. In the current study we tested the effectiveness of a varied practice intervention during laparoscopy training. 24 trainees (control group without prior experience received a three week laparoscopic skills training utilizing four basic and one advanced training task. 28 trainees (experimental group received the same training with a random training task schedule, more frequent task switching and inverted viewing conditions on the four basic training tasks, but not the advanced task. Results showed inferior performance of the experimental group on the four basic laparoscopy tasks during training, at the end of training and at a two month retention session. We assume the inverted viewing conditions have led to the deterioration of learning in the experimental group because no significant differences were found between groups on the only task that had not been practiced under inverted viewing conditions; the advanced laparoscopic task. Potential moderating effects of inter-task similarity, task complexity and trainee characteristics are discussed.

  10. Qualification requirements and training programs for nonreactor nuclear facility personnel in the Operations Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, E.L.; Culbert, W.H.; Baldwin, M.E.; McCormack, K.E.; Rivera, A.L.; Setaro, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    This document describes the program for training, retraining, and qualification of nonreactor nuclear operators in the Operations Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the program is to provide the Operators and Supervisors of nuclear facilities the knowledge and skills needed to perform assigned duties in a safe and efficient manner and to comply with US Department of Energy Order 5480.1A Chapter V. This order requires DOE nuclear facilities to maintain formal training programs for their operating staff and documentation of that training.

  11. Qualification requirements and training programs for nonreactor nuclear facility personnel in the Operations Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, E.L.; Culbert, W.H.; Baldwin, M.E.; McCormack, K.E.; Rivera, A.L.; Setaro, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    This document describes the program for training, retraining, and qualification of nonreactor nuclear operators in the Operations Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the program is to provide the Operators and Supervisors of nuclear facilities the knowledge and skills needed to perform assigned duties in a safe and efficient manner and to comply with US Department of Energy Order 5480.1A Chapter V. This order requires DOE nuclear facilities to maintain formal training programs for their operating staff and documentation of that training

  12. The European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine syllabus for postgraduate education and training for Specialists in Laboratory Medicine: version 5 - 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassam, Nuthar; Lake, Jennifer; Dabrowska, Milena; Queralto, Jose; Rizos, Demetrios; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Baum, Hannsjörg; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; O'Mullane, John; Homšak, Evgenija; Charilaou, Charis; Ohlson, Mats; Rako, Ivana; Vitkus, Dalius; Kovac, Gustav; Verschuure, Pauline; Racek, Jaroslav; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Wieringa, Gilbert

    2018-06-05

    Although laboratory medicine practise varies across the European Union's (EU) member states, the extent of overlap in scope is such that a common syllabus describing the education and training associated with high-quality, specialist practise can be identified. In turn, such a syllabus can help define the common set of skills, knowledge and competence in a Common Training Framework (CTF) for non-medical Specialists in Laboratory Medicine under EU Directive 2013/55/EU (The recognition of Professional Qualifications). In meeting the requirements of the directive's CTF patient safety is particularly enhanced when specialists seek to capitalise on opportunities for free professional migration across EU borders. In updating the fourth syllabus, the fifth expands on individual discipline requirements, new analytical techniques and use of statistics. An outline structure for a training programme is proposed together with expected responsibilities of trainees and trainers; reference is provided to a trainee's log book. In updating the syllabus, it continues to support national programmes and the aims of EU Directive 2013/55/EU in providing safeguards to professional mobility across European borders at a time when the demand for highly qualified professionals is increasing in the face of a disparity in their distribution across Europe. In support of achieving a CTF, the syllabus represents EFLM's position statement for the education and training that underpins the framework.

  13. Practical training on porcine hearts enhances students' knowledge of human cardiac anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Mazzone, Venera; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Castorina, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    Historically, cadavers have been used for the study of anatomy. Nowadays, the territorial and legal limitations of this approach have led to the introduction of alternative teaching methods such as the use of practical exercise consisting of dissection and observation of animal organs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of practical training on animal organs compared with the traditional method of anatomy teaching, based on the dissection of human cadavers. In this study, we seek to demonstrate the usefulness of practical exercise on animal organs. This practical training was held a week after the series of lectures, thus leaving time for the students to learn and understand the topics discussed. Immediately after the lecture, all of the students completed a preliminary test to assess the immediate effect of the lecture. Immediately before the practical exercise, both control and experimental groups completed a second test to assess the effectiveness of personal study. Immediately after practical training, a third test was completed by the experimental group and the control group (no practical activity on animal organs) to highlight the added value of hands-on practice in addition to the lecture. Data obtained from statistical analysis showed a panatomy learning between control and experimental groups. Thus, the results of this study emphasize the utility of practical training on animal organs in learning and understanding anatomy, considering the limitations of the use of cadavers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Auditory Training for Adults Who Have Hearing Loss: A Comparison of Spaced Versus Massed Practice Schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spehar, Brent; Barcroft, Joe; Sommers, Mitchell

    2017-08-16

    The spacing effect in human memory research refers to situations in which people learn items better when they study items in spaced intervals rather than massed intervals. This investigation was conducted to compare the efficacy of meaning-oriented auditory training when administered with a spaced versus massed practice schedule. Forty-seven adult hearing aid users received 16 hr of auditory training. Participants in a spaced group (mean age = 64.6 years, SD = 14.7) trained twice per week, and participants in a massed group (mean age = 69.6 years, SD = 17.5) trained for 5 consecutive days each week. Participants completed speech perception tests before training, immediately following training, and then 3 months later. In line with transfer appropriate processing theory, tests assessed both trained tasks and an untrained task. Auditory training improved the speech recognition performance of participants in both groups. Benefits were maintained for 3 months. No effect of practice schedule was found on overall benefits achieved, on retention of benefits, nor on generalizability of benefits to nontrained tasks. The lack of spacing effect in otherwise effective auditory training suggests that perceptual learning may be subject to different influences than are other types of learning, such as vocabulary learning. Hence, clinicians might have latitude in recommending training schedules to accommodate patients' schedules.

  15. Practical approach in training (on-the-job) for workers in nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianna, Vilson Bedim; Rocha, Janine Gandolpho da

    2005-01-01

    This work approaches the 'on-the-job training' - a method of practical training - used in nuclear industries for workers who handle radioactive nuclides. The required training must, in accordance with the ISO 9000 standard, be geared to meet the needs of the organization, including the minimization of errors in operation with radionuclides, which involves various aspects (standard, social, environmental, personal and process safety etc.). Therefore, the training process must have the commitment of everybody and have a logical and documented sequence, where both the individual and the needs of the company are raised and analyzed. The clear identification of the radiological risks associated to the hands-on training is critical to the safety of who is being trained and should be part of the training content. However, the greatest challenge is a mechanism allowing to transform the hands-on training in practical learning. The role of training in the modern nuclear industry should not be restricted to provide conditions for better training or development of the employee, but also motivate the continuous improvement of the company and of the productive process

  16. Effect of Training on Knowledge and Practice of Universal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    among Primary Health Care Workers in Kaduna State, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION .... educational institutions, religion and culture. A ..... Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health 2010; ... Attitudes, perception and practice of workers in.

  17. Training reduces catabolic and inflammatory response to a single practice in female volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim, Alon; Portal, Shawn; Zadik, Zvi; Meckel, Yoav; Nemet, Dan

    2013-11-01

    We examined the effect of training on hormonal and inflammatory response to a single volleyball practice in elite adolescent players. Thirteen female, national team level, Israeli volleyball players (age 16.0 ± 1.4 years, Tanner stage 4-5) participated in the study. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after a typical 60 minutes of volleyball practice, before and after 7 weeks of training during the initial phase of the season. Training involved tactic and technical drills (20% of time), power and speed drills (25% of time), interval sessions (25% of time), endurance-type training (15% of time), and resistance training (15% of time). To achieve greater training responses, the study was performed during the early phase (first 7 weeks) of the volleyball season. Hormonal measurements included the anabolic hormones growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3, the catabolic hormone cortisol, the proinflammatory marker interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the anti-inflammatory marker IL-1 receptor antagonist. Training led to a significant improvement of vertical jump, anaerobic properties (peak and mean power by the Wingate Anaerobic Test), and predicted VO2max (by the 20-m shuttle run). Volleyball practice, both before and after the training intervention, was associated with a significant increase of serum lactate, GH, and IL-6. Training resulted in a significantly reduced cortisol response ([INCREMENT]cortisol: 4.2 ± 13.7 vs. -4.4 ± 12.3 ng · ml, before and after training, respectively; p volleyball practice. The results suggest that along with the improvement of power and anaerobic and aerobic characteristics, training reduces the catabolic and inflammatory response to exercise.

  18. SOFTWARE TRAINING AIDS DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION IN PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION PRACTICE OF TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION TEACHER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy G. Gritchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the theoretical and practical aspects of software training aids development and implementation in professional preparation practice of technological education teacher. The myriad opportunities of new information technologies are described; the characteristic features of modern software training tool (STT are revealed; the main algorithmic structure circuits of training programs construction (linear, cyclic, with hyperlinks, to the labels, which enable the development of STT variety and functionality are given; the methodology of STT creating is described based on the analysis of the technology teacher preparation in HEE content, MITE didactic functions and selection criteria of educational software for this area of specialist’s preparation.

  19. Positive Child Rearing Practices: Parents training for reduce bullying

    OpenAIRE

    González, Brenda; Cabrera, Francisco; Martínez, Kalina

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed at assessing the effectiveness of a positive child rearing program with parents for reducing bullying and incrementing pro-social behavior of their children. Participants were eight couples and two single parents of 10 children identified as bullies. Half of the parents were assigned to a control group and the other half were trained to identify aggressive and pro-social behaviors of their children, as well as their antecedents and consequences. During eight weekly sessions pa...

  20. Simulation training in neurosurgery: advances in education and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Fong, Reginald; Schirmer, Clemens M

    2017-01-01

    The current simulation technology used for neurosurgical training leaves much to be desired. Significant efforts are thoroughly exhausted in hopes of developing simulations that translate to give learners the “real-life” feel. Though a respectable goal, this may not be necessary as the application for simulation in neurosurgical training may be most useful in early learners. The ultimate uniformly agreeable endpoint of improved outcome and patient safety drives these investments. We explore the development, availability, educational taskforces, cost burdens and the simulation advancements in neurosurgical training. The technologies can be directed at achieving early resident milestones placed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We discuss various aspects of neurosurgery disciplines with specific technologic advances of simulation software. An overview of the scholarly landscape of the recent publications in the realm of medical simulation and virtual reality pertaining to neurologic surgery is provided. We analyze concurrent concept overlap between PubMed headings and provide a graphical overview of the associations between these terms. PMID:28765716

  1. The diagnosis of autism in community pediatric settings: does advanced training facilitate practice change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Amy R; Warren, Zachary E; Stone, Wendy L; Vehorn, Alison C; Dohrmann, Elizabeth; Humberd, Quentin

    2014-07-01

    The increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorder and documented benefits of early intensive intervention have created a need for flexible systems for determining eligibility for autism-specific services. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a training program designed to enhance autism spectrum disorder identification and assessment within community pediatric settings across the state. Twenty-seven pediatric providers participated in regional trainings across a 3.5-year period. Trainings provided clinicians with strategies for conducting relatively brief within-practice interactive assessments following positive autism spectrum disorder screenings. Program evaluation was measured approximately 1.5 years following training through (a) clinician self-reports of practice change and (b) blind diagnostic verification of a subset of children assessed. Pediatric providers participating in the training reported significant changes in screening and consultation practices following training, with a reported 85% increase in diagnostic identification of children with autism spectrum disorder within their own practice setting. In addition, substantial agreement (86%-93%) was found between pediatrician diagnostic judgments and independent, comprehensive blinded diagnostic evaluations. Collaborative training methods that allow autism spectrum disorder identification within broader community pediatric settings may help translate enhanced screening initiatives into more effective and efficient diagnosis and treatment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. BSL-3 laboratory practices in the United States: comparison of select agent and non-select agent facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Stephanie L; Pompei, Victoria C; Anderson, Alice

    2014-01-01

    New construction of biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) laboratories in the United States has increased in the past decade to facilitate research on potential bioterrorism agents. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention inspect BSL-3 facilities and review commissioning documentation, but no single agency has oversight over all BSL-3 facilities. This article explores the extent to which standard operating procedures in US BSL-3 facilities vary between laboratories with select agent or non-select agent status. Comparisons are made for the following variables: personnel training, decontamination, personal protective equipment (PPE), medical surveillance, security access, laboratory structure and maintenance, funding, and pest management. Facilities working with select agents had more complex training programs and decontamination procedures than non-select agent facilities. Personnel working in select agent laboratories were likely to use powered air purifying respirators, while non-select agent laboratories primarily used N95 respirators. More rigorous medical surveillance was carried out in select agent workers (although not required by the select agent program) and a higher level of restrictive access to laboratories was found. Most select agent and non-select agent laboratories reported adequate structural integrity in facilities; however, differences were observed in personnel perception of funding for repairs. Pest management was carried out by select agent personnel more frequently than non-select agent personnel. Our findings support the need to promote high quality biosafety training and standard operating procedures in both select agent and non-select agent laboratories to improve occupational health and safety.

  3. Exploration and practice for engineering innovative talents training based on project-driven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yishen; Lv, Qingsong; Ye, Yan; Wu, Maocheng; Gu, Jihua

    2017-08-01

    As one of the "excellent engineer education program" of the Ministry of Education and one of the characteristic majors of Jiangsu Province, the major of optoelectronic information science and engineering in Soochow University has a long history and distinctive features. In recent years, aiming to the talents training objective of "broad foundation, practiceoriented, to be creative", education and teaching reforms have been carried out, which emphasize basis of theoretical teaching, carrier of practical training, promotion of projects and discussion, and development of second class. By optimizing the teaching contents and course system of the theoretical courses, the engineering innovative talents training mode based on the project-driven has been implemented with playing a practical training carrier role and overall managing the second class teaching for cultivating students' innovative spirit and practical ability. Meanwhile, the evaluation mechanism of the students' comprehensive performance mainly based on "scores of theory test" is being gradually changed, and the activities such as scientific research, discipline competitions and social practices are playing an increasing important role in the students' comprehensive assessment. The produced achievements show that the proposed training model based on project-driven could stimulate the students' enthusiasm and initiative to participate in research activities and promote the training of students' ability of engineering practice and consciousness of innovation.

  4. Delivering Communication Strategy Training for People with Aphasia: What Is Current Clinical Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Firle; Best, Wendy; Beeke, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    Background: Communication strategy training (CST) is a recognized part of UK speech and language therapists' (SLTs) role when working with a person with aphasia. Multiple CST interventions have been published but, to date, there are no published studies exploring clinical practice in this area. Aims: To investigate UK SLTs' current CST practices.…

  5. The Literacy Practices of Vocational Training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jean; Mackay, James

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies indicate that vocational students' literacy practices are more demanding than is generally recognised. Employing a view of literacy acquisition as socialisation, we investigated the literacy practices of trades training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology, by interviewing tutors and examined course books and student writing. A…

  6. The impact of pre-menarcheal training on menstrual practices and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The menstrual practices of adolescents derive largely from health issues associated with their adjustment to reproductive life. The objective of the study was to assess the effect of pre-menarcheal training on the menstrual and hygiene practices of Nigerian school girls. Methods: A cross-sectional ...

