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Sample records for power production facility

  1. Optimum operation of a small power production facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capehart, B.L.; Mahoney, J.F.; Sivazlian, B.D.

    1983-09-01

    To help reduce the U.S.A.'s dependence on imported oil for electrical power generation, the 1978 National Energy Act established regulations to promote construction and operation of cogeneration and small power production facilities. Many of these facilities are presently under construction, with a great number planned. This paper examines the operation of a small power production facility with on-site generation and storage, on-site use, and connection to an electric utility grid system for the purpose of both selling excess power and buying power. It is assumed that the buying and selling price of electricity varies frequently during the day and that the relevant price and demand data may be accurately projected into the near future. With this system description, a mathematical model is formulated and solved by linear programming to obtain a series of periodic buy and sell decisions so as to maximize the profit from operating the small power production facility. Results are presented to illustrate the methodology for determining potential profits.

  2. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208 Section... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. (a) A hydroelectric small power production facility that impounds or diverts the water of a natural watercourse by...

  3. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... the Federal Power Act, at which non-Federal hydroelectric development is permissible; or (2) An...

  4. Design of radioisotope power systems facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschenbaum, R.C.; Wiemers, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    Radioisotope power systems currently produced for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Special Applications by the Mound Laboratory at Miamisburg, Ohio, have been used in a variety of configurations by the Department of Defense and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A forecast of fugure radioisotope power systems requirements showed a need for an increased production rate beyond the capability of the existing Mound Laboratory. Westinghouse Hanford Company is modifying the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to install the new Radioisotope Power Systems Facility for assembling future radioisotope power systems. The facility is currently being prepared to assemble the radioisotope thermoelectric generators required by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration missions for Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby in 1995 and Cassini, an investigation of Saturn and its moons, in 1996

  5. Coal gasification and the power production market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howington, K.; Flandermeyer, G.

    1995-01-01

    The US electric power production market is experiencing significant changes sparking interest in the current and future alternatives for power production. Coal gasification technology is being marketed to satisfy the needs of the volatile power production industry. Coal gasification is a promising power production process in which solid coal is burned to produce a synthesis gas (syn gas). The syn gas may be used to fuel combustion integrated into a facility producing electric power. Advantages of this technology include efficient power production, low flue gas emissions, flexible fuel utilization, broad capability for facility integration, useful process byproducts, and decreased waste disposal. The primary disadvantages are relatively high capital costs and lack of proven long-term operating experience. Developers of coal gasification intend to improve on these disadvantages and lop a strong position in the power generation market. This paper is a marketing analysis of the partial oxidation coal gasification processes emerging in the US in response to the market factors of the power production industry. A brief history of these processes is presented, including the results of recent projects exploring the feasibility of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) as a power production alternative. The current power generation market factors are discussed, and the status of current projects is presented including projected performance

  6. Capabilities of the Power Burst Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.; Jensen, A.M.; McCardell, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    The unique and diverse test capabilities of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are described in this paper. The PBF test reactor, located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, simulates normal, off-normal, and accident operating conditions of light water reactor fuel rods. An overview description is given, with specific detail on design and operating characteristics of the driver core, experiment test loop, fission product detection system, test train assembly facility, and support equipment which make the testing capability of the PBF so versatile

  7. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Adli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter regime of CLIC.

  8. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dubrovskiy, A; Syratchev, I; Ruber, R; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter reg...

  9. Power Electronics and Electric Machines Facilities | Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research | NREL Facilities Power Electronics and Electric Machines Facilities NREL's power electronics and electric machines thermal management experimentation facilities feature a wide range of four researchers in discussion around a piece of laboratory equipment. Power electronics researchers

  10. Maximization of revenues for power sales from a solid waste resources recovery facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The report discusses the actual implementation of the best alternative in selling electrical power generated by an existing waste-to-energy facility, the Metro-Dade County Resources Recovery Plant. After the plant processes and extracts various products out of the municipal solid waste, it burns it to produce electrical power. The price for buying power to satisfy the internal needs of our Resources Recovery Facility (RRF) is substantially higher than the power price for selling electricity to any other entity. Therefore, without any further analysis, it was decided to first satisfy those internal needs and then export the excess power. Various alternatives were thoroughly explored as to what to do with the excess power. Selling power to the power utilities or utilizing the power in other facilities were the primary options.

  11. Engineering and technology in the deconstruction of nuclear materials production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsley, R.S.; Reynolds, W.E.; Heffner, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Technology and equipment exist to support nuclear facility deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. In reality, this statement is not surprising because the nuclear industry has been decontaminating and decommissioning production plants for decades as new generations of production technology were introduced. Since the 1950s, the Babcock and Wilcox Company (B ampersand W) has operated a number of nuclear materials processing facilities to manufacture nuclear fuel for the commercial power industry and the U.S. Navy. These manufacturing facilities included a mixed oxide (PuO 2 -UO 2 ) nuclear fuel manufacturing plant, low- and high-enriched uranium (HEU/LEU) chemical and fuel plants, and fuel assembly plants. In addition, B ampersand W designed and build a major nuclear research center in Lynchburg, Virginia, to support these nuclear fuel manufacturing activities and to conduct nuclear power research. These nuclear research facilities included two research reactors, a hot-cell complex for nuclear materials research, four critical experiment facilities, and a plutonium fuels research and development facility. This article describes the B ampersand W deactivation, decomtanimation, and decommisioning program

  12. Power source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1998-09-29

    The present invention concerns a power plant, in which power is supplied from an ordinary system battery to an ordinary DC bus system when all of the AC power sources should be lost and a generator is driven by a steam turbine. A generator is connected with an ordinary system battery charger by way of a channel. If all of power sources should be lost, the ordinary system battery charger is driven by using emergency steam turbine generator facilities, and reactor steams are supplied thereby enabling to supply power to the ordinary system DC bus system for a long period of time. (N.H.)

  13. IAEA Director General visits purification facility at Polish thermal power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    On the occasion of his first visit to Poland, the Director General of the IAEA visited an industrial scale Electron Beam Demonstration facility constructed with IAEA assistance at the Pomorzany Electric Power Station near Szczecin. The facility uses an electron beam device to purify gas effluents from coal burning. By the addition of ammonia, the process permits the production of fertilizer as a by-product. This is an excellent example of how nuclear techniques can be used to reduce the emissions from conventional power plants. Experience gained will help to demonstrate the environmental effectiveness and economic competitiveness of this technology and serve to illustrate how the IAEA in cooperation with Member States can provide advanced nuclear technique to industrial companies

  14. Gingin High Optical Power Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, C; Blair, D G; Barrigo, P

    2006-01-01

    The Australian Consortium for Gravitational Wave Astronomy (ACIGA) in collaboration with LIGO is developing a high optical power research facility at the AIGO site, Gingin, Western Australia. Research at the facility will provide solutions to the problems that advanced gravitational wave detectors will encounter with extremely high optical power. The problems include thermal lensing and parametric instabilities. This article will present the status of the facility and the plan for the future experiments

  15. Power Systems Development Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the PSDF would be to provide a modular facility which would support the development of advanced, pilot-scale, coal-based power systems and hot gas clean-up components. These pilot-scale components would be designed to be large enough so that the results can be related and projected to commercial systems. The facility would use a modular approach to enhance the flexibility and capability for testing; consequently, overall capital and operating costs when compared with stand-alone facilities would be reduced by sharing resources common to different modules. The facility would identify and resolve technical barrier, as well as-provide a structure for long-term testing and performance assessment. It is also intended that the facility would evaluate the operational and performance characteristics of the advanced power systems with both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Five technology-based experimental modules are proposed for the PSDF: (1) an advanced gasifier module, (2) a fuel cell test module, (3) a PFBC module, (4) a combustion gas turbine module, and (5) a module comprised of five hot gas cleanup particulate control devices. The final module, the PCD, would capture coal-derived ash and particles from both the PFBC and advanced gasifier gas streams to provide for overall particulate emission control, as well as to protect the combustion turbine and the fuel cell

  16. Power Reactor Thoria Reprocessing Facility (PRTRF), Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhami, P.S; Yadav, J.S; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    Exploitation of the abundant thorium resources to meet sustained energy demand forms the basis of the Indian nuclear energy programme. To gain reprocessing experience in thorium fuel cycle, thoria was irradiated in research reactor CIRUS in early sixties. Later in eighties, thoria bundles were used for initial flux flattening in some of the pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The research reactor irradiated thoria contained small content (∼ 2-3ppm) of "2"3"2U in "2"3"3U product, which did not pose any significant radiological problems during processing in Uranium Thorium Separation Facility (UTSF), Trombay. Thoria irradiated in PHWRs on discharge contained (∼ 0.5-1.5% "2"3"3U with significant "2"3"2U content (100-500 ppm) requiring special radiological attention. Based on the experience from UTSF, a new facility viz. Power Reactor Thoria Reprocessing Facility (PRTRF), Trombay was built which was hot commissioned in the year 2015

  17. 8. High power laser and ignition facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramian, A.J.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.

    2002-01-01

    This document gives a review of the various high power laser projects and ignition facilities in the world: the Mercury laser system and Electra (Usa), the krypton fluoride (KrF) laser and the HALNA (high average power laser for nuclear-fusion application) project (Japan), the Shenguang series, the Xingguang facility and the TIL (technical integration line) facility (China), the Vulcan peta-watt interaction facility (UK), the Megajoule project and its feasibility phase: the LIL (laser integration line) facility (France), the Asterix IV/PALS high power laser facility (Czech Republic), and the Phelix project (Germany). In Japan the 100 TW Petawatt Module Laser, constructed in 1997, is being upgraded to the world biggest peta-watt laser. Experiments have been performed with single-pulse large aperture e-beam-pumped Garpun (Russia) and with high-current-density El-1 KrF laser installation (Russia) to investigate Al-Be foil transmittance and stability to multiple e-beam irradiations. An article is dedicated to a comparison of debris shield impacts for 2 experiments at NIF (national ignition facility). (A.C.)

  18. Space Power Facility (SPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Power Facility (SPF) houses the world's largest space environment simulation chamber, measuring 100 ft. in diameter by 122 ft. high. In this chamber, large...

  19. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yoon W; Campisi, Isidoro E; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark; Davis, Kirk; Drury, Michael A; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; McCarthy, Michael P; Powers, Tom; Shajedul Hasan, S M; Stirbet, Mircea; Stout, Daniel; Tang, Johnny Y; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V; Wezensky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavitites have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducti...

  20. 44 CFR 331.5 - Production facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Production facilities. 331.5... AND FACILITIES IN LABOR SURPLUS AREAS § 331.5 Production facilities. All Federal departments and... production facilities, including expansion, to the extent that such selection is consistent with existing law...

  1. New facility for testing LHC HTS power leads

    CERN Document Server

    Rabehl, Roger Jon; Fehér, S; Huang, Y; Orris, D; Pischalnikov, Y; Sylvester, C D; Tartaglia, M

    2005-01-01

    A new facility for testing HTS power leads at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has been designed and operated. The facility has successfully tested 19 pairs of HTS power leads, which are to be integrated into the Large Hadron Collider Interaction Region cryogenic feed boxes. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. HTS power lead test results from the commissioning phase of the project are also presented.

  2. Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility; 1988 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, James M.; Olson, Todd

    1989-05-01

    This fiscal year 1988 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates an existing, small-scale salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop County Economic Development Committee's Fisheries Project.

  3. Power facility plan and power supply plan of Japan in 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Shoji; Makino, Masao

    1988-06-01

    The power facility plan and the power supply plan for 1988 are described. The demand by non-industrial use will grow at an average of 3.8% for the 1986-97 period due to changes in the life style, construction and extension of buildings and increasing use of OA equipment although the power conservation is promoted. The industrial consumption will increase at only 1.2% a year due to the slowed growth and energy saving. As a result, the total demand will be 778,200 million kWh in 1997 with annual growth of 2.4%. The maximum demand will be 151,210 kW in 1997 with annual growth of 2.9%. The annual load rate will decrease to 56.9%, showing a continuously worsening utilization efficiency of power facilities. The development of 29 power units with total capacity of 2,760 MW is planned in 1988 for a stable power supply with a sufficient margin regarding maximum demand. The plan requires the investment of 3,700 billion yen, including the power transmission systems and substations. The power supply plan in 1988 is aimed at the effective operation of facilities and cost reduction by regional management under proper recognition of local characteristics of each power source, while maintaining a stable power supply with specified margins. (1 fig, 11 tabs)

  4. Lewis Research Center space station electric power system test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Martin, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center facilities were developed to support testing of the Space Station Electric Power System. The capabilities and plans for these facilities are described. The three facilities which are required in the Phase C/D testing, the Power Systems Facility, the Space Power Facility, and the EPS Simulation Lab, are described in detail. The responsibilities of NASA Lewis and outside groups in conducting tests are also discussed.

  5. Backup power sources for DOE facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This standard establishes fundamental requirements and guidance for backup power sources at DOE facilities. Purpose is to document good engineering practices for installation, testing, and maintenance of these backup power sources, which also covers emergency power sources. Examples are those which supply power to nuclear safety systems, radiation monitors and alarms, fire protection systems, security systems, and emergency lighting.

  6. Integrated biofuel facility, with carbon dioxide consumption and power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, E.E.; Hill, G.A. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This presentation provided details of an economical design for a large-scale integrated biofuel facility for coupled production of bioethanol and biodiesel, with carbon dioxide capture and power generation. Several designs were suggested for both batch and continuous culture operations, taking into account all costs and revenues associated with the complete plant integration. The microalgae species Chlorella vulgaris was cultivated in a novel photobioreactor (PBR) in order to consume industrial carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This photosynthetic culture can also act as a biocathode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC), which when coupled to a typical yeast anodic half cell, results in a complete biological MFC. The photosynthetic MFC produces electricity as well as valuable biomass and by-products. The use of this novel photosynthetic microalgae cathodic half cell in an integrated biofuel facility was discussed. A series of novel PBRs for continuous operation can be integrated into a large-scale bioethanol facility, where the PBRs serve as cathodic half cells and are coupled to the existing yeast fermentation tanks which act as anodic half cells. These coupled MFCs generate electricity for use within the biofuel facility. The microalgae growth provides oil for biodiesel production, in addition to the bioethanol from the yeast fermentation. The photosynthetic cultivation in the cathodic PBR also requires carbon dioxide, resulting in consumption of carbon dioxide from bioethanol production. The paper also discussed the effect of plant design on net present worth and internal rate of return. tabs., figs.

  7. Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Power Systems Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, Cindy H.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides a detailed description of the Johnson Space Center's Power Systems Facility located in the Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Facilities and the resources used to support power and battery systems testing are also shown. The contents include: 1) Power Testing; 2) Power Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 3) Source/Load; 4) Battery Facilities; 5) Battery Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 6) Battery Testing; 7) Performance Test Equipment; 8) Battery Test Environments; 9) Battery Abuse Chambers; 10) Battery Abuse Capabilities; and 11) Battery Test Area Resources.

  8. Feasibility Investigation for a Solar Power Generation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Lakshmi

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 states that by fiscal year 2013, at least 7.5% of the energy consumed by the government must be renewable energy. In an effort to help meet this goal, Johnson Space Center (JSC) is considering installing a solar power generation facility. The purpose of this project is to conduct a feasibility investigation for such a facility. Because Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a solar power generation facility, the first step in this investigation is to learn about KSC's facility and obtain information on how it was constructed. After collecting this information, the following must be determined: the amount of power desired, the size of the facility, potential locations for it, and estimated construction and maintenance costs. Contacts with JSC's energy provider must also be established to determine if a partnership would be agreeable to both parties. Lastly, all of this data must be analyzed to decide whether or not JSC should construct the facility. The results from analyzing the data collected indicate that a 200 kW facility would provide enough energy to meet 1% of JSC's energy demand. This facility would require less than 1 acre of land. In the map below, potential locations are shown in green. The solar power facility is projected to cost $2 M. So far, the information collected indicates that such a facility could be constructed. The next steps in this investigation include contacting JSC's energy provider, CenterPoint Energy, to discuss entering a partnership; developing a life cycle cost analysis to determine payback time; developing more detailed plans; and securing funding.

