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Sample records for pr protein genes

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 famil...

  2. Molecular cloning of a PR-5 like protein gene from cherry tomato and analysis of the response of this gene to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xueyan; Kong, Qingjun; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Feng; Wang, Huili; Yu, Ting; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2011-02-01

    LePR-5, a putative PR5 like protein gene was amplified from a cherry tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), which encodes a precursor protein of 250 amino acid residues, and shares high degrees of homology with a number of other PR5 genes. Expression of LePR-5 in different tomato organs was analyzed with Semi-quantitative RT-PCR, showing that LePR-5 expressed at different levels in leaves, stems, roots, flowers and fruits. In addition, expression of LePR-5 under different abiotic stresses was carried out at different time points. Three of the four tested abiotic stimuli, ethophen, salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, triggered a significant induction of LePR-5 after treatment. However, LePR-5 was weaker induced by abscisic acid than by others. The positive responses of LePR-5 to the three abiotic stimuli suggested that LePR-5 may play an important role in response to abiotic stresses, and it may also be involved in plant defense system against pathogens. In addition, different expression patterns between tomato fruit and seedling suggested that LePR-5 may play a distinctive role in the defensive system protecting tomato fruit and seedling.

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shunwen; Faris, Justin D; Edwards, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 family. The two TaPr-1-rk genes are located on homoeologous chromosomes 3D and 3A, respectively, and each contains a large open reading frame (7385 or 6060 bp) that is interrupted by seven introns and subjected to alternative splicing (AS) with five or six isoforms of mRNA transcripts. The deduced full-length TaPR-1-RK1 and TaPR-1-RK2 proteins (95% identity) contain two repeat PR-1 domains, the second of which is fused via a transmembrane helix to a serine/threonine kinase catalytic (STKc) domain characteristic of receptor-like protein kinases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two PR-1 domains of the TaPR-1-RK proteins form sister clades with their homologues identified in other monocot plants and are well separated from stand-alone PR-1 proteins, whereas the STKc domains may have originated from cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs). Reverse-transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that the TaPr-1-rk genes are predominantly expressed in wheat leaves and their expression levels are elevated in response to pathogen attack, such as infection by barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), and also to stress conditions, most obviously, to soil salinity. This is the first report of PR-1-CRK hybrid proteins in wheat. The data may shed new insights into the function/evolutionary origin of the PR-1 family and the STKc-mediated defense/stress response pathways in plants.

  4. Molecular characterization and genomic mapping of the pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR-1) gene family in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins, known as hallmarks of defense pathways, are encoded by multigene families in plants as evidenced by the presence of 22 and 32 PR-1 genes in the finished Arabidopsis and rice genomes, respectively. Here, we report the initial characterization and mapp...

  5. Characterization of a pathogenesis-related thaumatin-like protein gene TaPR5 from wheat induced by stripe rust fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Tang, Chunlei; Deng, Lin; Cai, Gaolei; Liu, Xinying; Liu, Bo; Han, Qingmei; Buchenauer, Heinrich; Wei, Guorong; Han, Dejun; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2010-05-01

    Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, induced in plants in response to various biotic and abiotic stresses, have been assumed to play a role in plant defense system. Proteins of the PR5 family, also named thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs), have been detected in numerous plant species. In this research, a novel PR5 gene, designated as TaPR5, was isolated and characterized from wheat leaves (cv. Suwon 11) infected by the stripe rust pathotype CY23 (incompatible interaction) using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). TaPR5 was predicted to encode a protein of 173 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 17.6 kDa and a theoretical pI of 4.64. The deduced amino acid sequence of TaPR5 showed a significant sequence similarity with PR5 and TLPs from barley and other plants and contained a putative signal peptide at the amino terminus. Southern blot analysis indicated that TaPR5 is coded by a single-copy gene. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that TaPR5 transcript is significantly induced and upregulated in the incompatible interaction while in the compatible interaction a relative low level of the transcript was detected. TaPR5 was also induced by phytohormones (SA, JA and ABA) and stress stimuli (wounding, cold temperature and high salinity). Using an assay of onion epidermal cells indicated accumulation of TaPR5 protein in the apoplast. The immunocytochemical method showed that the TaPR5 protein was detected on cell walls of wheat leaves in the incompatible interaction at markedly higher labeling density compared with the compatible interaction.

  6. The insectivorous sundew (Drosera rotundifolia, L.) might be a novel source of PR genes for biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matusikova, I.; Libantova, J.; Moravcikova, J.; Mlynarova, L.; Nap, J.P.H.

    2004-01-01

    The gene pool of insectivorous sundew, Drosera rotundifolia L., was studied to identify and analyse sequences encoding for pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The digested genomic DNA was in ¿inverted¿ Southern hybridisation probed to 19 clones for PR genes from different plant sources. From

  7. The tomato UV-damaged DNA-binding protein-1 (DDB1) is implicated in pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression and resistance to Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jikai; Li, Hanjing; Miao, Min; Tang, Xiaofeng; Giovannoni, Jim; Xiao, Fangming; Liu, Yongsheng

    2012-02-01

    Plants defend themselves against potential pathogens via the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) are largely unknown. In this study, we show that tomato HP1/DDB1, coding for a key component of the CUL4-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complex, is required for resistance to Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We found that the DDB1-deficient mutant (high pigment-1, hp1) is susceptible to nontumorigenic A. tumefaciens. The efficiency of callus generation from the hp1 cotyledons was extremely low as a result of the necrosis caused by Agrobacterium infection. On infiltration of nontumorigenic A. tumefaciens into leaves, the hp1 mutant moderately supported Agrobacterium growth and developed disease symptoms, but the expression of the pathogenesis-related gene SlPR1a1 and several PTI marker genes was compromised at different levels. Moreover, exogenous application of salicylic acid (SA) triggered SlPR1a1 gene expression and enhanced resistance to A. tumefaciens in wild-type tomato plants, whereas these SA-regulated defence responses were abolished in hp1 mutant plants. Thus, HP1/DDB1 may function through interaction with the SA-regulated PTI pathway in resistance against Agrobacterium infection. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2011 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  8. Modeling and molecular dynamics simulation of PR-1 protein from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are considered as major weapons in plant's defense tactics against pathogens. The PR-1protein of Solanum tuberosum forms an integral part of the host defense system. We present here the 3D structure of PR-1 protein of S. tuberosum based on homology modeling technique.

  9. Plasminogen: A cellular protein cofactor for PrPSc propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Mays, Charles E; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical essence of prion replication is the molecular multiplication of the disease-associated misfolded isoform of prion protein (PrP), termed PrPSc, in a nucleic acid-free manner. PrPSc is generated by the protein misfolding process facilitated by conformational conversion of the host-encoded cellular PrP to PrPSc. Evidence suggests that an auxiliary factor may play a role in PrPSc propagation. We and others previously discovered that plasminogen interacts with PrP, while its functi...

  10. Plasminogen: A cellular protein cofactor for PrPSc propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Charles E; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical essence of prion replication is the molecular multiplication of the disease-associated misfolded isoform of prion protein (PrP), termed PrPSc, in a nucleic acid-free manner. PrP(Sc) is generated by the protein misfolding process facilitated by conformational conversion of the host-encoded cellular PrP to PrP(Sc). Evidence suggests that an auxiliary factor may play a role in PrP(Sc) propagation. We and others previously discovered that plasminogen interacts with PrP, while its functional role for PrPSc propagation remained undetermined. In our recent in vitro PrP conversion study, we showed that plasminogen substantially stimulates PrP(Sc) propagation in a concentration-dependent manner by accelerating the rate of PrP(Sc) generation, while depletion of plasminogen, destabilization of its structure, and interference with the PrP-plasminogen interaction hinder PrP(Sc) propagation. Further investigation in cell culture models confirmed an increase of PrP(Sc) formation by plasminogen. Although molecular basis of the observed activity for plasminogen remain to be addressed, our results demonstrate that plasminogen is the first cellular protein auxiliary factor proven to stimulate PrP(Sc) propagation.

  11. Prion protein gene variability in Spanish goats. Inference through susceptibility to classical scrapie strains and pathogenic distribution of peripheral PrP(sc..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Acín

    Full Text Available Classical scrapie is a neurological disorder of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal, partially protease resistant prion protein (PrP(sc in the CNS and in some peripheral tissues in domestic small ruminants. Whereas the pathological changes and genetic susceptibility of ovine scrapie are well known, caprine scrapie has been less well studied. We report here a pathological study of 13 scrapie-affected goats diagnosed in Spain during the last 9 years. We used immunohistochemical and biochemical techniques to discriminate between classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE. All the animals displayed PrP(sc distribution patterns and western blot characteristics compatible with classical scrapie. In addition, we determined the complete open reading frame sequence of the PRNP in these scrapie-affected animals. The polymorphisms observed were compared with those of the herd mates (n = 665 and with the frequencies of healthy herds (n = 581 of native Spanish goats (Retinta, Pirenaica and Moncaina and other worldwide breeds reared in Spain (Saanen, Alpine and crossbreed. In total, sixteen polymorphic sites were identified, including the known amino acid substitutions at codons G37V, G127S, M137I, I142M, H143R, R151H, R154H, R211Q, Q222K, G232W, and P240S, and new polymorphisms at codons G74D, M112T, R139S, L141F and Q215R. In addition, the known 42, 138 and 179 silent mutations were detected, and one new one is reported at codon 122. The genetic differences observed in the population studied have been attributed to breed and most of the novel polymorphic codons show frequencies lower than 5%. This work provides the first basis of polymorphic distribution of PRNP in native and worldwide goat breeds reared in Spain.

  12. Polymorphism of the PrP prion protein gene in Polish Merino and old-type Polish Merino from Brylewo flock

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    Niżnikowski Roman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted on Polish Merino (143♀ and 39♂ and old-type Polish Merino sheep (176♀ and 61♂ in Brylewo flock (Wielkopolskie Province. The examined sheep were at the age of one year. Prion protein (PrP genotype was determined in all animals. In both breeds four alleles (ARR, ARQ, AHQ, VRQ were found. Highly significant effect of breed and insignificant impact of gender within breed was observed in regard to the frequency of occurrence of alleles and genotypes susceptible to classical scrapie in the sheep. Eight different PrP genotypes in Polish Merino and nine genotypes in old-type Polish Merino were identified. Very high frequency of ARR/ARR genotype in old-type Polish Merino and high frequency of ARR/ARQ genotype in Polish Merino were found, with relatively significant frequency of occurrence of the genotypes containing VRQ allele. In old-type Polish Merino, three animals (of both genders had VRQ/VRQ genotype. Breeding work involving elimination of animals encoding valine at codon 136, and introduction of rams with ARR allele to the population increased the frequency of occurrence of ARR/ARR genotype and ARR allele in the population of old-type Polish Merino. To improve the distribution of the genotypes genetically resistant to scrapie in the flock of Polish Merino only rams with ARR/ARR genotype were left. This guarantees an increase in the frequency of occurrence of genotypes genetically resistant to scrapie in the offspring.

  13. Real time expression of ACC oxidase and PR-protein genes mediated by Methylobacterium spp. in tomato plants challenged with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, W J; Kim, K Y; Lee, Y W; Sundaram, S P; Lee, Y; Sa, T M

    2014-07-15

    Biotic stress like pathogenic infection increases ethylene biosynthesis in plants and ethylene inhibitors are known to alleviate the severity of plant disease incidence. This study aimed to reduce the bacterial spot disease incidence in tomato plants caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (XCV) by modulating stress ethylene with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity of Methylobacterium strains. Under greenhouse condition, Methylobacterium strains inoculated and pathogen challenged tomato plants had low ethylene emission compared to pathogen infected ones. ACC accumulation and ACC oxidase (ACO) activity with ACO related gene expression increased in XCV infected tomato plants over Methylobacterium strains inoculated plants. Among the Methylobacterium spp., CBMB12 resulted lowest ACO related gene expression (1.46 Normalized Fold Expression), whereas CBMB20 had high gene expression (3.42 Normalized Fold Expression) in pathogen challenged tomato. But a significant increase in ACO gene expression (7.09 Normalized Fold Expression) was observed in the bacterial pathogen infected plants. In contrast, Methylobacterium strains enhanced β-1,3-glucanase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) enzyme activities in pathogen challenged tomato plants. The respective increase in β-1,3-glucanase related gene expressions due to CBMB12, CBMB15, and CBMB20 strains were 66.3, 25.5 and 10.4% higher over pathogen infected plants. Similarly, PAL gene expression was high with 0.67 and 0.30 Normalized Fold Expression, in pathogen challenged tomato plants inoculated with CBMB12 and CBMB15 strains. The results suggest that ethylene is a crucial factor in bacterial spot disease incidence and that methylobacteria with ACC deaminase activity can reduce the disease severity with ultimate pathogenesis-related protein increase in tomato. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Cloning, Overexpression and in vitro Antifungal Activity of Zea Mays PR10 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvakili, Niloofar; Zamani, Mohammadreza; Motallebi, Mostafa; Moghaddassi Jahromi, Zahra

    2017-03-01

    Plants have various defense mechanisms such as production of antimicrobial peptides, particularly pathogenesis related proteins (PR proteins). PR10 family is an essential member of this group, with antifungal, antibacterial and antiviral activities. The goal of this study is to assess the antifungal activity of maize PR10 against some of fungal phytopathogens. Zea mays PR10 gene (TN-05-147) was cloned from genomic DNA and cDNA and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The existence of a 77- bp intron and two exons in PR10 was confi rmed by comparing the genomic and cDNA sequences. The PR10 cDNA was cloned in pET26b (+) expression vector and transformed into E. coli strain Rosetta DE3 in order to express PR10 recombinant protein. Expression of the recombinant protein was checked by western analysis. Recombinant PR10 appeared as insoluble inclusion bodies and thus solubilized and refolded. PR10 was isolated using Ni- NTA column. The activity of the refolded protein was confi rmed by DNA degradation test. The antifungal activity of PR10 was assessed using radial diff usion, disc diff usion and spore germination. The hemolytic assay was performed to investigate the biosafety of recombinant PR10. Recombinant maize PR10 exerted broad spectrum antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Fusarium oxysporum, Verticillium dahlia and Alternaria solani. Hemolysis biosafety test indicated that the protein is not poisonous to mammalian cells. Maize PR10 has the potential to be used as the antifungal agent against diff erent fungal phytopathogens. Therefore, this protein can be used in order to produce antifungal agents and fungi resistance transgenic plants.

  15. [Abnormal floral meristem development in transgenic tomato plants do not depend on the expression of genes encoding defense-related PR-proteins and antimicrobial peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliluev, M R; Chaban, I A; Kononenko, N V; Baranova, E N; Dolgov, S V; Kharchenko, P N; Poliakov, V Iu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the morphological and cytoembryological analyses of the tomato plants transformed with the genes encoding chitin-binding proteins (ac and RS-intron-Shir) from Amaranthus caudatus L. andA. retroflexus L., respectively, as well as the gene amp2 encoding hevein-like antimicrobial peptides from Stellaria media L., have been performed. The transgenic lines were adapted to soil and grown the greenhouse. The analysis of putative transgenic tomato plants revealed several lines that did not differ phenotypically from the wild type plants and three lines with disruption in differentiation of the inflorescence shoot and the flower, as well as the fruit formation (modified plants of each line were transformed with a single gene as noted before). Abnormalities in the development of the generative organs were maintained for at least six vegetative generations. These transgenic plants were shown to be defective in the mail gametophyte formation, fertilization, and, consequently, led to parthenocarpic fruits. The detailed analysis of growing ovules in the abnormal transgenic plants showed that the replacement tissue was formed and proliferated instead of unfertilized embryo sac. The structure of the replacement tissue differed from both embryonic and endosperm tissue of the normal ovule. The formation of the replacement tissue occurred due to continuing proliferation of the endothelial cells that lost their ability for differentiation. The final step in the development of the replacement tissue was its death, which resulted in the cell lysis. The expression of the genes used was confirmed by RT-PCR in all three lines with abnormal phenotype, as well as in several lines that did not phenotypically differ from the untransformed control. This suggests that abnormalities in the organs of the generative sphere in the transgenic plants do not depend on the expression of the foreign genes that were introduced in the tomato genome. Here, we argue that agrobacterial

  16. Silencing of acidic pathogenesis-related PR-1 genes increases extracellular beta-(1 -> 3)-glucanase activity at the onset of tobacco defence reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riviere, M.P.; Marais, A.; Ponchet, M.

    2008-01-01

    silenced. Plants lacking extracellular PR-1s were more susceptible than wild-type plants to the oomycete Phytophthora parasitica but displayed unaffected systemic acquired resistance and developmental resistance to this pathogen. Treatment with salicylic acid up-regulates the PR-1g gene, encoding a basic...... protein of the PR-1 family, in PR-1-deficient tobacco, indicating that PR-1 expression may repress that of PR-1g. This shows that acidic PR-1s are dispensable for expression of salicylic acid-dependent acquired resistances against P. parasitica and may reveal a functional overlap in tobacco defence......The class 1 pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are thought to be involved in plant defence responses, but their molecular functions are unknown. The function of PR-1 was investigated in tobacco by generating stable PR-1a-silenced lines in which other acidic PR-1 genes (PR-1b and PR-1c) were...

  17. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of an antifungal PR-5 protein from Ocimum basilicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, Irshad Ahmad; Awasthi, Praveen; Mahajan, Vidushi; Bedi, Yashbir S; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Gandhi, Sumit G

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are involved in biotic and abiotic stress responses of plants and are grouped into 17 families (PR-1 to PR-17). PR-5 family includes proteins related to thaumatin and osmotin, with several members possessing antimicrobial properties. In this study, a PR-5 gene showing a high degree of homology with osmotin-like protein was isolated from sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.). A complete open reading frame consisting of 675 nucleotides, coding for a precursor protein, was obtained by PCR amplification. Based on sequence comparisons with tobacco osmotin and other osmotin-like proteins (OLPs), this protein was named ObOLP. The predicted mature protein is 225 amino acids in length and contains 16 cysteine residues that may potentially form eight disulfide bonds, a signature common to most PR-5 proteins. Among the various abiotic stress treatments tested, including high salt, mechanical wounding and exogenous phytohormone/elicitor treatments; methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and mechanical wounding significantly induced the expression of ObOLP gene. The coding sequence of ObOLP was cloned and expressed in a bacterial host resulting in a 25kDa recombinant-HIS tagged protein, displaying antifungal activity. The ObOLP protein sequence appears to contain an N-terminal signal peptide with signatures of secretory pathway. Further, our experimental data shows that ObOLP expression is regulated transcriptionally and in silico analysis suggests that it may be post-transcriptionally and post-translationally regulated through microRNAs and post-translational protein modifications, respectively. This study appears to be the first report of isolation and characterization of osmotin-like protein gene from O. basilicum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploration of the main sites for the transformation of normal prion protein (PrPC into pathogenic prion protein (PrPsc

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    Liu Xi-Lin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The functions and mechanisms of prion proteins (PrPC are currently unknown, but most experts believe that deformed or pathogenic prion proteins (PrPSc originate from PrPC, and that there may be plural main sites for the conversion of normal PrPC into PrPSc. In order to better understand the mechanism of PrPC transformation to PrPSc, the most important step is to determine the replacement or substitution site.

  19. Evaluation of the Allergenicity Potential of TcPR-10 Protein from Theobroma cacao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Thyago Hermylly Santana; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho; Micheli, Fabienne; Noronha, Fátima Soares Motta; Alves, Andréa Catão; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; da Silva Gesteira, Abelmon

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis related protein PR10 (TcPR-10), obtained from the Theobroma cacao-Moniliophthora perniciosa interaction library, presents antifungal activity against M. perniciosa and acts in vitro as a ribonuclease. However, despite its biotechnological potential, the TcPR-10 has the P-loop motif similar to those of some allergenic proteins such as Bet v 1 (Betula verrucosa) and Pru av 1 (Prunus avium). The insertion of mutations in this motif can produce proteins with reduced allergenic power. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the allergenic potential of the wild type and mutant recombinant TcPR-10 using bioinformatics tools and immunological assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Mutant substitutions (T10P, I30V, H45S) were inserted in the TcPR-10 gene by site-directed mutagenesis, cloned into pET28a and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells. Changes in molecular surface caused by the mutant substitutions was evaluated by comparative protein modeling using the three-dimensional structure of the major cherry allergen, Pru av 1 as a template. The immunological assays were carried out in 8–12 week old female BALB/c mice. The mice were sensitized with the proteins (wild type and mutants) via subcutaneous and challenged intranasal for induction of allergic airway inflammation. Conclusions/Significance We showed that the wild TcPR-10 protein has allergenic potential, whereas the insertion of mutations produced proteins with reduced capacity of IgE production and cellular infiltration in the lungs. On the other hand, in vitro assays show that the TcPR-10 mutants still present antifungal and ribonuclease activity against M. perniciosa RNA. In conclusion, the mutant proteins present less allergenic potential than the wild TcPR-10, without the loss of interesting biotechnological properties. PMID:22768037

  20. Evaluation of the allergenicity potential of TcPR-10 protein from Theobroma cacao.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pereira Menezes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis related protein PR10 (TcPR-10, obtained from the Theobroma cacao-Moniliophthora perniciosa interaction library, presents antifungal activity against M. perniciosa and acts in vitro as a ribonuclease. However, despite its biotechnological potential, the TcPR-10 has the P-loop motif similar to those of some allergenic proteins such as Bet v 1 (Betula verrucosa and Pru av 1 (Prunus avium. The insertion of mutations in this motif can produce proteins with reduced allergenic power. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the allergenic potential of the wild type and mutant recombinant TcPR-10 using bioinformatics tools and immunological assays. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mutant substitutions (T10P, I30V, H45S were inserted in the TcPR-10 gene by site-directed mutagenesis, cloned into pET28a and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3 cells. Changes in molecular surface caused by the mutant substitutions was evaluated by comparative protein modeling using the three-dimensional structure of the major cherry allergen, Pru av 1 as a template. The immunological assays were carried out in 8-12 week old female BALB/c mice. The mice were sensitized with the proteins (wild type and mutants via subcutaneous and challenged intranasal for induction of allergic airway inflammation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that the wild TcPR-10 protein has allergenic potential, whereas the insertion of mutations produced proteins with reduced capacity of IgE production and cellular infiltration in the lungs. On the other hand, in vitro assays show that the TcPR-10 mutants still present antifungal and ribonuclease activity against M. perniciosa RNA. In conclusion, the mutant proteins present less allergenic potential than the wild TcPR-10, without the loss of interesting biotechnological properties.

  1. PrPSc-like prion protein peptide inhibits the function of cellular prion protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    Mice lacking expression of the prion protein are protected against infection with prion disease. Neurodegeneration in prion disease requires the formation of the abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) from host prion protein. Therefore expression of normal host prion protein is necessary for prion disease. In the present investigation, it was demonstrated that PrP(Sc) and a peptide resembling PrP(Sc), PrP106-126, both bind to cellular prion protein at amino acid residues 112-119. Int...

  2. ck2-Dependent Phosphorylation of Progesterone Receptors (PR) on Ser81 Regulates PR-B Isoform-Specific Target Gene Expression in Breast Cancer Cells ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Christy R.; Regan, Tarah M.; Dressing, Gwen E.; Lange, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Progesterone receptors (PR) are critical mediators of mammary gland development and contribute to breast cancer progression. Progestin-induced rapid activation of cytoplasmic protein kinases leads to selective regulation of growth-promoting genes by phospho-PR species. Herein, we show that phosphorylation of PR Ser81 is ck2 dependent and progestin regulated in intact cells but also occurs in the absence of PR ligands when cells enter the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. T47D breast cancer cells stably expressing a PR-B mutant receptor that cannot be phosphorylated at Ser79/81 (S79/81A) formed fewer soft agar colonies. Regulation of selected genes by PR-B, but not PR-A, also required Ser79/81 phosphorylation for basal and/or progestin-regulated (BIRC3, HSD11β2, and HbEGF) expression. Additionally, wild-type (wt) PR-B, but not S79/81A mutant PR, was robustly recruited to a progesterone response element (PRE)-containing transcriptional enhancer region of BIRC3; abundant ck2 also associated with this region in cells expressing wt but not S79/81A PR. We conclude that phospho-Ser81 PR provides a platform for ck2 recruitment and regulation of selected PR-B target genes. Understanding how ligand-independent PRs function in the context of high levels of kinase activities characteristic of breast cancer is critical to understanding the basis of tumor-specific changes in gene expression and will speed the development of highly selective treatments. PMID:21518957

  3. A novel pathogenesis-related protein (LcPR4a from lentil, and its involvement in defence against Ascochyta lentis

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    Niloofar VAGHEFI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel pathogenesis-related protein 4 (PR4 encoding gene, LcPR4a, was induced in Lens culinaris following Ascochyta lentis infection. LcPR4a encodes a predicted 146 amino acid protein of 15.8 kDa. The putative LcPR4a protein belongs to the class II PR4 family and has close phylogenetic affinity to PR4 proteins from related species. qPCR analysis revealed differential expression of the LcPR4a gene upon Ascochyta lentis infection in both resistant and susceptible cultivars. This, combined with preliminary in vitro antifungal assays of the recombinant protein expressed in E. coli, suggests the potential important role of LcPR4a in the defence response of lentil to Ascochyta lentis attack.

  4. Chapter 11 Unexpected Turns and Twists in Structure/Function of PR-Proteins that Connect Energy Metabolism and Immunity

    KAUST Repository

    Narasimhan, Meena L.

    2009-01-01

    Innate immunity in plants is manifested by a complex array of antimicrobial processes that includes induction of sets of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The availability of genomic data has made clear that each PR-protein family in a species is represented by several genes. Microarray data in public databases show that in most families, including the PR-5 family surveyed here, the expression of only few family members is defense associated. Genetic studies show that depending on their nutrient acquisition strategy, pathogens induce distinct but overlapping sets of PR genes, suggesting a connection to energy or resource allocation. PR-5 proteins have a clearly recognizable structure that is referred to as the thaumatin (THN) domain, which can be overlapped with mammalian Complement 1q-tumor necrosis factor (C1q-TNF) domains such as that of the mammalian hormone adiponectin. The occurrence of THN domain proteins is widespread. Similarities between THN domain proteins and mammalian C1q-TNF family proteins include their ligands and their subcellular locations. Osmotin (tobacco PR-5c) regulates energy balance signaling in mammalian cells by interaction with adiponectin receptors by a pathway that shares components with plant energy and stress signaling pathways. These data suggest additional roles for PR-5 proteins, as scaffolds and/or in signaling, particularly in regulating energy balance. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of prion protein (PrP)-derived peptides that discriminate full-length PrPSc from PrPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anthony L; Yam, Alice Y; Michelitsch, Melissa M D; Wang, Xuemei; Gao, Carol; Goodson, Robert J; Shimizu, Robert; Timoteo, Gulliver; Hall, John; Medina-Selby, Angelica; Coit, Doris; McCoin, Colin; Phelps, Bruce; Wu, Ping; Hu, Celine; Chien, David; Peretz, David

    2007-07-10

    On our initial discovery that prion protein (PrP)-derived peptides were capable of capturing the pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)), we have been interested in how these peptides interact with PrP(Sc). After screening peptides from the entire human PrP sequence, we found two peptides (PrP(19-30) and PrP(100-111)) capable of binding full-length PrP(Sc) in plasma, a medium containing a complex mixture of other proteins including a vast excess of the normal prion protein (PrP(C)). The limit of detection for captured PrP(Sc) was calculated to be 8 amol from a approximately 10(5)-fold dilution of 10% (wt/vol) human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brain homogenate, with >3,800-fold binding specificity to PrP(Sc) over PrP(C). Through extensive analyses, we show that positively charged amino acids play an important, but not exclusive, role in the interaction between the peptides and PrP(Sc). Neither hydrophobic nor polar interactions appear to correlate with binding activity. The peptide-PrP(Sc) interaction was not sequence-specific, but amino acid composition affected binding. Binding occurs through a conformational domain that is only present in PrP(Sc), is species-independent, and is not affected by proteinase K digestion. These and other findings suggest a mechanism by which cationic domains of PrP(C) may play a role in the recruitment of PrP(C) to PrP(Sc).

  6. Different structural stability and toxicity of PrP(ARR) and PrP(ARQ) sheep prion protein variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paludi, Domenico; Thellung, Stefano; Chiovitti, Katia; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Russo, Claudio; Ianieri, Adriana; Bertsch, Uwe; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Aceto, Antonio; Florio, Tullio

    2007-12-01

    The polymorphisms at amino acid residues 136, 154, and 171 in ovine prion protein (PrP) have been associated with different susceptibility to scrapie: animals expressing PrP(ARQ) [PrP(Ala136/Arg154/Gln171)] show vulnerability, whereas those that express PrP(ARR) [PrP(Ala136/Arg154/Arg171)] are resistant to scrapie. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro toxic effects of PrP(ARR) and PrP(ARQ) variants in relation with their structural characteristics. We show that both peptides cause cell death inducing apoptosis but, unexpectedly, the scrapie resistant PrP(ARR) form was more toxic than the scrapie susceptible PrP(ARQ) variant. Moreover, the alpha-helical conformation of PrP(ARR) was less stable than that of PrP(ARQ) and the structural determinants responsible of these different conformational stabilities were characterized by spectroscopic analysis. We observed that PrP toxicity was inversely related to protein structural stability, being the unfolded conformation more toxic than the native one. However, the PrP(ARQ) variant displays a higher propensity to form large aggregates than PrP(ARR). Interestingly, in the presence of small amounts of PrP(ARR), PrP(ARQ) aggregability was reduced to levels similar to that of PrP(ARR). Thus, in contrast to PrP(ARR) toxicity, scrapie transmissibility seems to reside in the more stable conformation of PrP(ARQ) that allows the formation of large amyloid fibrils.

  7. Involvement of EIN3 homologues in basic PR gene expression and flower development in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Tadaharu; Kosugi, Shunichi; Iwai, Takayoshi; Kawata, Motoshige; Seo, Shigemi; Mitsuhara, Ichiro; Ohashi, Yuko

    2007-01-01

    The TEIL (Tobacco EIN3-Like) gene is a tobacco homologue of arabidopsis Ethylene Insensitive 3 (EIN3), and the gene product binds an 8 bp sequence in the tobacco PR1a promoter in a sequence specific manner. It was found here that accumulation of TEIL transcript was induced by wounding and preceded basic PR gene expression. To study the downstream signalling pathway of TEIL, TEIL was overexpressed under the control of the constitutive 35S promoter in tobacco plants. In 35S::TEIL lines, basic PR genes, which are wound-, jasmonate-, and ethylene-inducible, were expressed constitutively. Next, the conserved 781 bp sequence among tobacco EIN3-like (EIL) protein genes was introduced as an inverted-repeat (IR) into tobacco to suppress expression of these genes. In two independent IRTEIL lines, the TEIL transcript was not found and transcripts of other tobacco EILs, NtEIL3, and NtEIL5, were reduced. In IRTEIL plants, wound-, jasmonate-, and ACC-induced accumulation of basic PR gene transcripts was significantly inhibited. These results indicate that TEIL functions upstream of tobacco basic PR genes in wound signalling via not only ethylene but also jasmonate. In 35S::TEIL plants, the pistil length of the flower was longer with a slight protrusion of the stigma compared with the control. In IRTEIL plants, the length of the stamens was shorter than the control with significant protrusion of the stigma in the flower. These observations indicate the involvement of tobacco EILs in flower development.

  8. Mouse Prion Protein (PrP) Segment 100 to 104 Regulates Conversion of PrPC to PrPSc in Prion-Infected Neuroblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hideyuki; Okemoto-Nakamura, Yuko; Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Hanada, Kentaro; Yamakawa, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by the replicative propagation of disease-associated forms of prion protein (PrPSc; PrP refers to prion protein). The propagation is believed to proceed via two steps; the initial binding of the normal form of PrP (PrPC) to PrPSc and the subsequent conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. We have explored the two-step model in prion-infected mouse neuroblastoma (ScN2a) cells by focusing on the mouse PrP (MoPrP) segment 92-GGTHNQWNKPSKPKTN-107, which is within a region previously suggested to be part of the binding interface or shown to differ in its accessibility to anti-PrP antibodies between PrPC and PrPSc. Exchanging the MoPrP segment with the corresponding chicken PrP segment (106-GGSYHNQKPWKPPKTN-121) revealed the necessity of MoPrP residues 99 to 104 for the chimeras to achieve the PrPSc state, while segment 95 to 98 was replaceable with the chicken sequence. An alanine substitution at position 100, 102, 103, or 104 of MoPrP gave rise to nonconvertible mutants that associated with MoPrPSc and interfered with the conversion of endogenous MoPrPC. The interference was not evoked by a chimera (designated MCM2) in which MoPrP segment 95 to 104 was changed to the chicken sequence, though MCM2 associated with MoPrPSc. Incubation of the cells with a synthetic peptide composed of MoPrP residues 93 to 107 or alanine-substituted cognates did not inhibit the conversion, whereas an anti-P8 antibody recognizing the above sequence in PrPC reduced the accumulation of PrPSc after 10 days of incubation of the cells. These results suggest the segment 100 to 104 of MoPrPC plays a key role in conversion after binding to MoPrPSc. PMID:22398286

  9. Plant Pathogenesis-Related Proteins PR-10 and PR-14 as Components of Innate Immunity System and Ubiquitous Allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkina, Ekaterina I; Melnikova, Daria N; Bogdanov, Ivan V; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are components of innate immunity system in plants. They play an important role in plant defense against pathogens. Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) and Bet v 1 homologs comprise of two separate families of PR-proteins. Both LTPs (PR-14) and Bet v 1 homologs (PR-10) are multifunctional small proteins involving in plant response to abiotic and biotic stress conditions. The representatives of these PR-protein families do not show any sequence similarity but have other common biochemical features such as low molecular masses, the presence of hydrophobic cavities, ligand binding properties, and antimicrobial activities. Besides, many members of PR-10 and PR-14 families are ubiquitous plant panallergens which are able to cause sensitization of human immune system and crossreactive allergic reactions to plant food and pollen. This review is aimed at comparative analysis of structure-functional and allergenic properties of the PR-10 and PR-14 families, as well as prospects for their medicinal application. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of hyp-1 type PR-10 family genes in Hypericum perforatum

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    Katja eKarppinen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypericum perforatum L. is an important medicinal plant for the treatment of depression. The plant contains bioactive hypericins that accumulate in dark glands present especially in reproductive parts of the plant. In this study, pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10 family genes were identified in H. perforatum, including three previously unidentified members with sequence homology to hyp-1, a phenolic coupling protein that has earlier been suggested to participate in hypericin biosynthesis and binding/transportation. The PR-10 genes showed constitutive but variable expression patterns in different H. perforatum tissues. They were all expressed at relatively high levels in leaves, variably in roots and low levels in stem and reproductive parts of the plant with no association with dark glands. The gene expression was up-regulated in leaves after salicylic acid, abscisic acid and wounding treatments but with variable levels. To study exact location of the gene expression, in situ hybridization of hyp-1 transcripts was performed and the accumulation of the Hyp-1 protein was examined in various tissues. The presence of Hyp-1 protein in H. perforatum tissues mostly paralleled with the mRNA levels. In situ RNA hybridization localized the hyp-1 transcripts predominantly in vascular tissues in root and stem, while in leaf the mRNA levels were high also in mesophyll cells in addition to vasculature. Our results indicate that the studied PR-10 genes are likely to contribute to the defence responses in H. perforatum. Furthermore, despite the location of the hyp-1 transcripts in vasculature, no support for the transportation of the Hyp-1 protein to dark glands was found in the current study. The present results together with earlier data question the role of the hyp-1 as a key gene responsible for the hypericin biosynthesis in dark glands of H. perforatum.

  11. Diversity in genomic organisation, developmental regulation and distribution of the murine PR72/B" subunits of protein phosphatase 2A

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    Janssens Veerle

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a serine/threonine-specific phosphatase displaying vital functions in growth and development through its role in various signalling pathways. PP2A holoenzymes comprise a core dimer composed of a catalytic C and a structural A subunit, which can associate with a variable B-type subunit. The importance of the B-type subunits for PP2A regulation cannot be overestimated as they determine holoenzyme localisation, activity and substrate specificity. Three B-type subunit families have been identified: PR55/B, PR61/B' and PR72/B", of which the latter is currently the least characterised. Results We deduced the sequences and genomic organisation of the different murine PR72/B" isoforms: three genes encode nine isoforms, five of which are abundantly expressed and give rise to genuine PP2A subunits. Thereby, one novel subunit was identified. Using Northern blotting, we examined the tissue-specific and developmental expression of these subunits. All subunits are highly expressed in heart, suggesting an important cardiac function. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a striated expression pattern of PR72 and PR130 in heart and skeletal muscle, but not in bladder smooth muscle. The subcellular localisation and cell cycle regulatory ability of several PR72/B" isoforms were determined, demonstrating differences as well as similarities. Conclusion In contrast to PR55/B and PR61/B', the PR72/B" family seems evolutionary more divergent, as only two of the murine genes have a human orthologue. We have integrated these results in a more consistent nomenclature of both human and murine PR72/B" genes and their transcripts/proteins. Our results provide a platform for the future generation of PR72/B" knockout mice.

  12. Alt a 1 from Alternaria interacts with PR5 thaumatin-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Casado, Cristina; Murua-García, Amaya; Garrido-Arandia, María; González-Melendi, Pablo; Sánchez-Monge, Rosa; Barber, Domingo; Pacios, Luis F; Díaz-Perales, Araceli

    2014-05-02

    Alt a 1 is a protein found in Alternaria alternata spores related to virulence and pathogenicity and considered to be responsible for chronic asthma in children. We found that spores of Alternaria inoculated on the outer surface of kiwifruits did not develop hyphae. Nevertheless, the expression of Alt a 1 gene was upregulated, and the protein was detected in the pulp where it co-localized with kiwi PR5. Pull-down assays demonstrated experimentally that the two proteins interact in such a way that Alt a 1 inhibits the enzymatic activity of PR5. These results are relevant not only for plant defense, but also for human health as patients with chronic asthma could suffer from an allergic reaction when they eat fruit contaminated with Alternaria. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The novel gene VpPR4-1 from Vitis pseudoreticulata increases powdery mildew resistance in transgenic Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingmin eDai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs can lead to increased resistance of the whole plant to pathogen attack. Here, we isolate and characterize a PR-4 protein from a wild Chinese grape Vitis pseudoreticulata which shows greatly elevated transcription following powdery mildew infection. Its expression profiles under a number of abiotic stresses were also investigated. The PR-4 gene was overexpressed in regenerated V. vinifera cv. Red Globe via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and verified by the Western blot. The transgenic grapevines exhibited higher expression levels of PR-4 protein content than wild-type vines and also repressed the growth of powdery mildew. The PR gene responds differently to different stresses in the PR-4 transformants. This study demonstrates that PR-4 protein in grapes plays a vital role in defense against powdery mildew invasion.

  14. The fungal pathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa has genes similar to plant PR-1 that are highly expressed during its interaction with cacao.

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    Paulo J P L Teixeira

    Full Text Available The widespread SCP/TAPS superfamily (SCP/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 has multiple biological functions, including roles in the immune response of plants and animals, development of male reproductive tract in mammals, venom activity in insects and reptiles and host invasion by parasitic worms. Plant Pathogenesis Related 1 (PR-1 proteins belong to this superfamily and have been characterized as markers of induced defense against pathogens. This work presents the characterization of eleven genes homologous to plant PR-1 genes, designated as MpPR-1, which were identified in the genome of Moniliophthora perniciosa, a basidiomycete fungus responsible for causing the devastating witches' broom disease in cacao. We describe gene structure, protein alignment and modeling analyses of the MpPR-1 family. Additionally, the expression profiles of MpPR-1 genes were assessed by qPCR in different stages throughout the fungal life cycle. A specific expression pattern was verified for each member of the MpPR-1 family in the conditions analyzed. Interestingly, some of them were highly and specifically expressed during the interaction of the fungus with cacao, suggesting a role for the MpPR-1 proteins in the infective process of this pathogen. Hypothetical functions assigned to members of the MpPR-1 family include neutralization of plant defenses, antimicrobial activity to avoid competitors and fruiting body physiology. This study provides strong evidence on the importance of PR-1-like genes for fungal virulence on plants.

  15. Accumulation of proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrP) is restricted by the expression level of normal PrP in mice inoculated with a mouse-adapted strain of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaguchi, S; Katamine, S.; Shigematsu, K.; Nakatani, A; Moriuchi, R.; Nishida, N.; Kurokawa, K; Nakaoke, R; Sato, H; Jishage, K

    1995-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a transmissible neurodegenerative disease of humans caused by an unidentified infectious agent, the prion. To determine whether there was an involvement of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPc) in CJD development and prion propagation, mice heterozygous (PrP+/-) or homozygous (PrP-/-) for a disrupted PrP gene were established and inoculated with the mouse-adapted CJD agent. In keeping with findings of previous studies using other lines of PrP-less mice inocu...

  16. Analysis of human protein replacement stable cell lines established using snoMEN-PR vector.

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    Motoharu Ono

    Full Text Available The study of the function of many human proteins is often hampered by technical limitations, such as cytotoxicity and phenotypes that result from overexpression of the protein of interest together with the endogenous version. Here we present the snoMEN (snoRNA Modulator of gene ExpressioN vector technology for generating stable cell lines where expression of the endogenous protein can be reduced and replaced by an exogenous protein, such as a fluorescent protein (FP-tagged version. SnoMEN are snoRNAs engineered to contain complementary sequences that can promote knock-down of targeted RNAs. We have established and characterised two such partial protein replacement human cell lines (snoMEN-PR. Quantitative mass spectrometry was used to analyse the specificity of knock-down and replacement at the protein level and also showed an increased pull-down efficiency of protein complexes containing exogenous, tagged proteins in the protein replacement cell lines, as compared with conventional co-expression strategies. The snoMEN approach facilitates the study of mammalian proteins, particularly those that have so far been difficult to investigate by exogenous expression and has wide applications in basic and applied gene-expression research.

  17. Cellular Trafficking of the Pathogenic Prion Protein PrPSc and Phenotypic Characterisation of Deletion Mutants in the Hydrophobic Domain of the Normal Prion Protein PrPC

    OpenAIRE

    Veith, Nathalie Monika

    2008-01-01

    The localisation of the pathogenic prion protein PrPSc was investigated with light and electron microscopy. The PrPSc specific antibody 15B3 was tested for its efficiency in immuncytochemistry. Subsequently, an appropriate method was found to stain PrPSc selectively. PrPSc was detected in clathrin coated pits, early endosomes, late endosomes/lysosomes nad exosomes. PrPSc could not be observed in lipid droplets.In the next part of the thesis different mutants of the prion protein carrying micr...

  18. Human prion protein (PrP) 219K is converted to PrPSc but shows heterozygous inhibition in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizume, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Teruya, Kenta; Ohashi, Hiroaki; Ironside, James W; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2009-02-06

    Prion protein gene (PRNP) E219K is a human polymorphism commonly occurring in Asian populations but is rarely found in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Thus the polymorphism E219K has been considered protective against sporadic CJD. The corresponding mouse prion protein (PrP) polymorphism variant (mouse PrP 218K) is not converted to the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) and shows a dominant negative effect on wild-type PrP conversion. To define the conversion activity of this human molecule, we herein established knock-in mice with human PrP 219K and performed a series of transmission experiments with human prions. Surprisingly, the human PrP 219K molecule was converted to PrP(Sc) in variant CJD infection, and the conversion occurred more efficiently than PrP 219E molecule. Notably the knock-in mice with PRNP codon 219E/K showed the least efficient conversion compared with their hemizygotes with PRNP codon 219E/0 or codon 219K/0, or homozygotes with PRNP codon 219E/E or codon 219K/K. This phenomenon indicated heterozygous inhibition. This heterozygous inhibition was observed also in knock-in mice with PRNP codon 129M/V genotype. In addition to variant CJD infection, the human PrP 219K molecule is conversion-competent in transmission experiments with sporadic CJD prions. Therefore, the protective effect of PRNP E219K against sporadic CJD might be due to heterozygous inhibition.

  19. Computational identification of novel PR-1-type genes in Oryza sativa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    made it possible to identify all the PR-1 family members in this plant species ... the first to provide the list of rice PR-1 genes, which will be beneficial for ... be an expressed gene in rice. Multiple-sequence alignment and construction of phylogenetic tree. Multiple-sequence alignment of candidate PR-1 amino acid sequences ...

  20. PR genes of apple: identification and expression in response to elicitors and inoculation with Erwinia amylovora

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    Kim Jihyun F

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decade, much work has been done to dissect the molecular basis of the defence signalling pathway in plants known as Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR. Most of the work has been carried out in model species such as Arabidopsis, with little attention paid to woody plants. However within the range of species examined, components of the pathway seem to be highly conserved. In this study, we attempted to identify downstream components of the SAR pathway in apple to serve as markers for its activation. Results We identified three pathogenesis related (PR genes from apple, PR-2, PR-5 and PR-8, which are induced in response to inoculation with the apple pathogen, Erwinia amylovora, but they are not induced in young apple shoots by treatment with known elicitors of SAR in herbaceous plants. We also identified three PR-1-like genes from apple, PR-1a, PR-1b and PR-1c, based solely on sequence similarity to known PR-1 genes of model (intensively researched herbaceous plants. The PR-1-like genes were not induced in response to inoculation with E. amylovora or by treatment with elicitors; however, each showed a distinct pattern of expression. Conclusion Four PR genes from apple were partially characterized. PR-1a, PR-2, PR-5 and PR-8 from apple are not markers for SAR in young apple shoots. Two additional PR-1-like genes were identified through in-silico analysis of apple ESTs deposited in GenBank. PR-1a, PR-1b and PR-1c are not involved in defence response or SAR in young apple shoots; this conclusion differs from that reported previously for young apple seedlings.

  1. Variation in Chst8 gene expression level affects PrPC to PrPSc conversion efficiency in prion-infected Mov cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Renaud; Chantepie, Sandrine; Chapuis, Jérôme; Le-Duc, Aurélien; Maftah, Abderrahman; Papy-Garcia, Dulcé; Laude, Hubert; Petit, Jean-Michel; Gallet, Paul-François

    2011-10-28

    The conversion of the endogenous cellular prion protein to an abnormally folded isoform is a hallmark of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. It occurs when a misfolded prion protein contacts the cellular PrP. Among the molecular partners suggested to be involved in the misfolding process, the glycosaminoglycans seem to be good candidates. The present study was aimed to examine a possible link between PrP conversion efficiency and transcript level of Chst8 gene that encodes the carbohydrate N-acetylgalactosamine 4-O-sulfotransferase 8. Mov cells expressing ovine PrP were transfected with shRNA directed against Chst8 transcripts. Resulting clones were characterized for their Chst8 and Prnp transcript levels, and for their content in sulfated glycosaminoglycans, more particularly sulfated chondroitins. Unexpectedly, the decreased amount of Chst8 transcript induced an increase of the chondroitin sulfate percentage among total GAGs, with an increased amount of 4-O-sulfation of GalNAc residues. Upon to infection by a sheep prion, a slight amount of PrP(Sc) was observed, which rapidly disappeared upon subpassaging. Together, these findings indicate that the Chst8 transcript level affects the glycosaminoglycan environment of the cellular prion protein, and as a consequence its ability for conversion into PrP(Sc). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Overexpression of NtPR-Q Up-Regulates Multiple Defense-Related Genes in Nicotiana tabacum and Enhances Plant Resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum

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    Yuanman Tang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Various classes of plant pathogenesis-related proteins have been identified in the past several decades. PR-Q, a member of the PR3 family encoding chitinases, has played an important role in regulating plant resistance and preventing pathogen infection. In this paper, we functionally characterized NtPR-Q in tobacco plants and found that the overexpression of NtPR-Q in tobacco Yunyan87 resulted in higher resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation. Surprisingly, overexpression of NtPR-Q led to the activation of many defense-related genes, such as salicylic acid (SA-responsive genes NtPR1a/c, NtPR2 and NtCHN50, JA-responsive gene NtPR1b and ET production-associated genes NtACC Oxidase and NtEFE26. Consistent with the role of NtPR-Q in multiple stress responses, NtPR-Q transcripts were induced by the exogenous hormones SA, ethylene and methyl jasmonate, which could enhance the resistance of tobacco to R. solanacearum. Collectively, our results suggested that NtPR-Q overexpression led to the up-regulation of defense-related genes and enhanced plant resistance to R. solanacearum infection.

  3. Sequence polymorphism of PrP exon 3 gene in Istrian and crossbred sheep

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    Ino Curik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in sheep PrP (prion protein gene are known for scrapie susceptibility. We sequenced part of PrP exon 3 gene in 92 autochthonous Istrian (IS and 38 crossbred sheep (CBS. ARQ, ARR and AHQ alleles were predominant with frequency of 0.674 (0.526, 0.228 (0.132 and 0.082 (0.263 in IS (CBS, respectively, while VRQ (0.011 in IS and ARH (0.005 in IS and 0.079 in CBS alleles were rare. We also found non-synonymous mutations at codons 112 (M→T, 127 (G→S and 143 (H→R, and synonymous mutations at codons 231 (R and 237 (L. Additional mutations were associated only with AHQ, ARH and ARQ alleles. The polymorphism of PrP gene in IS was not critical with respect to scrapie susceptibility and with some efforts number of “favourable” genotypes can be increased.

  4. The Novel Gene VpPR4-1 from Vitis pseudoreticulata Increases Powdery Mildew Resistance in Transgenic Vitis vinifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lingmin; Wang, Dan; Xie, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Chaohong; Wang, Xiping; Xu, Yan; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Jianxia

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) can lead to increased resistance of the whole plant to pathogen attack. Here, we isolate and characterize a PR-4 protein (VpPR4-1) from a wild Chinese grape Vitis pseudoreticulata which shows greatly elevated transcription following powdery mildew infection. Its expression profiles under a number of abiotic stresses were also investigated. Powdery mildew, salicylic acid, and jasmonic acid methyl ester significantly increased the VpPR4-1 induction while NaCl and heat treatments just slightly induced VpPR4-1 expression. Abscisic acid and cold treatment slightly affected the expression level of VpPR4-1. The VpPR4-1 gene was overexpressed in 30 regenerated V. vinifera cv. Red Globe via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and verified by the Western blot. The 26 transgenic grapevines exhibited higher expression levels of PR-4 protein content than wild-type vines and six of them were inoculated with powdery mildew which showed that the growth of powdery mildew was repressed. The powdery mildew-resistance of Red Globe transformed with VpPR4-1 was enhanced inoculated with powdery mildew. Moreover, other powdery mildew resistant genes were associated with feedback regulation since VpPR4-1 is in abundance. This study demonstrates that PR-4 protein in grapes plays a vital role in defense against powdery mildew invasion. PMID:27303413

  5. Cellular prion protein (PrPC) in the development of Merlin-deficient tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, L; Ryan, Y; Hilton, D A; Lyons-Rimmer, J; Dave, F; Maze, E A; Adams, C L; Rigby-Jones, R; Ammoun, S; Hanemann, C O

    2017-11-02

    Loss of function mutations in the neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) gene, coding for a tumour suppressor, Merlin, cause multiple tumours of the nervous system such as schwannomas, meningiomas and ependymomas. These tumours may occur sporadically or as part of the hereditary condition neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2). Current treatment is confined to (radio) surgery and no targeted drug therapies exist. NF2 mutations and/or Merlin inactivation are also seen in other cancers including some mesothelioma, breast cancer, colorectal carcinoma, melanoma and glioblastoma. To study the relationship between Merlin deficiency and tumourigenesis, we have developed an in vitro model comprising human primary schwannoma cells, the most common Merlin-deficient tumour and the hallmark for NF2. Using this model, we show increased expression of cellular prion protein (PrPC) in schwannoma cells and tissues. In addition, a strong overexpression of PrPC is observed in human Merlin-deficient mesothelioma cell line TRA and in human Merlin-deficient meningiomas. PrPC contributes to increased proliferation, cell-matrix adhesion and survival in schwannoma cells acting via 37/67 kDa non-integrin laminin receptor (LR/37/67 kDa) and downstream ERK1/2, PI3K/AKT and FAK signalling pathways. PrPC protein is also strongly released from schwannoma cells via exosomes and as a free peptide suggesting that it may act in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. We suggest that PrPC and its interactor, LR/37/67 kDa, could be potential therapeutic targets for schwannomas and other Merlin-deficient tumours.

  6. Peroxiredoxin 6 promotes upregulation of the prion protein (PrP in neuronal cells of prion-infected mice

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    Wagner Wibke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been widely established that the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC into its abnormal isoform (PrPSc is responsible for the development of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs. However, the knowledge of the detailed molecular mechanisms and direct functional consequences within the cell is rare. In this study, we aimed at the identification of deregulated proteins which might be involved in prion pathogenesis. Findings Apolipoprotein E and peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 were identified as upregulated proteins in brains of scrapie-infected mice and cultured neuronal cell lines. Downregulation of PrP gene expression using specific siRNA did not result in a decrease of PRDX6 amounts. Interestingly, selective siRNA targeting PRDX6 or overexpression of PRDX6 controlled PrPC and PrPSc protein amounts in neuronal cells. Conclusions Besides its possible function as a novel marker protein in the diagnosis of TSEs, PDRX6 represents an attractive target molecule in putative pharmacological intervention strategies in the future.

  7. Heterogeneity of the Abnormal Prion Protein (PrPSc) of the Chandler Scrapie Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Kazuo; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Masujin, Kentaro; Imamura, Morikazu; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2013-02-18

    The pathological prion protein, PrPSc, displays various sizes of aggregates. In this study, we investigated the conformation, aggregation stability and proteinase K (PK)-sensitivity of small and large PrPSc aggregates of mouse-adapted prion strains. We showed that small PrPSc aggregates, previously thought to be PK-sensitive, are resistant to PK digestion. Furthermore, we showed that small PrPSc aggregates of the Chandler scrapie strain have greater resistance to PK digestion and aggregation-denaturation than large PrPSc aggregates of this strain. We conclude that this strain consists of heterogeneous PrPSc.

  8. Immune-enhancing effect of nano-DNA vaccine encoding a gene of the prME protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and BALB/c mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yongzhen; Zhou, Yan; Li, Ximei; Feng, Guohe

    2015-07-01

    Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM‑CSF) is an adjuvant for genetic vaccines; however, how GM-CSF enhances immunogenicity remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that injection of a plasmid encoding the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and mouse GM-CSF (pJME/GM-CSF) into mouse muscle recruited large and multifocal conglomerates of macrophages and granulocytes, predominantly neutrophils. During the peak of the infiltration, an appreciable number of immature dendritic cells (DCs) appeared, although no T and B-cells was detected. pJME/GM-CSF increased the number of splenic DCs and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) on splenic DC, and enhanced the antigenic capture, processing and presentation functions of splenic DCs, and the cell-mediated immunity induced by the vaccine. These findings suggested that the immune-enhancing effect by pJME/GM-CSF was associated with infiltrate size and the appearance of integrin αx (CD11c)+cells. Chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles, prepared by coacervation via intramuscular injection, outperformed standard pJME/GM-CSF administrations in DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. This revealed that muscular injection of chitosan‑pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles may enhance the immunoadjuvant properties of GM-CSF.

  9. Ubiquitin ligase gp78 targets unglycosylated prion protein PrP for ubiquitylation and degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Shao

    Full Text Available Prion protein PrP is a central player in several devastating neurodegenerative disorders, including mad cow disease and Creutzfeltd-Jacob disease. Conformational alteration of PrP into an aggregation-prone infectious form PrPSc can trigger pathogenic events. How levels of PrP are regulated is poorly understood. Human PrP is known to be degraded by the proteasome, but the specific proteolytic pathway responsible for PrP destruction remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the ubiquitin ligase gp78, known for its role in protein quality control, is critical for unglycosylated PrP ubiquitylation and degradation. Furthermore, C-terminal sequences of PrP protein are crucial for its ubiquitylation and degradation. Our study reveals the first ubiquitin ligase specifically involved in prion protein PrP degradation and PrP sequences crucial for its turnover. Our data may lead to a new avenue to control PrP level and pathogenesis.

  10. Methamphetamine increases Prion Protein and induces dopamine-dependent expression of protease resistant PrPsc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, M; Ryskalin, L; Biagioni, F; Gambardella, S; Busceti, C L; Falleni, A; Lazzeri, G; Fornai, F

    2017-07-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPc) is physiologically expressed within selective brain areas of mammals. Alterations in the secondary structure of this protein lead to scrapie-like prion protein (PrPsc), which precipitates in the cell. PrPsc has been detected in infectious, inherited or sporadic neurodegenerative disorders. Prion protein metabolism is dependent on autophagy and ubiquitin proteasome. Despite not being fully elucidated, the physiological role of prion protein relates to chaperones which rescue cells under stressful conditions.Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused drug which produces oxidative stress in various brain areas causing mitochondrial alterations and protein misfolding. These effects produce a compensatory increase of chaperones while clogging cell clearing pathways. In the present study, we explored whether METH administration modifies the amount of PrPc. Since high levels of PrPc when the clearing systems are clogged may lead to its misfolding into PrPsc, we further tested whether METH exposure triggers the appearance of PrPsc. We analysed the effects of METH and dopamine administration in PC12 and striatal cells by using SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue, immune- histochemistry and immune-gold electron microscopy. To analyze whether METH administration produces PrPsc aggregates we used antibodies directed against PrP following exposure to proteinase K or sarkosyl which digest folded PrPc but misfolded PrPsc. We fond that METH triggers PrPsc aggregates in DA-containing cells while METH is not effective in primary striatal neurons which do not produce DA. In the latter cells exogenous DA is needed to trigger PrPsc accumulation similarly to what happens in DA containing cells under the effects of METH. The present findings, while fostering novel molecular mechanisms involving prion proteins, indicate that, cell pathology similar to prion disorders can be mimicked via a DA-dependent mechanism by a drug of abuse.

  11. Recombinant AAV-PR39-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α gene expression attenuates myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijun; Hao, Yuewen; Nie, Xiaowei; Xu, Jian; Li, Zhenwu; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Xuexin

    2014-01-01

    PR39 is an angiogenic masterswitch protein, belonging to the second generation of angiogenic growth factors. However, the role of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying the PR39 fusion gene (AAV-PR39) in acute myocardial infarction remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of AAV-PR39 in an experimental animal model of acute myocardial infarction. The PR39 gene was fused with the transmembrane peptide, TAT, 6xHis‑tag and NT4 signal sequences. AAV-PR39 was then obtained by calcium phosphate co-precipitation. A total of 18 healthy Chinese mini pigs were randomly divided into an experimental groups (the AAV-PR39-treated group) and a control group [phosphated-buffered saline (PBS)-treated group]. Following the induction of myocardial infarction, enhanced 3.0T MR imaging was performed to observe the changes in myocardial signal intensity at 0 h, 1, 2 and 3 weeks. The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor‑1α (HIF-1α) in the myocardial tissues was determined by SABC immunohistochemistry. In addition, in vitro experiments using CRL-1730 endothelial cells transfected with AAV vector containing NT4-TAT-His-PR39 revealed that the AAV-PR39-treated group had a significantly higher expression of HIF-1α compared with the control group. Moreover, PR39 regulated the HIF-1α-induced expression of angiogenic growth factors. Under hypoxic conditions, the anti-apoptotic effects in the AAV-PR39 group were more pronounced than those observed in the control (PBS-treated) group. In vivo, the enforced expression of recombinant PR39 elevated the level of HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions and decreased the size of the infarcted areas by upregulating the expression of HIF-1α in the areas surrounding the infarct area. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the recombinant AAV-PR39-mediated HIF-1α expression attenuates myocardial infarction, indicating that AAV-PR39 may serve as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of myocardial infarction.