  7. Post-analysis methods for lactate threshold depend on training intensity and aerobic capacity in runners. An experimental laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Lazzaretti Fernandes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate different mathematical post-analysis methods of determining lactate threshold in highly and lowly trained endurance runners. DESIGN AND SETTING: Experimental laboratory study, in a tertiary-level public university hospital. METHOD: Twenty-seven male endurance runners were divided into two training load groups: lowly trained (frequency < 4 times per week, < 6 consecutive months, training velocity ≥ 5.0 min/km and highly trained (frequency ≥ 4 times per week, ≥ 6 consecutive months, training velocity < 5.0 min/km. The subjects performed an incremental treadmill protocol, with 1 km/h increases at each subsequent 4-minute stage. Fingerprint blood-lactate analysis was performed at the end of each stage. The lactate threshold (i.e. the running velocity at which blood lactate levels began to exponentially increase was measured using three different methods: increase in blood lactate of 1 mmol/l at stages (DT1, absolute 4 mmol/l blood lactate concentration (4 mmol, and the semi-log method (semi-log. ANOVA was used to compare different lactate threshold methods and training groups. RESULTS: Highly trained athletes showed significantly greater lactate thresholds than lowly trained runners, regardless of the calculation method used. When all the subject data were combined, DT1 and semi-log were not different, while 4 mmol was significantly lower than the other two methods. These same trends were observed when comparing lactate threshold methods in the lowly trained group. However, 4 mmol was only significantly lower than DT1 in the highly trained group. CONCLUSION: The 4 mmol protocol did not show lactate threshold measurements comparable with DT1 and semi-log protocols among lowly trained athletes.

  8. Training and qualification of health and safety technicians at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, W.F.; Trinoskey, P.A.

    1994-10-01

    Over the last 30 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has successfully implemented the concept of a multi-disciplined technician. LLNL Health and Safety Technicians have responsibilities in industrial hygiene, industrial safety, health physics, as well as fire, explosive, and criticality safety. One of the major benefits to this approach is the cost-effective use of workers who display an ownership of health and safety issues which is sometimes lacking when responsibilities are divided. Although LLNL has always promoted the concept of a multi-discipline technician, this concept is gaining interest within the Department of Energy (DOE) community. In November 1992, individuals from Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE) and RUST Geotech, joined by LLNL established a committee to address the issues of Health and Safety Technicians. In 1993, the DOE Office of Environmental, Safety and Health, in response to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 91-6, stated DOE projects, particularly environmental restoration, typically present hazards other than radiation such as chemicals, explosives, complex construction activities, etc., which require additional expertise by Radiological Control Technicians. They followed with a commitment that a training guide would be issued. The trend in the last two decades has been toward greater specialization in the areas of health and safety. In contrast, the LLNL has moved toward a generalist approach integrating the once separate functions of the industrial hygiene and health physics technician into one function

  9. Laboratory tools and e-learning elements in training of acousto-optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barócsi, Attila; Lenk, Sándor; Ujhelyi, Ferenc; Majoros, Tamás.; Maák, Paál.

    2015-10-01

    Due to the acousto-optic (AO) effect, the refractive index of an optical interaction medium is perturbed by an acoustic wave induced in the medium that builds up a phase grating that will diffract the incident light beam if the condition of constructive interference is satisfied. All parameters, such as magnitude, period or phase of the grating can be controlled that allows the construction of useful devices (modulators, switches, one or multi-dimensional deflectors, spectrum analyzers, tunable filters, frequency shifters, etc.) The research and training of acousto-optics have a long-term tradition at our department. In this presentation, we introduce the related laboratory exercises fitted into an e-learning frame. The BSc level exercise utilizes a laser source and an AO cell to demonstrate the effect and principal AO functions explaining signal processing terms such as amplitude or frequency modulation, modulation depth and Fourier transformation ending up in building a free space sound transmitting and demodulation system. The setup for MSc level utilizes an AO filter with mono- and polychromatic light sources to learn about spectral analysis and synthesis. Smart phones can be used to generate signal inputs or outputs for both setups as well as to help students' preparation and reporting.

  10. Implementation of Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) in basic scientific research: Translating the concept beyond regulatory compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, G B; Chavan, Sapana

    2017-10-01

    The principles of Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs) are mainly intended for the laboratories performing studies for regulatory compliances. However, today GLP can be applied to broad disciplines of science to cater to the needs of the experimental objectives, generation of quality data and assay reproducibility. Considering its significance, it can now be applied in academics; industries as well as government set ups throughout the world. GLP is the best way to promote the reliability, reproducibility of the test data and hence facilitates the international acceptability. Now it is high time to translate and implement the concept of GLP beyond regulatory studies. Thus, it can pave the way for better understanding of scientific problems and help to maintain a good human and environmental health. Through this review, we have made an attempt to explore the uses of GLP principles in different fields of science and its acceptability as well as looking for its future perspectives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 'Just a lovely luxury?' What can public health attachments add to postgraduate general practice training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Jane; Reynolds, Joanna; Swanwick, Tim

    2009-07-01

    Changing trends in the role of general practice and general practitioners (GPs), including a focus on commissioning and practice population health needs, were reflected in the specialty training curriculum published by the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) in 2007. In response to these developments the London Deanery established training attachments to the public health departments of ten primary care trusts (PCTs) across London, incorporated into three-year GP specialty training programmes. These attachments were evaluated in 2008 by London South Bank University. The aims of the evaluation were to assess the attachment's suitability for addressing areas of the RCGP curriculum; and to explore perceptions of its value for GP training and for future practice. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with two cohorts of trainees towards the end of their public health attachment, and with public health trainers and GP training programme directors from participating schemes. The training attachments were generally considered to offer good opportunities for trainees to fulfil both public health competences and to address relevant areas of the RCGP curriculum, through a variety of types of work. However, this did not necessarily influence either the level of importance attributed to public health in comparison with other clinical training posts or the perceived impact of the attachment on the trainees' future practice as GPs. The reported learning outcomes and value of the attachment for the public health trainers and programme directors reflected the changing and perceived future demands on GPs, but these views were not generally shared by trainees. Public health attachments may offer general practice training programme opportunities for the development of skills and knowledge that are relevant to the changing nature of general practice. Yet, there still appears to be a barrier for trainee GPs in acknowledging their role in non-clinical, population

  12. Aggression prevention training for student nurses: differential responses to training and the interaction between theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Bernard

    2008-03-01

    Workplace violence is of great concern to all health care professionals. Nurses are major targets for incidents of violence, with student nurses being clearly recognised as a high-risk sub-group. Training is widely advocated as the appropriate organisational response but the effects and effectiveness of training are inadequately studied. A recently completed Ph.D study used a longitudinal research design to evaluate the effects of a three-day 'aggression prevention and management training programme' on various learning domains of three cohorts of UK student nurses destined for adult, child, mental health and learning disability specialities [N=243] in their first year of nurse training. A purpose-designed questionnaire was used to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and self-assessed competence at four time points, two before and two following the educational input. This paper focuses on the differences detected in student nurses' responses to different sections of the questionnaire, at various time points, in relation to recorded demographic variables, namely, their age, gender, destined speciality, and previous relevant training experience. It also considers the 'interaction' between theoretical preparation and clinical practice. These finding may also have wider relevance to skills training and understanding of the reality of student nurse experience in clinical settings.

  13. Impact of Training on Improving Proper Handwashing Practices among Elementary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theruna Huthamaputiran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hand washing is among the most effective ways to prevent diseases. In Indonesia, only a quarter of the entire population practice proper handwashing techniques. Of these, children are the most vulnerable group for contracting diseases. Nevertheless, they also are crucial agent for behavior transformation as they are keen and open to new ideas. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine if training would have an improvement on a proper hand washing practices among elementary school students. Methods:An observational descriptive study design using random sampling was conducted from September to November 2013 in Jatinangor Subdistrict, West Java, Indonesia using primary data of one hundred elementary school students from four elementary schools. Questionnaires were given after informed consent. A demonstration on hand washing techniques and education on proper hand washing practices was then given. Two weeks later, the same questionnaire was given to measure the influence of the training. The collected data were presented using frequency tabulation. Results: Before the training on proper hand washing practices was conducted, only 86.9% students were practicing it properly. After the training was given, 90.7% of the students were doing it properly. For the hand washing technique, only 66.8% of students knew the correct steps before the intervention was given and 78.7% students did them correctly after the intervention. Conclusions:The training shows an overall improvement on the students’ hand washing practices.   DOI: 10.15850/amj.v4n2.1073

  14. Effective Practices for Training and Inspiring High School Physics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee-Sauer, Karen

    It is well-documented that there is a nationwide shortage of highly qualified high school physics teachers. Not surprising, institutions of higher education report that the most common number of physics teacher graduates is zero with the majority of institutions graduating less than two physics teachers per year. With these statistics in mind, it is critical that institutions take a careful look at how they recruit, train, and contribute to the retention of high school physics teachers. PhysTEC is a partnership between the APS and AAPT that is dedicated to improving and promoting the education of high school physics teachers. Primarily funded by the NSF and its partnering organizations, PhysTEC has identified key components that are common to successful physics teacher preparation programs. While creating a successful training program in physics, it is also important that students have the opportunity for a ``do-able'' path to certification that does not add further financial debt. This talk will present an overview of ``what works'' in creating a path for physics majors to a high school physics teaching career, actions and activities that help train and inspire pre-service physics teachers, and frameworks that provide the support for in-service teachers. Obstacles to certification and the importance of a strong partnership with colleges of education will be discussed. Several examples of successful physics high school teacher preparation programs will be presented. This material is part of the Physics Teacher Education Coalition project, which is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. 0808790, 0108787, and 0833210.

  15. An Approach to Ethical Practice in Management and Trainer Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Rita

    1992-01-01

    Concern with ethics has given rise to two educational approaches, one derived from philosophical principles of social ethics, the other based on case studies of practical issues. A combination of these is necessary to ensure situational applicability and to avoid moral relativism and expediency. (SK)

  16. Increasing the Demand for Workplace Training: Workforce Development in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thursfield, Denise; Holden, Rick

    2004-01-01

    In this article I draw attention to the current legitimising of new forms of identity of vocational and higher education learners. Using identity as a lens for examining pedagogy I focus on one of these new forms--the learner-worker identity. I examine one teaching and learning practice portfolio development, by discussing the program within which…

  17. Practical Bioremediation Course – Laboratory Exercises on Biodegradation of Cationic Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Ivankovic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available 0 From the perspective of the lab exercises leader and teaching assistant for the Bioremediation course, it was very difficult to design and conduct a set of exercises that would fit the course curriculum and satisfactorily demonstrate bioremediation basics through practical laboratory work. Thus, Bioremediation course students designed the experiment with the help of the teaching assistant; a simulation of possible bioremediation of “Jarun” lake in Zagreb, Croatia, if contaminated with cationic surfactant. The experiment nicely showed how natural bioremediation differs from engineered bioremediation and the levels of success between different types of engineered bioremediation. The laboratory exercises were designed to be interesting and the results perceivable to the students.  Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques. For more information, read the laboratory safety section of the ASM Curriculum Recommendations: Introductory Course in Microbiology and the Guidelines for Biosafety in Teaching Laboratories, available at www.asm.org. The Editors of JMBE recommend that adopters of the protocols included in this article follow a minimum of Biosafety Level 2 practices. Normal 0 21 false false false HR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Cambria","serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  18. Quality Indicators in Laboratory Medicine: from theory to practice. Preliminary data from the IFCC Working Group Project "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, Laura; O'Kane, Maurice; Skaik, Younis Abdelwahab; Caciagli, Patrizio; Pellegrini, Cristina; Da Rin, Giorgio; Ivanov, Agnes; Ghys, Timothy; Plebani, Mario

    2011-05-01

    The adoption of Quality Indicators (QIs) has prompted the development of tools to measure and evaluate the quality and effectiveness of laboratory testing, first in the hospital setting and subsequently in ambulatory and other care settings. While Laboratory Medicine has an important role in the delivery of high-quality care, no consensus exists as yet on the use of QIs focussing on all steps of the laboratory total testing process (TTP), and further research in this area is required. In order to reduce errors in laboratory testing, the IFCC Working Group on "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety" (WG-LEPS) developed a series of Quality Indicators, specifically designed for clinical laboratories. In the first phase of the project, specific QIs for key processes of the TTP were identified, including all the pre-, intra- and post-analytic steps. The overall aim of the project is to create a common reporting system for clinical laboratories based on standardized data collection, and to define state-of-the-art and Quality Specifications (QSs) for each QI independent of: a) the size of organization and type of activities; b) the complexity of processes undertaken; and c) different degree of knowledge and ability of the staff. The aim of the present paper is to report the results collected from participating laboratories from February 2008 to December 2009 and to identify preliminary QSs. The results demonstrate that a Model of Quality Indicators managed as an External Quality Assurance Program can serve as a tool to monitor and control the pre-, intra- and post-analytical activities. It might also allow clinical laboratories to identify risks that lead to errors resulting in patient harm: identification and design of practices that eliminate medical errors; the sharing of information and education of clinical and laboratory teams on practices that reduce or prevent errors; the monitoring and evaluation of improvement activities.

  19. Is The Legal Practice Course Training Future Solicitors to Avoid Professional Negligence?

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Mark R

    1996-01-01

    In 1993 the Law Society for England and Wales introduced the Legal Practice Course as the final major taught and examined stafe of solicitors' training replacing the previous Law Socity Finals Course. In this article it is argued that many of the occurrences of solicitors negligence result not from a lack of legal knowledge but from poor working practices. The article considers whether the LPC meets the challenge of better preparing future solicitors for a modern and changing practice environ...

  20. Shaping talent for sustainable business development - Nuclear training practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillot, V.; Thoral, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The AREVA group, which is committed to offering its customers technological solutions for reliable CO 2 -free power generation, is both a designer and vendor of nuclear units and operator of nuclear facilities. The group's ambitions are to maintain its knowledge capabilities and develop skills at the level necessary to respond to its business objectives around the world. The AREVA Human Resources department has developed an action plan to support business strategy which aims to accelerate its investment in people, to reinforce recruitment and retain high quality talents and valuable skills and knowledge. Today, there is a global challenge for attracting the best talent and becoming an employer of choice. The group must be creative in attracting, retaining, mobilising, engaging, developing and rewarding its people. AREVA has 61 100 employees worldwide, of which 38 000 work in nuclear activities. In 2006, some 10% of the nuclear workforce represented newcomers, and the group anticipates recruiting a similar significant ratio in 2007. The group has to be ready to tackle a surge in recruitment which is believed will continue over the next 5 years. AREVA has developed, on an international level, networks and partnerships with academic institutions. New programs are being created and promoted to prepare for the integration of future skills needed in the nuclear business. The group has coordinated and pooled resources to gain efficiencies and to strengthen its presence on the employment market. Plans are in place for employee integration and development, mobility, and managing the transfer of knowledge and specific skills. In this context, internal professional training paths are being developed and reinforced, including geology of uranium, dismantling, reactors, nuclear safety and the environment. AREVA is developing a common methodology to lever the transfer of knowledge through training modules, sharing experience and mentoring. Mentoring programs have been

  1. Creating Best Practices for the Submission of Actionable Food and Feed Testing Data Generated in State and Local Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsness, Kathryn; Salfinger, Yvonne; Randolph, Robyn; Shea, Shari; Larson, Kirsten

    2017-07-01

    Laboratory accreditation provides a level of standardization in laboratories and confidence in generated food and feed testing results. For some laboratories, ISO/IEC 17025:2005 accreditation may not be fiscally viable, or a requested test method may be out of the scope of the laboratory's accreditation. To assist laboratories for whom accreditation is not feasible, the Association of Public Health Laboratories Data Acceptance Work Group developed a white paper entitled "Best Practices for Submission of Actionable Food and Feed Testing Data Generated in State and Local Laboratories." The basic elements of a quality management system, along with other best practices that state and local food and feed testing laboratories should follow, are included in the white paper. It also covers program-specific requirements that may need to be addressed. Communication with programs and end data users is regarded as essential for establishing the reliability and accuracy of laboratory data. Following these suggested best practices can facilitate the acceptance of laboratory data, which can result in swift regulatory action and the quick removal of contaminated product from the food supply, improving public health nationally.

  2. Design of a Flexible Hardware Interface for Multiple Remote Electronic practical Experiments of Virtual Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Said

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to present a new design of a Flexible Hardware Interface (FHI based on PID control techniques to use in a virtual laboratory. This flexible hardware interface allows the easy implementation of different and multiple remote electronic practical experiments for undergraduate engineering classes. This interface can be viewed as opened hardware architecture to easily develop simple or complex remote experiments in the electronic domain. The philosophy of the use of this interface can also be expanded to many other domains as optic experiments for instance. It is also demonstrated that software can be developed to enable remote measurements of electronic circuits or systems using only Web site Interface. Using standard browsers (such as Internet explorer, Firefox, Chrome or Safari, different students can have a remote access to different practical experiments at a time.