  9. Production LHC HTS power lead test results

    CERN Document Server

    Tartaglia, M; Fehér, S; Huang, Y; Orris, D F; Pischalnikov, Y; Rabehl, Roger Jon; Sylvester, C D; Zbasnik, J

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Magnet test facility has built and operated a test stand to characterize the performance of HTS power leads. We report here the results of production tests of 20 pairs of 7.5 kA HTS power leads manufactured by industry for installation in feed boxes for the LHC Interaction Region quadrupole strings. Included are discussions of the thermal, electrical, and quench characteristics under "standard" and "extreme" operating conditions, and the stability of performance across thermal cycles.

  10. Production LHC HTS power lead test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Carcagno, R.H.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Rabehl, R.J.; Sylvester, C.; Zbasnik, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Fermilab Magnet test facility has built and operated a test stand to characterize the performance of HTS power leads. We report here the results of production tests of 20 pairs of 7.5 kA HTS power leads manufactured by industry for installation in feed boxes for the LHC Interaction Region quadrupole strings. Included are discussions of the thermal, electrical, and quench characteristics under ''standard'' and ''extreme'' operating conditions, and the stability of performance across thermal cycles

  11. Pinellas Plant facts. [Products, processes, laboratory facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    This plant was built in 1956 in response to a need for the manufacture of neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology: hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials: plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at the Pinellas Plant has led directly to the assignment of the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator draw on the materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life. A product development and production capability in alumina ceramics, cermet (electrical) feedthroughs, and glass ceramics has become a specialty of the plant; the laboratories monitor the materials and processes used by the plant's commercial suppliers of ferroelectric ceramics. In addition to the manufacturing facility, a production development capability is maintained at the Pinellas Plant.

  12. Preliminary design of a production automation framework for a pyroprocessing facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonsoo Shin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyroprocessing technology has been regarded as a promising solution for recycling spent fuel in nuclear power plants. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been studying the current status of equipment and facilities for pyroprocessing and found that existing facilities are manually operated; therefore, their applications have been limited to laboratory scale because of low productivity and safety concerns. To extend the pyroprocessing technology to a commercial scale, the facility, including all the processing equipment and the material-handling devices, should be enhanced in view of automation. In an automated pyroprocessing facility, a supervised control system is needed to handle and manage material flow and associated operations. This article provides a preliminary design of the supervising system for pyroprocessing. In particular, a manufacturing execution system intended for an automated pyroprocessing facility, named Pyroprocessing Execution System, is proposed, by which the overall production process is automated via systematic collaboration with a planning system and a control system. Moreover, a simulation-based prototype system is presented to illustrate the operability of the proposed Pyroprocessing Execution System, and a simulation study to demonstrate the interoperability of the material-handling equipment with processing equipment is also provided. Keywords: Manufacturing Execution System, Material-handling, Production Automation, Production Planning and Control, Pyroprocessing, Pyroprocessing Execution System

  13. Lessons learned: the effect of increased production rate on operation and maintenance of OPG's Western Used Fuel Dry Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, L.; Smith, N. [Ontario Power Generation, Tiverton, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In 2010, the Western Used Fuel Dry Storage Facility (WUFDSF) located at Ontario Power Generation's (OPG's) Western Waste Management Facility in Tiverton, ON, transferred, processed and stored a record-high number of Dry Storage Containers (DSC's) from Bruce Power's nuclear generating stations. The WUFDSF has been in operation since 2002. The facility transfers, processes, and stores the used fuel from the Bruce Power generating stations located in Tiverton, Ontario. As per a contractual agreement between OPG and Bruce Power, an annual DSC production and transfer schedule is agreed to between the two parties. In 2010, an increased annual production rate of 130 DSC's was agreed to between OPG and Bruce Power. Throughout 2007, 2008 and 2009, several facility modifications had been completed in anticipation of the increased production rate. These modifications included: Installation and commissioning of a second set of welding consoles; Addition of a second vacuum drying system; Procurement of a second transfer vehicle; and, Installation of a bulk gas system for welding cover gas. In 2010, the increased production rate of 130 DSC's/year came into effect. Throughout 2010, significant lessons learned were gained related to the impact of such a high production rate on the operation and maintenance of the facility. This paper presents the challenges and successes of that operation. The facility successfully achieved its production target with no safety incidents. This high rate of production is planned to continue for several years at the facility. Some challenges continue and these are being assessed and incorporated into the facility's business plan. In order to continue being successful, the facility must look to the future for opportunities for improvement and efficiencies to be gained. (author)

  14. Lessons learned: the effect of increased production rate on operation and maintenance of OPG's Western Used Fuel Dry Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, L.; Smith, N.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the Western Used Fuel Dry Storage Facility (WUFDSF) located at Ontario Power Generation's (OPG's) Western Waste Management Facility in Tiverton, ON, transferred, processed and stored a record-high number of Dry Storage Containers (DSC's) from Bruce Power's nuclear generating stations. The WUFDSF has been in operation since 2002. The facility transfers, processes, and stores the used fuel from the Bruce Power generating stations located in Tiverton, Ontario. As per a contractual agreement between OPG and Bruce Power, an annual DSC production and transfer schedule is agreed to between the two parties. In 2010, an increased annual production rate of 130 DSC's was agreed to between OPG and Bruce Power. Throughout 2007, 2008 and 2009, several facility modifications had been completed in anticipation of the increased production rate. These modifications included: Installation and commissioning of a second set of welding consoles; Addition of a second vacuum drying system; Procurement of a second transfer vehicle; and, Installation of a bulk gas system for welding cover gas. In 2010, the increased production rate of 130 DSC's/year came into effect. Throughout 2010, significant lessons learned were gained related to the impact of such a high production rate on the operation and maintenance of the facility. This paper presents the challenges and successes of that operation. The facility successfully achieved its production target with no safety incidents. This high rate of production is planned to continue for several years at the facility. Some challenges continue and these are being assessed and incorporated into the facility's business plan. In order to continue being successful, the facility must look to the future for opportunities for improvement and efficiencies to be gained. (author)

  15. Outline of electric power facility plan in fiscal year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    As to the electric power facility plan in fiscal year 1988, 15 designated electric power enterprises made the notification to the Minister of International Trade and Industry in March, 1988. This outline of the facility plan summarized the plans of 66 enterprises in total, including the plans of municipally operated, joint thermal power and other enterprises in addition to the above 15. In order to ensure the stable supply of electric power, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry considers that it is indispensable to purposefully develop electric power sources and the facilities for distribution along this facility plan. The forecast for fiscal year 1997 is : total electric power demand 778.2 billion kWh, maximum power demand 151.21 million kW, and yearly load factor 56.9 %. This is equivalent to the yearly growth of 2.4 %. In fiscal year 1988, it is planned to present 29 plants of 2760 MW to the Power Source Development Coordination Council. The breakdown is : hydroelectricity 140 MW, thermal power 2010 MW, and nuclear power 610 MW. The Ministry guides electric power enterprises so as to realize the diversification of electric power sources. Also the increase of transmission and transformation facilities, the plan of equipment investment and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  16. Calculations of high-power production target and beamdump for the GSI future Super-FRS for a fast extraction scheme at the FAIR Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N A; Weick, H; Iwase, H

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting fragment separator (Super-FRS) is being designed for the production and separation of radioactive isotopes at the future FAIR (Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research) facility at Darmstadt. This paper discusses various aspects and requirements for the high-power production target that will be used in the Super-FRS experiments. The production target must survive over an extended period of time as it will be used during the course of many experiments. The specific power deposited by the high intensity beam that will be generated at the future FAIR facility will be high enough to destroy the target in most of the cases as a result of a single shot from the new heavy ion synchrotrons SIS100/300. By using an appropriate beam intensity and focal spot parameters, the target would survive after being irradiated once. However, the heat should be dissipated efficiently before the same target area is irradiated again. We have considered a wheel shaped solid carbon target that rotates around its axis so that different areas of the target are irradiated successively. This allows for cooling of the beam heated region by thermal conduction before the same part of the target is irradiated a second time. Another attractive option is to use a liquid jet target at the Super-FRS. First calculations of a possible liquid lithium target are also presented in this paper. One of the advantages of using lithium as a target is that it will survive even if one uses a smaller focal spot, which has half the area of that used for a solid carbon target. This will significantly improve the isotope resolution. A similar problem associated with these experiments will be safe deposition of the beam energy in a beamdump after its interaction with the production target. We also present calculations to study the suitability of a proposed beamdump

  17. Operation reliability analysis of independent power plants of gas-transmission system distant production facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Maksim V.; Voytkov, Ivan S.; Vysokomornaya, Olga V.; Vysokomorny, Vladimir S.

    2015-01-01

    The new approach was developed to analyze the failure causes in operation of linear facilities independent power supply sources (mini-CHP-plants) of gas-transmission system in Eastern part of Russia. Triggering conditions of ceiling operation substance temperature at condenser output were determined with mathematical simulation use of unsteady heat and mass transfer processes in condenser of mini-CHP-plants. Under these conditions the failure probability in operation of independent power supply sources is increased. Influence of environmental factors (in particular, ambient temperature) as well as output electric capability values of power plant on mini-CHP-plant operation reliability was analyzed. Values of mean time to failure and power plant failure density during operation in different regions of Eastern Siberia and Far East of Russia were received with use of numerical simulation results of heat and mass transfer processes at operation substance condensation.

  18. Power Systems Integration Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    | NREL Power Systems Integration Laboratory Power Systems Integration Laboratory Research in the Energy System Integration Facility's Power Systems Integration Laboratory focuses on the microgrid applications. Photo of engineers testing an inverter in the Power Systems Integration Laboratory

  19. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  20. Deployment of Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility with the Introduction of Nuclear Power Plants in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadrack, Antoony; Kim, Changlak [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Uljin (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear power program will inevitably generate radioactive wastes including low-and intermediate radioactive waste and spent fuel. These wastes are hazardous to human health and the environment and therefore, a reliable radioactive waste disposal facility becomes a necessity. This paper describes Kenya's basic plans for the disposal of radioactive wastes expected from the nuclear program. This plan is important as an initial implementation of a national Low to intermediate level wastes storage facility in Kenya. In Kenya, radioactive waste is generated from the use of radioactive materials in medicine, industry, education and research and development. Future radioactive waste is expected to arise from nuclear reactors, oil exploration, radioisotope and fuel production, and research reactors as shown in table 1. The best strategy is to store the LILW and spent fuel temporarily within reactor sites pending construction of a centralized interim storage facility or final disposal facility. The best philosophy is to introduce both repository and nuclear power programs concurrently. Research and development on volume reduction technology and conceptual design of disposal facility of LILW should be pursued. Safe management of radioactive waste is a national responsibility for sustainable generation of nuclear power. The republic of Kenya is set to become the second African nuclear power generation country after South Africa.

  1. Measurements of nuclear data and possibility to construct the nuclear data production facility based on electron linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Won; Ko, In Soo; Cho, Moo Hyun; Kim, Gui Nyun; Lee, Young Seok; Kang, Heung Sik [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang(Korea)

    2001-04-01

    In order to construct an infrastructure to produce nuclear data, we studied three main items; (1) Study on the possibility to construct a facility for nuclear data production, (2) Production of nuclear data for nuclear power plant, and (3) Pulsed neutron source based on a 100-MeV electron linac at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). We confirmed the possibility to build a nuclear data production facility utilizing a 100-MeV electron linac at PAL and manpower who wanted to participate the nuclear data production experiments. In order to measure the nuclear data for nuclear power plant, we used several nuclear data production facilities in abroad. We measured total cross sections and neutron caprure cross sections for {sup nat}Dy and {sup nat}Hf using the pulsed neutron facility in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI). The neutron capture cross sections for {sup 161,162,163,164}Dy were measured at KURRI in the neutron energy region between 0.001 eV and several tens keV, and at the fast neutron facility in Tokyo Institute of Technology in the neutron energy region between 10 keV and 100 keV. We also measured the neutron capture cross sections and gamma multiplicity of {sup 232}Th at the IBR30 in Dubna, Russia. We have construct a pulsed neutron source using a 100-MeV electron linac at PAL. We measured neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectra in order to check the characteristics of the pulsed neutron source. We also measured a neutron total cross sections of W and Cu. The pulsed neutron facility can be utilized in the education facility for nuclear data production and the test facility for the R and D purpose of the nuclear data production facility. 29 refs., 57 figs., 22 tabs. (Author)

  2. Comparison of tritium production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Kaihui; Huang Jinhua

    2002-01-01

    Detailed investigation and research on the source of tritium, tritium production facilities and their comparison are presented based on the basic information about tritium. The characteristics of three types of proposed tritium production facilities, i.e., fissile type, accelerator production tritium (APT) and fusion type, are presented. APT shows many advantages except its rather high cost; fusion reactors appear to offer improved safety and environmental impacts, in particular, tritium production based on the fusion-based neutron source costs much lower and directly helps the development of fusion energy source

  3. Prospects for high-power radioactive beam facilities worldwide

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, Jerry A

    2003-01-01

    Advances in accelerators, targets, ion sources, and experimental instrumentation are making possible ever more powerful facilities for basic and applied research with short-lived radioactive isotopes. There are several current generation facilities, based on a variety of technologies, operating worldwide. These include, for example, those based on the in-flight method such as the recently upgraded National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, the facility at RIKEN in Japan, GANIL in Caen, France, and GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. Present facilities based on the Isotope-Separator On-Line method include, for example, the ISOLDE laboratory at CERN, HRIBF at Oak Ridge, and the new high-power facility ISAC at TRIUMF in Vancouver. Next-generation facilities include the Radioactive-Ion Factory upgrade of RIKEN to higher energy and intensity and the upgrade of ISAC to a higher energy secondary beam; both of these projects are in progress. A new project, LINAG, to upgrade the capabilities at...