  12. Evaluation of the use of the tobacco PR-1a promoter to monitor defense gene expression by the luciferase bioluminescence reporter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Sachiko; Kusama, Masahiro; Ogura, Rieko; Hiratsuka, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Because of their marked responsiveness to induction signals, genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins are used as markers to monitor defense gene expression in plants. To develop a non-invasive bioluminescence reporter assay system, we tested acidic PR-1 gene promoters from tobacco and Arabidopsis. These two promoters share common regulatory elements and are believed to show similar responsiveness to various stimuli but the results of transient expression assays by microprojectile bombardment of various plant cells and npr1 mutant Arabidopsis suggest that the tobacco PR-1a promoter is superior to its Arabidopsis counterpart in terms of responsiveness to salicylic acid treatment. Transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings harboring the tobacco PR-1a promoter fused to firefly luciferase showed marked induction in response to treatment with chemicals that induce defense gene expression in plants. These results suggest that the tobacco PR-1a promoter is applicable in monitoring defense-gene expression in various plant species.

  13. Kosmotropic anions promote conversion of recombinant prion protein into a PrPSc-like misfolded form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo; Mukherjee, Abhisek; Soto, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Prions are self-propagating proteins involved in transmissible spongiform encephalopaties in mammals. An aberrant conformation with amyloid-like features of a cell surface protein, termed prion protein (PrP), is thought to be the essential component of the infectious particle, though accessory co-factor molecules such as lipids and nucleotides may be involved. The cellular co-factors and environmental conditions implicated in PrP misfolding are not completely understood. To address this issue, several studies have been done inducing misfolding of recombinant PrP (recPrP) into classical amyloid structures using partially denaturing conditions. In this work, we report that misfolding of recPrP into PrP(Sc)-like aggregates can be induced by simply incubating the protein in the presence of kosmotropic salts at concentrations that are known to retain or increase the stability of the protein. We used a simple experimental reaction (protein, buffer and salts) submitted to agitation/incubation cycles at physiological temperature and pH. The formation of protease resistant-recPrP was time and salt-concentration dependent and required the presence of kosmotropic anions such as F(-) or SO(4)(-2). The molecular weights of the protease resistant recPrP fragments are reminiscent of those found in degradation assays of bona fide PrP(Sc). The aggregates also exhibited PrP(Sc)-like ultrastructural features including rod-shape morphology under electron microscope, high beta-sheet content and thioflavin-T positive signal. The formation of recPrP aggregates with PrP(Sc) biochemical features under conditions closer to physiological in the absence of organic co-factor molecules provides a simple setup that may prove helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of PrP misfolding.

  14. Kosmotropic anions promote conversion of recombinant prion protein into a PrPSc-like misfolded form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Diaz-Espinoza

    Full Text Available Prions are self-propagating proteins involved in transmissible spongiform encephalopaties in mammals. An aberrant conformation with amyloid-like features of a cell surface protein, termed prion protein (PrP, is thought to be the essential component of the infectious particle, though accessory co-factor molecules such as lipids and nucleotides may be involved. The cellular co-factors and environmental conditions implicated in PrP misfolding are not completely understood. To address this issue, several studies have been done inducing misfolding of recombinant PrP (recPrP into classical amyloid structures using partially denaturing conditions. In this work, we report that misfolding of recPrP into PrP(Sc-like aggregates can be induced by simply incubating the protein in the presence of kosmotropic salts at concentrations that are known to retain or increase the stability of the protein. We used a simple experimental reaction (protein, buffer and salts submitted to agitation/incubation cycles at physiological temperature and pH. The formation of protease resistant-recPrP was time and salt-concentration dependent and required the presence of kosmotropic anions such as F(- or SO(4(-2. The molecular weights of the protease resistant recPrP fragments are reminiscent of those found in degradation assays of bona fide PrP(Sc. The aggregates also exhibited PrP(Sc-like ultrastructural features including rod-shape morphology under electron microscope, high beta-sheet content and thioflavin-T positive signal. The formation of recPrP aggregates with PrP(Sc biochemical features under conditions closer to physiological in the absence of organic co-factor molecules provides a simple setup that may prove helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of PrP misfolding.

  15. The UBC9 E2 SUMO conjugating enzyme binds the PR-Set7 histone methyltransferase to facilitate target gene repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spektor, Tanya M; Congdon, Lauren M; Veerappan, Chendhore S; Rice, Judd C

    2011-01-01

    PR-Set7/Set8/KMT5a is a chromatin-modifying enzyme that specifically monomethylates lysine 20 of histone H4 (H4K20me1). In this study we attempted to identify PR-Set7-interacting proteins reasoning that these proteins would provide important insights into the role of PR-Set7 in transcriptional regulation. Using an unbiased yeast two-hybrid approach, we discovered that PR-Set7 interacts with the UBC9 E2 SUMO conjugating enzyme. This interaction was confirmed in human cells and we demonstrated that PR-Set7 was preferentially modified with SUMO1 in vivo. Further in vitro studies revealed that UBC9 directly binds PR-Set7 proximal to the catalytic SET domain. Two putative SUMO consensus sites were identified in this region and both were capable of being SUMOylated in vitro. The absence of either or both SUMO sites did not perturb nuclear localization of PR-Set7. By employing whole genome expression arrays, we identified a panel of genes whose expression was significantly altered in the absence of PR-Set7. The vast majority of these genes displayed increased expression strongly suggesting that PR-Set7 predominantly functions as a transcriptional repressor. Importantly, the reduction of UBC9 resulted in the consistent derepression of several of these newly identified genes regulated by PR-Set7. Our findings indicate that direct interaction with UBC9 facilitates the repressive effects of PR-Set7 at specific target genes, most likely by SUMOylating PR-Set7.

  16. The UBC9 E2 SUMO conjugating enzyme binds the PR-Set7 histone methyltransferase to facilitate target gene repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya M Spektor

    Full Text Available PR-Set7/Set8/KMT5a is a chromatin-modifying enzyme that specifically monomethylates lysine 20 of histone H4 (H4K20me1. In this study we attempted to identify PR-Set7-interacting proteins reasoning that these proteins would provide important insights into the role of PR-Set7 in transcriptional regulation. Using an unbiased yeast two-hybrid approach, we discovered that PR-Set7 interacts with the UBC9 E2 SUMO conjugating enzyme. This interaction was confirmed in human cells and we demonstrated that PR-Set7 was preferentially modified with SUMO1 in vivo. Further in vitro studies revealed that UBC9 directly binds PR-Set7 proximal to the catalytic SET domain. Two putative SUMO consensus sites were identified in this region and both were capable of being SUMOylated in vitro. The absence of either or both SUMO sites did not perturb nuclear localization of PR-Set7. By employing whole genome expression arrays, we identified a panel of genes whose expression was significantly altered in the absence of PR-Set7. The vast majority of these genes displayed increased expression strongly suggesting that PR-Set7 predominantly functions as a transcriptional repressor. Importantly, the reduction of UBC9 resulted in the consistent derepression of several of these newly identified genes regulated by PR-Set7. Our findings indicate that direct interaction with UBC9 facilitates the repressive effects of PR-Set7 at specific target genes, most likely by SUMOylating PR-Set7.

  17. NMR structure of the mouse prion protein domain PrP(121-231).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riek, R; Hornemann, S; Wider, G; Billeter, M; Glockshuber, R; Wüthrich, K

    1996-07-11

    The 'protein only' hypothesis states that a modified form of normal prion protein triggers infectious neurodegenerative diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. Prion proteins are thought to exist in two different conformations: the 'benign' PrPcform, and the infectious 'scrapie form', PrPsc. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of PrPc is essential for understanding the transition to PrPsc. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the autonomously folding PrP domain comprising residues 121-231 (ref. 6) contains a two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and three alpha-helices. This domain contains most of the point-mutation sites that have been linked, in human PrP, to the occurrence of familial prion diseases. The NMR structure shows that these mutations occur within, or directly adjacent to, regular secondary structures. The presence of a beta-sheet in PrP(121-231) is in contrast with model predictions of an all-helical structure of PrPc (ref. 8), and may be important for the initiation of the transition from PrPc to PrPsc.

  18. Genetic variation of the prion protein gene (PRNP) in alpaca (Vicugna pacos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are caused by accumulation of a misfolded form of the prion protein (PrP). The normal cellular isoform of PrP is produced by the prion gene (PRNP) and is highly expressed in the central nervous system. Currently, there is an absence of information rega...

  19. Identification and expression analysis of a pathogen- responsive PR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    related (PR) proteins. .... undesirable impacts of chemicals on environment. Introducing disease .... Figure 1. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences of VqPR-1 gene, the type member PR-1a from tobacco (GenBank:.

  20. Non-infectious aggregates of the prion protein react with several PrPSc-directed antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasini, Emiliano; Seegulam, M Esa; Patti, Brianna N; Solforosi, Laura; Medrano, Andrea Z; Christensen, Heather M; Senatore, Assunta; Chiesa, Roberto; Williamson, R Anthony; Harris, David A

    2008-06-01

    The key event in the pathogenesis of prion diseases is the conformational conversion of the normal prion protein (PrP) (PrP(C)) into an infectious, aggregated isoform (PrP(Sc)) that has a high content of beta-sheet. Historically, a great deal of effort has been devoted to developing antibodies that specifically recognize PrP(Sc) but not PrP(C), as such antibodies would have enormous diagnostic and experimental value. A mouse monoclonal IgM antibody (designated 15B3) and three PrP motif-grafted monoclonal antibodies (referred to as IgG 19-33, 89-112, and 136-158) have been previously reported to react specifically with infectious PrP(Sc) but not PrP(C). In this study, we extend the characterization of these four antibodies by testing their ability to immunoprecipitate and immunostain infectious and non-infectious aggregates of wild-type, mutant, and recombinant PrP. We find that 15B3 as well as the motif-grafted antibodies recognize multiple types of aggregated PrP, both infectious and non-infectious, including forms found in brain, in transfected cells, and induced in vitro from purified recombinant protein. These antibodies are exquisitely selective for aggregated PrP, and do not react with soluble PrP even when present in vast excess. Our results suggest that 15B3 and the motif-grafted antibodies recognize structural features common to both infectious and non-infectious aggregates of PrP. Our study extends the utility of these antibodies for diagnostic and experimental purposes, and it provides new insight into the structural changes that accompany PrP oligomerization and prion propagation.

  1. PR gene families of citrus: their organ specific-biotic and abiotic inducible expression profiles based on ESTs approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnólia A. Campos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In silico expression profiles, of the discovered 3,103 citrus ESTs putatively encoding for PR protein families (PR-1 to PR-17, were evaluated using the Brazil citrus genome EST CitEST/database. Hierarchical clustering was displayed to identify similarities in expression patterns among citrus PR-like gene families (PRlgf in 33 selected cDNA libraries. In this way, PRlgf preferentially expressed by organ and citrus species, and library conditions were highlighted. Changes in expression profiles of clusters for each of the 17 PRlgf expressed in organs infected by pathogens or drought-stressed citrus species were displayed for relative suppression or induction gene expression in relation to the counterpart control. Overall, few PRlgf showed expression 2-fold higher in pathogen-infected than in uninfected organs, even though the differential expression profiles displayed have been quite diverse among studied species and organs. Furthermore, an insight into some contigs from four PRlgf pointed out putative members of multigene families. They appear to be evolutionarily conserved within citrus species and/or organ- or stress-specifically expressed. Our results represent a starting point regarding the extent of expression pattern differences underlying PRlgf expression and reveal genes that may prove to be useful in studies regarding biotechnological approaches or citrus resistance markers.

  2. The Functional Role of Prion Protein (PrPC on Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Young Shin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular prion protein (PrPC plays an important role in the cellular defense against oxidative stress. However, the exact protective mechanism of PrPC is unclear. Autophagy is essential for survival, differentiation, development, and homeostasis in several organisms. Although the role that autophagy plays in neurodegenerative disease has yet to be established, it is clear that autophagy-induced cell death is observed in neurodegenerative disorders that exhibit protein aggregations. Moreover, autophagy can promote cell survival and cell death under various conditions. In this review, we describe the involvement of autophagy in prion disease and the effects of PrPC.

  3. Genes candidatos de suscetibilidade a pré-eclampsia: estudo de associação

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Leonardo Capistrano

    2010-01-01

    A pré-eclâmpsia é uma doença multifatorial de etiologia ainda desconhecida que apresenta um amplo espectro quanto à gravidade dos sintomas, podendo variar da forma mais branda (pré-eclâmpsia leve) às formas mais severas (eclâmpsia e síndrome HELLP). Atualmente sabe-se que a pré-eclâmpsia é influenciada tanto por fatores ambientais quanto por fatores genéticos. Com o propósito de identificar genes de suscetibilidade à doença, genotipamos um total de 22 marcadores genéticos distribuídos e...

  4. Efficient assembly and secretion of recombinant subviral particles of the four dengue serotypes using native prM and E proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Gang; Kudelko, Mateusz; Lo, Joanne; Siu, Lewis Yu Lam; Kwok, Kevin Tsz Hin; Sachse, Martin; Nicholls, John M; Bruzzone, Roberto; Altmeyer, Ralf M; Nal, Béatrice

    2009-12-15

    Flavivirus infected cells produce infectious virions and subviral particles, both of which are formed by the assembly of prM and E envelope proteins and are believed to undergo the same maturation process. Dengue recombinant subviral particles have been produced in cell cultures with either modified or chimeric proteins but not using the native forms of prM and E. We have used a codon optimization strategy to obtain an efficient expression of native viral proteins and production of recombinant subviral particles (RSPs) for all four dengue virus (DV) serotypes. A stable HeLa cell line expressing DV1 prME was established (HeLa-prME) and RSPs were analyzed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. We found that E protein is mainly present in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where assembly of RSPs could be observed. Biochemical characterization of DV1 RSPs secretion revealed both prM protein cleavage and homodimerization of E proteins before their release into the supernatant, indicating that RSPs undergo a similar maturation process as dengue virus. Pulse chase experiment showed that 8 hours are required for the secretion of DV1 RSPs. We have used HeLa-prME to develop a semi-quantitative assay and screened a human siRNA library targeting genes involved in membrane trafficking. Knockdown of 23 genes resulted in a significant reduction in DV RSP secretion, whereas for 22 others we observed an increase of RSP levels in cell supernatant. Our data describe the efficient production of RSPs containing native prM and E envelope proteins for all dengue serotypes. Dengue RSPs and corresponding producing cell lines are safe and novel tools that can be used in the study of viral egress as well as in the development of vaccine and drugs against dengue virus.

  5. Efficient assembly and secretion of recombinant subviral particles of the four dengue serotypes using native prM and E proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Gang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Flavivirus infected cells produce infectious virions and subviral particles, both of which are formed by the assembly of prM and E envelope proteins and are believed to undergo the same maturation process. Dengue recombinant subviral particles have been produced in cell cultures with either modified or chimeric proteins but not using the native forms of prM and E. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used a codon optimization strategy to obtain an efficient expression of native viral proteins and production of recombinant subviral particles (RSPs for all four dengue virus (DV serotypes. A stable HeLa cell line expressing DV1 prME was established (HeLa-prME and RSPs were analyzed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. We found that E protein is mainly present in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER where assembly of RSPs could be observed. Biochemical characterization of DV1 RSPs secretion revealed both prM protein cleavage and homodimerization of E proteins before their release into the supernatant, indicating that RSPs undergo a similar maturation process as dengue virus. Pulse chase experiment showed that 8 hours are required for the secretion of DV1 RSPs. We have used HeLa-prME to develop a semi-quantitative assay and screened a human siRNA library targeting genes involved in membrane trafficking. Knockdown of 23 genes resulted in a significant reduction in DV RSP secretion, whereas for 22 others we observed an increase of RSP levels in cell supernatant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data describe the efficient production of RSPs containing native prM and E envelope proteins for all dengue serotypes. Dengue RSPs and corresponding producing cell lines are safe and novel tools that can be used in the study of viral egress as well as in the development of vaccine and drugs against dengue virus.

  6. Unraveling Prion Protein Interactions with Aptamers and Other PrP-Binding Nucleic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Bruno; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2017-05-17

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of neurodegenerative disorders that affect humans and other mammals. The etiologic agents common to these diseases are misfolded conformations of the prion protein (PrP). The molecular mechanisms that trigger the structural conversion of the normal cellular PrP (PrP(C)) into the pathogenic conformer (PrP(Sc)) are still poorly understood. It is proposed that a molecular cofactor would act as a catalyst, lowering the activation energy of the conversion process, therefore favoring the transition of PrP(C) to PrP(Sc). Several in vitro studies have described physical interactions between PrP and different classes of molecules, which might play a role in either PrP physiology or pathology. Among these molecules, nucleic acids (NAs) are highlighted as potential PrP molecular partners. In this context, the SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) methodology has proven extremely valuable to investigate PrP-NA interactions, due to its ability to select small nucleic acids, also termed aptamers, that bind PrP with high affinity and specificity. Aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can be folded into a wide range of structures (from harpins to G-quadruplexes). They are selected from a nucleic acid pool containing a large number (10(14)-10(16)) of random sequences of the same size (~20-100 bases). Aptamers stand out because of their potential ability to bind with different affinities to distinct conformations of the same protein target. Therefore, the identification of high-affinity and selective PrP ligands may aid the development of new therapies and diagnostic tools for TSEs. This review will focus on the selection of aptamers targeted against either full-length or truncated forms of PrP, discussing the implications that result from interactions of PrP with NAs, and their potential advances in the studies of prions. We will also provide a critical evaluation

  7. Lipid interaction converts prion protein to a PrPSc-like proteinase K-resistant conformation under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Yang, Fan; Hu, Yunfei; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xinhe; Jin, Changwen; Ma, Jiyan

    2007-06-12

    The conversion of prion protein (PrP) to the pathogenic PrPSc conformation is central to prion disease. Previous studies revealed that PrP interacts with lipids and the interaction induces PrP conformational changes, yet it remains unclear whether in the absence of any denaturing treatment, PrP-lipid interaction is sufficient to convert PrP to the classic proteinase K-resistant conformation. Using recombinant mouse PrP, we analyzed PrP-lipid interaction under physiological conditions and followed lipid-induced PrP conformational change with proteinase K (PK) digestion. We found that the PrP-lipid interaction was initiated by electrostatic contact and followed by hydrophobic interaction. The PrP-lipid interaction converted full-length alpha-helix-rich recombinant PrP to different forms. A significant portion of PrP gained a conformation reminiscent of PrPSc, with a PrPSc-like PK-resistant core and increased beta-sheet content. The efficiency for lipid-induced PrP conversion depended on lipid headgroup structure and/or the arrangement of lipids on the surface of vesicles. When lipid vesicles were disrupted by Triton X-100, PrP aggregation was necessary to maintain the lipid-induced PrPSc-like conformation. However, the PK resistance of lipid-induced PrPSc-like conformation does not depend on amyloid fiber formation. Our results clearly revealed that the lipid interaction can overcome the energy barrier and convert full-length alpha-helix-rich PrP to a PrPSc-like conformation under physiological conditions, supporting the relevance of lipid-induced PrP conformational change to in vivo PrP conversion.

  8. Global gene expression profiles of Phytophthora ramorum strain pr102 in response to plant host and tissue differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroline M. Press; Niklaus J. Grunwald

    2008-01-01

    The release of the draft genome sequence of P. ramorum strain Pr102, enabled the construction of an oligonucleotide microarray of the entire genome of Pr102. The array contains 344,680 features (oligos) that represent the transcriptome of Pr102. P. ramorum RNA was extracted from mycelium and sporangia and used to compare gene...

  9. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  10. Computational identification of novel PR-1-type genes in Oryza sativa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Computational identification of novel PR-1-type genes in Oryza sativa. Qingpo Liu Qingzhong ... Author Affiliations. Qingpo Liu1 Qingzhong Xue1. Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, 310029 Hangzhou, China ...

  11. Precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (PrIITE) enables absolute control of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Rita; Hansen, Lars; Hintze, John Birger Hjalmar

    2017-01-01

    to be a limitation. Here, we report that the combined use of genome editing tools and last generation Tet-On systems can resolve these issues. Our principle is based on precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (coined PrIITE) targeted to: (i) exons of an endogenous gene of interest (GOI) and (ii...

  12. WRKY transcription factors involved in PR-1 gene expression in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, Rana Muhammad Fraz

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is involved in mediating defense against biotrophic pathogens. The current knowledge of the SA-mediated signaling pathway and its effect on the transcriptional regulation of defense responses are reviewed in this thesis. PR-1 is a marker gene for systemic acquired resistance

  13. Precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (PrIITE) enables absolute control of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rita; Hansen, Lars; Hintze, John; Almeida, Raquel; Larsen, Sylvester; Coskun, Mehmet; Davidsen, Johanne; Mitchelmore, Cathy; David, Leonor; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tetracycline-based inducible systems provide powerful methods for functional studies where gene expression can be controlled. However, the lack of tight control of the inducible system, leading to leakiness and adverse effects caused by undesirable tetracycline dosage requirements, has proven to be a limitation. Here, we report that the combined use of genome editing tools and last generation Tet-On systems can resolve these issues. Our principle is based on precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (coined PrIITE) targeted to: (i) exons of an endogenous gene of interest (GOI) and (ii) a safe harbor locus. Using PrIITE cells harboring a GFP reporter or CDX2 transcription factor, we demonstrate discrete inducibility of gene expression with complete abrogation of leakiness. CDX2 PrIITE cells generated by this approach uncovered novel CDX2 downstream effector genes. Our results provide a strategy for characterization of dose-dependent effector functions of essential genes that require absence of endogenous gene expression. PMID:28472465

  14. Bacteriophage T4 unf (=alc) gene function is required for late replication in the presence of plasmid pR386.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, R E; Snustad, D P

    1985-02-01

    The bacteriophage T4 unf gene, known to be involved in the arrest of transcription from cytosine-containing DNA, is unessential except in Escherichia coli strains containing plasmid pR386. Comparative genetic and biochemical analyses of parameters of unf+ and unf- phage growth in host cells isogenic except for the presence or absence of plasmid pR386 have shown that unf gene function is required for late phage DNA synthesis in the presence of the plasmid. Shutoff of host DNA, RNA, and protein syntheses, degradation of host DNA, adsorption, injection, and early phage DNA, RNA, and protein syntheses all occurred with normal or near-normal kinetics in unf- infections, even in the presence of the plasmid. The switch from early to late protein synthesis occurred in plasmid pR386-containing cells infected with unf+ or unf- phage. However, this switchover was slow in both cases and may be slower in unf- infections than in unf+ infections. Net incorporation of [3H]thymidine terminated at about 30 min after infection of pR386-containing cells with unf- phage at 30 degrees C. Alkaline sucrose gradient studies of the intracellular pools of replicative DNA in unf-infected plasmid pR386-containing cells indicated that this DNA is not detectably nickel or cleaved at the time that DNA synthesis aborts. The addition of chloramphenicol subsequent to early enzyme synthesis prevented the arrest of DNA synthesis in plasmid-containing cells infected with unf-phage.

  15. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of venom allergen-like protein genes in the potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venom allergen-like proteins (VAPs) are members of the SCP/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 family of eukaryotic secreted proteins. We have identified a VAP gene (designated GrVAP-1) from the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. The GrVAP-1 gene contains an open reading frame (660 bp) encoding a putative...

  16. The N-Terminal Sequence of Prion Protein Consists an Epitope Specific to the Abnormal Isoform of Prion Protein (PrPSc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masujin, Kentaro; Kaku-Ushiki, Yuko; Miwa, Ritsuko; Okada, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Kazuo; Matsuura, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The conformation of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) differs from that of cellular prion protein (PrPC), but the precise characteristics of PrPSc remain to be elucidated. To clarify the properties of native PrPSc, we attempted to generate novel PrPSc-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by immunizing PrP-deficient mice with intact PrPSc purified from bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-affected mice. The generated mAbs 6A12 and 8D5 selectivity precipitated PrPSc from the brains of prion-affected mice, sheep, and cattle, but did not precipitate PrPC from the brains of healthy animals. In histopathological analysis, mAbs 6A12 and 8D5 strongly reacted with prion-affected mouse brains but not with unaffected mouse brains without antigen retrieval. Epitope analysis revealed that mAbs 8D5 and 6A12 recognized the PrP subregions between amino acids 31–39 and 41–47, respectively. This indicates that a PrPSc-specific epitope exists in the N-terminal region of PrPSc, and mAbs 6A12 and 8D5 are powerful tools with which to detect native and intact PrPSc. We found that the ratio of proteinase K (PK)-sensitive PrPSc to PK-resistant PrPSc was constant throughout the disease time course. PMID:23469131

  17. Mutation in West Nile Virus Structural Protein prM during Human Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Yaniv; Lanciotti, Robert S; Hindiyeh, Musa; Keller, Nathan; Milo, Ron; Mayan, Shlomo; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-09-01

    A mutation leading to substitution of a key amino acid in the prM protein of West Nile virus (WNV) occurred during persistent infection of an immunocompetent patient. WNV RNA persisted in the patient's urine and serum in the presence of low-level neutralizing antibodies. This case demonstrates active replication of WNV during persistent infection.

  18. Integrated protein function prediction by mining function associations, sequences, and protein-protein and gene-gene interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-15

    Protein function prediction is an important and challenging problem in bioinformatics and computational biology. Functionally relevant biological information such as protein sequences, gene expression, and protein-protein interactions has been used mostly separately for protein function prediction. One of the major challenges is how to effectively integrate multiple sources of both traditional and new information such as spatial gene-gene interaction networks generated from chromosomal conformation data together to improve protein function prediction. In this work, we developed three different probabilistic scores (MIS, SEQ, and NET score) to combine protein sequence, function associations, and protein-protein interaction and spatial gene-gene interaction networks for protein function prediction. The MIS score is mainly generated from homologous proteins found by PSI-BLAST search, and also association rules between Gene Ontology terms, which are learned by mining the Swiss-Prot database. The SEQ score is generated from protein sequences. The NET score is generated from protein-protein interaction and spatial gene-gene interaction networks. These three scores were combined in a new Statistical Multiple Integrative Scoring System (SMISS) to predict protein function. We tested SMISS on the data set of 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA). The method performed substantially better than three base-line methods and an advanced method based on protein profile-sequence comparison, profile-profile comparison, and domain co-occurrence networks according to the maximum F-measure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Behavioral abnormalities in prion protein knockout mice and the potential relevance of PrPc for the cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a highly conserved protein, which is anchored to the outer surface of the plasma membrane. Even though its physiological function has already been investigated in different cell or mouse models where PrPC expression is either up-regulated or depleted, its exact p...

  20. Quantification of surviving cerebellar granule neurones and abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) deposition in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease supports a pathogenic role for small PrPSc deposits common to the various molecular subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheux, B A; Morain, E; Diouron, V; Brandel, J-P; Salomon, D; Sazdovitch, V; Privat, N; Laplanche, J-L; Hauw, J-J; Haïk, S

    2011-08-01

    Neuronal death is a major neuropathological hallmark in prion diseases. The association between the accumulation of the disease-related prion protein (PrP(Sc) ) and neuronal loss varies within the wide spectrum of prion diseases and their experimental models. In this study, we investigated the relationships between neuronal loss and PrP(Sc) deposition in the cerebellum from cases of the six subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD; n=100) that can be determined according to the M129V polymorphism of the human prion protein gene (PRNP) and PrP(Sc) molecular types. The numerical density of neurones was estimated with a computer-assisted image analysis system and the accumulation of PrP(Sc) deposits was scored. The scores of PrP(Sc) immunoreactive deposits of the punctate type (synaptic type) were correlated with neurone counts - the higher the score the higher the neuronal loss - in all sCJD subtypes. Large 5- to 50-µm-wide deposits (focal type) were found in sCJD-MV2 and sCJD-VV2 subtypes, and occasionally in a few cases of the other studied groups. By contrast, the highest scores for 5- to 50-µm-wide deposits observed in sCJD-MV2 subtype were not associated with higher neuronal loss. In addition, these scores were inversely correlated with neuronal counts in the sCJD-VV2 subtype. These results support a putative pathogenic role for small PrP(Sc) deposits common to the various sCJD subtypes. Furthermore, the observation of a lower loss of neurones associated with PrP(Sc) type-2 large deposits is consistent with a possible 'protective' role of aggregated deposits in both sCJD-MV2 and sCJD-VV2 subtypes. © 2011 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2011 British Neuropathological Society.

  1. In vitro and in vivo studies identify important features of dengue virus pr-E protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Zheng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses bud into the endoplasmic reticulum and are transported through the secretory pathway, where the mildly acidic environment triggers particle rearrangement and allows furin processing of the prM protein to pr and M. The peripheral pr peptide remains bound to virus at low pH and inhibits virus-membrane interaction. Upon exocytosis, the release of pr at neutral pH completes virus maturation to an infectious particle. Together this evidence suggests that pr may shield the flavivirus fusion protein E from the low pH environment of the exocytic pathway. Here we developed an in vitro system to reconstitute the interaction of dengue virus (DENV pr with soluble truncated E proteins. At low pH recombinant pr bound to both monomeric and dimeric forms of E and blocked their membrane insertion. Exogenous pr interacted with mature infectious DENV and specifically inhibited virus fusion and infection. Alanine substitution of E H244, a highly conserved histidine residue in the pr-E interface, blocked pr-E interaction and reduced release of DENV virus-like particles. Folding, membrane insertion and trimerization of the H244A mutant E protein were preserved, and particle release could be partially rescued by neutralization of the low pH of the secretory pathway. Thus, pr acts to silence flavivirus fusion activity during virus secretion, and this function can be separated from the chaperone activity of prM. The sequence conservation of key residues involved in the flavivirus pr-E interaction suggests that this protein-protein interface may be a useful target for broad-spectrum inhibitors.

  2. Induction of pathogenesis-related gene 1 (PR-1 by acibenzolar-s-methyl application in pineapple and its effect on reniform nematodes (Rotylenchulus reniformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buncha Chinnasri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR in pineapples (Ananas comosus was studied as shown by the up-regulation of the PR-1 gene (the SAR marker and examination of the SAR effect on the reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assay was performed using degenerate primers designed from the PR-1 genes of several monocotyledonous (monocots and dicotyledonous (dicots plants. A 266 bp cDNA band was evident only in plants treated with the SAR inducer, acibenzolar-s-methyl. This 266 bp cDNA was sequenced and found to be highly homologous to a number of PR-1 genes from monocots. In addition, the amino acid sequence deduced from the 266 bp cDNA showed a high identity to PR-1 proteins from both monocots and dicots. Therefore, it was highly likely that this cloned fragment was part of the A. comosus PR-1 gene, indicating that A. comosus has an SAR pathway. The time course of PR-1 expression was studied. The results showed that PR-1 induction was initiated as early as 1 d after acibenzolar application and continued through 3 wk thereafter. The effect of SAR on the nematodes, R. reniformis, in pineapples was also elucidated. The results showed that the reproduction of nematodes on the pineapples treated with 100 mg/L or 200 mg/L was 55% lower than that on pineapples treated with 0 mg/L or 50 mg/L. Nematode reproduction on pineapples treated with the same concentration but inoculated at different times was not significantly different (p > 0.05.

  3. Distinct structures of scrapie prion protein (PrPSc)-seeded versus spontaneous recombinant prion protein fibrils revealed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnovas, Vytautas; Kim, Jae-Il; Lu, Xiaojun; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Caughey, Byron; Surewicz, Witold K

    2009-09-04

    The detailed structures of prion disease-associated, partially protease-resistant forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc)) are largely unknown. PrP(Sc) appears to propagate itself by autocatalyzing the conformational conversion and oligomerization of normal prion protein (PrP(C)). One manifestation of PrP(Sc) templating activity is its ability, in protein misfolding cyclic amplification reactions, to seed the conversion of recombinant prion protein (rPrP) into aggregates that more closely resemble PrP(Sc) than spontaneously nucleated rPrP amyloids in terms of proteolytic fragmentation and infrared spectra. The absence of posttranslational modifications makes these rPrP aggregates more amenable to detailed structural analyses than bona fide PrP(Sc). Here, we compare the structures of PrP(Sc)-seeded and spontaneously nucleated aggregates of hamster rPrP by using H/D exchange coupled with mass spectrometry. In spontaneously formed fibrils, very slow H/D exchange in region approximately 163-223 represents a systematically H-bonded cross-beta amyloid core structure. PrP(Sc)-seeded aggregates have a subpopulation of molecules in which this core region extends N-terminally as far as to residue approximately 145, and there is a significant degree of order within residues approximately 117-133. The formation of tightly H-bonded structures by these more N-terminal residues may account partially for the generation of longer protease-resistant regions in the PrP(Sc)-seeded rPrP aggregates; however, part of the added protease resistance is dependent on the presence of SDS during proteolysis, emphasizing the multifactorial influences on proteolytic fragmentation patterns. These results demonstrate that PrP(Sc) has a distinct templating activity that induces ordered, systematically H-bonded structure in regions that are dynamic and poorly defined in spontaneously formed aggregates of rPrP.

  4. The human protein disulfide isomerase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galligan James J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enzyme-mediated disulfide bond formation is a highly conserved process affecting over one-third of all eukaryotic proteins. The enzymes primarily responsible for facilitating thiol-disulfide exchange are members of an expanding family of proteins known as protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs. These proteins are part of a larger superfamily of proteins known as the thioredoxin protein family (TRX. As members of the PDI family of proteins, all proteins contain a TRX-like structural domain and are predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subcellular localization and the presence of a TRX domain, however, comprise the short list of distinguishing features required for gene family classification. To date, the PDI gene family contains 21 members, varying in domain composition, molecular weight, tissue expression, and cellular processing. Given their vital role in protein-folding, loss of PDI activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, most commonly related to the unfolded protein response (UPR. Over the past decade, UPR has become a very attractive therapeutic target for multiple pathologies including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, and type-2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms of protein-folding, specifically thiol-disulfide exchange, may lead to development of a novel class of therapeutics that would help alleviate a wide range of diseases by targeting the UPR.

  5. Expression and In Situ Localization of Two Major PR Proteins of Grapevine Berries during Development and after UV-C Exposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Steven; Afoufa-Bastien, Damien; Jacquens, Lucile; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    In grapevine Vitis vinifera L. cv Pinot noir, the Pathogenesis-Related (PR) proteins CHI4D and TL3 are among the most abundant extractable PR proteins of ripe berries and accumulate during berry ripening from véraison until full maturation. Evidence was supplied in favor of the involvement of these two protein families in plant defense mechanisms and plant development. In order to better understand CHI4D and TL3 function in grapevine, we analyzed their temporal and spatial pattern of expression during maturation and after an abiotic stress (UV-C) by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistolocalization. In ripening berries, CHI4D and TL3 genes were mainly expressed in the exocarp and around vascular bundles of the mesocarp. In UV-C exposed berries, CHI4D and TL3 gene expression was strongly induced before véraison. Corresponding proteins localized in the exocarp and, to a lesser extent, around vascular bundles of the mesocarp. The spatial and temporal accumulation of the two PR proteins during berry maturation and after an abiotic stress is discussed in relation to their putative roles in plant defense. PMID:22937077

  6. Expression and in situ localization of two major PR proteins of grapevine berries during development and after UV-C exposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Colas

    Full Text Available In grapevine Vitis vinifera L. cv Pinot noir, the Pathogenesis-Related (PR proteins CHI4D and TL3 are among the most abundant extractable PR proteins of ripe berries and accumulate during berry ripening from véraison until full maturation. Evidence was supplied in favor of the involvement of these two protein families in plant defense mechanisms and plant development. In order to better understand CHI4D and TL3 function in grapevine, we analyzed their temporal and spatial pattern of expression during maturation and after an abiotic stress (UV-C by in situ hybridization (ISH and immunohistolocalization. In ripening berries, CHI4D and TL3 genes were mainly expressed in the exocarp and around vascular bundles of the mesocarp. In UV-C exposed berries, CHI4D and TL3 gene expression was strongly induced before véraison. Corresponding proteins localized in the exocarp and, to a lesser extent, around vascular bundles of the mesocarp. The spatial and temporal accumulation of the two PR proteins during berry maturation and after an abiotic stress is discussed in relation to their putative roles in plant defense.

  7. Expression and in situ localization of two major PR proteins of grapevine berries during development and after UV-C exposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Steven; Afoufa-Bastien, Damien; Jacquens, Lucile; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Mazeyrat-Gourbeyre, Florence; Monti-Dedieu, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    In grapevine Vitis vinifera L. cv Pinot noir, the Pathogenesis-Related (PR) proteins CHI4D and TL3 are among the most abundant extractable PR proteins of ripe berries and accumulate during berry ripening from véraison until full maturation. Evidence was supplied in favor of the involvement of these two protein families in plant defense mechanisms and plant development. In order to better understand CHI4D and TL3 function in grapevine, we analyzed their temporal and spatial pattern of expression during maturation and after an abiotic stress (UV-C) by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistolocalization. In ripening berries, CHI4D and TL3 genes were mainly expressed in the exocarp and around vascular bundles of the mesocarp. In UV-C exposed berries, CHI4D and TL3 gene expression was strongly induced before véraison. Corresponding proteins localized in the exocarp and, to a lesser extent, around vascular bundles of the mesocarp. The spatial and temporal accumulation of the two PR proteins during berry maturation and after an abiotic stress is discussed in relation to their putative roles in plant defense.

  8. Verticillium Ave1 effector induces tomato defense gene expression independent of Ve1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castroverde, Christian Danve M; Nazar, Ross N; Robb, Jane

    2016-11-01

    Verticillium resistance is thought to be mediated by Ve1 protein, which presumably follows a "gene-for-gene" relationship with the V. dahliae Ave1 effector. Because in planta analyses of Ave1 have relied so far on transient expression of the gene in tobacco, this study investigated gene function using stably expressing 35S:Ave1 transgenic tomato. Transgenic Ave1 expression was shown to induce various defense genes including those coding for PR-1 (P6), PR-2 (βbeta-1,3-glucanase) and peroxidases (anionic peroxidase 2, Cevi16 peroxidase). Since a Ve1(-) tomato cultivar served as germplasm, these results indicate that Ave1 induces these defense genes independently of Ve1.

  9. Porcine lung surfactant protein B gene (SFTPB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    The porcine surfactant protein B (SFTPB) is a single copy gene on chromosome 3. Three different cDNAs for the SFTPB have been isolated and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison revealed six nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), four synonymous SNPs and an in-frame deletion of 69...... bp in the region coding for the active protein. Northern analysis showed lung-specific expression of three different isoforms of the SFTPB transcript. The expression level for the SFTPB gene is low in 50 days-old fetus and it increases during lung development. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain...

  10. Prion Strain Differences in Accumulation of PrPSc on Neurons and Glia Are Associated with Similar Expression Profiles of Neuroinflammatory Genes: Comparison of Three Prion Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, James A; Striebel, James F; Rangel, Alejandra; Woods, Tyson; Phillips, Katie; Peterson, Karin E; Race, Brent; Chesebro, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of host proteins are important features of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia and prion diseases. In all these diseases, the misfolded protein increases in amount by a mechanism involving seeded polymerization. In prion diseases, host prion protein is misfolded to form a pathogenic protease-resistant form, PrPSc, which accumulates in neurons, astroglia and microglia in the CNS. Here using dual-staining immunohistochemistry, we compared the cell specificity of PrPSc accumulation at early preclinical times post-infection using three mouse scrapie strains that differ in brain regional pathology. PrPSc from each strain had a different pattern of cell specificity. Strain 22L was mainly associated with astroglia, whereas strain ME7 was mainly associated with neurons and neuropil. In thalamus and cortex, strain RML was similar to 22L, but in substantia nigra, RML was similar to ME7. Expression of 90 genes involved in neuroinflammation was studied quantitatively using mRNA from thalamus at preclinical times. Surprisingly, despite the cellular differences in PrPSc accumulation, the pattern of upregulated genes was similar for all three strains, and the small differences observed correlated with variations in the early disease tempo. Gene upregulation correlated with activation of both astroglia and microglia detected in early disease prior to vacuolar pathology or clinical signs. Interestingly, the profile of upregulated genes in scrapie differed markedly from that seen in two acute viral CNS diseases (LaCrosse virus and BE polytropic Friend retrovirus) that had reactive gliosis at levels similar to our prion-infected mice.

  11. Assessment of strain-specific PrP(Sc elongation rates revealed a transformation of PrP(Sc properties during protein misfolding cyclic amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Gonzalez-Montalban

    Full Text Available Prion replication is believed to consist of two components, a growth or elongation of infectious isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc particles and their fragmentation, a process that provides new replication centers. The current study introduced an experimental approach that employs Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification with beads (PMCAb and relies on a series of kinetic experiments for assessing elongation rates of PrP(Sc particles. Four prion strains including two strains with short incubation times to disease (263K and Hyper and two strains with very long incubation times (SSLOW and LOTSS were tested. The elongation rate of brain-derived PrP(Sc was found to be strain-specific. Strains with short incubation times had higher rates than strains with long incubation times. Surprisingly, the strain-specific elongation rates increased substantially for all four strains after they were subjected to six rounds of serial PMCAb. In parallel to an increase in elongation rates, the percentages of diglycosylated PrP glycoforms increased in PMCAb-derived PrP(Sc comparing to those of brain-derived PrP(Sc. These results suggest that PMCAb selects the same molecular features regardless of strain initial characteristics and that convergent evolution of PrP(Sc properties occurred during in vitro amplification. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that each prion strain is comprised of a variety of conformers or 'quasi-species' and that change in the prion replication environment gives selective advantage to those conformers that replicate most effectively under specific environment.

  12. Assessment of Strain-Specific PrPSc Elongation Rates Revealed a Transformation of PrPSc Properties during Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Montalban, Nuria; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2012-01-01

    Prion replication is believed to consist of two components, a growth or elongation of infectious isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) particles and their fragmentation, a process that provides new replication centers. The current study introduced an experimental approach that employs Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification with beads (PMCAb) and relies on a series of kinetic experiments for assessing elongation rates of PrPSc particles. Four prion strains including two strains with short incubation times to disease (263K and Hyper) and two strains with very long incubation times (SSLOW and LOTSS) were tested. The elongation rate of brain-derived PrPSc was found to be strain-specific. Strains with short incubation times had higher rates than strains with long incubation times. Surprisingly, the strain-specific elongation rates increased substantially for all four strains after they were subjected to six rounds of serial PMCAb. In parallel to an increase in elongation rates, the percentages of diglycosylated PrP glycoforms increased in PMCAb-derived PrPSc comparing to those of brain-derived PrPSc. These results suggest that PMCAb selects the same molecular features regardless of strain initial characteristics and that convergent evolution of PrPSc properties occurred during in vitro amplification. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that each prion strain is comprised of a variety of conformers or ‘quasi-species’ and that change in the prion replication environment gives selective advantage to those conformers that replicate most effectively under specific environment. PMID:22815972

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of PR genes in some pome fruit species with the emphasis on transcriptional analysis and ROS response under Erwinia amylovora inoculation in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Maryam; Salami, Seyed Alireza; Nasiri, Jaber; Abdollahi, Hamid; Ghahremani, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Attempts were made to identify eight pathogenesis related (PR) genes (i.e., PR-1a, PR3-ch1, PR3-Ch2, PR3-Ch3, PR3-Ch4, PR3-Ch5, PR-5 and PR-8) from 27 genotypes of apple, quince and pear, which are induced in response to inoculation with the pathogen Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. Totally, 32 PR genes of different families were obtained, excepting PR3-Ch2 (amplified only in apple) and PR3-Ch4 (amplified only in apple and pear), the others were successfully amplified in all the genotypes of apple, quince and pear. Evolutionary, the genes of each family exhibited significant homology with each other, as the corresponded phylogenetic neighbor-joining-based dendrograms were taken into consideration. Meanwhile, according to the expression assay, it was deduced that the pathogen activity can significantly affect the expression levels of some selected PR genes of PR3-Ch2, PR3-Ch4, PR3-Ch5 and particularly Cat I in both resistant (MM-111) and semi-susceptible (MM-106) apple rootstocks. Lastly, it was concluded that the pathogen E. amylovora is able to stimulate ROS response, particularly using generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in both aforementioned apple rootstock.

  14. Characterization of the GXXXG motif in the first transmembrane segment of Japanese encephalitis virus precursor membrane (prM protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Suh-Chin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interaction between prM and E proteins in flavivirus-infected cells is a major driving force for the assembly of flavivirus particles. We used site-directed mutagenesis to study the potential role of the transmembrane domains of the prM proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV in prM-E heterodimerization as well as subviral particle formation. Alanine insertion scanning mutagenesis within the GXXXG motif in the first transmembrane segment of JEV prM protein affected the prM-E heterodimerization; its specificity was confirmed by replacing the two glycines of the GXXXG motif with alanine, leucine and valine. The GXXXG motif was found to be conserved in the JEV serocomplex viruses but not other flavivirus groups. These mutants with alanine inserted in the two prM transmembrane segments all impaired subviral particle formation in cell cultures. The prM transmembrane domains of JEV may play importation roles in prM-E heterodimerization and viral particle assembly.

  15. Alga-PrAS (Algal Protein Annotation Suite): A Database of Comprehensive Annotation in Algal Proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Yamada, Yutaka; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Algae are smaller organisms than land plants and offer clear advantages in research over terrestrial species in terms of rapid production, short generation time and varied commercial applications. Thus, studies investigating the practical development of effective algal production are important and will improve our understanding of both aquatic and terrestrial plants. In this study we estimated multiple physicochemical and secondary structural properties of protein sequences, the predicted presence of post-translational modification (PTM) sites, and subcellular localization using a total of 510,123 protein sequences from the proteomes of 31 algal and three plant species. Algal species were broadly selected from green and red algae, glaucophytes, oomycetes, diatoms and other microalgal groups. The results were deposited in the Algal Protein Annotation Suite database (Alga-PrAS; http://alga-pras.riken.jp/), which can be freely accessed online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  16. Mechanistic insights into the role of prenyl-binding protein PrBP/δ in membrane dissociation of phosphodiesterase 6

    KAUST Repository

    Qureshi, Bilal M.

    2018-01-02

    Isoprenylated proteins are associated with membranes and their inter-compartmental distribution is regulated by solubilization factors, which incorporate lipid moieties in hydrophobic cavities and thereby facilitate free diffusion during trafficking. Here we report the crystal structure of a solubilization factor, the prenyl-binding protein (PrBP/δ), at 1.81 Å resolution in its ligand-free apo-form. Apo-PrBP/δ harbors a preshaped, deep hydrophobic cavity, capacitating apo-PrBP/δ to readily bind its prenylated cargo. To investigate the molecular mechanism of cargo solubilization we analyzed the PrBP/δ-induced membrane dissociation of rod photoreceptor phosphodiesterase (PDE6). The results suggest that PrBP/δ exclusively interacts with the soluble fraction of PDE6. Depletion of soluble species in turn leads to dissociation of membrane-bound PDE6, as both are in equilibrium. This

  17. Amelogenesis Imperfecta; Genes, Proteins, and Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire E. L.; Poulter, James A.; Antanaviciute, Agne; Kirkham, Jennifer; Brookes, Steven J.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by inherited developmental enamel defects. AI enamel is abnormally thin, soft, fragile, pitted and/or badly discolored, with poor function and aesthetics, causing patients problems such as early tooth loss, severe embarrassment, eating difficulties, and pain. It was first described separately from diseases of dentine nearly 80 years ago, but the underlying genetic and mechanistic basis of the condition is only now coming to light. Mutations in the gene AMELX, encoding an extracellular matrix protein secreted by ameloblasts during enamel formation, were first identified as a cause of AI in 1991. Since then, mutations in at least eighteen genes have been shown to cause AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, with many more implicated in syndromic AI. Some of the encoded proteins have well documented roles in amelogenesis, acting as enamel matrix proteins or the proteases that degrade them, cell adhesion molecules or regulators of calcium homeostasis. However, for others, function is less clear and further research is needed to understand the pathways and processes essential for the development of healthy enamel. Here, we review the genes and mutations underlying AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, the proteins they encode and knowledge of their roles in amelogenesis, combining evidence from human phenotypes, inheritance patterns, mouse models, and in vitro studies. An LOVD resource (http://dna2.leeds.ac.uk/LOVD/) containing all published gene mutations for AI presenting in isolation of other health problems is described. We use this resource to identify trends in the genes and mutations reported to cause AI in the 270 families for which molecular diagnoses have been reported by 23rd May 2017. Finally we discuss the potential value of the translation of AI genetics to clinical care with improved patient pathways and speculate on the

  18. Do ethylene response factorS9 and -14 repress PR gene expression in the interaction between Piriformospora indica and Arabidopsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camehl, Iris; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2010-08-01

    The plant hormone ethylene (ET) plays a crucial role in the signalling network when plants have to respond to biotic stresses. We investigate the beneficial interaction between the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica. Recently, we showed that ET signalling and ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)1 are important to balance beneficial and nonbeneficial traits in this symbiosis. 147 ERF genes in Arabidopsis encode transcriptional regulators with a variety of functions involved in development, physiological processes as well as plant/microbe interactions. In the beneficial symbiosis between Arabidopsis and P. indica, overexpression of ERF1 activates defence responses, strongly reduces root colonization and thus abolishes the benefits for the plants. Here we show that additional transcription factors of the ERF family, the ERF DOMAIN PROTEIN9 (ERF9) and the ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING FACTOR14 (ERF14) are involved in the interaction between the two symbionts and are required for growth promotion of the host plant. Expression of these genes is upregulated in colonized wild-type roots. Insertional inactivation of ERF9 and ERF14 diminishes the P. indica-induced growth promotion and activates the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR)-1 and PR-2 genes. We propose that ERF9 and ERF14 repress PR gene expression in colonized Arabidopsis roots and thus contribute to the establishment of a beneficial interaction.

  19. Mining disease genes using integrated protein-protein interaction and gene-gene co-regulation information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Guo, Maozu; Zhang, Ruijie; Dai, Qiguo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Xuan, Ping; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    In humans, despite the rapid increase in disease-associated gene discovery, a large proportion of disease-associated genes are still unknown. Many network-based approaches have been used to prioritize disease genes. Many networks, such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI), KEGG, and gene co-expression networks, have been used. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) have been successfully applied for the determination of genes associated with several diseases. In this study, we constructed an eQTL-based gene-gene co-regulation network (GGCRN) and used it to mine for disease genes. We adopted the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm to mine for genes associated with Alzheimer disease. Compared to the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) PPI network alone, the integrated HPRD PPI and GGCRN networks provided faster convergence and revealed new disease-related genes. Therefore, using the RWR algorithm for integrated PPI and GGCRN is an effective method for disease-associated gene mining.

  20. Redox behaviors of the neurotoxic portion in human prion protein, HuPrP(106-126)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Norifumi; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2010-09-01

    A peptide fragment of human prion protein, HuPrP(106-126), has been reported to mimic the pathological features underlying prion diseases. Although the actual neurotoxic mechanism of HuPrP(106-126) has not been elucidated, several hypotheses has been proposed based on the role for copper. In this study, to understand the toxic function of HuPrP(106-126) from a viewpoint of electrochemical competence, we investigated redox properties of copper ion complexes with four different binding motifs of a model of HuPrP(106-126) based on density functional theory calculations. We found that the HuPrP(106-126)-derived models exhibited diverse redox activities that depended on copper-binding conformations.

  1. Sensitization to PR-10 proteins is indicative of distinctive sensitization patterns in adults with a suspected food allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankestijn, Mark A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413636143; Knulst, André C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101112017; Knol, Edward F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/090565800; Le, Thuy My|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313715882; Rockmann, Heike|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304810606; Otten, Henny G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10391921X; Klemans, Rob J.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/344727378

    2017-01-01

    Background: The extent of co-sensitization within and between food protein families in an adult population is largely unknown. This study aimed to identify the most frequently recognized components in the PR-10 and storage protein family, as well as patterns in (co-)sensitization, in a birch-endemic

  2. New insights into flavivirus biology: the influence of pH over interactions between prM and E proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Edson R. A.; de Alencastro, Ricardo B.; Horta, Bruno A. C.

    2017-11-01

    Diseases caused by flaviviruses, such as dengue and zika, are globally recognized as major threats. During infection, a critical point in their replicative cycle is the maturation step, which occurs throughout the cellular exocytic pathway. This step is a pH-dependent process that involves the modification of the viral envelope by converting prM (pre-membrane) into M (membrane) proteins with the release of a "pr peptide". After this reaction, the pr peptides remain bound to the viral envelope while the virions cross the acidic trans-Golgi network, and are released only at neutral pH after secretion of the virus particles. Despite this current knowledge, the molecular basis of the flavivirus maturation step is largely unknown. Here, based on the crystal structure of the dengue pr-E complex ("pr peptide" bound to virus envelope protein) and using molecular dynamics simulations, we found that the pH shift from acidic to neutral yields considerable structural changes in the system. Dynamic cross correlation maps and root mean square deviation analyses revealed that the pr-E junction is clearly unstable under neutral pH. Secondary structure analysis also revealed that the fusion loop region, present in the E protein, is sensitive to pH and tends to unstructure at a neutral environment. Moreover, we found that five residues present in the E protein, Gly102, His244, Thr70, Thr68 and Asn67 are critical to confer stability to the pr-E complex while inside the Golgi apparatus. This work brings details about the dynamical behavior of the pr-E system, helps to better understand the flavivirus biology and may also be of use in the development of novel antiviral strategies.

  3. An intron in a ribosomal protein gene from Tetrahymena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Andreasen, Per Hove; Dreisig, Hanne

    1986-01-01

    of hybrid-selected mRNA and authentic ribosomal proteins. The proteins show strong homology to ribosomal protein S12 from Escherichia coli. The coding region of the gene is interrupted by a 979-bp intron 68 bp downstream of the translation start. This is the first intron in a protein encoding gene...

  4. Accumulation of pathological prion protein PrPSc in the skin of animals with experimental and natural scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Thomzig

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Prion infectivity and its molecular marker, the pathological prion protein PrP(Sc, accumulate in the central nervous system and often also in lymphoid tissue of animals or humans affected by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Recently, PrP(Sc was found in tissues previously considered not to be invaded by prions (e.g., skeletal muscles. Here, we address the question of whether prions target the skin and show widespread PrP(Sc deposition in this organ in hamsters perorally or parenterally challenged with scrapie. In hamsters fed with scrapie, PrP(Sc was detected before the onset of symptoms, but the bulk of skin-associated PrP(Sc accumulated in the clinical phase. PrP(Sc was localized in nerve fibres within the skin but not in keratinocytes, and the deposition of PrP(Sc in skin showed no dependence from the route of infection and lymphotropic dissemination. The data indicated a neurally mediated centrifugal spread of prions to the skin. Furthermore, in a follow-up study, we examined sheep naturally infected with scrapie and detected PrP(Sc by Western blotting in skin samples from two out of five animals. Our findings point to the skin as a potential reservoir of prions, which should be further investigated in relation to disease transmission.

  5. Genomic assessment of the evolution of the prion protein gene family in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Paul M; Khachane, Amit; Kumar, Manish

    2010-05-01

    Prion diseases are devastating neurological disorders caused by the propagation of particles containing an alternative beta-sheet-rich form of the prion protein (PrP). Genes paralogous to PrP, called Doppel and Shadoo, have been identified, that also have neuropathological relevance. To aid in the further functional characterization of PrP and its relatives, we annotated completely the PrP gene family (PrP-GF), in the genomes of 42 vertebrates, through combined strategic application of gene prediction programs and advanced remote homology detection techniques (such as HMMs, PSI-TBLASTN and pGenThreader). We have uncovered several previously undescribed paralogous genes and pseudogenes. We find that current high-quality genomic evidence indicates that the PrP relative Doppel, was likely present in the last common ancestor of present-day Tetrapoda, but was lost in the bird lineage, since its divergence from reptiles. Using the new gene annotations, we have defined the consensus of structural features that are characteristic of the PrP and Doppel structures, across diverse Tetrapoda clades. Furthermore, we describe in detail a transcribed pseudogene derived from Shadoo that is conserved across primates, and that overlaps the meiosis gene, SYCE1, thus possibly regulating its expression. In addition, we analysed the locus of PRNP/PRND for significant conservation across the genomic DNA of eleven mammals, and determined the phylogenetic penetration of non-coding exons. The genomic evidence indicates that the second PRNP non-coding exon found in even-toed ungulates and rodents, is conserved in all high-coverage genome assemblies of primates (human, chimp, orang utan and macaque), and is, at least, likely to have fallen out of use during primate speciation. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the PRNT gene (at the PRNP human locus) is conserved across at least sixteen mammals, and evolves like a long non-coding RNA, fashioned from fragments of ancient, long

  6. PR Interval Associated Genes, Atrial Remodeling and Rhythm Outcome of Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation—A Gene-Based Analysis of GWAS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Husser

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: PR interval prolongation has recently been shown to associate with advanced left atrial remodeling and atrial fibrillation (AF recurrence after catheter ablation. While different genome-wide association studies (GWAS have implicated 13 loci to associate with the PR interval as an AF endophenotype their subsequent associations with AF remodeling and response to catheter ablation are unknown. Here, we perform a gene-based analysis of GWAS data to test the hypothesis that PR interval candidate genes also associate with left atrial remodeling and arrhythmia recurrence following AF catheter ablation.Methods and Results: Samples from 660 patients with paroxysmal (n = 370 or persistent AF (n = 290 undergoing AF catheter ablation were genotyped for ~1,000,000 SNPs. Gene-based association was investigated using VEGAS (versatile gene-based association study. Among the 13 candidate genes, SLC8A1, MEIS1, ITGA9, SCN5A, and SOX5 associated with the PR interval. Of those, ITGA9 and SOX5 were significantly associated with left atrial low voltage areas and left atrial diameter and subsequently with AF recurrence after radiofrequency catheter ablation.Conclusion: This study suggests contributions of ITGA9 and SOX5 to AF remodeling expressed as PR interval prolongation, low voltage areas and left atrial dilatation and subsequently to response to catheter ablation. Future and larger studies are necessary to replicate and apply these findings with the aim of designing AF pathophysiology-based multi-locus risk scores.