  3. Microscopic or occult hematuria, when reflex testing is not good laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froom, Paul; Barak, Mira

    2010-01-01

    Consensus opinion suggests that hematuria found by dipstick and not confirmed on microscopic examination (<2 erythrocytes per high power field) signifies a false-positive reagent strip test result. Standard practice is to repeat the dipstick test several days later and if still positive to confirm by microscopic examination. If discordant results are obtained, experts recommend reflex testing for urinary myoglobin and hemoglobin concentrations. The question is whether or not this approach represents good laboratory practice. These recommendations are not evidence based. We conclude that the reference range for red blood cells on the reagent strip should be increased to 25x10(6) cells/L for young men, and 50x10(6) cells/L for the rest of the adult population, ranges consistent with flow cytometry reports. Confirmation reflex testing using tests that have inferior sensitivity, precision and probably accuracy is not recommended.

  4. Laboratory projects using inquiry-based learning: an application to a practical inorganic course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Carriazo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports how laboratory projects (LP coupled to inquiry-based learning (IBL were implemented in a practical inorganic chemistry course. Several coordination compounds have been successfully synthesised by students according to the proposed topics by the LP-IBL junction, and the chemistry of a number of metals has been studied. Qualitative data were collected from written reports, oral presentations, lab-notebook reviews and personal discussions with the students through an experimental course with undergraduate second-year students at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia during the last 5 years. Positive skills production was observed by combining LP and IBL. Conceptual, practical, interpretational, constructional (questions, explanations, hypotheses, communicational, environmental and application abilities were revealed by the students throughout the experimental course.

  5. Laboratory preparation questionnaires as a tool for the implementation of the Just in Time Teaching in the Physics I laboratories: Research training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, David A.; Sanchez, Melba J.; Forero, Oscar M.

    2017-06-01

    The implementation of the JiTT (Just in Time Teaching) strategy is presented to increase the previous preparation of students enrolled in the subject Physics Laboratory I offered at the Industrial University of Santander (UIS), Colombia. In this study, a laboratory preparation questionnaire (CPL) was applied as a tool for the implementation of JiTT combined with elements of mediated learning. It was found that the CPL allows to improve the students’ experience regarding the preparation of the laboratory and the development of the experimental session. These questionnaires were implemented in an academic manager (Moodle) and a web application (lab.ciencias.uis.edu.co) was used to publish the contents essential for the preparation of the student before each practical session. The most significant result was that the students performed the experimental session with the basic knowledge to improve their learning experience.

  6. Evaluation of freshmen coordination abilities on practical training in gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Tereschenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Measured coordination abilities (baseline to the static and dynamic equilibrium of the body, the space-time orientation on the support and in unsupported position, proprioception sense, vestibular stability, vestibular sensitivity, coordination limbs symmetrical and asymmetrical. Coordination abilities were also measured under difficult conditions. The study involved 238 students aged 17 - 18 years. Registered a positive trend of improving performance motor tests, development of educational material. Students who specialize in difficult to coordinate sports had significantly better performance. Found that the content of the material work programs of sports and educational disciplines helps improve sensorimotor coordination tasks students. It is noted that the content of the training material is the basis for efficient formation of motor skills and motor skills development of gymnastic exercises. Recommended ways to increase sports and technical and professional skills of students.

  7. Training Pathology Residents to Practice 21st Century Medicine: A Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black-Schaffer, W Stephen; Morrow, Jon S; Prystowsky, Michael B; Steinberg, Jacob J

    2016-01-01

    Scientific advances, open information access, and evolving health-care economics are disrupting extant models of health-care delivery. Physicians increasingly practice as team members, accountable to payers and patients, with improved efficiency, value, and quality. This change along with a greater focus on population health affects how systems of care are structured and delivered. Pathologists are not immune to these disruptors and, in fact, may be one of the most affected medical specialties. In the coming decades, it is likely that the number of practicing pathologists will decline, requiring each pathologist to serve more and often sicker patients. The demand for increasingly sophisticated yet broader diagnostic skills will continue to grow. This will require pathologists to acquire appropriate professional training and interpersonal skills. Today's pathology training programs are ill designed to prepare such practitioners. The time to practice for most pathology trainees is typically 5 to 6 years. Yet, trainees often lack sufficient experience to practice independently and effectively. Many studies have recognized these challenges suggesting that more effective training for this new century can be implemented. Building on the strengths of existing programs, we propose a redesign of pathology residency training that will meet (and encourage) a continuing evolution of American Board of Pathology and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements, reduce the time to readiness for practice, and produce more effective, interactive, and adaptable pathologists. The essence of this new model is clear definition and acquisition of core knowledge and practice skills that span the anatomic and clinical pathology continuum during the first 2 years, assessed by competency-based metrics with emphasis on critical thinking and skill acquisition, followed by individualized modular training with intensively progressive responsibility during the final years of

  8. Needs assessment for developing a program to help train advanced-practice pharmacists for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulkley, Christina F; Miller, Michael J; Bush, Colleen G; Nussbaum, Barbara B; Draugalis, JoLaine R

    2017-12-01

    Results of a needs assessment to determine priority topics and preferred formats for research training in pharmacy residency programs are reported. For pharmacists seeking advanced-practice positions in academia, the ability to conduct practice-based research is expected. Pharmacy residency programs are a primary recruitment source for these positions, but research training varies by residency site and available expertise. To help define the optimal content and format of resident research training, ASHP and the ASHP Research and Education Foundation conducted a needs assessment targeting postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) pharmacy residency directors (RPDs). The response rate was 36.5% (271 of 743 invitees); the information obtained was used to guide development of a Web-based training series. Only 12% of the RPDs who participated in the survey indicated that currently available research training resources within their residency programs were sufficient. Sixty-seven percent of surveyed RPDs agreed that a Web-based training program would be a useful resource, and 81% agreed that the target audience should be pharmacy residents. Training topics of greatest interest to RPDs included (1) components of a resident research plan, (2) identifying research questions, (3) study design and sample selection, (4) project management, (5) data acquisition, cleaning, management, and analysis, and (6) presenting and publishing project results. This needs assessment clearly identified opportunities for improving the infrastructure and content of PGY1 residency research training. At a minimum, training programs should focus on practice-based research concepts using readily accessible health-system data systems and provide universal accessibility and sufficient flexibility to allow residency programs to integrate the training in a manner that works best for the program. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. UK Transfusion Laboratory Collaborative: minimum standards for staff qualifications, training, competency and the use of information technology in hospital transfusion laboratories 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffe, B; Glencross, H; Jones, J; Staves, J; Capps-Jenner, A; Mistry, H; Bolton-Maggs, P; McQuade, M; Asher, D

    2014-12-01

    The SHOT Adverse Incident Reporting Scheme has consistently reported an unacceptably high level of errors originating in the laboratory setting. In 2006 an initiative was launched in conjunction with the IBMS, SHOT, RCPath, BBTS, UK NEQAS, the NHSE NBTC and the equivalents in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland that led to the formation of the UK TLC. The UK TLC in considering the nature and spread of the errors documented by SHOT concluded that a significant proportion of these errors were most likely to be related to either the use of information technology or staff education, staffing levels, skill mix, training and competency issues. In the absence of any formal guidance on these matters, the UK TLC developed a series of recommendations using the results of two laboratory surveys conducted in 2007 and 2008.

  10. The Usefulness of Clinical-Practice-Based Laboratory Data in Facilitating the Diagnosis of Dengue Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jien-Wei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alertness to dengue and making a timely diagnosis is extremely important in the treatment of dengue and containment of dengue epidemics. We evaluated the complementary role of clinical-practice-based laboratory data in facilitating suspicion/diagnosis of dengue. One hundred overall dengue (57 dengue fever [DF] and 43 dengue hemorrhagic fever [DHF] cases and another 100 nondengue cases (78 viral infections other than dengue, 6 bacterial sepsis, and 16 miscellaneous diseases were analyzed. We separately compared individual laboratory variables (platelet count [PC] , prothrombin time [PT], activated partial thromboplastin time [APTT], alanine aminotransferase [ALT], and aspartate aminotransferase [AST] and varied combined variables of DF and/or DHF cases with the corresponding ones of nondengue cases. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV in the diagnosis of DF and/or DHF were measured based on these laboratory variables. While trade-off between sensitivity and specificity, and/or suboptimal PPV/NPV was found at measurements using these variables, prolonged APTT + normal PT + PC < 100 × 109 cells/L had a favorable sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV in diagnosis of DF and/or DHF. In conclusion, these data suggested that prolonged APTT + normal PT + PC < 100 × 109 cells/L is useful in evaluating the likelihood of DF and/or DHF.

  11. The Effects of Using Jigsaw Method Based on Cooperative Learning Model in the Undergraduate Science Laboratory Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacop, Ataman

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of the present study is to determine the influence of a Jigsaw method based on cooperative learning and a confirmatory laboratory method on prospective science teachers' achievements of physics in science teaching laboratory practice courses. The sample of this study consisted of 33 female and 15 male third-grade prospective science…

  12. Evaluation of the "Foundations in Knowledge Translation" training initiative: preparing end users to practice KT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jamie S; Moore, Julia E; Sayal, Radha; Holmes, Bev J; Scarrow, Gayle; Graham, Ian D; Jeffs, Lianne; Timmings, Caitlyn; Rashid, Shusmita; Johnson, Alekhya Mascarenhas; Straus, Sharon E

    2018-04-25

    Current knowledge translation (KT) training initiatives are primarily focused on preparing researchers to conduct KT research rather than on teaching KT practice to end users. Furthermore, training initiatives that focus on KT practice have not been rigorously evaluated and have focused on assessing short-term outcomes and participant satisfaction only. Thus, there is a need for longitudinal training evaluations that assess the sustainability of training outcomes and contextual factors that may influence outcomes. We evaluated the KT training initiative "Foundations in KT" using a mixed-methods longitudinal design. "Foundations in KT" provided training in KT practice and included three tailored in-person workshops, coaching, and an online platform for training materials and knowledge exchange. Two cohorts were included in the study (62 participants, including 46 "Foundations in KT" participants from 16 project teams and 16 decision-maker partners). Participants completed self-report questionnaires, focus groups, and interviews at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after the first workshop. Participant-level outcomes include survey results which indicated that participants' self-efficacy in evidence-based practice (F(1,8.9) = 23.7, p = 0.001, n = 45), KT activities (F(1,23.9) = 43.2, p training initiative helped participants achieve their KT project objectives, plan their projects, and solve problems over time. Contextual factors include teams with high self-reported organizational capacity and commitment to implement at the start of their project had buy-in from upper management that resulted in secured funding and resources for their project. Training initiative outcomes include participants who applied the KT knowledge and skills they learned to other projects by sharing their knowledge informally with coworkers. Sustained spread of KT practice was observed with five teams at 24 months. We completed a longitudinal evaluation of a KT

  13. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    OpenAIRE

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and th...

  14. Journalism, controversy and convincing practices: the words and the training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Castilhos Karam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Journalism is raised by Greco-RomanRhetoric and Dialectics and comes through thepresent days without ever giving up on its centralpillar: words. Words are to be found everywhere:in writt en texts, static or dynamic images; in infographicsand great, typical journalistic tales. Theyare to be found in chronics, comics, informal talkand social networks. To become a journalist meansto not give up on words that are central when oneacknowledges the importance of the surroundings,of detection methods and narrative models. Wordsare at the core of controversy and convincing practices.They are at the core of becoming a journalist.

  15. Enhancing Self-Awareness: A Practical Strategy to Train Culturally Responsive Social Work Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini J. Negi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A primary goal of social justice educators is to engage students in a process of self-discovery, with the goal of helping them recognize their own biases, develop empathy, and become better prepared for culturally responsive practice. While social work educators are mandated with the important task of training future social workers in culturally responsive practice with diverse populations, practical strategies on how to do so are scant. This article introduces a teaching exercise, the Ethnic Roots Assignment, which has been shown qualitatively to aid students in developing self-awareness, a key component of culturally competent social work practice. Practical suggestions for classroom utilization, common challenges, and past student responses to participating in the exercise are provided. The dissemination of such a teaching exercise can increase the field’s resources for addressing the important goal of cultural competence training.

  16. Salaries and compensation practices in public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratories: findings from a 2010 national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoy, John M; Boulton, Matthew L; Carpenter, David F

    2013-01-01

    The public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratory (PHEAL) workforce is a key component of the public health infrastructure. The national laboratory workforce faces an ongoing challenge of recruitment and retention of workers often related to pay and other compensation issues. To collect information on laboratory salaries and laboratory compensation practices using a national compensation survey targeting the PHEAL workforce. Seventy-three of 109 (67%) PHEAL directors in the 50 states and District of Columbia collectively employ 3723/4830 (77%) PHEAL employees in the United States. A standardized survey was developed and administered in 2010. Compensation data were compiled by job classification, geographic region, laboratory gross operating budget size, laboratory staff size, and laboratory type. Laboratory staff size ranged from 3 to 327 individuals (mean = 74 and median = 51). Median base salaries were lowest in the Southwest and South and highest in the Mountain and Pacific regions. Mean and median laboratory gross operating budgets for all participating PHEALs were $8 609 238 and $5 671 500, respectively. Extra cash compensation, used by 8 of 60 (13.3%) PHEALs, was more likely to go to a scientist-manager or scientist-supervisor. In 2010, a standardized national compensation survey of technical and scientific public health employees working in 73 PHEALs was effective in collecting previously unavailable data about laboratory salaries, laboratory budgets, and payroll practices. Laboratory salaries varied by geographic region and there was an uneven distribution of extra cash compensation among job classifications. The compensation data collected may be useful in characterizing and improving laboratory salary structures and practices to better support workforce recruitment and retention.

  17. MAP as a model for practice-based learning and improvement in child psychiatry training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Sheryl H; Podell, Jennifer L; Zima, Bonnie T; Best, Karin; Sidhu, Shawn; Jura, Martha Bates

    2014-01-01

    Not only is there a growing literature demonstrating the positive outcomes that result from implementing evidence based treatments (EBTs) but also studies that suggest a lack of delivery of these EBTs in "usual care" practices. One way to address this deficit is to improve the quality of psychotherapy teaching for clinicians-in-training. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires all training programs to assess residents in a number of competencies including Practice-Based Learning and Improvements (PBLI). This article describes the piloting of Managing and Adapting Practice (MAP) for child psychiatry fellows, to teach them both EBT and PBLI skills. Eight child psychiatry trainees received 5 full days of MAP training and are delivering MAP in a year-long outpatient teaching clinic. In this setting, MAP is applied to the complex, multiply diagnosed psychiatric patients that present to this clinic. This article describes how MAP tools and resources assist in teaching trainees each of the eight required competency components of PBLI, including identifying deficits in expertise, setting learning goals, performing learning activities, conducting quality improvement methods in practice, incorporating formative feedback, using scientific studies to inform practice, using technology for learning, and participating in patient education. A case example illustrates the use of MAP in teaching PBLI. MAP provides a unique way to teach important quality improvement and practice-based learning skills to trainees while training them in important psychotherapy competence.

  18. Practical Applications for Maintenance of Certification Products in Child and Adolescent Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Laurel L; Sexson, Sandra; Dingle, Arden D; Young-Walker, Laine; John, Nadyah; Hunt, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The authors evaluated whether Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Performance-in-Practice products in training increases trainee knowledge of MOC processes and is viewed by trainees as a useful activity. Six child and adolescent psychiatry fellowships used MOC products in continuity clinics to assess their usefulness as training tools. Two surveys assessed initial knowledge of MOC and usefulness of the activity. Forty-one fellows completed the initial survey. A majority of first-year fellows indicated lack of awareness of MOC in contrast to a majority of second-year fellows who indicated some awareness. Thirty-five fellows completed the second survey. A majority of first- and second-year fellows found the activity easy to execute and would change something about their practice as a result. Using MOC products in training appears to be a useful activity that may assist training programs in teaching the principles of self- and peer-learning.