  4. Power technology complex for production of motor fuel from brown coals with power supply from NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyanov, M.F.; Poplavskij, V.M.; Sidorov, G.I.; Bondarenko, A.V.; Chebeskov, A.N.; Chushkin, V.N.; Karabash, A.A.; Krichko, A.A.; Maloletnev, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    With the present-day challenge of efficient use of low-grade coals and current restructuring of coal industry in the Russian Federation, it is urgent to organise the motor fuel production by the synthesis from low grade coals and heavy petroleum residues. With this objective in view, the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering of RF Minatom and Combustible Resources Institute of RF Mintopenergo proposed a project of a standard nuclear power technology complex for synthetic liquid fuel (SLF) production using fast neutron reactors for power supply. The proposed project has two main objectives: (1) Engineering and economical optimization of the nuclear power supply for SLF production; and (2) Engineering and economical optimization of the SLF production by hydrogenisation of brown coals and heavy petroleum residues with a complex development of advanced coal chemistry. As a first approach, a scheme is proposed with the use of existing reactor cooling equipment, in particular, steam generators of BN-600, limiting the effect on safety of reactor facility operation at minimum in case of deviations and abnormalities in the operation of technological complex. The possibility to exclude additional requirements to the equipment for nuclear facility cooling was also taken into account. It was proposed to use an intermediate steam-water circuit between the secondary circuit sodium and the coolant to heat the technological equipment. The only change required for the BN-600 equipment will be the replacement of sections of intermediate steam superheaters at the section of main steam superheaters. The economic aspects of synthetic motor fuel production proposed by the joint project depend on the evaluation of integral balances: thermal power engineering, chemical technology, the development of advanced large scale coal chemistry of high profitability; utilisation of ash and precious microelements in waste-free technology; production of valuable isotopes; radical solution of

  5. Effective use of electric power facilities and promotion of energy conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumitsu, Iwao

    1999-01-01

    The capacity of Japan's commercial electric power facilities has been increased to more than 200 million kw. In order to provide a stable supply of electric power to meet constantly fluctuaring electric power demands, Japan's power plants generate electricity using an optimal combination of facilities, with nuclear power and coal-fired thermoelectric power providing the base load supply. In the use of electric power, moreover, measures are being implemented to reduce generation costs, conserve energy, and cut carbon dioxide emissions by reducing maximum output and equalizing the load. This report presents information concerning measures for improving the efficiency of electric power facilities operation, equalizing the load and promoting energy conservation. (author)

  6. Summarisation of construction and commissioning experience for nuclear power integrated test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zejun; Jia Dounan; Jiang Xulun; Chen Bingde

    2003-01-01

    Since the foundation of Nuclear Power Institute of China, it has successively designed various engineering experimental facilities, and constructed nuclear power experimental research base, and accumulated rich construction experiences of nuclear power integrated test facility. The author presents experience on design, construction and commissioning of nuclear power integrated test facility

  7. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year

  8. HUMPF [Heterogeneous Unix Montecarlo Production Facility] users guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, P.; Edgecock, R.; Fisher, S.M.; Gee, C.N.P.; Gordon, J.C.; Kidd, T.; Leake, J.; Rigby, D.J.; Roberts, J.H.C.

    1992-11-01

    The Heterogenous Unix Monte Carlo Production Facility (HUMPF) simplifies the running of particle physics simulation programs on Unix workstations. Monte Carlo is the largest consumer of IBM (CPU) capacity within the Atlas centre at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). It is likely that the future computing requirements of the LEP and HERA experiments cannot be satisfied by the IBM 3090 system. HUMPF adds extra capacity, and can be expanded with minimal effort. Monte Carlo programs are CPU-bound, and make little use of the vector or the input/output capacity of the IBM 3090. Such programs are therefore excellent candidates to use the spare capacity of powerful workstations. The main data storage is still handled centrally by the IBM 3090 and its peripherals. The HUMPF facility is suitable for any program with a similar profile. (author)

  9. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99 Mo is the parent isotope of 99m Tc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  10. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99Mo is the parent isotope of 99mTc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  11. ACIGA's high optical power test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, L; Aoun, M; Barriga, P

    2004-01-01

    Advanced laser interferometer detectors utilizing more than 100 W of laser power and with ∼10 6 W circulating laser power present many technological problems. The Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy (ACIGA) is developing a high power research facility in Gingin, north of Perth, Western Australia, which will test techniques for the next generation interferometers. In particular it will test thermal lensing compensation and control strategies for optical cavities in which optical spring effects and parametric instabilities may present major difficulties

  12. Report of third regular inspection of Tokai reprocessing facilities, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The reprocessing facilities passed the inspection before use on December 25, 1980, and started the full operation. Since then, this is the third regular inspection. It was begun on April 1, 1986, and finished on August 18, 1986, with the inspection of the rate of recovery of products. The reprocessing facilities which became the object of inspection were the facilities for accepting and storing spent fuel, the reprocessing facilities proper (the facilities of shearing, dissolution, separation, refining, denitration and recovery of acid and solvent), the facilities for storing products, measurement and control system, radioactive waste facilities, radiation control facilities and attached facilities (power, water, steam and testing). The main works carried out during the period of this regular inspection were the repair of an enriched uranium dissolution tank by welding, the renewal of a piping for a low activity waste liquid storing tank, and the removal of a washing tank. The total exposure dose in the first half of fiscal year 1986 was about 30.81 man-rem. (Kako, I.)

  13. On-site electric power source facility for Japanese nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohara, T.

    1986-01-01

    Trends of construction of nuclear power plants in Japan, occurrence rate of incidents/failures of electric facilities, major example of incidents/failures, their countermeasure to prevent recurrence are introduced. Furthermore, safety administration system of the Government, electric utilities and manufacturers, and various countermeasures to prevent incident/ failure of electrical facilities from the hardware and software sides are discussed. (author)

  14. On-site electric power source facility for Japanese nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oohara, T. [Incident/Failure Analysis and Evaluation Office, Nuclear Power Safety Information Research Centre, Nuclear Power Engineering Test Centre, 2nd Floor, Shuwa-Kamiyacho Bldg., 3-13, 4-Chome, Toranomon Minato-ku, Tokyo 105 (Japan)

    1986-02-15

    Trends of construction of nuclear power plants in Japan, occurrence rate of incidents/failures of electric facilities, major example of incidents/failures, their countermeasure to prevent recurrence are introduced. Furthermore, safety administration system of the Government, electric utilities and manufacturers, and various countermeasures to prevent incident/ failure of electrical facilities from the hardware and software sides are discussed. (author)

  15. Optimised deployment of hydro-power generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werlen, K.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how the opening-up of the European electricity market has led to the creation of more room for manoeuvre in the deployment of the generation capacity of dam and pumped-storage-based hydropower facilities and low-head power stations. Software tools for the optimisation of the operation of power generation facilities that can take care of complex hydraulic interdependencies are described. The use of the software for the assessment of new installations being planned or of older installations being extended is examined. The influence of climatic conditions, market prices for power, the general requirements placed on the system and other influences on financial gain are looked at. The article makes recommendations on those factors influencing the design of the software and for its optimal use in practice

  16. Large power supply facilities for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Akira; Yamamoto, Mitsuyoshi.

    1976-01-01

    The authors had opportunities to manufacture and to operate two power supply facilities, that is, 125MVA computer controlled AC generator with a fly wheel for JIPP-T-2 stellerator in Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University and 3MW trial superconductive homopolar DC generator to the Japan Society for Promotion of Machine Industry. The 125MVA fly-wheel generator can feed both 60MW (6kV x 10kA) DC power for toroidal coils and 20MW (0.5kV x 40kA) DC power for helical coils. The characteristic features are possibility of Bung-Bung control based on Pontrjagin's maximum principle, constant current control or constant voltage control for load coils, and cpu control for routine operation. The 3MW (150V-20000A) homopolar generator is the largest in the world as superconductive one, however, this capacity is not enough for nuclear fusion research. The problems of power supply facilities for large Tokamak devices are discussed

  17. Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) facility specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    General requirements for the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS)/Ground Demonstration System (GDS) assembly and test facility are defined. The facility will include provisions for a complete test laboratory for GDS checkout, performance, and endurance testing, and a contamination-controlled area for assembly, fabrication, storage, and storage preparation of GDS components. Specifications, schedules, and drawings are included

  18. Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) facility specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-31

    General requirements for the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS)/Ground Demonstration System (GDS) assembly and test facility are defined. The facility will include provisions for a complete test laboratory for GDS checkout, performance, and endurance testing, and a contamination-controlled area for assembly, fabrication, storage, and storage preparation of GDS components. Specifications, schedules, and drawings are included.

  19. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

  20. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV CO interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads

  1. Radiation protection programme for a radioisotope production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makgato, Thutu Nelson

    2015-02-01

    The present project reviews reactor based radioisotope production facilities. An overview of techniques and methodologies used as well as laboratory facilities necessary for the production process are discussed. Specific details of reactor based production and processing of more commonly used industrial and pharmaceutical radioisotopes are provided. Ultimately, based on facilities and techniques utilized as well as the associated hazard assessment, a proposed radiation protection programme is discussed. Elements of the radiation protection programme will also consider lessons from recent incidents and accidents encountered in radioisotope production facilities. (au)

  2. No nuclear power. No disposal facility?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinhals, J. [DMT GmbH und Co.KG, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Countries with a nuclear power programme are making strong efforts to guarantee the safe disposal of radioactive waste. The solutions in those countries are large disposal facilities near surface or in deep geological layers depending on the activity and half-life of the nuclides in the waste. But what will happen with the radioactive waste in countries that do not have NPPs but have only low amounts of radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities as well as from research reactors? Countries producing only low amounts of radioactive waste need convincing solutions for the safe and affordable disposal of their radioactive waste. As they do not have a fund by an operator of nuclear power plants, those countries need an appropriate and commensurate solution for the disposal of their waste. In a first overview five solutions seem to be appropriate: (i) the development of multinational disposal facilities by using the existing international knowhow; (ii) common disposal with hazardous waste; (iii) permanent storage; (iv) use of an existing mine or tunnel; (v) extension of the borehole disposal concept for all the categories of radioactive wastes.

  3. Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage test series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.; Osetek, D.J.; Ploger, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) tests planned for the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are described. Bundles containing 32 zircaloy-clad, PWR-type fuel rods will be subjected to severe overheating transients in a high-pressure, superheated-steam environment. Cladding temperatures are expected to reach 2400 0 K, resulting in cladding ballooning and rupture, severe cladding oxidation, cladding melting, fuel dissolution, fuel rod fragmentation, and possibly, rubble bed formation. An experiment effluent collection system is being installed and the PBF fission product monitoring system is being upgraded to meet the special requirements of the SFD tests. Scoping calculations were performed to evaluate performance of the SFD test design and to establish operational requirements for the PBF loop

  4. Utilizing Solar Power Technologies for On-Orbit Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, John C.; Howell, Joe T.; Henley, Mark W.

    2006-01-01

    The cost of access to space beyond low Earth orbit may be reduced if vehicles can refuel in orbit. The cost of access to low Earth orbit may also be reduced by launching oxygen and hydrogen propellants in the form of water. To achieve this reduction in costs of access to low Earth orbit and beyond, a propellant depot is considered that electrolyzes water in orbit, then condenses and stores cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen. Power requirements for such a depot require Solar Power Satellite technologies. A propellant depot utilizing solar power technologies is discussed in this paper. The depot will be deployed in a 400 km circular equatorial orbit. It receives tanks of water launched into a lower orbit from Earth, converts the water to liquid hydrogen and oxygen, and stores up to 500 metric tons of cryogenic propellants. This requires a power system that is comparable to a large Solar Power Satellite capable of several 100 kW of energy. Power is supplied by a pair of solar arrays mounted perpendicular to the orbital plane, which rotates once per orbit to track the Sun. The majority of the power is used to run the electrolysis system. Thermal control is maintained by body-mounted radiators; these also provide some shielding against orbital debris. The propellant stored in the depot can support transportation from low Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit, the Moon, LaGrange points, Mars, etc. Emphasis is placed on the Water-Ice to Cryogen propellant production facility. A very high power system is required for cracking (electrolyzing) the water and condensing and refrigerating the resulting oxygen and hydrogen. For a propellant production rate of 500 metric tons (1,100,000 pounds) per year, an average electrical power supply of 100 s of kW is required. To make the most efficient use of space solar power, electrolysis is performed only during the portion of the orbit that the Depot is in sunlight, so roughly twice this power level is needed for operations in sunlight

  5. Consequences of reduced production of electricity in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Power Administration has assessed the possibilities of expanding electric power sources other than nuclear power plants for the years 1980 and 1985. Reports on costs in the form of loss of capital and increased operating costs involved in the dismantling of nuclear power plants are made in Supplement 1. The economics division of the Finance Department, starting with a long-range study model of the Swedish economy, has calculated the consequences of a cutback in electric power up to 1980 for Sweden's economy and employment in that year. The consequences of reduction of electricity supplies up to 1985 are summarized in Supplement 2 in this report. It is concluded that in order to be able to manage the problem of supplying electricity by 1985, it will be necessary to increase oil power above what was assumed in the energy policy program. There will have to be new oil-based power as well. According to the Power Administration, oil-power facilities can be expanded to varying degrees, depending upon when the decision is made. The Power Administration's calculations show that 125 TWh is possible in 1985 without nuclear power only if a decision for discontinuation is made in the fall of 1976. This is based on very optimistic assumptions about the time of execution of a program for oil-steam operation, and also on the assumption that extreme measures will be initiated to force expansion of both district-heating distribution and power + heat facilities. Oil consumption for production of electricity in such an electric power system would be about 9 million m 3 , which is about 5 times more than at present and about one-third of the present total consumption of petroleum products in Sweden

  6. Development of the power ramping facility at JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hirokatsu; Sezaki, Katsuji; Nakazaki, Chosaburo; Ishii, Tadahiko; Ito, Haruhiko; Abe, Hiroshi

    1985-03-01

    The LWR fuel power ramping facility have been being developed at JMTR since 1978. This report, following previous reports, JAERI-M 8533 and 9343, summarizes the results of performance test performed in 1981 on the 3 He power controlled boiling water capsule, which is a basic part of the facility. Various measurements were carried out during reactor operation on each part of the capsule, i.e. capsule itself, capsule control unit and 3 He power control unit, after a long-time cold run test of the units. Through the test, it was confirmed that the capsule satisfies the specifications which stated that LWR fuel pin should be power-ramped under BWR conditions up to 50 kW/m with a change factor of more than 2, and that the control units operate in a good condition. (author)

  7. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  8. The enforcement order for the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This rule is established under the provisions of the law for the redevelopment of the surrounding areas of power generating facilities. Persons who install power generating facilities under the law include general electric power enterprises and wholesale electric power enterprises defined under the electric enterprises act and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The scale of these facilities defined under the law is 350,000 kilo-watts output for atomic and thermal power generating facilities, 10,000 kilo-watts output for the facilities utilizing geothermal energy, 100,000 kilo-watts output for facilities whose main fuel is coal, and 1,000 kilo-watts output for hydraulic power generating facilities, etc. The facilities closely related to atomic power generation include the reprocessing and examination facilities of fuel materials spent in atomic power reactors, the reactors installed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute for studying on the safety of atomic power reactors, the experimental fast reactors and the uranium enrichment facilities established by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The public facilities in this rule are those for communication, sport and recreation, environment hygiene, education and culture, medicine, social welfare, fire fighting, etc. Governors of prefectures who intend to get approval under the law shall file redevelopment plans to the competent minister through the Minister of the International Trade and Industry. (Okada, K.)

  9. Conditioning and handling of tritiated wastes at Canadian nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krochmalnek, L.S.; Krasznai, J.P.; Carney, M.

    1987-04-01

    Ontario Hydro operates a 10,000 MW capacity nuclear power system utilizing the CANDU pressurized heavy water reactor design. The use of D 2 O as moderator and coolant results in the production of about 2400 Ci of tritium per MWe-yr. As a result, there is significant Canadian experience in the treatment, handling, transport and storage of tritiated wastes. Ontario Hydro operates its own reactor waste storage site which includes systems for volume reduction, immobilization and packaging of wastes. In addition, a facility to remove tritium from heavy water is presently being commissioned at the Darlington nuclear site. This facility will generate tritiated liquid and solid waste that will have to be properly conditioned prior to storage or disposal. The nature of these various wastes and the processes/packaging required to meet storage/disposal criteria are judged to have relevance to investigations in fusion facility waste arisings. Experience to date, planned operational procedures and ongoing R and D in this area are described

  10. Fuel Processing Plants - ETHANOL_PRODUCTION_FACILITIES_IN: Ethanol Production Facilities in Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — This GIS layer shows the locations of ethanol production facilities in the state of Indiana. Attributes include the name and address of the facility, and information...