  7. Construction and immune efficacy of recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing PrM-E proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype І.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ping; Zhi, Xianwei; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Huawei; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2015-12-10

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an arboviral disease with high case fatality rates and neurologic or psychiatric sequelae among survivors in Asia, western Pacific countries and northern Australia. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the cause of JE and the emergence of genotype І (GI) JEV has displaced genotype III (GIII) as the dominant strains circulating in some Asian regions. The currently available JE vaccines are safe and effective in preventing this disease, but they are developed based on the GIII JEV strains. The recombinant virus PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) which expressed the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of JEV SX09S-01 strain (genotype I, GI) was constructed by homologous recombination between the genome of PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/LacZ(+) digested with EcoRI and plasmid pIE-CAG-PrM-E-BGH. Expression of JEV PrM and E proteins was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Immune efficacy of PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) was further evaluated in mouse model. A recombinant pseudorabies virus (PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+)) was successfully constructed. Mice experiments showed that PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) could induce a high level of ELISA antibodies against PRV and JEV, as well as high titer of PRV neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with 1 × 10(7) PFU virulent JEV SX09S-01 strain, the time of death was delayed and the survival rate was improved in PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) vaccinated mice. PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) is a potential vaccine candidate against PRV and JEV GI infection in the future.

  8. Crystallographic Studies of Prion Protein (PrP) Segments Suggest How Structural Changes Encoded by Polymorphism at Residue 129 Modulate Susceptibility to Human Prion Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostol, Marcin I.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2010-09-23

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in codon 129 of the human prion gene, leading to a change from methionine to valine at residue 129 of prion protein (PrP), has been shown to be a determinant in the susceptibility to prion disease. However, the molecular basis of this effect remains unexplained. In the current study, we determined crystal structures of prion segments having either Met or Val at residue 129. These 6-residue segments of PrP centered on residue 129 are 'steric zippers,' pairs of interacting {beta}-sheets. Both structures of these 'homozygous steric zippers' reveal direct intermolecular interactions between Met or Val in one sheet and the identical residue in the mating sheet. These two structures, plus a structure-based model of the heterozygous Met-Val steric zipper, suggest an explanation for the previously observed effects of this locus on prion disease susceptibility and progression.

  9. Characterisation of the Vitis vinifera PR10 multigene family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Genes belonging to the pathogenesis related 10 (PR10) group have been studied in several plant species, where they form multigene families. Until now, such an analysis has not been performed in Vitis vinifera, although three different PR10 genes were found to be expressed under pathogen attack or abiotic stress, and during somatic embryogenesis induction. We used the complete genome sequence for characterising the whole V. vinifera PR10 gene family. The expression of candidate genes was studied in various non-treated tissues and following somatic embryogenesis induction by the auxin 2,4-D. Results In addition to the three V. vinifera PR10 genes already described, namely VvPR10.1, VvPR10.2 and VvPR10.3, fourteen different PR10 related sequences were identified. Showing high similarity, they form a single cluster on the chromosome 5 comprising three pseudogenes. The expression of nine different genes was detected in various tissues. Although differentially expressed in non-treated plant organs, several genes were up-regulated in tissues treated with 2,4-D, as expected for PR genes. Conclusions PR10 genes form a multigene family in V. vinifera, as found in birch, apple or peach. Seventeen closely related PR10 sequences are arranged in a tandem array on the chromosome 5, probably reflecting small-scale duplications during evolution. Various expression patterns were found for nine studied genes, highlighting functional diversification. A phylogenetic comparison of deduced proteins with PR10 proteins of other plants showed a characteristic low intraspecific variability. Particularly, a group of seven close tandem duplicates including VvPR10.1, VvPR10.2 and VvPR10.3 showed a very high similarity, suggesting concerted evolution or/and recent duplications. PMID:20727162

  10. The cellular prion protein PrP(c is involved in the proliferation of epithelial cells and in the distribution of junction-associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Morel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The physiological function of the ubiquitous cellular prion protein, PrP(c, is still under debate. It was essentially studied in nervous system, but poorly investigated in epithelial cells. We previously reported that PrP(c is targeted to cell-cell junctions of polarized epithelial cells, where it interacts with c-Src. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We show here that, in cultured human enterocytes and in intestine in vivo, the mature PrP(c is differentially targeted either to the nucleus in dividing cells or to cell-cell contacts in polarized/differentiated cells. By proteomic analysis, we demonstrate that the junctional PrP(c interacts with cytoskeleton-associated proteins, such as gamma- and beta-actin, alpha-spectrin, annexin A2, and with the desmosome-associated proteins desmoglein, plakoglobin and desmoplakin. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed complexes associating PrP(c, desmoglein and c-Src in raft domains. Through siRNA strategy, we show that PrP(c is necessary to complete the process of epithelial cell proliferation and for the sub-cellular distribution of proteins involved in cell architecture and junctions. Moreover, analysis of the architecture of the intestinal epithelium of PrP(c knock-out mice revealed a net decrease in the size of desmosomal junctions and, without change in the amount of BrdU incorporation, a shortening of the length of intestinal villi. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From these results, PrP(c could be considered as a new partner involved in the balance between proliferation and polarization/differentiation in epithelial cells.

  11. Characterization of PR-10 genes from eight Betula species and detection of Bet v 1 isoforms in birch pollen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, M.F.; Cordewener, J.H.G.; America, A.H.P.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Bet v 1 is an important cause of hay fever in northern Europe. Bet v 1 isoforms from the European white birch (Betula pendula) have been investigated extensively, but the allergenic potency of other birch species is unknown. The presence of Bet v 1 and closely related PR-10 genes in the

  12. Effect of ethephon on protein degradation and the accumulation of pathogensis-related (PR) proteins in tomato leaf discs. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, P.; Conejero, V. (Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain))

    1990-01-01

    The effect of ethephon (2-chloroetylphosphonic acid) on the degradation of proteins and on the induction of Lycopersicon esculentum pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins was studied in tomato leaf discs. The rate of ribulose, -1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) degradation was maximal in discs after 48 hours of incubation with 1 millimolar ethephon, leading to complete disappearance of Rubisco after 96 hours. This effect was correlated with an increase in PR protein synthesis and the induction of the previously reported alkaline proteolytic enzyme PR-P69. In vivo pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that ethephon not only affected Rubisco content but that of many other {sup 35}S-labeled proteins as well, indicating that ethylene activates a general and nonspecific mechanism of protein degradation. This effect was partially inhibited in vivo by the action of pCMB, a selective inhibitor of cysteine-proteinases such as P69. These data reinforce the hypothesis that P69 and perhaps other PR proteins are involved in the mechanism of accelerated protein degradation activated by ethylene.

  13. Characterization of PR-10 genes from eight Betula species and detection of Bet v 1 isoforms in birch pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van't Westende Wendy PC

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bet v 1 is an important cause of hay fever in northern Europe. Bet v 1 isoforms from the European white birch (Betula pendula have been investigated extensively, but the allergenic potency of other birch species is unknown. The presence of Bet v 1 and closely related PR-10 genes in the genome was established by amplification and sequencing of alleles from eight birch species that represent the four subgenera within the genus Betula. Q-TOF LC-MSE was applied to identify which PR-10/Bet v 1 genes are actually expressed in pollen and to determine the relative abundances of individual isoforms in the pollen proteome. Results All examined birch species contained several PR-10 genes. In total, 134 unique sequences were recovered. Sequences were attributed to different genes or pseudogenes that were, in turn, ordered into seven subfamilies. Five subfamilies were common to all birch species. Genes of two subfamilies were expressed in pollen, while each birch species expressed a mixture of isoforms with at least four different isoforms. Isoforms that were similar to isoforms with a high IgE-reactivity (Bet v 1a = PR-10.01A01 were abundant in all species except B. lenta, while the hypoallergenic isoform Bet v 1d (= PR-10.01B01 was only found in B. pendula and its closest relatives. Conclusion Q-TOF LC-MSE allows efficient screening of Bet v 1 isoforms by determining the presence and relative abundance of these isoforms in pollen. B. pendula contains a Bet v 1-mixture in which isoforms with a high and low IgE-reactivity are both abundant. With the possible exception of B. lenta, isoforms identical or very similar to those with a high IgE-reactivity were found in the pollen proteome of all examined birch species. Consequently, these species are also predicted to be allergenic with regard to Bet v 1 related allergies.

  14. Malus hupehensis NPR1 induces pathogenesis-related protein gene expression in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J-Y; Qiao, Y-S; Lv, D; Gao, Z-H; Qu, S-C; Zhang, Z

    2012-03-01

    Most commercially grown apple cultivars are susceptible to fungal diseases. Malus hupehensis has high resistance to many diseases affecting apple cultivars. Understanding innate defence mechanisms would help to develop disease-resistant apple crops. Non-expressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) plays a key role in regulating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated systemic acquired resistance (SAR). MhNPR1 cDNA, corresponding to genomic DNA and its 5' flanking sequences, was isolated from M. hupehensis. Sequence analysis showed that the regulatory mechanism for oligomer-monomer transition of the MhNPR1 protein in apple might be similar to that of GmNPR1 in soybean, but different from that of AtNPR1 in Arabidopsis. No significant differences in MhNPR1 expression were found in M. hupehensis after infection with Botryosphaeria berengeriana, showing that MhNPR1 might be regulated by pathogens at the protein level, as described for Arabidopsis and grapevine. SA treatment significantly induced MhNPR1 expression in leaves, stems and roots, while methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment induced MhNPR1 expression in roots, but not in leaves or stems. The expression of MhNPR1 was highly increased in roots, moderately in leaves, and did not change in stems after treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). SAR marker genes (MhPR1 and MhPR5) were induced by SA, MeJA and ACC in leaves, stems and roots. Overexpression of MhNPR1 significantly induced the expression of pathogenesis-related genes (NtPR1, NtPR3 and NtPR5) in transgenic tobacco plants and resistance to the fungus Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that MhNPR1 orthologues are a component of the SA defence signalling pathway and SAR is induced in M. hupehensis. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. The potential role of PR-8 gene of apple fruit in the mode of action of yeast antagonist, Candida oleophila, in postharvest biocontrol of Botrytis cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several pathogenesis-related (PR) genes of apple have been cloned and identified in response to specific pathogens. However, different PR genes in certain organs of specific host may be involved in specific interaction with different microbes. Current research is aimed at characterizing specific P...

  16. Multiplex PCR assay for direct identification of group B streptococcal alpha-protein-like protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creti, Roberta; Fabretti, Francesca; Orefici, Graziella; von Hunolstein, Christina

    2004-03-01

    We developed a group B streptococcus multiplex PCR assay which allows, by direct analysis of the amplicon size, determination of the surface protein antigen genes of alpha-C protein, epsilon protein, Rib, Alp2, Alp3, and Alp4. The multiplex PCR assay offers a rapid and simple method of subtyping Streptococcus agalactiae based on surface protein genes.

  17. Mutational analysis of the mycobacteriophage BPs promoter PR reveals context-dependent sequences for mycobacterial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Lauren M; Hatfull, Graham F

    2014-10-01

    The PR promoter of mycobacteriophage BPs directs early lytic gene expression and is under the control of the BPs repressor, gp33. Reporter gene fusions showed that PR has modest activity in an extrachromosomal context but has activity that is barely detectable in an integrated context, even in the absence of its repressor. Mutational dissection of PR showed that it uses a canonical -10 hexamer recognized by SigA, and mutants with mutations to the sequence 5'-TATAMT had the greatest activities. It does not contain a 5'-TGN-extended -10 sequence, although mutants with mutations creating an extended -10 sequence had substantially increased promoter activity. Mutations in the -35 hexamer also influenced promoter activity but were strongly context dependent, and similar substitutions in the -35 hexamer differentially affected promoter activity, depending on the -10 and extended -10 motifs. This warrants caution in the construction of synthetic promoters or the bioinformatic prediction of promoter activity. Combinations of mutations throughout PR generated a calibrated series of promoters for expression of stably integrated recombinant genes in both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis, with maximal promoter activity being more than 2-fold that of the strong hsp60 promoter. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Gene regulation in response to protein disulphide isomerase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Per; Tachibana, Christine; Bruun, Anette W

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the activities of promoters of a number of yeast genes encoding resident endoplasmic reticulum proteins, and found increased expression in a strain with severe protein disulphide isomerase deficiency. Serial deletion in the promoter of the MPD1 gene, which encodes a PDI1-homologue...... element. The sequence (GACACG) does not resemble the unfolded protein response element. It is present in the upstream regions of the MPD1, MPD2, KAR2, PDI1 and ERO1 genes....

  19. The strawberry pathogenesis-related 10 (PR-10) Fra a proteins control flavonoid biosynthesis by binding to metabolic intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casañal, Ana; Zander, Ulrich; Muñoz, Cristina; Dupeux, Florine; Luque, Irene; Botella, Miguel Angel; Schwab, Wilfried; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Marquez, José A

    2013-12-06

    Pathogenesis-related 10 (PR-10) proteins are involved in many aspects of plant biology but their molecular function is still unclear. They are related by sequence and structural homology to mammalian lipid transport and plant abscisic acid receptor proteins and are predicted to have cavities for ligand binding. Recently, three new members of the PR-10 family, the Fra a proteins, have been identified in strawberry, where they are required for the activity of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway, which is essential for the development of color and flavor in fruits. Here, we show that Fra a proteins bind natural flavonoids with different selectivity and affinities in the low μm range. The structural analysis of Fra a 1 E and a Fra a 3-catechin complex indicates that loops L3, L5, and L7 surrounding the ligand-binding cavity show significant flexibility in the apo forms but close over the ligand in the Fra a 3-catechin complex. Our findings provide mechanistic insight on the function of Fra a proteins and suggest that PR-10 proteins, which are widespread in plants, may play a role in the control of secondary metabolic pathways by binding to metabolic intermediates.

  20. Specific maceration and induction of PR-3 gene in potato tuber tissue by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atrosepticum type III secretion system mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghabozorgy, Sohrab; Niakan, Mohammad

    2009-12-15

    The exact function of type III secretion system in some phytopathogenes including Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atrosepticum (Pca) is not understood and is a matter of debate. The aim of this study were to determine specific effect of type III secretion system on potato tubers and to reveal the connection of this system with potato resistant genes such as PR-3. A Pca hrpW fragment was subcloned into a low-copy-number cloning vector (pZH448). The resulting plasmid (pAS19) was then conjugated into the wild-type and mutant strains of Pca by type III secretion system. The virulence property of different Pca strains was studied and the influence of over expression of hrpW on maceration activity was also investigated. Furthermore, the effect of mentioned mutation on the maceration of carrot-root was evaluated. Finally, using real-time PCR, the copy-number of PR-3 gene in potato tuber tissue was assessed. In conclusion, for type III secretion system mutant strains, in contrast with the wild-type, the maceration amount of potato tuber tissue decreased after over expression of hrpW while inoculation of tubers by mutants, increased this amount. In the case of potato, HrpN and DspE proteins appeared to be avirulent factors. Compared with the wild-type strains, Pca nominated mutants significantly reduced potato PR-3 expression thus, PR-3 expression level in potato tuber tissue in answer to infiltration by Pca, depends on functional type III secretion system in the bacterium.

  1. Truncated forms of the prion protein PrP demonstrate the need for complexity in prion structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, William; Stöhr, Jan; Kendall, Amy; Stubbs, Gerald

    2015-09-01

    Self-propagation of aberrant protein folds is the defining characteristic of prions. Knowing the structural basis of self-propagation is essential to understanding prions and their related diseases. Prion rods are amyloid fibrils, but not all amyloids are prions. Prions have been remarkably intractable to structural studies, so many investigators have preferred to work with peptide fragments, particularly in the case of the mammalian prion protein PrP. We compared the structures of a number of fragments of PrP by X-ray fiber diffraction, and found that although all of the peptides adopted amyloid conformations, only the larger fragments adopted conformations that modeled the complexity of self-propagating prions, and even these fragments did not always adopt the PrP structure. It appears that the relatively complex structure of the prion form of PrP is not accessible to short model peptides, and that self-propagation may be tied to a level of structural complexity unobtainable in simple model systems. The larger fragments of PrP, however, are useful to illustrate the phenomenon of deformed templating (heterogeneous seeding), which has important biological consequences.

  2. Truncated forms of the prion protein PrP demonstrate the need for complexity in prion structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, William; Stöhr, Jan; Kendall, Amy; Stubbs, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Self-propagation of aberrant protein folds is the defining characteristic of prions. Knowing the structural basis of self-propagation is essential to understanding prions and their related diseases. Prion rods are amyloid fibrils, but not all amyloids are prions. Prions have been remarkably intractable to structural studies, so many investigators have preferred to work with peptide fragments, particularly in the case of the mammalian prion protein PrP. We compared the structures of a number of fragments of PrP by X-ray fiber diffraction, and found that although all of the peptides adopted amyloid conformations, only the larger fragments adopted conformations that modeled the complexity of self-propagating prions, and even these fragments did not always adopt the PrP structure. It appears that the relatively complex structure of the prion form of PrP is not accessible to short model peptides, and that self-propagation may be tied to a level of structural complexity unobtainable in simple model systems. The larger fragments of PrP, however, are useful to illustrate the phenomenon of deformed templating (heterogeneous seeding), which has important biological consequences.

  3. Phenotypical features of the p.R120W mutation in the GDAP1 gene causing autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivera, Rafael; Espinós, Carmen; Vílchez, Juan J; Mas, Fernando; Martínez-Rubio, Dolores; Chumillas, María José; Mayordomo, Fernando; Muelas, Nuria; Bataller, Luis; Palau, Francesc; Sevilla, Teresa

    2010-12-01

    Mutations in the ganglioside-induced-differentiation-associated protein 1 gene (GDAP1) can cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease with demyelinating (CMT4A) or axonal forms (CMT2K and ARCMT2K). Most of these mutations present a recessive inheritance, but few autosomal dominant GDAP1 mutations have also been reported. We performed a GDAP1 gene screening in a clinically well-characterized series of 81 index cases with axonal CMT neuropathy, identifying 17 patients belonging to 4 unrelated families in whom the heterozygous p.R120W was found to be the only disease-causing mutation. The main objective was to fully characterize the neuropathy caused by this mutation. The clinical picture included a mild-moderate phenotype with onset around adolescence, but great variability. Consistently, ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion were impaired to a similar degree. Nerve conduction studies revealed an axonal neuropathy. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging studies demonstrated selective involvement of intrinsic foot muscles in all patients and a uniform pattern of fatty infiltration in the calf, with distal and superficial posterior predominance. Pathological abnormalities included depletion of myelinated fibers, regenerative clusters and features of axonal degeneration with mitochondrial aggregates. Our findings highlight the relevance of dominantly transmitted p.R120W GDAP1 gene mutations which can cause an axonal CMT with a wide clinical profile. © 2010 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  4. Anatomy of a nonhost disease resistance response of pea to Fusarium solani: PR gene elicitation via DNase, chitosan and chromatin alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A Hadwiger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Of the multiplicity of plant pathogens in nature, only a few are virulent on a given plant species. Conversely, plants develop a rapid nonhost resistance response to the majority of the pathogens. The anatomy of the nonhost resistance of pea endocarp tissue against a pathogen of bean, Fusarium solani f.sp. phaseoli (Fsph and the susceptibility of pea to F. solani f sp. pisi (Fspi has been described cytologically, biochemically and molecular-biologically. Cytological changes have been followed by electron microscope and stain differentiation under white and UV light. The induction of changes in transcription, protein synthesis, expression of pathogenesis-related (PR genes, and increases in metabolic pathways culminating in low molecular weight, antifungal compounds are described biochemically. Molecular changes initiated by fungal signals to host organelles, primarily to the chromatin within host nuclei, are identified according to source of the signal and the mechanisms utilized in activating defense genes. The functions of some PR genes are defined. A hypothesis based on this data is developed to explain both why fungal growth is suppressed in nonhost resistance and why growth can continue in a susceptible reaction.

  5. Genetics and fine mapping of a purple leaf gene, BoPr, in ornamental kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Ping; Gao, Bao-Zhen; Han, Feng-Qing; Fang, Zhi-Yuan; Yang, Li-Mei; Zhuang, Mu; Lv, Hong-Hao; Liu, Yu-Mei; Li, Zhan-Sheng; Cai, Cheng-Cheng; Yu, Hai-Long; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Yang-Yong

    2017-03-14

    Due to its variegated and colorful leaves, ornamental kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala) has become a popular ornamental plant. In this study, we report the fine mapping and analysis of a candidate purple leaf gene using a backcross population and an F2 population derived from two parental lines: W1827 (with white leaves) and P1835 (with purple leaves). Genetic analysis indicated that the purple leaf trait is controlled by a single dominant gene, which we named BoPr. Using markers developed based on the reference genome '02-12', the BoPr gene was preliminarily mapped to a 280-kb interval of chromosome C09, with flanking markers M17 and BoID4714 at genetic distances of 4.3 cM and 1.5 cM, respectively. The recombination rate within this interval is almost 12 times higher than the usual level, which could be caused by assembly error for reference genome '02-12' at this interval. Primers were designed based on 'TO1000', another B. oleracea reference genome. Among the newly designed InDel markers, BRID485 and BRID490 were found to be the closest to BoPr, flanking the gene at genetic distances of 0.1 cM and 0.2 cM, respectively; the interval between the two markers is 44.8 kb (reference genome 'TO1000'). Seven annotated genes are located within the 44.8 kb genomic region, of which only Bo9g058630 shows high homology to AT5G42800 (dihydroflavonol reductase), which was identified as a candidate gene for BoPr. Blast analysis revealed that this 44.8 kb interval is located on an unanchored scaffold (Scaffold000035_P2) of '02-12', confirming the existence of assembly error at the interval between M17 and BoID4714 for reference genome '02-12'. This study identified a candidate gene for BoPr and lays a foundation for the cloning and functional analysis of this gene.

  6. A naturally occurring C-terminal fragment of the prion protein (PrP) delays disease and acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of PrPSc formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westergard, Laura; Turnbaugh, Jessie A; Harris, David A

    2011-12-23

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) undergoes constitutive proteolytic cleavage between residues 111/112 to yield a soluble N-terminal fragment (N1) and a membrane-anchored C-terminal fragment (C1). The C1 fragment represents the major proteolytic fragment of PrPC in brain and several cell types. To explore the role of C1 in prion disease, we generated Tg(C1) transgenic mice expressing this fragment (PrP(Δ23-111)) in the presence and absence of endogenous PrP. In contrast to several other N-terminally deleted forms of PrP, the C1 fragment does not cause a spontaneous neurological disease in the absence of endogenous PrP. Tg(C1) mice inoculated with scrapie prions remain healthy and do not accumulate protease-resistant PrP, demonstrating that C1 is not a substrate for conversion to PrPSc (the disease-associated isoform). Interestingly, Tg(C1) mice co-expressing C1 along with wild-type PrP (either endogenous or encoded by a second transgene) become ill after scrapie inoculation, but with a dramatically delayed time course compared with mice lacking C1. In addition, accumulation of PrPSc was markedly slowed in these animals. Similar effects were produced by a shorter C-terminal fragment of PrP(Δ23-134). These results demonstrate that C1 acts as dominant-negative inhibitor of PrPSc formation and accumulation of neurotoxic forms of PrP. Thus, C1, a naturally occurring fragment of PrPC, might play a modulatory role during the course of prion diseases. In addition, enhancing production of C1, or exogenously administering this fragment, represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of prion diseases.

  7. Sialylation of prion protein controls the rate of prion amplification, the cross-species barrier, the ratio of PrPSc glycoform and prion infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; D'Azzo, Alessandra; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2014-09-01

    The central event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) into the disease-associated, transmissible form (PrP(Sc)). Pr(PC) is a sialoglycoprotein that contains two conserved N-glycosylation sites. Among the key parameters that control prion replication identified over the years are amino acid sequence of host PrP(C) and the strain-specific structure of PrPSc. The current work highlights the previously unappreciated role of sialylation of PrP(C) glycans in prion pathogenesis, including its role in controlling prion replication rate, infectivity, cross-species barrier and PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. The current study demonstrates that undersialylated PrP(C) is selected during prion amplification in Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCAb) at the expense of oversialylated PrP(C). As a result, PMCAb-derived PrP(Sc) was less sialylated than brain-derived PrP(Sc). A decrease in PrPSc sialylation correlated with a drop in infectivity of PMCAb-derived material. Nevertheless, enzymatic de-sialylation of PrP(C) using sialidase was found to increase the rate of PrP(Sc) amplification in PMCAb from 10- to 10,000-fold in a strain-dependent manner. Moreover, de-sialylation of PrP(C) reduced or eliminated a species barrier of for prion amplification in PMCAb. These results suggest that the negative charge of sialic acid controls the energy barrier of homologous and heterologous prion replication. Surprisingly, the sialylation status of PrP(C) was also found to control PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. A decrease in Pr(PC) sialylation levels resulted in a higher percentage of the diglycosylated glycoform in PrP(Sc). 2D analysis of charge distribution revealed that the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C) differed from that of spleen-derived PrP(C). Knocking out lysosomal sialidase Neu1 did not change the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C), suggesting that Neu1 is not responsible for desialylation of Pr

  8. Sialylation of prion protein controls the rate of prion amplification, the cross-species barrier, the ratio of PrPSc glycoform and prion infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizaveta Katorcha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C into the disease-associated, transmissible form (PrP(Sc. Pr(PC is a sialoglycoprotein that contains two conserved N-glycosylation sites. Among the key parameters that control prion replication identified over the years are amino acid sequence of host PrP(C and the strain-specific structure of PrPSc. The current work highlights the previously unappreciated role of sialylation of PrP(C glycans in prion pathogenesis, including its role in controlling prion replication rate, infectivity, cross-species barrier and PrP(Sc glycoform ratio. The current study demonstrates that undersialylated PrP(C is selected during prion amplification in Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCAb at the expense of oversialylated PrP(C. As a result, PMCAb-derived PrP(Sc was less sialylated than brain-derived PrP(Sc. A decrease in PrPSc sialylation correlated with a drop in infectivity of PMCAb-derived material. Nevertheless, enzymatic de-sialylation of PrP(C using sialidase was found to increase the rate of PrP(Sc amplification in PMCAb from 10- to 10,000-fold in a strain-dependent manner. Moreover, de-sialylation of PrP(C reduced or eliminated a species barrier of for prion amplification in PMCAb. These results suggest that the negative charge of sialic acid controls the energy barrier of homologous and heterologous prion replication. Surprisingly, the sialylation status of PrP(C was also found to control PrP(Sc glycoform ratio. A decrease in Pr(PC sialylation levels resulted in a higher percentage of the diglycosylated glycoform in PrP(Sc. 2D analysis of charge distribution revealed that the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C differed from that of spleen-derived PrP(C. Knocking out lysosomal sialidase Neu1 did not change the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C, suggesting that Neu1 is not responsible for desialylation of Pr

  9. Manipulating the Prion Protein Gene Sequence and Expression Levels with CRISPR/Cas9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Kaczmarczyk

    Full Text Available The mammalian prion protein (PrP, encoded by Prnp is most infamous for its central role in prion diseases, invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans, food animals, and animals in the wild. However, PrP is also hypothesized to be an important receptor for toxic protein conformers in Alzheimer's disease, and is associated with other clinically relevant processes such as cancer and stroke. Thus, key insights into important clinical areas, as well as into understanding PrP functions in normal physiology, can be obtained from studying transgenic mouse models and cell culture systems. However, the Prnp locus is difficult to manipulate by homologous recombination, making modifications of the endogenous locus rarely attempted. Fortunately in recent years genome engineering technologies, like TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9 (CC9, have brought exceptional new possibilities for manipulating Prnp. Herein, we present our observations made during systematic experiments with the CC9 system targeting the endogenous mouse Prnp locus, to either modify sequences or to boost PrP expression using CC9-based synergistic activation mediators (SAMs. It is our hope that this information will aid and encourage researchers to implement gene-targeting techniques into their research program.

  10. Overexpression of NtPR-Q Up-Regulates Multiple Defense-Related Genes in Nicotiana tabacum and Enhances Plant Resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanman Tang; Qiuping Liu; Ying Liu; Linli Zhang; Wei Ding

    2017-01-01

    Various classes of plant pathogenesis-related proteins have been identified in the past several decades. PR-Q, a member of the PR3 family encoding chitinases, has played an important role in regulating plant resistance and preventing pathogen infection. In this paper, we functionally characterized NtPR-Q in tobacco plants and found that the overexpression of NtPR-Q in tobacco Yunyan87 resulted in higher resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation. Surprisingly, overexpression of NtPR-Q l...

  11. PrPc capping in T cells promotes its association with the lipid raft proteins reggie-1 and reggie-2 and leads to signal transduction : [Langfassung

    OpenAIRE

    Stürmer, Claudia; Langhorst, Matthias F.; Wiechers, Marianne F.; Legler, Daniel F.; Hannbeck von Hanwehr, Sylvia; Guse, Andreas H.; Plattner, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPc) resides in lipid rafts, yet the type of raft and the physiological function of PrPc are unclear. We show here that cross-linking of PrPc with specific antibodies leads to 1) PrPc capping in Jurkat and human peripheral blood T cells; 2) to cocapping with the intracellular lipid raft proteins reggie-1 and reggie-2; 3) to signal transduction as seen by MAP kinase phosphorylation and an elevation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration; 4) to the recruitment of T...

  12. Expression of protein-coding genes embedded in ribosomal DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steinar D; Haugen, Peik; Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a specialised chromosomal location that is dedicated to high-level transcription of ribosomal RNA genes. Interestingly, rDNAs are frequently interrupted by parasitic elements, some of which carry protein genes. These are non-LTR retrotransposons and group II introns...... that encode reverse transcriptase-like genes, and group I introns and archaeal introns that encode homing endonuclease genes (HEGs). Although rDNA-embedded protein genes are widespread in nuclei, organelles and bacteria, there is surprisingly little information available on how these genes are expressed....... Exceptions include a handful of HEGs from group I introns. Recent studies have revealed unusual and essential roles of group I and group I-like ribozymes in the endogenous expression of HEGs. Here we discuss general aspects of rDNA-embedded protein genes and focus on HEG expression from group I introns...

  13. Gene composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Barrow, Adrienne; Wallace, Ellen; Grice, Rena; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-04-21

    To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene assembly procedure with mis-match specific endonuclease

  14. Gene Composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mixon Mark

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. Results An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. Conclusion We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene

  15. Protein Subcellular Relocalization of Duplicated Genes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-Lun; Pan, An Qi; Adams, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplications during eukaroytic evolution, by successive rounds of polyploidy and by smaller scale duplications, have provided an enormous reservoir of new genes for the evolution of new functions. Preservation of many duplicated genes can be ascribed to changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. Protein subcellular relocalization (protein targeting to a new location within the cell) is another way that duplicated genes can diverge. We studied subcellular relocalization of gene pairs duplicated during the evolution of the Brassicaceae including gene pairs from the alpha whole genome duplication that occurred at the base of the family. We analyzed experimental localization data from green fluorescent protein experiments for 128 duplicate pairs in Arabidopsis thaliana, revealing 19 pairs with subcellular relocalization. Many more of the duplicate pairs with relocalization than with the same localization showed an accelerated rate of amino acid sequence evolution in one duplicate, and one gene showed evidence for positive selection. We studied six duplicate gene pairs in more detail. We used gene family analysis with several pairs to infer which gene shows relocalization. We identified potential sequence mutations through comparative analysis that likely result in relocalization of two duplicated gene products. We show that four cases of relocalization have new expression patterns, compared with orthologs in outgroup species, including two with novel expression in pollen. This study provides insights into subcellular relocalization of evolutionarily recent gene duplicates and features of genes whose products have been relocalized. PMID:25193306

  16. Role of PrPC Expression in Tau Protein Levels and Phosphorylation in Alzheimer¿s Disease Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Vergara, Cristina; Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Ferrer, I. M; Río, J. A. del; Gavín, Rosalina

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques mainly consisting of hydrophobic -amyloid peptide (A) aggregates and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) composed principally of hyperphosphorylated tau. A oligomers have been described as the earliest effectors to negatively affect synaptic structure and plasticity in the affected brains, and cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been proposed as receptor for these oligomers. The most widely accepted theory holds that the to...

  17. A Novel WRKY transcription factor is required for induction of PR-1a gene expression by salicylic acid and bacterial elicitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Verk, Marcel C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/327618671; Pappaioannou, Dimitri; Neeleman, Lyda; Bol, John F; Linthorst, Huub J M

    PR-1a is a salicylic acid-inducible defense gene of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). One-hybrid screens identified a novel tobacco WRKY transcription factor (NtWRKY12) with specific binding sites in the PR-1a promoter at positions -564 (box WK(1)) and -859 (box WK(2)). NtWRKY12 belongs to the class of

  18. Gene duplication and the evolution of moonlighting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eEspinosa-Cantú

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication is a recurring phenomenon in genome evolution and a major driving force in the gain of biological functions. Here, we examine the role of gene duplication in the origin and maintenance of moonlighting proteins, with special focus on functional redundancy and innovation, molecular tradeoffs, and genetic robustness. An overview of specific examples--mainly from yeast--suggests a widespread conservation of moonlighting behavior in duplicate genes after long evolutionary times. Dosage amplification and incomplete subfunctionalization appear to be prevalent in the maintenance of multifunctionality. We discuss the role of gene-expression divergence and paralog responsiveness in moonlighting proteins with overlapping biochemical properties. Future studies analyzing multifunctional genes in a more systematic and comprehensive manner will not only enable a better understanding of how this emerging class of protein behavior originates and is maintained, but also provide new insights on the mechanisms of evolution by gene duplication.

  19. Gene duplication and the evolution of moonlighting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; Ascencio, Diana; Barona-Gómez, Francisco; DeLuna, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication is a recurring phenomenon in genome evolution and a major driving force in the gain of biological functions. Here, we examine the role of gene duplication in the origin and maintenance of moonlighting proteins, with special focus on functional redundancy and innovation, molecular tradeoffs, and genetic robustness. An overview of specific examples-mainly from yeast-suggests a widespread conservation of moonlighting behavior in duplicate genes after long evolutionary times. Dosage amplification and incomplete subfunctionalization appear to be prevalent in the maintenance of multifunctionality. We discuss the role of gene-expression divergence and paralog responsiveness in moonlighting proteins with overlapping biochemical properties. Future studies analyzing multifunctional genes in a more systematic and comprehensive manner will not only enable a better understanding of how this emerging class of protein behavior originates and is maintained, but also provide new insights on the mechanisms of evolution by gene duplication.

  20. The Structural Characterization of Tumor Fusion Genes and Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dandan; Li, Daixi; Qin, Guangrong; Zhang, Wen; Ouyang, Jian; Zhang, Menghuan; Xie, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation, which generates fusion proteins in blood tumor or solid tumor, is considered as one of the major causes leading to cancer. Recent studies suggested that the disordered fragments in a fusion protein might contribute to its carcinogenicity. Here, we investigated the sequence feature near the breakpoints in the fusion partner genes, the structure features of breakpoints in fusion proteins, and the posttranslational modification preference in the fusion proteins. Result...

  1. De Novo Origin of Human Protein-Coding Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA–seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes. PMID:22102831

  2. Identification of the bacteriophage T4 unf ( = alc) gene product, a protein involved in the shutoff of host transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, R E; Haas, N; Snustad, D P

    1984-10-01

    The introduction of plasmid pR386 into E. coli cells renders them restrictive to the growth of phage T4 unf ( = alc) mutants. This system has been used to isolate Unf+ revertants, which, along with the mutant parental strains, have been used to identify the unf gene product by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Synthesis of the unf gene product, a polypeptide of just over 18,000 daltons in size, begins within 1 min after infection and terminates at about 12 min after infection at 30 degrees. Gene dosage experiments suggest that the unf protein functions catalytically.

  3. Exacerbation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in prion protein (PrPc-null mice: evidence for a critical role of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourdain Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellular prion protein (PrPc is a host-encoded glycoprotein whose transconformation into PrP scrapie (PrPSc initiates prion diseases. The role of PrPc in health is still obscure, but many candidate functions have been attributed to the protein, both in the immune and the nervous systems. Recent data show that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is worsened in mice lacking PrPc. Disease exacerbation has been attributed to T cells that would differentiate into more aggressive effectors when deprived of PrPc. However, alternative interpretations such as reduced resistance of neurons to autoimmune insult and exacerbated gliosis leading to neuronal deficits were not considered. Method To better discriminate the contribution of immune cells versus neural cells, reciprocal bone marrow chimeras with differential expression of PrPc in the lymphoid or in the central nervous system (CNS were generated. Mice were subsequently challenged with MOG35-55 peptide and clinical disease as well as histopathology were compared in both groups. Furthermore, to test directly the T cell hypothesis, we compared the encephalitogenicity of adoptively transferred PrPc-deficient versus PrPc-sufficient, anti-MOG T cells. Results First, EAE exacerbation in PrPc-deficient mice was confirmed. Irradiation exacerbated EAE in all the chimeras and controls, but disease was more severe in mice with a PrPc-deleted CNS and a normal immune system than in the reciprocal construction. Moreover, there was no indication that anti-MOG responses were different in PrPc-sufficient and PrPc-deficient mice. Paradoxically, PrPc-deficient anti-MOG 2D2 T cells were less pathogenic than PrPc-expressing 2D2 T cells. Conclusions In view of the present data, it can be concluded that the origin of EAE exacerbation in PrPc-ablated mice resides in the absence of the prion protein in the CNS. Furthermore, the absence of PrPc on both neural and immune cells does not

  4. The structure of the protein phosphatase 2A PR65/A subunit reveals the conformation of its 15 tandemly repeated HEAT motifs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Hanlon, N; Turowski, P; Hemmings, B A; Barford, D

    1999-01-01

    The PR65/A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A serves as a scaffolding molecule to coordinate the assembly of the catalytic subunit and a variable regulatory B subunit, generating functionally diverse heterotrimers. Mutations of the beta isoform of PR65 are associated with lung and colon tumors. The

  5. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  6. Loss of prion protein induces a primed state of type I interferon-responsive genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malachin, Giulia; Reiten, Malin R.; Salvesen, Øyvind

    2017-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been extensively studied because of its pivotal role in prion diseases; however, its functions remain incompletely understood. A unique line of goats has been identified that carries a nonsense mutation that abolishes synthesis of PrPC. In these animals, the Pr...

  7. Antibody-IL2 Fusion Protein Delivery by Gene Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolet, Charles

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the work described is to assess the feasibility of a gene therapy approach to deliver a specific antibody cytokine fusion protein called CC49-1L2 to a tumor expressing antigen reactive with the antibody...

  8. Associating genes and protein complexes with disease via network propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oron Vanunu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental challenge in human health is the identification of disease-causing genes. Recently, several studies have tackled this challenge via a network-based approach, motivated by the observation that genes causing the same or similar diseases tend to lie close to one another in a network of protein-protein or functional interactions. However, most of these approaches use only local network information in the inference process and are restricted to inferring single gene associations. Here, we provide a global, network-based method for prioritizing disease genes and inferring protein complex associations, which we call PRINCE. The method is based on formulating constraints on the prioritization function that relate to its smoothness over the network and usage of prior information. We exploit this function to predict not only genes but also protein complex associations with a disease of interest. We test our method on gene-disease association data, evaluating both the prioritization achieved and the protein complexes inferred. We show that our method outperforms extant approaches in both tasks. Using data on 1,369 diseases from the OMIM knowledgebase, our method is able (in a cross validation setting to rank the true causal gene first for 34% of the diseases, and infer 139 disease-related complexes that are highly coherent in terms of the function, expression and conservation of their member proteins. Importantly, we apply our method to study three multi-factorial diseases for which some causal genes have been found already: prostate cancer, alzheimer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PRINCE's predictions for these diseases highly match the known literature, suggesting several novel causal genes and protein complexes for further investigation.

  9. Gene, protein and network of male sterility in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang eKun; Peng eXiaojue; Ji eYanxiao; Pingfang eYang; Zhu eYingguo; Shaoqing eLi

    2013-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important model crop plants whose heterosis has been well exploited in commercial hybrid seed production via a variety of types of male sterile lines. Hybrid rice cultivation area is steadily expanding around the world, especially in Southern Asia. Characterization of genes and proteins related to male sterility aims to understand how and why the male sterility occurs, and which proteins are the key players for microspores abortion. Recently, a series of genes an...

  10. Gene, protein, and network of male sterility in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kun; Peng, Xiaojue; Ji, Yanxiao; Yang, Pingfang; Zhu, Yingguo; Li, Shaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important model crop plants whose heterosis has been well-exploited in commercial hybrid seed production via a variety of types of male-sterile lines. Hybrid rice cultivation area is steadily expanding around the world, especially in Southern Asia. Characterization of genes and proteins related to male sterility aims to understand how and why the male sterility occurs, and which proteins are the key players for microspores abortion. Recently, a series of genes and prot...

  11. Comparison of genes fragments coding for ribosomal protein in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María I. Oloriz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial sequences of sugarcane genes, obtained by means of a subtractive library were identified by BLAST alignment against all sequences available in the databases. During the homology search, five genes were identified as chloroplast or citosol ribosomal proteins. The biggest homology obtained among the identified sequences as ribosomal proteins of sugarcane was with the corn genome. Key words: consensus domain, Saccharum spp., subtractive library

  12. Gene essentiality and the topology of protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulomb, Stéphane; Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis; Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude

    2005-01-01

    The mechanistic bases for gene essentiality and for cell mutational resistance have long been disputed. The recent availability of large protein interaction databases has fuelled the analysis of protein interaction networks and several authors have proposed that gene dispensability could be strongly related to some topological parameters of these networks. However, many results were based on protein interaction data whose biases were not taken into account. In this article, we show that the essentiality of a gene in yeast is poorly related to the number of interactants (or degree) of the corresponding protein and that the physiological consequences of gene deletions are unrelated to several other properties of proteins in the interaction networks, such as the average degrees of their nearest neighbours, their clustering coefficients or their relative distances. We also found that yeast protein interaction networks lack degree correlation, i.e. a propensity for their vertices to associate according to their degrees. Gene essentiality and more generally cell resistance against mutations thus seem largely unrelated to many parameters of protein network topology. PMID:16087428

  13. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification is pro...... PCR strategy is a highly specific and sensitive way to monitor recombinant DNA in environments like the efflux of a biotechnological plant....

  14. A novel homozygous p.R1105X mutation of the AP4E1 gene in twins with hereditary spastic paraplegia and mycobacterial disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Fei Kong

    Full Text Available We report identical twins with intellectual disability, progressive spastic paraplegia and short stature, born to a consanguineous family. Intriguingly, both children presented with lymphadenitis caused by the live Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine. Two syndromes - hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP and mycobacterial disease - thus occurred simultaneously. Whole-exome sequencing (WES revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation (p.R1105X of the AP4E1 gene, which was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The p.R1105X mutation has no effect on AP4E1 mRNA levels, but results in lower levels of AP-4ε protein and of the other components of the AP-4 complex, as shown by western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence. Thus, the C-terminal part of the AP-4ε subunit plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of the AP-4 complex. No abnormalities of the IL-12/IFN-γ axis or oxidative burst pathways were identified. In conclusion, we identified twins with autosomal recessive AP-4 deficiency associated with HSP and mycobacterial disease, suggesting that AP-4 may play important role in the neurological and immunological systems.

  15. Optimization of influenza A vaccine virus by reverse genetic using chimeric HA and NA genes with an extended PR8 backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Julie; Boukhebza, Houda; De Saint Jean, Amélie; Sodoyer, Régis; Legastelois, Isabelle; Moste, Catherine

    2015-08-20

    The yield of influenza antigen production may significantly vary between vaccine strains; for example the A/California/07/09 (H1N1)-X179A vaccine virus, prepared during 2009 influenza pandemic, presented a low antigen yield in eggs compared to other seasonal H1N1 reassortants. In this study a bi-chimeric virus expressing HA and NA genes with A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) (PR8) and X179A domains was rescued by reverse genetics using a mixture of Vero/CHOK1 cell lines (Medina et al. [7]). The bi-chimeric virus obtained demonstrated to yield much larger amounts of HA than X179A in eggs as measured by single-radial-immunodiffusion (SRID), the reference method to quantify HA protein in influenza vaccine. Such kind of optimized virus using PR8 backbone derived chimeric glycoproteins could be used as improved seed viruses for vaccine production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Structural Characterization of Tumor Fusion Genes and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dandan; Li, Daixi; Qin, Guangrong; Zhang, Wen; Ouyang, Jian; Zhang, Menghuan; Xie, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation, which generates fusion proteins in blood tumor or solid tumor, is considered as one of the major causes leading to cancer. Recent studies suggested that the disordered fragments in a fusion protein might contribute to its carcinogenicity. Here, we investigated the sequence feature near the breakpoints in the fusion partner genes, the structure features of breakpoints in fusion proteins, and the posttranslational modification preference in the fusion proteins. Results show that the breakpoints in the fusion partner genes have both sequence preference and structural preference. At the sequence level, nucleotide combination AG is preferred before the breakpoint and GG is preferred at the breakpoint. At the structural level, the breakpoints in the fusion proteins prefer to be located in the disordered regions. Further analysis suggests the phosphorylation sites at serine, threonine, and the methylation sites at arginine are enriched in disordered regions of the fusion proteins. Using EML4-ALK as an example, we further explained how the fusion protein leads to the protein disorder and contributes to its carcinogenicity. The sequence and structural features of the fusion proteins may help the scientific community to predict novel breakpoints in fusion genes and better understand the structure and function of fusion proteins.

  17. Novel receptor-like kinases in cacao contain PR-1 extracellular domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Costa, Gustavo Gilson Lacerda; Fiorin, Gabriel Lorencini; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa

    2013-08-01

    Members of the pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR-1) family are well-known markers of plant defence responses, forming part of the arsenal of the secreted proteins produced on pathogen recognition. Here, we report the identification of two cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) PR-1s that are fused to transmembrane regions and serine/threonine kinase domains, in a manner characteristic of receptor-like kinases (RLKs). These proteins (TcPR-1f and TcPR-1g) were named PR-1 receptor kinases (PR-1RKs). Phylogenetic analysis of RLKs and PR-1 proteins from cacao indicated that PR-1RKs originated from a fusion between sequences encoding PR-1 and the kinase domain of a LecRLK (Lectin Receptor-Like Kinase). Retrotransposition marks surround TcPR-1f, suggesting that retrotransposition was involved in the origin of PR-1RKs. Genes with a similar domain architecture to cacao PR-1RKs were found in rice (Oryza sativa), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) and a nonphototrophic bacterium (Herpetosiphon aurantiacus). However, their kinase domains differed from those found in LecRLKs, indicating the occurrence of convergent evolution. TcPR-1g expression was up-regulated in the biotrophic stage of witches' broom disease, suggesting a role for PR-1RKs during cacao defence responses. We hypothesize that PR-1RKs transduce a defence signal by interacting with a PR-1 ligand. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  18. Disease candidate gene identification and prioritization using protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aronow Bruce J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most of the current disease candidate gene identification and prioritization methods depend on functional annotations, the coverage of the gene functional annotations is a limiting factor. In the current study, we describe a candidate gene prioritization method that is entirely based on protein-protein interaction network (PPIN analyses. Results For the first time, extended versions of the PageRank and HITS algorithms, and the K-Step Markov method are applied to prioritize disease candidate genes in a training-test schema. Using a list of known disease-related genes from our earlier study as a training set ("seeds", and the rest of the known genes as a test list, we perform large-scale cross validation to rank the candidate genes and also evaluate and compare the performance of our approach. Under appropriate settings – for example, a back probability of 0.3 for PageRank with Priors and HITS with Priors, and step size 6 for K-Step Markov method – the three methods achieved a comparable AUC value, suggesting a similar performance. Conclusion Even though network-based methods are generally not as effective as integrated functional annotation-based methods for disease candidate gene prioritization, in a one-to-one comparison, PPIN-based candidate gene prioritization performs better than all other gene features or annotations. Additionally, we demonstrate that methods used for studying both social and Web networks can be successfully used for disease candidate gene prioritization.

  19. Recombinant mouse prion protein alone or in combination with lipopolysaccharide alters expression of innate immunity genes in the colon of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervishi, Elda; Lam, Tran H; Dunn, Suzana M; Zwierzchowski, Grzegorz; Saleem, Fozia; Wishart, David S; Ametaj, Burim N

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test whether recombinant mouse (mo)PrP alone or in combination with LPS or under simulated endotoxemia would affect expression of genes related to host inflammatory and antimicrobial responses. To test our hypotheses colon tissues were collected from 16 male mice (FVB/N strain) and mounted in an Ussing chamber. Application of moPrP to the mucosal side of the colon affected genes related to TLR- and NLR- signaling and antimicrobial responses. When LPS was added on the mucosal side of the colon, genes related to TLR, Nlrp3 inflammasome, and iron transport proteins were over-expressed. Addition of LPS to the serosal side of the colon up-regulated genes related to TLR- and NLR-signaling, Nlrp3 inflammasome, and a chemokine. Treatment with both moPrP and LPS to the mucosal side of the colon upregulated genes associated with TLR, downstream signal transduction (DST), inflammatory response, attraction of dendritic cells to the site of inflammation, and the JNK-apoptosis pathway. Administration of moPrP to the mucosal side and LPS to the serosal side of the colon affected genes related to TLR- and NLR-signaling, DST, apoptosis, inflammatory response, cytokines, chemokines, and antimicrobial peptides. Overall this study suggests a potential role for moPrP as an endogenous 'danger signal' associated with activation of colon genes related to innate immunity and antibacterial responses.

  20. Origins of gene, genetic code, protein and life: comprehensive view ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have investigated the origin of genes, the genetic code, proteins and life using six indices (hydropathy, -helix, -sheet and -turn formabilities, acidic amino acid content and basic amino acid content) necessary for appropriate three-dimensional structure formation of globular proteins. From the analysis of microbial ...

  1. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kenyae. J. Genet. 81, 5–11]. Introduction. Subspecies of Bacillus thuringiensis, a sporulating bac- terium, produce a wide range of insecticidal crystal proteins. These have been grouped on the basis of their toxicity spectrum for a ...

  2. Identification and cloning of two insecticidal protein genes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most widely applied type of microbial pesticide due to its high specificity and environmental safety. The activity of Bt is largely attributed to the insecticidal crystal protein encoded by the cry genes. Different insecticidal crystal proteins of Bt have different bioactivity against distinct agricultural ...

  3. Présentation de la rubrique "Imágenes en movimientos"

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Le cinéma est un art du présent, la recherche en sciences sociales ne peut en détourner les yeux. Il ne fonctionne jamais comme une simple chambre d’enregistrement de ce présent : scénario, prise de vue, montage, mixage… donnent à voir le réel à travers un prisme toujours fécond, que l’on essaiera de rendre polémique. Il ne s’agit pas de critiques de cinéma, mais du regard partial que porte le chercheur sur des documents dont le support de diffusion modifie le rapport à l’image, à la source. ...

  4. [Gene technology in animal husbandry, new research approaches exemplified by the milk protein gene of cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldermann, H

    1989-02-01

    For investigation of bovine milk protein genes several methods of recombinant DNA techniques are presented. Possible applications of genome research in animal breeding are given including the characterization of structure and function for single genes, gene mapping as well as screening for gene variants in populations. Hence it follows that scientific and practical developments can be expected and will be an influence on future animal production.

  5. Analysis of gene and protein name synonyms in Entrez Gene and UniProtKB resources

    KAUST Repository

    Arkasosy, Basil

    2013-05-11

    Ambiguity in texts is a well-known problem: words can carry several meanings, and hence, can be read and interpreted differently. This is also true in the biological literature; names of biological concepts, such as genes and proteins, might be ambiguous, referring in some cases to more than one gene or one protein, or in others, to both genes and proteins at the same time. Public biological databases give a very useful insight about genes and proteins information, including their names. In this study, we made a thorough analysis of the nomenclatures of genes and proteins in two data sources and for six different species. We developed an automated process that parses, extracts, processes and stores information available in two major biological databases: Entrez Gene and UniProtKB. We analysed gene and protein synonyms, their types, frequencies, and the ambiguities within a species, in between data sources and cross-species. We found that at least 40% of the cross-species ambiguities are caused by names that are already ambiguous within the species. Our study shows that from the six species we analysed (Homo Sapiens, Mus Musculus, Arabidopsis Thaliana, Oryza Sativa, Bacillus Subtilis and Pseudomonas Fluorescens), rice (Oriza Sativa) has the best naming model in Entrez Gene database, with low ambiguities between data sources and cross-species.

  6. Systems properties of proteins encoded by imprinted genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh

    2010-10-01

    Genomically imprinted genes show parentally fixed mono-allelic expression and are important for the mammalian development. Dysregulation of genomic imprinting leads to several complex pathological conditions. Though the genetic and epigenetic regulation of imprinted genes has been well studied, their protein aspects are largely ignored. Here, we systematically studied a sub-network centered on proteins encoded by imprinted genes within human interactome. Using concepts of network biology, we uncover a highly connected, transitive and central network module of imprinted gene-products and their interacting partners (IGPN). The network is enriched in development, metabolism and cell cycle related functions and its malfunctioning ascribes error intolerance to human interactome network. Further, detailed analysis revealed that its higher centrality is determined by 'date' interactions among the proteins belonging to different functional classes than the 'party' interactions within the same functional class. Interestingly, a significant proportion of this network genetically associates with disease phenotypes. Moreover, the network comprises of gene-sets that are upregulated in leukemia, psychosis, obesity/diabetes and downregulated in autism. We conclude that imprinted gene-products are part of a functionally and topologically important module of human interactome and errors in this sub-network are intolerant to, otherwise robust, human interactome. The findings might also shed light on how imprinted genes, which are rather very few, coordinate at protein level to pleiotropically regulate growth and metabolism during embryonic and post-natal development.

  7. Subcellular localization of Arabidopsis pathogenesis-related 1 (PR1) protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pečenková, Tamara; Pleskot, Roman; Žárský, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 825. E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14886S Grant - others:OPPK(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21519 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : cape * mvb * pi(3)p * pr1 * Secretion * Trafficking Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  8. binding protein gene from Dasypyrum Villosum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... common wheat. Blue copper-binding protein (BCB) can bind a single copper atom (Ryden and Hunt, 1993). The copper binding sites consist of two ..... Moerschbacher BM, Noll U, Gorrichon L, Reisener HJ (1990). Specific inhibition of lignification breaks hypersensitive resistance of wheat to stem rust.

  9. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eKeith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorised according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest novel genes that may also contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity.

  10. Comparison of abnormal isoform of prion protein in prion-infected cell lines and primary-cultured neurons by PrPSc-specific immunostaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Misaki; Fujiwara, Ai; Suzuki, Akio; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Hasebe, Rie; Masujin, Kentaro; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2016-08-01

    We established abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrPSc)-specific double immunostaining using mAb 132, which recognizes aa 119-127 of the PrP molecule, and novel PrPSc-specific mAb 8D5, which recognizes the N-terminal region of the PrP molecule. Using the PrPSc-specific double immunostaining, we analysed PrPSc in immortalized neuronal cell lines and primary cerebral-neuronal cultures infected with prions. The PrPSc-specific double immunostaining showed the existence of PrPSc positive for both mAbs 132 and 8D5, as well as those positive only for either mAb 132 or mAb 8D5. This indicated that double immunostaining detects a greater number of PrPSc species than single immunostaining. Double immunostaining revealed cell-type-dependent differences in PrPSc staining patterns. In the 22 L prion strain-infected Neuro2a (N2a)-3 cells, a subclone of N2a neuroblastoma cell line, or GT1-7, a subclone of the GT1 hypothalamic neuronal cell line, granular PrPSc stains were observed at the perinuclear regions and cytoplasm, whereas unique string-like PrPSc stains were predominantly observed on the surface of the 22 L strain-infected primary cerebral neurons. Only 14 % of PrPSc in the 22 L strain-infected N2a-3 cells were positive for mAb 8D5, indicating that most of the PrPSc in N2a-3 lack the N-terminal portion. In contrast, nearly half PrPSc detected in the 22 L strain-infected primary cerebral neurons were positive for mAb 8D5, suggesting the abundance of full-length PrPSc that possesses the N-terminal portion of PrP. Further analysis of prion-infected primary neurons using PrPSc-specific immunostaining will reveal the neuron-specific mechanism for prion propagation.

  11. Prioritization of candidate genes for cattle reproductive traits, based on protein-protein interactions, gene expression, and text-mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulsegge, Ina; Woelders, Henri; Smits, Mari

    2013-01-01

    and processes in brain areas and pituitary involved in reproductive traits in cattle using information derived from three different data sources: gene expression, protein-protein interactions, and literature. We identified 59, 89, 53, 23, and 71 genes in bovine amygdala, dorsal hypothalamus, hippocampus......, pituitary, and ventral hypothalamus, respectively, potentially involved in processes underlying estrus and estrous behavior. Functional annotation of the candidate genes points to a number of tissue-specific processes of which the "neurotransmitter/ion channel/synapse" process in the amygdala, "steroid...

  12. Low frequency of the scrapile resistance-associated allele and presence of lysine-171 allele of the prion protein gene in Italian Biellese ovine breed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acutis, P.L.; Sbaiz, L.; Verburg, F.J.; Riina, M.V.; Ru, G.; Moda, G.; Caramelli, M.; Bossers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Frequencies of polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the prion protein (PrP) gene were studied in 1207 pure-bred and cross-bred Italian Biellese rams, a small ovine breed of about 65 000 head in Italy. Aside from the five most common alleles (VRQ, ARQ, ARR, AHQ and ARH), the rare ARK allele

  13. Prediction of human protein function according to Gene Ontology categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gupta, Ramneek; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Motivation: The human genome project has led to the discovery of many human protein coding genes which were previously unknown. As a large fraction of these are functionally uncharacterized, it is of interest to develop methods for predicting their molecular function from sequence.Results: We have...... calculated from the amino acid composition. This allows for prediction of the function for orphan proteins where no homologs can be found. Using this method we propose two novel receptors in the human genome, and further demonstrate chromosomal clustering of related proteins....... developed a method for prediction of protein function for a subset of classes from the Gene Ontology classification scheme. This subset includes several pharmaceutically interesting categories-transcription factors, receptors, ion channels, stress and immune response proteins, hormones and growth factors...

  14. PrPc capping in T cells promotes its association with the lipid raft proteins reggie-1 and reggie-2 and leads to signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuermer, Claudia A O; Langhorst, Matthias F; Wiechers, Marianne F; Legler, Daniel F; Von Hanwehr, Sylvia Hannbeck; Guse, Andreas H; Plattner, Helmut

    2004-11-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPc) resides in lipid rafts, yet the type of raft and the physiological function of PrPc are unclear. We show here that cross-linking of PrPc with specific antibodies leads to 1) PrPc capping in Jurkat and human peripheral blood T cells; 2) to cocapping with the intracellular lipid raft proteins reggie-1 and reggie-2; 3) to signal transduction as seen by MAP kinase phosphorylation and an elevation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration; 4) to the recruitment of Thy-1, TCR/CD3, fyn, lck and LAT into the cap along with local tyrosine phosphorylation and F-actin polymerization, and later, internalization of PrPc together with the reggies into limp-2 positive lysosomes. Thus, PrPc association with reggie rafts triggers distinct transmembrane signal transduction events in T cells that promote the focal concentration of PrPc itself by guiding activated PrPc into preformed reggie caps and then to the recruitment of important interacting signaling molecules.