  19. Management of liquid radioactive waste from research and training laboratories of radiochemistry and radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnopyorova, A.P.; Yuhno, G.D.; Sytnik, O.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Liquid radioactive waste (LRW), that is formed in research and training cycle of radiochemistry and radioecology laboratories of Kharkov National University, corresponds to medium active one (10 5 -10 7 Bq/l). Since the great number of different radioactive isotopes is involved in research conducted by the laboratories, liquid waste contains various radioactive contaminations. As a rule these are the water solutions of salts with concentration of 0.8-1.0 gm/l, containing mixture of 45 Ca, 65 Zn, 90 Sr, 173 Cs radionuclides. Accumulation of liquid waste from the laboratories is comparatively small, approximately 20-30 I per month. A great while LRW from the laboratories had been accumulated in special protective containers and delivered to the central waste disposal. Numerous studies has shown that LRW storage in special containers may only be temporal, since durable holding of waste necessarily gives rise to corrosion of the facing materials, and therefore diffusion of radioactive substances into environment. In addition long-term LRW storage is disadvantageous from economic point of view. Only conversion of LWR into solid state provides safe protection of environment and decreases volumes of waste. At present LRW from the laboratories is necessarily decontaminated and concentrated before being disposed.To that end the sorption methods are used, in which radionuclides from solution are concentrated in solid phase. Since small volumes of LRW are accumulated in the laboratories, the simple scheme of LRW treatment and conversion into solid residual has been designed. It comprises two steps. At the first stage consists in combining of lime-soda-ash softening with the ion-exchange sorption on the finely divided solid sorbent. Natural zeolite, clinoptilolite from Sokimitsk deposit of Ukraine, is used as the sorbent. Usage of clinoptilolite is justified by its high selectivity and sorption power in regard to 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 65 Zn radionuclides. Both low cost and

  20. Teaching, Practice, Feedback: 15 years of COMPASS science communication training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, L.; Smith, B.; McLeod, K.; English, C. A.; Baron, N.

    2014-12-01

    COMPASS is focused on helping scientists build the skills and relationships they need to effectively participate in public discourse. Founded in 2001 with an emphasis on ocean science, and since expanding to a broader set of environmental sciences, we have advised, coached, and/or trained thousands of researchers of all career stages. Over the years, our primary work has notably shifted from needing to persuade scientists why communication matters to supporting them as they pursue the question of what their communication goals are and how best to achieve them. Since our earliest forays into media promotion, we have evolved with the state of the science communication field. In recent years, we have adapted our approach to one that facilitates dialogue and encourages engagement, helps scientists identify the most relevant people and times to engage, tests our own assumptions, and incorporates relevant social science as possible. In this case study, we will discuss more than a decade of experience in helping scientists find or initiate and engage in meaningful conversations with journalists and policymakers.

  1. Expatriate training and support: How effective are multinational companies’ practices in Cyprus?

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjiyianni, Chara

    2009-01-01

    Most of the literature demonstrates that multinational companies do not adequately train and support expatriates prior to and during overseas assignments. If expatriates do not sufficiently adjust to host-country conditions, this can have detrimental effects on expatriate managers themselves, the assignment and the sending organisation. This study examines the effectiveness of expatriate training and support practices of multinational companies in Cyprus. The dissertation builds on three them...

  2. Best Practices and Provisional Guidelines for Integrating Mobile, Virtual, and Videogame-Based Training and Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    videogame -based platforms, 2) role of assessments and how they can be implemented within these platforms, or 3) benefits or challenges of the...Technical Report 1334 Best Practices and Provisional Guidelines for Integrating Mobile, Virtual, and Videogame -Based Training and...Virtual, and Videogame -Based Training and Assessments 5a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER W5J9CQ-11-D-0002 5b. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 622785

  3. Vertical integration of teaching in Australian general practice--a survey of regional training providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Nigel P; Frank, Oliver; Linn, Andrew M; Anderson, Katrina; Meertens, Sarah

    2011-06-06

    To examine vertical integration of teaching and clinical training in general practice and describe practical examples being undertaken by Australian general practice regional training providers (RTPs). A qualitative study of all RTPs in Australia, mid 2010. All 17 RTPs in Australia responded. Eleven had developed some vertical integration initiatives. Several encouraged registrars to teach junior doctors and medical students, others encouraged general practitioner supervisors to run multilevel educational sessions, a few coordinated placements, linkages and support across their region. Three RTPs provided case studies of vertical integration. Many RTPs in Australia use vertical integration of teaching in their training programs. RTPs with close associations with universities and rural clinical schools seem to be leading these initiatives.

  4. Current practice in laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. 
Survey of the Working group for laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Andrea Tešija; Đerek, Lovorka; Kozmar, Ana; Drvar, Vedrana

    2016-10-15

    With the trend of increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases, laboratories are faced with exponential growth of the requests for tests relating the diagnosis of these diseases. Unfortunately, the lack of laboratory personnel experienced in this specific discipline of laboratory diagnostic, as well as an unawareness of a method limitation often results in confusion for clinicians. The aim was to gain insight into number and type of Croatian laboratories that perform humoral diagnostics with the final goal to improve and harmonize laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. In order to get insight into current laboratory practice two questionnaires, consisting of 42 questions in total, were created. Surveys were conducted using SurveyMonkey application and were sent to 88 medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia for the first survey. Out of 33 laboratories that declared to perform diagnostic from the scope, 19 were selected for the second survey based on the tests they pleaded to perform. The survey comprised questions regarding autoantibody hallmarks of systemic autoimmune diseases while regarding organ-specific autoimmune diseases was limited to diseases of liver, gastrointestinal and nervous system. Response rate was high with 80 / 88 (91%) laboratories which answered the first questionnaire, and 19 / 19 (1.0) for the second questionnaire. Obtained results of surveys indicate high heterogeneity in the performance of autoantibody testing among laboratories in Croatia. Results indicate the need of creating recommendations and algorithms in order to harmonize the approach to laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia.

  5. Prostate Brachytherapy Case Volumes by Academic and Nonacademic Practices: Implications for Future Residency Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orio, Peter F.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Cail, Daniel W.; Chen, Yu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prostate brachytherapy has continued to decline in the United States. We examined the national practice patterns of both academic and nonacademic practices performing prostate brachytherapy by case volume per year to further characterize the decline and postulate the effect this trend might have on training the next generation of residents. Methods and Materials: Men diagnosed with prostate cancer who had undergone radiation therapy in 2004 to 2012 were identified. The annual brachytherapy case volume at each facility was determined and further categorized into ≤12 cases per year (ie, an average of ≤1 cases per month), 13 to 52 cases per year, and ≥53 cases per year (ie, an average of ≥1 cases per week) in academic practices versus nonacademic practices. Results: In 2004 to 2012, academic practices performing an average of ≤1 brachytherapy cases per month increased from 56.4% to 73.7%. In nonacademic practices, this percentage increased from 60.2% to 77.4% (P<.0001 for both). Practices performing an average of ≥1 cases per week decreased among both academic practices (from 6.7% to 1.5%) and nonacademic practices (from 4.5% to 2.7%). Conclusions: Both academic and nonacademic radiation oncology practices have demonstrated a significant reduction in the use of prostate brachytherapy from 2004 to 2012. With the case volume continuing to decline, it is unclear whether we are prepared to train the next generation of residents in this critical modality.

  6. Leadership development in UK medical training: pedagogical theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekas, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    PHENOMENON: The central role of clinical leadership in achieving the vision of quality and productivity could be attained by investing in its development in postgraduate medical education. A critical review of selected literature is presented. The author identifies some of the main theoretical constructs related to leadership; the pedagogical underpinning of medical leadership programs; their learning objectives; and the mixture of methods, individual and collective, to achieve them. INSIGHTS: How to best develop leadership through medical education remains an open debate. Experiential learning, reflective practice, action learning, and mentoring could provide the foundations of leadership development. Application of the aforementioned should be cautious due to limitations of the concept of leadership as currently promoted and lack of robust evaluation methodologies.

  7. Diabetes Mellitus Coding Training for Family Practice Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urse, Geraldine N

    2015-07-01

    Although physicians regularly use numeric coding systems such as the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) to describe patient encounters, coding errors are common. One of the most complicated diagnoses to code is diabetes mellitus. The ICD-9-CM currently has 39 separate codes for diabetes mellitus; this number will be expanded to more than 50 with the introduction of ICD-10-CM in October 2015. To assess the effect of a 1-hour focused presentation on ICD-9-CM codes on diabetes mellitus coding. A 1-hour focused lecture on the correct use of diabetes mellitus codes for patient visits was presented to family practice residents at Doctors Hospital Family Practice in Columbus, Ohio. To assess resident knowledge of the topic, a pretest and posttest were given to residents before and after the lecture, respectively. Medical records of all patients with diabetes mellitus who were cared for at the hospital 6 weeks before and 6 weeks after the lecture were reviewed and compared for the use of diabetes mellitus ICD-9 codes. Eighteen residents attended the lecture and completed the pretest and posttest. The mean (SD) percentage of correct answers was 72.8% (17.1%) for the pretest and 84.4% (14.6%) for the posttest, for an improvement of 11.6 percentage points (P≤.035). The percentage of total available codes used did not substantially change from before to after the lecture, but the use of the generic ICD-9-CM code for diabetes mellitus type II controlled (250.00) declined (58 of 176 [33%] to 102 of 393 [26%]) and the use of other codes increased, indicating a greater variety in codes used after the focused lecture. After a focused lecture on diabetes mellitus coding, resident coding knowledge improved. Review of medical record data did not reveal an overall change in the number of diabetic codes used after the lecture but did reveal a greater variety in the codes used.

  8. Networking and training in palliative care: challenging values and changing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Mhoira Ef

    2011-01-01

    What make a good doctor is a question posed by the public and profession and is key when designing training programmes. The goal of training is to change practice not simply acquire knowledge yet too often curriculums and assessment focuses on knowledge and skills. Professional practice is underpinned by beliefs and values and therefore training may need to challenge deeply held values in order to result in a change in practice. Palliative care offers an opportunity to challenge values at a deeply personal level as it brings experiences of pain and suffering alongside clinical knowledge and skills. Palliative care is holistic and so real scenarios where physical, psychological, social and spiritual issues are evident can be presented in an interactive, learner centered environment. Training in ethics alongside clinical skills will assist the development of judgment which should also be assessed. Communication skills enable the clinician to hear and understand the needs and wishes of those facing life limiting illness. Training should include aspects of modeling and mentorship to demonstrate and integrate the learning with the realities of clinical practice and include those who lead and influence policy and advocacy.

  9. Compatibility of scientific research and specialty training in general practice. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kötter, Thomas; Carmienke, Solveig; Herrmann, Wolfram J

    2014-01-01

    In many departments of General Practice (GP) in Germany, young doctors who are trainees also work as researchers. Often these trainees work part time at the university and part time as a trainee in clinical practice. However, little is known about the situation of the actors involved. The aim of the study was to investigate the perspectives of GP trainees, heads of departments and GP trainers regarding the combination of research and GP training. We conducted a web-based survey with the heads of all German departments of General Practice, GP trainees who also conduct research and their GP trainers. The questionnaires consisted of open and closed questions. The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative methods. 28 heads of GP departments and 20 GP trainees responded. The trainees were mostly very satisfied with their situation as a trainee. However, the trainees considered the combination of research and GP training as difficult. The respondents name as problems the coordination of multiple jobs and the lack of credibility given to research in General Practice. They name as solutions research-enabling training programs and uniform requirements in training regarding research. The combination of GP training and scientific research activity is perceived as difficult. However, well-organized and designed programs can improve the quality of the combination.

  10. Surgical specialty procedures in rural surgery practices: implications for rural surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticca, Robert P; Mullin, Brady C; Harris, Joel D; Hosford, Clint C

    2012-12-01

    Specialty procedures constitute one eighth of rural surgery practice. Currently, general surgeons intending to practice in rural hospitals may not get adequate training for specialty procedures, which they will be expected to perform. Better definition of these procedures will help guide rural surgery training. Current Procedural Terminology codes for all surgical procedures for 81% of North Dakota and South Dakota rural surgeons were entered into the Dakota Database for Rural Surgery. Specialty procedures were analyzed and compared with the Surgical Council on Resident Education curriculum to determine whether general surgery training is adequate preparation for rural surgery practice. The Dakota Database for Rural Surgery included 46,052 procedures, of which 5,666 (12.3%) were specialty procedures. Highest volume specialty categories included vascular, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, cardiothoracic, urology, and otolaryngology. Common procedures in cardiothoracic and vascular surgery are taught in general surgical residency, while common procedures in obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and otolaryngology are usually not taught in general surgery training. Optimal training for rural surgery practice should include experience in specialty procedures in obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and otolaryngology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. New developments in technology-assisted supervision and training: a practical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousmaniere, Tony; Abbass, Allan; Frederickson, Jon

    2014-11-01

    Clinical supervision and training are now widely available online. In this article, three of the most accessible and widely adopted new developments in clinical supervision and training technology are described: Videoconference supervision, cloud-based file sharing software, and clinical outcome tracking software. Partial transcripts from two online supervision sessions are provided as examples of videoconference-based supervision. The benefits and limitations of technology in supervision and training are discussed, with an emphasis on supervision process, ethics, privacy, and security. Recommendations for supervision practice are made, including methods to enhance experiential learning, the supervisory working alliance, and online security. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A comparison of best practices for doctoral training in Europe and North America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnett, Joey, V.; Harris, Robert. A; Mulvany, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The PhD degree was established in Berlin 200 years ago and has since spread across the whole world. While there is general agreement that the degree is awarded in recognition of successfully completed research training, there have been significant differences in the way doctoral training programs......D theses. These differences are analyzed in detail in order to provide a foundation for discussion of their relative advantages and disadvantages, with a view to providing a platform for discussion of best practices. The results will be of importance in the continued development of global discussion about...... development of doctoral training....

  13. Practice patterns and job satisfaction in fellowship-trained endocrine surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinberg, Michael; Duh, Quan-Yang; Cisco, Robin M; Gosnell, Jessica E; Scholten, Anouk; Clark, Orlo H; Shen, Wen T

    2012-12-01

    Debates about the difficult job market for young endocrine surgeons are ongoing. This study aimed to analyze the practice patterns and work-related satisfaction levels of recently trained endocrine surgeons. An anonymous survey was utilized. Participants were divided into 3 groups: "Young" (5 years). Fifty-six of 78 surgeons (72%) responded to the survey. Time in practice ranged from 1 to 9 years (mean, 3.9 ± 0.28). Forty-five (80%) described their practice as academic. Participants performed 244.1 ± 17.8 operations within the last year; 75.4 ± 3.3% were endocrine cases. More surgeons in the "young" group have academic practices (92%) and joined established endocrine surgery groups (54%) versus older surgeons (67% and 42%; P = .05). Of surgeons in the "young" group, 4% started their own practice versus 33% in the "older" group (P = .04). Level of satisfaction with financial compensation (3.2 on a 4-point scale versus 2.9) and lifestyle (3.6 vs 3.1) was also higher in the younger group (P = .009). Despite widespread speculation about scarcity of academic jobs after fellowship, recently trained endocrine surgeons are more likely to practice in academic settings and join established endocrine surgery practices when compared with older surgeons. Overall satisfaction level is higher among recently trained surgeons. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference on good laboratory practices in gynecologic cytology: background, rationale, and organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tworek, Joseph A; Henry, Michael R; Blond, Barbara; Jones, Bruce Allen

    2013-02-01

    Gynecologic cytopathology is a heavily regulated field, with Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 mandating the collection of many quality metrics. There is a lack of consensus regarding methods to collect, monitor, and benchmark these data and how these data should be used in a quality assurance program. Furthermore, the introduction of human papilloma virus testing and proficiency testing has provided more data to monitor. To determine good laboratory practices in quality assurance of gynecologic cytopathology. Data were collected through a written survey consisting of 98 questions submitted to 1245 Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-licensed or Department of Defense laboratories. There were 541 usable responses. Additional input was sought through a Web posting of results and questions on the College of American Pathologists Web site. Four senior authors who authored the survey and 28 cytopathologists and cytotechnologists were assigned to 5 working groups to analyze data and present statements on good laboratory practices in gynecologic cytopathology at the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference. Ninety-eight attendees at the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference discussed and voted on good laboratory practice statements to obtain consensus. This paper describes the rationale, background, process, and strengths and limitations of a series of papers that summarize good laboratory practice statements in quality assurance in gynecologic cytopathology.