  11. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains data on power plants, based on the Energy Information Administration's EIA-860 dataset and supplemented with data from EPA's Facility...

  12. Development of the Ukrainian power sector taking into account the environmental impact of power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyakova, E.; Krymskaya, L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the following problems: Evaluation of total environmental impacts from all kinds of power plants on the whole territory of Ukraine; evaluation of environmental impacts in selected regions due to uneven power facilities distribution. Analysis of the environmental situation in Ukraine was conducted using the IMPACTS module of the ENPEP package with account to the Ukrainian energy requirements in perspective. Some recommendations concerning the development of power facilities and reduction of air emissions are also given. (author). 7 figs, 5 tabs

  13. Development of the Ukrainian power sector taking into account the environmental impact of power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyakova, E; Krymskaya, L [Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Science, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-09-01

    This paper concentrates on the following problems: Evaluation of total environmental impacts from all kinds of power plants on the whole territory of Ukraine; evaluation of environmental impacts in selected regions due to uneven power facilities distribution. Analysis of the environmental situation in Ukraine was conducted using the IMPACTS module of the ENPEP package with account to the Ukrainian energy requirements in perspective. Some recommendations concerning the development of power facilities and reduction of air emissions are also given. (author). 7 figs, 5 tabs.

  14. Production capacity of equipment for medium and large hydroelectric power plant in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Shenyang [Ministry of Electric Power, Beijing (China). Bureau of Electric Power Machinery

    1995-07-01

    This document presents an overview on the production capacity of equipment for medium and large hydroelectric power plant in China. The document approaches general aspects, production capability and testing facilities related to Francis, Kaplan, tubular and impulse hydroelectric generating sets, and the introduction of main manufacturers as well.

  15. Using sound to modify fish behavior at power-production and water-control facilities: A workshop. Phase 2: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, T.J.; Popper, A.N.

    1997-06-01

    A workshop on ''''Use of Sound for Fish Protection at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities'''' was held in Portland, Oregon on December 12--13, 1995. This workshop convened a 22-member panel of international experts from universities, industry, and government to share knowledge, questions, and ideas about using sound for fish guidance. Discussions involved in a broad range of indigenous migratory and resident fish species and fish-protection issues in river systems, with particular focus on the Columbia River Basin. Because the use of sound behavioral barriers for fish is very much in its infancy, the workshop was designed to address the many questions being asked by fishery managers and researchers about the feasibility and potential benefits of using sound to augment physical barriers for fish protection in the Columbia River system

  16. Distributed Supply Coordination for Power-to-Gas Facilities Embedded in Energy Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkano, Desti; Scherpen, Jacquelien M. A.

    This paper considers hydrogen and renewable electricity from power-to-gas (PtG) facilities supplied to a gas grid, a mobility sector, and a power grid. The PtG facilities are equipped with hydrogen buffers and fuel cells. The goal is to maximize the expected profit of PtG facilities without

  17. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT4 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT4. GCT4 was planned as a 250-hour test run to continue characterization of the transport reactor using a blend of several Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: Operational Stability--Characterize reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal-feed rate, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids-circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. Secondary objectives included the following: Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. Effects of Reactor Conditions on Synthesis Gas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids-circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, synthesis gas Lower Heating Value (LHV), carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) Testing--Provide syngas in support of the DSRP commissioning. Loop Seal Operations--Optimize loop seal operations and investigate increases to previously achieved maximum solids-circulation rate.

  18. The regulation for delivery of subsidies for measures of promoting power source location for nuclear power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Regulation is based on the prescriptions of the Enforcement Order for the Law for Arrangement of Surrounding Areas of Power Generating Facilities, the Law for Proper Budget Enforcement Concerning Subsidies and its Enforcement Order. These rules apply to the subsidies concerning nuclear power generating facilities, reprocessing facilities and test and examination facilities for nuclear fuel materials used for power generating reactors, reactors used for research on the safety of power generating reactors, and experimental reactors for fast breeder reactors. The limits of subsidies are specified respectively for the cases that a unit of power generating facility or two and more units of such facilities are set up in a local municipality. The subsidies are delivered for the expenses occurred in the period, beginning from the fiscal year when construction of the generating facility concerned starts or the arrangement plan of the concerned project is approved, and ending in the fiscal year when such construction comes to an end. The subsidies are given as evenly as possible in each fiscal year. The applicants of the subsidies file the applications attached with the explanations of the projects to the chief of the competent ministry (Director General of the Science and Technology Agency or the Minister of International Trade and Industry). Terms of delivery, reports submitted by the receivers of the subsidies and other related matters are specified. (Okada, K.)

  19. Exergy analysis of a combined heat and power plant with integrated lignocellulosic ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lythcke-Jørgensen, Christoffer; Haglind, Fredrik; Clausen, Lasse R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We model a system where lignocellulosic ethanol production is integrated with a combined heat and power (CHP) plant. • We conduct an exergy analysis for the ethanol production in six different system operation points. • Integrated operation, district heating (DH) production and low CHP loads all increase the exergy efficiency. • Separate operation has the largest negative impact on the exergy efficiency. • Operation is found to have a significant impact on the exergy efficiency of the ethanol production. - Abstract: Lignocellulosic ethanol production is often assumed integrated in polygeneration systems because of its energy intensive nature. The objective of this study is to investigate potential irreversibilities from such integration, and what impact it has on the efficiency of the integrated ethanol production. An exergy analysis is carried out for a modelled polygeneration system in which lignocellulosic ethanol production based on hydrothermal pretreatment is integrated in an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant. The ethanol facility is driven by steam extracted from the CHP unit when feasible, and a gas boiler is used as back-up when integration is not possible. The system was evaluated according to six operation points that alternate on the following three different operation parameters: Load in the CHP unit, integrated versus separate operation, and inclusion of district heating production in the ethanol facility. The calculated standard exergy efficiency of the ethanol facility varied from 0.564 to 0.855, of which the highest was obtained for integrated operation at reduced CHP load and full district heating production in the ethanol facility, and the lowest for separate operation with zero district heating production in the ethanol facility. The results suggest that the efficiency of integrating lignocellulosic ethanol production in CHP plants is highly dependent on operation, and it is therefore suggested that the

  20. Design of GMP compliance radiopharmaceutical production facility in MINT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar Abd Rahman; Shaharum Ramli; M Rizal Mamat Ibrahim; Rosli Darmawan; Yusof Azuddin Ali; Jusnan Hashim

    2005-01-01

    In 1985, MINT built the only radiopharmaceutical production facility in Malaysia. The facility was designed based on IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) standard guidelines which provide radiation safety to the staff and the surrounding environment from radioactive contamination. Since 1999, BPFK (Biro Pengawalan Farmaseutikal Kebangsaan) has used the guidelines from Pharmaceutical Inspection Convention Scheme (PICS) to meet the requirements of the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) for Pharmaceutical Products. In the guidelines, the pharmaceutical production facility shall be designed based on clean room environment. In order to design a radiopharmaceutical production facility, it is important to combine the concept of radiation safety and clean room to ensure that both requirements from GMP and IAEA are met. The design requirement is necessary to set up a complete radiopharmaceutical production facility, which is safe, has high production quality and complies with the Malaysian and International standards. (Author)

  1. Post 9-11 Security Issues for Non-Power Reactor Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaffuts, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the legal and practical issues arising out of the design and implementation of a security-enhancement program for non power reactor nuclear facilities. The security enhancements discussed are derived from the commercial nuclear power industry's approach to security. The nuclear power industry's long and successful experience with protecting highly sensitive assets provides a wealth of information and lessons that should be examined by other industries contemplating security improvements, including, but not limited to facilities using or disposing of nuclear materials. This paper describes the nuclear industry's approach to security, the advantages and disadvantages of its constituent elements, and the legal issues that facilities will need to address when adopting some or all of these elements in the absence of statutory or regulatory requirements to do so

  2. Post 9-11 Security Issues for Non-Power Reactor Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaffuts, P. J.

    2003-02-25

    This paper addresses the legal and practical issues arising out of the design and implementation of a security-enhancement program for non power reactor nuclear facilities. The security enhancements discussed are derived from the commercial nuclear power industry's approach to security. The nuclear power industry's long and successful experience with protecting highly sensitive assets provides a wealth of information and lessons that should be examined by other industries contemplating security improvements, including, but not limited to facilities using or disposing of nuclear materials. This paper describes the nuclear industry's approach to security, the advantages and disadvantages of its constituent elements, and the legal issues that facilities will need to address when adopting some or all of these elements in the absence of statutory or regulatory requirements to do so.

  3. Ministry of ordinance determining the technical standard concerning atomic energy facilities for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The ministerial ordinance provides for the technical standards for the power generation of nuclear facilities; i.e., electric power facilities generating electricity with nuclear energy for motive power, according to the Electricity Enterprises Act. The contents are as follows: protection against fires, aseismatic design, radiation protective barriers, structural protection for sitings, reactor installation, safety measures, materials and structures, safety valves, pressure resistance tests, reactor core, radiation shields, reactor cooling, emergency core cooling system, facility equipment, alarm system, reactor control system, reactor control room, fuel storage facility, fuel handling facility, ventilation equipment, radioactive contamination prevention, radioactive waste management facility, reactor containment facility, and so on. (Kubozono, M.)

  4. 78 FR 5773 - Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Generac Power Systems, Inc., Subzone 41J...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... Activity, Generac Power Systems, Inc., Subzone 41J, (Generators, Pressure Washers, Engines and Other... Whitewater, Edgerton and Jefferson, Wisconsin. The facilities are used for the production of generators... the foreign status components used in export production (15% of annual shipments). On its domestic...

  5. The enforcement order for the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Order is based on the prescriptions of the Law for the Arrangement of Surrounding Areas of Power Generating Facilities. Those establishing power generating facilities are general and wholesale electric enterprisers provided for by the Electricity Enterprises Act as well as the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The generating capacity is specified as 350,000 kilowatts for nuclear and steam power generating facilities, 150,000 kilowatts for those set up by the Corporation, 100,000 kilowatts for those using coal as main fuel, and 10,000 kilowatts for water power generation and geothermal plants. The facilities closely connected to nuclear power generation include the reprocessing facilities and test and examination facilities for nuclear fuel materials used for power-generating nuclear reactors, reactors used for the research on the safety of power generating reactors, and experimental reactors for fast breeder reactors. The public facilities consist of communication facilities, and the facilities for sports and recreations, environmental hygiene, education and culture, medicine, social welfare, fire fighting, etc. Prefectural governors ought to file the arrangement plans to the competent minister through the Minister of International Trade and Industry to get the permission prescribed by the Law. The subsidy is not granted to the expenses of the enterprises undertaken by the nation or those enterprises, a part of the expenses of which is borne or subsidized by the nation. (Okada, K.)

  6. Yearly program of safety research in nuclear power facilities from fiscal 1981 to 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear safety research plans for nuclear power facilities and others from fiscal 1981 to 1985 are presented for the following areas: the safety of LWR fuel, loss-of-coolant accidents, the structural safety of LWR installations, the reduction of radioactive material release from nuclear power facilities, the stochastic safety evaluation of nuclear power facilities, the aseismicity of nuclear power facilities, the safety of nuclear fuel facilities, and the safety of nuclear fuel transport vessels. In the respective areas, the needs for research and the outline of research works are summarized. Then, about the major research works in each area, the purpose, contents, term and responsible institution of the research are given. (Mori, K.)

  7. Establishing and development of nuclear power production in the Republic of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zhotabayev, Zh.R.

    2007-01-01

    systematic development of nuclear power sector would be based on the State program that is currently under development; the main principles of the program are: - maximal utilization of national scientific and technological potential for the development of nuclear power production; -international cooperation in designing and construction of reactors and nuclear power facilities; safety substantiation studies; - development of closed fuel cycle systems integration of departmental and branch programs related to development and utilization of nuclear technologies

  8. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 284-E and 284-W power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, D.R.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP- 0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years. The 284-E and 284-W Power Plants are coal-fired plants used to generate steam. Electricity is not generated at these facilities. The maximum production of steam is approximately 159 t (175 tons)/h at 101 kg (225 lb)/in 2 . Steam generated at these facilities is used in other process facilities (i. e., the B Plant, Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant, 242-A Evaporator) for heating and process operations. The functions or processes associated with these facilities do not have the potential to generate radioactive airborne effluents or radioactive liquid effluents, therefore, radiation monitoring equipment is not used on the discharge of these streams. The functions or processes associated with the production of steam result in the use, storage, management and disposal of hazardous materials

  9. High-power light-emitting diode based facility for plant cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamulaitis, G [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Duchovskis, P [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Bliznikas, Z [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Breive, K [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Ulinskaite, R [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Brazaityte, A [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Novickovas, A [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Zukauskas, A [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2005-09-07

    Based on perspectives of the development of semiconductor materials systems for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs), an illumination facility for greenhouse plant cultivation was designed with the dominating 640 nm photosynthetically active component delivered by AlGaInP LEDs and supplementary components from AlGaN (photothropic action, 455 nm) and AlGaAs (photosynthetic 660 nm and photomorphogenetic 735 nm) LEDs. Photosynthesis intensity, photosynthetic productivity and growth morphology as well as chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations were investigated in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under the LED-based illuminators and under high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps with an equivalent photon flux density. Advantages of the high-power LED-based illuminators over conventional HPS lamps, applicability of AlGaInP LEDs for photosynthesis and control of plant growth by circadian manipulation of a relatively weak far-red component were demonstrated.

  10. High-power light-emitting diode based facility for plant cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamulaitis, G; Duchovskis, P; Bliznikas, Z; Breive, K; Ulinskaite, R; Brazaityte, A; Novickovas, A; Zukauskas, A

    2005-01-01

    Based on perspectives of the development of semiconductor materials systems for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs), an illumination facility for greenhouse plant cultivation was designed with the dominating 640 nm photosynthetically active component delivered by AlGaInP LEDs and supplementary components from AlGaN (photothropic action, 455 nm) and AlGaAs (photosynthetic 660 nm and photomorphogenetic 735 nm) LEDs. Photosynthesis intensity, photosynthetic productivity and growth morphology as well as chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations were investigated in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under the LED-based illuminators and under high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps with an equivalent photon flux density. Advantages of the high-power LED-based illuminators over conventional HPS lamps, applicability of AlGaInP LEDs for photosynthesis and control of plant growth by circadian manipulation of a relatively weak far-red component were demonstrated

  11. Power conditioning development for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, M.A.; Larson, D.W.; Wilson, J.M.; Harjes, H.C.; Savage, M.E.; Anderson, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high energy glass laser system and target chamber that will be used for research in inertial confinement fusion. The 192 beams of the NIF laser system are pumped by over 8600 Xenon flashlamps. The power conditioning system for NIF must deliver nearly 300 MJ of energy to the flashlamps in a cost effective and reliable manner. The present system design has over 200 capacitive energy storage modules that store approximately 1.7 MJ each and deliver that energy through a single switch assembly to 20 parallel sets of two series flashlamps. Although there are many possible system designs, few will meet the aggressive cost goals necessary to make the system affordable. Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing the system and component technologies that will be required to build the power conditioning system for the National Ignition Facility. This paper will describe the ongoing development activities for the NIF power conditioning system

  12. A flexible testing facility for high-power targets T-MIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusco, Y.; Samec, K.; Behzad, M.; Kadi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A dedicated material test irradiation facility is being proposed. The testing station will allow critical issues concerning materials under irradiation to be addressed, such as the impact of proton beam irradiation, neutron irradiation, liquid metal corrosion and temperature. The material samples to be investigated in such a facility will be subjected to tensile stress, either constant or cyclical. The facility may also be used for sensor development under irradiation and isotope production. The goal of the current work is to propose a facility that is sufficiently versatile and compact so that it may be transported and used in different laboratories. The power is limited to 100 kW. The general aspect of the proposed irradiation facility is a cube, 2 metres deep and comprising within it all the necessary systems. The interface to the laboratory is limited to the coolant connections, the secondary circuit, the electric energy supply and the signals from the instrumentation. The liquid metal target placed in the centre of the facility contains the samples which are subjected to a proton beam, creating irradiation damage directly through protons or indirectly through neutrons created by spallation of the surrounding liquid metal by the incoming protons. The design of the target is based upon the EURISOL target. The same beam window design is used, albeit stretched horizontally to adopt an elliptical section which is compatible with the shape of the beam used to irradiate the samples. The liquid metal in the target is re-circulated by an electromagnetic pump that drives the liquid metal through a heat exchanger located at the top of the facility, the position of which was chosen to encourage natural circulation. The heat exchanger is made up of two separate parts which allow the primary and secondary circuit to separate cleanly

  13. Micro-Combined Heat and Power Device Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has developed a test facility for micro-combined heat and power (micro-CHP) devices to measure their performance over a range of different operating strategies...