  15. Detection of PrPCWD in feces from naturally exposed Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using protein misfolding cyclic amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulford, Bruce; Spraker, Terry R; Wyckoff, A Christy; Meyerett, Crystal; Bender, Heather; Ferguson, Adam; Wyatt, Brittney; Lockwood, Krista; Powers, Jenny; Telling, Glenn C; Wild, Margaret A; Zabel, Mark D

    2012-04-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting captive and free-ranging cervids. Currently, tests for CWD in live animals involve relatively invasive procedures to collect lymphoid tissue biopsies and examine them for CWD-associated, protease-resistant cervid prion protein (PrP(CWD)) detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). We adapted an ultrasensitive prion detection system, protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), to detect PrP(CWD) in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) feces. Our PMCA reproducibly detected a 1.2 × 10(7) dilution of PrP(CWD) (a 10% infected brain homogenate diluted 1.2 × 10(6)-fold into 10% fecal homogenates), equivalent to approximately 100 pg of PrP(CWD)/g of feces. We developed a semiquantitative scoring system based on the first PMCA round at which PrP(CWD) was detected and fit a nonlinear regression curve to our serial dilutions to correlate PMCA scores with known PrP(CWD) concentrations. We used this PMCA scoring system to detect PrP(CWD) and estimate its concentration in feces from free-ranging elk from Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. We compared our results to PrP(CWD) IHC of rectoanal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue and obex from the same animals. The PMCA successfully detected PrP(CWD) in feces from elk that were positive by IHC, with estimated prion loads from 100 to 5,000 pg PrP(CWD)/g of feces. These data show for the first time PrP(CWD) in feces from naturally exposed free-ranging elk and demonstrate the potential of PMCA as a new, noninvasive CWD diagnostic tool to complement IHC.

  16. Overexpression of a stress-responsive U-box protein gene VaPUB affects the accumulation of resistance related proteins in Vitis vinifera 'Thompson Seedless'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Many U-box proteins have been identified and characterized as important factors against environmental stresses such as chilling, heat, salinity and pathogen attack in plant. Our previous research reported the cloning of a novel U-box protein gene VaPUB from Vitis amurensis 'Zuoshanyi' grape and suggested a function of it in related to cold stress in the model plant Arabidopsis system. In this study, the role of VaPUB in response to biotic and abiotic stress was further analyzed in the homologous grapevine system by studying the transcript regulation and the protein accumulation in VaPUB transgenic vines. The expression analysis assay shown that VaPUB was significantly up-regulated 6 h after cold treatment and as early as 2 h post inoculation with Plasmopara viticola, a pathogen causing downy mildew disease in grapevine. Over-expressing VaPUB in V. Vinifera 'Thompson Seedless' affected the microstructure of leaves. The proteome assay shown that the accumulation of pathogenesis-related protein PR10 and many proteins involved in carbon and energy metabolism, oxidation reaction and protein metabolism were significantly altered in transgenic vines. In comparison with wild type plants, the expression level of PR10 family genes was significantly decreased in VaPUB transgenic vines under P. viticola treatment or cold stress. Results from this study showed that the U-box protein gene PUB quickly responded to both biotic stress and abiotic stress and significantly influenced the accumulation of resistance related proteins in grapevine. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Phyletic distribution of fatty acid-binding protein genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Zheng

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are a family of fatty acid-binding small proteins essential for lipid trafficking, energy storage and gene regulation. Although they have 20 to 70% amino acid sequence identity, these proteins share a conserved tertiary structure comprised of ten beta sheets and two alpha helixes. Availability of the complete genomes of 34 invertebrates, together with transcriptomes and ESTs, allowed us to systematically investigate the gene structure and alternative splicing of FABP genes over a wide range of phyla. Only in genomes of two cnidarian species could FABP genes not be identified. The genomic loci for FABP genes were diverse and their genomic structure varied. In particular, the intronless FABP genes, in most of which the key residues involved in fatty acid binding varied, were common in five phyla. Interestingly, several species including one trematode, one nematode and four arthropods generated FABP mRNA variants via alternative splicing. These results demonstrate that both gene duplication and post-transcriptional modifications are used to generate diverse FABPs in species studied.

  18. Differential expression of the pr1A gene in Metarhizium anisopliae and Metarhizium acridum across different culture conditions and during pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariele Porto Carneiro Leão

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The entomopathogenic fungi of the genus Metarhizium have several subtilisin-like proteases that are involved in pathogenesis and these have been used to investigate genes that are differentially expressed in response to different growth conditions. The identification and characterization of these proteases can provide insight into how the fungus is capable of infecting a wide variety of insects and adapt to different substrates. In addition, the pr1A gene has been used for the genetic improvement of strains used in pest control. In this study we used quantitative RT-PCR to assess the relative expression levels of the pr1A gene in M. anisopliae and M. acridum during growth in different culture conditions and during infection of the sugar cane borer, Diatraea saccharalis Fabricius. We also carried out a pathogenicity test to assess the virulence of both species against D. saccharalis and correlated the results with the pattern of pr1A gene expression. This analysis revealed that, in both species, the pr1A gene was differentially expressed under the growth conditions studied and during the pathogenic process. M. anisopliae showed higher expression of pr1A in all conditions examined, when compared to M. acridum. Furthermore, M. anisopliae showed a greater potential to control D. saccharalis. Taken together, our results suggest that these species have developed different strategies to adapt to different growing conditions.

  19. Gene and protein expression of oestrogen-β and progesterone receptors in facial melasma and adjacent healthy skin in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamega, A de A; Miot, H A; Moço, N P; Silva, M G; Marques, M E A; Miot, L D B

    2015-04-01

    Compare gene and protein expression for oestrogen receptor-β (ER-β) and progesterone receptor (PR) in facial melasma and adjacent healthy skin. A cross-sectional study including 42 women with facial melasma, conducted at the Dermatology Service of Botucatu Medical School of São Paulo State University, Brazil. Biopsies of the melasma skin were performed, together with healthy surrounding skin. The gene expression (real-time PCR) of the hormone receptors in the tissue was evaluated. Subsequently, skin fragments were immunostained for nuclear ER-β and PR, evaluated according to their HSCORE (epidermis) and percentage of staining per microscopic field (dermis). Messenger RNA tissue expression for ER-β and PR showed no difference between melasma-affected skin fragments and the healthy perilesional areas (P > 0.2). Median nuclear epithelial expression for ER-β and PR was higher in lesioned skin (HSCORE 157 and 58) than in the healthy perilesional skin (HSCORE 97 and 19; P expression for ER-β was associated to sun-induced melasma and negative familiar background; PR expression was associated to sun-induced melasma and darker phototypes. No difference was observed in gene expression for oestrogen-β and progesterone receptors in melasma-affected skin compared with adjacent healthy skin. However, the higher protein expression of these receptors in melasma-affected epithelia suggests hormonal participation in the pathogenesis of this disease. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  20. A Novel WRKY transcription factor is required for induction of PR-1a gene expression by salicylic acid and bacterial elicitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Verk, Marcel C; Pappaioannou, Dimitri; Neeleman, Lyda; Bol, John F; Linthorst, Huub J M

    2008-04-01

    PR-1a is a salicylic acid-inducible defense gene of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). One-hybrid screens identified a novel tobacco WRKY transcription factor (NtWRKY12) with specific binding sites in the PR-1a promoter at positions -564 (box WK(1)) and -859 (box WK(2)). NtWRKY12 belongs to the class of transcription factors in which the WRKY sequence is followed by a GKK rather than a GQK sequence. The binding sequence of NtWRKY12 (WK box TTTTCCAC) deviated significantly from the consensus sequence (W box TTGAC[C/T]) shown to be recognized by WRKY factors with the GQK sequence. Mutation of the GKK sequence in NtWRKY12 into GQK or GEK abolished binding to the WK box. The WK(1) box is in close proximity to binding sites in the PR-1a promoter for transcription factors TGA1a (as-1 box) and Myb1 (MBSII box). Expression studies with PR-1a promoterbeta-glucuronidase (GUS) genes in stably and transiently transformed tobacco indicated that NtWRKY12 and TGA1a act synergistically in PR-1a expression induced by salicylic acid and bacterial elicitors. Cotransfection of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts with 35SNtWRKY12 and PR-1aGUS promoter fusions showed that overexpression of NtWRKY12 resulted in a strong increase in GUS expression, which required functional WK boxes in the PR-1a promoter.

  1. Cellular unfolded protein response against viruses used in gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwaipayan eSen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are excellent vehicles for gene therapy due to their natural ability to infect and deliver the cargo to specific tissues with high efficiency. Although such vectors are usually ‘gutted’ and are replication defective, they are subjected to clearance by the host cells by immune recognition and destruction. Unfolded protein response (UPR is a naturally evolved cyto-protective signaling pathway which is triggered due to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress caused by accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in its lumen. The UPR signaling consists of three signaling pathways, namely PKR-like ER kinase, activating transcription factor 6, and inositol-requiring protein-1. Once activated, UPR triggers the production of ER molecular chaperones and stress response proteins to help reduce the protein load within the ER. This occurs by degradation of the misfolded proteins and ensues in the arrest of protein translation machinery. If the burden of protein load in ER is beyond its processing capacity, UPR can activate pro-apoptotic pathways or autophagy leading to cell death. Viruses are naturally evolved in hijacking the host cellular translation machinery to generate a large amount of proteins. This phenomenon disrupts ER homeostasis and leads to ER stress. Alternatively, in the case of gutted vectors used in gene therapy, the excess load of recombinant vectors administered and encountered by the cell can trigger UPR. Thus, in the context of gene therapy, UPR becomes a major roadblock that can potentially trigger inflammatory responses against the vectors and reduce the efficiency of gene transfer.

  2. BET proteins are a key component of immunoglobulin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jung Min; Lee, Jin S; Russell, Kirsty E; Wiegman, Coen H; Barnes, Peter J; Fear, David; Adcock, Ian M; Durham, Andrew L

    2017-04-01

    BET proteins have been shown to regulate gene expression including inflammatory genes. In order to investigate the role of the BET proteins in immunoglobulin production we treated the human B-cell line CLNH11.4 and primary human B cells and ozone-exposed mice with BET inhibitors (JQ1 or IBET151). Both proliferation and IgG production were reduced by JQ1 in a concentration-dependent manner. JQ1 significantly reduced immunoglobulin gene transcription. In vivo treatment of ozone-exposed mice with the BET inhibitor IBET151 similarly inhibited ozone-induced immunoglobulin production. JQ1 did not reduce the protein levels of Brd4 or Oct2 per se but reduced the ability of Brd4 and Oct2 to co-immunoprecipitate and of Oct2 to bind to immunoglobulin gene promoters. Our results indicate that BET proteins including Brd4 play a crucial role regulation B-cell-specific gene expression and immunoglobulin production.

  3. Dysregulation of BCL-2 family proteins by leukemia fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lauren M; Hanna, Diane T; Khaw, Seong L; Ekert, Paul G

    2017-09-01

    The genomic lesions that characterize acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood include recurrent translocations that result in the expression of fusion proteins that typically involve genes encoding tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, and transcription factors. These genetic rearrangements confer phenotypic hallmarks of malignant transformation, including unrestricted proliferation and a relative resistance to apoptosis. In this Minireview, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that link these fusions to the control of cell death. We examine how these fusion genes dysregulate the BCL-2 family of proteins, preventing activation of the apoptotic effectors, BAX and BAK, and promoting cell survival. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  5. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  6. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoman Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature.

  7. The Role of Bromodomain Proteins in Regulating Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Duffy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are important in regulating gene expression in eukaryotes. Of the numerous histone modifications which have been identified, acetylation is one of the best characterised and is generally associated with active genes. Histone acetylation can directly affect chromatin structure by neutralising charges on the histone tail, and can also function as a binding site for proteins which can directly or indirectly regulate transcription. Bromodomains specifically bind to acetylated lysine residues on histone tails, and bromodomain proteins play an important role in anchoring the complexes of which they are a part to acetylated chromatin. Bromodomain proteins are involved in a diverse range of functions, such as acetylating histones, remodeling chromatin, and recruiting other factors necessary for transcription. These proteins thus play a critical role in the regulation of transcription.

  8. Inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 signaling pathway clear prion-infected cells from PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Elin K; Luhr, Katarina M; Ibáñez, Carlos; Kristensson, Krister

    2005-09-14

    Prions represent a unique class of infectious agents in which the normal cellular prion protein (PrPC) is converted to an abnormal isoform (PrPSc), which accumulates in the brain and constitutes the major, if not the only, component of the infectious particle. Factors that still remain to be identified may facilitate the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. In the present study, we first demonstrated that a growth factor of the neurotrophin family, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), stimulates the formation of PrPSc in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-secreting neuronal cell line (GT1-1 cells) infected with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) strain of scrapie as determined by Western blot analysis. We then observed that the prion-infected cells can be cleared from PrPSc by treatment with three inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) [1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(o-aminophenylmercapto)butadiene and 2-(2-amino-3-methyoxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one, as well as alpha-[amino[(4-aminophenyl)thio]methylene]-2-(trifluoromethyl) benzeneacetonitrile, which passes the blood-brain barrier], a component of one of the intracellular signaling pathways activated by BDNF. The MEK1/2 inhibitors were also efficient in clearing PrPSc from prion-infected GT1-1 cells stimulated to accumulate high levels of PrPSc by enhanced serum concentrations in the medium or by the use of a serum-free neuron-specific neurobasal medium. PrPSc did not reappear in the cultures within 5 weeks after completion of treatment. We conclude that inhibitors of the MEK1/2 pathway can efficiently and probably irreversibly clear PrP(Sc) from prion-infected cells. The MEK pathway may therefore be a suitable target for therapeutic intervention in prion diseases.

  9. Ethylene emission and PR protein synthesis in ACC deaminase producing Methylobacterium spp. inoculated tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) challenged with Ralstonia solanacearum under greenhouse conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Woojong; Seshadri, Sundaram; Kim, Kiyoon; Lee, Gillseung; Sa, Tongmin

    2013-06-01

    Bacteria of genus Methylobacterium have been found to promote plant growth and regulate the level of ethylene in crop plants. This work is aimed to test the induction of defense responses in tomato against bacterial wilt by stress ethylene level reduction mediated by the ACC deaminase activity of Methylobacterium strains. Under greenhouse conditions, the disease index value in Methylobacterium sp. inoculated tomato plants was lower than control plants. Plants treated with Methylobacterium sp. challenge inoculated with Ralstonia solanacearum (RS) showed significantly reduced disease symptoms and lowered ethylene emission under greenhouse condition. The ACC and ACO (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase) accumulation in tomato leaves were significantly reduced with Methylobacterium strains inoculation. While ACC oxidase gene expression was found higher in plants treated with R. solanacearum than Methylobacterium sp. treatment, PR proteins related to induced systemic resistance like β-1,3-glucanase, PAL, PO and PPO were increased in Methylobacterium sp. inoculated plants. A significant increase in β-1,3-glucanase and PAL gene expression was found in all the Methylobacterium spp. treatments compared to the R. solanacearum treatment. This study confirms the activity of Methylobacterium sp. in increasing the defense enzymes by modulating the ethylene biosynthesis pathway and suggests the use of methylotrophic bacteria as potential biocontrol agents in tomato cultivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Presence and seeding activity of pathological prion protein (PrP(TSE in skeletal muscles of white-tailed deer infected with chronic wasting disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L Daus

    Full Text Available Chronic wasting disease (CWD is a contagious, rapidly spreading transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE, or prion disease, occurring in cervids such as white tailed-deer (WTD, mule deer or elk in North America. Despite efficient horizontal transmission of CWD among cervids natural transmission of the disease to other species has not yet been observed. Here, we report for the first time a direct biochemical demonstration of pathological prion protein PrP(TSE and of PrP(TSE-associated seeding activity, the static and dynamic biochemical markers for biological prion infectivity, respectively, in skeletal muscles of CWD-infected cervids, i. e. WTD for which no clinical signs of CWD had been recognized. The presence of PrP(TSE was detected by Western- and postfixed frozen tissue blotting, while the seeding activity of PrP(TSE was revealed by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA. Semi-quantitative Western blotting indicated that the concentration of PrP(TSE in skeletal muscles of CWD-infected WTD was approximately 2000-10,000-fold lower than in brain tissue. Tissue-blot-analyses revealed that PrP(TSE was located in muscle-associated nerve fascicles but not, in detectable amounts, in myocytes. The presence and seeding activity of PrP(TSE in skeletal muscle from CWD-infected cervids suggests prevention of such tissue in the human diet as a precautionary measure for food safety, pending on further clarification of whether CWD may be transmissible to humans.

  11. Presence and seeding activity of pathological prion protein (PrP(TSE)) in skeletal muscles of white-tailed deer infected with chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daus, Martin L; Breyer, Johanna; Wagenfuehr, Katja; Wemheuer, Wiebke M; Thomzig, Achim; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Beekes, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a contagious, rapidly spreading transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), or prion disease, occurring in cervids such as white tailed-deer (WTD), mule deer or elk in North America. Despite efficient horizontal transmission of CWD among cervids natural transmission of the disease to other species has not yet been observed. Here, we report for the first time a direct biochemical demonstration of pathological prion protein PrP(TSE) and of PrP(TSE)-associated seeding activity, the static and dynamic biochemical markers for biological prion infectivity, respectively, in skeletal muscles of CWD-infected cervids, i. e. WTD for which no clinical signs of CWD had been recognized. The presence of PrP(TSE) was detected by Western- and postfixed frozen tissue blotting, while the seeding activity of PrP(TSE) was revealed by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). Semi-quantitative Western blotting indicated that the concentration of PrP(TSE) in skeletal muscles of CWD-infected WTD was approximately 2000-10,000-fold lower than in brain tissue. Tissue-blot-analyses revealed that PrP(TSE) was located in muscle-associated nerve fascicles but not, in detectable amounts, in myocytes. The presence and seeding activity of PrP(TSE) in skeletal muscle from CWD-infected cervids suggests prevention of such tissue in the human diet as a precautionary measure for food safety, pending on further clarification of whether CWD may be transmissible to humans.

  12. Brain transcriptional stability upon prion protein-encoding gene invalidation in zygotic or adult mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béringue Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of the prion protein remains largely elusive while its key role in prion infection has been expansively documented. To potentially assess this conundrum, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the brain of wild-type mice with that of transgenic mice invalidated at this locus either at the zygotic or at the adult stages. Results Only subtle transcriptomic differences resulting from the Prnp knockout could be evidenced, beside Prnp itself, in the analyzed adult brains following microarray analysis of 24 109 mouse genes and QPCR assessment of some of the putatively marginally modulated loci. When performed at the adult stage, neuronal Prnp disruption appeared to sequentially induce a response to an oxidative stress and a remodeling of the nervous system. However, these events involved only a limited number of genes, expression levels of which were only slightly modified and not always confirmed by RT-qPCR. If not, the qPCR obtained data suggested even less pronounced differences. Conclusions These results suggest that the physiological function of PrP is redundant at the adult stage or important for only a small subset of the brain cell population under classical breeding conditions. Following its early reported embryonic developmental regulation, this lack of response could also imply that PrP has a more detrimental role during mouse embryogenesis and that potential transient compensatory mechanisms have to be searched for at the time this locus becomes transcriptionally activated.

  13. Endosome to Golgi Retrieval of the Vacuolar Protein Sorting Receptor, Vps10p, Requires the Function of the VPS29, VPS30, and VPS35 Gene Products

    OpenAIRE

    Seaman, Matthew N.J.; Marcusson, Eric G.; Cereghino, Joan Lin; Emr, Scott D

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in the S. cerevisiae VPS29 and VPS30 genes lead to a selective protein sorting defect in which the vacuolar protein carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is missorted and secreted from the cell, while other soluble vacuolar hydrolases like proteinase A (PrA) are delivered to the vacuole. This phenotype is similar to that seen in cells with mutations in the previously characterized VPS10 and VPS35 genes. Vps10p is a late Golgi transmembrane protein that acts as the sorting receptor for soluble va...

  14. Evolution of the MAGUK protein gene family in premetazoan lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Trillo Iñaki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-to-cell communication is a key process in multicellular organisms. In multicellular animals, scaffolding proteins belonging to the family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK are involved in the regulation and formation of cell junctions. These MAGUK proteins were believed to be exclusive to Metazoa. However, a MAGUK gene was recently identified in an EST survey of Capsaspora owczarzaki, an unicellular organism that branches off near the metazoan clade. To further investigate the evolutionary history of MAGUK, we have undertook a broader search for this gene family using available genomic sequences of different opisthokont taxa. Results Our survey and phylogenetic analyses show that MAGUK proteins are present not only in Metazoa, but also in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis and in the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki. However, MAGUKs are absent from fungi, amoebozoans or any other eukaryote. The repertoire of MAGUKs in Placozoa and eumetazoan taxa (Cnidaria + Bilateria is quite similar, except for one class that is missing in Trichoplax, while Porifera have a simpler MAGUK repertoire. However, Vertebrata have undergone several independent duplications and exhibit two exclusive MAGUK classes. Three different MAGUK types are found in both M. brevicollis and C. owczarzaki: DLG, MPP and MAGI. Furthermore, M. brevicollis has suffered a lineage-specific diversification. Conclusions The diversification of the MAGUK protein gene family occurred, most probably, prior to the divergence between Metazoa+choanoflagellates and the Capsaspora+Ministeria clade. A MAGI-like, a DLG-like, and a MPP-like ancestral genes were already present in the unicellular ancestor of Metazoa, and new gene members have been incorporated through metazoan evolution within two major periods, one before the sponge-eumetazoan split and another within the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, choanoflagellates have suffered an independent MAGUK

  15. HashGO: hashing gene ontology for protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoxian; Zhao, Yingwen; Lu, Chang; Wang, Jun

    2017-10-04

    Gene ontology (GO) is a standardized and controlled vocabulary of terms that describe the molecular functions, biological roles and cellular locations of proteins. GO terms and GO hierarchy are regularly updated as the accumulated biological knowledge. More than 50,000 terms are included in GO and each protein is annotated with several or dozens of these terms. Therefore, accurately predicting the association between proteins and massive GO terms is rather challenging. To accurately predict the association between massive GO terms and proteins, we proposed a method called Hashing GO for protein function prediction (HashGO in short). HashGO firstly adopts a protein-term association matrix to store available GO annotations of proteins. Then, it tailors a graph hashing method to explore the underlying structure between GO terms and to obtain a series of hash functions to compress the high-dimensional protein-term association matrix into a low-dimensional one. Next, HashGO computes the semantic similarity between proteins based on Hamming distance on that low-dimensional matrix. After that, it predicts missing annotations of a protein based on the annotations of its semantic neighbors. Experimental results on archived GO annotations of two model species (Yeast and Human) show that HashGO not only more accurately predicts functions than other related approaches, but also runs faster than them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  17. A cerato-platanin protein SsCP1 targets plant PR1 and contributes to virulence of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guogen; Tang, Liguang; Gong, Yingdi; Xie, Jiatao; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Li, Guoqing; Collinge, David B; Chen, Weidong; Cheng, Jiasen

    2017-10-27

    Cerato-platanin proteins (CPs), which are secreted by filamentous fungi, are phytotoxic to host plants, but their functions have not been well defined to date. Here we characterized a CP (SsCP1) from the necrotrophic phytopathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Sscp1 transcripts accumulated during plant infection, and deletion of Sscp1 significantly reduced virulence. SsCP1 could induce significant cell death when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Using yeast two-hybrid, GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular florescence complementation, we found that SsCP1 interacts with PR1 in the apoplast to facilitate infection by S. sclerotiorum. Overexpressing PR1 enhanced resistance to the wild-type strain, but not to the Sscp1 knockout strain of S. sclerotiorum. Sscp1-expressing transgenic plants showed increased concentrations of salicylic acid (SA) and higher levels of resistance to several plant pathogens (namely Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria brassicicola and Golovinomyces orontii). Our results suggest that SsCP1 is important for virulence of S. sclerotiorum and that it can be recognized by plants to trigger plant defense responses. Our results also suggest that the SA signaling pathway is involved in CP-mediated plant defense . © 2017 State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP3) Gene Variation in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR BRILLIANT

    Abstract. Variation in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP3) genes in some selected livestock animals was assessed using sequences downloaded from the GenBank. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/). The analysis was carried out in 36 pair-wise comparisons where averages of 1277.780 sites were analyzed.

  19. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP3) Gene Variation in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP3) genes in some selected livestock animals was assessed using sequences downloaded from the GenBank (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/). The analysis was carried out in 36 pair-wise comparisons where averages of 1277.780 sites were analyzed. Analysis at ...

  20. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2.3 RNA extraction and Northern blot analysis. Total RNA from cells was isolated by the method of ... After 24 h of recovery, cells were treated with 50 nM moxesterol (NEN life science products, USA) dissolved .... major egg yolk protein genes, vitellogenin (VTG) (Gold- berger and Deeley 1980; Wolffe and Tata 1983) and the.

  1. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A 1.9-kb DNA fragment, PCR-amplified from HD549 using cryII-gene-specific primers, was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein produced 92% mortality in first-instar larvae of Spodoptera litura and 86% inhibition of adult emergence in Phthorimaea operculella, but showed very low toxicity against ...

  2. Do prion protein gene polymorphisms induce apoptosis in non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in prion protein coding gene, Prnp, greatly affect susceptibility to prion diseases in mammals. Here, the coding region of Prnp was screened for polymorphisms in redeared turtle, Trachemys scripta. Four polymorphisms, L203V, N205I, V225A and M237V, ...

  3. Molecular characterization of capsid protein gene of potato virus X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular characterization of capsid protein gene of potato virus X from Pakistan. Arshad Jamal, Idrees Ahmad Nasir, Bushra Tabassum, Muhammad Tariq, Abdul Munim Farooq, Zahida Qamar, Mohsin Ahmad Khan, Nadeem Ahmad, Muhammad Shafiq, Muhammad Saleem Haider, M. Arshad Javed, Tayyab Husnain ...

  4. Prion Protein Gene Polymorphisms in Turkish Native Goat Breeds ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    Prion Protein Gene Polymorphisms in Turkish Native Goat Breeds. HASAN MEYDAN1,*, ERKAN PEHLİVAN2, MUSTAFA MUHIP ÖZKAN2,. MEHMET ALI YILDIZ2, WILFRED GOLDMANN3. 1 Akdeniz University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Antalya, Turkey. 2 Ankara University, Faculty of ...

  5. Protein networks identify novel symbiogenetic genes resulting from plastid endosymbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méheust, Raphaël; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-03-29

    The integration of foreign genetic information is central to the evolution of eukaryotes, as has been demonstrated for the origin of the Calvin cycle and of the heme and carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in algae and plants. For photosynthetic lineages, this coordination involved three genomes of divergent phylogenetic origins (the nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). Major hurdles overcome by the ancestor of these lineages were harnessing the oxygen-evolving organelle, optimizing the use of light, and stabilizing the partnership between the plastid endosymbiont and host through retargeting of proteins to the nascent organelle. Here we used protein similarity networks that can disentangle reticulate gene histories to explore how these significant challenges were met. We discovered a previously hidden component of algal and plant nuclear genomes that originated from the plastid endosymbiont: symbiogenetic genes (S genes). These composite proteins, exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, encode a cyanobacterium-derived domain fused to one of cyanobacterial or another prokaryotic origin and have emerged multiple, independent times during evolution. Transcriptome data demonstrate the existence and expression of S genes across a wide swath of algae and plants, and functional data indicate their involvement in tolerance to oxidative stress, phototropism, and adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Our research demonstrates the "recycling" of genetic information by photosynthetic eukaryotes to generate novel composite genes, many of which function in plastid maintenance.

  6. Mouse-hamster chimeric prion protein (PrP) devoid of N-terminal residues 23-88 restores susceptibility to 22L prions, but not to RML prions in PrP-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Keiji; Miyata, Hironori; Yano, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Imamura, Morikazu; Muramatsu, Naomi; Das, Nandita Rani; Chida, Junji; Hara, Hideyuki; Sakaguchi, Suehiro

    2014-01-01

    Prion infection induces conformational conversion of the normal prion protein PrPC, into the pathogenic isoform PrPSc, in prion diseases. It has been shown that PrP-knockout (Prnp0/0) mice transgenically reconstituted with a mouse-hamster chimeric PrP lacking N-terminal residues 23-88, or Tg(MHM2Δ23-88)/Prnp 0/0 mice, neither developed the disease nor accumulated MHM2ScΔ23-88 in their brains after inoculation with RML prions. In contrast, RML-inoculated Tg(MHM2Δ23-88)/Prnp 0/+ mice developed the disease with abundant accumulation of MHM2ScΔ23-88 in their brains. These results indicate that MHM2Δ23-88 itself might either lose or greatly reduce the converting capacity to MHM2ScΔ23-88, and that the co-expressing wild-type PrPC can stimulate the conversion of MHM2Δ23-88 to MHM2ScΔ23-88 in trans. In the present study, we confirmed that Tg(MHM2Δ23-88)/Prnp 0/0 mice remained resistant to RML prions for up to 730 days after inoculation. However, we found that Tg(MHM2Δ23-88)/Prnp 0/0 mice were susceptible to 22L prions, developing the disease with prolonged incubation times and accumulating MHM2ScΔ23-88 in their brains. We also found accelerated conversion of MHM2Δ23-88 into MHM2ScΔ23-88 in the brains of RML- and 22L-inoculated Tg(MHM2Δ23-88)/Prnp 0/+ mice. However, wild-type PrPSc accumulated less in the brains of these inoculated Tg(MHM2Δ23-88)/Prnp 0/+ mice, compared with RML- and 22L-inoculated Prnp 0/+ mice. These results show that MHM2Δ23-88 itself can convert into MHM2ScΔ23-88 without the help of the trans-acting PrPC, and that, irrespective of prion strains inoculated, the co-expressing wild-type PrPC stimulates the conversion of MHM2Δ23-88 into MHM2ScΔ23-88, but to the contrary, the co-expressing MHM2Δ23-88 disturbs the conversion of wild-type PrPC into PrPSc.

  7. Gene, protein and network of male sterility in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang eKun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the most important model crop plants whose heterosis has been well exploited in commercial hybrid seed production via a variety of types of male sterile lines. Hybrid rice cultivation area is steadily expanding around the world, especially in Southern Asia. Characterization of genes and proteins related to male sterility aims to understand how and why the male sterility occurs, and which proteins are the key players for microspores abortion. Recently, a series of genes and proteins related to cytoplasmic male sterility, photoperiod sensitive male sterility, self-incompatibility and other types of microspores deterioration have been characterized through genetics or proteomics. Especially the latter, offers us a powerful and high throughput approach to discern the novel proteins involving in male-sterile pathways which may help us to breed artificial male-sterile system. This represents an alternative tool to meet the critical challenge of further development of hybrid rice. In this paper, we reviewed the recent developments in our understanding of male sterility in rice hybrid production across gene, protein and integrated network levels, and also, present a perspective on the engineering of male sterile lines for hybrid rice production.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the uncoupling protein-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroya, Francesc; Peyrou, Marion; Giralt, Marta

    2017-03-01

    Regulated transcription of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) gene, and subsequent UCP1 protein synthesis, is a hallmark of the acquisition of the differentiated, thermogenically competent status of brown and beige/brite adipocytes, as well as of the responsiveness of brown and beige/brite adipocytes to adaptive regulation of thermogenic activity. The 5' non-coding region of the UCP1 gene contains regulatory elements that confer tissue specificity, differentiation dependence, and neuro-hormonal regulation to UCP1 gene transcription. Two main regions-a distal enhancer and a proximal promoter region-mediate transcriptional regulation through interactions with a plethora of transcription factors, including nuclear hormone receptors and cAMP-responsive transcription factors. Co-regulators, such as PGC-1α, play a pivotal role in the concerted regulation of UCP1 gene transcription. Multiple interactions of transcription factors and co-regulators at the promoter region of the UCP1 gene result in local chromatin remodeling, leading to activation and increased accessibility of RNA polymerase II and subsequent gene transcription. Moreover, a commonly occurring A-to-G polymorphism in close proximity to the UCP1 gene enhancer influences the extent of UCP1 gene transcription. Notably, it has been reported that specific aspects of obesity and associated metabolic diseases are associated with human population variability at this site. On another front, the unique properties of the UCP1 promoter region have been exploited to develop brown adipose tissue-specific gene delivery tools for experimental purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Convection-enhanced delivery of AAV2-PrPshRNA in prion-infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misol Ahn

    Full Text Available Prion disease is caused by a single pathogenic protein (PrPSc, an abnormal conformer of the normal cellular prion protein PrPC. Depletion of PrPC in prion knockout mice makes them resistant to prion disease. Thus, gene silencing of the Prnp gene is a promising effective therapeutic approach. Here, we examined adeno-associated virus vector type 2 encoding a short hairpin RNA targeting Prnp mRNA (AAV2-PrP-shRNA to suppress PrPC expression both in vitro and in vivo. AAV2-PrP-shRNA treatment suppressed PrP levels and prevented dendritic degeneration in RML-infected brain aggregate cultures. Infusion of AAV2-PrP-shRNA-eGFP into the thalamus of CD-1 mice showed that eGFP was transported to the cerebral cortex via anterograde transport and the overall PrPC levels were reduced by ∼ 70% within 4 weeks. For therapeutic purposes, we treated RML-infected CD-1 mice with AAV2-PrP-shRNA beginning at 50 days post inoculation. Although AAV2-PrP-shRNA focally suppressed PrPSc formation in the thalamic infusion site by ∼ 75%, it did not suppress PrPSc formation efficiently in other regions of the brain. Survival of mice was not extended compared to the untreated controls. Global suppression of PrPC in the brain is required for successful therapy of prion diseases.

  10. N-terminal Prion Protein Peptides (PrP(120-144)) Form Parallel In-register β-Sheets via Multiple Nucleation-dependent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiming; Shao, Qing; Hall, Carol K

    2016-10-14

    The prion diseases are a family of fatal neurodegenerative diseases associated with the misfolding and accumulation of normal prion protein (PrP(C)) into its pathogenic scrapie form (PrP(Sc)). Understanding the fundamentals of prion protein aggregation and the molecular architecture of PrP(Sc) is key to unraveling the pathology of prion diseases. Our work investigates the early-stage aggregation of three prion protein peptides, corresponding to residues 120-144 of human (Hu), bank vole (BV), and Syrian hamster (SHa) prion protein, from disordered monomers to β-sheet-rich fibrillar structures. Using 12 μs discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations combined with the PRIME20 force field, we find that the Hu-, BV-, and SHaPrP(120-144) aggregate via multiple nucleation-dependent pathways to form U-shaped, S-shaped, and Ω-shaped protofilaments. The S-shaped HuPrP(120-144) protofilament is similar to the amyloid core structure of HuPrP(112-141) predicted by Zweckstetter. HuPrP(120-144) has a shorter aggregation lag phase than BVPrP(120-144) followed by SHaPrP(120-144), consistent with experimental findings. Two amino acid substitutions I138M and I139M retard the formation of parallel in-register β-sheet dimers during the nucleation stage by increasing side chain-side chain association and reducing side chain interaction specificity. On average, HuPrP(120-144) aggregates contain more parallel β-sheet content than those formed by BV- and SHaPrP(120-144). Deletion of the C-terminal residues 138-144 prevents formation of fibrillar structures in agreement with the experiment. This work sheds light on the amyloid core structures underlying prion strains and how I138M, I139M, and S143N affect prion protein aggregation kinetics. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Expression of a serine protease gene prC is up-regulated by oxidative stress in the fungus Clonostachys rosea: implications for fungal survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Gang Zou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soil fungi face a variety of environmental stresses such as UV light, high temperature, and heavy metals. Adaptation of gene expression through transcriptional regulation is a key mechanism in fungal response to environmental stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factors Msn2/4 induce stress-mediated gene expression by binding to the stress response element. Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of extracellular proteases is up-regulated in response to heat shock in fungi. However, the physiological significance of regulation of these extracellular proteases by heat shock remains unclear. The nematophagous fungus Clonostachys rosea can secret an extracellular serine protease PrC during the infection of nematodes. Since the promoter of prC has three copies of the stress response element, we investigated the effect of environmental stress on the expression of prC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results demonstrated that the expression of prC was up-regulated by oxidants (H(2O(2 or menadione and heat shock, most likely through the stress response element. After oxidant treatment or heat shock, the germination of conidia in the wild type strain was significantly higher than that in the prC mutant strain in the presence of nematode cuticle. Interestingly, the addition of nematode cuticle significantly attenuated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS induced by oxidants and heat shock in the wild type strain, but not in prC mutant strain. Moreover, low molecule weight (<3 kD degradation products of nematode cuticle suppressed the inhibitory effect of conidial germination induced by oxidants and heat shock. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that PrC plays a protective role in oxidative stress in C. rosea. PrC degrades the nematode cuticle to produce degradation products, which in turn offer a protective effect against oxidative stress by scavenging ROS. Our study reveals a novel

  12. [Autism spectrum disorder and genes for synaptic proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Emiko

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and restricted interests. It is generally accepted that ASD is caused by abnormalities in the structure or functions of the brain. Recent genome-wide analyses have identified copy number variations (CNVs) of neuronal genes in the genomes of ASD patients. CNV is a commonly observed phenomenon in human beings. During the first cell division of meiosis, irregular crossing over between homologous chromosomes results in loss or duplication of a segment. From 2007 to 2010, several groups performed a large-scale virtual screening of CNVs in ASD genomes. Genes affected by CNV, de novo CNVs, and rare CNVs were more prevalent in ASD. The results highlighted the CNVs of many neuronal genes associated with ASD. A fraction of these genes was previously identified in ASD but some were newly identified in each study. The CNVs implicated in ASD include neuronal genes belonging to 4 classes. These genes encode (1) neural adhesion molecules, including cadherins, neuroligin, and neurexin; (2) scaffold proteins such as SHANK3; (3) protein kinases and other intracellular signaling molecules; and (4) proteins that regulate protein syntheses. In general, these proteins play a role in synapse of glutamatergic neurons. The CNVs detected in the ASD patient genomes of imply a link between the synaptic proteins and pathological characteristics of ASD. Altered protein dosage by the CNVs may alter the functional quality of ASD patient's synapses, and may consequently affect their development of language and communication skills. There are 2 types of ASD, one is sporadic and, the other is familial. According to some reports, de novo CNVs are more frequently observed in sporadic-type ASD. However, it is generally understood that a combination of particular CNVs and other possible mutations underlie the pathology of ASD regardless of ASD type. The major symptoms of ASD are often curable with

  13. An IgE epitope of Bet v 1 and fagales PR10 proteins as defined by a human monoclonal IgE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, J.; Diethers, A.; Schulz, D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analyses of the molecular basis underlying allergenicity and allergen cross-reactivity, as well as improvement of allergy diagnostics and therapeutics, are hampered by the lack of human monoclonal IgE antibodies and knowledge about their epitopes. Here, we addressed the consecutive...... formats including IgE. Using variants of Bet v 1, the epitope of the antibody was mapped and extrapolated to other PR10 proteins. RESULTS: The obtained antibodies exhibited pronounced reactivity with Bet v 1, but were not reactive with the homologous PR10 protein Mal d 1. The epitope as defined by the Ig...

  14. Mapping of the Mouse Actin Capping Protein Beta Subunit Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper John A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capping protein (CP, a heterodimer of α and β subunits, is found in all eukaryotes. CP binds to the barbed ends of actin filaments in vitro and controls actin assembly and cell motility in vivo. Vertebrates have three isoforms of CPβ produced by alternatively splicing from one gene; lower organisms have one gene and one isoform. Results We isolated genomic clones corresponding to the β subunit of mouse CP and identified its chromosomal location by interspecies backcross mapping. Conclusions The CPβ gene (Cappb1 mapped to Chromosome 4 between Cdc42 and D4Mit312. Three mouse mutations, snubnose, curly tail, and cribriform degeneration, map in the vicinity of the β gene.

  15. Prion protein gene frequencies in three Sicilian dairy sheep populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santo Caracappa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to investigate the prion protein (PrP genotype and haplotype frequencies in three Sicilian dairy sheep populations. The three populations were: (1 1096 Valle del Belice animals, (2 1143 Comisana animals, and (3 1771 individuals from 5 flocks with scrapie outbreaks, in which the animals were crossbreds derived from indigenous Sicilian dairy breeds. PrP genotypes are described for the three codons 136 (Alanine or Valine; A, V, 154 (Histidine or Arginine; H, R, and 171 (Glutamine, Arginine or Histidine; Q, R, H which represent polymorphisms known to be linked with scrapie susceptibility. The Valle del Belice haplotype frequencies were 32.3% ARR, 6.5% AHQ, 1.0% ARH, 58.8% ARQ, and 1.4% VRQ. The Comisana frequencies were 39.4% ARR, 2.9% AHQ, 2.9% ARH, 50.9% ARQ, and 3.9% VRQ. In the flocks with scrapie outbreaks the frequencies were 32.8% ARR, 2.4% AHQ, 1.7% ARH, 59.1% ARQ, and 3.9% VRQ. In all three populations ARQ and ARR were the most frequent haplotypes. Multiple generations of strong selection will be needed to fixate the most resistant ARR haplotype.

  16. A new essential protein discovery method based on the integration of protein-protein interaction and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of essential proteins is always a challenging task since it requires experimental approaches that are time-consuming and laborious. With the advances in high throughput technologies, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which have produced unprecedented opportunities for detecting proteins' essentialities from the network level. There have been a series of computational approaches proposed for predicting essential proteins based on network topologies. However, the network topology-based centrality measures are very sensitive to the robustness of network. Therefore, a new robust essential protein discovery method would be of great value. Results In this paper, we propose a new centrality measure, named PeC, based on the integration of protein-protein interaction and gene expression data. The performance of PeC is validated based on the protein-protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experimental results show that the predicted precision of PeC clearly exceeds that of the other fifteen previously proposed centrality measures: Degree Centrality (DC, Betweenness Centrality (BC, Closeness Centrality (CC, Subgraph Centrality (SC, Eigenvector Centrality (EC, Information Centrality (IC, Bottle Neck (BN, Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC, Local Average Connectivity-based method (LAC, Sum of ECC (SoECC, Range-Limited Centrality (RL, L-index (LI, Leader Rank (LR, Normalized α-Centrality (NC, and Moduland-Centrality (MC. Especially, the improvement of PeC over the classic centrality measures (BC, CC, SC, EC, and BN is more than 50% when predicting no more than 500 proteins. Conclusions We demonstrate that the integration of protein-protein interaction network and gene expression data can help improve the precision of predicting essential proteins. The new centrality measure, PeC, is an effective essential protein discovery method.

  17. A new essential protein discovery method based on the integration of protein-protein interaction and gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Hanhui; Wang, Jian-xin; Pan, Yi

    2012-03-10

    Identification of essential proteins is always a challenging task since it requires experimental approaches that are time-consuming and laborious. With the advances in high throughput technologies, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which have produced unprecedented opportunities for detecting proteins' essentialities from the network level. There have been a series of computational approaches proposed for predicting essential proteins based on network topologies. However, the network topology-based centrality measures are very sensitive to the robustness of network. Therefore, a new robust essential protein discovery method would be of great value. In this paper, we propose a new centrality measure, named PeC, based on the integration of protein-protein interaction and gene expression data. The performance of PeC is validated based on the protein-protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experimental results show that the predicted precision of PeC clearly exceeds that of the other fifteen previously proposed centrality measures: Degree Centrality (DC), Betweenness Centrality (BC), Closeness Centrality (CC), Subgraph Centrality (SC), Eigenvector Centrality (EC), Information Centrality (IC), Bottle Neck (BN), Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC), Local Average Connectivity-based method (LAC), Sum of ECC (SoECC), Range-Limited Centrality (RL), L-index (LI), Leader Rank (LR), Normalized α-Centrality (NC), and Moduland-Centrality (MC). Especially, the improvement of PeC over the classic centrality measures (BC, CC, SC, EC, and BN) is more than 50% when predicting no more than 500 proteins. We demonstrate that the integration of protein-protein interaction network and gene expression data can help improve the precision of predicting essential proteins. The new centrality measure, PeC, is an effective essential protein discovery method.

  18. Analysis of ribosomal protein gene structures: implications for intron evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many spliceosomal introns exist in the eukaryotic nuclear genome. Despite much research, the evolution of spliceosomal introns remains poorly understood. In this paper, we tried to gain insights into intron evolution from a novel perspective by comparing the gene structures of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (CRPs and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs, which are held to be of archaeal and bacterial origin, respectively. We analyzed 25 homologous pairs of CRP and MRP genes that together had a total of 527 intron positions. We found that all 12 of the intron positions shared by CRP and MRP genes resulted from parallel intron gains and none could be considered to be "conserved," i.e., descendants of the same ancestor. This was supported further by the high frequency of proto-splice sites at these shared positions; proto-splice sites are proposed to be sites for intron insertion. Although we could not definitively disprove that spliceosomal introns were already present in the last universal common ancestor, our results lend more support to the idea that introns were gained late. At least, our results show that MRP genes were intronless at the time of endosymbiosis. The parallel intron gains between CRP and MRP genes accounted for 2.3% of total intron positions, which should provide a reliable estimate for future inferences of intron evolution.

  19. Epigenetic engineering of ribosomal RNA genes enhances protein production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Santoro

    Full Text Available Selection of mammalian high-producer cell lines remains a major challenge for the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes encode the major component of the ribosome but many rRNA gene copies are not transcribed due to epigenetic silencing by the nucleolar remodelling complex (NoRC [6], which may limit the cell's full production capacity. Here we show that the knockdown of TIP5, a subunit of NoRC, decreases the number of silent rRNA genes, upregulates rRNA transcription, enhances ribosome synthesis and increases production of recombinant proteins. However, general enhancement of rRNA transcription rate did not stimulate protein synthesis. Our data demonstrates that the number of transcriptionally competent rRNA genes limits efficient ribosome synthesis. Epigenetic engineering of ribosomal RNA genes offers new possibilities for improving biopharmaceutical manufacturing and provides novel insights into the complex regulatory network which governs the translation machinery in normal cellular processes as well as in pathological conditions like cancer.

  20. Inference of gene-phenotype associations via protein-protein interaction and orthology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panwen Wang

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental goals of genetics is to understand gene functions and their associated phenotypes. To achieve this goal, in this study we developed a computational algorithm that uses orthology and protein-protein interaction information to infer gene-phenotype associations for multiple species. Furthermore, we developed a web server that provides genome-wide phenotype inference for six species: fly, human, mouse, worm, yeast, and zebrafish. We evaluated our inference method by comparing the inferred results with known gene-phenotype associations. The high Area Under the Curve values suggest a significant performance of our method. By applying our method to two human representative diseases, Type 2 Diabetes and Breast Cancer, we demonstrated that our method is able to identify related Gene Ontology terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. The web server can be used to infer functions and putative phenotypes of a gene along with the candidate genes of a phenotype, and thus aids in disease candidate gene discovery. Our web server is available at http://jjwanglab.org/PhenoPPIOrth.

  1. DING proteins: numerous functions, elusive genes, a potential for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, François

    2013-09-01

    DING proteins, named after their conserved N-terminus, form an overlooked protein family whose members were generally discovered through serendipity. It is characterized by an unusually high sequence conservation, even between distantly related species, and by an outstanding diversity of activities and ligands. They all share a demonstrated capacity to bind phosphate with high affinity or at least a predicted phosphate-binding site. However, DING protein genes are conspicuously absent from databases. The many novel family members identified in recent years have confirmed that DING proteins are ubiquitous not only in animals and plants but probably also in prokaryotes. At the functional level, there is increasing evidence that they participate in many health-related processes such as cancers as well as bacterial (Pseudomonas) and viral (HIV) infections, by mechanisms that are now beginning to be understood. They thus represent potent targets for the development of novel therapeutic approaches, especially against HIV. The few genomic sequences that are now available are starting to give some clues on why DING protein genes and mRNAs are well conserved and difficult to clone. This could open a new era of research, of both fundamental and applied importance.

  2. Manipulating the Prion Protein Gene Sequence and Expression Levels with CRISPR/Cas9

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Mende, Ylva; Zevnik, Branko; Jackson, Walker S

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian prion protein (PrP, encoded by Prnp) is most infamous for its central role in prion diseases, invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans, food animals, and animals in the wild...

  3. Protein C/S ratio, an accurate and simple tool to identify carriers of a protein C gene mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libourel, EJ; Meinardi, [No Value; de Kam, PJ; Ruiters, MHJ; van der Meer, J; van der Schaaf, W; Veenstra, R.

    Hereditary protein C deficiency is demonstrated by lowered protein C plasma levels in a patient and at least one first-degree relative. This approach is insufficient in some cases owing to overlapping protein C levels in carriers and non-carriers of a protein C gene mutation. The protein C/S ratio

  4. FancyGene: dynamic visualization of gene structures and protein domain architectures on genomic loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaldi, Davide; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2009-09-01

    FancyGene is a fast and user-friendly web-based tool for producing images of one or more genes directly on the corresponding genomic locus. Starting from a variety of input formats, FancyGene rebuilds the basic components of a gene (UTRs, intron, exons). Once the initial representation is obtained, the user can superimpose additional features-such as protein domains and/or a variety of biological markers-in specific positions. FancyGene is extremely flexible allowing the user to change the resulting image dynamically, modifying colors and shapes and adding and/or removing objects. The output images are generated either in portable network graphics (PNG) or portable document format (PDF) formats and can be used for scientific presentations as well as for publications. The PDF format preserves editing capabilities, allowing picture modification using any vector graphics editor.

  5. Metazoan Ribosome Inactivating Protein encoding genes acquired by Horizontal Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapadula, Walter J; Marcet, Paula L; Mascotti, María L; Sanchez-Puerta, M Virginia; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2017-05-12

    Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) are RNA N-glycosidases that depurinate a specific adenine residue in the conserved sarcin/ricin loop of 28S rRNA. These enzymes are widely distributed among plants and their presence has also been confirmed in several bacterial species. Recently, we reported for the first time in silico evidence of RIP encoding genes in metazoans, in two closely related species of insects: Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. Here, we have experimentally confirmed the presence of these genes in mosquitoes and attempted to unveil their evolutionary history. A detailed study was conducted, including evaluation of taxonomic distribution, phylogenetic inferences and microsynteny analyses, indicating that mosquito RIP genes derived from a single Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) event, probably from a cyanobacterial donor species. Moreover, evolutionary analyses show that, after the HGT event, these genes evolved under purifying selection, strongly suggesting they play functional roles in these organisms.

  6. Loss of Bloom syndrome protein destabilizes human gene cluster architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Michael W; Stults, Dawn M; Adachi, Noritaka; Hanakahi, Les; Pierce, Andrew J

    2009-09-15

    Bloom syndrome confers strong predisposition to malignancy in multiple tissue types. The Bloom syndrome patient (BLM) protein defective in the disease biochemically functions as a Holliday junction dissolvase and human cells lacking functional BLM show 10-fold elevated rates of sister chromatid exchange. Collectively, these phenomena suggest that dysregulated mitotic recombination drives the genomic instability underpinning the development of cancer in these individuals. Here we use physical analysis of the highly repeated, highly self-similar human ribosomal RNA gene clusters as sentinel biomarkers for dysregulated homologous recombination to demonstrate that loss of BLM protein function causes a striking increase in spontaneous molecular level genomic restructuring. Analysis of single-cell derived sub-clonal populations from wild-type human cell lines shows that gene cluster architecture is ordinarily very faithfully preserved under mitosis, but is so unstable in cell lines derived from BLMs as to make gene cluster architecture in different sub-clonal populations essentially unrecognizable one from another. Human cells defective in a different RecQ helicase, the WRN protein involved in the premature aging Werner syndrome, do not exhibit the gene cluster instability (GCI) phenotype, indicating that the BLM protein specifically, rather than RecQ helicases generally, holds back this recombination-mediated genomic instability. An ataxia-telangiectasia defective cell line also shows elevated rDNA GCI, although not to the extent of BLM defective cells. Genomic restructuring mediated by dysregulated recombination between the abundant low-copy repeats in the human genome may prove to be an important additional mechanism of genomic instability driving the initiation and progression of human cancer.

  7. Human Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and sheep scrapie PrP (res) detection using seeded conversion of recombinant prion protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orrú, C.D.; Wilham, J.M.; Hughson, A.G.; Raymond, L.D.; McNally, K.L.; Bossers, A.; Ligios, C.; Caughey, B.

    2009-01-01

    The pathological isoform of the prion protein (PrPres) can serve as a marker for prion diseases, but more practical tests are needed for preclinical diagnosis and sensitive detection of many prion infections. Previously we showed that the quaking-induced conversion (QuIC) assay can detect

  8. A study of variability of capsid protein genes of Radish mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    HOLÁ, Marcela

    2008-01-01

    The part of RNA2 genome segment of several isolates of Radish mosaic virus (RaMV) including capsid protein genes was sequenced. Variability of capsid protein genes among the isolates of Radish mosaic virus was studied.

  9. Computational codon optimization of synthetic gene for protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Bevan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The construction of customized nucleic acid sequences allows us to have greater flexibility in gene design for recombinant protein expression. Among the various parameters considered for such DNA sequence design, individual codon usage (ICU has been implicated as one of the most crucial factors affecting mRNA translational efficiency. However, previous works have also reported the significant influence of codon pair usage, also known as codon context (CC, on the level of protein expression. Results In this study, we have developed novel computational procedures for evaluating the relative importance of optimizing ICU and CC for enhancing protein expression. By formulating appropriate mathematical expressions to quantify the ICU and CC fitness of a coding sequence, optimization procedures based on genetic algorithm were employed to maximize its ICU and/or CC fitness. Surprisingly, the in silico validation of the resultant optimized DNA sequences for Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests that CC is a more relevant design criterion than the commonly considered ICU. Conclusions The proposed CC optimization framework can complement and enhance the capabilities of current gene design tools, with potential applications to heterologous protein production and even vaccine development in synthetic biotechnology.

  10. Computational codon optimization of synthetic gene for protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2012-10-20

    The construction of customized nucleic acid sequences allows us to have greater flexibility in gene design for recombinant protein expression. Among the various parameters considered for such DNA sequence design, individual codon usage (ICU) has been implicated as one of the most crucial factors affecting mRNA translational efficiency. However, previous works have also reported the significant influence of codon pair usage, also known as codon context (CC), on the level of protein expression. In this study, we have developed novel computational procedures for evaluating the relative importance of optimizing ICU and CC for enhancing protein expression. By formulating appropriate mathematical expressions to quantify the ICU and CC fitness of a coding sequence, optimization procedures based on genetic algorithm were employed to maximize its ICU and/or CC fitness. Surprisingly, the in silico validation of the resultant optimized DNA sequences for Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests that CC is a more relevant design criterion than the commonly considered ICU. The proposed CC optimization framework can complement and enhance the capabilities of current gene design tools, with potential applications to heterologous protein production and even vaccine development in synthetic biotechnology.

  11. Crystal Structure of MpPR-1i, a SCP/TAPS protein from Moniliophthora perniciosa, the fungus that causes Witches’ Broom Disease of Cacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, Renata M.; Luo, Zhipu; Darwiche, Rabih; Hudspeth, Elissa M.; Schneiter, Roger; Pereira, Gonçalo A.G.; Mondego, Jorge M.C.; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A. (Fribourg); (Baylor); (NCI); (IAC-- Brazil); (UNICAMP)

    2017-08-10

    The pathogenic fungi Moniliophthora perniciosa causes Witches’ Broom Disease (WBD) of cacao. The structure of MpPR-1i, a protein expressed by M. perniciosa when it infects cacao, are presented. This is the first reported de novo structure determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing upon soaking with selenourea. Each monomer has flexible loop regions linking the core alpha-beta-alpha sandwich topology that comprise ~50% of the structure, making it difficult to generate an accurate homology model of the protein. MpPR-1i is monomeric in solution but is packed as a high ~70% solvent content, crystallographic heptamer. The greatest conformational flexibility between monomers is found in loops exposed to the solvent channel that connect the two longest strands. MpPR-1i lacks the conserved CAP tetrad and is incapable of binding divalent cations. MpPR-1i has the ability to bind lipids, which may have roles in its infection of cacao. These lipids likely bind in the palmitate binding cavity as observed in tablysin-15, since MpPR-1i binds palmitate with comparable affinity as tablysin-15. Further studies are required to clarify the possible roles and underlying mechanisms of neutral lipid binding, as well as their effects on the pathogenesis of M. perniciosa so as to develop new interventions for WBD.

  12. Crystal Structure of MpPR-1i, a SCP/TAPS protein from Moniliophthora perniciosa, the fungus that causes Witches' Broom Disease of Cacao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Renata M; Luo, Zhipu; Darwiche, Rabih; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Schneiter, Roger; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Mondego, Jorge M C; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A

    2017-08-10

    The pathogenic fungi Moniliophthora perniciosa causes Witches' Broom Disease (WBD) of cacao. The structure of MpPR-1i, a protein expressed by M. perniciosa when it infects cacao, are presented. This is the first reported de novo structure determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing upon soaking with selenourea. Each monomer has flexible loop regions linking the core alpha-beta-alpha sandwich topology that comprise ~50% of the structure, making it difficult to generate an accurate homology model of the protein. MpPR-1i is monomeric in solution but is packed as a high ~70% solvent content, crystallographic heptamer. The greatest conformational flexibility between monomers is found in loops exposed to the solvent channel that connect the two longest strands. MpPR-1i lacks the conserved CAP tetrad and is incapable of binding divalent cations. MpPR-1i has the ability to bind lipids, which may have roles in its infection of cacao. These lipids likely bind in the palmitate binding cavity as observed in tablysin-15, since MpPR-1i binds palmitate with comparable affinity as tablysin-15. Further studies are required to clarify the possible roles and underlying mechanisms of neutral lipid binding, as well as their effects on the pathogenesis of M. perniciosa so as to develop new interventions for WBD.

  13. Next Generation Delivery System for Proteins and Genes of Therapeutic Purpose: Why and How?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Ranjan Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and genes of therapeutic interests in conjunction with different delivery systems are growing towards new heights. “Next generation delivery systems” may provide more efficient platform for delivery of proteins and genes. In the present review, snapshots about the benefits of proteins or gene therapy, general procedures for therapeutic protein or gene delivery system, and different next generation delivery system such as liposome, PEGylation, HESylation, and nanoparticle based delivery have been depicted with their detailed explanation.