  15. Physical activity levels during youth sport practice: does coach training or experience have an influence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlechter, Chelsey R; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Milliken, George A; Dzewaltowski, David A

    2017-01-01

    This study examined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels in youth during flag football practice and compared youth MVPA in practices led by trained or untrained, and by experienced or inexperienced, coaches. Boys (n = 111, mean age = 7.9 ± 1.2 years) from 14 recreation-level flag football teams wore an accelerometer during two practices. Each team's volunteer head coach reported prior training and coaching experience. Mixed-model team-adjusted means showed the proportion of practice time spent in sedentary (13 ± 1%), MVPA (34 ± 2%) and vigorous (12 ± 1%) activity. Practice contributed ~20 min of MVPA towards public health guidelines. There was no significant difference in percentage time spent in MVPA between teams with trained (mean = 33.3%, 95% CI = 29.4%, 37.2%) and untrained coaches (mean = 35.9%, 95% CI = 25.5%, 42.4%) or between experienced (mean = 34.1%, 95% CI = 30.2%, 38.0%) and inexperienced coaches (mean = 33.8, 95% CI = 27.9%, 39.7%). Although sport provides a setting for youth to accrue MVPA, two-thirds of practice was spent sedentarily or in light activity. Participation in a coach training programme was not associated with higher MVPA. Further research is needed to inform volunteer coach training programmes that provide coaches with skills necessary to increase the percentage of practice time spent in MVPA.

  16. Measuring impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps section on training in US dermatology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Kristina M; Stratman, Erik J

    2013-07-01

    JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries are intended to aid in the interpretation of the literature to make it more practical and applicable to daily patient care. Practice Gaps commentaries have had an impact on physician clinical practice and dermatology residency curricula. To assess the impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries on dermatology residency training programs in the United States, including journal club discussions and local quality improvement activities. A web-based questionnaire of 17 questions was sent via e-mail to US dermatology residency program directors (PDs) in February 2012. Program director report of incorporating Practice Gaps themes and discussions into resident journal club activities, clinical practice, quality improvement activities, or research projects in the residency programs, as a result of a Practice Gaps commentary. Of the 114 surveys distributed to US dermatology residency PDs, 48 were completed (42% response rate). Sixty percent of PDs reported familiarity with the Practice Gaps section of JAMA Dermatology, and 56% discuss these commentaries during resident journal club activities. Quality improvement and research projects have been initiated as a result of Practice Gaps commentaries. Practice Gaps commentaries are discussed during most dermatology residency journal club activities. Practice Gaps have had an impact on physician practice and dermatology residency curricula and can serve as a tool for enhanced continuing medical education and quality improvement initiatives.

  17. Putting integrated reservoir characterization into practice - in house training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, F.M. Jr.; Best, D.A.; Clarke, R.T. [Mobile Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The need for even more efficient reservoir characterization and management has forced a change in the way Mobil Oil provides technical support to its production operations. We`ve learned that to be successful, a good understanding of the reservoir is essential. This includes an understanding of the technical and business significance of reservoir heterogeneities at different stages of field development. A multi-disciplinary understanding of the business of integrated reservoir characterization is essential and to facilitate this understanding, Mobil has developed a highly successful {open_quotes}Reservoir Characterization Field Seminar{close_quotes}. Through specific team based case studies that incorporate outcrop examples and data the program provides participants the opportunity to explore historic and alternative approaches to reservoir description, characterization and management. We explore appropriate levels and timing of data gathering, technology applications, risk assessment and management practices at different stages of field development. The case studies presented throughout the course are a unique element of the program which combine real life and hypothetical problem sets that explore how different technical disciplines interact, the approaches to a problem solving they use, the assumptions and uncertainties contained in their contributions and the impact those conclusions may have on other disciplines involved in the overall reservoir management process. The team building aspect of the course was an added bonus.

  18. Training in radiological protection - a pool of practical exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, J.R.; Hudson, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    Courses in Radiological Protection have been organised at Leeds by the NRPB since its formation, and prior to that by the Leeds Centre of the Radiological Protection Service. From the outset it seemed essential that such courses should contain a practical element, and accordingly a number of exercises were drawn up. Since that time further exercises have been added, often in response to a specific requirement from a customer or group of customers. Most of the exercises have involved the design and construction of 'one-off' items of equipment, a number of which can be considered to represent interesting approaches towards radiological protection teaching. The construction of a 'second generation' of hardware has focused attention on the objectives and design features of the exercises, which in turn has prompted a desire to publish a series of short papers describing the pool of exercises that is currently available for inclusion in the various courses run by the NRPB Centres. The first of these papers puts the series into context and provides a background to the descriptions of specific exercises. (author)

  19. Assessment of the Results from Conducted Experimental Training in Computer Networks and Communications in the Laboratory Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gencho Stoitsov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a conducted educational research, related to the use of virtual models and appropriate software in order to acquire practical knowledge and skills in laboratory work in the subject "Computer Networks and Communications" (CNC at the FMI at PU "Paisii Hilendarski".

  20. Radiation protection for surgeons and anesthetists: practices and knowledge before and after training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, A; Mor, R Alcaraz; Bourrelly, M; Dalivoust, G; Gazazian, G; Boufercha, R; Lehucher-Michel, M P; Sari-Minodier, I

    2018-03-01

    The use of radiological activity in the operating room (OR) and a regulatory decrease of the eye lens dose warrant an assessment of how medical staff are protected from radiation. This study aims to evaluate practices and knowledge in radiation protection (RP) for OR doctors before and after training. A descriptive study of surgeons and anesthetists in a French public hospital center was conducted in 2016. An ad hoc questionnaire concerning occupational practices and knowledge about RP was distributed before and one month after RP training. Among 103 doctors attending the training, 90 answered the questionnaire before the training. Results showed a lack of knowledge and good practice in RP. Most of the participants (86.7%) had never been trained in RP and recognized insufficient knowledge. Most of them (92.2%) wore a lead apron, 50.0% a thyroid-shield, 5.6% lead glasses, 53.3% a passive dosimeter and 17.8% an electronic dosimeter. None of them benefitted from collective protective equipment such as a ceiling suspended screen. The questionnaire following the training was completed by only 35 doctors. A comparison before and after training results showed an improvement in knowledge (scores of correct responses: 5.5/16 before and 9.5/16 after training) but not in RP good practices (scores of correct responses: 3.2/7 before and 3.3/7 after training). One training session appears to be insufficient to improve the application of the safety rules when x-rays are used. Communication needs to be improved regarding RP among anesthetists and surgeons, such as training renewal, workstation analysis in OR related to x-ray use and occupational medical follow-up. Otherwise, radiological risks in OR need to be given better consideration, such as radio-induced cataract risk. It is necessary to encourage the use of dosimeters and protective equipment and to strengthen access to lead glasses and collective protective equipment, such as ceiling suspended screens. All these

  1. Study on Students' Impression Data in Practical Training Using Text Mining Method-Analysis of Considerable Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramachi, Hitomi; Sugita, Ikuto; Ino, Yoko; Hayashi, Yuta; Yoshida, Aki; Otsubo, Manami; Ueno, Anri; Katsuno, Hayato; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Tachi, Tomoya

    2017-09-01

    We analyzed impression data and the scale of communication skills of students using text mining method to clarify which area a student was conscious of in communication in practical training. The results revealed that students tended to be conscious of the difference between practical hospital training and practical pharmacy training. In practical hospital training, specific expressions denoting relationships were "patient-visit", "counseling-conduct", "patient-counseling", and "patient-talk". In practical pharmacy training, specific expressions denoting relationships were "patient counseling-conduct", "story-listen", "patient-many", and "patient-visit". In practical hospital training, the word "patient" was connected to many words suggesting that students were conscious of a patient-centered communication. In practical pharmacy training, words such as "patient counseling", "patient", and "explanation" were placed in center and connected with many other words and there was an independent relationship between "communication" and "accept". In conclusion, it was suggested that students attempted active patient-centered communication in practical hospital training, while they were conscious of listening closely in patient counseling in practical pharmacy training.

  2. Audit to assess the quality of communication between operators and technicians in a fixed prosthodontic laboratory: educational and training implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, J; Shearer, A C; Ricketts, D N J

    2014-02-01

    This audit aimed to assess the quality of communication between dental students/qualified dentists and dental technicians, increase the percentage of satisfactorily completed laboratory prescriptions and reduce the number of errors that can result from poor communication. A subsidiary aim was to educate students and staff in this respect. An audit of laboratory prescription completion was conducted within Dundee Dental Hospital. Four hundred and eighteen prescriptions for indirect fixed restorations completed by dental undergraduates and qualified staff were audited over a three month period (first audit cycle). Educational reminders on laboratory prescriptions were then provided to undergraduates and qualified staff, a further three hundred and twenty-two prescriptions were audited (second audit cycle) and compared with the first cycle. Satisfactorily completed prescriptions increased from 28% to 43% following basic educational intervention. However, this percentage still signifies a poor level of completion and the need for improvement. Some aspects of the prescription were completed better than others, but overall the standard remained poor with a significant number failing to comply with guidelines set by the UK General Dental Council, the European Union's Medical Devices Directive and the British Society for Restorative Dentistry (BSRD). Further undergraduate and staff training on laboratory prescription writing will be necessary through staff training events and developments in the undergraduate curriculum. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Quality Versus Quantity Debate in Swimming: Perceptions and Training Practices of Expert Swimming Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Frank J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The debate over low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training, commonly known as Quality versus Quantity, respectively, is a frequent topic of discussion among swimming coaches and academics. The aim of this study was to explore expert coaches’ perceptions of quality and quantity coaching philosophies in competitive swimming and to investigate their current training practices. A purposeful sample of 11 expert swimming coaches was recruited for this study. The study was a mixed methods design and involved each coach participating in 1 semi-structured interview and completing 1 closed-ended questionnaire. The main findings of this study were that coaches felt quality training programmes would lead to short term results for youth swimmers, but were in many cases more appropriate for senior swimmers. The coaches suggested that quantity training programmes built an aerobic base for youth swimmers, promoted technical development through a focus on slower swimming and helped to enhance recovery from training or competition. However, the coaches continuously suggested that quantity training programmes must be performed with good technique and they felt this was a misunderstood element. This study was a critical step towards gaining a richer and broader understanding on the debate over Quality versus Quantity training from an expert swimming coaches’ perspective which was not currently available in the research literature.

  4. Surgical simulation: Current practices and future perspectives for technical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, Flemming; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Konge, Lars

    2018-06-17

    Simulation-based training (SBT) has become a standard component of modern surgical education, yet successful implementation of evidence-based training programs remains challenging. In this narrative review, we use Kern's framework for curriculum development to describe where we are now and what lies ahead for SBT within surgery with a focus on technical skills in operative procedures. Despite principles for optimal SBT (proficiency-based, distributed, and deliberate practice) having been identified, massed training with fixed time intervals or a fixed number of repetitions is still being extensively used, and simulators are generally underutilized. SBT should be part of surgical training curricula, including theoretical, technical, and non-technical skills, and be based on relevant needs assessments. Furthermore, training should follow evidence-based theoretical principles for optimal training, and the effect of training needs to be evaluated using relevant outcomes. There is a larger, still unrealized potential of surgical SBT, which may be realized in the near future as simulator technologies evolve, more evidence-based training programs are implemented, and cost-effectiveness and impact on patient safety is clearly demonstrated.

  5. Quality versus Quantity Debate in Swimming: Perceptions and Training Practices of Expert Swimming Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Frank J; Comyns, Thomas M; Warrington, Giles D

    2017-06-01

    The debate over low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training, commonly known as Quality versus Quantity, respectively, is a frequent topic of discussion among swimming coaches and academics. The aim of this study was to explore expert coaches' perceptions of quality and quantity coaching philosophies in competitive swimming and to investigate their current training practices. A purposeful sample of 11 expert swimming coaches was recruited for this study. The study was a mixed methods design and involved each coach participating in 1 semi-structured interview and completing 1 closed-ended questionnaire. The main findings of this study were that coaches felt quality training programmes would lead to short term results for youth swimmers, but were in many cases more appropriate for senior swimmers. The coaches suggested that quantity training programmes built an aerobic base for youth swimmers, promoted technical development through a focus on slower swimming and helped to enhance recovery from training or competition. However, the coaches continuously suggested that quantity training programmes must be performed with good technique and they felt this was a misunderstood element. This study was a critical step towards gaining a richer and broader understanding on the debate over Quality versus Quantity training from an expert swimming coaches' perspective which was not currently available in the research literature.

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF MRSA DETECTION METHODS IN THE LABORATORY PRACTICE – A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neli M. Ermenlieva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are bacteria, responsible for severe and hard-to-manage infections in human. They are resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics – penicillins (methicillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin, and oxacillin, cephalosporins and carbapenems, but can also be resistant to the new-generation MRSA-active cephalosporins (such as ceftaroline or other groups of antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, macrolides, clindamycin, amphenicols, quinolones and tetracyclines. MRSA bacteria are pandemic and are often isolated in medical practice and nosocomial infections. The MRSA detection is a challenge to any clinical microbiology laboratory and demands implementation of strict protocols for active screening. While more expensive molecular techniques have the potential of offering highly sensitive and rapid results, the cultural methods require longer time but can achieve a comparable sensitivity for lower price.

  7. Collaborative Testing in Practical Laboratories: An Effective Teaching-Learning Method in Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuping; Li, Enzhong

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an experimental teaching and learning program used in histology with first-year students in the second term in the Faculty of Biology at Huanghuai University, China. Eighty-six students were divided randomly into two groups (n=43 per group). Tests were conducted at the end of each practical laboratory (10 laboratories in total) in which collaborative testing was used in the experimental group and traditional testing in the control group. To assess achievement, a final examination in histology was carried out at the end of the course. To determine students' attitude to the teaching styles, a questionnaire survey was conducted at the end of the term. Results showed that students preferred the collaborative testing format. In the experimental group, students' scores were significantly higher than those of students in the control group in final examinations. These findings indicate that collaborative testing enhances student learning and understanding of the material taught, and suggest that collaborative testing is an effective teaching-learning method in histology.

  8. Practical aspects during sterilization validation for medical devices at IRASM Microbiological Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trandafir, L.; Ene, M.; Alexandru, M.; Constantin, M.; Ionita, A.; Zorila, F.; Moise, I.V.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The state of being free of living microorganisms is called sterility. The sterility state can be achieved by different means of sterilization. In practice the results of the process cannot be fully verified by tests, so the efficacy of the sterilization process must be validated. ISO 11137 established regulations for setting or substantiating the dose for achieving the desired sterility assurance level. The validation studies can be designed in particular for different types of product. Each product needs distinct protocol for bioburden determination and sterility testing. During time, the Microbiological Laboratories from Multipurpose Irradiation Center deals with different types of products, mainly for VD max 25 method. When it comes to microbiological evaluation the most challenging was cotton gauze. Special situation for establishing the sterilization validation method appears in cases of cotton, packed in large quantities. VD max 25 method can not be applied for items with average bioburden more than 1000 CFU / pack, no matter which is the weight of the package. This is a method limitation and implies increased costs for manufacturer, when choosing other method. For microbiological tests, culture condition should be selected in both cases the bioburden and sterility testing. These are time and money consuming. The costs can be reduced if taking into account some aspects. Reason for performing the bacteriostasis-fungistasis just for sterility testing will be given. The present study puts forward aspects during the validation studies for medical devices (cotton wool, cotton gauze, surgical sutures, dental screws), at IRASM Microbiological Laboratory.