  14. Power conditioning for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.W.; Anderson, R.; Boyes, J.

    1994-01-01

    A cost-effective, 320-MJ power-conditioning system has been completed for the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The design features include metallized dielectric capacitors, a simple topology, and large (1.6-MJ) module size. Experimental results address the technical risks associated with the design

  15. A multi-tank storage facility to effect power control in the PBMR power cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matimba, T.A.D.; Krueger, D.L.W.; Mathews, E.H.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the concept of a storage facility used to effect power control in South Africa's PBMR power cycle. The concept features a multiple number of storage vessels whose purpose is to contain the working medium, helium, as it is withdrawn from the PBMR's closed loop power cycle, at low energy demand. This helium is appropriately replenished to the power cycle as the energy demand increases. Helium mass transfer between the power cycle and the storage facility, henceforth known as the inventory control system (ICS), is carried out by way of the pressure differential that exists between these two systems. In presenting the ICS concept, emphasis is placed on storage effectiveness; hence the discussion in this paper is centred on those features which accentuate storage effectiveness, namely:- Storage vessel multiplicity; - Unique initial pressures for each vessel arranged in a cascaded manner; and - A heat sink placed in each vessel to provide thermal inertia. Having presented the concept, the objective is to qualitatively justify the presence of each of the above-mentioned features using thermodynamics as a basis

  16. ACIGA's high optical power test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, L [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Aoun, M [Computer and Information Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth (Australia); Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)] [and others

    2004-03-07

    Advanced laser interferometer detectors utilizing more than 100 W of laser power and with {approx}10{sup 6} W circulating laser power present many technological problems. The Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy (ACIGA) is developing a high power research facility in Gingin, north of Perth, Western Australia, which will test techniques for the next generation interferometers. In particular it will test thermal lensing compensation and control strategies for optical cavities in which optical spring effects and parametric instabilities may present major difficulties.

  17. Decommissioning of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Vasil'chenko, V.N.; Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Yashchenko, Ya.V.

    2005-01-01

    This is the first manual in Ukraine giving the complete review of the decommissioning process of the nuclear power facilities including the issues of the planning, design documentation development, advanced technology description. On the base of the international and domestic experience, the issues on the radwaste management, the decontamination methods, the equipment dismantling, the remote technology application, and also the costs estimate at decommissioning are considered. The special attention to the personnel safety provision, population and environment at decommissioning process is paid

  18. Human engineering considerations in the design of New Virginia Power Radwaste facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankley, A.V.; Morris, L.L.; Lippard, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Human engineering principles were considered by Virginia Power in the recent design of new radwaste facilities (NRFs) for both the Surry and North Anna power stations. Virginia Power recognized that the rigorous application of human engineering principles to the NRF design was essential to the ultimate success or failure of the facilities. Success of the NRF should not only be measured in the volume of radwaste processed but also by other factors such as (a) availability and maintainability of preferred equipment, (b) as-low-as-reasonably-achievable considerations, (c) actual release rates versus achievable release rates, and (d) flexibility to deal with varying circumstances. Each of these success criteria would suffer as the result of operator/human inefficiencies or error. Therefore, human engineering should be applied to the maximum practical extent to minimize such inefficiencies or errors. No method is ever going to ensure a perfectly human-engineered facility design. Virginia Power believes, however, that significant strides have been made in efforts to design and construct a successful radwaste processing facility, a facility where operating success rests with the ability of the human operators to perform their jobs in an efficient and reliable fashion

  19. Helium turbomachinery operating experience from gas turbine power plants and test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Colin F.

    2012-01-01

    The closed-cycle gas turbine, pioneered and deployed in Europe, is not well known in the USA. Since nuclear power plant studies currently being conducted in several countries involve the coupling of a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a helium closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system, the experience gained from operated helium turbomachinery is the focus of this paper. A study done as early as 1945 foresaw the use of a helium closed-cycle gas turbine coupled with a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor, and some two decades later this was investigated but not implemented because of lack of technology readiness. However, the first practical use of helium as a gas turbine working fluid was recognized for cryogenic processes, and the first two small fossil-fired helium gas turbines to operate were in the USA for air liquefaction and nitrogen production facilities. In the 1970's a larger helium gas turbine plant and helium test facilities were built and operated in Germany to establish technology bases for a projected future high efficiency large nuclear gas turbine power plant concept. This review paper covers the experience gained, and the lessons learned from the operation of helium gas turbine plants and related test facilities, and puts these into perspective since over three decades have passed since they were deployed. An understanding of the many unexpected events encountered, and how the problems, some of them serious, were resolved is important to avoid them being replicated in future helium turbomachines. The valuable lessons learned in the past, in many cases the hard way, particularly from the operation in Germany of the Oberhausen II 50 MWe helium gas turbine plant, and the technical know-how gained from the formidable HHV helium turbine test facility, are viewed as being germane in the context of current helium turbomachine design work being done for future high efficiency nuclear gas turbine plant concepts. - Highlights:

  20. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Barton, M [California Institute of Technology, LIGO Project, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Blair, D G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)] [and others

    2005-05-21

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with {approx}200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented.

  1. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga, P; Barton, M; Blair, D G

    2005-01-01

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with ∼200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented

  2. Management of the high-level nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Marin

    2003-05-01

    This thesis approaches current issues in the management of the high power nuclear facilities and as such it appears to be important particularly for nuclear power plant operation topics. Of special interest are the failure events entailing possible catastrophic situations. The contents is structured onto ten chapters. The first chapter describes the operation regimes of the nuclear high power facilities. Highlighted here are the thesis scope and the original features of the work. The second chapter deals with operational policies developed in order to ensure the preventive maintenance of the nuclear installations. Also managing structures are described devoted to practical warranting the equipment safety function of non-classical power stations. In the third chapter cases of nuclear accidents are analyzed especially stressing the probabilistic risk and the operation regimes having in view the elimination of catastrophic events. In the fourth and fifth chapters the control of nuclear radiation emission is treated focusing the quality issue of nuclear installations required to avoid hazardous effects at level of nuclear reactor operation stage. At the same time set of operational measures is given here for preventing risks, catastrophes and chaotic situations. The chapter five presents both theoretical and practical approaches of the nuclear reactor core management concerning particularly the fuel testing, the water primary system and the quality of the involved equipment. In the sixth and seventh chapters issues of risk-quality correlations are approached as well as the structure of expert systems for monitoring the operational regimes of nuclear facilities. The efficiency of the power systems with nuclear injection is discussed and some original ideas developed in this work are evidenced in the eighth and ninth chapters. Presented are here both the operational principles and models of raising the efficiency of the interconnected nuclear stations and prices' policy

  3. The December 7, 1988 Armenia earthquake effects on selected power, industrial and commercial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.D.; Griffin, M.J.; Bragagnolo, L.J.; Yanev, P.I.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed overview of the Armenia earthquake (occurred on December 7, 1988) effects on selected power, industrial and commercial facilities is presented in this paper. It involves geologic and seismology study of the region; description of the design building standards; detailed description of the damaged nuclear and other power plants as well as other industrial facilities. Extensive damage was sustained by the industrial facilities in the epicentral area, the majority due to poor design and construction. The effects on power facilities were much less severe. response time to restore power to the transmission was 2 to 3 days following the earthquake. Power plant equipment without rigorous seismic design performed well. Mechanical equipment, pumps, valves, compressors, and piping all performed with minimal damage, Electrical control equipment if properly anchored performed well without exception

  4. Synthetic methods for beam to beam power balancing capability of large laser facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guangyu; Zhang Xiaomin; Zhao Runchang; Zheng Wanguo; Yang Xiaoyu; You Yong; Wang Chengcheng; Shao Yunfei

    2011-01-01

    To account for output power balancing capability of large laser facilities, a synthetic method with beam to beam root-mean-square is presented. Firstly, a conversion process for the facilities from original data of beam powers to regular data is given. The regular data contribute to the normal distribution approximately, and then a corresponding simple method of root-mean-square for beam to beam power balancing capability is given.Secondly, based on theory of total control charts and cause-selecting control charts, control charts with root-mean-square are established which show short-term variety of power balancing capability of the facilities. Mean rate of failure occurrence is also defined and used to describe long-term trend of global balancing capabilities of the facilities. Finally, advantages of the intuitive and efficient diagnosis for synthetic methods are illustrated by analysis of experimental data. (authors)

  5. Exergy analysis of a combined heat and power plant with integrated lignocellulosic ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lythcke-Jørgensen, Christoffer Ernst; Haglind, Fredrik; Clausen, Lasse Røngaard

    2014-01-01

    production. An exergy analysis is carried out for a modelled polygeneration system in which lignocellulosic ethanol production based on hydrothermal pretreatment is integrated in an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant. The ethanol facility is driven by steam extracted from the CHP unit when feasible...... district heating production in the ethanol facility. The results suggest that the efficiency of integrating lignocellulosic ethanol production in CHP plants is highly dependent on operation, and it is therefore suggested that the expected operation pattern of such polygeneration system is taken......Lignocellulosic ethanol production is often assumed integrated in polygeneration systems because of its energy intensive nature. The objective of this study is to investigate potential irreversibilities from such integration, and what impact it has on the efficiency of the integrated ethanol...

  6. Production Facility SCADA Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Holloway, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baily, Scott A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wheat, Robert Mitchell Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-23

    The following report covers FY 14 activities to develop supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the Northstar Moly99 production facility. The goal of this effort is to provide Northstar with a baseline system design.

  7. Emergency response facility technical data system of Taiwan Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, E.; Liang, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company (Taipower) has developed its emergency response facility program since 1981. This program is integrated with the following activities to enhance the emergency response capability of nuclear power plants: (1) survey of the plant instrumentation based on the requirements of R.G. 1.97; (2) improvement of plant specific emergency operating procedures based on the emergency response guidelines developed by the Owners group; (3) implementation of the detailed control room design review with the consideration of human engineering and task analysis; and (4) organization, staff and communication of emergency planning of nuclear power plant. The emergency response facility programs of Taipower are implemented in Chinshan (GE BWR4/MARK I), Kuosheng (GE BWR6/MARK III) and Maanshan (W PWR). The major items included in each program are: (1) to establish new buildings for On-Site Technical Support Center, Near-Site Emergency Operation Facility; (2) to establish an Emergency Executive Center at Taipower headquarters; (3) to establish the communication network between control room and emergency response facilities; and (4) to install a dedicated Emergency Response Facility Technical Data System (ERFTDS) for each plant. The ERFTDS provides the functions of data acquisition, data processing, data storage and display in meeting with the requirements of NUREG 0696. The ERFTDS is designed with plant specific requirements. These specific requirements are expected to be useful not only for the emergency condition but also for normal operation conditions

  8. The enforcement order for the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The order is defined under the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities. Establishers of power generating facilities shall be hereunder general electric enterprisers, wholesale electric enterprisers and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The scale of power generating facilities provided by the order is 350,000 kilo-watts for atomic and steam power generation and 5,000 kilo-watts for hydroelectric power. Equipment closely related to atomic power generation shall include facilities for reprocessing and examination of nuclear fuel materials spent for power generating reactors, reactors used for research of the safety of power generating reactors, experimental fast breeding reactors and experimental uranium enrichment facilities. Requisites for the extent of industrial accumulation are that the area belongs to those self-governing bodies whose industrial accumulation is more than the 8th degree. Public facilities specified are those for communication, sports or recreation, environmental hygiene, education and culture, medicine, social welfare, fire fighting and heat supplying, etc. Governors of the prefectures shall file arrangement programs to the Minister in charge through the Minister of International Trade and Industry to get the permission stipulated by the law. Subsidies shall not be paid to those enterprises which are executed by the government or a part of the expenses is born or supported by it. (Okada, K.)

  9. Decommissioning of U.S. uranium production facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    From 1980 to 1993, the domestic production of uranium declined from almost 44 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to about 3 million pounds. This retrenchment of the U.S. uranium industry resulted in the permanent closing of many uranium-producing facilities. Current low uranium prices, excess world supply, and low expectations for future uranium demand indicate that it is unlikely existing plants will be reopened. Because of this situation, these facilities eventually will have to be decommissioned. The Uranium Mill Tailings and Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) vests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with overall responsibility for establishing environmental standards for decommissioning of uranium production facilities. UMTRCA also gave the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility for licensing and regulating uranium production and related activities, including decommissioning. Because there are many issues associated with decommissioning-environmental, political, and financial-this report will concentrate on the answers to three questions: (1) What is required? (2) How is the process implemented? (3) What are the costs? Regulatory control is exercised principally through the NRC licensing process. Before receiving a license to construct and operate an uranium producing facility, the applicant is required to present a decommissioning plan to the NRC. Once the plan is approved, the licensee must post a surety to guarantee that funds will be available to execute the plan and reclaim the site. This report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) represents the most comprehensive study on this topic by analyzing data on 33 (out of 43) uranium production facilities located in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

  10. Decommissioning of U.S. uranium production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    From 1980 to 1993, the domestic production of uranium declined from almost 44 million pounds U 3 O 8 to about 3 million pounds. This retrenchment of the U.S. uranium industry resulted in the permanent closing of many uranium-producing facilities. Current low uranium prices, excess world supply, and low expectations for future uranium demand indicate that it is unlikely existing plants will be reopened. Because of this situation, these facilities eventually will have to be decommissioned. The Uranium Mill Tailings and Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) vests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with overall responsibility for establishing environmental standards for decommissioning of uranium production facilities. UMTRCA also gave the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility for licensing and regulating uranium production and related activities, including decommissioning. Because there are many issues associated with decommissioning-environmental, political, and financial-this report will concentrate on the answers to three questions: (1) What is required? (2) How is the process implemented? (3) What are the costs? Regulatory control is exercised principally through the NRC licensing process. Before receiving a license to construct and operate an uranium producing facility, the applicant is required to present a decommissioning plan to the NRC. Once the plan is approved, the licensee must post a surety to guarantee that funds will be available to execute the plan and reclaim the site. This report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) represents the most comprehensive study on this topic by analyzing data on 33 (out of 43) uranium production facilities located in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Washington

  11. Low-power critical facilities: their role in the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didsbury, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of low power critical facilities and their role in the nuclear renaissance. It outline the role of human capital in some detail. sufficient conditions for the renaissance are that nuclear power is safe, sustainable, economical and proliferation resistant.

  12. High efficiency combined heat and power facilities - benefits and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.