  14. Functional interconnections of Arabidopsis exon junction complex proteins and genes at multiple steps of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufarrege, Eduardo F; Gonzalez, Daniel H; Curi, Graciela C

    2011-10-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is deposited on mRNA after splicing and participates in several aspects of RNA metabolism, from intracellular transport to translation. In this work, the functional and molecular interactions of Arabidopsis homologues of Mago, Y14, and PYM, three EJC components that participate in intron-mediated enhancement of gene expression in animals, have been analysed. AtMago, AtY14, and AtPYM are encoded by single genes that show similar expression patterns and contain common regulatory elements, known as site II, that are required for expression. AtPYM and AtY14 are phosphorylated by plant extracts and this modification regulates complex formation between both proteins. In addition, overexpression of AtMago and AtY14 in plants produces an increase in AtPYM protein levels, while overexpression of AtPYM results in increased formation of a complex that contains the three proteins. The effect of AtMago and AtY14 on AtPYM expression is most likely to be due to intron-mediated enhacement of AtPYM expression, since the AtPYM gene contains a leader intron that is required for expression. Indeed, transient transformation asssays indicated that the three proteins are able to increase expression from reporter constructs that contain leader introns required for the expression of different genes. The results indicate that the plant homologues of Mago, Y14, and PYM are closely interconnected, not only through their function as EJC components but also at different steps of their own gene expression mechanisms, probably reflecting the importance of their interaction for the correct expression of plant genes.

  15. Diverse nucleotide compositions and sequence fluctuation in Rubisco protein genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Bienaime, R.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    The Rubisco protein-enzyme is arguably the most abundance protein on Earth. The biology dogma of transcription and translation necessitates the study of the Rubisco genes and Rubisco-like genes in various species. Stronger correlation of fractal dimension of the atomic number fluctuation along a DNA sequence with Shannon entropy has been observed in the studied Rubisco-like gene sequences, suggesting a more diverse evolutionary pressure and constraints in the Rubisco sequences. The strategy of using metal for structural stabilization appears to be an ancient mechanism, with data from the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in Capsaspora owczarzaki and Monosiga brevicollis. Using the chi-square distance probability, our analysis supports the conjecture that the more ancient Rubisco-like sequence in Microcystis aeruginosa would have experienced very different evolutionary pressure and bio-chemical constraint as compared to Bordetella bronchiseptica, the two microbes occupying either end of the correlation graph. Our exploratory study would indicate that high fractal dimension Rubisco sequence would support high carbon dioxide rate via the Michaelis- Menten coefficient; with implication for the control of the whooping cough pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica, a microbe containing a high fractal dimension Rubisco-like sequence (2.07). Using the internal comparison of chi-square distance probability for 16S rRNA (~ E-22) versus radiation repair Rec-A gene (~ E-05) in high GC content Deinococcus radiodurans, our analysis supports the conjecture that high GC content microbes containing Rubisco-like sequence are likely to include an extra-terrestrial origin, relative to Deinococcus radiodurans. Similar photosynthesis process that could utilize host star radiation would not compete with radiation resistant process from the biology dogma perspective in environments such as Mars and exoplanets.

  16. Insight into the PrPC-->PrPSc conversion from the structures of antibody-bound ovine prion scrapie-susceptibility variants.

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    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Grosclaude, Jeanne; Lesceu, Stéphanie; Debey, Pascale; Doublet, Bénédicte; Tréguer, Eric; Rezaei, Human; Knossow, Marcel

    2004-07-13

    Prion diseases are associated with the conversion of the alpha-helix rich prion protein (PrPC) into a beta-structure-rich insoluble conformer (PrPSc) that is thought to be infectious. The mechanism for the PrPC-->PrPSc conversion and its relationship with the pathological effects of prion diseases are poorly understood, partly because of our limited knowledge of the structure of PrPSc. In particular, the way in which mutations in the PRNP gene yield variants that confer different susceptibilities to disease needs to be clarified. We report here the 2.5-A-resolution crystal structures of three scrapie-susceptibility ovine PrP variants complexed with an antibody that binds to PrPC and to PrPSc; they identify two important features of the PrPC-->PrPSc conversion. First, the epitope of the antibody mainly consists of the last two turns of ovine PrP second alpha-helix. We show that this is a structural invariant in the PrPC-->PrPSc conversion; taken together with biochemical data, this leads to a model of the conformational change in which the two PrPC C-terminal alpha-helices are conserved in PrPSc, whereas secondary structure changes are located in the N-terminal alpha-helix. Second, comparison of the structures of scrapie-sensitivity variants defines local changes in distant parts of the protein that account for the observed differences of PrPC stability, resistant variants being destabilized compared with sensitive ones. Additive contributions of these sensitivity-modulating mutations to resistance suggest a possible causal relationship between scrapie resistance and lowered stability of the PrP protein.

  17. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

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    Qiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications.

  18. False positive reduction in protein-protein interaction predictions using gene ontology annotations

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    Lin Yen-Han

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many crucial cellular operations such as metabolism, signalling, and regulations are based on protein-protein interactions. However, the lack of robust protein-protein interaction information is a challenge. One reason for the lack of solid protein-protein interaction information is poor agreement between experimental findings and computational sets that, in turn, comes from huge false positive predictions in computational approaches. Reduction of false positive predictions and enhancing true positive fraction of computationally predicted protein-protein interaction datasets based on highly confident experimental results has not been adequately investigated. Results Gene Ontology (GO annotations were used to reduce false positive protein-protein interactions (PPI pairs resulting from computational predictions. Using experimentally obtained PPI pairs as a training dataset, eight top-ranking keywords were extracted from GO molecular function annotations. The sensitivity of these keywords is 64.21% in the yeast experimental dataset and 80.83% in the worm experimental dataset. The specificities, a measure of recovery power, of these keywords applied to four predicted PPI datasets for each studied organisms, are 48.32% and 46.49% (by average of four datasets in yeast and worm, respectively. Based on eight top-ranking keywords and co-localization of interacting proteins a set of two knowledge rules were deduced and applied to remove false positive protein pairs. The 'strength', a measure of improvement provided by the rules was defined based on the signal-to-noise ratio and implemented to measure the applicability of knowledge rules applying to the predicted PPI datasets. Depending on the employed PPI-predicting methods, the strength varies between two and ten-fold of randomly removing protein pairs from the datasets. Conclusion Gene Ontology annotations along with the deduced knowledge rules could be implemented to partially

  19. Reconstructing protein and gene phylogenies using reconciliation and soft-clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuitche, Esaie; Lafond, Manuel; Ouangraoua, Aïda

    2017-12-01

    The architecture of eukaryotic coding genes allows the production of several different protein isoforms by genes. Current gene phylogeny reconstruction methods make use of a single protein product per gene, ignoring information on alternative protein isoforms. These methods often lead to inaccurate gene tree reconstructions that require to be corrected before phylogenetic analyses. Here, we propose a new approach for the reconstruction of gene trees and protein trees accounting for alternative protein isoforms. We extend the concept of reconciliation to protein trees, and we define a new reconciliation problem called MinDRGT that consists in finding a gene tree that minimizes a double reconciliation cost with a given protein tree and a given species tree. We define a second problem called MinDRPGT that consists in finding a protein supertree and a gene tree minimizing a double reconciliation cost, given a species tree and a set of protein subtrees. We propose a shift from the traditional view of protein ortholog groups as hard-clusters to soft-clusters and we study the MinDRPGT problem under this assumption. We provide algorithmic exact and heuristic solutions for versions of the problems, and we present the results of applications on protein and gene trees from the Ensembl database. The implementations of the methods are available at https://github.com/UdeS-CoBIUS/Protein2GeneTree and https://github.com/UdeS-CoBIUS/SuperProteinTree .

  20. Construction of PR39 recombinant AAV under control of the HRE promoter and the effect of recombinant AAV on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijun; Hao, Yuewen; Nie, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xuexin; Yang, Guangxiao; Wang, Quanying

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the PR39 recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) controlled by the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease. The minimal HRE was artificially synthesized and the AAV vector controlled by HRE was introduced with NT4-TAT-His-PR39 to investigate the expression of AAV-PR39 in hypoxic vascular endothelial cells (VEC) of human umbilical vein (CRL-1730 cell line) and the angiogenesis-promoting effect in pigs with acute myocardial infraction (AMI). The minimal HRE/CMV was designed and artificially synthesized using the PCR method and cloned with the T vector cloning method. The pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV plasmid was constructed. Using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, HEK-293 cells were co-transfected with three plasmids to produce the recombinant virus. An equal volume of pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyAAAV and enterovirus (EV, blank virus) was transfected into CRL-1730 cell lines, respectively. The immunohistochemical method was used to assay the expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cell lines and the expression of PR39 under hypoxia. Eighteen AMI miniature pigs were randomized into the experimental group (HRE-AAV-PR39 group), control group 1 (physical saline group) and control group 2 (EV group). The area of ischemia was assessed with conventional MRI and myocardium perfusion MRI. Pigs were sacrificed at preset time-points to obtain samples of ischemic myocardium. Morphological and pathological data were collected. According to data in the literature and databases, the minimal HRE was designed and synthesized with the PCR method. A large number of HREs were connected to modified pSSHGAAV (pSSV9int-/XbaI) vector followed by insertion of the NT4-6His-PR39 gene segment and, thus, the recombinant plasmid pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV was successfully constructed. The expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cells under the regulation of HRE was assayed using the

  1. Immunological mimicry of PrPC-PrPSc interactions: antibody-induced PrP misfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Guest, Will; Huang, Alan; Plotkin, Steven S; Cashman, Neil R

    2009-08-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to an abnormal protease-resistant conformational isoform (PrP(Sc)) by template-directed conversion. The interaction between PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) is mediated by specific sites which have been mapped to six putative 'binding and conversion domains' (PrP-BCD) through peptide and antibody competition studies. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the bityrosine motif Tyr-Tyr-Arg (YYR) specifically recognize PrP(Sc) and other misfolded PrP species. Here, we report that select bead-bound PrP-BCD mAbs induce exposure of bityrosine epitopes on mouse brain PrP. By competition immunoprecipitation, we show that PrP-BCD mAb-induced bityrosine exposure occurs at alpha-helices 1 and 3. However, PrP-BCD mAb-induced PrP(C) misfolding is not accompanied by beta-sheet dissociation, a key event in PrP(C) conversion to PrP(Sc), and is not associated with acquisition of protease resistance, or the capacity to recruit additional molecules of PrP. Our data suggest that mAb mimics of the physical interaction of PrP(C) with PrP(Sc) can induce unfolding of specific PrP domains, but that subsequent processes (including the energetically unfavorable beta-sheet dissociation) effect isoform conversion in prion disease.

  2. Principal genetic syndromes and autism: from phenotypes, proteins to genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Meng; Wang, Man-jie; Zhong, Nanbert

    2006-02-18

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in social skills, language, and behavior. It is now clear that autism is not a disease, but a syndrome characterized by phenotypic and genetic complexity. The etiology of autism is still poorly understood. Available evidence from a variety of sources strongly suggests that many genetic disorders are frequently associated with autism for their similar phenotypes. Based on this fact, this review begins by highlighting several principal genetic syndromes consistently associated with autism (fragile X, tuberous sclerosis, Angelman syndrome, Pader-Willi syndrome, Rett syndrome, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome). These genetic disorders include both chromosome disorders and single gene disorders. By comparing the similar phenotype, protein marker and candidate genes, we might make some breakthrough in the mechanism of autism and other genetic disorders.

  3. [Drosophila melanogaster gene Merlin interacts with the clathrin adaptor protein gene lap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopyl, S A; Dorogova, N V; Akhmamet'eva, E M; Omel'ianchuk, L V; Chang, L -S

    2010-03-01

    The protein Merlin is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation in the eyes and wings of Drosophila and is a homolog of the human protein encoded by the Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene whose mutations cause auricular nerve tumors. Recent studies show that Merlin and Expanded cooperatively regulate the recycling of membrane receptors, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). By performing a search for potential genetic interactions between Merlin (Mer) and the genes important for vesicular trafficking, we found that ectopic expression in the wing pouch of the clathrin adapter protein Lap involved in clathrin-mediated receptor endocytosis resulted in the formation of extra vein materials. On the one hand, coexpression of wild-type Merlin and lap in the wing pouch restored normal venation, while overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant Mer(DBB) together with lap enhanced ectopic vein formation. Using various constructs with Merlin truncated copies, we showed the C-terminal portion of the Merlin protein to be responsible for the Merlin-lap genetic interaction. Furthermore, we showed that the Merlin and Lap proteins colocalized at the cortex of the wing imaginal disc cells.

  4. PREFACE: Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Panchenko, Anna R.; Przytycka, Teresa

    2011-06-01

    networks have been identified, including scale free distribution of the vertex degree, network motifs, and modularity, to name a few. These studies of network organization require the network to be as complete as possible, which given the limitations of experimental techniques is not currently the case. Therefore, experimental procedures for detecting biomolecular interactions should be complemented by computational approaches. The paper by Lees et al provides a review of computational methods, integrating multiple independent sources of data to infer physical and functional protein-protein interaction networks. One of the important aspects of protein interactions that should be accounted for in the prediction of protein interaction networks is that many proteins are composed of distinct domains. Protein domains may mediate protein interactions while proteins and their interaction networks may gain complexity through gene duplication and expansion of existing domain architectures via domain rearrangements. The latter mechanisms have been explored in detail in the paper by Cohen-Gihon et al. Protein-protein interactions are not the only component of the cell's interactome. Regulation of cell activity can be achieved at the level of transcription and involve a transcription factor—DNA binding which typically requires recognition of a specific DNA sequence motif. Chip-Chip and the more recent Chip-Seq technologies allow in vivo identification of DNA binding sites and, together with novel in vitro approaches, provide data necessary for deciphering the corresponding binding motifs. Such information, complemented by structures of protein-DNA complexes and knowledge of the differences in binding sites among homologs, opens the door to constructing predictive binding models. The paper by Persikov and Singh provides an example of such a model in the Cys2His2 zinc finger family. Recent studies have indicated that the presence of such binding motifs is, however, neither necessary

  5. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification corroborates the absence of PrP(Sc) accumulation in placenta from foetuses with the ARR/ARQ genotype in natural scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, María Carmen; Eraña, Hasier; Castilla, Joaquín; Acín, Cristina; Vargas, Antonia; Badiola, Juan José; Monleón, Eva

    2017-05-01

    Ovine scrapie is a worldwide spread prion disease that is transmitted horizontally under field conditions. Placenta from scrapie-infected ewes is an important source of infection, since this tissue can accumulate high amounts of PrP(Sc) depending on the foetal genotype. Therefore, placentas carrying susceptible foetuses can accumulate PrP(Sc) but there is not PrP(Sc) accumulation in presence of foetuses with at least one ARR haplotype. In scrapie eradication programs, ARR/ARR males are used for breeding to increase the resistant progeny and reduce the horizontal transmission of the disease through the placenta. The development of highly sensitive techniques, that allow the detection of minimal amounts of PrP(Sc), has caused many secretions/excretions and tissues that had previously been deemed negative to be relabeled as positive for PrP(Sc). This has raised concerns about the possible presence of minimal amounts of PrP(Sc) in placentas from ARR foetuses that conventional techniques had indicated were negative. In the present study we examined 30 placentas from a total of 23 gestations; 15 gestations resulted from naturally ARQ/ARQ scrapie-infected ewes mated with ARR/ARR rams. The absence of PrP(Sc) in placentas carrying the foetal ARR haplotype (n=19) was determined by IDEXX HerdChek scrapie/BSE Antigen EIA Test, Prionics(®)-Check WESTERN and corroborated by the highly sensitive Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification technique (PMCA). By immunohistochemistry, several unspecific stainings that might mislead a diagnosis were observed. The results of the present study support that using ARR/ARR males in scrapie eradication programs efficiently decreases the spreading of the agent in the environment via shed placentas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Human amyloid beta protein gene locus: HaeIII RFLP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.E.; Gonzalez-DeWhitt, P.A.; Fuller, F.; Cordell, B.; Frossard, P.M. (California Biotechnology Inc., Mountain View (USA)); Tinklenberg, J.R.; Davies, H.D.; Eng, L.F.; Yesavage, J.A. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

    1988-07-25

    A 2.2 kb EcoRI-EcoRI fragment from the 5{prime} end of the human amyloid beta protein cDNA was isolated from a human fibroblast cDNA library and subcloned into pGEM3. HaeIII (GGCC) detects 6 invariant bands at 0.5 kb, 1.0 kb, 1.1 kb, 1.3 kb, 1.4 kb and 1.6 kb and a two-allele polymorphism with bands at either 1.9 kb or 2.1 kb. Its frequency was studied in 50 North Americans. Human amyloid beta protein gene mapped to the long arm of chromosome 21 (21q11.2-21q21) by Southern blot analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Co-dominant segregation was observed in two families (15 individuals).

  7. Glutamic acid at residue 125 of the prM helix domain interacts with positively charged amino acids in E protein domain II for Japanese encephalitis virus-like-particle production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jia-Guan; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2014-08-01

    Interaction between E and prM proteins in flavivirus-infected cells is a major factor for virus-like particle (VLP) production. The prM helical (prM-H) domain is topologically close to and may interact with domain II of the E protein (EDII). In this study, we investigated prM-H domain amino acid residues facing Japanese encephalitis virus EDII using site-directed mutagenesis to determine their roles in prM-E interaction and VLP production. Our results indicate that negatively charged prM-E125 residue at the prM-H domain affected VLP production via one or more interactions with positively charged E-K93 and E-H246 residues at EDII. Exchanges of oppositely charged residue side chains at prM-E125/E-K93 and prM-E125/E-H246 are recoverable for VLP production. The prM-E125 and E-H246 residues are conserved and that the positive charge of the E-K93 residue is preserved in different flavivirus groups. These findings suggest that the electrostatic attractions of prM-E125, E-K93, and E-H246 residues are important to flavivirus VLP production and that inhibiting these interactions is a potential strategy for blocking flavivirus infections. Molecular interaction between E and prM proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus is a major driving force for virus-like particle (VLP) production. The current high-resolution structures available for prM-E complexes do not include the membrane proximal stem region of prM. The prM stem region contains an N-terminal loop and a helix domain (prM-H). Since the prM-H domain is topologically close to domain II of the E protein (EDII), this study was to determine molecular interactions between the prM-H domain and EDII. We found that the molecular interactions between prM-E125 residue and positively charged E-K93 and E-H246 residues at EDII are critical for VLP production. More importantly, the prM-E125 and E-H246 residues are conserved and the positive charge of the E-K93 residue is preserved in different flavivirus groups. Our findings help

  8. Regulation of gene expression for defensins and lipid transfer protein in Scots pine seedlings by necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria alternata (Fr.

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    Hrunyk Nataliya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Damping-off disease in pine seedling, caused by fungi and oomycetes (Fusarium, Alternaria, Botrytis, Phytophthora and other species, is one of the most dangerous diseases in conifer nurseries and greenhouses worldwide. Alternaria alternata is a necrotrophic pathogen, which causes early blight in higher plants and results in massive economic losses in agro-industry as well as in forestry. Pine seedlings that lack strong lignificated and suberized cell walls at early stages of their growth are vulnerable to damping-off disease. So, triggering the synthesis of antimicrobial compounds, such as phytoalexins, anticipins and pathogenesis-related (PR proteins, is the main defense strategy to confine pathogens at early stages of pine ontogenesis. Defensins and lipid transfer proteins are members of two PR-protein families (PR-12 and PR-14 respectively and possess antimicrobial activities in vitro through contact toxicity, and the involvement in defense signalling. In this work, we describe the changes in the expression levels of four defensin genes and lipid transfer protein in Scots pine seedlings infected with A. alternata. The expression levels of PsDef1 and PsDef2 increased at 48 h.p.i. (hours post inoculation. The levels of PsDef4 transcripts have increased after 6 and 24 hours. Notably, at 48 h.p.i., the level of PsDef4 transcripts was decreased by 1.2 times compared to control. The level of PsDef3 transcripts was reduced at all three time points. On the other hand, the level of PsLTP1 transcripts increased at 6 h and 48 h.p.i.; while at 24 h.p.i., it decreased by 20% when compared to the control sample. Our results suggest that defensins and lipid transfer protein are involved in the defense response of young Scots pine to necrotrophic pathogen. Thus, those genes can be used as the molecular markers in forestry selection and development of the ecologically friendly remedies for coniferous seedlings cultivation in greenhouses and nurseries.

  9. A RNA interference screen identifies the protein phosphatase 2A subunit PR55gamma as a stress-sensitive inhibitor of c-SRC.

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    Pieter J A Eichhorn

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein Phosphatase type 2A (PP2A represents a family of holoenzyme complexes with diverse biological activities. Specific holoenzyme complexes are thought to be deregulated during oncogenic transformation and oncogene-induced signaling. Since most studies on the role of this phosphatase family have relied on the use of generic PP2A inhibitors, the contribution of individual PP2A holoenzyme complexes in PP2A-controlled signaling pathways is largely unclear. To gain insight into this, we have constructed a set of shRNA vectors targeting the individual PP2A regulatory subunits for suppression by RNA interference. Here, we identify PR55gamma and PR55delta as inhibitors of c-Jun NH(2-terminal kinase (JNK activation by UV irradiation. We show that PR55gamma binds c-SRC and modulates the phosphorylation of serine 12 of c-SRC, a residue we demonstrate to be required for JNK activation by c-SRC. We also find that the physical interaction between PR55gamma and c-SRC is sensitive to UV irradiation. Our data reveal a novel mechanism of c-SRC regulation whereby in response to stress c-SRC activity is regulated, at least in part, through loss of the interaction with its inhibitor, PR55gamma.

  10. Structural and biochemical characterization of human PR70 in isolation and in complex with the scaffolding subunit of protein phosphatase 2A.

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    Rebecca Dovega

    Full Text Available Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a major Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. PP2A assembles into diverse trimeric holoenzymes, which consist of a scaffolding (A subunit, a catalytic (C subunit and various regulatory (B subunits. Here we report a 2.0 Å crystal structure of the free B''/PR70 subunit and a SAXS model of an A/PR70 complex. The crystal structure of B''/PR70 reveals a two domain elongated structure with two Ca2+ binding EF-hands. Furthermore, we have characterized the interaction of both binding partner and their calcium dependency using biophysical techniques. Ca2+ biophysical studies with Circular Dichroism showed that the two EF-hands display different affinities to Ca2+. In the absence of the catalytic C-subunit, the scaffolding A-subunit remains highly mobile and flexible even in the presence of the B''/PR70 subunit as judged by SAXS. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry studies and SAXS data support that PR70 and the A-subunit have high affinity to each other. This study provides additional knowledge about the structural basis for the function of B'' containing holoenzymes.

  11. Plant proteogenomics: from protein extraction to improved gene predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Brett; Castellana, Natalie; Apffel, Alex; Ghan, Ryan; Cramer, Grant R; Bellgard, Matthew; Haynes, Paul A; Van Sluyter, Steven C

    2013-01-01

    Historically many genome annotation strategies have lacked experimental evidence at the protein level, which and have instead relied heavily on ab initio gene prediction tools, which consequently resulted in many incorrectly annotated genomic sequences. Proteogenomics aims to address these issues using mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, genomic mapping, and providing statistical significance measures such as false discovery rates (FDRs) to validate the mapped peptides. Presented here is a tool capable of meeting this goal, the UCSD proteogenomic pipeline, which maps peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) to the genome using the Inspect MS/MS database search tool and assigns a statistical significance to the match using a target-decoy search approach to assign estimated FDRs. This pipeline also provides the option of using a more reliable approach to proteogenomics by determining the precise false-positive rates (FPRs) and p-values of each PSM by calculating their spectral probabilities and rescoring each PSM accordingly. In addition to the protein prediction challenges in the rapidly growing number of sequenced plant genomes, it is difficult to extract high-quality protein samples from many plant species. For that reason, this chapter contains methods for protein extraction and trypsin digestion that reliably produce samples suitable for proteogenomic analysis.

  12. Growing functional modules from a seed protein via integration of protein interaction and gene expression data

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    Dimitrakopoulou Konstantina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays modern biology aims at unravelling the strands of complex biological structures such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. A key concept in the organization of PPI networks is the existence of dense subnetworks (functional modules in them. In recent approaches clustering algorithms were applied at these networks and the resulting subnetworks were evaluated by estimating the coverage of well-established protein complexes they contained. However, most of these algorithms elaborate on an unweighted graph structure which in turn fails to elevate those interactions that would contribute to the construction of biologically more valid and coherent functional modules. Results In the current study, we present a method that corroborates the integration of protein interaction and microarray data via the discovery of biologically valid functional modules. Initially the gene expression information is overlaid as weights onto the PPI network and the enriched PPI graph allows us to exploit its topological aspects, while simultaneously highlights enhanced functional association in specific pairs of proteins. Then we present an algorithm that unveils the functional modules of the weighted graph by expanding a kernel protein set, which originates from a given 'seed' protein used as starting-point. Conclusion The integrated data and the concept of our approach provide reliable functional modules. We give proofs based on yeast data that our method manages to give accurate results in terms both of structural coherency, as well as functional consistency.

  13. Protein-Protein Interactions Prediction Based on Iterative Clique Extension with Gene Ontology Filtering

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    Lei Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cliques (maximal complete subnets in protein-protein interaction (PPI network are an important resource used to analyze protein complexes and functional modules. Clique-based methods of predicting PPI complement the data defection from biological experiments. However, clique-based predicting methods only depend on the topology of network. The false-positive and false-negative interactions in a network usually interfere with prediction. Therefore, we propose a method combining clique-based method of prediction and gene ontology (GO annotations to overcome the shortcoming and improve the accuracy of predictions. According to different GO correcting rules, we generate two predicted interaction sets which guarantee the quality and quantity of predicted protein interactions. The proposed method is applied to the PPI network from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and most of the predicted interactions are verified by another biological database, BioGRID. The predicted protein interactions are appended to the original protein network, which leads to clique extension and shows the significance of biological meaning.

  14. The earlier described mutation (c.307c > T [p.R103X]) in the SRD5A2 gene causing a 46,XY female phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Enver; Binay, Cigdem; Ceylaner, Serdar

    2012-01-01

    Deletions and mutations in the 5-alpha-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) gene have been identified in 46,XY disorders of sexual differentiation (DSD). The clinical spectrum is heterogeneous, varying from a normal female external genital appearance to clitoromegaly and isolated micropenis or microphallus associated with hypospadias of various degrees. We describe a 46,XY DSD patient with a homozygous c.307C>T (p.R103X) mutation in the SRD5A2 gene. The case presented with a normal female external genital phenotype.

  15. A prospective comparison of ER, PR, Ki67 and gene expression in paired sequential core biopsies of primary, untreated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Sirwan M; Jordan, Lee B; Roy, Pankaj G; Purdie, Colin A; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Pusztai, Lajos; Moulder-Thompson, Stacy L; Thompson, Alastair M

    2016-09-22

    Sequential biopsy of breast cancer is used to assess biomarker effects and drug efficacy. The preoperative "window of opportunity" setting is advantageous to test biomarker changes in response to therapeutic agents in previously untreated primary cancers. This study tested the consistency over time of paired, sequential biomarker measurements on primary, operable breast cancer in the absence of drug therapy. Immunohistochemistry was performed for ER, PR and Ki67 on paired preoperative/operative tumor samples taken from untreated patients within 2 weeks of each other. Microarray analysis on mRNA extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded cores was performed using Affymetrix based arrays on paired core biopsies analysed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and Gene Set Analysis (GSA). In 41 core/resection pairs, the recognised trend to lower ER, PR and Ki67 score on resected material was confirmed. Concordance for ER, PR and Ki67 without changing biomarker status (e.g. ER+ to ER-) was 90, 74 and 80 % respectively. However, in 23 paired core samples (diagnostic core v on table core), Ki67 using a cut off of 13.25 % was concordant in 22/23 (96 %) and differences in ER and PR immunohistochemistry by Allred or Quickscore between the pairs did not impact hormone receptor status. IPA and GSA demonstrated substantial gene expression changes between paired cores at the mRNA level, including reduced expression of ER pathway analysis on the second core, despite the absence of drug intervention. Sequential core biopsies of primary breast cancer (but not core versus resection) was consistent and is appropriate to assess the effects of drug therapy in vivo on ER, PR and Ki67 using immunohistochemistry. Conversely, studies utilising mRNA expression may require non-treatment controls to distinguish therapeutic from biopsy differences.

  16. The FU gene and its possible protein isoforms

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    Nöthen Markus M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FU is the human homologue of the Drosophila gene fused whose product fused is a positive regulator of the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci. Thus, FU may act as a regulator of the human counterparts of Ci, the GLI transcription factors. Since Ci and GLI are targets of Hedgehog signaling in development and morphogenesis, it is expected that FU plays an important role in Sonic, Desert and/or Indian Hedgehog induced cellular signaling. Results The FU gene was identified on chromosome 2q35 at 217.56 Mb and its exon-intron organization determined. The human developmental disorder Syndactyly type 1 (SD1 maps to this region on chromosome 2 and the FU coding region was sequenced using genomic DNA from an affected individual in a linked family. While no FU mutations were found, three single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. The expression pattern of FU was thoroughly investigated and all examined tissues express FU. It is also clear that different tissues express transcripts of different sizes and some tissues express more than one transcript. By means of nested PCR of specific regions in RT/PCR generated cDNA, it was possible to verify two alternative splicing events. This also suggests the existence of at least two additional protein isoforms besides the FU protein that has previously been described. This long FU and a much shorter isoform were compared for the ability to regulate GLI1 and GLI2. None of the FU isoforms showed any effects on GLI1 induced transcription but the long form can enhance GLI2 activity. Apparently FU did not have any effect on SUFU induced inhibition of GLI. Conclusions The FU gene and its genomic structure was identified. FU is a candidate gene for SD1, but we have not identified a pathogenic mutation in the FU coding region in a family with SD1. The sequence information and expression analyses show that transcripts of different sizes are expressed and subjected to alternative splicing

  17. The pathogenesis-related protein PR-4b from Theobroma cacao presents RNase activity, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) dependent-DNase activity and antifungal action on Moniliophthora perniciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Menezes, Sara; de Andrade Silva, Edson Mario; Matos Lima, Eline; Oliveira de Sousa, Aurizângela; Silva Andrade, Bruno; Santos Lima Lemos, Livia; Peres Gramacho, Karina; da Silva Gesteira, Abelmon; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho; Micheli, Fabienne

    2014-06-11

    The production and accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR proteins) in plants in response to biotic or abiotic stresses is well known and is considered as a crucial mechanism for plant defense. A pathogenesis-related protein 4 cDNA was identified from a cacao-Moniliophthora perniciosa interaction cDNA library and named TcPR-4b. TcPR-4b presents a Barwin domain with six conserved cysteine residues, but lacks the chitin-binding site. Molecular modeling of TcPR-4b confirmed the importance of the cysteine residues to maintain the protein structure, and of several conserved amino acids for the catalytic activity. In the cacao genome, TcPR-4b belonged to a small multigene family organized mainly on chromosome 5. TcPR-4b RT-qPCR analysis in resistant and susceptible cacao plants infected by M. perniciosa showed an increase of expression at 48 hours after infection (hai) in both cacao genotypes. After the initial stage (24-72 hai), the TcPR-4b expression was observed at all times in the resistant genotypes, while in the susceptible one the expression was concentrated at the final stages of infection (45-90 days after infection). The recombinant TcPR-4b protein showed RNase, and bivalent ions dependent-DNase activity, but no chitinase activity. Moreover, TcPR-4b presented antifungal action against M. perniciosa, and the reduction of M. perniciosa survival was related to ROS production in fungal hyphae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a PR-4 showing simultaneously RNase, DNase and antifungal properties, but no chitinase activity. Moreover, we showed that the antifungal activity of TcPR-4b is directly related to RNase function. In cacao, TcPR-4b nuclease activities may be related to the establishment and maintenance of resistance, and to the PCD mechanism, in resistant and susceptible cacao genotypes, respectively.

  18. Regulatory elements of Caenorhabditis elegans ribosomal protein genes

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    Sleumer Monica C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs are essential, tightly regulated, and highly expressed during embryonic development and cell growth. Even though their protein sequences are strongly conserved, their mechanism of regulation is not conserved across yeast, Drosophila, and vertebrates. A recent investigation of genomic sequences conserved across both nematode species and associated with different gene groups indicated the existence of several elements in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs, providing a new insight regarding the regulation of these genes in C. elegans. Results In this study, we performed an in-depth examination of C. elegans RPG regulation and found nine highly conserved motifs in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs using the motif discovery algorithm DME. Four motifs were partially similar to transcription factor binding sites from C. elegans, Drosophila, yeast, and human. One pair of these motifs was found to co-occur in the upstream regions of 250 transcripts including 22 RPGs. The distance between the two motifs displayed a complex frequency pattern that was related to their relative orientation. We tested the impact of three of these motifs on the expression of rpl-2 using a series of reporter gene constructs and showed that all three motifs are necessary to maintain the high natural expression level of this gene. One of the motifs was similar to the binding site of an orthologue of POP-1, and we showed that RNAi knockdown of pop-1 impacts the expression of rpl-2. We further determined the transcription start site of rpl-2 by 5’ RACE and found that the motifs lie 40–90 bases upstream of the start site. We also found evidence that a noncoding RNA, contained within the outron of rpl-2, is co-transcribed with rpl-2 and cleaved during trans-splicing. Conclusions Our results indicate that C. elegans RPGs are regulated by a complex novel series of regulatory elements that is evolutionarily distinct from

  19. Production of recombinant proteins in E. coli by the heat inducible expression system based on the phage lambda pL and/or pR promoters

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    Trujillo-Roldán Mauricio A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The temperature inducible expression system, based on the pL and/or pR phage lambda promoters regulated by the thermolabile cI857 repressor has been widely use to produce recombinant proteins in prokariotic cells. In this expression system, induction of heterologous protein is achieved by increasing the culture temperature, generally above 37°C. Concomitant to the overexpression of heterologous protein, the increase in temperature also causes a variety of complex stress responses. Many studies have reported the use of such temperature inducible expression system, however only few discuss the simultaneous stress effects caused by recombinant protein production and the up-shift in temperature. Understanding the integral effect of such responses should be useful to develop improved strategies for high yield protein production and recovery. Here, we describe the current status of the heat inducible expression system based on the pL and/or pR λ phage promoters, focusing on recent developments on expression vehicles, the stress responses at the molecular and physiological level that occur after heat induction, and bioprocessing factors that affect protein overexpression, including culture operation variables and induction strategies.

  20. Differential Expression of Two Paralogous Genes of Bacillus subtilis Encoding Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindner, Cordula; Nijland, Reindert; Hartskamp, Mariska van; Bron, Sierd; Hamoen, Leendert W.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    The Bacillus subtilis genome comprises two paralogous single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) genes, ssb and ywpH, which show distinct expression patterns. The main ssb gene is strongly expressed during exponential growth and is coregulated with genes encoding the ribosomal proteins S6 and S18.

  1. A Codon Deletion at the Beginning of Green Fluorescent Protein Genes Enhances Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mejía, José-Luis; Roldán-Salgado, Abigail; Osuna, Joel; Merino, Enrique; Gaytán, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant protein expression is one of the key issues in protein engineering and biotechnology. Among the different models for assessing protein production and structure-function studies, green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the preferred models because of its importance as a reporter in cellular and molecular studies. In this research we analyze the effect of codon deletions near the amino terminus of different GFP proteins on fluorescence. Our study includes Gly4 deletions in the enhanced GFP (EGFP), the red-shifted GFP and the red-shifted EGFP. The Gly4 deletion mutants and their corresponding wild-type counterparts were transcribed under the control of the T7 or Trc promoters and their expression patterns were analyzed. Different fluorescent outcomes were observed depending on the type of fluorescent gene versions. In silico analysis of the RNA secondary structures near the ribosome binding site revealed a direct relationship between their minimum free energy and GFP production. Integrative analysis of these results, including SDS-PAGE analysis, led us to conclude that the fluorescence improvement of cells expressing different versions of GFPs with Gly4 deleted is due to an enhancement of the accessibility of the ribosome binding site by reducing the stability of the RNA secondary structures at their mRNA leader regions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Ebolavirus Database: Gene and Protein Information Resource for Ebolaviruses

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    Rayapadi G. Swetha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola Virus Disease (EVD is a life-threatening haemorrhagic fever in humans. Even though there are many reports on EVD, the protein precursor functions and virulent factors of ebolaviruses remain poorly understood. Comparative analyses of Ebolavirus genomes will help in the identification of these important features. This prompted us to develop the Ebolavirus Database (EDB and we have provided links to various tools that will aid researchers to locate important regions in both the genomes and proteomes of Ebolavirus. The genomic analyses of ebolaviruses will provide important clues for locating the essential and core functional genes. The aim of EDB is to act as an integrated resource for ebolaviruses and we strongly believe that the database will be a useful tool for clinicians, microbiologists, health care workers, and bioscience researchers.

  3. A Novel c.554+5C>T Mutation in the DUOXA2 Gene Combined with p.R885Q Mutation in the DUOX2 Gene Causing Congenital Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Ma, Shao Gang; Qiu, Ya Li; Guo, Man Li; Shao, Xiao Juan

    2016-06-05

    The coexistence of mutations in the dual oxidase maturation factor 2 (DUOXA2) and dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) genes is rarely identified in congenital hypothyroidism (CH). This study reports a boy with CH due to a novel splice-site mutation in the DUOXA2 gene and a missense mutation in the DUOX2 gene. A four-year-old boy was diagnosed with CH at neonatal screening and was enrolled in this study. The DUOXA2, DUOX2, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) genes were considered for genetic defects screening. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and Sanger sequencing was used to screen the mutations in the exon fragments. Family members of the patient and the controls were also enrolled and evaluated. The boy harbored compound heterozygous mutations including a novel splice-site mutation c.554+5C>T in the maternal DUOXA2 allele and c.2654G>A (p.R885Q) in the paternal DUOX2 allele. The germline mutations from his parents were consistent with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. No mutations in the TPO and TSHR genes were detected. A novel splice-site mutation c.554+5C>T in the DUOXA2 gene and a mutation p.R885Q in the DUOX2 gene were identified in a 4-year-old patient with goitrous CH.

  4. Systematically characterizing and prioritizing chemosensitivity related gene based on Gene Ontology and protein interaction network

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    Chen Xin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of genes that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity of cancer cells is of great importance. Chemosensitivity related genes (CRGs have been widely utilized to guide clinical and cancer chemotherapy decisions. In addition, CRGs potentially share functional characteristics and network features in protein interaction networks (PPIN. Methods In this study, we proposed a method to identify CRGs based on Gene Ontology (GO and PPIN. Firstly, we documented 150 pairs of drug-CCRG (curated chemosensitivity related gene from 492 published papers. Secondly, we characterized CCRGs from the perspective of GO and PPIN. Thirdly, we prioritized CRGs based on CCRGs’ GO and network characteristics. Lastly, we evaluated the performance of the proposed method. Results We found that CCRG enriched GO terms were most often related to chemosensitivity and exhibited higher similarity scores compared to randomly selected genes. Moreover, CCRGs played key roles in maintaining the connectivity and controlling the information flow of PPINs. We then prioritized CRGs using CCRG enriched GO terms and CCRG network characteristics in order to obtain a database of predicted drug-CRGs that included 53 CRGs, 32 of which have been reported to affect susceptibility to drugs. Our proposed method identifies a greater number of drug-CCRGs, and drug-CCRGs are much more significantly enriched in predicted drug-CRGs, compared to a method based on the correlation of gene expression and drug activity. The mean area under ROC curve (AUC for our method is 65.2%, whereas that for the traditional method is 55.2%. Conclusions Our method not only identifies CRGs with expression patterns strongly correlated with drug activity, but also identifies CRGs in which expression is weakly correlated with drug activity. This study provides the framework for the identification of signatures that predict in vitro cellular chemosensitivity and offers a valuable

  5. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-enhanced humoral immune response and production of antibodies to prion protein PrPSc in mice immunized with 139A scrapie-associated fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Daryl S; Kascsak, Regina B; Lafauci, Giuseppe; Meeker, Harry C; Ye, Xuemin; Flory, Michael J; Kim, Jae Il; Schuller-Levis, Georgia B; Levis, William R; Wisniewski, Thomas; Carp, Richard I; Kascsak, Richard J

    2007-06-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to a protease-resistant conformer, the srapie form of PrP (PrP(Sc)). Humoral immune responses to nondenatured forms of PrP(Sc) have never been fully characterized. We investigated whether production of antibodies to PrP(Sc) could occur in PrP null (Prnp(-/-)) mice and further, whether innate immune stimulation with the TLR9 agonist CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) 1826 could enhance this process. Whether such stimulation could raise anti-PrP(Sc) antibody levels in wild-type (Prnp(+/+)) mice was also investigated. Prnp(-/-) and Prnp(+/+) mice were immunized with nondenatured 139A scrapie-associated fibrils (SAF), with or without ODN 1826, and were tested for titers of PrP-specific antibodies. In Prnp(-/-) mice, inclusion of ODN 1826 in the immunization regime increased anti-PrP titers more than 13-fold after two immunizations and induced, among others, antibodies to an N-terminal epitope, which were only present in the immune repertoire of mice receiving ODN 1826. mAb 6D11, derived from such a mouse, reacts with the N-terminal epitope QWNK in native and denatured forms of PrP(Sc) and recombinant PrP and exhibits a K(d) in the 10(-)(11) M range. In Prnp(+/+) mice, ODN 1826 increased anti-PrP levels as much as 84% after a single immunization. Thus, ODN 1826 potentiates adaptive immune responses to PrP(Sc) in 139A SAF-immunized mice. These results represent the first characterization of humoral immune responses to nondenatured, infectious PrP(Sc) and suggest methods for optimizing the generation of mAbs to PrP(Sc), many of which could be used for diagnosis and treatment of prion diseases.

  6. Leaf-specific pathogenesis-related 10 homolog, PgPR-10.3, shows in silico binding affinity with several biologically important molecules

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    Jin Haeng Han

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Although ginseng PR-10.3 gene is expressed in all organs of 3-wk-old plantlets, its expression is restricted to leaves in mature 2-yr-old ginseng plants. The putative binding property of PgPR-10.3 with Re is intriguing. Further verification of binding affinity with other biologically important molecules in the large hydrophobic cavity of PgPR-10.3 may provide an insight into the biological features of PR-10 proteins.

  7. BSE case associated with prion protein gene mutation.

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    Jürgen A Richt

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE of cattle and was first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans. The origin of BSE remains an enigma. Here we report an H-type BSE case associated with the novel mutation E211K within the prion protein gene (Prnp. Sequence analysis revealed that the animal with H-type BSE was heterozygous at Prnp nucleotides 631 through 633. An identical pathogenic mutation at the homologous codon position (E200K in the human Prnp has been described as the most common cause of genetic CJD. This finding represents the first report of a confirmed case of BSE with a potential pathogenic mutation within the bovine Prnp gene. A recent epidemiological study revealed that the K211 allele was not detected in 6062 cattle from commercial beef processing plants and 42 cattle breeds, indicating an extremely low prevalence of the E211K variant (less than 1 in 2000 in cattle.

  8. Universal PCR primers for ribosomal protein gene introns of fish

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    Seinen Chow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human ribosomal protein (RP gene sequences with respect to intron/exon structures and corresponding cDNA or genomic data of fish species were obtained from the GenBank database. Based on conserved exon sequences, 128 primer pairs for 41 genes were designed for exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC polymerase chain reaction (PCR. In reference to the draft genome sequences of the Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis, 12 primer pairs expected to amplify introns of the bluefin tuna with lengths of 500–1000 bp were selected and applied to six distantly related fish species belonging to the Orders Clupeiformes, Tetraodontiformes, Pleuronectiformes, Perciformes, Scorpaeniformes, and Anguilliformes. PCR amplification was observed for at least four species in each primer pair, and all fragments were larger than those expected for intronless amplification. Single fragment amplification was observed for at least seven primer pairs per species. Fragment sizes of the bluefin tuna for nine primer pairs corresponded to those expected from the genomic data. Thus, our primer pairs are potentially applicable to a wide variety of fish species and serve as an initial step for isolating single-copy nuclear DNA sequences.

  9. Topology association analysis in weighted protein interaction network for gene prioritization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunyao; Shao, Fengjing; Zhang, Qi; Ji, Jun; Xu, Shaojie; Sun, Rencheng; Sun, Gengxin; Du, Xiangjun; Sui, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Although lots of algorithms for disease gene prediction have been proposed, the weights of edges are rarely taken into account. In this paper, the strengths of topology associations between disease and essential genes are analyzed in weighted protein interaction network. Empirical analysis demonstrates that compared to other genes, disease genes are weakly connected with essential genes in protein interaction network. Based on this finding, a novel global distance measurement for gene prioritization with weighted protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. Positive and negative flow is allocated to disease and essential genes, respectively. Additionally network propagation model is extended for weighted network. Experimental results on 110 diseases verify the effectiveness and potential of the proposed measurement. Moreover, weak links play more important role than strong links for gene prioritization, which is meaningful to deeply understand protein interaction network.

  10. Orthogonal Cas9 proteins for RNA-guided gene regulation and editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Esvelt, Kevin; Mali, Prashant

    2017-03-07

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including use of multiple orthogonal Cas9 proteins to simultaneously and independently regulate corresponding genes or simultaneously and independently edit corresponding genes.

  11. Cognitive and emotional information processing: protein synthesis and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Navakkode, Sheeja; Korz, Volker; Frey, Julietta U

    2007-10-15

    Recent findings suggest that functional plasticity phenomena such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) - cellular processes underlying memory - are restricted to functional dendritic compartments. It was also shown, however, that a relatively strong activation of a synaptic input can abolish compartment restrictions. Our data support these findings and we present one cellular pathway responsible for uncompartmentalization of the normally localized plasticity processes by the action of rolipram, an inhibitor of type 4 phosphodiesterases. In contrast with compartment-restricted information processing, uncompartmentalization requires transcription. In the search for system relevance of compartmentalization versus uncompartmentalization we describe firstly data which show that more cognitive information processing in rats' behaviour may follow rules of compartmentalization, whereas stressful, more life-threatening, inputs abolish compartment-restricted information processing involving transcription. Our findings allow us to suggest that consolidation of processes which take place during the cognitive event most probably depend on local protein synthesis, whereas stress immediately induces gene expression in addition, resulting in a compartment-unspecific up-regulation of plasticity-related proteins (PRPs), providing the entire neuron with a higher level of 'reactiveness'. These data would provide a specific functional cellular mechanism to respond differentially and effectively to behaviourally weighted inputs.

  12. Evolutionary hallmarks of the human proteome: chasing the age and coregulation of protein-coding genes

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    Katia de Paiva Lopes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of large-scale technologies for quantitative transcriptomics has enabled comprehensive analysis of the gene expression profiles in complete genomes. RNA-Seq allows the measurement of gene expression levels in a manner far more precise and global than previous methods. Studies using this technology are altering our view about the extent and complexity of the eukaryotic transcriptomes. In this respect, multiple efforts have been done to determine and analyse the gene expression patterns of human cell types in different conditions, either in normal or pathological states. However, until recently, little has been reported about the evolutionary marks present in human protein-coding genes, particularly from the combined perspective of gene expression and protein evolution. Results We present a combined analysis of human protein-coding gene expression profiling and time-scale ancestry mapping, that places the genes in taxonomy clades and reveals eight evolutionary major steps (“hallmarks”, that include clusters of functionally coherent proteins. The human expressed genes are analysed using a RNA-Seq dataset of 116 samples from 32 tissues. The evolutionary analysis of the human proteins is performed combining the information from: (i a database of orthologous proteins (OMA, (ii the taxonomy mapping of genes to lineage clades (from NCBI Taxonomy and (iii the evolution time-scale mapping provided by TimeTree (Timescale of Life. The human protein-coding genes are also placed in a relational context based in the construction of a robust gene coexpression network, that reveals tighter links between age-related protein-coding genes and finds functionally coherent gene modules. Conclusions Understanding the relational landscape of the human protein-coding genes is essential for interpreting the functional elements and modules of our active genome. Moreover, decoding the evolutionary history of the human genes can

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at 15 codons of the prion protein gene from a scrapie-affected herd of Suffolk sheep in Brazil

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    Caroline Pinto de Andrade

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of sheeps and goats, associated with the deposition of a isoform of the prion protein (PrPsc. This isoform presents an altered conformation that leads to aggregation in the host's central nervous and lymphoreticular systems. Predisposition to the prion agent infection can be influenced by specific genotypes related to mutations in amino acids of the PrPsc gene. The most characterized mutations occur at codons 136, 154 and 171, with genotypes VRQ being the most susceptible and ARR the most resistant. In this study we have analyzed polymorphisms in 15 different codons of the PrPsc gene in sheeps from a Suffolk herd from Brazil affected by an outbreak of classical scrapie. Amplicons from the PrPsc gene, encompassing the most relevant altered codons in the protein, were sequenced in order to determine each animal's genotype. We have found polymorphisms at 3 of the 15 analyzed codons (136, 143 and 171. The most variable codon was 171, where all described alleles were identified. A rare polymorphism was found at the 143 codon in 4% of the samples analyzed, which has been described as increasing scrapie resistance in otherwise susceptible animals. No other polymorphisms were detected in the remaining 12 analyzed codons, all of them corresponding to the wild-type prion protein. Regarding the risk degree of developing scrapie, most of the animals (96% had genotypes corresponding to risk groups 1 to 3 (very low to moderate, with only 4% in the higher risks group. Our data is discussed in relation to preventive measures involving genotyping and positive selection to control the disease.

  14. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

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    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  15. Dosage sensitivity of RPL9 and concerted evolution of ribosomal protein genes in plants

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    Deborah eDevis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ribosome in higher eukaryotes is a large macromolecular complex composed of four rRNAs and eighty different ribosomal proteins. In plants, each ribosomal protein is encoded by multiple genes. Duplicate genes within a family are often necessary to provide a threshold dose of a ribosomal protein but in some instances appear to have non-redundant functions. Here, we addressed whether divergent members of the RPL9 gene family are dosage sensitive or whether these genes have non-overlapping functions. The RPL9 family in A. thaliana comprises two nearly identical members, RPL9B and RPL9C, and a more divergent member, RPL9D. Mutations in RPL9C and RPL9D genes leads to delayed growth early in development, and loss of both genes is embryo lethal, indicating that these are dosage-sensitive and redundant genes. Phylogenetic analysis of RPL9 as well as RPL4, RPL5, RPL27a, RPL36a and RPS6 family genes in the Brassicaceae indicated that multicopy ribosomal protein genes have been largely retained following whole genome duplication. However, these gene families also show instances of tandem duplication, small scale deletion and evidence of gene conversion. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of RPL9 genes in angiosperm species showed that genes within a species are more closely related to each other than to RPL9 genes in other species, suggesting ribosomal protein genes undergo convergent evolution. Our analysis indicates that ribosomal protein gene retention following whole genome duplication contributes to the number of genes in a family. However, small scale rearrangements influence copy number and likely drive concerted evolution of these dosage-sensitive genes.

  16. PR-10, defensin and cold dehydrin genes are among those over expressed in Oxytropis (Fabaceae) species adapted to the arctic

    OpenAIRE

    Archambault, Annie; Strömvik, Martina V.

    2011-01-01

    In many studied plants, typical responses to cold treatment include up-regulating the hydrophilic COR/LEA genes and down-regulating photosynthesis-related genes, carbohydrate metabolism, GDSL-motif lipase, hormone metabolism and oxidative regulation genes. However, next to nothing is known about gene expression in arctic plants, which are actually adapted to a harsh, cold environment. The molecular mechanisms behind the many specific adaptations of arctic plants, such as slow growth, well-dev...

  17. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins...... at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...

  18. Overexpression of a thaumatin-like protein gene from Vitis amurensis improves downy mildew resistance in Vitis vinifera grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rongrong; Wu, Jiao; Zhang, Yali; Agüero, Cecilia B; Li, Xinlong; Liu, Shaoli; Wang, Chaoxia; Walker, M Andrew; Lu, Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Downy mildew is a highly destructive disease in grapevine production. A gene encoding pathogenesis-related (PR) thaumatin-like protein was isolated from the downy mildew-resistant grapevine "Zuoshan-1," a clonal selection from wild Vitis amurensis Rupr. The predicted thaumatin-like protein (VaTLP) has 225 amino acids and it is acidic, with a calculated isoelectric point of 4.8. The full length of the VaTLP gene was transformed into somatic embryogenic calli of V. vinifera 'Thompson Seedless' via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed that the VaTLP gene was expressed at a high level in the transgenic grapevines. Improved resistance of the transgenic lines against downy mildew was evaluated using leaf disks and whole plants inoculated with Plasmopara viticola, the pathogen causing grapevine downy mildew disease. Bioassay of the pathogen showed that both hyphae growth and asexual reproduction were inhibited significantly among the transgenic plants. Histological analysis also confirmed this disease resistance by demonstrating the inhibition and malformation of hyphae development in leaf tissue of the transgenic plants. These results indicated that the accumulation of VaTLP could enhance resistance to P. viticola in transgenic 'Thompson Seedless' grapevines.

  19. Preservation of Gene Duplication Increases the Regulatory Spectrum of Ribosomal Protein Genes and Enhances Growth under Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Parenteau

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In baker’s yeast, the majority of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs are duplicated, and it was recently proposed that such duplications are preserved via the functional specialization of the duplicated genes. However, the origin and nature of duplicated RPGs’ (dRPGs functional specificity remain unclear. In this study, we show that differences in dRPG functions are generated by variations in the modality of gene expression and, to a lesser extent, by protein sequence. Analysis of the sequence and expression patterns of non-intron-containing RPGs indicates that each dRPG is controlled by specific regulatory sequences modulating its expression levels in response to changing growth conditions. Homogenization of dRPG sequences reduces cell tolerance to growth under stress without changing the number of expressed genes. Together, the data reveal a model where duplicated genes provide a means for modulating the expression of ribosomal proteins in response to stress.

  20. In search of function for hypothetical proteins encoded by genes of SA-JA pathways in Oryza sativa by in silico comparison and structural modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Indra; Agrawal, Pragati; Shah, Kavita

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of rice genome brings new dimensions to the management of abiotic stresses; however, gene sequences in the rice genome are yet to be assigned structure and function. Hydrogen peroxide, salicylates and jasmonates act as signal molecules in plants employing common machinery to manage abiotic stress. The present work is primarily focused to assign a structurefunction relationship by modeling of the hypothetical proteins of SA-JA signaling pathway known in Arabidopsis thaliana and compare them with corresponding proteins in rice in silico. Thirteen known gene sequences with their encoded proteins for SA/JA pathway in model plant A. thaliana were obtained and similar gene sequences from rice were retrieved at NCBI. Five rice gene sequences Os09g0392100, Os03g0233200, OsJ_33269, OsJ_23610 and Os01g0194300 resulted in hypothetical protein products with unknown structure and function. Modeling and comparison of 5 proteins from rice and Arabidopsis showed 73 - 98% identity with acceptable RMSD values of 0.6 - 1.7 upon superimposition. Results suggest conserved nature of these proteins during evolution. The hypothetical protein from rice contains similar functional protein domain as that in A. thaliana and therefore are likely to perform similar functions in rice. There is a cross talk between the genes in SA/JA pathway wherein Os09g0392100 or EDS1, Os03g0233200 or PR5, OsJ_33269 or PAD4 and OsJ_23610 or SFD-1 activates the pathway and Os01g0194300 or NPR1 inhibit the pathway. Further investigation through wet-lab experiments are in progress to look into suppression/activation of the genes of SAJA signaling in rice plants exposed to abiotic stress.

  1. The inner nuclear membrane protein Src1 associates with subtelomeric genes and alters their regulated gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Grund, S.E.; Fischer, Tomás; Cabal, G.G.; Antúnez Temporal, Oreto; Pérez Ortín, José Enrique; Hurt, E.

    2008-01-01

    Inner nuclear membrane proteins containing a LEM (LAP2, emerin, and MAN1) domain participate in different processes, including chromatin organization, gene expression, and nuclear envelope biogenesis. In this study, we identify a robust genetic interaction between transcription export (TREX) factors and yeast Src1, an integral inner nuclear membrane protein that is homologous to vertebrate LEM2. DNA macroarray analysis revealed that the expression of the phosphate-regulated genes PHO11 ,PHO12...

  2. Centrin protein and genes in Trichomonas vaginalis and close relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    2000-01-01

    Anti-centrin monoclonal antibodies 20H5 and 11B2 produced against Clamydomononas centrin decorated the group of basal bodies as well as very closely attached structures in all trichomonads studied and in the devescovinids Foaina and Devescovina. Moreover, these antibodies decorated the undulating membrane in Trichomonas vaginalis, Trichomitus batrachorum, and Tritrichomonas foetus, and the cresta in Foaina. Centrin was not demonstrated in the dividing spindle and paradesmosis. Immunogold labeling, both in pre- and post-embedding, confirmed that centrin is associated with the basal body cylinder and is a component of the nine anchoring arms between the terminal plate of flagellar bases and the plasma-membrane. Centrin is also associated with the hook-shaped fibers attached to basal bodies (F1, F3), the X-fiber, and along sigmoid fibers (F2) at the pelta-axostyle junction, which is the microtubule organizing center for pelta-axostyle microtubules. There was no labeling on the striated costa and parabasal fibers nor on microtubular pelta-axostyle, but the fibrous structure inside the undulating membrane was labeled in T. vaginalis. Two proteins of 22-20 kDa corresponding to the centrin molecular mass were recognized by immunoblotting using these antibodies in the three trichomonad species examined. By screening a T. vaginalis cDNA library with 20H5 antibody, two genes encoding identical protein sequences were found. The sequence comprises the 4 typical EF-hand Ca++-binding domains present in every known centrin. Trichomonad centrin is closer to the green algal cluster (70% identity) than to the yeast Cdc31 cluster (55% identity) or the Alveolata cluster (46% identity).

  3. Familial CJD associated PrP mutants within transmembrane region induced Ctm-PrP retention in ER and triggered apoptosis by ER stress in SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic prion diseases are linked to point and inserted mutations in the prion protein (PrP gene that are presumed to favor conversion of the cellular isoform of PrP (PrP(C to the pathogenic one (PrP(Sc. The pathogenic mechanisms and the subcellular sites of the conversion are not completely understood. Here we introduce several PRNP gene mutations (such as, PrP-KDEL, PrP-3AV, PrP-A117V, PrP-G114V, PrP-P102L and PrP-E200K into the cultured cells in order to explore the pathogenic mechanism of familial prion disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the roles of aberrant retention of PrP in endoplasmic reticulum (ER, the recombinant plasmids expressing full-length human PrP tailed with an ER signal peptide at the COOH-terminal (PrP-KDEL and PrP with three amino acids exchange in transmembrane region (PrP-3AV were constructed. In the preparations of transient transfections, 18-kD COOH-terminal proteolytic resistant fragments (Ctm-PrP were detected in the cells expressing PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV. Analyses of the cell viabilities in the presences of tunicamycin and brefeldin A revealed that expressions of PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV sensitized the transfected cells to ER stress stimuli. Western blots and RT-PCR identified the clear alternations of ER stress associated events in the cells expressing PrP-KDEL and PrP-3AV that induced ER mediated apoptosis by CHOP and caspase-12 apoptosis pathway. Moreover, several familial CJD related PrP mutants were transiently introduced into the cultured cells. Only the mutants within the transmembrane region (G114V and A117V induced the formation of Ctm-PrP and caused the ER stress, while the mutants outside the transmembrane region (P102L and E200K failed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data indicate that the retention of PrP in ER through formation of Ctm-PrP results in ER stress and cell apoptosis. The cytopathic activities caused by different familial CJD associated PrP mutants may vary, among them

  4. High CpG island methylation of p16 gene and loss of p16 protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... in p16 promoters in ToF patients was negatively correlated with p16 protein and gene expression (both P < 0.05). Our study reports that high CpG island methylation of p16 gene and loss of p16 protein expression associate with the development and progression of ToF, which may have significant therapeutic applications ...