  9. Practical biosafety in the tuberculosis laboratory: containment at the source is what truly counts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soolingen, D.; Wisselink, H.J.; Lumb, R.; Anthony, R.; Zanden, van der A.; Gilpin, C.

    2014-01-01

    In industrialised countries, sufficient resources for establishing and maintaining fully equipped biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) laboratories according to international standards are generally available. BSL-3 laboratories are designed to provide several layers of containment to protect the laboratory

  10. The Practical Aspects of Online Counseling: Ethics, Training, Technology, and Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallen, Michael J.; Vogel, David L.; Rochlen, Aaron B.

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses the practical aspects of online counseling, including ethics, training, supervision, technology, and competency issues. The authors discuss online counseling's strengths and limitations and present guidelines for what types of clients and counseling psychologists may be appropriate for online counseling. To illustrate the…

  11. The Delphi Method: An Approach for Facilitating Evidence Based Practice in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrey, Michelle A.; Bulger, Sean M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The growing importance of evidence based practice in athletic training is necessitating academics and clinicians to be able to make judgments about the quality or lack of the body of research evidence and peer-reviewed standards pertaining to clinical questions. To assist in the judgment process, consensus methods, namely brainstorming,…

  12. Development and feasibility of a patient feedback programme to improve consultation skills in general practice training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.E.; Blankenstein, A.H.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Schleypen, H.; Schoonheim, P.L.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop an attractive and effective patient feedback training programme for general practice trainees (GPTs). Methods: First, an exploratory study was conducted in which patients and GPTs were interviewed after they had worked with patient feedback. This contributed to the development

  13. 78 FR 59725 - Construction Fall Protection Systems Criteria and Practices, and Training Requirements; Extension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ...- 1648. Mail, hand delivery, express mail, messenger, or courier service: When using this method, you... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety and Health Administration [Docket No. OSHA-2010-0008] Construction Fall Protection Systems Criteria and Practices, and Training Requirements; Extension of the Office...

  14. Novice to expert practice via postprofessional athletic training education: a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neibert, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    To discover the theoretic constructs that confirm, disconfirm, or extend the principles and their applications appropriate for National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA)-accredited postprofessional athletic training education programs. Interviews at the 2003 NATA Annual Meeting & Clinical Symposia. Qualitative study using grounded theory procedures. Thirteen interviews were conducted with postprofessional graduates. Participants were purposefully selected based on theoretic sampling and availability. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using open coding, axial coding, and selective coding procedures. Member checks, reflective journaling, and triangulation were used to ensure trustworthiness. The participants' comments confirmed and extended the current principles of postprofessional athletic training education programs and offered additional suggestions for more effective practical applications. The emergence of this central category of novice to expert practice is a paramount finding. The tightly woven fabric of the 10 processes, when interlaced with one another, provides a strong tapestry supporting novice to expert practice via postprofessional athletic training education. The emergence of this theoretic position pushes postprofessional graduate athletic training education forward to the future for further investigation into the theoretic constructs of novice to expert practice.

  15. Training vegetable parenting practices through a mobile game: Iterative qualitative alpha test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetable consumption protects against chronic diseases, but many young children do not eat vegetables. One quest within the mobile application Mommio was developed to train mothers of preschoolers in effective vegetable parenting practices, or ways to approach getting their child to eat and enjoy v...

  16. Vocational Education and Training Manager Discursive Practices at the Frontline: Alternative Possibilities in a Victorian Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Annette

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at how the neoliberal reform process is affecting the professional identity of frontline managers in the Australian vocational education and training sector. The article examines how frontline managers are required to negotiate their working practices between their understandings and experiences as educators and the new…

  17. Parent Training among Ethnic Minorities: Parenting Practices as Mediators of Change in Child Conduct Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorknes, Ragnhild; Kjobli, John; Manger, Terje; Jakobsen, Reidar

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined parenting practices as mediators of changes in child conduct problems in ethnic minority families participating in Parent Management Training-Oregon Model (PMTO). The participants included 96 Somali and Pakistani immigrant mothers and their children living in Norway. The families were randomized to PMTO or a waiting-list…

  18. Exploring the Theory-Practice Gap: Applications to Health Information Management/Technology Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Zakevia Denise

    2013-01-01

    Although research on the theory-practice gap is available across multiple disciplines, similar studies focusing on the profession of health information management/technology (HIM/T) are not yet available. The projected number of qualified HIM/T needed with advanced skills and training suggests that skillful use of electronic health records (EHR)…

  19. EVALUATION OF PRE AND POST TRAINING PRACTICES REGARDING MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohanty

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted on 112 diabetic patients in S.S. Hospital.Varanasi to evaluate the pre- and post- training practices regarding management of Diabetes mellitus. A pre-tested structured respondent schedule urn used to collect information regarding the socio-economic status and some of the managerial aspects of the disease by questionaire cum interview method. Education cum training was imparted to all the respondents in the first three months and in the fourth month evaluation programme was carried out and their level ofpractive regarding different aspects of diabetic management were assessed by using seven point score method. It was found that training was proved effective for the aspect "Physical exer­cise" and "Restricted diet" but slight improvement in the practive score was seen in "Precaution in Special Hygienic Condition" aspects. So. con­tinuous education programme was needed to improve their practice rate.

  20. Working with LGBT Individuals: Incorporating Positive Psychology into Training and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Megan C.; Vaughan, Michelle D.; Rodriguez, Eric M.; Shmerler, David L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how positive psychology principles can be incorporated into clinical training and practice to work with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) clients. LGBT psychology literature has all too often relied on heterosexual and cisgender reference groups as the norm with respect to psychological health, primarily framing the experiences of LGBT individuals through the lens of psychopathology. As a result, strengths that could be ascribed to the LGBT experience have been overlooked within training and practice. While positive psychology is actively being incorporated into clinical and counseling psychology curricula, broadening the paradigm to include LGBT individuals has generally not been included in the discussion. Specific recommendations for training psychologists to incorporate and foster positive social institutions, positive subjective experiences and character strengths when working with LGBT clients and celebrating their unique experiences are provided. PMID:25544947

  1. Prepare, Do, Review: A skills-based approach for laboratory practical classes in biochemistry and molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Peter; Ludwig, Martha; Castelli, Joane; Kirkwood, Paul; Attwood, Paul

    2016-05-06

    A new laboratory practical system is described which is comprised of a number of laboratory practical modules, each based around a particular technique or set of techniques, related to the theory part of the course but not designed to be dependent on it. Each module comprises an online recorded pre-lab lecture, the laboratory practical itself and a post-lab session in which students make oral presentations on different aspects of the practical. Each part of the module is assessed with the aim of providing rapid feedback to staff and students. Each laboratory practical is the responsibility of a single staff member and through this "ownership," continual review and updating is promoted. Examples of changes made by staff to modules as a result of student feedback are detailed. A survey of students who had experienced both the old-style laboratory course and the new one provided evidence of increased satisfaction with the new program. The assessment of acquired shills in the new program showed that it was much more effective than the old course. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:276-287, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. The importance of the practical training, the retraining and the accreditation of the personnel with regulatory functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menossi, Carlos A.

    2004-01-01

    Medicine, industry, hydrology, research, development and academic scenarios are, nowadays the focus for a wide application of radioisotope techniques of permanently increasing use. This situation should move the governments towards the improvement of their infrastructures and the updating of the nuclear regulatory authorities knowledge. The regulation and control of radioactive sources and its associated practices, to guarantee its safe use and minimize the derived risks from those practices, constitute the main tasks of nuclear regulatory institutions. On the other hand, it is known that personnel with regulatory functions has further interaction with people responsible of facilities and practices (users). In fact, most of these people only have contact with the regulatory authority through the inspector visits, the documents, notes or requirements received. For such a reason, nuclear regulatory authority management success or failure depends fundamentally on the successes or errors occurring in the course of these interactions. Due to it, it should be kept in mind that a successful management of a Nuclear Regulatory Authority implies: a) The users accomplish the effective standards and satisfy the authority requirements, and b) An attitude of respect is induced in the users by the appropriate regulatory function. That is to say because the 'inspectors' possess the necessary technical knowledge. In that sense, with the experience of many years, improvements have been introduced in the radiological protection Post Graduate Course program. This course sponsored by the IAEA has been given in Argentina for 24 years. Such improvements have been made to allow participants that will perform regulatory functions to have enough sessions of practical training, demonstrations, laboratory exercises, case studies and technical visits. This formation course will be supplemented by an accreditation and training on the job. The scope and dimension of the improvements are

  3. Science-practice nexus for landslide surveying: technical training for local government units in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, A. L.; Hespiantoro, S.; Dyar, D.; Balzer, D.; Kuhn, D.; Torizin, J.; Fuchs, M.; Kastl, S.; Anhorn, J.

    2017-02-01

    The Indonesian archipelago is prone to various geological hazards on an almost day to day basis. In order to mitigate disaster risk and reduce losses, the government uses its unique setup of ministerial training institutions. The Centre for Development of Human Resources in Geology, Mineral and Coal offers different level of technical training to local governments in order to provide them with the necessary means to understand geological hazards, mitigate risks, and hence close the gap between local and national governments. One key factor has been the continuous incorporation of new scientific knowledge into their training curricula. The paper presents benefits and challenges of this science-practice nexus using the standardised landslide survey as one example where mobile technology has been introduced to the training just recently.

  4. Monthly radiation protection training of workers: An evaluation of two years operational practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berus, D.; Covens, P.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation protection training and education is important in stimulating safety culture of occupationally exposed workers. Taking into account the mandatory requirements in relation to education and training a digital training tool was introduced for communication of personal dose results and regular information on radiation protection. This tool enables that personal dose reports are monthly sent to the individual mailbox of workers together with short comprehensive slideshows on radiation protection topics. After two years of operational practice a survey was organised to evaluate the training tool. The results show that the majority (92%) of the occupationally exposed workers are aware of the communication of personal dose results through e-mail. Furthermore, 81% of these workers are also aware of their monthly and cumulated dose level. The monthly information on radiation protection topics is however less consulted. Around 40% of the workers that noticed the link are indifferent to the monthly information. The interest in radiation protection issues increases however with the education level.

  5. Use of Low-Fidelity Simulation Laboratory Training for Teaching Radiology Residents CT-Guided Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Melissa; Nelson, Rachel; Roebel, John; Collins, Heather; Anderson, M Bret

    2016-11-01

    To determine the benefit of the addition of low-fidelity simulation-based training to the standard didactic-based training in teaching radiology residents common CT-guided procedures. This was a prospective study involving 24 radiology residents across all years in a university program. All residents underwent standard didactic lecture followed by low-fidelity simulation-based training on three common CT-guided procedures: random liver biopsy, lung nodule biopsy, and drain placement. Baseline knowledge, confidence, and performance assessments were obtained after the didactic session and before the simulation training session. Approximately 2 months later, all residents participated in a simulation-based training session covering all three of these procedures. Knowledge, confidence, and performance data were obtained afterward. These assessments covered topics related to preprocedure workup, intraprocedure steps, and postprocedure management. Knowledge data were collected based on a 15-question assessment. Confidence data were obtained based on a 5-point Likert-like scale. Performance data were obtained based on successful completion of predefined critical steps. There was significant improvement in knowledge (P = .005), confidence (P simulation-based training to the standard didactic curriculum for all procedures. This study suggests that the addition of low-fidelity simulation-based training to a standard didactic-based curriculum is beneficial in improving resident knowledge, confidence, and tested performance of common CT-guided procedures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Does the Pedagogy for the Teaching of First Year Undergraduate Laboratory Practicals Still Meet the Needs of the Curriculum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Hopper

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the teaching approach for chemistry laboratory practicals for first year undergraduate students to determine if the underpinning pedagogical strategy meets the requirements for these students for the remainder of their undergraduate programme. This is based on the knowledge, skills, content and learning outcomes for undergraduate chemistry courses. This work aims to enhance the first year experience of chemistry education by facilitating greater student engagement and “deeper” learning of relevant content during practical laboratory experiences by focusing on the learners’ needs. During this research, a survey of undergraduate science students from 2nd, 3rd and 4th years was carried out to determine if first year chemistry practicals facilitated the development of skills needed in further science education. It concluded that overall there was a positive response to first year laboratory practicals, that students engaged with them and felt they assisted with skills required for subsequent years of undergraduate study. Participants were most satisfied with the organic chemistry experiments while, for the physical/analytical chemistry experiments, the results obtained reiterated difficulties with mathematical calculations that are accepted as an issue in other aspects of third level STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics subjects. As a result of these findings, modifications that were made to the laboratory practical element included a pre-populated workbook supplied to the students and the introduction of pre-laboratory questions to be completed by each student before each session to reduce cognitive load and improve the students’ knowledge and understanding of 2 the purpose and potential outcomes of each laboratory practical. Also, the total first year chemistry syllabus was re-organised, as was the scheduling of the experiments to synchronise the theory lectures with the experiments as far as was

  7. Nursing students' experiences of and satisfaction with the clinical learning environment: the role of educational models in the simulation laboratory and in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonini, Valeria; Ferri, Paola; Artioli, Giovanna; Sarli, Leopoldo; Piccioni, Enrico; Rubbi, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Student satisfaction is an important element of the effectiveness of clinical placement, but there is little consensus in the literature as to the preferred model of clinical experience for undergraduate nursing students. The aim of this study was assess, for each academic year, students' perception of the roles of nurse teachers (NT) and clinical nurse supervisors (CNS) who perform tutoring in both apprenticeship and laboratories and to identify and evaluate students' satisfaction with the environment of clinical learning. This analytic cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 173 nursing students in the Northern Italy. The research instrument used is the Clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher (CLES+T) evaluation scale. Data were statistically analysed. 94% of our sample answered questionnaires. Students expressed a higher level of satisfaction with their training experiences. The highest mean value was in the sub-dimension "Pedagogical atmosphere on the ward". Third year students expressed higher satisfaction levels in their relationship with the CNS and lower satisfaction levels in their relationship with the NT. This result may be due to the educational model that is adopted in the course, in which the simulation laboratory didactic activities of the third year are conducted by CNS, who also supervises experiences of clinical learning in the clinical practice. The main finding in this study was that the students' satisfaction with the supervisory relationship and the role of NT depend on how supervision in the clinical practice and in the simulation laboratory is organized.

  8. CONTEXTUAL TRAINING MODEL IN THE PRACTICAL COURSE OF GENERAL TECHNICAL DISCIPLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natal’ja N. Jel’jash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is a verification of new model necessity of vocational training within the graduates of technical branches of study in high schools. Expert’s activity unlike educational activity is not structured-indetail. Knowledge from the diversified areas and based on it skills to find out appropriate, uncommon decisions of current problems and arising problems are required for effective work on present-day production with constantly improved and becoming complicated technologies. The traditional reproductive training focused on presentation of a set of information and given algorithms for completing different activities presented by the teacher does not allow forming properly creative research way of thinking, abilities to master professional innovations and readiness for regular self-education of trainees. The author notes that it is necessary to work out and introduce essentially alternate methods of preparation that would provide systematic integrity of the systematised theoretical knowledge with acquirable practical skills and its application. The author considers the contextual model of training as one of the most appropriate and reasoned. Methods. The core theory of contextual training is the statute of sensemaking influence of professional work context on educational activity of the student. Theoretically training is to be carried out in the closest field and in forms to real activity; as a peculiar kind of immersion to the future professional sphere. The proposed model of contextual training is installed on the basis of activity approach. The activity approach in contrast to traditional system preparation isn’t broken up to two stages (firstly, overlearning, then its practical application, but is posed to be indivisible: mastery to theoretical readiness and required practical skills acquisition refer a concurrent process under the performance of any tutorial activity or task at the training subject. Results. The

  9. Training small producers in Good Manufacturing Practices for the development of goat milk cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Noemí RAMÓN

    Full Text Available Abstract Training in Good Manufacturing Practices enhances quality during food processing. This paper evaluates GMP training aimed at improving the chemical, sensory and microbiological quality of goat milk cheese. We worked with 26 families that produce cheese as their main source of income. Semi-structured interviews and observation were conducted to select relevant topics. The manufacturing processes were compared and samples were analyzed before and after GMP training. We trained 80% of the producers. Before receiving training, they used to make cheese from raw milk in unhygienic conditions and with little equipment. The products obtained had bad sensory characteristics, cracks, eyes on the pasta, a high number of aerobic mesophilic bacteria and total coliforms. After training, the producers pasteurized the milk and standardized processing procedures, resulting in final products that contained higher protein and calcium content, suitable sensory characteristics, and a significant reduction in microorganisms, with total coliforms falling to ≤ 5.103 UFC/g. Therefore, this study shows that the manufacturing process and the chemical, sensory and microbiological parameters of goat milk cheese improved after GMP training.