    2001-01-01

    There are important linkages between the economy, energy production, the environment and our health. Where thermal energy is needed, distributed Combined Heat and Power facilities, using gas turbines, reciprocating engines and future fuel cells can provide significant improvements to our long term mix of energy production. Local generation can also have benefits in security of energy supply and economic savings. This paper is intended to discuss the relevant air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from modem CHP plants, the emission prevention and reduction methods available, and their operating experience and cost-effectiveness. Mention is made of recently constructed industrial and commercial plants, and institutional barriers to further development. Solutions described for these barriers include the need for more awareness of opportunities, improved access to the electricity grid, the proper design balance between thermal and electric for CHP systems rather than large combined cycles, improved corporate taxation incentives, and the assessment of all environmental and economic benefits when considering such cleaner sources in a restructured energy market. (author)

  13. Base isolation for nuclear power and nuclear material facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidinger, J.M.; Kircher, C.A.; Vaidya, N.; Constantinou, M.; Kelly, J.M.; Seidensticker, R.; Tajirian, F.F.; Ovadia, D.

    1989-01-01

    This report serves to document the status of the practice for the use of base isolation systems in the design and construction of nuclear power and nuclear material facilities. The report first describes past and current (1989) applications of base isolation in nuclear facilities. The report then provides a brief discussion of non-nuclear applications. Finally, the report summarizes the status of known base-isolation codes and standards

  14. Economic benefits of power factor correction at a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boger, R.M.; Dalos, W.; Juguilon, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    The economic benefits of correcting poor power factor at an operating nuclear facility are shown. A project approach for achieving rapid return of investment without disrupting plant availability is described. Examples of technical problems associated with using capacitors for power factor correction are presented

  15. Mortality monitoring design for utility-scale solar power facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huso, Manuela; Dietsch, Thomas; Nicolai, Chris

    2016-05-27

    IntroductionSolar power represents an important and rapidly expanding component of the renewable energy portfolio of the United States (Lovich and Ennen, 2011; Hernandez and others, 2014). Understanding the impacts of renewable energy development on wildlife is a priority for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) in compliance with Department of Interior Order No. 3285 (U.S. Department of the Interior, 2009) to “develop best management practices for renewable energy and transmission projects on the public lands to ensure the most environmentally responsible development and delivery of renewable energy.” Recent studies examining effects of renewable energy development on mortality of migratory birds have primarily focused on wind energy (California Energy Commission and California Department of Fish and Game, 2007), and in 2012 the FWS published guidance for addressing wildlife conservation concerns at all stages of land-based wind energy development (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2012). As yet, no similar guidelines exist for solar development, and no published studies have directly addressed the methodology needed to accurately estimate mortality of birds and bats at solar facilities. In the absence of such guidelines, ad hoc methodologies applied to solar energy projects may lead to estimates of wildlife mortality rates that are insufficiently accurate and precise to meaningfully inform conversations regarding unintended consequences of this energy source and management decisions to mitigate impacts. Although significant advances in monitoring protocols for wind facilities have been made in recent years, there remains a need to provide consistent guidance and study design to quantify mortality of bats, and resident and migrating birds at solar power facilities (Walston and others, 2015).In this document, we suggest methods for mortality monitoring at solar facilities that are based on current methods used at wind power facilities but adapted for the

  16. Integration of the nuclear energy among the production facilities of energy in France; Integration de l'energie nucleaire parmi les moyens de production de l'energie en france

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ailleret, P [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Taranger, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The present report gives an overview of the present facilities of energy productions in France and their perspectives. the electric production comes for half about power stations hydraulics and for half of thermal power stations. However due to the increase of the energy consumption, France is particularly interested by the atomic energy that appears to bring a supply in due time to the hydraulics and to limit a development of the thermal power stations to which the natural resources of France in classic fuel would not permit to cope presumably. The integration of the nuclear plants to the other production facilities will make itself gradually according to the evolution of the energy needs. (M.B.) [French] Le present rapport donne un apercu des moyens actuels de productions energetiques en France et de ses perspectives. la production electrique provient pour moitie environ de centrales hydraulique et pour moitie de centrales thermiques. Cependant face a l'augmentation de la consommation energetique, la France est tres particulierement interessee par l'energie atomique qui parait devoir apporter en temps utile la releve a l'hydraulique et limiter un developpement des centrales thermiques auxquels les ressources naturelles de la France en combustible classique ne permettraient vraisemblablement pas de faire face. L'integration des centrales nucleaires aux autres moyens de production se fera graduellment en fonction de l'evolution des besoins energetiques. (M.B.)

  17. Lawrence Berkeley laboratory neutral-beam engineering test facility power-supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, I.C.; Arthur, C.A.; deVries, G.J.; Owren, H.M.

    1981-10-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is upgrading the neutral beam source test facility (NBSTF) into a neutral beam engineering test facility (NBETF) with increased capabilities for the development of neutral beam systems. The NBETF will have an accel power supply capable of 170 kV, 70 A, 30 sec pulse length, 10% duty cycle; and the auxiliary power supplies required for the sources. This paper describes the major components, their ratings and capabilities, and the flexibility designed to accomodate the needs of source development

  18. Power Systems Development Facility. Quarterly report, July--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a fimction of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and hot gas cleanup units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDS) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of the process structural steel is nearing completion. Nearly all equipment are set in its place and the FW equipment and the PCDs are being set in the structure.

  19. S-band 45 MW peak power test facility at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanmode, A. Yashwant; Reddy, Sivananda; Mulchandani, J.; Mohania, Praveen; Shrivastava, B. Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    RRCAT is engaged in the design and development of high energy electron LINAC as future injectors for the Booster Synchrotron for Indus-1 and Indus-2 SRS. The high energy LINAC will need microwave power over 30 MW depending on the number of structures to be energized. In order to have advance preparations for this development a 45 MW S-Band test facility has been designed and developed at RRCAT. The test stand is built around a 45 MW peak power S-band pulsed klystron, A conventional pulse forming network based modulator for klystron has been designed and developed. The WR-284 waveguide transmission system consisting of dual directional couplers, SF 6 gas pressurization unit, high power waveguide load and arc sensor has been developed and interfaced with the klystron. The klystron has been successfully tested up to 30 MW peak power at 2856 MHz on SF 6 pressurized waveguide line. A solid state S Band driver amplifier up to 1 kW output power was designed developed for driving the klystron. This paper describes the results of 30 MW peak power test of this facility. (author)

  20. Facilities for the production and processing of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourie, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    Radioisotopes which are used in South Africa are produced in the nuclear reactor SAFARI 1 of the AEB and the CSIR cyclotron in Pretoria or are being imported from various overseas manufactures. The safe and efficient production and use of radioisotopes is possible when being handled by sufficiently trained personnel using special designed equipment and facilities. The Isotope Production Centre is situated next to the reactor and waste treatment buildings. New production facilities shielded with lead and equipped with remote handling equipment are being erected and will be commissioned early during 1980 [af

  1. Resource-recovery facilities: Production and cost functions, and debt-financing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonsen, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Some of the fiscal questions relating to resource-recovery, or trash-burning, facilities are addressed. Production and cost functions for resource-recovery facilities are estimated using regression analysis. Whether or not there are returns to scale are addressed using the production and cost-function framework. Production functions are also estimated using data envelopment analysis (DEA), and results are compared to the regression results. DEA is a linear-program-based technique that can provide information about the production process. The data used to estimate the production and cost functions were collected from the Resource Recovery Yearbook. Once the decision is made to construct a resource-recovery facility, it needs to be financed. The high cost of these facilities usually prohibits financing construction out of regular operating revenues. Therefore, the issues a government faces when debt is used to finance a resource-recovery facility are analyzed. The most important public policy finding is that increasing economies of scale do not seem to be present for resource-recovery facilities

  2. Locations and attributes of utility-scale solar power facilities in Colorado and New Mexico, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignizio, Drew A.; Carr, Natasha B.

    2012-01-01

    The data series consists of polygonal boundaries for utility-scale solar power facilities (both photovoltaic and concentrating solar power) located within Colorado and New Mexico as of December 2011. Attributes captured for each facility include the following: facility name, size/production capacity (in MW), type of solar technology employed, location, state, operational status, year the facility came online, and source identification information. Facility locations and perimeters were derived from 1-meter true-color aerial photographs (2011) produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP); the photographs have a positional accuracy of about ±5 meters (accessed from the NAIP GIS service: http://gis.apfo.usda.gov/arcgis/services). Solar facility perimeters represent the full extent of each solar facility site, unless otherwise noted. When visible, linear features such as fences or road lines were used to delineate the full extent of the solar facility. All related equipment including buildings, power substations, and other associated infrastructure were included within the solar facility. If solar infrastructure was indistinguishable from adjacent infrastructure, or if solar panels were installed on existing building tops, only the solar collecting equipment was digitized. The "Polygon" field indicates whether the "equipment footprint" or the full "site outline" was digitized. The spatial accuracy of features that represent site perimeters or an equipment footprint is estimated at +/- 10 meters. Facilities under construction or not fully visible in the NAIP imagery at the time of digitization (December 2011) are represented by an approximate site outline based on the best available information and documenting materials. The spatial accuracy of these facilities cannot be estimated without more up-to-date imagery – users are advised to consult more recent imagery as it becomes available. The "Status" field provides information about the operational

  3. Analysis of an Improved Solar-Powered Hydrogen Generation System for Sustained Renewable Energy Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    hydrogen gas by electrolysis. In LT Aviles’ design , distilled water was collected from the ambient air using Peltier dehumidifiers, manufactured by...Figure 13 shows the shelfing along with the entire system. Figure 13. Reconfigured Hydrogen Production Facility Because the system was designed for...POWERED HYDROGEN GENERATION SYSTEM FOR SUSTAINED RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION by Sen Feng Yu December 2017 Thesis Advisor: Garth V. Hobson Co

  4. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  5. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  6. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC 1 licensees during the years 1969 through 1989. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC 1 licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1989 annual reports submitted by about 448 licensees indicated that approximately 216,294 individuals were monitored 111,000 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual does of 0.18 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of 0.36 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 113,535 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 448 covered licensees during 1989. Some 76,561 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 10, 344 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.64 rem (cSv)

  7. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1988. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1988 annual reports submitted by about 429 licensees indicated that approximately 220,048 individuals were monitored, 113,00 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.20 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of 0.41 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 113,072 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 429 covered licensees during 1988. Some 80,211 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 8,760 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.27 rem (cSv). 17 refs., 11 figs., 29 tabs

  8. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1991. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1991 annual reports submitted by about 436 licensees indicated that approximately 206,732 individuals were monitored, 182,334 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.15 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.31 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 96,231 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 436 covered licensees during 1991. Some 68,115 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 7,763 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.52 rem (cSv)

  9. 78 FR 8493 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; SoloPower Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ...; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; SoloPower Inc. (Thin Film Photovoltaic Solar Panels); Portland... of FTZ 45. The facility is used for the production of thin film photovoltaic solar panels. Pursuant... procedures that applies to the thin film solar panels (duty-free) for the foreign status inputs noted below...

  10. Nuclear facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The information brochure is a survey of installed nuclear facilities in Germany, presenting on one page each a picture of a nuclear power plant together with the main relevant data, or of other type of nuclear facilities belonging to the nuclear fuel cycle (such as fuel production plant, fuel production plant, fuel element storage facilities, and facilities for spent fuel and waste management). (UA) [de

  11. Trend chart: wind power. Third quarter 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, Didier

    2015-11-01

    This publication presents the wind energy situation of continental France and overseas territories during the third quarter 2015: total connected load, new connected facilities, regional distribution of wind power production, evolution of quarterly production, distribution of facilities versus power, evolution forecasts of the French wind power park, projects in progress, detailed regional results, methodology used

  12. Trend chart: wind power. Forth quarter 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltier, Yves

    2017-02-01

    This publication presents the wind energy situation of continental France and overseas territories during the forth quarter 2016: total connected load, new connected facilities, regional distribution of wind power production, evolution of quarterly production, distribution of facilities versus power, evolution forecasts of the French wind power park, projects in progress, detailed regional results, methodology used

  13. Trend chart: wind power. First quarter 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, Didier

    2016-05-01

    This publication presents the wind energy situation of continental France and overseas territories during the first quarter 2016: total connected load, new connected facilities, regional distribution of wind power production, evolution of quarterly production, distribution of facilities versus power, evolution forecasts of the French wind power park, projects in progress, detailed regional results, methodology used

  14. Trend chart: wind power. Third quarter 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, Didier

    2016-11-01

    This publication presents the wind energy situation of continental France and overseas territories during the third quarter 2016: total connected load, new connected facilities, regional distribution of wind power production, evolution of quarterly production, distribution of facilities versus power, evolution forecasts of the French wind power park, projects in progress, detailed regional results, methodology used

  15. Trend chart: wind power. Second quarter 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, Didier

    2016-08-01

    This publication presents the wind energy situation of continental France and overseas territories during the second quarter 2016: total connected load, new connected facilities, regional distribution of wind power production, evolution of quarterly production, distribution of facilities versus power, evolution forecasts of the French wind power park, projects in progress, detailed regional results, methodology used

  16. Trend chart: wind power. First quarter 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-05-01

    This publication presents the wind energy situation of continental France and overseas territories during the first quarter 2017: total connected load, new connected facilities, regional distribution of wind power production, evolution of quarterly production, distribution of facilities versus power, evolution forecasts of the French wind power park, projects in progress, detailed regional results, methodology used

  17. Trend chart: wind power. Forth quarter 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, Didier

    2016-02-01

    This publication presents the wind energy situation of continental France and overseas territories during the forth quarter 2015: total connected load, new connected facilities, regional distribution of wind power production, evolution of quarterly production, distribution of facilities versus power, evolution forecasts of the French wind power park, projects in progress, detailed regional results, methodology used

  18. Appendix E - Sample Production Facility Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    This sample Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan in Appendix E is intended to provide examples and illustrations of how a production facility could address a variety of scenarios in its SPCC Plan.

  19. Training of nuclear power facility personnel. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The proceedings of the conference entitled ''Training of Nuclear Power Facility Personnel'' and held in Tale, Czechoslovakia, on 24 - 27 April 1989, contain full texts of 58 contributions, 57 of which fall in the INIS subject scope. The aim of the conference was to summarize experience gained during the training and education of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants operating personnel, to put forth new suggestions for increasing the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants, and to establish the needs and new trends in the training and education of nuclear power plants personnel. The topics treated at the conference can be divided into three basic groups as follows: 1. professional qualification of nuclear power plant staff members; 2. development of technical means for the nuclear power plants personnel training; and 3. training of maintenance personnel, the system and organization of this training and education. The proceedings are published in two volumes. Part 1 contains the texts of 25 papers falling in the INIS subject scope. (Z.M.)

  20. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-07-01

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC12 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SW) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC12 began on May 16, 2003, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until May 24, 2003, when a scheduled outage occurred to allow maintenance crews to install the fuel cell test unit and modify the gas clean-up system. On June 18, 2003, the test run resumed when operations relit the start-up burner, and testing continued until the scheduled end of the run on July 14, 2003. TC12 had a total of 733 hours using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,850 F at pressures from 130 to 210 psig.