  5. A homolog of an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, C. M.; White, F. F.; Heaton, L. A.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae gene with sequence similarity to an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene (phoS) produces a periplasmic protein of apparent M(r) 35,000 when expressed in E. coli. Amino terminal sequencing revealed that a signal peptide is removed during transport to the periplasm in E. coli.

  6. Prioritizing orphan proteins for further study using phylogenomics and gene expression profiles in Streptomyces coelicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Background: Streptomyces coelicolor, a model organism of antibiotic producing bacteria, has one of the largest genomes of the bacterial kingdom, including 7825 predicted protein coding genes. A large number of these genes, nearly 34%, are functionally orphan (hypothetical proteins with unknown

  7. [Polymorphism of genes encoding proteins of DNA repair vs. occupational and environmental exposure to lead, arsenic and pesticides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Karol; Woźniak, Katarzyna

    2017-10-12

    Genetic polymorphism is associated with the occurrence of at least 2 different alleles in the locus with a frequency higher than 1% in the population. Among polymorphisms we can find single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and polymorphism of variable number of tandem repeats. The presence of certain polymorphisms in genes encoding DNA repair enzymes is associated with the speed and efficiency of DNA repair and can protect or expose humans to the effects provoked by xenobiotics. Chemicals, such as lead, arsenic pesticides are considered to exhibit strong toxicity. There are many different polymorphisms in genes encoding DNA repair enzymes, which determine the speed and efficiency of DNA damage repair induced by these xenobiotics. In the case of lead, the influence of various polymorphisms, such as APE1 (apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1) (rs1130409), hOGG1 (human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase) (rs1052133), XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing protein group 1) (rs25487), XRCC1 (rs1799782) and XRCC3 (X-ray repair cross-complementing protein group 3) (rs861539) were described. For arsenic polymorphisms, such as ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing) (rs13181), XRCC3 (rs861539), APE1 (rs1130409) and hOGG1 (rs1052133) were examined. As to pesticides, separate and combined effects of polymorphisms in genes encoding DNA repair enzymes, such as XRCC1 (rs1799782), hOGG1 (rs1052133), XRCC4 (X-ray repair cross-complementing protein group 4) (rs28360135) and the gene encoding the detoxification enzyme PON1 paraoxonase (rs662) were reported. Med Pr 2018;69(1). This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  8. Automatic extraction of gene/protein biological functions from biomedical text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Asako; Niwa, Yoshiki; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2005-04-01

    With the rapid advancement of biomedical science and the development of high-throughput analysis methods, the extraction of various types of information from biomedical text has become critical. Since automatic functional annotations of genes are quite useful for interpreting large amounts of high-throughput data efficiently, the demand for automatic extraction of information related to gene functions from text has been increasing. We have developed a method for automatically extracting the biological process functions of genes/protein/families based on Gene Ontology (GO) from text using a shallow parser and sentence structure analysis techniques. When the gene/protein/family names and their functions are described in ACTOR (doer of action) and OBJECT (receiver of action) relationships, the corresponding GO-IDs are assigned to the genes/proteins/families. The gene/protein/family names are recognized using the gene/protein/family name dictionaries developed by our group. To achieve wide recognition of the gene/protein/family functions, we semi-automatically gather functional terms based on GO using co-occurrence, collocation similarities and rule-based techniques. A preliminary experiment demonstrated that our method has an estimated recall of 54-64% with a precision of 91-94% for actually described functions in abstracts. When applied to the PUBMED, it extracted over 190 000 gene-GO relationships and 150 000 family-GO relationships for major eukaryotes.

  9. Characterizing genes with distinct methylation patterns in the context of protein-protein interaction network: application to human brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Chen, Hong; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Shengli; Bai, Jing; Wu, Aiwei; Jiang, Chunjie; Wang, Yuan; Su, Bin; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in transcriptional control. However, how genes with different methylation patterns are assembled in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) remains a mystery. In the present study, we systematically dissected the characterization of genes with different methylation patterns in the PPIN. A negative association was detected between the methylation levels in the brain tissues and topological centralities. By focusing on two classes of genes with considerably different methylation levels in the brain tissues, namely the low methylated genes (LMGs) and high methylated genes (HMGs), we found that their organizing principles in the PPIN are distinct. The LMGs tend to be the center of the PPIN, and attacking them causes a more deleterious effect on the network integrity. Furthermore, the LMGs express their functions in a modular pattern and substantial differences in functions are observed between the two types of genes. The LMGs are enriched in the basic biological functions, such as binding activity and regulation of transcription. More importantly, cancer genes, especially recessive cancer genes, essential genes, and aging-related genes were all found more often in the LMGs. Additionally, our analysis presented that the intra-classes communications are enhanced, but inter-classes communications are repressed. Finally, a functional complementation was revealed between methylation and miRNA regulation in the human genome. We have elucidated the assembling principles of genes with different methylation levels in the context of the PPIN, providing key insights into the complex epigenetic regulation mechanisms.

  10. Polymorphism of the pig preimplantation protein 3 gene (prei3)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UPuser

    1Agricultural Ministry Key Laboratory of Pig Breeding and Genetics, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan. 430070, P.R. .... PCR was performed to amplify a 294-bp fragment using primer SNP-R as reverse primer and the forward mutated ... The expression pattern of prei3 was analyzed by RT-PCR amplification using.

  11. Wool Keratin-Associated Protein Genes in Sheep—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Gong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of sheep’s wool in making textiles has inspired extensive research into its structure and the underlying genetics since the 1960s. Wool keratin-associated proteins (KAPs are a key structural component of the wool fibre. The characterisation of the genes encoding these proteins has progressed rapidly with advances in the nucleotide and protein sequencing. This review describes our knowledge of ovine KAPs, their categorisation into families, polymorphism in the proteins and genes, the clustering and chromosomal location of the genes, some characteristics of gene expression and some potential effects of the KAPs on wool traits. The extent and nature of genetic variation in wool KAP genes and its association with fibre characteristics, provides an opportunity for the development of gene-markers for selective breeding of sheep to produce better wool with properties highly matched to specific end-uses.

  12. The structure of the human sterol carrier protein X/sterol carrier protein 2 gene (SCP2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohba, Takashi; Rennert, H.; Pfeifer, S.M. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Phildelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-15

    Sterol carrier protein X (SCPx) is a 58-kDa protein that is localized to peroxisomes. The amino acid sequence of the protein suggests that SCPx may function as a thiolase. The gene encoding SCPx also codes for a 15.3-kDa protein called sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). Here the authors report the structure of this gene (SCP2), which spans approximately 80 kb and consists of 16 exons and 15 introns. Multiple transcription start sites were identified. The 5{prime} flanking region has characteristics of other peroxisomal protein promoters, which include the absence of a TATA box and G+C-enriched region containing several reverse GC boxes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Arabidopsis mRNA polyadenylation machinery: comprehensive analysis of protein-protein interactions and gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Min

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polyadenylation of mRNA is one of the critical processing steps during expression of almost all eukaryotic genes. It is tightly integrated with transcription, particularly its termination, as well as other RNA processing events, i.e. capping and splicing. The poly(A tail protects the mRNA from unregulated degradation, and it is required for nuclear export and translation initiation. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that the polyadenylation process is also involved in the regulation of gene expression. The polyadenylation process requires two components, the cis-elements on the mRNA and a group of protein factors that recognize the cis-elements and produce the poly(A tail. Here we report a comprehensive pairwise protein-protein interaction mapping and gene expression profiling of the mRNA polyadenylation protein machinery in Arabidopsis. Results By protein sequence homology search using human and yeast polyadenylation factors, we identified 28 proteins that may be components of Arabidopsis polyadenylation machinery. To elucidate the protein network and their functions, we first tested their protein-protein interaction profiles. Out of 320 pair-wise protein-protein interaction assays done using the yeast two-hybrid system, 56 (~17% showed positive interactions. 15 of these interactions were further tested, and all were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and/or in vitro co-purification. These interactions organize into three distinct hubs involving the Arabidopsis polyadenylation factors. These hubs are centered around AtCPSF100, AtCLPS, and AtFIPS. The first two are similar to complexes seen in mammals, while the third one stands out as unique to plants. When comparing the gene expression profiles extracted from publicly available microarray datasets, some of the polyadenylation related genes showed tissue-specific expression, suggestive of potential different polyadenylation complex configurations. Conclusion An

  14. Prioritizing cancer-related genes with aberrant methylation based on a weighted protein-protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Jie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As an important epigenetic modification, DNA methylation plays a crucial role in the development of mammals and in the occurrence of complex diseases. Genes that interact directly or indirectly may have the same or similar functions in the biological processes in which they are involved and together contribute to the related disease phenotypes. The complicated relations between genes can be clearly represented using network theory. A protein-protein interaction (PPI network offers a platform from which to systematically identify disease-related genes from the relations between genes with similar functions. Results We constructed a weighted human PPI network (WHPN using DNA methylation correlations based on human protein-protein interactions. WHPN represents the relationships of DNA methylation levels in gene pairs for four cancer types. A cancer-associated subnetwork (CASN was obtained from WHPN by selecting genes associated with seed genes which were known to be methylated in the four cancers. We found that CASN had a more densely connected network community than WHPN, indicating that the genes in CASN were much closer to seed genes. We prioritized 154 potential cancer-related genes with aberrant methylation in CASN by neighborhood-weighting decision rule. A function enrichment analysis for GO and KEGG indicated that the optimized genes were mainly involved in the biological processes of regulating cell apoptosis and programmed cell death. An analysis of expression profiling data revealed that many of the optimized genes were expressed differentially in the four cancers. By examining the PubMed co-citations, we found 43 optimized genes were related with cancers and aberrant methylation, and 10 genes were validated to be methylated aberrantly in cancers. Of 154 optimized genes, 27 were as diagnostic markers and 20 as prognostic markers previously identified in literature for cancers and other complex diseases by searching Pub

  15. Análisis de micromatrices de ADN revela genes asociados a metástasis en líneas celulares de cáncer de próstata de rata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Reyes

    2007-06-01

    Conclusiones. Se identificaron genes con expresión alterada asociados al fenotipo metastásico del cáncer de próstata. La subsiguiente validación de estos genes en tejido prostático humano pudiera revelar su utilidad como marcadores biológicos para esta enfermedad.

  16. Involvement of metabolic components, volatile compounds, PR proteins, and mechanical strengthening in multilayer protection of cucumber plants against Rhizoctonia solani activated by Trichoderma atroviride TRS25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocka, Justyna; Małolepsza, U; Szymczak, K; Szczech, M

    2017-09-06

    In the present study, the spread of Rhizoctonia solani-induced disease was limited when cucumber plants were pretreated with Trichoderma atroviride TRS25. The systemic disease suppression was related to TRS25-induced resistance (TISR) induction with simultaneous plant growth promotion. Protection of cucumber was related to enhanced activity of defense enzymes, e.g., guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), syringaldazine peroxidase (SPX), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) as well as phenolic (PC) concentration increases in the conditions of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation, resulting in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) decrease. Moreover, the obtained results indicated that TISR might depend on accumulation of salicylic acid derivatives, that is methyl salicylate (MeSA), ethylhexyl salicylate (EHS), salicylic acid glucosylated conjugates (SAGC), and β-cyclocitral as well as volatile organic compounds (VOC) such as Z-3-hexanal, Z-3-hexenol, and E-2-hexenal. The results point to important, not previously documented, roles of these VOC in TISR signaling with up-regulation of PR1 and PR5 gene characteristic of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and of PR4 gene, marker of induced systemic resistance (ISR). The study established that TRS25 enhanced deposition of callose and lignin in specialized plant cells, which protected vascular system in cucumber shoots and roots as well as assimilation cells and dermal tissues in shoots and leaves. These compounds protected cucumber organs against R. solani influence and made them more flexible and resilient, which contributed to better nutrition and hydration of plants. The growth promotion coupled with systemic mobilization of biochemical and mechanical strengthening might be involved in multilayer protection of cucumber against R. solani activated by TRS25.

  17. EvoTol: a protein-sequence based evolutionary intolerance framework for disease-gene prioritization

    OpenAIRE

    Rackham, Owen?J.?L.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Johnson, Michael R.; Petretto, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Methods to interpret personal genome sequences are increasingly required. Here, we report a novel framework (EvoTol) to identify disease-causing genes using patient sequence data from within protein coding-regions. EvoTol quantifies a gene's intolerance to mutation using evolutionary conservation of protein sequences and can incorporate tissue-specific gene expression data. We apply this framework to the analysis of whole-exome sequence data in epilepsy and congenital heart disease, and demon...

  18. Protein functional links in Trypanosoma brucei, identified by gene fusion analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trimpalis Philip

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domain or gene fusion analysis is a bioinformatics method for detecting gene fusions in one organism by comparing its genome to that of other organisms. The occurrence of gene fusions suggests that the two original genes that participated in the fusion are functionally linked, i.e. their gene products interact either as part of a multi-subunit protein complex, or in a metabolic pathway. Gene fusion analysis has been used to identify protein functional links in prokaryotes as well as in eukaryotic model organisms, such as yeast and Drosophila. Results In this study we have extended this approach to include a number of recently sequenced protists, four of which are pathogenic, to identify fusion linked proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. We have also examined the evolution of the gene fusion events identified, to determine whether they can be attributed to fusion or fission, by looking at the conservation of the fused genes and of the individual component genes across the major eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages. We find relatively limited occurrence of gene fusions/fissions within the protist lineages examined. Our results point to two trypanosome-specific gene fissions, which have recently been experimentally confirmed, one fusion involving proteins involved in the same metabolic pathway, as well as two novel putative functional links between fusion-linked protein pairs. Conclusions This is the first study of protein functional links in T. brucei identified by gene fusion analysis. We have used strict thresholds and only discuss results which are highly likely to be genuine and which either have already been or can be experimentally verified. We discuss the possible impact of the identification of these novel putative protein-protein interactions, to the development of new trypanosome therapeutic drugs.

  19. Prioritizing orphan proteins for further study using phylogenomics and gene expression profiles in Streptomyces coelicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takano Eriko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptomyces coelicolor, a model organism of antibiotic producing bacteria, has one of the largest genomes of the bacterial kingdom, including 7825 predicted protein coding genes. A large number of these genes, nearly 34%, are functionally orphan (hypothetical proteins with unknown function. However, in gene expression time course data, many of these functionally orphan genes show interesting expression patterns. Results In this paper, we analyzed all functionally orphan genes of Streptomyces coelicolor and identified a list of "high priority" orphans by combining gene expression analysis and additional phylogenetic information (i.e. the level of evolutionary conservation of each protein. Conclusions The prioritized orphan genes are promising candidates to be examined experimentally in the lab for further characterization of their function.

  20. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of Rh Family Genes and Proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng-Han Huang; Jianbin Peng

    2005-01-01

    .... In the latter view, Rh and Amt are different biological gas channels. To reconstruct the phytogeny of the Rh family and study its coexistence with and relationship to Amt in depth, we analyzed 111 Rh genes and 260 Amt genes...

  1. PCR-based gene synthesis to produce recombinant proteins for crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne-Steele Miranda L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene synthesis technologies are an important tool for structural biology projects, allowing increased protein expression through codon optimization and facilitating sequence alterations. Existing methods, however, can be complex and not always reproducible, prompting researchers to use commercial suppliers rather than synthesize genes themselves. Results A PCR-based gene synthesis method, referred to as SeqTBIO, is described to efficiently assemble the coding regions of two novel hyperthermophilic proteins, PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille domain, a siRNA-binding domain of an Argonaute protein homologue and a deletion mutant of a family A DNA polymerase (PolA. The gene synthesis procedure is based on sequential assembly such that homogeneous DNA products can be obtained after each synthesis step without extensive manipulation or purification requirements. Coupling the gene synthesis procedure to in vivo homologous recombination techniques allows efficient subcloning and site-directed mutagenesis for error correction. The recombinant proteins of PAZ and PolA were subsequently overexpressed in E. coli and used for protein crystallization. Crystals of both proteins were obtained and they were suitable for X-ray analysis. Conclusion We demonstrate, by using PAZ and PolA as examples, the feasibility of integrating the gene synthesis, error correction and subcloning techniques into a non-automated gene to crystal pipeline such that genes can be designed, synthesized and implemented for recombinant expression and protein crystallization.

  2. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Hox genes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hox genes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteran Bombyx mori. In this species, Antennapedia (Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antp can regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antp in the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such as sericin-3, fhxh4, and fhxh5. These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp. Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antp activates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putative sericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antp directly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. mori and the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori. We suggest that Hox genes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes. PMID:26814126

  3. Downregulation of ATM Gene and Protein Expression in Canine Mammary Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo-Ferreira, T M M; Bueno, R C; Terra, E M; Avante, M L; Tinucci-Costa, M; Carvalho, M; Cassali, G D; Linde, S D; Rogatto, S R; Laufer-Amorim, R

    2016-11-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene encodes a protein associated with DNA damage repair and maintenance of genomic integrity. In women, ATM transcript and protein downregulation have been reported in sporadic breast carcinomas, and the absence of ATM protein expression has been associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate ATM gene and protein expression in canine mammary tumors and their association with clinical outcome. ATM gene and protein expression was evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in normal mammary gland samples (n = 10), benign mammary tumors (n = 11), nonmetastatic mammary carcinomas (n = 19), and metastatic mammary carcinomas (n = 11). Lower ATM transcript levels were detected in benign mammary tumors and carcinomas compared with normal mammary glands (P = .011). Similarly, lower ATM protein expression was observed in benign tumors (P = .0003), nonmetastatic mammary carcinomas (P ATM gene or protein levels were detected among benign tumors and nonmetastatic and metastatic mammary carcinomas (P > .05). The levels of ATM gene or protein expression were not significantly associated with clinical and pathological features or with survival. Similar to human breast cancer, the data in this study suggest that ATM gene and protein downregulation is involved in canine mammary gland tumorigenesis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression maps of ARFs and Aux/IAAs in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbottam ePiya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The phytohormone auxin regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development. Based on the current model in Arabidopsis thaliana, Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA proteins repress auxin-inducible genes by inhibiting auxin response transcription factors (ARFs. Experimental evidence suggests that heterodimerization between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins are related to their unique biological functions. The objective of this study was to generate the Aux/IAA-ARF protein-protein interaction map using full length sequences and locate the interacting protein pairs to specific gene co-expression networks in order to define tissue-specific responses of the Aux/IAA-ARF interactome. Pairwise interactions between 19 ARFs and 29 Aux/IAAs resulted in the identification of 213 specific interactions of which 79 interactions were previously unknown. The incorporation of co-expression profiles with protein-protein interaction data revealed a strong correlation of gene co-expression for 70% of the ARF-Aux/IAA interacting pairs in at least one tissue/organ, indicative of the biological significance of these interactions. Importantly, ARF4-8 and 19, which were found to interact with almost all Aux-Aux/IAA showed broad co-expression relationships with Aux/IAA genes, thus, formed the central hubs of the co-expression network. Our analyses provide new insights into the biological significance of ARF-Aux/IAA associations in the morphogenesis and development of various plant tissues and organs.

  5. Protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression maps of ARFs and Aux/IAAs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piya, Sarbottam; Shrestha, Sandesh K; Binder, Brad; Stewart, C Neal; Hewezi, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development. Based on the current model in Arabidopsis thaliana, Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins repress auxin-inducible genes by inhibiting auxin response transcription factors (ARFs). Experimental evidence suggests that heterodimerization between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins are related to their unique biological functions. The objective of this study was to generate the Aux/IAA-ARF protein-protein interaction map using full length sequences and locate the interacting protein pairs to specific gene co-expression networks in order to define tissue-specific responses of the Aux/IAA-ARF interactome. Pairwise interactions between 19 ARFs and 29 Aux/IAAs resulted in the identification of 213 specific interactions of which 79 interactions were previously unknown. The incorporation of co-expression profiles with protein-protein interaction data revealed a strong correlation of gene co-expression for 70% of the ARF-Aux/IAA interacting pairs in at least one tissue/organ, indicative of the biological significance of these interactions. Importantly, ARF4-8 and 19, which were found to interact with almost all Aux-Aux/IAA showed broad co-expression relationships with Aux/IAA genes, thus, formed the central hubs of the co-expression network. Our analyses provide new insights into the biological significance of ARF-Aux/IAA associations in the morphogenesis and development of various plant tissues and organs.

  6. Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant outer membrane protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Qiu, Xuemei

    2011-06-01

    Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. The outer membrane protein of bacteria plays an important role in the infection and pathogenicity to the host. Thus, the outer membrane proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified a complete outer membrane protein gene (ompW) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 42.78 kDa. We purified the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for future application of the OmpW protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by V. parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified OmpW protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

  7. Connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions for stochastic models of gene expression

    CERN Document Server

    Elgart, Vlad; Fenley, Andrew T; Kulkarni, Rahul V

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variability in protein levels for genetically identical cells. Such variability in protein levels can arise from infrequent synthesis of mRNAs which in turn give rise to bursts of protein expression. Protein expression occurring in bursts has indeed been observed experimentally and recent studies have also found evidence for transcriptional bursting, i.e. production of mRNAs in bursts. Given that there are distinct experimental techniques for quantifying the noise at different stages of gene expression, it is of interest to derive analytical results connecting experimental observations at different levels. In this work, we consider stochastic models of gene expression for which mRNA and protein production occurs in independent bursts. For such models, we derive analytical expressions connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions which show how the functional form of the mRNA burst distribution can be inferred from the protein burst distributio...

  8. Response Gene to Complement 32 Protein Promotes Macrophage Phagocytosis via Activation of Protein Kinase C Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Gui; Chen, Shi-You

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage phagocytosis plays an important role in host defense. The molecular mechanism, especially factors regulating the phagocytosis, however, is not completely understood. In the present study, we found that response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) is an important regulator of phagocytosis. Although RGC-32 is induced and abundantly expressed in macrophage during monocyte-macrophage differentiation, RGC-32 appears not to be important for this process because RGC-32-deficient bone marrow progenitor can normally differentiate to macrophage. However, both peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages with RGC-32 deficiency exhibit significant defects in phagocytosis, whereas RGC-32-overexpressed macrophages show increased phagocytosis. Mechanistically, RGC-32 is recruited to macrophage membrane where it promotes F-actin assembly and the formation of phagocytic cups. RGC-32 knock-out impairs F-actin assembly. RGC-32 appears to interact with PKC to regulate PKC-induced phosphorylation of F-actin cross-linking protein myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that RGC-32 is a novel membrane regulator for macrophage phagocytosis. PMID:24973210

  9. Response gene to complement 32 protein promotes macrophage phagocytosis via activation of protein kinase C pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Gui; Chen, Shi-You

    2014-08-15

    Macrophage phagocytosis plays an important role in host defense. The molecular mechanism, especially factors regulating the phagocytosis, however, is not completely understood. In the present study, we found that response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) is an important regulator of phagocytosis. Although RGC-32 is induced and abundantly expressed in macrophage during monocyte-macrophage differentiation, RGC-32 appears not to be important for this process because RGC-32-deficient bone marrow progenitor can normally differentiate to macrophage. However, both peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages with RGC-32 deficiency exhibit significant defects in phagocytosis, whereas RGC-32-overexpressed macrophages show increased phagocytosis. Mechanistically, RGC-32 is recruited to macrophage membrane where it promotes F-actin assembly and the formation of phagocytic cups. RGC-32 knock-out impairs F-actin assembly. RGC-32 appears to interact with PKC to regulate PKC-induced phosphorylation of F-actin cross-linking protein myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that RGC-32 is a novel membrane regulator for macrophage phagocytosis. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Evolution of the duplicated intracellular lipid-binding protein genes of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Ananda B; Parmar, Manoj B; Wright, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    Increasing organismal complexity during the evolution of life has been attributed to the duplication of genes and entire genomes. More recently, theoretical models have been proposed that postulate the fate of duplicated genes, among them the duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model. In the DDC model, the common fate of a duplicated gene is lost from the genome owing to nonfunctionalization. Duplicated genes are retained in the genome either by subfunctionalization, where the functions of the ancestral gene are sub-divided between the sister duplicate genes, or by neofunctionalization, where one of the duplicate genes acquires a new function. Both processes occur either by loss or gain of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. Here, we review the genomic organization, evolution, and transcriptional regulation of the multigene family of intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) genes from teleost fishes. Teleost fishes possess many copies of iLBP genes owing to a whole genome duplication (WGD) early in the teleost fish radiation. Moreover, the retention of duplicated iLBP genes is substantially higher than the retention of all other genes duplicated in the teleost genome. The fatty acid-binding protein genes, a subfamily of the iLBP multigene family in zebrafish, are differentially regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, which may account for the retention of iLBP genes in the zebrafish genome by the process of subfunctionalization of cis-acting regulatory elements in iLBP gene promoters.

  11. Prion protein amyloidosis with divergent phenotype associated with two novel nonsense mutations in PRNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Casper; Parchi, Piero; Capellari, Sabina; Vermeij, Ad J.; Corrado, Patrizia; Baas, Frank; Strammiello, Rosaria; van Gool, Willem A.; van Swieten, John C.; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Stop codon mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PRNP) are very rare and have thus far only been described in two patients with prion protein cerebral amyloid angiopathy (PrP-CAA). In this report, we describe the clinical, histopathological and pathological prion protein (PrPSc)

  12. Prion protein amyloidosis with divergent phenotype associated with two novel nonsense mutations in PRNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, C.; Parchi, P.; Capellari, S.; Vermeij, A.J.; Corrado, P.; Baas, F.; Strammiello, R.; van Gool, W.A.; van Swieten, J.C.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Stop codon mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PRNP) are very rare and have thus far only been described in two patients with prion protein cerebral amyloid angiopathy (PrP-CAA). In this report, we describe the clinical, histopathological and pathological prion protein (PrP

  13. Computational codon optimization of synthetic gene for protein expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Bevan Kai-Sheng; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2012-01-01

    ...), on the level of protein expression. In this study, we have developed novel computational procedures for evaluating the relative importance of optimizing ICU and CC for enhancing protein expression...

  14. Expression and chromatin structures of cellulolytic enzyme gene regulated by heterochromatin protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiujun; Qu, Yinbo; Qin, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    Background Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, homologue HepA in Penicillium oxalicum) binding is associated with a highly compact chromatin state accompanied by gene silencing or repression. HP1 loss leads to the derepression of gene expression. We investigated HepA roles in regulating cellulolytic enzyme gene expression, as an increasingly number of studies have suggested that cellulolytic enzyme gene expression is not only regulated by transcription factors, but is also affected by the chromat...

  15. The pathogenesis-related protein PR-4b from Theobroma cacao presents RNase activity, Ca2+ and Mg2+ dependent-DNase activity and antifungal action on Moniliophthora perniciosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The production and accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins (PR proteins) in plants in response to biotic or abiotic stresses is well known and is considered as a crucial mechanism for plant defense. A pathogenesis-related protein 4 cDNA was identified from a cacao-Moniliophthora perniciosa interaction cDNA library and named TcPR-4b. Results TcPR-4b presents a Barwin domain with six conserved cysteine residues, but lacks the chitin-binding site. Molecular modeling of TcPR-4b confirmed the importance of the cysteine residues to maintain the protein structure, and of several conserved amino acids for the catalytic activity. In the cacao genome, TcPR-4b belonged to a small multigene family organized mainly on chromosome 5. TcPR-4b RT-qPCR analysis in resistant and susceptible cacao plants infected by M. perniciosa showed an increase of expression at 48 hours after infection (hai) in both cacao genotypes. After the initial stage (24-72 hai), the TcPR-4b expression was observed at all times in the resistant genotypes, while in the susceptible one the expression was concentrated at the final stages of infection (45-90 days after infection). The recombinant TcPR-4b protein showed RNase, and bivalent ions dependent-DNase activity, but no chitinase activity. Moreover, TcPR-4b presented antifungal action against M. perniciosa, and the reduction of M. perniciosa survival was related to ROS production in fungal hyphae. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of a PR-4 showing simultaneously RNase, DNase and antifungal properties, but no chitinase activity. Moreover, we showed that the antifungal activity of TcPR-4b is directly related to RNase function. In cacao, TcPR-4b nuclease activities may be related to the establishment and maintenance of resistance, and to the PCD mechanism, in resistant and susceptible cacao genotypes, respectively. PMID:24920373

  16. Predicting Essential Genes and Proteins Based on Machine Learning and Network Topological Features: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Acencio, Marcio Luis; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins/genes are indispensable to the survival or reproduction of an organism, and the deletion of such essential proteins will result in lethality or infertility. The identification of essential genes is very important not only for understanding the minimal requirements for survival of an organism, but also for finding human disease genes and new drug targets. Experimental methods for identifying essential genes are costly, time-consuming, and laborious. With the accumulation of sequenced genomes data and high-throughput experimental data, many computational methods for identifying essential proteins are proposed, which are useful complements to experimental methods. In this review, we show the state-of-the-art methods for identifying essential genes and proteins based on machine learning and network topological features, point out the progress and limitations of current methods, and discuss the challenges and directions for further research. PMID:27014079

  17. Predicting Essential Genes and Proteins Based on Machine Learning and Network Topological Features: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Acencio, Marcio Luis; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins/genes are indispensable to the survival or reproduction of an organism, and the deletion of such essential proteins will result in lethality or infertility. The identification of essential genes is very important not only for understanding the minimal requirements for survival of an organism, but also for finding human disease genes and new drug targets. Experimental methods for identifying essential genes are costly, time-consuming, and laborious. With the accumulation of sequenced genomes data and high-throughput experimental data, many computational methods for identifying essential proteins are proposed, which are useful complements to experimental methods. In this review, we show the state-of-the-art methods for identifying essential genes and proteins based on machine learning and network topological features, point out the progress and limitations of current methods, and discuss the challenges and directions for further research.

  18. Novel surface layer protein genes in Bacillus sphaericus associated with unusual insertion elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, Katrin; Raff, Johannes; Schnorpfeil, Michaela; Radeva, Galina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2005-09-01

    The surface layer (S-layer) protein genes of the uranium mining waste pile isolate Bacillus sphaericus JG-A12 and of its relative B. sphaericus NCTC 9602 were analysed. The almost identical N-termini of the two S-layer proteins possess a unique structure, comprising three N-terminal S-layer homologous (SLH) domains. The central parts of the proteins share a high homology and are related to the S-layer proteins of B. sphaericus CCM 2177 and P-1. In contrast, the C-terminal parts of the S-layer proteins of JG-A12 and NCTC 9602 differ significantly between each other. Surprisingly, the C-terminal part of the S-layer protein of JG-A12 shares a high identity with that of the S-layer protein of B. sphaericus CCM 2177. In both JG-A12 and NCTC 9602 the chromosomal S-layer protein genes are followed by a newly identified putative insertion element comprising three ORFs, which encode a putative transposase, a putative integrase/recombinase and a putative protein containing a DNA binding helix-turn-helix motif, and the S-layer-protein-like gene copies sllA (9602) or sllB (JG-A12). Interestingly, both B. sphaericus strains studied were found to contain an additional, plasmid-located and silent S-layer protein gene with the same sequence as sllA and sllB. The primary structures of the corresponding putative proteins are almost identical in both strains. The N-terminal and central parts of these S-layer proteins share a high identity with those of the chromosomally encoded functional S-layer proteins. Their C-terminal parts, however, differ significantly. These results strongly suggest that the S-layer protein genes have evolved via horizontal transfer of genetic information followed by DNA rearrangements mediated by mobile elements.

  19. In silicio search for genes encoding peroxisomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, A J; Hettema, E H; van den Berg, M; Koerkamp, M G; van Ijlst, L; Distel, B; Tabak, H F

    2000-01-01

    The biogenesis of peroxisomes involves the synthesis of new proteins that after, completion of translation, are targeted to the organelle by virtue of peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). Two types of PTSs have been well characterized for import of matrix proteins (PTS1 and PTS2). Induction of the genes encoding these matrix proteins takes place in oleate-containing medium and is mediated via an oleate response element (ORE) present in the region preceding these genes. The authors have searched the yeast genome for OREs preceding open reading frames (ORFs), and for ORFs that contain either a PTS1 or PTS2. Of the ORFs containing an ORE, as well as either a PTS1 or a PTS2, many were known to encode bona fide peroxisomal matrix proteins. In addition, candidate genes were identified as encoding putative new peroxisomal proteins. For one case, subcellular location studies validated the in silicio prediction. This gene encodes a new peroxisomal thioesterase.

  20. Revisiting the missing protein-coding gene catalog of the domestic dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galibert Francis

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among mammals for which there is a high sequence coverage, the whole genome assembly of the dog is unique in that it predicts a low number of protein-coding genes, ~19,000, compared to the over 20,000 reported for other mammalian species. Of particular interest are the more than 400 of genes annotated in primates and rodent genomes, but missing in dog. Results Using over 14,000 orthologous genes between human, chimpanzee, mouse rat and dog, we built multiple pairwise synteny maps to infer short orthologous intervals that were targeted for characterizing the canine missing genes. Based on gene prediction and a functionality test using the ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitution rates (dN/dS, we provide compelling structural and functional evidence for the identification of 232 new protein-coding genes in the canine genome and 69 gene losses, characterized as undetected gene or pseudogenes. Gene loss phyletic pattern analysis using ten species from chicken to human allowed us to characterize 28 canine-specific gene losses that have functional orthologs continuously from chicken or marsupials through human, and 10 genes that arose specifically in the evolutionary lineage leading to rodent and primates. Conclusion This study demonstrates the central role of comparative genomics for refining gene catalogs and exploring the evolutionary history of gene repertoires, particularly as applied for the characterization of species-specific gene gains and losses.

  1. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64% consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial proteins (mt-cy families while the remaining 33 (36% were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families. Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1 relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2 from cytosol to mitochondria and 3 multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on

  2. Absence of repellents in Ustilago maydis induces genes encoding small secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teertstra, Wieke R; Krijgsheld, Pauline; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-08-01

    The rep1 gene of the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis encodes a pre-pro-protein that is processed in the secretory pathway into 11 peptides. These so-called repellents form amphipathic amyloid fibrils at the surface of aerial hyphae. A SG200 strain in which the rep1 gene is inactivated (∆rep1 strain) is affected in aerial hyphae formation. We here assessed changes in global gene expression as a consequence of the inactivation of the rep1 gene. Microarray analysis revealed that only 31 genes in the ∆rep1 SG200 strain had a fold change in expression of ≥2. Twenty-two of these genes were up-regulated and half of them encode small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown functions. Seven of the SSP genes and two other genes that are over-expressed in the ∆rep1 SG200 strain encode proteins that can be classified as secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SCRPs). Interestingly, most of the SCRPs are predicted to form amyloids. The SCRP gene um00792 showed the highest up-regulation in the ∆rep1 strain. Using GFP as a reporter, it was shown that this gene is over-expressed in the layer of hyphae at the medium-air interface. Taken together, it is concluded that inactivation of rep1 hardly affects the expression profile of U. maydis, despite the fact that the mutant strain has a strong reduced ability to form aerial hyphae.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HspX/EsxS Fusion Protein: Gene Cloning, Protein Expression, and Purification in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Farzad; Yousefi-Avarvand, Arshid; Derakhshan, Mohammad; Meshkat, Zahra; Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Aryan, Ehsan; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clone, express, and purify a novel multidomain fusion protein of Micobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in a prokaryotic system. An hspX/esxS gene construct was synthesized and ligated into a pGH plasmid, E. coli TOP10 cells were transformed, and the vector was purified. The vector containing the construct and pET-21b (+) plasmid were digested with the same enzymes and the construct was ligated into pET-21b (+). The accuracy of cloning was confirmed by colony PCR and sequencing. E. coli BL21 cells were transformed with the pET-21b (+)/hspX/esxS expression vector and protein expression was evaluated. Finally, the expressed fusion protein was purified on a Ni-IDA column and verified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. The hspX/esxS gene construct was inserted into pET-21b (+) and recombinant protein expression was induced with IPTG in E. coli BL21 cells. Various concentrations of IPTG were tested to determine the optimum concentration for expression induction. The recombinant protein was expressed in insoluble inclusion bodies. Three molar guanidine HCl was used to solubilize the insoluble protein. An HspX/EsxS Mtb fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein was purified. After immunological analysis, the HspX/EsxS fusion protein might be an anti-tuberculosis vaccine candidate in future clinical trial studies.

  4. Leber congenital amaurosis: genes, proteins and disease mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, A.I. den; Roepman, R.; Koenekoop, R.K.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe retinal dystrophy causing blindness or severe visual impairment before the age of 1 year. Linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping and candidate gene analysis facilitated the identification of 14 genes mutated in patients with LCA and juvenile

  5. Identification of toxin genes encoding Cyt proteins from standard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods for identification of cyt subclasses from Bacillus thuringiensis were established. Eight of 68 standard and ten of 107 Argentine B. thuringiensis strains harbor at least one cyt gene. The combination of cyt1Aa/cyt2Ba genes was identified in four ...

  6. MaSnf1, a sucrose non-fermenting protein kinase gene, is involved in carbon source utilization, stress tolerance, and virulence in Metarhizium acridum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yue; Wei, Qinglv; Jin, Kai; Xia, Yuxian

    2014-12-01

    The protein kinase sucrose non-fermenting-1(Snf1) regulates the derepression of glucose-repressible genes and plays a major role in carbon source utilization. In this study, MaSnf1, a sucrose non-fermenting protein kinase gene, has been identified from the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium acridum, which has a great potential as a biocontrol agent. The functions of MaSnf1 were characterized using gene disruption and complementation strategies. Disruption of MaSnf1 reduced the conidial yield and delayed the conidial germination on potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium. MaSnf1 is also important for response to ultraviolet radiation and heat shock stress and carbon source utilization in M. acridum. Bioassays by topical inoculation and intrahemocoel injection showed that the MaSnf1 deletion mutant exhibited greatly reduced pathogenicity. The reduced expression level of chitinase gene (Chi) and protease gene (Pr1A) in MaSnf1-disruption transformant (ΔMaSnf1) most likely affects the initial penetration into its host. Additionally, the reduced expression level of acidic trehalase gene (ATM1) probably causes a decline in growth rate in insect hemolymph. Inactivation of MaSnf1 led to a significant decrease in virulence, probably owing to reduction in conidial germination, and appressorium formation, impairment in penetration, and decrease in growth rate in insect hemolymph.

  7. Molecular characterisation of the nucleocapsid protein gene, glycoprotein gene and gene junctions of rhabdovirus 903/87, a novel fish pathogenic rhabdovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Tove; Nylund, S.; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    The sequences of the nucleocapsid and glycoprotein genes and the gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus 903/87 were determined from cDNA and PCR clones. The mRNA of the nucleocapsid is most likely 1492 nucleotides long and encodes a protein of 426 amino acids, whereas the m......RNA of the glycoprotein is likely to be 1682 nucleotides long and the protein 517 amino acids. When the nucleocapsid and glycoprotein genes of virus 903/87 were compared at amino acid level with other rhabdoviruses they showed the hi hest homology with the Vesiculovirus genus. By sequencing the junctions between the N, P...

  8. Accelerated evolution of schistosome genes coding for proteins located at the host-parasite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippsen, Gisele S; Wilson, R Alan; DeMarco, Ricardo

    2015-01-06

    Study of proteins located at the host-parasite interface in schistosomes might provide clues about the mechanisms utilized by the parasite to escape the host immune system attack. Micro-exon gene (MEG) protein products and venom allergen-like (VAL) proteins have been shown to be present in schistosome secretions or associated with glands, which led to the hypothesis that they are important components in the molecular interaction of the parasite with the host. Phylogenetic and structural analysis of genes and their transcripts in these two classes shows that recent species-specific expansion of gene number for these families occurred separately in three different species of schistosomes. Enrichment of transposable elements in MEG and VAL genes in Schistosoma mansoni provides a credible mechanism for preferential expansion of gene numbers for these families. Analysis of the ratio between synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) in the comparison between schistosome orthologs for the two classes of genes reveals significantly higher values when compared with a set of a control genes coding for secreted proteins, and for proteins previously localized in the tegument. Additional analyses of paralog genes indicate that exposure of the protein to the definitive host immune system is a determining factor leading to the higher than usual dN/dS values in those genes. The observation that two genes encoding S. mansoni vaccine candidate proteins, known to be exposed at the parasite surface, also display similar evolutionary dynamics suggests a broad response of the parasite to evolutionary pressure imposed by the definitive host immune system. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. The presence of two S-layer-protein-encoding genes is conserved among species related to Lactobacillus acidophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, H.J.; Kolen, C.P.A.M.; Pot, B.; Kersters, K.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    Previously we have shown that the type strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus possesses two S-protein-encoding genes, one of which is silent, on a chromosomal segment of 6 kb. The S-protein-encoding gene in the expression site can be exchanged for the silent S-protein-encoding gene by inversion of this

  10. Housekeeping gene on the X chromosome encodes a protein similar to ubiquitin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toniolo, D.; Persico, M.; Alcalay, M.

    1988-02-01

    An X chromosome gene located 40 kilobases downstream from the G6PD gene, at Xq28, was isolated and sequenced. This gene, which the authors named GdX, spans about 3.5 kilobases of genomic DNA. GdX is a single-copy gene, is conserved in evolution, and has the features of a housekeeping gene. At its 5' end, a cluster of CpG dinucleotides is methylated on the inactive X chromosome and unmethylated on the active X chromosome. The GdX gene can code for a 157 amino acid protein, GdX. Residues 1-74 of GdX show 43% identity to ubiquitin, a highly conserved 76 amino acid protein. The COOH-terminal moiety of GdX is characterized in its central part (residues 110-128) by a sequence homologous to the COOH-terminal hormonogenic site of thyroglobulin. The structural organization of the GdX protein suggests the existence of a family of genes, in addition to the ubiquitin gene, that could play specific roles in key cellular processes, possible through protein-protein recognition.

  11. Identification of Gene-Expression Signatures and Protein Markers for Breast Cancer Grading and Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Wei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The grade of a cancer is a measure of the cancer's malignancy level, and the stage of a cancer refers to the size and the extent that the cancer has spread. Here we present a computational method for prediction of gene signatures and blood/urine protein markers for breast cancer grades and stages based on RNA-seq data, which are retrieved from the TCGA breast cancer dataset and cover 111 pairs of disease and matching adjacent noncancerous tissues with pathologists-assigned stages and grades. By applying a differential expression and an SVM-based classification approach, we found that 324 and 227 genes in cancer have their expression levels consistently up-regulated vs. their matching controls in a grade- and stage-dependent manner, respectively. By using these genes, we predicted a 9-gene panel as a gene signature for distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well differentiated breast cancers, and a 19-gene panel as a gene signature for discriminating between the moderately and well differentiated breast cancers. Similarly, a 30-gene panel and a 21-gene panel are predicted as gene signatures for distinguishing advanced stage (stages III-IV) from early stage (stages I-II) cancer samples and for distinguishing stage II from stage I samples, respectively. We expect these gene panels can be used as gene-expression signatures for cancer grade and stage classification. In addition, of the 324 grade-dependent genes, 188 and 66 encode proteins that are predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively; and of the 227 stage-dependent genes, 123 and 51 encode proteins predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively. We anticipate that some combinations of these blood and urine proteins could serve as markers for monitoring breast cancer at specific grades and stages through blood and urine tests.

  12. Grb7 gene amplification and protein expression by FISH and IHC in ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    ZENG, MANMAN; Yang, Zhu; Hu, Xiaoyu; LIU, Yi; YANG, XIAOTAO; Ran, Hailong; Li, Yanan; Li, Xu; YU, QIUBO

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Overexpression of growth factor receptor-bound protein 7 (Grb7) has been found in numerous human cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between Grb7 gene amplification and protein expression in ovarian cancer (OC). Methods: We use Tissue Microarray (TMA) respectively to detect the gene amplification and protein expression of Grb7 in 90 cases OC and 10 control specimens of normal ovarian tissues by IHC and FISH. Results: The Grb7 protein expression by IHC ana...

  13. The use of Gene Ontology terms for predicting highly-connected 'hub' nodes in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherkasov Artem

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions mediate a wide range of cellular functions and responses and have been studied rigorously through recent large-scale proteomics experiments and bioinformatics analyses. One of the most important findings of those endeavours was the observation that 'hub' proteins participate in significant numbers of protein interactions and play critical roles in the organization and function of cellular protein interaction networks (PINs 12. It has also been demonstrated that such hub proteins may constitute an important pool of attractive drug targets. Thus, it is crucial to be able to identify hub proteins based not only on experimental data but also by means of bioinformatics predictions. Results A hub protein classifier has been developed based on the available interaction data and Gene Ontology (GO annotations for proteins in the Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens genomes. In particular, by utilizing the machine learning method of boosting trees we were able to create a predictive bioinformatics tool for the identification of proteins that are likely to play the role of a hub in protein interaction networks. Testing the developed hub classifier on external sets of experimental protein interaction data in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA 252 and Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrated that our approach can predict hub proteins with a high degree of accuracy. A practical application of the developed bioinformatics method has been illustrated by the effective protein bait selection for large-scale pull-down experiments that aim to map complete protein-protein interaction networks for several species. Conclusion The successful development of an accurate hub classifier demonstrated that highly-connected proteins tend to share certain relevant functional properties reflected in their Gene Ontology annotations. It is anticipated that the developed

  14. Gene expression and protein localisation of calcyclin, a calcium-binding protein of the S-100 family in fresh neuroblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, G P; Fabretti, G; Kuznicki, J; Massimo, L; Scaruffi, P; Brisigotti, M; Mazzocco, K

    1995-01-01

    Calcyclin gene, a Ca(2+)-binding protein with homology to S-100, has been found to be expressed at different levels in leukaemic cells and in other tumour cells. We recently reported the expression of the gene in human neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines, and suggested a possible role of calcyclin in cell differentiation. To extend our findings, we investigated the expression of the gene in NB cells induced to differentiate by retinoic acid (RA), using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Time-course experiments employing LA-N-5 cells showed that calcyclin mRNA appeared 2 h after RA treatment, long before the cells were blocked in the G1 cell-cycle phase and before the neurite-like structures outgrew from the cell bodies. This suggests the involvement of the gene in the early phase of cell differentiation. Furthermore, we investigated mRNA expression in a series of fresh neuroblastomas. NB tumours showed a heterogeneous pattern of calcyclin expression, although calcyclin seemed to be expressed more frequently in cases with a favourable Shimada histology. We also studied the expression of the protein in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissues, by using a specific anticalcyclin antibody. The protein was detected in stromal cells which characterise a more mature histological type, and in nerve sheaths, whereas neuroblasts were negative. The tissue that expressed calcyclin protein showed a Schwann-like differentiation and, unlike S-100 protein, calcyclin was expressed in the perineurium.

  15. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-03-25

    Hoxgenes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hoxgenes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteranBombyx mori In this species,Antennapedia(Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antpcan regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antpin the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such assericin-3,fhxh4, and fhxh5 These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antpactivates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putativesericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antpdirectly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. moriand the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori We suggest that Hoxgenes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Do prion protein gene polymorphisms induce apoptosis in non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-15

    Jan 15, 2016 ... prion protein-specific mRNA in scrapie-infected and uninfected brain. Nature 315 331–333. Colby DW and Prusiner SB 2011 Prions. Cold Spring Harb. Perspect. Biol. 3 a006833. Fournier JG, Escaig-Haye F and Grigoriev V 2000 Ultrastructural localization of prion proteins: physiological and pathological.

  17. Identification and cloning of two insecticidal protein genes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-18

    Jun 18, 2014 ... 2State Key Laboratory of Biology for Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of ... Different insecticidal crystal proteins of Bt have different bioactivity ... Key words: Bacillus thuringiensis, peptide mess fingerprint, identification, clone, insecticidal crystal protein.

  18. Association of C-reactive protein (CRP) gene polymorphisms, serum CRP levels and cervical cancer prognosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polterauer, Stephan; Grimm, Christoph; Zeillinger, Robert; Heinze, Georg; Tempfer, Clemens; Reinthaller, Alexander; Hefler, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the prototypical biomarker of inflammation. Genetic variations within the CRP gene have been shown to be associated with alterations of CRP expression and prognosis in cancer patients...

  19. EvoTol: a protein-sequence based evolutionary intolerance framework for disease-gene prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackham, Owen J L; Shihab, Hashem A; Johnson, Michael R; Petretto, Enrico

    2015-03-11

    Methods to interpret personal genome sequences are increasingly required. Here, we report a novel framework (EvoTol) to identify disease-causing genes using patient sequence data from within protein coding-regions. EvoTol quantifies a gene's intolerance to mutation using evolutionary conservation of protein sequences and can incorporate tissue-specific gene expression data. We apply this framework to the analysis of whole-exome sequence data in epilepsy and congenital heart disease, and demonstrate EvoTol's ability to identify known disease-causing genes is unmatched by competing methods. Application of EvoTol to the human interactome revealed networks enriched for genes intolerant to protein sequence variation, informing novel polygenic contributions to human disease. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Evolutionary genomics of plant genes encoding N-terminal-TM-C2 domain proteins and the similar FAM62 genes and synaptotagmin genes of metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craxton Molly

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptotagmin genes are found in animal genomes and are known to function in the nervous system. Genes with a similar domain architecture as well as sequence similarity to synaptotagmin C2 domains have also been found in plant genomes. The plant genes share an additional region of sequence similarity with a group of animal genes named FAM62. FAM62 genes also have a similar domain architecture. Little is known about the functions of the plant genes and animal FAM62 genes. Indeed, many members of the large and diverse Syt gene family await functional characterization. Understanding the evolutionary relationships among these genes will help to realize the full implications of functional studies and lead to improved genome annotation. Results I collected and compared plant Syt-like sequences from the primary nucleotide sequence databases at NCBI. The collection comprises six groups of plant genes conserved in embryophytes: NTMC2Type1 to NTMC2Type6. I collected and compared metazoan FAM62 sequences and identified some similar sequences from other eukaryotic lineages. I found evidence of RNA editing and alternative splicing. I compared the intron patterns of Syt genes. I also compared Rabphilin and Doc2 genes. Conclusion Genes encoding proteins with N-terminal-transmembrane-C2 domain architectures resembling synaptotagmins, are widespread in eukaryotes. A collection of these genes is presented here. The collection provides a resource for studies of intron evolution. I have classified the collection into homologous gene families according to distinctive patterns of sequence conservation and intron position. The evolutionary histories of these gene families are traceable through the appearance of family members in different eukaryotic lineages. Assuming an intron-rich eukaryotic ancestor, the conserved intron patterns distinctive of individual gene families, indicate independent origins of Syt, FAM62 and NTMC2 genes. Resemblances

  1. In-silico analysis of cis-acting regulatory elements of pathogenesis-related proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amritpreet; Pati, Pratap Kumar; Pati, Aparna Maitra; Nagpal, Avinash Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are low molecular weight family of proteins induced in plants under various biotic and abiotic stresses. They play an important role in plant-defense mechanism. PRs have wide range of functions, acting as hydrolases, peroxidases, chitinases, anti-fungal, protease inhibitors etc. In the present study, an attempt has been made to analyze promoter regions of PR1, PR2, PR5, PR9, PR10 and PR12 of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. Analysis of cis-element distribution revealed the functional multiplicity of PRs and provides insight into the gene regulation. CpG islands are observed only in rice PRs, which indicates that monocot genome contains more GC rich motifs than dicots. Tandem repeats were also observed in 5’ UTR of PR genes. Thus, the present study provides an understanding of regulation of PR genes and their versatile roles in plants. PMID:28910327

  2. De novo origination of a new protein-coding gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Zhao, Ruoping; Jiang, Huifeng; Wang, Wen

    2008-05-01

    Origination of new genes is an important mechanism generating genetic novelties during the evolution of an organism. Processes of creating new genes using preexisting genes as the raw materials are well characterized, such as exon shuffling, gene duplication, retroposition, gene fusion, and fission. However, the process of how a new gene is de novo created from noncoding sequence is largely unknown. On the basis of genome comparison among yeast species, we have identified a new de novo protein-coding gene, BSC4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The BSC4 gene has an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 132-amino-acid-long peptide, while there is no homologous ORF in all the sequenced genomes of other fungal species, including its closely related species such as S. paradoxus and S. mikatae. The functional protein-coding feature of the BSC4 gene in S. cerevisiae is supported by population genetics, expression, proteomics, and synthetic lethal data. The evidence suggests that BSC4 may be involved in the DNA repair pathway during the stationary phase of S. cerevisiae and contribute to the robustness of S. cerevisiae, when shifted to a nutrient-poor environment. Because the corresponding noncoding sequences in S. paradoxus, S. mikatae, and S. bayanus also transcribe, we propose that a new de novo protein-coding gene may have evolved from a previously expressed noncoding sequence.

  3. Predicting protein phosphorylation from gene expression: top methods from the IMPROVER Species Translation Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayarian, Adel; Romero, Roberto; Wang, Zhiming; Biehl, Michael; Bilal, Erhan; Hormoz, Sahand; Meyer, Pablo; Norel, Raquel; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Bhanot, Gyan; Luo, Feng; Tarca, Adi L

    2015-02-15

    Using gene expression to infer changes in protein phosphorylation levels induced in cells by various stimuli is an outstanding problem. The intra-species protein phosphorylation challenge organized by the IMPROVER consortium provided the framework to identify the best approaches to address this issue. Rat lung epithelial cells were treated with 52 stimuli, and gene expression and phosphorylation levels were measured. Competing teams used gene expression data from 26 stimuli to develop protein phosphorylation prediction models and were ranked based on prediction performance for the remaining 26 stimuli. Three teams were tied in first place in this challenge achieving a balanced accuracy of about 70%, indicating that gene expression is only moderately predictive of protein phosphorylation. In spite of the similar performance, the approaches used by these three teams, described in detail in this article, were different, with the average number of predictor genes per phosphoprotein used by the teams ranging from 3 to 124. However, a significant overlap of gene signatures between teams was observed for the majority of the proteins considered, while Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways were enriched in the union of the predictor genes of the three teams for multiple proteins. Gene expression and protein phosphorylation data are available from ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-2091). Software implementation of the approach of Teams 49 and 75 are available at http://bioinformaticsprb.med.wayne.edu and http://people.cs.clemson.edu/∼luofeng/sbv.rar, respectively. gyanbhanot@gmail.com or luofeng@clemson.edu or atarca@med.wayne.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes in avocados fumigated with thyme oil vapours and control of anthracnose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Malick; Sivakumar, Dharini; Beukes, Mervyn; Korsten, Lise

    2016-03-01

    Thyme oil (TO) fumigation (96μll(-1)) to cv. Hass and Ryan avocados significantly reduced anthracnose incidence compared to prochloraz and the untreated control. Also, enhanced activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase were noted in both cultivars. TO fumigation induced the expression of both β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase genes in naturally infected fruit of both cultivars, during storage at 7 or 7.5°C for up to 21d and during subsequent simulated market shelf conditions at 20°C for 5d. However, the impact of TO fumigation on the β-1,3-glucanase gene expression was higher in both cultivars. Higher gene regulation and β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase activities were observed in cv. Ryan compared to Hass. Although TO fumigation significantly reduced anthracnose incidence in both naturally infected cultivars, the inhibitory effect was slightly higher in cv. Ryan than Hass. Thus, postharvest TO fumigation had positive effects on enhancing anthracnose disease resistance during storage and also gave a residual effect during the simulated shelf life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins in atopic dermatitis patients from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Jörg T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic dermatitis (AD is believed to result from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. A main feature of AD as well as other allergic disorders is serum and tissue eosinophilia. Human eosinophils contain high amounts of cationic granule proteins, including eosinophil cationic protein (ECP, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO and major basic protein (MBP. Recently, variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. We therefore genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ECP, EDN, EPO and MBP genes in a cohort of 361 German AD patients and 325 healthy controls. Results Genotype and allele frequencies did not differ between patients and controls for all polymorphisms investigated in this study. Haplotype analysis did not reveal any additional information. Conclusion We did not find evidence to support an influence of variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins for AD pathogenesis in this German cohort.

  6. Characterisation of silent and active genes for a variable large protein of Borrelia recurrentis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scragg Ian G

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report the characterisation of the variable large protein (vlp gene expressed by clinical isolate A1 of Borrelia recurrentis; the agent of the life-threatening disease louse-borne relapsing fever. Methods The major vlp protein of this isolate was characterised and a DNA probe created. Use of this together with standard molecular methods was used to determine the location of the vlp1B. recurrentis A1 gene in both this and other isolates. Results This isolate was found to carry silent and expressed copies of the vlp1B. recurrentis A1 gene on plasmids of 54 kbp and 24 kbp respectively, whereas a different isolate, A17, had only the silent vlp1B. recurrentis A17 on a 54 kbp plasmid. Silent and expressed vlp1 have identical mature protein coding regions but have different 5' regions, both containing different potential lipoprotein leader sequences. Only one form of vlp1 is transcribed in the A1 isolate of B. recurrentis, yet both 5' upstream sequences of this vlp1 gene possess features of bacterial promoters. Conclusion Taken together these results suggest that antigenic variation in B. recurrentis may result from recombination of variable large and small protein genes at the junction between lipoprotein leader sequence and mature protein coding region. However, this hypothetical model needs to be validated by further identification of expressed and silent variant protein genes in other B. recurrentis isolates.

  7. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  8. BraLTP1, a lipid transfer protein gene involved in epicuticular wax deposition, cell proliferation and flower development in Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    Full Text Available Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs constitute large multigene families that possess complex physiological functions, many of which remain unclear. This study isolated and characterized the function of a lipid transfer protein gene, BraLTP1 from Brassica rapa, in the important oilseed crops Brassica napus. BraLTP1 encodes a predicted secretory protein, in the little known VI Class of nsLTP families. Overexpression of BnaLTP1 in B. napus caused abnormal green coloration and reduced wax deposition on leaves and detailed wax analysis revealed 17-80% reduction in various major wax components, which resulted in significant water-loss relative to wild type. BnaLTP1 overexpressing leaves exhibited morphological disfiguration and abaxially curled leaf edges, and leaf cross-sections revealed cell overproliferation that was correlated to increased cytokinin levels (tZ, tZR, iP, and iPR in leaves and high expression of the cytokinin biosynthsis gene IPT3. BnaLTP1-overexpressing plants also displayed morphological disfiguration of flowers, with early-onset and elongated carpel development and outwardly curled stamen. This was consistent with altered expression of a a number of ABC model genes related to flower development. Together, these results suggest that BraLTP1 is a new nsLTP gene involved in wax production or deposition, with additional direct or indirect effects on cell division and flower development.