  10. The new era of postgraduate certified general practice training in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Akiteru

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the background to, and the recent evolution of general practice as a recognised medical specialism in Japan (2015), and the evolution of a system of training to support this development. We, the general practitioners (GPs) in Japan have not been recognised as one body of medical specialists and have been training in our own way. A new certified training system will commence in 2018, authorised by a new third organisation, the Japanese Medical Specialty Board. An effective educational system has been developed for medical graduates that have a career intention in general practice that is distinct from other basic medical fields, but collaborates with them. A challenge exists to provide clarity to the Japanese population about what the specialty of general practice is, and what professionals in general practice can do for them. Japan currently has approximately 500 certified GPs and it is unclear at present what numbers will eventually be required. This paper reviews some of the challenges facing the development of general practice from the perspective of the Japan Primary Care Association.

  11. Clinical education - place and part for becoming a practically trained radiographer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shangova, M.; Stavreva, E.; Panamska, K.; Bozhkova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The aim is to present the crucial role of clinical education for becoming a practically trained radiographer. It's been put on review and analysis the role of the clinic practice and pre-graduate practice into the education of the future specialist. It's presenting in detail every component of the program for study and the contribution of every module in it - image diagnostic, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. the clinical education lasts six semesters in real working environment. The gradual increase of working hours creates conditions for higher educational quality. Students gradually master techniques, acquire skills and precision at working in an X-ray department, nuclear medicine units and radiotherapy, master communication techniques and acquire teamwork skills. the clinical education provides professional training, quick adaptation to realization and facilitates starting a job

  12. Educational area for learning of optics and technologies: union of open laboratories of ideas, methods and practices (OLIMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashchenko, Maksim; Bodrov, Kirill; Tolstoba, Nadezhda

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with the concept of creating the union of Open Laboratories of Ideas, Methods and Practices (OLIMP). It describes the structure designed to simplify the relationship, such as business incubators, start-up accelerators, small innovative enterprises, fabrication laboratories and student centers. We consider their advantages and disadvantages for the specific audience of students and enthusiasts who do not have funding for their own projects. The experience of interaction between the Open Laboratories of Ideas, Methods and Practices and the Student Research Laboratory for Optical Engineering shows the relative impact of structures on each other and the value of using such interaction in the learning process. The paper also addresses issues such as: the motivation of students, enthusiasm for the direction the lab participants identify and maintain the initiatives, profiling in the design, scientific, commercial, social sphere.

  13. AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline 3.a: Levels of supervision for medical physicists in clinical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, J Anthony; Clements, Jessica B; Halvorsen, Per H; Herman, Michael G; Martin, Melissa C; Palta, Jatinder; Pfeiffer, Douglas E; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Schueler, Beth A; Shepard, S Jeff; Fairobrent, Lynne A

    2015-05-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States.The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner.Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized.The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  14. The Recording of Student Performance in the Microbiology Laboratory as a Training, Tutorial, and Motivational Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Lipson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The laboratory component of a microbiology course consists of exercises which mandate a level of proficiency and manual dexterity equal to and often beyond that recognized among other biology courses. Bacterial growth, maintenance, identification (e.g., Gram stain, biochemical tests, genomics, as well as the continuous need to maintain laboratory safety and sterile technique, are only a few skills/responsibilities critical to the discipline of microbiology. Performance of the Gram stain remains one of the most basic and pivotal skills that must be mastered in the microbiology laboratory. However, a number of students continually have difficulty executing the Gram stain and preparative procedures associated with the test. In order to address this issue, we incorporated real-time digital recording as a supplemental teaching aid in the microbiology laboratory. Our use of the digital movie camera in the teaching setting served to enhance interest, motivate students, and in general, improve student performance.

  15. The recording of student performance in the microbiology laboratory as a training, tutorial, and motivational tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Steven M; Gair, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The laboratory component of a microbiology course consists of exercises which mandate a level of proficiency and manual dexterity equal to and often beyond that recognized among other biology courses. Bacterial growth, maintenance, identification (e.g., Gram stain, biochemical tests, genomics), as well as the continuous need to maintain laboratory safety and sterile technique, are only a few skills/responsibilities critical to the discipline of microbiology. Performance of the Gram stain remains one of the most basic and pivotal skills that must be mastered in the microbiology laboratory. However, a number of students continually have difficulty executing the Gram stain and preparative procedures associated with the test. In order to address this issue, we incorporated real-time digital recording as a supplemental teaching aid in the microbiology laboratory. Our use of the digital movie camera in the teaching setting served to enhance interest, motivate students, and in general, improve student performance.

  16. Impact of design research on industrial practice tools, technology, and training

    CERN Document Server

    Lindemann, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Showcasing exemplars of how various aspects of design research were successfully transitioned into and influenced, design practice, this book features chapters written by eminent international researchers and practitioners from industry on the Impact of Design Research on Industrial Practice. Chapters written by internationally acclaimed researchers of design analyse the findings (guidelines, methods and tools), technologies/products and educational approaches that have been transferred as tools, technologies and people to transform industrial practice of engineering design, whilst the chapters that are written by industrial practitioners describe their experience of how various tools, technologies and training impacted design practice. The main benefit of this book, for educators, researchers and practitioners in (engineering) design, will be access to a comprehensive coverage of case studies of successful transfer of outcomes of design research into practice; as well as guidelines and platforms for successf...

  17. Volatile organic compounds and good laboratory practices in the in vitro fertilization laboratory: the important parameters for successful outcome in extended culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nupur; Chattopadhyay, Ratna; Ghosh, Sanghamitra; Bhoumik, Arpita; Goswami, S K; Chakravarty, Baidyanath

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to describe the role of implementing good laboratory practices to improve in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes which are of great interest for practitioners dealing with infertility. Certain modifications were introduced in May 2015 in our IVF laboratory like high-efficiency particulate air CODA system, steel furniture instead of wooden, use of new disinfectants like oosafe, and restriction of personnel entry along with avoidance of cosmetics like perfume to improve pregnancy rates. Volatile organic compound (VOC) meter reading was monitored at two time points and five different places in the laboratory to compare the embryonic development parameters before (group A: July 2014-April 2015) and after (group B: July 2015-April 2016) remodeling. The IVF outcomes from 1036 cycles were associated in this study. Reduction in VOC meter readings, enhanced air quality, improvement in blastocyst formation rate, implantation, and clinical pregnancy rate were observed in the laboratory after implementation of new facilities. Results illustrated that the attention must be focused on potential hazards which expose laboratories to elevated VOC levels. Blastocyst formation rate increased around 18%. Implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, and live birth rate increased by around 11, 10, and 8%, respectively. In conclusion, with proper engineering and material selection, we have been able to reduce chemical contamination and adverse effects on culture with optimized IVF results. None.

  18. Integrated management system best practices in radioecological laboratories; Sistema de gestao integrado: melhores praticas para laboratorios radioecologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Claudia Aparecida Zerbinatti de

    2010-07-01

    The research aims to study the best practices to support a conceptual proposal for IMS - Integrated Management System (quality, environment, safety and health) applicable to Radioecology laboratories. The research design is organized into the following steps: in a first step, it was developed the bibliographic and documentary research in IMS, survey and study of standards (QMS ISO 9000 (2005), ISO 9001 (2008), ISO 9004 (2000), EMS ISO 14001 (2004) and OHSMS OHSAS 18001 (2007) and OHSAS 18002 (2008)), identification and characterization of processes in Radioecology Laboratories and study of best practices methodology and benchmarking; in the second stage of the research it was developed a case study (qualitative research, with questionnaires via e-mail and interviews, when possible), preceded by a survey and selection of international and national radioecology laboratories and then these laboratories were contacted and some of them agreed to participate in this research; in the third stage of the research it was built the framework of best practices that showed results that could support the conceptual proposal for the IMS Radioecology Laboratory; the fourth and final stage of research consisted in the construction of the proposed conceptual framework of SGI for Radioecology Laboratory, being then achieved the initial objective of the research. (author)

  19. Exploring the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice: stories from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Teresa; Howie, Linsey

    2011-08-01

    Psychiatric nurses interested in extending their interpersonal and psychotherapeutic skills sometimes undertake postgraduate training in gestalt therapy. Little is known about how this new knowledge and psychotherapeutic skill base informs their practice. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study that aimed to explore the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice. Within a framework of narrative inquiry, four psychiatric nurses trained in gestalt therapy were invited to tell their stories of training in a gestalt approach to therapy, and recount their experiences of how it influenced their practice. In keeping with narrative analysis methods, the research findings were presented as a collection of four stories. Eight themes were derived from a thematic analysis conducted within and across the four stories. The discussion of the themes encapsulates the similarities and differences across the storied collection, providing a community and cultural context for understanding the individual stories. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Neuropsychology in Finland - over 30 years of systematically trained clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokkanen, Laura; Nybo, Taina; Poutiainen, Erja

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this invited paper for a special issue of international practice in The Clinical Neuropsychologist is to provide information on training models, clinical practice, and professional issues within neuropsychology in Finland. Relevant information was gathered via literature searches, a survey by the Neuropsychology Working Group of the Finnish Psychological Association, archives of the Finnish Neuropsychological Society, and personal communication with professionals in Finland. The roots of Finnish neuropsychology are linked to the early German tradition of experimental psychology. Since the 1970s, it has been strongly influenced by both the psychometric approach in the U.S. and the qualitative approach by Luria. Systematic specialization training program began in Finland in 1983. It was first organized by the Finnish Neuropsychological Society and since 1997 by Finnish universities. At present, around 260 neuropsychologists have completed this training. According to the survey by the Finnish Psychological Association in 2014, 67% of Finnish neuropsychologists work in the public sector, 36% in the private sector, and 28% reported that they had private practice. Work includes assessments for 90% of the respondents, rehabilitation for 74%, and many are involved in teaching and research. Of the respondents, 20% worked both with adults and children, 44% with adults only and 36% with children only. Within test development, pediatric neuropsychology is an especially prominent field. A unique blend of approaches and a solid systematic training tradition has led to a strong position of neuropsychologists as distinguished experts in the Finnish health care system.

  1. Corporate Sector Practice Informs Online Workforce Training for Australian Government Agencies: Towards Effective Educational-Learning Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Elspeth; Vilela, Cenie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline government online training practice. We searched individual research domains of the human-dimensions of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), information and communications technologies (ICT) and instructional design for evidence of either corporate sector or government training practices. We overlapped these…

  2. Linking Organisational Training and Development Practices with New Forms of Career Structure: A Cross-National Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aidan; Brannick, Teresa; Hulpke, John; Levine, Jacqueline; To, Michelle

    2003-01-01

    Human resource management data were collected from 149 Irish, 201 Hong Kong, 92 Singaporean, and 144 Chinese organizations. Career patterns and training practices showed distinct differences. Irish organizations were more likely to have lower levels of career paths; their training practices suggested more new forms of careers. Fewer paths indicate…

  3. Nuclear Education & Training — Showcasing the Best Practices of the United Kingdom and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dato Syed Ahmad Idid, S.N. K. A.-I.

    2015-01-01

    Skilled, competent and sufficient human resources is fundamental for the safe and successful implementation and expansion of a nuclear power programme (NPP). As nuclear education and training (E&T) stakeholders deliberate and discuss to identify suitable syllabus and courses to offer for education and training to support NPP, it is critical that the nuclear fuel cycle as well as the nuclear power value-chain is taken into consideration in the selection and introduction of relevant courses by Universities and Institutions to nurture and educate skilled manpower for the nuclear power industry. This paper strives to share with the education and training stakeholders, that the task of educating and training students is not solely to prepare them to work in a nuclear power plant, but importantly also to train human resources to support other organizations that require skilled and competent personnel in nuclear related field including Government agencies and Ministries, Business and Industry, Financial sector, International agencies and media agencies, amongst others. Additionally this paper aims to dovetail that a critical mass of skilled manpower along the entire value-chain or scope of nuclear power sector covering planning, construction, manufacturing, commissioning, operation and maintenance and decommissioning must be trained to implement the related tasks required to support NPP competently. Thus, it is within this context, that this paper will outline best practices in nuclear education and training offered by the United Kingdom and France which trains students, professionals, technicians as well as craftsmen not only for employment in a nuclear power plant but also for supporting the nuclear policy formulation in Government Agencies and for supporting nuclear power industry sectors including engineering, construction, manufacturing and services. This paper will offer recommendations for enhancing cooperation in nuclear education and training aimed at building

  4. Decision-making in general practice: the effect of financial incentives on the use of laboratory analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkerud, Siri Fauli

    2012-04-01

    This paper examines the reaction of general practitioners (GPs) to a reform in 2004 in the remuneration system for using laboratory services in general practice. The purpose of this paper is to study whether income motivation exists regarding the use of laboratory services in general practice, and if so, the degree of income motivation among general practitioners (GPs) in Norway. We argue that the degree of income motivation is stronger when the physicians are uncertain about the utility of the laboratory service in question. We have panel data from actual physician-patient encounters in general practices in the years 2001-2004 and use discrete choice analysis and random effects models. Estimation results show that an increase in the fees will lead to a small but significant increase in use. The reform led to minor changes in the use of laboratory analyses in GPs' offices, and we argue that financial incentives were diluted because they were in conflict with medical recommendations and existing medical practice. The patient's age has the most influence and the results support the hypothesis that the impact of income increases with increasing uncertainty about diagnosis and treatment. The policy implication of our results is that financial incentives alone are not an effective tool for influencing the use of laboratory services in GPs' offices.

  5. Training doctors for primary care in China: Transformation of general practice education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donald

    2016-01-01

    China is known for developing a cadre of "Barefoot Doctors" to address her rural healthcare needs in past. The tradition of barefoot doctors has inspired similar developments in several other countries across world. Recently China has embarked upon an ambitious new mission to create a primary care workforce consisting of trained general practitioners having international standard skillsets. This editorial provides an insight into the current status of policy deliberations with regards to training of primary care doctors and a new surge in general practice education in China.

  6. Perspectives for understanding the relationship between the theory and the practice in teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen ÁLVAREZ ÁLVAREZ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects the main theoretical proposals about the relations between theory and practice that are have been formulated in the field of teacher training. The problem that is at the bottom of the theory-practice relationship: professional alienation of teachers in education. To overcome this mostly two responses have been: focus on the theory: convert to the teacher in an intellectual, and the proposal focus on the practice: assess the importance of the personal practical knowledge of teachers. Halfway between both perspectives it is possible to raise three current and relevant lines of research for studies to illuminate the relations between theory-practice in teacher training: (1 teacher’s thought and implicit theories, (2 the reflective teacher and (3 the formulation of principles of procedure and action research and theories experienced. This review haves the objective of reveal the complexity of linked thought, research and teaching action; but it also allows us move forward in building a comprehensive framework covering various forms of approach to a subject which lies at the base of any discussion on the teaching profession and advance in the challenge of achieving a practical domain and a critical awareness in the teaching.

  7. Astronomy in the training of teachers and the role of practical rationality in sky observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretones, P. S.; Compiani, M.