  1. Stabilization and shutdown of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Radioisotopes Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eversole, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in the production and distribution of a variety of radioisotopes for medical, scientific and industrial applications since the late 1940s. Production of these materials was concentrated in a number of facilities primarily built in the 1950s and 1960s. Due to the age and deteriorating condition of these facilities, it was determined in 1989 that it would not be cost effective to upgrade these facilities to bring them into compliance with contemporary environmental, safety and health standards. The US Department of Energy (DOE) instructed ORNL to halt the production of isotopes in these facilities and maintain the facilities in safe standby condition while preparing a stabilization and shutdown plan. The goal was to place the former isotope production facilities in a radiologically and industrially safe condition to allow a 5-year deferral of the initiation of environmental restoration (ER) activities. In response to DOE's instructions, ORNL identified 17 facilities for shutdown, addressed the shutdown requirements for each facility, and prepared and implemented a three-phase, 4-year plan for shutdown of the facilities. The Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program (IFSP) office was created to execute the stabilization and shutdown plan. The program is entering its third year in which the actual shutdown of the facilities is initiated. Accomplishments to date have included consolidation of all isotopes inventory into one facility, DOE approval of the IFSP Environmental Assessment (EA), and implementation of a detailed management plan for the shutdown of the facilities

  2. Trend chart: wind power. Second quarter 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    This publication presents the wind energy situation of continental France and overseas territories during the second quarter 2017: total connected load, new connected facilities, regional distribution of wind power production, evolution of quarterly production, distribution of facilities versus power, evolution forecasts of the French wind power park, projects in progress, detailed regional results, revision of results

  3. Trend chart: wind power. Fourth quarter 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, Sylvain

    2018-02-01

    This publication presents the wind energy situation of continental France and overseas territories during the fourth quarter 2017: total connected load, new connected facilities, regional distribution of wind power production, evolution of quarterly production, distribution of facilities versus power, evolution forecasts of the French wind power park, projects in progress, detailed regional results, revision of results

  4. Trend chart: wind power. Third quarter 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-11-01

    This publication presents the wind energy situation of continental France and overseas territories during the third quarter 2017: total connected load, new connected facilities, regional distribution of wind power production, evolution of quarterly production, distribution of facilities versus power, evolution forecasts of the French wind power park, projects in progress, detailed regional results, revision of results

  5. Radiological design criteria for fusion power test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    The quest for fusion power and understanding of plasma physics has resulted in planning, design, and construction of several major fusion power test facilities, based largely on magnetic and inertial confinement concepts. We have considered radiological design aspects of the Joint European Torus (JET), Livermore Mirror and Inertial Fusion projects, and Princeton Tokamak. Our analyses on radiological design criteria cover acceptable exposure levels at the site boundary, man-rem doses for plant personnel and population at large, based upon experience gained for the fission reactors, and on considerations of cost-benefit analyses

  6. Power Consumption Analysis of Electrical Installations at Healthcare Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Guillen-Garcia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology for power consumption estimation considering harmonic and interharmonic content and then it is compared to the power consumption estimation commonly done by commercial equipment based on the fundamental frequency, and how they can underestimate the power consumption considering power quality disturbances (PQD. For this purpose, data of electrical activity at the electrical distribution boards in a healthcare facility is acquired for a long time period with proprietary equipment. An analysis in the acquired current and voltage signals is done, in order to compare the power consumption centered in the fundamental frequency with the generalized definition of power consumption. The results obtained from the comparison in the power consumption estimation show differences between 4% and 10% of underestimated power consumption. Thus, it is demonstrated that the presence of harmonic and interharmonic content provokes a significant underestimation of power consumption using only the power consumption centered at the fundamental frequency.

  7. Administrative procedures linked with power production facilities that use renewable energy sources. Report made in application of article 6 of directive 2001/77/CE from October 27, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the legislative and regulatory framework relative to power generation facilities that use renewable energy sources. It presents also the actions that have been carried out to reduce the obstacles to the development of these facilities (access to the power distribution and transportation grid). (J.S.)

  8. Meteosat SEVIRI Fire Radiative Power (FRP) products from the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA SAF) - Part 1: Algorithms, product contents and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, M. J.; Roberts, G.; Freeborn, P. H.; Xu, W.; Govaerts, Y.; Beeby, R.; He, J.; Lattanzio, A.; Mullen, R.

    2015-06-01

    Characterising changes in landscape scale fire activity at very high temporal resolution is best achieved using thermal observations of actively burning fires made from geostationary Earth observation (EO) satellites. Over the last decade or more, a series of research and/or operational "active fire" products have been developed from these types of geostationary observations, often with the aim of supporting the generation of data related to biomass burning fuel consumption and trace gas and aerosol emission fields. The Fire Radiative Power (FRP) products generated by the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA SAF) from data collected by the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) are one such set of products, and are freely available in both near real-time and archived form. Every 15 min, the algorithms used to generate these products identify and map the location of new SEVIRI observations containing actively burning fires, and characterise their individual rates of radiative energy release (fire radiative power; FRP) that is believed proportional to rates of biomass consumption and smoke emission. The FRP-PIXEL product contains the highest spatial resolution FRP dataset, delivered for all of Europe, northern and southern Africa, and part of South America at a spatial resolution of 3 km (decreasing away from the west African sub-satellite point) at the full 15 min temporal resolution. The FRP-GRID product is an hourly summary of the FRP-PIXEL data, produced at a 5° grid cell size and including simple bias adjustments for meteorological cloud cover and for the regional underestimation of FRP caused, primarily, by the non-detection of low FRP fire pixels at SEVIRI's relatively coarse pixel size. Here we describe the enhanced geostationary Fire Thermal Anomaly (FTA) algorithm used to detect the SEVIRI active fire pixels, and detail methods used to deliver atmospherically corrected FRP information

  9. The concept of electro-nuclear facility for useful power generation and minor actinides transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergelson, B.R.; Balyuk, S.A. [ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-10-01

    The possibility is shown to design in principle the double-purpose liquid fuel electro nuclear facility for useful power generation and minor actinides transmutation in U-Pu fuel cycle conditions. D{sub 2}O and a melt of fluorine salts are considered as a working media for liquid fuel. Such facility replenished with depicted or natural uranium only makes it possible to generate power of 900 MW (c) for external consumers and serve 20 WWER-1000 reactors for transmutation of MA. The facility could be thought as an alternative to fast reactors since appr. 30% of the total power confined in uranium is utilized in it.

  10. Proposed power upgrade of the hot fuel examination facility's neutron radiography reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both non-destructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the non-destructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography. When the NRAD facility was designed and constructed, an operating power level of 250 kw was considered to be adequate for obtaining radiographs of the type of specimens envisaged at that time. Since that time, several things have occurred that have tended to increase radiography exposure times to as much as 90 minutes each. In order to decrease exposure times, the reactor power level is to be increased from 250 kW to 1 MW. This increase in power will necessitate several engineering and design changes. The proposed upgrade of the NRAD facility will increase the neutron flux available in the beam tubes appreciably. The increased flux will enable NRAD to continue to meet its operational commitments in a timely manner and to develop state-of-the-art techniques in the future as it has in the past

  11. Using Sound to Modify Fish Behavior at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities: A Workshop December 12-13, 1995. Phase II: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J. [ed.] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Popper, Arthur N. [ed.] [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A workshop on ``Use of Sound for Fish Protection at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities`` was held in Portland, Oregon on December 12--13, 1995. This workshop convened a 22-member panel of international experts from universities, industry, and government to share knowledge, questions, and ideas about using sound for fish guidance. Discussions involved in a broad range of indigenous migratory and resident fish species and fish-protection issues in river systems, with particular focus on the Columbia River Basin. Because the use of sound behavioral barriers for fish is very much in its infancy, the workshop was designed to address the many questions being asked by fishery managers and researchers about the feasibility and potential benefits of using sound to augment physical barriers for fish protection in the Columbia River system.

  12. The SPES High Power ISOL production target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, A.; Corradetti, S.; Ballan, M.; Borgna, F.; Manzolaro, M.; Scarpa, D.; Monetti, A.; Rossignoli, M.; Silingardi, R.; Mozzi, A.; Vivian, G.; Boratto, E.; De Ruvo, L.; Sattin, N.; Meneghetti, G.; Oboe, R.; Guerzoni, M.; Margotti, A.; Ferrari, M.; Zenoni, A.; Prete, G.

    2016-11-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is a facility under construction at INFN-LNL (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro), aimed to produce intense neutron-rich radioactive ion beams (RIBs). These will be obtained using the ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) method, bombarding a uranium carbide target with a proton beam of 40MeV energy and currents up to 200μA. The target configuration was designed to obtain a high number of fissions, up to 1013 per second, low power deposition and fast release of the produced isotopes. The exotic isotopes generated in the target are ionized, mass separated and re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10AMeV and higher, for masses in the region of A = 130 amu , with an expected rate on the secondary target up to 109 particles per second. In this work, recent results on the R&D activities regarding the SPES RIB production target-ion source system are reported.

  13. MELCOR modeling of the PBF [Power Burst Facility] Severe Fuel Damage Test 1-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madni, I.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a MELCOR Version 1.8 simulation of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1--4. The input data for the analysis were obtained from the Test Results Report and from SCDAP/RELAP5 input. Results are presented for the transient liquid level in the test bundle, clad temperatures, shroud temperatures, clad oxidation and hydrogen generation, bundle geometry changes, fission product release, and heat transfer to the bypass flow. Comparisons are made with experimental data and with SCDAP/RELAP5 calculations. 10 refs., 7 figs

  14. Power Systems Development Facility. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes the work completed during the third quarter of a project entitled Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion. The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phase expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  15. WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doug Strickland; Albert Tsang

    2002-10-14

    The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over a three year period, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial plants operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations; (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues; and (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. This report describes management planning, work breakdown structure development, and feasibility study activities by the IMPPCCT consortium in support of the first project phase. Project planning activities have been completed, and a project timeline and task list has been generated. Requirements for an economic model to evaluate the West Terre Haute implementation and for other commercial implementations are being defined. Specifications for methanol product and availability of local feedstocks for potential commercial embodiment plant sites have been defined. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the fifth phase solicitation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis

  16. Proceeding of the 7. Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Jujuratisbela, Uju; Aziz, Ferhat; Su'ud, Zaki; Suprawhardana, M. Salman

    2002-02-01

    The seventh proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities, held by National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about safety and nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of technology; high temperature reactor and application for national development sustain able and high technology. This seminar level all aspects technology, Power Reactor research reactor, high temperature reactor and nuclear facilities. The article is separated by index

  17. Moly99 Production Facility: Report on Beamline Components, Requirements, Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishofberger, Kip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-23

    In FY14 we completed the design of the beam line for the linear accelerator production design concept. This design included a set of three bending magnets, quadrupole focusing magnets, and octopoles to flatten the beam on target. This design was generic and applicable to multiple different accelerators if necessary. In FY15 we built on that work to create specifications for the individual beam optic elements, including power supply requirements. This report captures the specification of beam line components with initial cost estimates for the NorthStar production facility.This report is organized as follows: The motivation of the beamline design is introduced briefly, along with renderings of the design. After that, a specific list is provided, which accounts for each beamline component, including part numbers and costs, to construct the beamline. After that, this report details the important sections of the beamline and individual components. A final summary and list of follow-on activities completes this report.

  18. The enforcement order for the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The enforcement order provides for grants concerning the arrangement of various public facilities in the areas surrounding a power generating facility; the public facilities in the arrangement for which the grants are given include communication, recreation activities, environmental sanitation, culture, medicine, etc. The prefectural governor concerned submits his plan for the arrangement to the Government, which then decides on the grants. Then, the grants are given to local governments concerned. The sums of the grants are determined on the basis of the output, construction cost of the nuclear power facility. (Mori, K.)

  19. On optimization of power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feltenmark, S.

    1997-01-01

    Short-term optimization of power production is treated. It concerns the problem of determining a production schedule for a power system, which minimizes the total cost of production, while satisfying various constraints. The thesis consists of an introductory chapter, four chapters that each concerns a specific problem area (economic dispatch, unit commitment, hydro power planning and cogeneration optimization), plus a chapter with relevant theory. The emphasis of the thesis is on the mathematical structures that arise in problems in this field, and how to exploit them algorithmically. A recurring theme is convexification, either implicit, by dualization, or explicit, as in our approach to hydro power optimization. 134 refs

  20. Smart Power Supply Systems for Mission Critical Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Keiichi; Babasaki, Tadatoshi

    To develop the advanced and rich life, and the also economy and social activity continuously, various types of energy are necessary. At the same time, to protect the global environment and to prevent the depletion of natural resources, the effective and moreover efficient use of energy is becoming important. Electric power is one of the most important forms of energy for our life and society. This paper describes topics and survey results of technical trends regarding the electric power supply systems which are playing a core role as the important infrastructure to support the emergence of information-oriented society. Specifically, the power supply systems that enhance high power quality and reliability (PQR) are important for the steady growth of information and communication services. The direct current (DC) power, which has been used for telecommunications power systems and information and communications technologies (ICT), enables existing utilities' grid and distributed energy resources to keep a balance between supply and demand of small-scaled power systems or microgirds. These techniques are expected to be part of smartgrid technologies and facilitate the installation of distributed generators in mission critical facilities.

  1. Hazard analysis in uranium hexafluoride production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, Maristhela Passoni de Araujo

    1999-01-01

    The present work provides a method for preliminary hazard analysis of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The proposed method identify both chemical and radiological hazards, as well as the consequences associated with accident scenarios. To illustrate the application of the method, a uranium hexafluoride production facility was selected. The main hazards are identified and the potential consequences are quantified. It was found that, although the facility handles radioactive material, the main hazards as associated with releases of toxic chemical substances such as hydrogen fluoride, anhydrous ammonia and nitric acid. It was shown that a contention bung can effectively reduce the consequences of atmospheric release of toxic materials. (author)

  2. Global power production scenarios to 2100 and the dual role of forests: accelerated climate damage or regulating and provisioning ecosystem services?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg

    The worlds' electrical power production is depending on the current energy infrastructure, and future investments in new power supply facilities using renewable and non-renewable energy sources. Continued growth in power production in the 21st century will cause global environmental change (GEC......). GEC with climate change as an important driver will affect the environment and the economy in multiple ways that can be summarized as losses of biodiversity and changing ecosystem services (ES), but with very diverse temporal and spatial impacts. In a simple global growth model for power production......, including non-renewable and renewable energy sources, the potential role of forest biomass is investigated. The demands for forest ecosystem services imposed by the global power production are assessed in the present study. Three global power supply scenarios to 2050 with different emphasis...

  3. Overview of power plant and industrial facility performance in earthquakes in 1985 through 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstman, N.G.; Yanev, P.I.; McCormick, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper briefly documents the performance of power and industrial facilities during five destructive earthquakes in 1985 and 1986. These earthquakes represent varying levels of intensity, duration, frequency content, epicentral distance and construction practice. All of the earthquakes reinforce the findings of earlier earthquake investigations. Damage to equipment in power and industrial facilities is rare, as long as the equipment is adequately anchored. The ceramic components of switchyard equipment and the actuation of electro-mechanical relays remain concerns in the design of facilities which must remain operational during and following strong motion earthquakes. (orig.)

  4. 77 FR 48992 - Tobacco Product Manufacturing Facility Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... manufacture, preproduction design validation (including a process to assess the performance of a tobacco... about the manufacturing practices and processes unique to your facility and regulated tobacco products... process, package, label, and distribute different types of regulated tobacco products (cigarettes...

  5. Site Characterization Report ORGDP Diffusion Facilities Permanent Shutdown K-700 Power House and K-27 Switch Yard/Switch House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas R.J., Blanchard R.D.