  9. Novel reference genes for quantifying transcriptional responses of Escherichia coli to protein overexpression by quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Ruiyang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate interpretation of quantitative PCR (qPCR data requires normalization using constitutively expressed reference genes. Ribosomal RNA is often used as a reference gene for transcriptional studies in E. coli. However, the choice of reliable reference genes has not been systematically validated. The objective of this study is to identify a set of reliable reference genes for transcription analysis in recombinant protein over-expression studies in E. coli. Results In this study, the meta-analysis of 240 sets of single-channel Affymetrix microarray data representing over-expressions of 63 distinct recombinant proteins in various E. coli strains identified twenty candidate reference genes that were stably expressed across all conditions. The expression of these twenty genes and two commonly used reference genes, rrsA encoding ribosomal RNA 16S and ihfB, was quantified by qPCR in E. coli cells over-expressing four genes of the 1-Deoxy-D-Xylulose 5-Phosphate pathway. From these results, two independent statistical algorithms identified three novel reference genes cysG, hcaT, and idnT but not rrsA and ihfB as highly invariant in two E. coli strains, across different growth temperatures and induction conditions. Transcriptomic data normalized by the geometric average of these three genes demonstrated that genes of the lycopene synthetic pathway maintained steady expression upon enzyme overexpression. In contrast, the use of rrsA or ihfB as reference genes led to the mis-interpretation that lycopene pathway genes were regulated during enzyme over-expression. Conclusion This study identified cysG/hcaT/idnT to be reliable novel reference genes for transcription analysis in recombinant protein producing E. coli.

  10. Hormonal regulation of platypus Beta-lactoglobulin and monotreme lactation protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjapoori, Ashwantha Kumar; Lefèvre, Christophe M; Nicholas, Kevin R; Sharp, Julie A

    2017-02-01

    Endocrine regulation of milk protein gene expression in marsupials and eutherians is well studied. However, the evolution of this complex regulation that began with monotremes is unknown. Monotremes represent the oldest lineage of extant mammals and the endocrine regulation of lactation in these mammals has not been investigated. Here we characterised the proximal promoter and hormonal regulation of two platypus milk protein genes, Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a whey protein and monotreme lactation protein (MLP), a monotreme specific milk protein, using in vitro reporter assays and a bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV1). Insulin and dexamethasone alone provided partial induction of MLP, while the combination of insulin, dexamethasone and prolactin was required for maximal induction. Partial induction of BLG was achieved by insulin, dexamethasone and prolactin alone, with maximal induction using all three hormones. Platypus MLP and BLG core promoter regions comprised transcription factor binding sites (e.g. STAT5, NF-1 and C/EBPα) that were conserved in marsupial and eutherian lineages that regulate caseins and whey protein gene expression. Our analysis suggests that insulin, dexamethasone and/or prolactin alone can regulate the platypus MLP and BLG gene expression, unlike those of therian lineage. The induction of platypus milk protein genes by lactogenic hormones suggests they originated before the divergence of marsupial and eutherians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Polymorphism of the pig-implantation protein 3 ( preis3 ) gene and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pre-implantation protein 3 (prei3), which might play a role in pre-implantation embryogenesis, is one of the promising candidate genes for litter size traits in pigs. In this study, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP: T802G) in intron 6 of the pig prei3 gene was detected and a genotyping assay for this SNP was ...

  12. Association of protein Z and factor VII gene polymorphisms with risk ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Protein Z (PZ) and factor (F) VII are two important factors in the clotting pathway which have similar structure, linked function and nearby gene sites. The aims of this study were to investigate whether the common variants of PZ and FVII genes are associated with the risk of cerebral hemorrhage (CH) and to explore ...

  13. Cloning of heterologous genes specifying detrimental proteins on pUC-derived plasmids in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Jörg P.; van Dijl, J. M.; Venema, G; Bron, S

    1996-01-01

    A system is described that enables the cloning of genes specifying detrimental proteins in Escherichia coli. The system is based on pUC plasmids and was developed for the expression of the Bacillus subtilis csaA gene, which is lethal when expressed at high levels. Suppressor strains that tolerate

  14. Elevated expression of protein biosynthesis genes in liver and muscle of hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vadim B; Goropashnaya, Anna V; Tøien, Øivind; Stewart, Nathan C; Gracey, Andrew Y; Chang, Celia; Qin, Shizhen; Pertea, Geo; Quackenbush, John; Showe, Louise C; Showe, Michael K; Boyer, Bert B; Barnes, Brian M

    2009-04-10

    We conducted a large-scale gene expression screen using the 3,200 cDNA probe microarray developed specifically for Ursus americanus to detect expression differences in liver and skeletal muscle that occur during winter hibernation compared with animals sampled during summer. The expression of 12 genes, including RNA binding protein motif 3 (Rbm3), that are mostly involved in protein biosynthesis, was induced during hibernation in both liver and muscle. The Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment analysis consistently showed a highly significant enrichment of the protein biosynthesis category by overexpressed genes in both liver and skeletal muscle during hibernation. Coordinated induction in transcriptional level of genes involved in protein biosynthesis is a distinctive feature of the transcriptome in hibernating black bears. This finding implies induction of translation and suggests an adaptive mechanism that contributes to a unique ability to reduce muscle atrophy over prolonged periods of immobility during hibernation. Comparing expression profiles in bears to small mammalian hibernators shows a general trend during hibernation of transcriptional changes that include induction of genes involved in lipid metabolism and carbohydrate synthesis as well as depression of genes involved in the urea cycle and detoxification function in liver.

  15. Revised Mimivirus major capsid protein sequence reveals intron-containing gene structure and extra domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan-Monti Marie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus (APM is the largest known dsDNA virus. The viral particle has a nearly icosahedral structure with an internal capsid shell surrounded with a dense layer of fibrils. A Capsid protein sequence, D13L, was deduced from the APM L425 coding gene and was shown to be the most abundant protein found within the viral particle. However this protein remained poorly characterised until now. A revised protein sequence deposited in a database suggested an additional N-terminal stretch of 142 amino acids missing from the original deduced sequence. This result led us to investigate the L425 gene structure and the biochemical properties of the complete APM major Capsid protein. Results This study describes the full length 3430 bp Capsid coding gene and characterises the 593 amino acids long corresponding Capsid protein 1. The recombinant full length protein allowed the production of a specific monoclonal antibody able to detect the Capsid protein 1 within the viral particle. This protein appeared to be post-translationnally modified by glycosylation and phosphorylation. We proposed a secondary structure prediction of APM Capsid protein 1 compared to the Capsid protein structure of Paramecium Bursaria Chlorella Virus 1, another member of the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA virus family. Conclusion The characterisation of the full length L425 Capsid coding gene of Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus provides new insights into the structure of the main Capsid protein. The production of a full length recombinant protein will be useful for further structural studies.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of the genes encoding the proteins of Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wangheng; Cruz-Cosme, Ruth; Armstrong, Najealicka; Obwolo, Lilian Akello; Wen, Fayuan; Hu, Wenhui; Luo, Min-Hua; Tang, Qiyi

    2017-09-10

    Zika virus (ZIKV) encodes a precursor protein (also called polyprotein) of about 3424 amino acids that is processed by proteases to generate 10 mature proteins and a small peptide. In the present study, we characterized the chemical features, suborganelle distribution and potential function of each protein using Flag-tagged protein expression system. Western blot analysis revealed the molecular weight of the proteins and the polymerization of E, NS1, and NS3 proteins. In addition, we performed multi-labeled fluorescent immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation to determine the subcellular localization of these proteins in host cells. We found that 1) the capsid protein colocalizes with 3 different cellular organelles: nucleoli, Golgi apparatus, and lipid droplet; NS2b and NS4a are associated with the Golgi apparatus; 2) the capsid and NS1proteins distribute in both cytoplasm and nucleus, NS5 is a nuclear protein; 3) NS3 protein colocalizes with tubulin and affects Lamin A; 4) Envelope, PrM, and NS2a proteins co-localize with the endoplasmic reticulum; 5) NS1 is associated with autophagosomes and NS4b is related to early endosome; 6) NS5 forms punctate structures in the nucleus that associate with splicing compartments shown by SC35, leading to reduction of SC35 protein level and trafficking of SC35 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. These data suggest that ZIKV generates 10 functional viral proteins that exhibit distinctive subcellular distribution in host cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene promoter evolution targets the center of the human protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Planas

    Full Text Available Assessing the contribution of promoters and coding sequences to gene evolution is an important step toward discovering the major genetic determinants of human evolution. Many specific examples have revealed the evolutionary importance of cis-regulatory regions. However, the relative contribution of regulatory and coding regions to the evolutionary process and whether systemic factors differentially influence their evolution remains unclear. To address these questions, we carried out an analysis at the genome scale to identify signatures of positive selection in human proximal promoters. Next, we examined whether genes with positively selected promoters (Prom+ genes show systemic differences with respect to a set of genes with positively selected protein-coding regions (Cod+ genes. We found that the number of genes in each set was not significantly different (8.1% and 8.5%, respectively. Furthermore, a functional analysis showed that, in both cases, positive selection affects almost all biological processes and only a few genes of each group are located in enriched categories, indicating that promoters and coding regions are not evolutionarily specialized with respect to gene function. On the other hand, we show that the topology of the human protein network has a different influence on the molecular evolution of proximal promoters and coding regions. Notably, Prom+ genes have an unexpectedly high centrality when compared with a reference distribution (P=0.008, for Eigenvalue centrality. Moreover, the frequency of Prom+ genes increases from the periphery to the center of the protein network (P=0.02, for the logistic regression coefficient. This means that gene centrality does not constrain the evolution of proximal promoters, unlike the case with coding regions, and further indicates that the evolution of proximal promoters is more efficient in the center of the protein network than in the periphery. These results show that proximal promoters

  18. Gene Promoter Evolution Targets the Center of the Human Protein Interaction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Jordi; Serrat, Josep M.

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the contribution of promoters and coding sequences to gene evolution is an important step toward discovering the major genetic determinants of human evolution. Many specific examples have revealed the evolutionary importance of cis-regulatory regions. However, the relative contribution of regulatory and coding regions to the evolutionary process and whether systemic factors differentially influence their evolution remains unclear. To address these questions, we carried out an analysis at the genome scale to identify signatures of positive selection in human proximal promoters. Next, we examined whether genes with positively selected promoters (Prom+ genes) show systemic differences with respect to a set of genes with positively selected protein-coding regions (Cod+ genes). We found that the number of genes in each set was not significantly different (8.1% and 8.5%, respectively). Furthermore, a functional analysis showed that, in both cases, positive selection affects almost all biological processes and only a few genes of each group are located in enriched categories, indicating that promoters and coding regions are not evolutionarily specialized with respect to gene function. On the other hand, we show that the topology of the human protein network has a different influence on the molecular evolution of proximal promoters and coding regions. Notably, Prom+ genes have an unexpectedly high centrality when compared with a reference distribution (P = 0.008, for Eigenvalue centrality). Moreover, the frequency of Prom+ genes increases from the periphery to the center of the protein network (P = 0.02, for the logistic regression coefficient). This means that gene centrality does not constrain the evolution of proximal promoters, unlike the case with coding regions, and further indicates that the evolution of proximal promoters is more efficient in the center of the protein network than in the periphery. These results show that proximal promoters have

  19. Hepatitis B viral core protein disrupts human host gene expression by binding to promoter regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yanhai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The core protein (HBc of hepatitis B virus (HBV has been implicated in the malignant transformation of chronically-infected hepatocytes and displays pleiotropic functions, including RNA- and DNA-binding activities. However, the mechanism by which HBc interacts with the human genome to exert effects on hepatocyte function remains unknown. This study investigated the distribution of HBc binding to promoters in the human genome and evaluated its effects on the related genes’ expression. Results Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray (ChIP-on-chip analysis was used to identify HBc-bound human gene promoters. Gene Ontology and pathway analyses were performed on related genes. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was used to verify ChIP-on-chip results. Five novel genes were selected for luciferase reporter assay evaluation to assess the influence of HBc promoter binding. The HBc antibody immunoprecipitated approximately 3100 human gene promoters. Among these, 1993 are associated with known biological processes, and 2208 regulate genes with defined molecular functions. In total, 1286 of the related genes mediate primary metabolic processes, and 1398 encode proteins with binding activity. Sixty-four of the promoters regulate genes related to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways, and 41 regulate Wnt/beta-catenin pathway genes. The reporter gene assay indicated that HBc binding up-regulates proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (SRC, type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R, and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2, and down-regulates v-Ha-ras Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene (HRAS. Conclusion HBc has the ability to bind a large number of human gene promoters, and can disrupt normal host gene expression. Manipulation of the transcriptional profile in HBV-infected hepatocytes may represent a key pathogenic mechanism of HBV infection.

  20. Identification and analysis of YELLOW protein family genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yong-Zhu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major royal jelly proteins/yellow (MRJP/YELLOW family possesses several physiological and chemical functions in the development of Apis mellifera and Drosophila melanogaster. Each protein of the family has a conserved domain named MRJP. However, there is no report of MRJP/YELLOW family proteins in the Lepidoptera. Results Using the YELLOW protein sequence in Drosophila melanogaster to BLAST silkworm EST database, we found a gene family composed of seven members with a conserved MRJP domain each and named it YELLOW protein family of Bombyx mori. We completed the cDNA sequences with RACE method. The protein of each member possesses a MRJP domain and a putative cleavable signal peptide consisting of a hydrophobic sequence. In view of genetic evolution, the whole Bm YELLOW protein family composes a monophyletic group, which is distinctly separate from Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera. We then showed the tissue expression profiles of Bm YELLOW protein family genes by RT-PCR. Conclusion A Bombyx mori YELLOW protein family is found to be composed of at least seven members. The low homogeneity and unique pattern of gene expression by each member among the family ensure us to prophesy that the members of Bm YELLOW protein family would play some important physiological functions in silkworm development.

  1. Synthesis of Bacteriophage M13-Specific Proteins in a DNA-Dependent Cell-Free System II. In Vitro Synthesis of Biologically Active Gene 5 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Ruud N. H.; Jansen, Josephine; Cuypers, Theo; Schoenmakers, John G. G.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that gene 5 protein of bacteriophage M13 is one of the major proteins synthesized in vitro under the direction of M13 replicative-form DNA. By means of DNA-cellulose chromatography, this protein has been purified to homogeneity and its biological characteristics have been compared with those of its native counterpart. Like native gene 5 protein, the purified, in vitro-synthesized protein binds tightly and selectively to single-stranded, but not to double-stranded, DNAs. These results suggest that truly functional gene 5 protein is made in the cell-free system. Images PMID:4586780

  2. Protein-protein and DNA-protein interactions mediate induction of defense genes by fruit extract of Azadirachta indica A. Juss. in Solanum lycopersicum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneshwari, V; Goel, N; Paul, P K

    2015-10-01

    The present work demonstrates that induction of defense-related genes in tomato by neem extract was mediated by protein-protein and DNA-protein interactions. The induction of elicitor-mediated defense responses in plants is known, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its induction are not well studied. In the present study, third node leaf from the base of aseptically raised tomato plants was treated with aqueous fruit extracts of Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (neem). Samples were collected from the treated node at 24-h intervals for up to 96 h and analyzed for the gene expression of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), Peroxidase (POX) and Polyphenol Oxidase (PPO), β-actin (standard). Samples were collected from elicitor-induced node at 5-min interval up to 70 min for analysis of protein-protein and DNA-protein interactions. The results demonstrated the induction of expression of PAL, POX and PPO due to the treatment whereas no change was observed in the expression of β-actin. There was disappearance of lower molecular weight proteins which cross-linked with other proteins to form complexes. MALDI-TOF MS analysis revealed the interaction of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). The analysis of proteins interacted with DNA after induction by neem extract indicated the involvement of WRKY transcriptional factors. Neem-elicited defense responses could possibly due to interaction of proteins with other proteins and transcription factors with DNA which might be crucial in enhancing the expression of defense-related genes (PAL, POX and PPO).

  3. Overexpression of a New Osmotin-Like Protein Gene (SindOLP) Confers Tolerance against Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Sesame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Supriyo; Basu, Arpita; Kundu, Surekha

    2017-01-01

    Osmotin-like proteins (OLPs), of PR-5 family, mediate defense against abiotic, and biotic stresses in plants. Overexpression in sesame of an OLP gene (SindOLP), enhanced tolerance against drought, salinity, oxidative stress, and the charcoal rot pathogen. SindOLP was expressed in all parts and localized to the cytosol. The transgenic plants recovered after prolonged drought and salinity stress, showing less electrolyte leakage, more water content, longer roots, and smaller stomatal aperture compared to control plants. There was an increase in osmolytes, ROS-scavenging enzymes, chlorophyll content, proline, secondary metabolites, and reduced lipid peroxidation in the transgenic sesame under multiple stresses. The OLP gene imparted increased tolerance through the increased expression of three genes coding for ROS scavenging enzymes and five defense-related marker genes functioning in the JA/ET and SA pathways, namely Si-Apetala2, Si-Ethylene-responsive factor, Si-Defensin, Si-Chitinase, and Si-Thaumatin-like protein were monitored. The transgenic lines showed greater survival under different stresses compared to control through the integrated activation of multiple components of the defense signaling cascade. This is the first report of transgenic sesame and first of any study done on defense-related genes in sesame. This is also the first attempt at understanding the molecular mechanism underlying multi-stress tolerance imparted by an OLP.

  4. Surfactant Protein-D-Encoding Gene Variant Polymorphisms Are Linked to Respiratory Outcome in Premature Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Dahl, Marianne; Tan, Qihua

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Associations between the genetic variation within or downstream of the surfactant protein-D-encoding gene (SFTPD), which encodes the collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D) and may lead to respiratory distress syndrome or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, recently were reported. Our aim was to...

  5. Down modulation of HIV-1 gene expression using a procaryotic RNA-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; Jeang, K. T.

    1990-01-01

    The coat protein of the single stranded RNA bacteriophages acts as a translational repressor by binding with high affinity to a target RNA that encompasses the ribosomal binding site of the replicase gene. We have expressed this procaryotic RNA-binding protein in mammalian cells. Using the coat

  6. Identification and phylogeny of a protein kinase gene of white spot syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Vlak, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a virus infecting shrimp and other crustaceans, which is unclassified taxonomically. A 2193 bp long open reading frame, encoding a putative protein kinase (PK), was found on a 8.4 kb EcoRI fragment of WSSV proximal to the gene for the major envelope protein

  7. Seed-protein genes and the regulation of their expression. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkins, B.A.; Hodges, T.K.; Foard, D.E.; Tomes, M.L.

    1981-08-01

    Research during the past year focused on two aspects of seed protein research. One objective explored the possibility of using Xenopus laevis oocytes as a potential system for studying expression of cloned storage protein genes. A second objective developed methods for isolating and partially purifying mRNAs directing the synthesis of the low molecular weight protease inhibitors of soybean seeds.

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis contains a protein similar to the Legionella pneumophila mip gene product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemose, AG; Birkelund, Svend; Fey, SJ

    1991-01-01

    A 27kDa Chlamydia trachomatis L2 protein was characterized by the use of monoclonal antibodies and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The protein was shown to be located in the membrane of reticulate bodies as well as elementary bodies. Its synthesis could be detected from 10 hours post-infe...... potentiator (mip) gene of Legionella pneumophila....

  9. The chicken CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein alpha gene. Cloning, characterisation and tissue distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, CF; Gringhuis, SI; Ab, G

    1997-01-01

    We present the cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the chicken CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein alpha (cC/EBP alpha). The coding region and 1.5 kb of 5' flanking DNA form a CpG island. Comparison of the chicken C/EBP alpha sequence to the homologous proteins of other species reveals several

  10. AtMBD6, a methyl CpG binding domain protein, maintains gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA methylation, mediated by double-stranded RNA, is a conserved epigenetic phenomenon that protects a genome fromtransposons, silences unwanted genes and has a paramount function in plant or animal development. Methyl CpG bindingdomain proteins are members of a class of proteins that bind tomethylated ...

  11. Gene Ontology consistent protein function prediction: the FALCON algorithm applied to six eukaryotic genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourmpetis, Y.A.I.; Dijk, van A.D.J.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Gene Ontology (GO) is a hierarchical vocabulary for the description of biological functions and locations, often employed by computational methods for protein function prediction. Due to the structure of GO, function predictions can be self- contradictory. For example, a protein may be predicted to

  12. The nuclear IκB family of proteins controls gene regulation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitory IκB family of proteins is subdivided into two groups based on protein localization in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. These proteins interact with NF-κB, a major transcription factor regulating the expression of many inflammatory cytokines, by modulating its transcriptional activity. However, nuclear IκB family proteins not only interact with NF-κB to change its transcriptional activity, but they also bind to chromatin and control gene expression. This review provides an overview of nuclear IκB family proteins and their role in immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene-specific correlation of RNA and protein levels in human cells and tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edfors, Fredrik; Danielsson, Frida; Hallström, Björn M.

    2016-01-01

    to measure, at steady-state conditions, absolute protein copy numbers across human tissues and cell lines and compared these levels with the corresponding mRNA levels using transcriptomics. The study shows that the transcript and protein levels do not correlate well unless a gene-specific RNA-to-protein (RTP......An important issue for molecular biology is to establish whether transcript levels of a given gene can be used as proxies for the corresponding protein levels. Here, we have developed a targeted proteomics approach for a set of human non-secreted proteins based on parallel reaction monitoring...... copies per mRNA molecule for others. In conclusion, our data suggest that transcriptome analysis can be used as a tool to predict the protein copy numbers per cell, thus forming an attractive link between the field of genomics and proteomics....

  14. A new class of wheat gliadin genes and proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olin D Anderson

    Full Text Available The utility of mining DNA sequence data to understand the structure and expression of cereal prolamin genes is demonstrated by the identification of a new class of wheat prolamins. This previously unrecognized wheat prolamin class, given the name δ-gliadins, is the most direct ortholog of barley γ3-hordeins. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the orthologous δ-gliadins and γ3-hordeins form a distinct prolamin branch that existed separate from the γ-gliadins and γ-hordeins in an ancestral Triticeae prior to the branching of wheat and barley. The expressed δ-gliadins are encoded by a single gene in each of the hexaploid wheat genomes. This single δ-gliadin/γ3-hordein ortholog may be a general feature of the Triticeae tribe since examination of ESTs from three barley cultivars also confirms a single γ3-hordein gene. Analysis of ESTs and cDNAs shows that the genes are expressed in at least five hexaploid wheat cultivars in addition to diploids Triticum monococcum and Aegilops tauschii. The latter two sequences also allow assignment of the δ-gliadin genes to the A and D genomes, respectively, with the third sequence type assumed to be from the B genome. Two wheat cultivars for which there are sufficient ESTs show different patterns of expression, i.e., with cv Chinese Spring expressing the genes from the A and B genomes, while cv Recital has ESTs from the A and D genomes. Genomic sequences of Chinese Spring show that the D genome gene is inactivated by tandem premature stop codons. A fourth δ-gliadin sequence occurs in the D genome of both Chinese Spring and Ae. tauschii, but no ESTs match this sequence and limited genomic sequences indicates a pseudogene containing frame shifts and premature stop codons. Sequencing of BACs covering a 3 Mb region from Ae. tauschii locates the δ-gliadin gene to the complex Gli-1 plus Glu-3 region on chromosome 1.

  15. Hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes originating from long non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA-Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis, which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level.

  16. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of a Bacillus subtilis gene encoding a flagellar switch protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Zuberi, A R; Bischoff, D S; Ordal, G W

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Bacillus subtilis fliM gene has been determined. This gene encodes a 38-kDa protein that is homologous to the FliM flagellar switch proteins of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Expression of this gene in Che+ cells of E. coli and B. subtilis interferes with normal chemotaxis. The nature of the chemotaxis defect is dependent upon the host used. In B. subtilis, overproduction of FliM generates mostly nonmotile cells. Those cells that are motile switch ...

  17. Phylogenetic analysis reveals dynamic evolution of the poly(A)-binding protein gene family in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Gallie, Daniel R; Liu, Renyi

    2014-01-01

    Background The poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) binds the poly(A) tail of eukaryotic mRNAs and functions to maintain the integrity of the mRNA while promoting protein synthesis through its interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4G and eIF4B. PABP is encoded by a single gene in yeast and marine algae but during plant evolution the PABP gene family expanded substantially, underwent sequence divergence into three subclasses, and acquired tissue-specificity in gene family m...

  18. Mitochondrial genome evolution in Alismatales: Size reduction and extensive loss of ribosomal protein genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gitte; Cuenca, Argelia; Zervas, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    The order Alismatales is a hotspot for evolution of plant mitochondrial genomes characterized by remarkable differences in genome size, substitution rates, RNA editing, retrotranscription, gene loss and intron loss. Here we have sequenced the complete mitogenomes of Zostera marina and Stratiotes ...... mitogenome from a non-parasitic plant. Using a broad sample of the Alismatales, the evolutionary history of ribosomal protein gene loss is analyzed. In Zostera almost all ribosomal protein genes are lost from the mitogenome, but only some can be found in the nucleus....

  19. Yeast prion architecture explains how proteins can be genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickner, Reed

    2013-03-01

    Prions (infectious proteins) transmit information without an accompanying DNA or RNA. Most yeast prions are self-propagating amyloids that inactivate a normally functional protein. A single protein can become any of several prion variants, with different manifestations due to different amyloid structures. We showed that the yeast prion amyloids of Ure2p, Sup35p and Rnq1p are folded in-register parallel beta sheets using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling experiments, mass-per-filament-length measurements, and filament diameter measurements. The extent of beta sheet structure, measured by chemical shifts in solid-state NMR and acquired protease-resistance on amyloid formation, combined with the measured filament diameters, imply that the beta sheets must be folded along the long axis of the filament. We speculate that prion variants of a single protein sequence differ in the location of these folds. Favorable interactions between identical side chains must hold these structures in-register. The same interactions must guide an unstructured monomer joining the end of a filament to assume the same conformation as molecules already in the filament, with the turns at the same locations. In this way, a protein can template its own conformation, in analogy to the ability of a DNA molecule to template its sequence by specific base-pairing. Bldg. 8, Room 225, NIH, 8 Center Drive MSC 0830, Bethesda, MD 20892-0830, wickner@helix.nih.gov, 301-496-3452

  20. Prion protein gene polymorphisms in Turkish native goat breeds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HASAN MEYDAN

    and goat production contributes directly to the income of nearly 3,000,000 people .... (c) Distribution of 17 ovine and caprine polymorphisms that have been shown to be associated with ... Hasan Meydan et al. Table 2. Number of various PRNP gene polymorphisms and their distributions in Turkish native goat breeds.

  1. Cloning and expression of a small heat shock protein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gene was also expressed weakly under salinity, heavy metal, low temperature and oxidative stresses; the expression levels under these conditions were remarkably lower than those under heat stress. Cell viability experiments showed that the heterologous expression of CaHSP24 could enhance the viability of ...

  2. Modification of gene duplicability during the evolution of protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo D'Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of genes encoding highly connected and essential proteins are selected against in several species but not in human, where duplicated genes encode highly connected proteins. To understand when and how gene duplicability changed in evolution, we compare gene and network properties in four species (Escherichia coli, yeast, fly, and human that are representative of the increase in evolutionary complexity, defined as progressive growth in the number of genes, cells, and cell types. We find that the origin and conservation of a gene significantly correlates with the properties of the encoded protein in the protein-protein interaction network. All four species preserve a core of singleton and central hubs that originated early in evolution, are highly conserved, and accomplish basic biological functions. Another group of hubs appeared in metazoans and duplicated in vertebrates, mostly through vertebrate-specific whole genome duplication. Such recent and duplicated hubs are frequently targets of microRNAs and show tissue-selective expression, suggesting that these are alternative mechanisms to control their dosage. Our study shows how networks modified during evolution and contributes to explaining the occurrence of somatic genetic diseases, such as cancer, in terms of network perturbations.

  3. Construction and analysis of the protein-protein interaction networks based on gene expression profiles of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hindol Rakshit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's Disease (PD is one of the most prevailing neurodegenerative diseases. Improving diagnoses and treatments of this disease is essential, as currently there exists no cure for this disease. Microarray and proteomics data have revealed abnormal expression of several genes and proteins responsible for PD. Nevertheless, few studies have been reported involving PD-specific protein-protein interactions. RESULTS: Microarray based gene expression data and protein-protein interaction (PPI databases were combined to construct the PPI networks of differentially expressed (DE genes in post mortem brain tissue samples of patients with Parkinson's disease. Samples were collected from the substantia nigra and the frontal cerebral cortex. From the microarray data, two sets of DE genes were selected by 2-tailed t-tests and Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM, run separately to construct two Query-Query PPI (QQPPI networks. Several topological properties of these networks were studied. Nodes with High Connectivity (hubs and High Betweenness Low Connectivity (bottlenecks were identified to be the most significant nodes of the networks. Three and four-cliques were identified in the QQPPI networks. These cliques contain most of the topologically significant nodes of the networks which form core functional modules consisting of tightly knitted sub-networks. Hitherto unreported 37 PD disease markers were identified based on their topological significance in the networks. Of these 37 markers, eight were significantly involved in the core functional modules and showed significant change in co-expression levels. Four (ARRB2, STX1A, TFRC and MARCKS out of the 37 markers were found to be associated with several neurotransmitters including dopamine. CONCLUSION: This study represents a novel investigation of the PPI networks for PD, a complex disease. 37 proteins identified in our study can be considered as PD network biomarkers. These network

  4. Transcriptional and translational start sites for the Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H C; Schnepf, H E; Whiteley, H R

    1983-02-10

    The nucleotide sequence of the promoter region and part of the coding region of the crystal protein gene from Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD-1-Dipel has been determined by analysis of a recombinant plasmid from Escherichia coli. The start points for transcription of the gene in B. thuringiensis and in the E. coli strain carrying the recombinant plasmid were located by S1 nuclease mapping. Two adjacent start sites were identified using RNAs synthesized during sporulation of B. thuringiensis: transcription was initiated from one site early in sporulation and from the other site in the middle of sporulation. A good correlation was found between the appearance of the crystal protein gene-specific RNA and the production of the protein, indicating that the gene is primarily under transcriptional control during sporulation. Parallel studies with the recombinant strain of E. coli revealed the presence of only a single species of gene-specific RNA, regardless of the growth phase of the cells; the crystal protein was produced at all stages of growth. The sequence for eight amino acids at the NH2 terminus of the crystal protein was determined and the corresponding coding sequence was located in the DNA sequence. A potential ribosome binding site of 11 nucleotides was found, located three nucleotides upstream from the initiator ATG codon. The deduced sequence for the first 333 amino acids of the crystal protein is presented.

  5. Grb7 gene amplification and protein expression by FISH and IHC in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Manman; Yang, Zhu; Hu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yi; Yang, Xiaotao; Ran, Hailong; Li, Yanan; Li, Xu; Yu, Qiubo

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of growth factor receptor-bound protein 7 (Grb7) has been found in numerous human cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between Grb7 gene amplification and protein expression in ovarian cancer (OC). We use Tissue Microarray (TMA) respectively to detect the gene amplification and protein expression of Grb7 in 90 cases OC and 10 control specimens of normal ovarian tissues by IHC and FISH. The Grb7 protein expression by IHC analysis was observed in 52/90 (57.8%) OC with 3 cases (3.3%) scored 3(+) and 9 cases (10%) scored 2(+) Grb7 gene amplification by FISH analysis was successfully detectable in 6 specimens with a positive rate of 6.8% (6/88) in which immunostaining 3(+), 2(+) and negative (1(+)/0) expressions of Grb7 were 100.0% (3/3), 11.1% (1/9) and 2.6% (2/76), respectively. Our data exhibited that the IHC and FISH results had a good consistency between Grb7 gene amplification and Grb7 protein expression (Kappa = 0.651, P IHC and FISH revealed that Grb7 did not seem to have a role in OC clinicopathology. There is a close relationship between Grb7 gene amplification and GRB7 protein overexpression in human OC. IHC might have limited diagnostic value especially in these tumors and especially in characterizing genetically diverse borderline cases, FISH could be superior to IHC.

  6. Association of N176K and L141F dimorphisms of the PRNP gene with lack of pathological prion protein deposition in placentas of naturally and experimentally scrapie-affected ARQ/ARQ sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucciu, Cinzia; Maestrale, Caterina; Madau, Laura; Attene, Sonia; Cancedda, Maria Giovanna; Demontis, Franca; Tilocca, Maria Giovanna; Saba, Mariangela; Macciocu, Simona; Carta, Antonello; Ligios, Ciriaco

    2010-09-01

    The placenta is important in the horizontal transmission of the aetiological agent in scrapie-affected sheep. It has been demonstrated that the placentas of fetuses carrying the dimorphism Q171R of the PRNP gene is resistant to pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) accumulation in the placenta. To test whether other PRNP polymorphisms are associated with a lack of placental PrP(Sc) deposition, we carried out a study on 26 naturally and 11 experimentally scrapie-affected ewes with or without clinical signs. PrP(Sc) was detected in the placenta of ARQ/ARQ(wild type) fetuses by Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis, but not in ARQN(176)/ARQK(176) or, as expected, ARQ/ARR samples. Furthermore, three of four AL(141)RQ/AF(141)RQ placentas were also PrP(Sc) negative, suggesting that the dimorphism at codon 141 may also mediate placental deposition of PrP(Sc). This finding demonstrates for the first time that fetal PRNP polymorphisms, other than those at codon 171, are associated with the lack of placental deposition of PrP(Sc).

  7. Prioritization of candidate disease genes by topological similarity between disease and protein diffusion profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Qin, Yufang; Liu, Taigang; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2013-01-01

    Identification of gene-phenotype relationships is a fundamental challenge in human health clinic. Based on the observation that genes causing the same or similar phenotypes tend to correlate with each other in the protein-protein interaction network, a lot of network-based approaches were proposed based on different underlying models. A recent comparative study showed that diffusion-based methods achieve the state-of-the-art predictive performance. In this paper, a new diffusion-based method was proposed to prioritize candidate disease genes. Diffusion profile of a disease was defined as the stationary distribution of candidate genes given a random walk with restart where similarities between phenotypes are incorporated. Then, candidate disease genes are prioritized by comparing their diffusion profiles with that of the disease. Finally, the effectiveness of our method was demonstrated through the leave-one-out cross-validation against control genes from artificial linkage intervals and randomly chosen genes. Comparative study showed that our method achieves improved performance compared to some classical diffusion-based methods. To further illustrate our method, we used our algorithm to predict new causing genes of 16 multifactorial diseases including Prostate cancer and Alzheimer's disease, and the top predictions were in good consistent with literature reports. Our study indicates that integration of multiple information sources, especially the phenotype similarity profile data, and introduction of global similarity measure between disease and gene diffusion profiles are helpful for prioritizing candidate disease genes. Programs and data are available upon request.

  8. [Cloning and structure analysis of zinc finger protein gene in Populus euphratica Oliv].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Ying; Yin, Wei-Lun; Xia, Xin-Li

    2005-03-01

    Zinc finger proteins belong to a family of nuclear transcription factors which function is to regulate gene expression in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. A pair of primers was designed after analyzing the conservation of salt-tolerant zinc protein Alfin-1 in such diverse plants as alfalfa and Arabidopsis. The zinc finger protein gene is isolated from total RNA with RT-PCR in aquaculture leaves of Populus euphratica . Its full cDNA length is 924bp. Analysis of its amino acid sequence showed it has a typical Cys(2)/His(2) zinc finger structure and a G-rich promoter binding site GTGGGG, starting from position 556. Since transcrptional factors which have the same function show conservation in structure and amino acid sequence of DNA binding region, the structure analysis in this paper indicates the cloned zinc finger protein gene may have functional correlation to Alfin-1.

  9. Down-regulation of osmotin (PR5) gene by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) leads to susceptibility of resistant Piper colubrinum Link. to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici Leonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, K; Jessymol, K K; Chidambareswaren, M; Gayathri, G S; Manjula, S

    2015-06-01

    Piper colubrinum Link., a distant relative of Piper nigrum L., is immune to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici Leonian that causes 'quick wilt' in cultivated black pepper (P. nigrum). The osmotin, PR5 gene homologue, earlier identified from P. colubrinum, showed significant overexpression in response to pathogen and defense signalling molecules. The present study focuses on the functional validation of P. colubrinum osmotin (PcOSM) by virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) using Tobacco Rattle Virus (TRV)-based vector. P. colubrinum plants maintained under controlled growth conditions in a growth chamber were infiltrated with Agrobacterium carrying TRV empty vector (control) and TRV vector carrying PcOSM. Three weeks post infiltration, viral movement was confirmed in newly emerged leaves of infiltrated plants by RT-PCR using TRV RNA1 and TRV RNA2 primers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed significant down-regulation of PcOSM gene in TRV-PcOSM infiltrated plant compared with the control plants. The control and silenced plants were challenged with Phytophthora capsici which demonstrated that knock-down of PcOSM in P. colubrinum leads to increased fungal mycelial growth in silenced plants compared to control plants, which was accompanied by decreased accumulation of H2O2 as indicated by 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated that Piper colubrinum osmotin gene is required for resisting P. capsici infection and has possible role in hypersensitive cell death response and oxidative burst signaling during infection.

  10. Evolution, gene expression profiling and 3D modeling of CSLD proteins in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanpeng; Yang, Tiegang; Dai, Dandan; Hu, Ying; Guo, Xiaoyang; Guo, Hongxia

    2017-07-10

    Among CESA-like gene superfamily, the cellulose synthase-like D (CSLD) genes are most similar to cellulose synthase genes and have been reported to be involved in tip-growing cell and stem development. However, there has been no genome-wide characterization of this gene subfamily in cotton. We thus sought to analyze the evolution and functional characterization of CSLD proteins in cotton based on fully sequenced cotton genomes. A total of 23 full-length CSLD proteins were identified in Gossypium raimondii, Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium hirsutum. The phylogenetic tree divided the CSLD proteins into five clades with strong support: CSLD1, CSLD2/3, CSLD4, CSLD5 and CSLD6. The total expression of GhCSLD genes was the highest in androecium & gynoecium (mostly contributed by CSLD1 and CSLD4) compared with other CSL genes. CSLD1 and CSLD4 were only highly expressed in androecium & gynoecium (A&G), and showed tissue-specific expression. The total expression of CSLD2/3, 5 and 6 was highest in the specific tissues. These results suggest that CSLD genes showed the different pattern of expression. Cotton CSLD proteins were subjected to different evolutionary pressures, and the CSLD1 and CSLD4 proteins exhibited episodic and long-term shift positive selection. The predicted three-dimensional structure of GrCSLD1 suggested that GrCSLD1 belongs to glycosyltransferase family 2. The amino acid residues under positive selection in the CSLD1 lineage are positioned in a region adjacent to the class-specific region (CSR), β1-strand and transmembrane helices (TMHs) in the GrCSLD1structure. Our results characterized the CSLD proteins by an integrated approach containing phylogeny, transcriptional profiling and 3D modeling. The study added to the understanding about the importance of the CSLD family and provide a useful reference for selecting candidate genes and their associations with the biosynthesis of the cell wall in cotton.

  11. Evolution of Antifreeze Protein Genes in the Diatom Genus Fragilariopsis: Evidence for Horizontal Gene Transfer, Gene Duplication and Episodic Diversifying Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorhannus, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    Hypotheses about horizontal transfer of antifreeze protein genes to ice-living diatoms were addressed using two different statistical methods available in the program Prunier. The role of diversifying selection in driving the differentiation of a set of antifreeze protein genes in the diatom genus Fragilariopsis was also investigated. Four horizontal gene transfer events were identified. Two of these took place between two major eukaryote lineages, that is from the diatom Chaetoceros neogracile to the copepod Stephos longipes and from a basidiomycete clade to a monophyletic group, consisting of the diatom species Fragilariopsis curta and Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The remaining two events included transfers from an ascomycete lineage to the proteobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca and from the proteobacterium Polaribacter irgensii to a group composed of 4 proteobacterium species. After the Fragilariopsis lineage acquired the antifreeze protein gene from the basidiomycetes, it duplicated and went through episodic evolution, characterized by strong positive selection acting on short segments of the branches in the tree. This selection pattern suggests that the paralogs differentiated functionally over relatively short time periods. Taken together, the results obtained here indicate that the group of antifreeze protein genes considered here have a complex evolutionary history. PMID:22253534

  12. Intratumoral heterogeneity of HER2 protein and amplification of HER2 gene in salivary duct carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Tomoki; Esteban, Joaquim Carreras; Kumaki, Nobue; Ogura, Go; Inomoto, Chie; Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Sakai, Akihiro; Sugimoto, Ryousuke; Otsuru, Mitsunobu; Okami, Kenji; Tsukinoki, Keiichi; Nakamura, Naoya

    2014-09-01

    Salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) is an aggressive adenocarcinoma of the salivary glands, and accounts for 1-3% of all malignant salivary gland tumors, resembling morphologically invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. In contrast to IDC of the breast and gastric carcinoma (GC), the study of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in SDC has not progressed. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between HER2 protein expression and amplification of the HER2 gene, and compared them in terms of intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) in 13 cases of SDC using immunohistochemistry and dual color in situ hybridization. We found seven cases with protein overexpression (53.8%) and five cases with gene amplification (38.5%) in accordance with ASCO/CAP guidelines. ITH of HER2 protein expression was seen in seven cases (53.8%). Interestingly, the ratio of the HER2 gene showed homogenous distribution with or without the presence of ITH of HER2 protein expression. SDC tends to have more ITH of HER2 protein similarly to GC, in contrast to IDC of the breast. ITH of HER2 protein in SDC has no heterogeneity of the HER2 gene amplification. The mechanism of HER2 protein expression in SDC might proceed through a more complex pathway relative to that of IDC of the breast. © 2014 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Origins of gene, genetic code, protein and life: comprehensive view ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    when I was a university student, these advances could not even be imagined. In those days, even sequences of several bases on DNA could not be determined, since no restriction enzyme was discovered. At that time, the research to determine tertiary structures of proteins such as lysozyme which had only 129 amino acids ...

  14. The characterization of cytoplasmic ribosomal protein genes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular, eukaryotic parasites of medical and commercial importance, which can infect almost all animals including humans. However, their ribosomes are not of the 80S type as other eukaryotes, but like the prokaryotic 70S ribosome. In order to get the global composition of ribosomal protein ...

  15. Molecular characterization of capsid protein gene of potato virus X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sami siraj

    2012-09-13

    Sep 13, 2012 ... 2Centre of Excellence in Molecular Biology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan. 3Institute of Agricultural ... first report on the molecular characterization of full length PVX coat protein sequence infecting potato from Pakistan. ... sensitive and reliable detection methods (Salazar, 1994). Potato virus X ...

  16. The flagellin gene and protein from the brewing spoilage bacteria Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus and Pectinatus frisingensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Bonnie; Deneer, Harry; Dowgiert, Teri; Hymers, Jillian; Ziola, Barry

    2005-10-01

    Flagellin genes from the anaerobic Gram-negative beer-spoilage bacteria Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus and Pectinatus frisingensis were sequenced and the flagellin proteins initially characterized. Protein microsequencing led to the design of two degenerate PCR primers that allowed the P. cerevisiiphilus flagellin gene to be partially sequenced. A combination of PCR and Bubble PCR was then used to sequence the flagellin genes of three isolates from each species. Cloning and gene expression, followed by immunoblotting, confirmed the gene identities as flagellin. Analysis of the gene sequences revealed proteins similar to other bacterial flagellins, including lengths of 446 or 448 amino acids, putative sigma 28 promoters, and a termination loop. Antibody binding studies with isolated flagella correlated with gene sequence comparisons, with both indicating that the P. cerevisiiphilus isolates studied are very similar but that the P. frisingensis isolates show greater variation. Purified flagellins were found to be glycosylated, probably through an O linkage. Phylogenetic analysis revealed greater diversity within the flagellin sequences than within the 16S rRNA genes. Despite the Gram-negative morphology of Pectinatus, this genus proved most closely related to Gram-positive Firmicutes.

  17. Correlation and prediction of gene expression level from amino acid and dipeptide composition of its protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Joon H

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of papers have been published on analysis of microarray data with particular emphasis on normalization of data, detection of differentially expressed genes, clustering of genes and regulatory network. On other hand there are only few studies on relation between expression level and composition of nucleotide/protein sequence, using expression data. There is a need to understand why particular genes/proteins express more in particular conditions. In this study, we analyze 3468 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtained from Holstege et al., (1998 to understand the relationship between expression level and amino acid composition. Results We compute the correlation between expression of a gene and amino acid composition of its protein. It was observed that some residues (like Ala, Gly, Arg and Val have significant positive correlation (r > 0.20 and some other residues (Like Asp, Leu, Asn and Ser have negative correlation (r Conclusion There is a correlation between gene expression and amino acid composition that can be used to predict the expression level of genes up to a certain extent. A web server based on the above strategy has been developed for calculating the correlation between amino acid composition and gene expression and prediction of expression level http://kiwi.postech.ac.kr/raghava/lgepred/. This server will allow users to study the evolution from expression data.

  18. Effect of the HBV whole-X gene on the expression of hepatocellular carcinoma associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Hongli; Cui, Meiling; Liu, Jinfeng; Yi, Ruitian; Niu, Yinghua; Chen, Tianyan; Zhao, Yingren

    2016-06-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) pre-X gene resides upstream of the HBV X gene, and together they form the HBV whole-X gene. Although it has been evident that the HBV whole-X protein is involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, its biological role and molecular mechanism remain largely unknown. In this study, we subcloned the HBV whole-X gene and constructed a HBV whole-X expressing vector. After transfection of the HBV whole-X gene into HL-7702 cells, the profile of the differential cellular protein composition in the cells was analyzed by using two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. The results showed that 18 major proteins were differentially expressed in the cells transfected with or without the HBV whole-X gene. The expression of these genes was further confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Our findings provide a new insight into the investigation of the pathological role that the HBV whole-X gene plays in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and may lead to the design of novel strategies for the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The inner nuclear membrane protein Src1 associates with subtelomeric genes and alters their regulated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grund, Stefanie E; Fischer, Tamás; Cabal, Ghislain G; Antúnez, Oreto; Pérez-Ortín, José E; Hurt, Ed

    2008-09-08

    Inner nuclear membrane proteins containing a LEM (LAP2, emerin, and MAN1) domain participate in different processes, including chromatin organization, gene expression, and nuclear envelope biogenesis. In this study, we identify a robust genetic interaction between transcription export (TREX) factors and yeast Src1, an integral inner nuclear membrane protein that is homologous to vertebrate LEM2. DNA macroarray analysis revealed that the expression of the phosphate-regulated genes PHO11, PHO12, and PHO84 is up-regulated in src1Delta cells. Notably, these PHO genes are located in subtelomeric regions of chromatin and exhibit a perinuclear location in vivo. Src1 spans the nuclear membrane twice and exposes its N and C domains with putative DNA-binding motifs to the nucleoplasm. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analyses indicated that Src1 is highly enriched at telomeres and subtelomeric regions of the yeast chromosomes. Our data show that the inner nuclear membrane protein Src1 functions at the interface between subtelomeric gene expression and TREX-dependent messenger RNA export through the nuclear pore complexes.

  20. Analysis of codon use features of stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene in Camellia sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lu-Lu; Wang, Yu; Hu, Jian-Hui; Ding, Zhao-Tang; Li, Chen

    2013-10-07

    The stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (SAD) gene widely exists in all kinds of plants. In this paper, the Camellia sinensis SAD gene (CsSAD) sequence was firstly analyzed by Codon W, CHIPS, and CUSP programs online, and then compared with genomes of the tea plant, other species and SAD genes from 11 plant species. The results show that the CsSAD gene and the selected 73 of C. sinensis genes have similar codon usage bias. The CsSAD gene has a bias toward the synonymous codons with A and T at the third codon position, the same as the 73 of C. sinensis genes. Compared with monocotyledons such as Triticum aestivum and Zea mays, the differences in codon usage frequency between the CsSAD gene and dicotyledons such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tobacum are less. Therefore, A. thaliana and N. tobacum expression systems may be more suitable for the expression of the CsSAD gene. The analysis result of SAD genes from 12 plant species also shows that most of the SAD genes are biased toward the synonymous codons with G and C at the third codon position. We believe that the codon usage bias analysis presented in this study will be essential for providing a theoretical basis for discussing the structure and function of the CsSAD gene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The genomic structure of the human Charcot-Leyden crystal protein gene is analogous to those of the galectin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, K.D. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Handen, J.S.; Rosenberg, H.F. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The Charcot-Leyden crystal (CLC) protein, or eosinophil lysophospholipase, is a characteristic protein of human eosinophils and basophils; recent work has demonstrated that the CLC protein is both structurally and functionally related to the galectin family of {beta}-galactoside binding proteins. The galectins as a group share a number of features in common, including a linear ligand binding site encoded on a single exon. In this work, we demonstrate that the intron-exon structure of the gene encoding CLC is analogous to those encoding the galectins. The coding sequence of the CLC gene is divided into four exons, with the entire {beta}-galactoside binding site encoded by exon III. We have isolated CLC {beta}-galactoside binding sites from both orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and murine (Mus musculus) genomic DNAs, both encoded on single exons, and noted conservation of the amino acids shown to interact directly with the {beta}-galactoside ligand. The most likely interpretation of these results suggests the occurrence of one or more exon duplication and insertion events, resulting in the distribution of this lectin domain to CLC as well as to the multiple galectin genes. 35 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Functional interaction between a novel protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit, PR59, and the retinoblastoma-related p107 protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorhoeve, P.M.; Hijmans, E.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The proteins of the retinoblastoma family are potent inhibitors of cell cycle progression. It is well documented that their growth-inhibitory activity can be abolished by phosphorylation on serine and threonine residues by cyclin dependent kinases. In contrast, very little is known about the

  3. The Multiple Roles of Myelin Protein Genes During the Development of the Oligodendrocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fulton

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available It has become clear that the products of several of the earliest identified myelin protein genes perform functions that extend beyond the myelin sheath. Interestingly, these myelin proteins, which comprise proteolipid protein, 2′, 3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase and the classic and golli MBPs (myelin basic proteins, play important roles during different stages of oligodendroglial development. These non-myelin-related functions are varied and include roles in the regulation of process outgrowth, migration, RNA transport, oligodendrocyte survival and ion channel modulation. However, despite the wide variety of cellular functions performed by the different myelin genes, the route by which they achieve these many functions seems to converge upon a common mechanism involving Ca2+ regulation, cytoskeletal rearrangements and signal transduction. In the present review, the newly emerging functions of these myelin proteins will be described, and these will then be discussed in the context of their contribution to oligodendroglial development.

  4. Prioritization of candidate genes for cattle reproductive traits, based on protein-protein interactions, gene expression, and text-mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsegge, B.; Woelders, H.; Smits, M.A.; Schokker, D.; Jiang, L.; Sorensen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Reproduction is of significant economic importance in dairy cattle. Improved understanding of mechanisms that control estrous behavior and other reproduction traits could help in developing strategies to improve and/or monitor these traits. The objective of this study was to predict and rank genes

  5. One, Two, Three: Polycomb Proteins Hit All Dimensions of Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania del Prete

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb group (PcG proteins contribute to the formation and maintenance of a specific repressive chromatin state that prevents the expression of genes in a particular space and time. Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs consist of several PcG proteins with specific regulatory or catalytic properties. PRCs are recruited to thousands of target genes, and various recruitment factors, including DNA-binding proteins and non-coding RNAs, are involved in the targeting. PcG proteins contribute to a multitude of biological processes by altering chromatin features at different scales. PcG proteins mediate both biochemical modifications of histone tails and biophysical modifications (e.g., chromatin fiber compaction and three-dimensional (3D chromatin conformation. Here, we review the role of PcG proteins in nuclear architecture, describing their impact on the structure of the chromatin fiber, on chromatin interactions, and on the spatial organization of the genome in nuclei. Although little is known about the role of plant PcG proteins in nuclear organization, much is known in the animal field, and we highlight similarities and differences in the roles of PcG proteins in 3D gene regulation in plants and animals.

  6. Gene divergence of homeologous regions associated with a major seed protein content QTL in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puji eLestari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding several modes of duplication contributing on the present genome structure is getting an attention because it could be related to numerous agronomically important traits. Since soybean serves as a rich protein source for animal feeds and human consumption, breeding efforts in soybean have been directed toward enhancing seed protein content. The publicly available soybean sequences and its genomically featured elements facilitate comprehending of quantitative trait loci (QTL for seed protein content in concordance with homeologous regions in soybean genome. Although parts of chromosome (Chr 20 and Chr 10 showed synteny, QTLs for seed protein content present only on Chr 20. Using comparative analysis of gene contents in recently duplicated genomic regions harboring QTL for protein/oil content on Chrs 20 and 10, a total of 27 genes are present in duplicated regions of both chromosomes. Notably, 4 tandem duplicates of the putative homeobox protein 22 (HB22 are present only on Chr 20 and this Medicago truncatula homolog expressed in endosperm at seed filling stage. These tandem duplicates could contribute on the protein/oil QTL of Chr 20. Our study suggests that non-shared gene contents within the duplicated genomic regions might lead to absence/presence of QTL related to protein/oil content.

  7. Characterization of gene organization and generation of heterogeneous mRNA species of rat ISK protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, M; Masu, M; Tsuchida, K; Mori, T; Ohkubo, H; Nakanishi, S

    1990-08-01

    The ISK protein is a novel, probably epithelial potassium channel which differs from conventional potassium channels in its structure, electrophysiology, and tissue distribution. In this investigation, we isolated and analyzed genomic and cDNA clones coding for the rat ISK protein to characterize the structural organization and expression pattern of the ISK protein gene. This analysis, together with primer extension and RNase protection experiments, indicated that the ISK protein mRNA is initiated from two different upstream exons and then encoded by an uninterrupted downstream exon covering the protein-coding and the 3'-untranslated regions of the mRNA. RNA blot hybridization analysis showed additional generation of several large species of mRNAs which result from inclusion of a part of the intron sequence and the 3'-flanking region of the ISK protein gene. Thus, the single ISK protein gene is involved in the production of multiple species of mRNAs through a variety of cellular mechanisms including transcription initiation at different sites, alternative RNA splicing, and polyadenylation at different sites. The heterogeneity of the ISK protein mRNAs may be associated with the emergence of the functional and regulatory diversity observed for potassium ion permeation in epithelial cells.

  8. Dietary soy and meat proteins induce distinct physiological and gene expression changes in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shangxin; Hooiveld, Guido J.; Li, Mengjie; Zhao, Fan; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Xinglian; Muller, Michael; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on a comprehensive comparison of the effects of soy and meat proteins given at the recommended level on physiological markers of metabolic syndrome and the hepatic transcriptome. Male rats were fed semi-synthetic diets for 1 wk that differed only regarding protein source, with casein serving as reference. Body weight gain and adipose tissue mass were significantly reduced by soy but not meat proteins. The insulin resistance index was improved by soy, and to a lesser extent by meat proteins. Liver triacylglycerol contents were reduced by both protein sources, which coincided with increased plasma triacylglycerol concentrations. Both soy and meat proteins changed plasma amino acid patterns. The expression of 1571 and 1369 genes were altered by soy and meat proteins respectively. Functional classification revealed that lipid, energy and amino acid metabolic pathways, as well as insulin signaling pathways were regulated differently by soy and meat proteins. Several transcriptional regulators, including NFE2L2, ATF4, Srebf1 and Rictor were identified as potential key upstream regulators. These results suggest that soy and meat proteins induce distinct physiological and gene expression responses in rats and provide novel evidence and suggestions for the health effects of different protein sources in human diets. PMID:26857845

  9. Designing of a single gene encoding four functional proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Masayori; Ishida, Yojiro; Inouye, Keiko

    2017-04-21

    In the genomes of some organisms such as bacteriophages and bacteria, a DNA sequence is able to encode two different proteins, indicating that genetic information is compacted in DNA twice denser than in usual DNA. In theory, a DNA sequence has a maximal capacity to produce six different mRNAs, however, it is an intriguing question how many of these mRNAs are able to synthesize functional proteins. Here, we design a DNA sequence encoding four collagen-like proteins, two, (Gly-Arg-Pro)n and (Gly-Ala-Pro)n, from a sense mRNA and the other two, also (Gly-Arg-Pro)n and (Gly-Ala-Pro)n from its antisense mRNA, all of which are expected to form triple-helical structures unique to collagens. Other designs such as the combination of (Gly-Arg-Pro)n, (Gly-Val-Pro)n, (Gly-Thr-Pro)n and (Gly-Arg-Pro)n are also possible. The proposed DNA sequence is considered to contain the most compact genetic information ever created. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Discovery of new candidate genes related to brain development using protein interaction information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Chu, Chen; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Human brain development is a dramatic process composed of a series of complex and fine-tuned spatiotemporal gene expressions. A good comprehension of this process can assist us in developing the potential of our brain. However, we have only limited knowledge about the genes and gene functions that are involved in this biological process. Therefore, a substantial demand remains to discover new brain development-related genes and identify their biological functions. In this study, we aimed to discover new brain-development related genes by building a computational method. We referred to a series of computational methods used to discover new disease-related genes and developed a similar method. In this method, the shortest path algorithm was executed on a weighted graph that was constructed using protein-protein interactions. New candidate genes fell on at least one of the shortest paths connecting two known genes that are related to brain development. A randomization test was then adopted to filter positive discoveries. Of the final identified genes, several have been reported to be associated with brain development, indicating the effectiveness of the method, whereas several of the others may have potential roles in brain development.

  11. An analysis of gene/protein associations at PubMed scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyysalo Sampo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Event extraction following the GENIA Event corpus and BioNLP shared task models has been a considerable focus of recent work in biomedical information extraction. This work includes efforts applying event extraction methods to the entire PubMed literature database, far beyond the narrow subdomains of biomedicine for which annotated resources for extraction method development are available. Results In the present study, our aim is to estimate the coverage of all statements of gene/protein associations in PubMed that existing resources for event extraction can provide. We base our analysis on a recently released corpus automatically annotated for gene/protein entities and syntactic analyses covering the entire PubMed, and use named entity co-occurrence, shortest dependency paths and an unlexicalized classifier to identify likely statements of gene/protein associations. A set of high-frequency/high-likelihood association statements are then manually analyzed with reference to the GENIA ontology. Conclusions We present a first estimate of the overall coverage of gene/protein associations provided by existing resources for event extraction. Our results suggest that for event-type associations this coverage may be over 90%. We also identify several biologically significant associations of genes and proteins that are not addressed by these resources, suggesting directions for further extension of extraction coverage.