    2006-08-01

    This work analyses a program in the training of teachers that departs from the courses based on the technical rationality. An Astronomy course was offered to Science and Geography teachers of the four last years of high school education, comprising 46 hours, and organized in 2002 by the Instituto Superior de Ciências Aplicadas in Limeira, Brazil. Following the course a study group was established and held five meetings. The data was obtained through assessments, interviews, and accounts by the teachers and records from the classes and meetings. The actions and conceptual changes and the role of the Practical Rationality were then investigated. It was verified that for sky observation, the model of Practical Rationality within the reflective teacher theoretical framework and tutorial actions leads to knowledge acquisition, conceptual changes and extracurricular activities. Examples are: suggestions, personal actions of the teachers without their students, accounts of extracurricular activities and development of astronomical contents in class, actions in the pedagogical practices and reflections of the teachers with the teacher/ researcher towards the assessment of such changes are shown. It is important to stress that sky observation has specific features that lead to an equally specific school practice, in which the contents and procedures based on observations and their representation point towards a more practical rationality. Even in a training course for teachers based on technical rationality, the introduction of sky observation deepens the practical rationality and the development of principles that guide the acquisition and the teaching of knowledge about sky observation.

  8. The hospital component of general practice vocational training--the Irish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, A W

    1992-12-01

    All second and third year general practice vocational trainees in the Irish Republic in 1991 were invited to complete a questionnaire concerning the hospital component of their training. The questionnaire was based on specific recommendations published by the I.C.G.P. regarding hospital training posts. Replies were received from 39 trainees constituting 70% of the total number of eligible trainees. In general, hospital posts were perceived to be of relevance and to offer adequate exposure to outpatient management and to the development of useful practical skills. More than 70% of the trainees were free to attend at least 75% of the study release course. Everyone entitled to study leave for examination purposes obtained it. However, 95% of trainees found their hospital teachers unfamiliar with the aims and objectives of Vocational Training. Two-thirds of trainees received less than two hours a week of formal or informal teaching. More than two-thirds did not participate in an introductory general practice period and less than a quarter had their individual needs assessed early on. Substantial realisation of the guidelines issued by the ICGP has been achieved. Further work is necessary in the areas of individual needs assessment, relevant structured teaching and general practice liaison. Three specific recommendations are made to achieve these aims.

  9. Identification of good practices for teachers and students training activity in the ENVRIPLUS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana; Marsili, Antonella; Beranzoli, Laura

    2016-04-01

    We elaborated basic guiding principles that will be used to improve the content of the ENVRIPLUS e-Training Platform for multimedia education of Secondary School level teachers and students. The purpose is to favour teacher training and consequently students training on selected scientific themes faced within the ENVRIPLUS Research Infrastructures. "Best practices" could positively impacts on students by providing motivation on promoting scientific research and to increase the awareness of the Earth System complexity and Environmental challenges for its preservation and sustainability. Best practice teaching strategies represent an inherent part of a curriculum that exemplifies the connection and relevance identified in education research. The actions are designed to develop thinking and problem-solving skill through integration and active learning. Relationships are built though opportunities for communication and teamwork. Best practices motivate, engage and prompt student to learn and achieve. A starting list of principles is discussed in respect of the following main Best Practices pillars: • Identify the conceptual framework of the subject of the dissemination • Increase personal awareness of the individual potential • Easy personal elaboration and the connection of the subject with the school curriculum.

  10. Assessing Clinical Microbiology Practice Guidelines: American Society for Microbiology Ad Hoc Committee on Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachamkin, Irving; Kirn, Thomas J; Westblade, Lars F; Humphries, Romney

    2017-11-01

    As part of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Committee of the Professional Practice Committee, an ad hoc committee was formed in 2014 to assess guidelines published by the committee using an assessment tool, Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation II (AGREE II). The AGREE II assessment helps reviewers determine whether published guidelines are robust, transparent, and clear in presenting practice recommendations in a standardized manner. Identifying strengths and weaknesses of practice guidelines by ad hoc assessments helps with improving future guidelines through the participation of key stakeholders. This minireview describes the development of the ad hoc committee and results from their review of several ASM best practices guidelines and a non-ASM practice guideline from the Emergency Nurses Association. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Formal and Informal Continuing Education Activities and Athletic Training Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Weidner, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Continuing education (CE) is intended to promote professional growth and, ultimately, to enhance professional practice. Objective: To determine certified athletic trainers' participation in formal (ie, approved for CE credit) and informal (ie, not approved for CE credit) CE activities and the perceived effect these activities have on professional practice with regard to improving knowledge, clinical skills and abilities, attitudes toward patient care, and patient care itself. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Athletic training practice settings. Patients or Other Participants: Of a geographic, stratified random sample of 1000 athletic trainers, 427 (42.7%) completed the survey. Main Outcome Measure(s): The Survey of Formal and Informal Athletic Training Continuing Education Activities was developed and administered electronically. The survey consisted of demographic characteristics and Likert-scale items regarding CE participation and perceived effect of CE on professional practice. Internal consistency of survey items was determined using the Cronbach α (α  =  0.945). Descriptive statistics were computed for all items. An analysis of variance and dependent t tests were calculated to determine differences among respondents' demographic characteristics and their participation in, and perceived effect of, CE activities. The α level was set at .05. Results: Respondents completed more informal CE activities than formal CE activities. Participation in informal CE activities included reading athletic training journals (75.4%), whereas formal CE activities included attending a Board of Certification–approved workshop, seminar, or professional conference not conducted by the National Athletic Trainers' Association or affiliates or committees (75.6%). Informal CE activities were perceived to improve clinical skills or abilities and attitudes toward patient care. Formal CE activities were perceived to enhance knowledge. Conclusions: More

  12. Guide to good practices for the selection, training, and qualification of shift technical advisors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The DOE Guide to Good Practices For The Selection, Training, and Qualification of Shift Technical Advisors can be used by any DOE nuclear facility that has implemented the shift technical advisor position. DOE Order 5480-20, ``Personnel Selection, Qualification, Training, and Staffing Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities,`` states that only Category A reactors must use shift technical advisor position. However, many DOE nuclear facilities have implemented the shift technical advisor position to provide independent on-shift technical advice and counsel to the shift operating personnel to help determine cause and mitigation of facility accidents. Those DOE nuclear facilities that have implemented or are going to implement the shift technical advisor position will find this guide useful. This guide addresses areas that may be covered by other training programs. In these cases, it is unnecessary (and undesirable) to duplicate these areas in the STA training program as long as the specific skills and knowledge essential for STAs are addressed. The guide is presented based on the premise that the trainee has not completed any facility-specific training other than general employee training.

  13. Advancing MCH Interdisciplinary/Interprofessional Leadership Training and Practice Through a Learning Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Meaghan C; Margolis, Lewis H; Rosenberg, Angela; Humphreys, Elizabeth

    2016-11-01

    Purpose The Interdisciplinary Leadership Learning Collaborative (ILLC), under the sponsorship of AUCD and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, brought together six teams, composed of 14 MCHB and UCEDD training programs to enhance their leadership training. Description Using adult learning principles, interactive training methods, and skill-focused learning, the ILLC built upon the evidence-based Interdisciplinary Leadership Development Program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The program began with a 4-day on-site intensive and then continued through monthly conference calls, a mid-term on-site workshop, and a summary virtual workshop to present programmatic accomplishments and share plans for sustainability. Coaching/consultation for the teams around particular challenges was also part of the program. Assessment All teams reported enhancements in intentional leadership training, threading of leadership concepts across clinical, didactic, and workshop settings, and new collaborative partnerships for leadership training. Teams also identified a number of strategies to increase sustainability of their intentional leadership training efforts. Conclusion for Practice The learning collaborative is a productive model to address the growing need for interdisciplinary MCH leaders.

  14. Training related research and development conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    For a number of years Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted a sizeable program of human factors research and development in support of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The history of this effort has in many ways paralleled the growth of human factors R and D throughout the nuclear industry and the program has contributed to advances in the industry as well as to NRC regulatory and research programs. This paper reviews the major projects and products of the program relevant to training and concludes with an identification of future R and D needs

  15. Policies and practices in haemostasis testing among laboratories in Croatia: a survey on behalf of a Working Group for Laboratory Coagulation of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronić, Ana; Herak, Desiree Coen; Margetić, Sandra; Milić, Marija

    2017-02-15

    The objective of this survey was to assess current policies and practice in haemostasis testing among both hospital and outpatient laboratories in Republic of Croatia. A questionnaire with seventy questions divided into nine sections was created in May 2015. Participants were asked about their practice related to test request form, sample collection, prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time assays, other individual haemostasis assays, point-of-care testing (POCT), reporting of coagulation tests results and quality assurance of procedures, the personnel and other laboratory resources, as well as on issues related to education and implementation of additional coagulation assays in their laboratory. The survey was administered and data were collected between June and September 2015. A total survey response rate was 104/170 (61.2%). Most respondents were faced with incomplete information on prescribed therapy and diagnosis on the test request or inappropriate samples withdrawn on distant locations, but also do not have protocols for handling samples with high haematocrit values. Reporting of PT-INR and D-dimer results was different between laboratories. Although almost all laboratories developed a critical value reporting system, reporting a value to general practitioners is still a problem. Result on coagulation POCT testing showed that not all devices were supervised by laboratories, which is not in compliance with Croatian Chamber of Medical Biochemistry acts. Obtained results highlighted areas that need improvement and different practice patterns in particular field of haemostasis testing among laboratories. A harmonization of the overall process of haemostasis testing at national level should be considered and undertaken.

  16. Laboratory practical to study the differential innervation pathways of urinary tract smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembetski, Benjamin E; Cobine, Caroline A; Drumm, Bernard T

    2018-06-01

    In the mammalian lower urinary tract, there is a reciprocal relationship between the contractile state of the bladder and urethra. As the bladder fills with urine, it remains relaxed to accommodate increases in volume, while the urethra remains contracted to prevent leakage of urine from the bladder to the exterior. Disruptions to the normal contractile state of the bladder and urethra can lead to abnormal micturition patterns and urinary incontinence. While both the bladder and urethra are smooth-muscle organs, they are differentially contracted by input from cholinergic and sympathetic nerves, respectively. The laboratory practical described here provides an experiential approach to understanding the anatomy of the lower urinary tract. Several key factors in urinary tract physiology are outlined, e.g., the bladder is contracted by activation of the parasympathetic pathway via cholinergic stimulation on muscarinic receptors, whereas the urethra is contracted by activation of the sympathetic pathway via adrenergic stimulation on α 1 -adrenoceptors. This is achieved by measuring the force generated by bladder and urethra smooth muscle to demonstrate that acetylcholine contracts the smooth muscle of the bladder, whereas adrenergic agonists contract the urethral smooth muscle. An inhibition of these effects is also demonstrated by application of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and the α 1 -adrenergic receptor blocker phentolamine. A list of suggested techniques and exam questions to evaluate student understanding on this topic is also provided.

  17. Ordering molecular genetic tests and reporting results: practices in laboratory and clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Ira M; Caggana, Michele; Constantin, Carolyn; Gross, Susan J; Lyon, Elaine; Pagon, Roberta A; Trotter, Tracy L; Wilson, Jean Amos; McGovern, Margaret M

    2008-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that patient care may be compromised as a consequence of poor communication between clinicians and laboratory professionals in cases in which molecular genetic test results are reported. To understand better the contributing factors to such compromised care, we investigated both pre- and postanalytical processes using cystic fibrosis mutation analysis as our model. We found that although the majority of test requisition forms requested patient/family information that was necessary for the proper interpretation of test results, in many cases, these data were not provided by the individuals filling out the forms. We found instances in which result reports for simulated diagnostic testing described individuals as carriers where only a single mutation was found with no comment pertaining to a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Similarly, reports based on simulated scenarios for carrier testing were problematic when no mutations were identified, and the patient's race/ethnicity and family history were not discussed in reference to residual risk of disease. Remarkably, a pilot survey of obstetrician-gynecologists revealed that office staff, including secretaries, often helped order genetic tests and reported test results to patients, raising questions about what efforts are undertaken to ensure personnel competency. These findings are reviewed in light of what efforts should be taken to improve the quality of test-ordering and result-reporting practices.

  18. Information Quality in Regulatory Decision Making: Peer Review versus Good Laboratory Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Lynn S; Borgert, Christopher J; Mihaich, Ellen M

    2012-07-01

    There is an ongoing discussion on the provenance of toxicity testing data regarding how best to ensure its validity and credibility. A central argument is whether journal peer-review procedures are superior to Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) standards employed for compliance with regulatory mandates. We sought to evaluate the rationale for regulatory decision making based on peer-review procedures versus GLP standards. We examined pertinent published literature regarding how scientific data quality and validity are evaluated for peer review, GLP compliance, and development of regulations. Some contend that peer review is a coherent, consistent evaluative procedure providing quality control for experimental data generation, analysis, and reporting sufficient to reliably establish relative merit, whereas GLP is seen as merely a tracking process designed to thwart investigator corruption. This view is not supported by published analyses pointing to subjectivity and variability in peer-review processes. Although GLP is not designed to establish relative merit, it is an internationally accepted quality assurance, quality control method for documenting experimental conduct and data. Neither process is completely sufficient for establishing relative scientific soundness. However, changes occurring both in peer-review processes and in regulatory guidance resulting in clearer, more transparent communication of scientific information point to an emerging convergence in ensuring information quality. The solution to determining relative merit lies in developing a well-documented, generally accepted weight-of-evidence scheme to evaluate both peer-reviewed and GLP information used in regulatory decision making where both merit and specific relevance inform the process.

  19. Blood sample collection and patient identification demand improvement: a questionnaire study of preanalytical practices in hospital wards and laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Olof; Söderberg, Johan; Van Guelpen, Bethany; Stenlund, Hans; Grankvist, Kjell; Brulin, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2010; 24; 581-591 
 Blood sample collection and patient identification demand improvement: a questionnaire study of preanalytical practices in hospital wards and laboratories   Most errors in venous blood testing result from human mistakes occurring before the sample reach the laboratory.   To survey venous blood sampling (VBS) practices in hospital wards and to compare practices with hospital laboratories.   Staff in two hospitals (all wards) and two hospital laboratories (314 respondents, response rate 94%), completed a questionnaire addressing issues relevant to the collection of venous blood samples for clinical chemistry testing.   The findings suggest that instructions for patient identification and the collection of venous blood samples were not always followed. For example, 79% of the respondents reported the undesirable practice (UDP) of not always using wristbands for patient identification. Similarly, 87% of the respondents noted the UDP of removing venous stasis after the sampling is finished. Compared with the ward staff, a significantly higher proportion of the laboratory staff reported desirable practices regarding the collection of venous blood samples. Neither education nor the existence of established sampling routines was clearly associated with VBS practices among the ward staff.   The results of this study, the first of its kind, suggest that a clinically important risk of error is associated with VBS in the surveyed wards. Most important is the risk of misidentification of patients. Quality improvement of blood sample collection is clearly needed, particularly in hospital wards. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  20. The role, practice and training of unregulated birth workers in Australia: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, Elizabeth C; Schmied, Virginia; Peters, Kath; Dahlen, Hannah G

    2018-05-23

    In Australia, the provision of homebirth services by unregulated birthworkers (doulas, ex-registered midwives, traditional midwives and lay workers) has increased. Accessing a homebirth with a registered midwife via mainstream services is limited. Concern is growing that new legislation aimed at prohibiting unregulated birthworkers practice may result in homebirth going underground. To explore the role, practice and training of unregulated birthworkers in Australian and establish what they would do if legislation prohibited their practice. This study used a mixed methods sequential exploratory design to explore the practice, training and role of unregulated birthworkers in Australia. In phase one, four unregulated birthworkers were interviewed in-depth and the findings informed the development of a survey in phase two. This was distributed nationally through two consumer websites, social media, Facebook and email. Data from both phases were integrated. Unregulated birthworkers in Australia provide homebirth services to women with high and low-risk pregnancies when this choice is unavailable or unacceptable within mainstream services. They operate covertly to protect their practice and avoid the scrutiny of authorities. Unregulated birthworkers can be experienced and trained in childbirth care and practice, much like a midwife working within a holistic paradigm of care. Unregulated birthworkers believe they provide women with the homebirth service they want but cannot access. Mainstream service providers need to listen to consumer criticisms, as women seek answers outside the system. Change is needed to improve and align services with women's expectations of homebirth. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.