  12. A human-specific de novo protein-coding gene associated with human brain functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether any human-specific new genes may be associated with human brain functions, we computationally screened the genetic vulnerable factors identified through Genome-Wide Association Studies and linkage analyses of nicotine addiction and found one human-specific de novo protein-coding gene, FLJ33706 (alternative gene symbol C20orf203. Cross-species analysis revealed interesting evolutionary paths of how this gene had originated from noncoding DNA sequences: insertion of repeat elements especially Alu contributed to the formation of the first coding exon and six standard splice junctions on the branch leading to humans and chimpanzees, and two subsequent substitutions in the human lineage escaped two stop codons and created an open reading frame of 194 amino acids. We experimentally verified FLJ33706's mRNA and protein expression in the brain. Real-Time PCR in multiple tissues demonstrated that FLJ33706 was most abundantly expressed in brain. Human polymorphism data suggested that FLJ33706 encodes a protein under purifying selection. A specifically designed antibody detected its protein expression across human cortex, cerebellum and midbrain. Immunohistochemistry study in normal human brain cortex revealed the localization of FLJ33706 protein in neurons. Elevated expressions of FLJ33706 were detected in Alzheimer's brain samples, suggesting the role of this novel gene in human-specific pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. FLJ33706 provided the strongest evidence so far that human-specific de novo genes can have protein-coding potential and differential protein expression, and be involved in human brain functions.

  13. The isolation and characterization of a Neurospora crassa gene (ubi::crp-6) encoding a ubiquitin-40S ribosomal protein fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, K A; Anumula, K R; Free, S J

    1994-09-15

    We have isolated and sequenced a Neurospora crassa gene encoding a single copy of ubiquitin (UBI) fused to the S27a ribosomal (r) protein. We have opted to name this gene the ubiquitin/cytoplasmic r-protein gene 6 (ubi::crp-6). The ubi::crp-6 gene generates a 700-nucleotide (nt) transcript. It shares a 700-bp regulatory region with the cytoplasmic r-protein gene 5 (crp-5), a gene encoding the N. crassa S26 r-protein. The two genes are transcribed divergently from the common regulatory region and their mRNA levels are regulated in parallel during growth on a variety of carbon sources.

  14. Overexpression Analysis of emv2 gene coding for Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Vigna radiata (Wilczek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh S.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are speculated to protect against water stress deficit in plants. An over expression system for mungbean late embryogenesis abundant protein, emv2 was constructed in a pET29a vector, designated pET-emv2 which is responsible for higher expression under the transcriptional/translational control of T7/lac promoter incorporated in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3.Induction protocol was optimized for pET recombinants harboring the target gene. Overexpressed EMV2 protein was purified to homogeneity and the protein profile monitored by SDS-PAGE.

  15. TIS11 Family Proteins and Their Roles in Posttranscriptional Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Baou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression of mRNAs containing adenine-uridine rich elements (AREs in their 3 untranslated regions is mediated by a number of different proteins that interact with these elements to either stabilise or destabilise them. The present review concerns the TPA-inducible sequence 11 (TIS11 protein family, a small family of proteins, that appears to interact with ARE-containing mRNAs and promote their degradation. This family of proteins has been extensively studied in the past decade. Studies have focussed on determining their biochemical functions, identifying their target mRNAs, and determining their roles in cell functions and diseases.

  16. Limitations of gene duplication models: evolution of modules in protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Emmert-Streib

    Full Text Available It has been generally acknowledged that the module structure of protein interaction networks plays a crucial role with respect to the functional understanding of these networks. In this paper, we study evolutionary aspects of the module structure of protein interaction networks, which forms a mesoscopic level of description with respect to the architectural principles of networks. The purpose of this paper is to investigate limitations of well known gene duplication models by showing that these models are lacking crucial structural features present in protein interaction networks on a mesoscopic scale. This observation reveals our incomplete understanding of the structural evolution of protein networks on the module level.

  17. The AGAAAAGA palindrome in PrP is required to generate a productive PrPSc-PrPC complex that leads to prion propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norstrom, Eric M; Mastrianni, James A

    2005-07-22

    The molecular hallmark of prion disease is the conversion of normal prion protein (PrPC) to an insoluble, proteinase K-resistant, pathogenic isoform (PrPSc). Once generated, PrPSc propagates by complexing with, and transferring its pathogenic conformation onto, PrPC. Defining the specific nature of this PrPSc-PrPC interaction is critical to understanding prion genesis. To begin to approach this question, we employed a prion-infected neuroblastoma cell line (ScN2a) combined with a heterologous yeast expression system to independently model PrPSc generation and propagation. We additionally applied fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis to the latter to specifically study PrP-PrP interactions. In this report we focus on an N-terminal hydrophobic palindrome of PrP (112-AGAAAAGA-119) thought to feature intimately in prion generation via an unclear mechanism. We found that, in contrast to wild type (wt) PrP, PrP lacking the palindrome (PrPDelta112-119) neither converted to PrPSc when expressed in ScN2a cells nor generated proteinase K-resistant PrP when expressed in yeast. Furthermore, PrPDelta112-119 was a dominant-negative inhibitor of wtPrP in ScN2a cells. Both wtPrP and PrPDelta112-119 were highly insoluble when expressed in yeast and produced distinct cytosolic aggregates when expressed as fluorescent fusion proteins (PrP::YFP). Although self-aggregation was evident, fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies in live yeast co-expressing PrPSc-like protein and PrPDelta112-119 indicated altered interaction properties. These results suggest that the palindrome is required, not only for the attainment of the PrPSc conformation but also to facilitate the proper association of PrPSc with PrPC to effect prion propagation.

  18. Transgenic plums (Prunus domestica L.) express the plum pox virus coat protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorza, R; Ravelonandro, M; Callahan, A M; Cordts, J M; Fuchs, M; Dunez, J; Gonsalves, D

    1994-11-01

    Plum hypocotyl slices were transformed with the coat protein (CP) gene of plum pox virus (PPV-CP) following cocultivation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens containing the plasmid pGA482GG/PPVCP-33. This binary vector carries the PPV-CP gene construct, as well as the chimeric neomycin phosphotransferase and β-glucuronidase genes. Integration and expression of the transferred genes into regenerated plum plants was verified through kan resistance, GUS assays, and PCR amplification of the PPV-CP gene. Twenty-two transgenic clones were identified from approximately 1800 hypocotyl slices. DNA, mRNA, and protein analyses of five transgenic plants confirmed the integration of the engineered CP gene, the accumulation of CP mRNA and of PPV-CP-immunoreactive protein. CP mRNA levels ranged from high to undetectable levels, apparently correlated with gene structure, as indicated by DNA blot analysis. Western analysis showed that transgenic plants produced amounts of CP which generally correlated with amounts of detected mRNA.

  19. Gene identification and protein classification in microbial metagenomic sequence data via incremental clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weizhong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification and study of proteins from metagenomic datasets can shed light on the roles and interactions of the source organisms in their communities. However, metagenomic datasets are characterized by the presence of organisms with varying GC composition, codon usage biases etc., and consequently gene identification is challenging. The vast amount of sequence data also requires faster protein family classification tools. Results We present a computational improvement to a sequence clustering approach that we developed previously to identify and classify protein coding genes in large microbial metagenomic datasets. The clustering approach can be used to identify protein coding genes in prokaryotes, viruses, and intron-less eukaryotes. The computational improvement is based on an incremental clustering method that does not require the expensive all-against-all compute that was required by the original approach, while still preserving the remote homology detection capabilities. We present evaluations of the clustering approach in protein-coding gene identification and classification, and also present the results of updating the protein clusters from our previous work with recent genomic and metagenomic sequences. The clustering results are available via CAMERA, (http://camera.calit2.net. Conclusion The clustering paradigm is shown to be a very useful tool in the analysis of microbial metagenomic data. The incremental clustering method is shown to be much faster than the original approach in identifying genes, grouping sequences into existing protein families, and also identifying novel families that have multiple members in a metagenomic dataset. These clusters provide a basis for further studies of protein families.

  20. Polymorphism of three milk protein genes in Mexican Jersey cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Zepeda-Batista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to estimate the allelic and genotypic frequencies, genetic diversity and polymorphic information content for the β-casein, κ-casein and β-lactoglobulin genes. Blood and frozen semen samples were collected from 453 Jersey individuals registered by the Mexican Jersey Cattle Association. Twenty eight breed specific SNP primers for whole genes were used. The B allele of κ-casein had higher frequency (0.69 than the A (0.26 and E (0.05. For β-lactoglobulin, the highest frequency was for B (0.72, followed by A and C alleles (0.26 and 0.02, respectively. The β-casein allele with the highest frequency was A2 (0.71, followed by A1 (0.19, A3 (0.05, B (0.04 and C (0.01. The average genetic diversity (He was 0.53. The average locus effective allele number was 1.79. These results indicate a high allelic diversity for κ-caseín, β-casein and β-lactoglobulin that could be included in breeding programs in the population studied, aimed to improve the milk quality traits of economic importance.

  1. Changes in allele and genotype frequencies of PrP gene in breeds of sheep in Slovakia between 2004 and 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Margetín

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to analyze the changes in allele and genotype frequencies of PrP gene in auction purebred rams of various breeds in Slovakia between 2004 and 2015. Male genotyping was done within the National Scrapie Eradication Programme by the certified laboratories. Positive changes in all breeds were found during the analyzed period. As a result of strict positive selection for ARR allele and strict negative selection for VRQ and ARQ alleles in most numerous Improved Valachian (IV and Tsigai (TS breeds, 94.7 % (IV and 95.7 % (TS of animals were included in the first and second risk (R1 and R2 groups in 2015. Frequencies of ARR allele were above 0.9 in specialized meat breeds. In Lacaune breed, frequencies of ARR, ARQ and VRQ alleles were 0.896, 0.117 and 0.003 in 2015. All purebred East Friesian males were included in R1 and R2 groups in 2015.

  2. Virulence plasmid of Rhodococcus equi contains inducible gene family encoding secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, B A; Prescott, J F; Palmer, G H; Takai, S; Nicholson, V M; Alperin, D C; Hines, S A

    2001-02-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals. This facultative intracellular pathogen produces similar lesions in immunocompromised humans, particularly in AIDS patients. Virulent strains of R. equi bear a large plasmid that is required for intracellular survival within macrophages and for virulence in foals and mice. Only two plasmid-encoded proteins have been described previously; a 15- to 17-kDa surface protein designated virulence-associated protein A (VapA) and an antigenically related 20-kDa protein (herein designated VapB). These two proteins are not expressed by the same R. equi isolate. We describe here the substantial similarity between VapA and VapB. Moreover, we identify three additional genes carried on the virulence plasmid, vapC, -D, and -E, that are tandemly arranged downstream of vapA. These new genes are members of a gene family and encode proteins that are approximately 50% homologous to VapA, VapB, and each other. vapC, -D, and -E are found only in R. equi strains that express VapA and are highly conserved in VapA-positive isolates from both horses and humans. VapC, -D, and -E are secreted proteins coordinately regulated by temperature with VapA; the proteins are expressed when R. equi is cultured at 37 degrees C but not at 30 degrees C, a finding that is compatible with a role in virulence. As secreted proteins, VapC, -D, and -E may represent targets for the prevention of rhodococcal pneumonia. An immunologic study using VapA-specific antibodies and recombinant Vap proteins revealed no evidence of cross-reactivity despite extensive sequence similarity over the carboxy terminus of all four proteins.

  3. Concordance of gene expression in human protein complexes reveals tissue specificity and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börnigen, Daniela; Pers, Tune Hannes; Thorrez, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing variants in human genes usually lead to phenotypes specific to only a few tissues. Here, we present a method for predicting tissue specificity based on quantitative deregulation of protein complexes. The underlying assumption is that the degree of coordinated expression among...... proteins in a complex within a given tissue may pinpoint tissues that will be affected by a mutation in the complex and coordinated expression may reveal the complex to be active in the tissue. We identified known disease genes and their protein complex partners in a high-quality human interactome. Each...... susceptibility gene's tissue involvement was ranked based on coordinated expression with its interaction partners in a non-disease global map of human tissue-specific expression. The approach demonstrated high overall area under the curve (0.78) and was very successfully benchmarked against a random model...

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined....... Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression...... in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p

  5. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: the extent of microglia activation is dependent on the biochemical type of PrPSc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puoti, Gianfranco; Giaccone, Giorgio; Mangieri, Michela; Limido, Lucia; Fociani, Paolo; Zerbi, Pietro; Suardi, Silvia; Rossi, Giacomina; Iussich, Selina; Capobianco, Raffaella; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Marcon, Gabriella; Cotrufo, Roberto; Filippini, Graziella; Bugiani, Orso; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2005-10-01

    In prion-related encephalopathies, microglial activation occurs early and is dependent on accumulation of disease-specific forms of the prion protein (PrPSc) and may play a role in nerve cell death. Previously, we found that different types of PrPSc (i.e. type 1 and type 2) coexisted in approximately 25% of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD); and a close relationship was detected between PrPSc type, the pattern of PrP immunoreactivity, and extent of spongiform degeneration. To investigate whether microglial reaction is related to the biochemical type and deposition pattern of PrPSc, we carried out a neuropathologic and biochemical study on 26 patients with sporadic CJD, including all possible genotypes at codon 129 of the prion protein gene. By quantitative analysis, we demonstrated that strong microglial activation was associated with type 1 PrPSc and diffuse PrP immunoreactivity, whereas type 2 PrPSc and focal PrP deposits were accompanied by mild microglia reaction. These findings support the view that the phenotypic heterogeneity of sporadic CJD is largely determined by the physicochemical properties of distinct PrPSc conformers.

  6. Horizontal gene transfer of zinc and non-zinc forms of bacterial ribosomal protein S4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthey-Schulten Zaida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The universal ribosomal protein S4 is essential for the initiation of small subunit ribosomal assembly and translational accuracy. Being part of the information processing machinery of the cell, the gene for S4 is generally thought of as being inherited vertically and has been used in concatenated gene phylogenies. Here we report the evolution of ribosomal protein S4 in relation to a broad sharing of zinc/non-zinc forms of the gene and study the scope of horizontal gene transfer (HGT of S4 during bacterial evolution. Results In this study we present the complex evolutionary history of ribosomal protein S4 using 660 bacterial genomes from 16 major bacterial phyla. According to conserved characteristics in the sequences, S4 can be classified into C+ (zinc-binding and C- (zinc-free variants, with 26 genomes (mainly from the class Clostridia containing genes for both. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of the S4 sequences was incongruent with the standard bacterial phylogeny, indicating a departure from strict vertical inheritance. Further analysis using the genome content near the S4 genes, which are usually located in a conserved gene cluster, showed not only that HGT of the C- gene had occurred at various stages of bacterial evolution, but also that both the C- and C+ genes were present before the individual phyla diverged. To explain the latter, we theorize that a gene pool existed early in bacterial evolution from which bacteria could sample S4 gene variants, according to environmental conditions. The distribution of the C+/- variants for seven other zinc-binding ribosomal proteins in these 660 bacterial genomes is consistent with that seen for S4 and may shed light on the evolutionary pressures involved. Conclusion The complex history presented for "core" protein S4 suggests the existence of a gene pool before the emergence of bacterial lineages and reflects the pervasive nature of HGT in subsequent bacterial evolution

  7. Theories of biological aging: genes, proteins, and free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2006-12-01

    Traditional categorization of theories of aging into programmed and stochastic ones is outdated and obsolete. Biological aging is considered to occur mainly during the period of survival beyond the natural or essential lifespan (ELS) in Darwinian terms. Organisms survive to achieve ELS by virtue of genetically determined longevity assuring maintenance and repair systems (MRS). Aging at the molecular level is characterized by the progressive accumulation of molecular damage caused by environmental and metabolically generated free radicals, by spontaneous errors in biochemical reactions, and by nutritional components. Damages in the MRS and other pathways lead to age-related failure of MRS, molecular heterogeneity, cellular dysfunctioning, reduced stress tolerance, diseases and ultimate death. A unified theory of biological aging in terms of failure of homeodynamics comprising of MRS, and involving genes, milieu and chance, is acquiring a definitive shape and wider acceptance. Such a theory also establishes the basis for testing and developing effective means of intervention, prevention and modulation of aging.

  8. Identification and characterization of multiple Spidroin 1 genes encoding major ampullate silk proteins in Nephila clavipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, W A; Marcotte, W R

    2008-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSps) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species.

  9. Frameshift mutations in coding repeats of protein tyrosine phosphatase genes in colorectal tumors with microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korff, Sebastian; Woerner, Stefan M; Yuan, Yan P; Bork, Peer; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Gebert, Johannes

    2008-11-10

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) like their antagonizing protein tyrosine kinases are key regulators of signal transduction thereby assuring normal control of cellular growth and differentiation. Increasing evidence suggests that mutations in PTP genes are associated with human malignancies. For example, mutational analysis of the tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) gene superfamily uncovered genetic alterations in about 26% of colorectal tumors. Since in these studies tumors have not been stratified according to genetic instability status we hypothesized that colorectal tumors characterized by high-level of microsatellite instability (MSI-H) might show an increased frequency of frameshift mutations in those PTP genes that harbor long mononucleotide repeats in their coding region (cMNR). Using bioinformatic analysis we identified 16 PTP candidate genes with long cMNRs that were examined for genetic alterations in 19 MSI-H colon cell lines, 54 MSI-H colorectal cancers, and 17 MSI-H colorectal adenomas. Frameshift mutations were identified only in 6 PTP genes, of which PTPN21 show the highest mutation frequency at all in MSI-H tumors (17%). Although about 32% of MSI-H tumors showed at least one affected PTP gene, and cMNR mutation rates in PTPN21, PTPRS, and PTPN5 are higher than the mean mutation frequency of MNRs of the same length, mutations within PTP genes do not seem to play a common role in MSI tumorigenesis, since no cMNR mutation frequency reached statistical significance and therefore, failed prediction as a Positive Selective Target Gene.

  10. A random set scoring model for prioritization of disease candidate genes using protein complexes and data-mining of GeneRIF, OMIM and PubMed records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Li; Edwards, Stefan M.; Thomsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    from PubMed abstracts, OMIM, and GeneRIF records. We also investigated the validity of several vocabulary filters and different likelihood thresholds for predicted protein-protein interactions in terms of their effect on the network-based gene-prioritization approach, which relies on text...

  11. Usher syndrome: animal models, retinal function of Usher proteins, and prospects for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a deafness-blindness disorder. The blindness occurs from a progressive retinal degeneration that begins after deafness and after the retina has developed. Three clinical subtypes of Usher syndrome have been identified, with mutations in any one of six different genes giving rise to type 1, in any one of three different genes to type 2, and in one identified gene causing Usher type 3. Mutant mice for most of the genes have been studied; while they have clear inner ear defects, retinal phenotypes are relatively mild and have been difficult to characterize. The retinal functions of the Usher proteins are still largely unknown. Protein binding studies have suggested many interactions among the proteins, and a model of interaction among all the proteins in the photoreceptor synapse has been proposed. However this model is not supported by localization data from some laboratories, or the indication of any synaptic phenotype in mutant mice. An earlier suggestion, based on patient pathologies, of Usher protein function in the photoreceptor cilium continues to gain support from immunolocalization and mutant mouse studies, which are consistent with Usher protein interaction in the photoreceptor ciliary/periciliary region. So far, the most characterized Usher protein is myosin VIIa. It is present in the apical RPE and photoreceptor ciliary/periciliary region, where it is required for organelle transport and clearance of opsin from the connecting cilium, respectively. Usher syndrome is amenable to gene replacement therapy, but also has some specific challenges. Progress in this treatment approach has been achieved by correction of mutant phenotypes in Myo7a-null mouse retinas, following lentiviral delivery of MYO7A. PMID:17936325

  12. Stepwise assembly of hyperaggregated forms of Drosophila zeste mutant protein suppresses white gene expression in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J D; Pirrotta, V

    1993-01-01

    The zeste gene is involved in two chromosome pairing-dependent phenomena: transvection and the suppression of white gene expression. Both require the ability of zeste protein to multimerize, dependent on three interlaced hydrophobic heptad repeats in the C-terminal domain. The first step is dimerization through a leucine zipper. Two other heptad repeats are then required to form higher multimers. The zeta(1) mutation, which causes the pairing-dependent suppression of white, creates a new hydr...

  13. Accurate Prediction of Protein-Coding Genes with Discriminative Learning Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Schweikert, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Zur Zeit werden die Genome einer Vielzahl von Organismen vollständig sequenziert. Die vorliegende Arbeit hatte daher zum Ziel, eine neue, gleichermaßen effiziente wie genaue Methode zu entwickeln, die es erlaubt, Protein-kodierende Gene mit Hilfe eines Computer- Programms zu finden. Betrachtet wurden eukaryotische Genome, bei denen die Offenen Leserahmen der Gene durch nicht-kodierende Introns unterbrochen werden. Im Gegensatz zu den meisten bereits bestehenden Ansätzen wurden ausschliesslich...

  14. Epigenetic modifications unlock the milk protein gene loci during mouse mammary gland development and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Rijnkels

    Full Text Available Unlike other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organization plays a key role in transcriptional regulation and underlies epigenetic regulation during development and differentiation. However, the role of chromatin organization in mammary gland development and differentiation is less well-defined. Here, we have studied the changes in chromatin organization at the milk protein gene loci (casein, whey acidic protein, and others in the mouse mammary gland before and after functional differentiation.Distal regulatory elements within the casein gene cluster and whey acidic protein gene region have an open chromatin organization after pubertal development, while proximal promoters only gain open-chromatin marks during pregnancy in conjunction with the major induction of their expression. In contrast, other milk protein genes, such as alpha-lactalbumin, already have an open chromatin organization in the mature virgin gland. Changes in chromatin organization in the casein gene cluster region that are present after puberty persisted after lactation has ceased, while the changes which occurred during pregnancy at the gene promoters were not maintained. In general, mammary gland expressed genes and their regulatory elements exhibit developmental stage- and tissue-specific chromatin organization.A progressive gain of epigenetic marks indicative of open/active chromatin on genes marking functional differentiation accompanies the development of the mammary gland. These results support a model in which a chromatin organization is established during pubertal development that is then poised to respond to the systemic hormonal signals of pregnancy and lactation to achieve the full functional capacity of the mammary gland.

  15. Transposon assisted gene insertion technology (TAGIT: a tool for generating fluorescent fusion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a transposon (transposon assisted gene insertion technology, or TAGIT that allows the random insertion of gfp (or other genes into chromosomal loci without disrupting operon structure or regulation. TAGIT is a modified Tn5 transposon that uses Kan(R to select for insertions on the chromosome or plasmid, beta-galactosidase to identify in-frame gene fusions, and Cre recombinase to excise the kan and lacZ genes in vivo. The resulting gfp insertions maintain target gene reading frame (to the 5' and 3' of gfp and are integrated at the native chromosomal locus, thereby maintaining native expression signals. Libraries can be screened to identify GFP insertions that maintain target protein function at native expression levels, allowing more trustworthy localization studies. We here use TAGIT to generate a library of GFP insertions in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor (LacI. We identified fully functional GFP insertions and partially functional insertions that bind DNA but fail to repress the lacZ operon. Several of these latter GFP insertions localize to lacO arrays integrated in the E. coli chromosome without producing the elongated cells frequently observed when functional LacI-GFP fusions are used in chromosome tagging experiments. TAGIT thereby faciliates the isolation of fully functional insertions of fluorescent proteins into target proteins expressed from the native chromosomal locus as well as potentially useful partially functional proteins.

  16. RING1A and BMI1 bookmark active genes via ubiquitination of chromatin-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Mansi; Packard, Colin Z; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-18

    During mitosis the chromatin undergoes dramatic architectural changes with the halting of the transcriptional processes and evacuation of nearly all transcription associated machinery from genes and promoters. Molecular bookmarking of genes during mitosis is a mechanism of faithfully transmitting cell-specific transcription patterns through cell division. We previously discovered chromatin ubiquitination at active promoters as a potential mitotic bookmark. In this study, we identify the enzymes involved in the deposition of ubiquitin before mitosis. We find that the polycomb complex proteins BMI1 and RING1A regulate the ubiquitination of chromatin associated proteins bound to promoters, and this modification is necessary for the expression of marked genes once the cells enter G1. Depletion of RING1A, and thus inactivation of mitotic bookmarking by ubiquitination, is deleterious to progression through G1, cell survival and proliferation. Though the polycomb complex proteins are thought to primarily regulate gene expression by transcriptional repression, in this study, we discover that these two polycomb proteins regulate the transcription of active genes during the mitosis to G1 transition. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Exact protein distributions for stochastic models of gene expression using partitioning of Poisson processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Platini, Thierry; Kulkarni, Rahul V

    2013-04-01

    Stochasticity in gene expression gives rise to fluctuations in protein levels across a population of genetically identical cells. Such fluctuations can lead to phenotypic variation in clonal populations; hence, there is considerable interest in quantifying noise in gene expression using stochastic models. However, obtaining exact analytical results for protein distributions has been an intractable task for all but the simplest models. Here, we invoke the partitioning property of Poisson processes to develop a mapping that significantly simplifies the analysis of stochastic models of gene expression. The mapping leads to exact protein distributions using results for mRNA distributions in models with promoter-based regulation. Using this approach, we derive exact analytical results for steady-state and time-dependent distributions for the basic two-stage model of gene expression. Furthermore, we show how the mapping leads to exact protein distributions for extensions of the basic model that include the effects of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation. The approach developed in this work is widely applicable and can contribute to a quantitative understanding of stochasticity in gene expression and its regulation.

  18. The Tzs protein and exogenous cytokinin affect virulence gene expression and bacterial growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Yang, Fong-Jhih; Cheng, Tun-Fang; Chen, Yi-Chun; Lee, Ying-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lai, Erh-Min

    2013-09-01

    The soil phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease in a wide range of plant species. The neoplastic growth at the infection sites is caused by transferring, integrating, and expressing transfer DNA (T-DNA) from A. tumefaciens into plant cells. A trans-zeatin synthesizing (tzs) gene is located in the nopaline-type tumor-inducing plasmid and causes trans-zeatin production in A. tumefaciens. Similar to known virulence (Vir) proteins that are induced by the vir gene inducer acetosyringone (AS) at acidic pH 5.5, Tzs protein is highly induced by AS under this growth condition but also constitutively expressed and moderately upregulated by AS at neutral pH 7.0. We found that the promoter activities and protein levels of several AS-induced vir genes increased in the tzs deletion mutant, a mutant with decreased tumorigenesis and transient transformation efficiencies, in Arabidopsis roots. During AS induction and infection of Arabidopsis roots, the tzs deletion mutant conferred impaired growth, which could be rescued by genetic complementation and supplementing exogenous cytokinin. Exogenous cytokinin also repressed vir promoter activities and Vir protein accumulation in both the wild-type and tzs mutant bacteria with AS induction. Thus, the tzs gene or its product, cytokinin, may be involved in regulating AS-induced vir gene expression and, therefore, affect bacterial growth and virulence during A. tumefaciens infection.

  19. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Edward I

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated and 901 (CAM treated THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold, eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the

  20. Molecular identification and expression patterns of odorant binding protein and chemosensory protein genes in Athetis lepigone (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Nan Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The olfaction system of insects plays an important role in mediating various physiological behaviors, including locating hosts, avoiding predators, and recognizing mates and oviposition sites. Therefore, some key genes in the system present valuable opportunities as targets for developing novel green pesticides. Athetis lepigone, a noctuid moth can feed on more than 30 different host plants making it a serious polyphagous pest worldwide, and it has become one of the major maize pests in northern China since 2011. However, there are no reports on effective and environmentally friendly pesticides for the control of this pest. In this study, we identified 28 genes encoding putative odorant binding proteins (OBPs and 20 chemosensory protein (CSPs genes based on our previous A. lepigone transcriptomic data. A tissue expression investigation and phylogenetic analysis were conducted in an effort to postulate the functions of these genes. Our results show that nearly half (46.4% of the AlOBPs exhibited antennae-biased expression while many of the AlCSPs were highly abundant in non-antennal tissues. These results will aid in exploring the chemosensory mechanisms of A. lepigone and developing environmentally friendly pesticides against this pest in the future.

  1. Gene delivery of the therapeutic polypeptide erythropoietin to primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Moos, Torben

    2016-01-01

    The potential for treatment of chronic disorders affecting the CNS is complicated by the inability of several drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). None-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints...... in this passage, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion into the brain. The non-mitotic BCECs might, however, not be very susceptible to non-viral gene therapy in vivo, since this strategy is believed to be dependent on active cell division. We have...

  2. Gene delivery of therapeutic polypeptides into brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    cells (BCECs) and their intermingling tight junctions. Polypeptides like brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), erythropoietin (EPO), and FGL peptide (part of Neuronal adhesion molecule (NCAM)) are acknowledged for their neuroprotective and neurogenerative effects. Generally, however...... has been to investigate the usage of BCEC as factories for recombinant protein production. A non-viral gene carrier was prepared from pullulan-spermine conjugated with plasmid DNA (Thomsen et al., 2011). In vitro transfection of Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (RBE4) and Human Brain Microvascular......, Moos T. Gene delivery by pullulan derivatives in brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion. J Control Release. 2011 Jan 18....

  3. Arabidopsis genes, AtNPR1, AtTGA2 and AtPR-5, confer partial resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) when overexpressed in transgenic soybean roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Benjamin F; Beard, Hunter; Brewer, Eric; Kabir, Sara; MacDonald, Margaret H; Youssef, Reham M

    2014-04-16

    Extensive studies using the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to elucidate plant defense signaling and pathway networks indicate that salicylic acid (SA) is the key hormone triggering the plant defense response against biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens, while jasmonic acid (JA) and derivatives are critical to the defense response against necrotrophic pathogens. Several reports demonstrate that SA limits nematode reproduction. Here we translate knowledge gained from studies using Arabidopsis to soybean. The ability of thirty-one Arabidopsis genes encoding important components of SA and JA synthesis and signaling in conferring resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN: Heterodera glycines) are investigated. We demonstrate that overexpression of three of thirty-one Arabidoposis genes in transgenic soybean roots of composite plants decreased the number of cysts formed by SCN to less than 50% of those found on control roots, namely AtNPR1(33%), AtTGA2 (38%), and AtPR-5 (38%). Three additional Arabidopsis genes decreased the number of SCN cysts by 40% or more: AtACBP3 (53% of the control value), AtACD2 (55%), and AtCM-3 (57%). Other genes having less or no effect included AtEDS5 (77%), AtNDR1 (82%), AtEDS1 (107%), and AtPR-1 (80%), as compared to control. Overexpression of AtDND1 greatly increased susceptibility as indicated by a large increase in the number of SCN cysts (175% of control). Knowledge of the pathogen defense system gained from studies of the model system, Arabidopsis, can be directly translated to soybean through direct overexpression of Arabidopsis genes. When the genes, AtNPR1, AtGA2, and AtPR-5, encoding specific components involved in SA regulation, synthesis, and signaling, are overexpressed in soybean roots, resistance to SCN is enhanced. This demonstrates functional compatibility of some Arabidopsis genes with soybean and identifies genes that may be used to engineer resistance to nematodes.

  4. Identification and functional analysis of variant haplotypes in the 5'-flanking region of protein phosphatase 2A-Bδ gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Feng Chen

    Full Text Available Serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a trimeric holoenzyme that plays an integral role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. The substrate specificity and (subcellular localization of the PP2A holoenzymes are highly regulated by interaction with a family of regulatory B subunits (PP2A-Bs. The regulatory subunit PP2A-B/PR55δ (PP2A-Bδ is involving in the dephosphorylation of PP2A substrates and is crucial for controlling entry into and exit from mitosis. The molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of expression of PP2A-Bδ gene (PPP2R2D remain largely unknown. To explore genetic variations in the 5'-flanking region of PPP2R2D gene as well as their frequent haplotypes in the Han Chinese population and determine whether such variations have an impact on transcriptional activity, DNA samples were collected from 70 healthy Chinese donors and sequenced for identifying genetic variants in the 5'-flanking region of PPP2R2D. Four genetic variants were identified in the 1836 bp 5'-flanking region of PPP2R2D. Linkage disequilibrium (LD patterns and haplotype profiles were constructed for the genetic variants. Using serially truncated human PPP2R2D promoter luciferase constructs, we found that a 601 bp (-540 nt to +61 nt fragment constitutes the core promoter region. The subcloning of individual 5'-flanking fragment revealed the existence of three haplotypes in the distal promoter of PPP2R2D. The luciferase reporter assay showed that different haplotypes exhibited distinct promoter activities. The EMSA revealed that the -462 G>A variant influences DNA-protein interactions involving the nuclear factor 1 (NF1. In vitro reporter gene assay indicated that cotransfection of NF1/B expression plasmid could positively regulate the activity of PPP2R2D proximal promoter. Introduction of exogenous NF1/B expression plasmid further confirmed that the NF1 involves in the regulation of PPP2R2D gene expression. Our findings

  5. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the Legionella micdadei mip gene, encoding a 30-kilodalton analog of the Legionella pneumophila Mip protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P; Hindersson, P

    1991-01-01

    After the demonstration of analogs of the Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein in other Legionella species, the Legionella micdadei mip gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. DNA sequence analysis of the L. micdadei mip gene contained in the plasmid p...... homology with the mip-like genes of several Legionella species. Furthermore, amino acid sequence comparisons revealed significant homology to two eukaryotic proteins with isomerase activity (FK506-binding proteins)....

  6. BMRF-MI: integrative identification of protein interaction network by modeling the gene dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xu; Wang, Xiao; Shajahan, Ayesha; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert; Xuan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Identification of protein interaction network is a very important step for understanding the molecular mechanisms in cancer. Several methods have been developed to integrate protein-protein interaction (PPI) data with gene expression data for network identification. However, they often fail to model the dependency between genes in the network, which makes many important genes, especially the upstream genes, unidentified. It is necessary to develop a method to improve the network identification performance by incorporating the dependency between genes. We proposed an approach for identifying protein interaction network by incorporating mutual information (MI) into a Markov random field (MRF) based framework to model the dependency between genes. MI is widely used in information theory to measure the uncertainty between random variables. Different from traditional Pearson correlation test, MI is capable of capturing both linear and non-linear relationship between random variables. Among all the existing MI estimators, we choose to use k-nearest neighbor MI (kNN-MI) estimator which is proved to have minimum bias. The estimated MI is integrated with an MRF framework to model the gene dependency in the context of network. The maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation is applied on the MRF-based model to estimate the network score. In order to reduce the computational complexity of finding the optimal network, a probabilistic searching algorithm is implemented. We further increase the robustness and reproducibility of the results by applying a non-parametric bootstrapping method to measure the confidence level of the identified genes. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we test the method on simulation data under different conditions. The experimental results show an improved accuracy in terms of subnetwork identification compared to existing methods. Furthermore, we applied our method onto real breast cancer patient data; the identified protein interaction

  7. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P.; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21–24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:25954206

  8. Prediction of essential proteins based on subcellular localization and gene expression correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yetian; Tang, Xiwei; Hu, Xiaohua; Wu, Wei; Ping, Qing

    2017-12-01

    Essential proteins are indispensable to the survival and development process of living organisms. To understand the functional mechanisms of essential proteins, which can be applied to the analysis of disease and design of drugs, it is important to identify essential proteins from a set of proteins first. As traditional experimental methods designed to test out essential proteins are usually expensive and laborious, computational methods, which utilize biological and topological features of proteins, have attracted more attention in recent years. Protein-protein interaction networks, together with other biological data, have been explored to improve the performance of essential protein prediction. The proposed method SCP is evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae datasets and compared with five other methods. The results show that our method SCP outperforms the other five methods in terms of accuracy of essential protein prediction. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm named SCP, which combines the ranking by a modified PageRank algorithm based on subcellular compartments information, with the ranking by Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) calculated from gene expression data. Experiments show that subcellular localization information is promising in boosting essential protein prediction.

  9. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M. [Univ. of Toronto, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. WebScipio: An online tool for the determination of gene structures using protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waack Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining the gene structure for a given protein encoding gene is an important step in many analyses. A software suited for this task should be readily accessible, accurate, easy to handle and should provide the user with a coherent representation of the most probable gene structure. It should be rigorous enough to optimise features on the level of single bases and at the same time flexible enough to allow for cross-species searches. Results WebScipio, a web interface to the Scipio software, allows a user to obtain the corresponding coding sequence structure of a here given a query protein sequence that belongs to an already assembled eukaryotic genome. The resulting gene structure is presented in various human readable formats like a schematic representation, and a detailed alignment of the query and the target sequence highlighting any discrepancies. WebScipio can also be used to identify and characterise the gene structures of homologs in related organisms. In addition, it offers a web service for integration with other programs. Conclusion WebScipio is a tool that allows users to get a high-quality gene structure prediction from a protein query. It offers more than 250 eukaryotic genomes that can be searched and produces predictions that are close to what can be achieved by manual annotation, for in-species and cross-species searches alike. WebScipio is freely accessible at http://www.webscipio.org.

  11. Rapid bursts of androgen-binding protein (Abp) gene duplication occurred independently in diverse mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukaitis, Christina M; Heger, Andreas; Blakley, Tyler D; Munclinger, Pavel; Ponting, Chris P; Karn, Robert C

    2008-02-12

    The draft mouse (Mus musculus) genome sequence revealed an unexpected proliferation of gene duplicates encoding a family of secretoglobin proteins including the androgen-binding protein (ABP) alpha, beta and gamma subunits. Further investigation of 14 alpha-like (Abpa) and 13 beta- or gamma-like (Abpbg) undisrupted gene sequences revealed a rich diversity of developmental stage-, sex- and tissue-specific expression. Despite these studies, our understanding of the evolution of this gene family remains incomplete. Questions arise from imperfections in the initial mouse genome assembly and a dearth of information about the gene family structure in other rodents and mammals. Here, we interrogate the latest 'finished' mouse (Mus musculus) genome sequence assembly to show that the Abp gene repertoire is, in fact, twice as large as reported previously, with 30 Abpa and 34 Abpbg genes and pseudogenes. All of these have arisen since the last common ancestor with rat (Rattus norvegicus). We then demonstrate, by sequencing homologs from species within the Mus genus, that this burst of gene duplication occurred very recently, within the past seven million years. Finally, we survey Abp orthologs in genomes from across the mammalian clade and show that bursts of Abp gene duplications are not specific to the murid rodents; they also occurred recently in the lagomorph (rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus) and ruminant (cattle, Bos taurus) lineages, although not in other mammalian taxa. We conclude that Abp genes have undergone repeated bursts of gene duplication and adaptive sequence diversification driven by these genes' participation in chemosensation and/or sexual identification.

  12. Beyond PrPres type 1/Type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uro-Coste, E.; Cassard, H.; Simon, S.; Lugan, S.; Bilheude, J.M.; Perret-Liaudet, A.; Ironside, J.E.; Haik, S.; Basset-Leobon, C.; Lacroux, C.; Peoch, K.; Streichenberger, N.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Head, M.W.; Grassi, J.; Hauw, J.J.; Schelcher, F.; Delisle, M.B.; Andreoletti, O.

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrPres) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct

  13. PTEN gene and phosphorylation of Akt protein expression in the LPS-induced lung fibroblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-lin HUANG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate PTEN gene expression and the Akt phosphorylation of protein expression in the LPS-induced lung fibroblast, to initially reveal the relation between PTEN gene and the Akt phosphorylated proteins to LPS-induced lung fibroblast proliferation mechanism. Methods: BrdU experiments was performed to evaluate the LPS-induced lung fibroblast proliferation,  RT-PCR and Western Blot analysis were used to analyze the PTEN gene expression and Western blot was performed to analyze Akt phosphorylated protein expression. Results: PTEN mRNA level of the experimental group were significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05 with LPS simulation for 24h and 72h , and there were no significant difference between the experimental group and control group the experimental group and control group (P>0.05 . PTEN protein expression levels of the experimental group were significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05 , at 72h, and PTEN mRNA levels had no significant differences between these of the experimental and control group at 6h,12h and 24h(p>0.05. Phosphorylation Akt protein level (relative to total Akt protein was significantly higer than the control group (P<0.05 at 24h and 72h, and phosphorylation Akt protein levels had no significant differences between these of the experimental and control group at 6h and 12h (P>0.05 .Conclusion: PTEN gene and phosphorylation Akt protein involve in LPS-induced lung fibroblast proliferation signal transduction pathway.

  14. A new family of giardial cysteine-rich non-VSP protein genes and a novel cyst protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J Davids

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the Giardia lamblia cyst wall is necessary for survival in the environment and host infection, we tested the hypothesis that it contains proteins other than the three known cyst wall proteins. Serial analysis of gene expression during growth and encystation revealed a gene, "HCNCp" (High Cysteine Non-variant Cyst protein, that was upregulated late in encystation, and that resembled the classic Giardia variable surface proteins (VSPs that cover the trophozoite plasmalemma. HCNCp is 13.9% cysteine, with many "CxxC" tetrapeptide motifs and a transmembrane sequence near the C-terminus. However, HCNCp has multiple "CxC" motifs rarely found in VSPs, and does not localize to the trophozoite plasmalemma. Moreover, the HCNCp C-terminus differed from the canonical VSP signature. Full-length epitope-tagged HCNCp expressed under its own promoter was upregulated during encystation with highest expression in cysts, including 42 and 21 kDa C-terminal fragments. Tagged HCNCp targeted to the nuclear envelope in trophozoites, and co-localized with cyst proteins to encystation-specific secretory vesicles during encystation. HCNCp defined a novel trafficking pathway as it localized to the wall and body of cysts, while the cyst proteins were exclusively in the wall. Unlike VSPs, HCNCp is expressed in at least five giardial strains and four WB subclones expressing different VSPs. Bioinformatics identified 60 additional large high cysteine membrane proteins (HCMp containing > or = 20 CxxC/CxC's lacking the VSP-specific C-terminal CRGKA. HCMp were absent or rare in other model or parasite genomes, except for Tetrahymena thermophila with 30. MEME analysis classified the 61 gHCMp genes into nine groups with similar internal motifs. Our data suggest that HCNCp is a novel invariant cyst protein belonging to a new HCMp family that is abundant in the Giardia genome. HCNCp and the other HCMp provide a rich source for developing parasite-specific diagnostic reagents

  15. Automating gene library synthesis by structure-based combinatorial protein engineering: examples from plant sesquiterpene synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokarry, Melissa; Laurendon, Caroline; O'Maille, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    Structure-based combinatorial protein engineering (SCOPE) is a homology-independent recombination method to create multiple crossover gene libraries by assembling defined combinations of structural elements ranging from single mutations to domains of protein structure. SCOPE was originally inspired by DNA shuffling, which mimics recombination during meiosis, where mutations from parental genes are "shuffled" to create novel combinations in the resulting progeny. DNA shuffling utilizes sequence identity between parental genes to mediate template-switching events (the annealing and extension of one parental gene fragment on another) in PCR reassembly reactions to generate crossovers and hence recombination between parental genes. In light of the conservation of protein structure and degeneracy of sequence, SCOPE was developed to enable the "shuffling" of distantly related genes with no requirement for sequence identity. The central principle involves the use of oligonucleotides to encode for crossover regions to choreograph template-switching events during PCR assembly of gene fragments to create chimeric genes. This approach was initially developed to create libraries of hybrid DNA polymerases from distantly related parents, and later developed to create a combinatorial mutant library of sesquiterpene synthases to explore the catalytic landscapes underlying the functional divergence of related enzymes. This chapter presents a simplified protocol of SCOPE that can be integrated with different mutagenesis techniques and is suitable for automation by liquid-handling robots. Two examples are presented to illustrate the application of SCOPE to create gene libraries using plant sesquiterpene synthases as the model system. In the first example, we outline how to create an active-site library as a series of complex mixtures of diverse mutants. In the second example, we outline how to create a focused library as an array of individual clones to distil minimal combinations of

  16. Synthetic zinc finger proteins: the advent of targeted gene regulation and genome modification technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersbach, Charles A; Gaj, Thomas; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-08-19

    The understanding of gene regulation and the structure and function of the human genome increased dramatically at the end of the 20th century. Yet the technologies for manipulating the genome have been slower to develop. For instance, the field of gene therapy has been focused on correcting genetic diseases and augmenting tissue repair for more than 40 years. However, with the exception of a few very low efficiency approaches, conventional genetic engineering methods have only been able to add auxiliary genes to cells. This has been a substantial obstacle to the clinical success of gene therapies and has also led to severe unintended consequences in several cases. Therefore, technologies that facilitate the precise modification of cellular genomes have diverse and significant implications in many facets of research and are essential for translating the products of the Genomic Revolution into tangible benefits for medicine and biotechnology. To address this need, in the 1990s, we embarked on a mission to develop technologies for engineering protein-DNA interactions with the aim of creating custom tools capable of targeting any DNA sequence. Our goal has been to allow researchers to reach into genomes to specifically regulate, knock out, or replace any gene. To realize these goals, we initially focused on understanding and manipulating zinc finger proteins. In particular, we sought to create a simple and straightforward method that enables unspecialized laboratories to engineer custom DNA-modifying proteins using only defined modular components, a web-based utility, and standard recombinant DNA technology. Two significant challenges we faced were (i) the development of zinc finger domains that target sequences not recognized by naturally occurring zinc finger proteins and (ii) determining how individual zinc finger domains could be tethered together as polydactyl proteins to recognize unique locations within complex genomes. We and others have since used this modular

  17. Cloning, mapping and nucleotide sequencing of a gene encoding a universal stress protein in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, T; Neidhardt, F C

    1992-11-01

    The response of non-differentiating bacteria to nutrient starvation is complex and includes the sequential synthesis of starvation-inducible proteins. Although starvation for different individual nutrients generally provokes unique and individual patterns of protein expression, some starvation stimulons share member proteins. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the synthesis of a small (13.5 kDa) cytoplasmic protein in Escherichia coli was greatly increased during growth inhibition caused by the exhaustion of any of a variety of nutrients (carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, sulphate, required amino acid) or by the presence of a variety of toxic agents including heavy metals, oxidants, acids and antibiotics. To determine further the mode of regulation of the protein designated UspA (universal stress protein A) we cloned the gene encoding the protein by the technique of reverse genetics. We isolated the protein from a preparative two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel, determined its N-terminal amino acid sequence, and used this sequence to construct a degenerate oligonucleotide probe. Two phages of the Kohara library were found to contain the gene which then was subcloned from the DNA in the overlapping region of these two clones. The amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the uspA gene, shows no significant homology with any other known protein. The uspA gene maps at 77 min on the E. coli W3110 chromosome, and is transcribed in a clockwise direction. The increase in the level of UspA during growth arrest was found to be primarily a result of transcriptional activation of the corresponding gene. The induction was independent of the RelA/SpoT, RpoH, KatF, OmpR, AppY, Lrp, PhoB and H-NS proteins during stress conditions that are known to induce or activate these global regulators. The -10 and -35 regions upstream of the transcriptional start site of the uspA gene are characteristic of a sigma 70-dependent promoter.

  18. Insights into Bacteriophage T5 Structure from Analysis of Its Morphogenesis Genes and Protein Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivanovic, Yvan; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Ponchon, Luc; Lurz, Rudi; Chami, Mohamed; Flayhan, Ali; Renouard, Madalena; Huet, Alexis; Decottignies, Paulette; Davidson, Alan R.; Breyton, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5 represents a large family of lytic Siphoviridae infecting Gram-negative bacteria. The low-resolution structure of T5 showed the T=13 geometry of the capsid and the unusual trimeric organization of the tail tube, and the assembly pathway of the capsid was established. Although major structural proteins of T5 have been identified in these studies, most of the genes encoding the morphogenesis proteins remained to be identified. Here, we combine a proteomic analysis of T5 particles with a bioinformatic study and electron microscopic immunolocalization to assign function to the genes encoding the structural proteins, the packaging proteins, and other nonstructural components required for T5 assembly. A head maturation protease that likely accounts for the cleavage of the different capsid proteins is identified. Two other proteins involved in capsid maturation add originality to the T5 capsid assembly mechanism: the single head-to-tail joining protein, which closes the T5 capsid after DNA packaging, and the nicking endonuclease responsible for the single-strand interruptions in the T5 genome. We localize most of the tail proteins that were hitherto uncharacterized and provide a detailed description of the tail tip composition. Our findings highlight novel variations of viral assembly strategies and of virion particle architecture. They further recommend T5 for exploring phage structure and assembly and for deciphering conformational rearrangements that accompany DNA transfer from the capsid to the host cytoplasm. PMID:24198424

  19. A dual-specificity isoform of the protein kinase inhibitor PKI produced by alternate gene splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Priyadarsini; Walsh, Donal A

    2002-03-15

    We have previously shown that the protein kinase inhibitor beta (PKIbeta) form of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor exists in multiple isoforms, some of which are specific inhibitors of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, whereas others also inhibit the cGMP-dependent enzyme [Kumar, Van Patten and Walsh (1997), J. Biol. Chem. 272, 20011-20020]. We have now demonstrated that the switch from a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-specific inhibitor to one with dual specificity arises as a consequence of alternate gene splicing. We have confirmed using bacterially produced pure protein that a single inhibitor species has dual specificity for both PKA and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), inhibiting each with very high and closely similar inhibitory potencies. The gene splicing converted a protein with 70 amino acids into one of 109 amino acids, and did not change the inhibitory potency to PKA, but changed it from a protein that had no detectable PKG inhibitory activity to one that now inhibited PKG in the nanomolar range.

  20. Cluster analysis of protein array results via similarity of Gene Ontology annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolting Cheryl

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advent of high-throughput proteomic experiments such as arrays of purified proteins comes the need to analyse sets of proteins as an ensemble, as opposed to the traditional one-protein-at-a-time approach. Although there are several publicly available tools that facilitate the analysis of protein sets, they do not display integrated results in an easily-interpreted image or do not allow the user to specify the proteins to be analysed. Results We developed a novel computational approach to analyse the annotation of sets of molecules. As proof of principle, we analysed two sets of proteins identified in published protein array screens. The distance between any two proteins was measured as the graph similarity between their Gene Ontology (GO annotations. These distances were then clustered to highlight subsets of proteins sharing related GO annotation. In the first set of proteins found to bind small molecule inhibitors of rapamycin, we identified three subsets containing four or five proteins each that may help to elucidate how rapamycin affects cell growth whereas the original authors chose only one novel protein from the array results for further study. In a set of phosphoinositide-binding proteins, we identified subsets of proteins associated with different intracellular structures that were not highlighted by the analysis performed in the original publication. Conclusion By determining the distances between annotations, our methodology reveals trends and enrichment of proteins of particular functions within high-throughput datasets at a higher sensitivity than perusal of end-point annotations. In an era of increasingly complex datasets, such tools will help in the formulation of new, testable hypotheses from high-throughput experimental data.

  1. Isolation of nuclear proteins from flax (Linum usitatissimum L. seed coats for gene expression regulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renouard Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While seed biology is well characterized and numerous studies have focused on this subject over the past years, the regulation of seed coat development and metabolism is for the most part still non-elucidated. It is well known that the seed coat has an essential role in seed development and its features are associated with important agronomical traits. It also constitutes a rich source of valuable compounds such as pharmaceuticals. Most of the cell genetic material is contained in the nucleus; therefore nuclear proteins constitute a major actor for gene expression regulation. Isolation of nuclear proteins responsible for specific seed coat expression is an important prerequisite for understanding seed coat metabolism and development. The extraction of nuclear proteins may be problematic due to the presence of specific components that can interfere with the extraction process. The seed coat is a rich source of mucilage and phenolics, which are good examples of these hindering compounds. Findings In the present study, we propose an optimized nuclear protein extraction protocol able to provide nuclear proteins from flax seed coat without contaminants and sufficient yield and quality for their use in transcriptional gene expression regulation by gel shift experiments. Conclusions Routinely, around 250 μg of nuclear proteins per gram of fresh weight were extracted from immature flax seed coats. The isolation protocol described hereafter may serve as an effective tool for gene expression regulation and seed coat-focused proteomics studies.

  2. SR proteins in vertical integration of gene expression from transcription to RNA processing to translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Pingping; Han, Joonhee; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-07-10

    SR proteins have been studied extensively as a family of RNA-binding proteins that participate in both constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing in mammalian cells. However, SR proteins were first discovered as factors that interact with transcriptionally active chromatin. Recent studies have now uncovered properties that connect these once apparently disparate functions, showing that a subset of SR proteins seem to bind directly to the histone 3 tail, play an active role in transcriptional elongation, and colocalize with genes that are engaged in specific intra- and interchromosome interactions for coordinated regulation of gene expression in the nucleus. These transcription-related activities are also coupled with a further expansion of putative functions of specific SR protein family members in RNA metabolism downstream of mRNA splicing, from RNA export to stability control to translation. These findings, therefore, highlight the broader roles of SR proteins in vertical integration of gene expression and provide mechanistic insights into their contributions to genome stability and proper cell-cycle progression in higher eukaryotic cells.

  3. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia.

  4. Analysis of polymorphic microsatellites within the bovine and ovine prion protein (PRNP) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldermann, H; Preuss, S; Eckert, J; Han, Y; Ollesch, K

    2003-08-01

    Twenty-four microsatellite sites with at least three repeats were found in the bovine prion protein gene (PRNP) and 23 in the ovine PRNP gene. Eight microsatellite sites were polymorphic in cattle and six in sheep with up to 10 alleles per site. In many cases allelic DNA fragments had variants in microsatellite sites and in flanking regions. Distances between microsatellite sites in eight genes from cattle and sheep occurred on average every 0.9 kb. The numerous polymorphic microsatellite sites will improve analysis of phylogenetic origin of different PRNP alleles and trait association studies for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and scrapie.

  5. Group A Streptococcal Vir Types Are M-Protein Gene (emm) Sequence Type Specific

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, Don L.; Goodfellow, Alison M.; Martin, Diana R.; Sriprakash, Kadaba S.

    1998-01-01

    The M-protein genes (emm genes) of 103 separate impetiginous Streptococcus pyogenes isolates were sequenced and the sequence types were compared to the types obtained by Vir typing. Vir typing is based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of a 4- to 7-kb pathogenicity island encoding emm and other virulence genes. By using both HaeIII and HinfI to generate RFLP profiles, complete concordance between Vir type and emm sequence type was found. Comparison of the emm sequenc...

  6. Regulation of contractile protein gene expression in unloaded mouse skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1996-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading was performed on mice in an effort to study the regulation of contractile protein genes. In particular, the regulation of myosin heavy chain IIb was examined. During unloading, muscle fibers undergo a type conversion. Preliminary data from this study does not support the hypothesis that the fiber type conversion is due to an increase in promoter activity of fast isoform genes, such as myosin heavy chain IIb. The consequences of this finding are examined, with particular focus on other factors controlling gene regulation.

  7. Control of Gene Expression in Senescence through Transcriptional Read-Through of Convergent Protein-Coding Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Muniz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antisense RNAs are non-coding RNAs that can regulate their corresponding sense RNAs and are generally produced from specific promoters. We uncover here a family of antisense RNAs, named START RNAs, produced during cellular senescence by transcriptional read-through at convergent protein-coding genes. Importantly, START RNAs repress the expression of their corresponding sense RNAs. In proliferative cells, we found that the Pol II elongation rate is limited downstream of TTS at START loci, allowing transcription termination to occur before Pol II reaches the convergent genes, thus preventing antisense RNA production and interference with the expression of the convergent genes. START RNAs are repressed by H2A.Z histone variant, whose local occupancy decreases in senescence. Our results thus uncover a mechanism of gene expression regulation relying on read-through antisense transcript production at convergent genes, underlining the functional importance of chromatin regulation in the control of RNA pol II elongation rate at intergenic regions.

  8. Naming 'junk': Human non-protein coding RNA (ncRNA gene nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Mathew W

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, the majority of the human genome was thought to be 'junk' DNA with no functional purpose. Over the past decade, the field of RNA research has rapidly expanded, with a concomitant increase in the number of non-protein coding RNA (ncRNA genes identified in this 'junk'. Many of the encoded ncRNAs have already been shown to be essential for a variety of vital functions, and this wealth of annotated human ncRNAs requires standardised naming in order to aid effective communication. The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC is the only organisation authorised to assign standardised nomenclature to human genes. Of the 30,000 approved gene symbols currently listed in the HGNC database (http://www.genenames.org/search, the majority represent protein-coding genes; however, they also include pseudogenes, phenotypic loci and some genomic features. In recent years the list has also increased to include almost 3,000 named human ncRNA genes. HGNC is actively engaging with the RNA research community in order to provide unique symbols and names for each sequence that encodes an ncRNA. Most of the classical small ncRNA genes have now been provided with a unique nomenclature, and work on naming the long (> 200 nucleotides non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs is ongoing.

  9. Non-random retention of protein-coding overlapping genes in Metazoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bork Peer

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the overlap of transcriptional units occurs frequently in eukaryotic genomes, its evolutionary and biological significance remains largely unclear. Here we report a comparative analysis of overlaps between genes coding for well-annotated proteins in five metazoan genomes (human, mouse, zebrafish, fruit fly and worm. Results For all analyzed species the observed number of overlapping genes is always lower than expected assuming functional neutrality, suggesting that gene overlap is negatively selected. The comparison to the random distribution also shows that retained overlaps do not exhibit random features: antiparallel overlaps are significantly enriched, while overlaps lying on the same strand and those involving coding sequences are highly underrepresented. We confirm that overlap is mostly species-specific and provide evidence that it frequently originates through the acquisition of terminal, non-coding exons. Finally, we show that overlapping genes tend to be significantly co-expressed in a breast cancer cDNA library obtained by 454 deep sequencing, and that different overlap types display different patterns of reciprocal expression. Conclusion Our data suggest that overlap between protein-coding genes is selected against in Metazoa. However, when retained it may be used as a species-specific mechanism for the reciprocal regulation of neighboring genes. The tendency of overlaps to involve non-coding regions of the genes leads to the speculation that the advantages achieved by an overlapping arrangement may be optimized by evolving regulatory non-coding transcripts.

  10. [Application of denaturing high performance liquid chromatography for detection of alpha-hemoglobin-stabilizing protein gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhipeng

    2011-04-01

    An assay method for alpha-hemoglobin-stabilizing protein (AHSP) gene was established based on denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). The AHSP gene sequences are divided into six fragments. Because of one or two common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in the first, second, fourth and sixth fragments, all samples should be analyzed individually when the fragments were detected. The third and fifth fragments were detected by DHPLC technique combined with DNA pooling for no common SNP in the fragments. The six common SNPs in AHSP gene can be genotyped accurately by the established method. After analyzing AHSP gene of 40 samples by DHPLC detection and gene sequencing, it was found that the results of the two methods were completely consistent. After AHSP gene of 365 samples being analyzed by DHPLC, two rare SNPs (11,810 G > A and 12,802 C > T)were found. Two missense mutations (AHSP D29V and AHSP V56G) were also