    1988-06-13

    The K-700 Power House area, initially built to supply power to the K-25 gaseous diffusion plant was shutdown and disassembled in the 1960s. This shutdown was initiated by TVA supplying economical power to the diffusion plant complex. As a result of world wide over production of enriched, reactor grade U{sup 235}, the K-27 switch yard and switch house area was placed in standby in 1985. Subsequently, as the future production requirements decreased, the cost of production increased and the separation technologies for other processes improved, the facility was permanently shutdown in December, 1987. This Site Characterization Report is a part of the FY-88 engineering Feasibility Study for placing ORGDP Gaseous Diffusion Process facilities in 'Permanent Shutdown'. It is sponsored by the Department of Energy through Virgil Lowery of Headquarters--Enrichment and through Don Cox of ORO--Enrichment Operations. The primary purpose of these building or site characterization reports is to document, quantify, and map the following potential problems: Asbestos; PCB containing fluids; Oils, coolants, and chemicals; and External contamination. With the documented quantification of the concerns (problems) the Engineering Feasibility Study will then proceed with examining the potential solutions. For this study, permanent shutdown is defined as the securing and/or conditioning of each facility to provide 20 years of safe service with minimal expenditures and, where feasible, also serving DOE's needs for long-term warehousing or other such low-risk use. The K-700 power house series of buildings were either masonry construction or a mix of masonry and wood. The power generating equipment was removed and sold as salvage in the mid 1960s but the buildings and auxiliary equipment were left intact. The nine ancillary buildings in the power house area use early in the Manhattan Project for special research projects, were left intact minus the original special equipment

  6. The GreenLab Research Facility: A Micro-Grid Integrating Production, Consumption and Storage of Clean Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell Bomani, Bilal Mark; Elbuluk, Malik; Fain, Henry; Kankam, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    There is a large gap between the production and demand for energy from alternative fuel and alternative renewable energy sources. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has initiated a laboratory-pilot study that concentrates on using biofuels as viable alternative fuel resources for the field of aviation, as well as, utilizing wind and solar technologies as alternative renewable energy resources, and in addition, the use of pumped water for storage of energy that can be retrieved through hydroelectric generation. This paper describes the GreenLab Research Facility and its power and energy sources with .recommendations for worldwide expansion and adoption of the concept of such a facility

  7. Governments' role in decommissioning nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guindon, S.; Wendling, R.D.; Gordelier, S.; Soederberg, O.; Averous, J.; Orlando, D.

    2005-01-01

    the Rome Workshop, we conclude that, with respect to power production facilities, government policy should aim at securing funding, whatever system is practically chosen, so that the actual beneficiary from the power generated - and not the future taxpayer -pays for all the production costs, including future decommissioning. There are very good ethical reasons behind a system which ensures that the generations that consume this electricity do not leave such an economic burden to their grandchildren. This is also one of the principles that are expressed in the 1999 Joint Convention. The most practical way to ensure that such economic burdens do not crop up at a later stage is probably to create some sort of funding mechanism. Such funding can be organised in different ways according to different conditions in different countries. Generally speaking, to ensure an effective funding mechanism, there has to be national legislation on how such a mechanism should be constructed. Different systems with governmental institutions more or less involved are possible. But any funding system, aiming at providing economic resources for decommissioning in a foreseeable future should meet the following requirements. Stable legal framework: the legislation regarding funding should have high profile among legislators to ensure that political pressures do not lead to decisions to change the legislation in order to allow assets to be used for other urgent purposes. Legal rules must ensure that funds collected for this purpose cannot disappear as a consequence of bankruptcy of an owner of a nuclear facility that needs to be decommissioned. Calculations of future costs have to meet high accuracy standards. This means that appropriate discount factors will have to be applied to ensure that the time frames when costs will be incurred will be factored into the costing formulae. One possible way to achieve high accuracy is to require regular and frequent reviews of all calculations. It is

  8. Data acquisition system for medium power neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.R. Jr.; Francis, J.E. Jr.; Hammons, C.E.; Dagenhart, W.K.

    1978-06-01

    The Medium Power Neutral Beam Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was constructed in order to develop, test, and condition powerful neutral beam lines for the Princeton Large Torus experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The data acquisition system for the test stand monitors source performance, beam characteristics, and power deposition profiles to determine if the beam line is operating up to its design specifications. The speed of the computer system is utilized to provide near-real-time analysis of experimental data. Analysis of the data is presented as numerical tabulation and graphic display

  9. Facility for protection of technological, especially power assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichon, S.; Hahn, J.; Malatek, K.; Randak, O.; Vitovec, P.; Zidek, M.

    1987-01-01

    The facility consists of sensors producing analog signals, used as input information for the evaluation of process conditions or equipment failures. The sensors are fitted to partial functional parts of technological assemblies, such as nuclear reactors. The individual sensors are connected via unification converters to the respective protection units. The facility is resistant to breakdowns of the analog sensors and other components including the computer; it features the possibility of in-service failure detection and the capability of immediate regeneration following a failure. This capability prevents, with high probability, the production of non-accident failures of the technological assembly. The block diagram is described of the facility and its operation in the event of an emergency. (J.B.). 1 fig

  10. Evaluation of medical isotope production with the accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, R.W.; Frey, G.D.; McLean, D.C., Jr; Spicer, K.M.; Davis, S.E.; Baron, S.; Frysinger, J.R.; Blanpied, G.; Adcock, D.

    1997-01-01

    The accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility, with its high beam current and high beam energy, would be an ideal supplier of radioisotopes for medical research, imaging, and therapy. By-product radioisotopes will be produced in the APT window and target cooling systems and in the tungsten target through spallation, neutron, and proton interactions. High intensity proton fluxes are potentially available at three different energies for the production of proton- rich radioisotopes. Isotope production targets can be inserted into the blanket for production of neutron-rich isotopes. Currently, the major production sources of radioisotopes are either aging or abroad, or both. The use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine is growing and changing, both in terms of the number of nuclear medicine procedures being performed and in the rapidly expanding range of procedures and radioisotopes used. A large and varied demand is forecast, and the APT would be an ideal facility to satisfy that demand

  11. A preliminary analysis of floating production storage and offloading facilities with gas liquefaction processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Carranza-Sánchez, Yamid Alberto; Junior, Silvio de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Floating, production, storage and offloading (FPSO) plants are facilities used in upstream petroleum processing. They have gained interest because they are more flexible than conventional plants and can be used for producing oil and gas in deep-water fields. In general, gas export is challenging...... because of the lack of infrastructure in remote locations. The present work investigates the possibility of integrating liquefaction processes on such facilities, considering two mixed-refrigerant and two expansion-based processes suitable for offshore applications. Two FPSO configurations are considered...... in this work, and they were suggested by Brazilian operators for fields processing natural gas with moderate to high content of carbon dioxide. The performance of the combined systems is analysed by conducting energy and exergy analyses. The integration of gas liquefaction results in greater power consumption...

  12. 76 FR 51961 - Brown Bear Power, LLC, Topsham Hydroelectric Generating Facility Trust No. 1, Topsham Hydro...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... On August 3, 2011, Brown Bear Power, LLC, Topsham Hydroelectric Generating Facility (Trust No. 1... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 4784-082] Brown Bear Power, LLC, Topsham Hydroelectric Generating Facility Trust No. 1, Topsham Hydro Partners Limited Partnership...

  13. Uranium Production Safety Assessment Team. UPSAT. An international peer review service for uranium production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The IAEA Uranium Production Safety Assessment Team (UPSAT) programme is designed to assist Member States to improve the safe operation of uranium production facilities. This programme facilitates the exchange of knowledge and experience between team members and industry personnel. An UPSAT mission is an international expert review, conducted outside of any regulatory framework. The programme is implemented in the spirit of voluntary co-operation to contribute to the enhancement of operational safety and practices where it is most effective, at the facility itself. An UPSAT review supplements other facility and regulatory efforts which may have the same objective

  14. 75 FR 76055 - Nebraska Public Power District Cooper Nuclear Station; Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Docket No. 50-298; NRC-2008-0617] Nebraska Public Power District Cooper Nuclear Station; Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility Operating License No. DPR-46 for an... Power District (NPPD), the operator of the Cooper Nuclear Station (CNS). Renewed facility operating...

  15. Proceedings of the 9. National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Aziz, Ferhat; Untoro, Pudji; Su'ud, Zaki; Zarkasi, Amin Santoso; Lasman, As Natio

    2003-08-01

    The ninth proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities held by National Nuclear Energy Agency and PLN-JTK. The aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about Safety and Nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of Technology High Temperature Reactor and Application for National Development Sustainable and High Technology. This seminar cover all aspects Technology, Power Reactor, Research Reactor High Temperature Reactor and Nuclear Facilities. There are 20 articles have separated index

  16. Issues of improving quality of training personnel for nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacko, J.

    1987-01-01

    The basic stages are characterized of the development of a standard system of personnel training for the start-up, operation and maintenance of nuclear power facilities. The experience is analyzed gained by the Branch Training Centre of the Nuclear Power Plant Research Institute. Suggestions are submitted for improving the quality of personnel training based on Czechoslovak and foreign experiences. (author). 3 refs

  17. Detailed description of an SSAC at the facility level for on-load refueled power reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.J.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of a system for the accounting for and control of nuclear material in an on-load refueled power reactor facility which can be used by a facility operator to establish his own system to comply with a national system for nuclear material accounting and control and to facilitate application of IAEA safeguards. The scope of this document is limited to descriptions of the following SSAC elements: (1) Nuclear Material Measurements; (2) Measurement Quality; (3) Records and Reports; (4) Physical Inventory Taking; (5) Material Balance Closing

  18. Development of high power CW and pulsed RF test facility based on 1 MW, 352.2 MHz klystron amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badapanda, M.K.; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Upadhyay, Rinki; Rao, J.N.; Tiwari, Ashish; Jain, Akhilesh; Lad, M.R.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    A high power 1 MW, 352.2 MHz RF Test facility having CW and Pulse capability is being developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore for performance evaluation of various RF components, accelerating structures and related subsystems. Thales make 1 MW, 352.2 MHz klystron amplifier (TH 2089) will be employed in this high power test facility, which is thoroughly tested for its performance parameters at rated operating conditions. Auxiliary power supplies like filament, electromagnet, ion pump and mod anode power supply as well as 200 W solid state driver amplifier necessary for this high power test facility have been developed. A high voltage floating platform is created for floating filament and mod anode power supplies. Interconnection of various power supplies and other subsystems of this test facility are being carried out. A high voltage 100 kV, 25 Amp DC crowbar less power supply and low conductivity water (LCW) plant required for this klystron amplifier are in advanced stage of development. NI make cRIO 9081 real time (RT) controller based control and interlock system has been developed to realize proper sequence of operation of various power supplies and to monitor the status of crucial parameters in this test facility. This RF test facility will provide confidence for development of RF System of future accelerators like SNS and ADSS. (author)

  19. A radioactive ion beam facility using photofission

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, W T

    1999-01-01

    Use of a high-power electron linac as the driver accelerator for a Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility is proposed. An electron beam of 30 MeV and 100 kW can produce nearly 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 fissions/s from an optimized sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U target and about 60% of this from a natural uranium target. An electron beam can be readily transmitted through a thin window at the exit of the accelerator vacuum system and transported a short distance through air to a water-cooled Bremsstrahlung-production target. The Bremsstrahlung radiation can, in turn, be transported through air to the isotope-production target. This separates the accelerator vacuum system, the Bremsstrahlung target and the isotope-production target, reducing remote handling problems. The electron beam can be scanned over a large target area to reduce the power density on both the Bremsstrahlung and isotope-production targets. These features address one of the most pressing technological challenges of a high-power RIB facility, namely the production o...

  20. Ownership options, financing structures, and regulatory considerations affecting independent power production projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper is a framework for analysis of the legal, financing, and policy differences between independent power production projects (IPPs) and projects with qualifying facility status (QFs) under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). At a basic level, there is no fundamental difference in types of ownership and financing structures available to IPPs and QFS. The key consideration, though, is the regulatory and legal implications to project participants. Significant issues arise for equity participants, lenders, developers, and project operators that are considering IPP projects. Of course, many of these same issues apply to certain types of QF projects that are not fully exempt from the Public Utility Holding Company Act (PUHCA) and the Federal Power Act (FPA)

  1. Temporary storage facility for spent nuclear fuels at the Atucha I nuclear power station (CNA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasinger, K.

    1983-01-01

    According to plans of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), the spent nuclear fuel elements of the Atucha I Nuclear Power Station are to be stored temporarily pending a decision about the ultimate disposal concept. The holding capacity of the first fuel storage facility built by the German KWU together with the whole power plant had been expanded in 1978 to a level good until mid-1982. In 1977, KWU drafted the concept of another fuel storage facility. Like the first one, it was designed as a wet storage system attached to the power plant installations and had a holding capacity of 6944 fuel elements, which corresponds to some 1100 te of uranium. This extends the storage capacity up until 1996. In 1978, KWU was commissioned by CNEA to plan the whole facility and deliver the mechanical and electrical equipment. CNEA themselves assumed responsibility for the construction work. The second fuel storage facility was commissioned three years after the start of construction. (orig.) [de

  2. Tunisian Rearing facility a first year production constraints and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerfali, M.M; Ben Salah, H.; Caceres, C.; Raies, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Tunisian Medfly rearing facility is located in the north of the country in a small city named Sidi Thabet, near the capital. This facility was designed for rearing the Medfly Genetic Sexing strain (GSS). The facility has been started operations in 2003 in order to release sterile males under 6000 hectares in the north east of the country in the Cap Bon Peninsula. This programme is supported by the Tunisian government, IAEA and FAO. Male only production was not stable for the four first months, due to some constraints. The production is stabilising by the time, after the tune fine off all rearing procedures and adjustment of the environmental control system. Quality control procedures (QC) were put for each procedure of the production from eggs to adult following the procedures established in the International FAO/IAEA/USDA Fruit Flies Quality control Manual

  3. Development of a Medical Cyclotron Production Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Danny R.

    2003-08-01

    Development of a Cyclotron manufacturing facility begins with a business plan. Geographics, the size and activity of the medical community, the growth potential of the modality being served, and other business connections are all considered. This business used the customer base established by NuTech, Inc., an independent centralized nuclear pharmacy founded by Danny Allen. With two pharmacies in operation in Tyler and College Station and a customer base of 47 hospitals and clinics the existing delivery system and pharmacist staff is used for the cyclotron facility. We then added cyclotron products to contracts with these customers to guarantee a supply. We partnered with a company in the process of developing PET imaging centers. We then built an independent imaging center attached to the cyclotron facility to allow for the use of short-lived isotopes.

  4. Development of a Medical Cyclotron Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Danny R.

    2003-01-01

    Development of a Cyclotron manufacturing facility begins with a business plan. Geographics, the size and activity of the medical community, the growth potential of the modality being served, and other business connections are all considered. This business used the customer base established by NuTech, Inc., an independent centralized nuclear pharmacy founded by Danny Allen. With two pharmacies in operation in Tyler and College Station and a customer base of 47 hospitals and clinics the existing delivery system and pharmacist staff is used for the cyclotron facility. We then added cyclotron products to contracts with these customers to guarantee a supply. We partnered with a company in the process of developing PET imaging centers. We then built an independent imaging center attached to the cyclotron facility to allow for the use of short-lived isotopes

  5. 47 CFR 74.795 - Digital low power TV and TV translator transmission system facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Digital low power TV and TV translator... DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.795 Digital low power TV and TV translator transmission system facilities. (a) A digital low power TV or TV translator station shall operate...

  6. Nuclear space power safety and facility guidelines study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlman, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    This report addresses safety guidelines for space nuclear reactor power missions and was prepared by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) under a Department of Energy grant, DE-FG01-94NE32180 dated 27 September 1994. This grant was based on a proposal submitted by the JHU/APL in response to an open-quotes Invitation for Proposals Designed to Support Federal Agencies and Commercial Interests in Meeting Special Power and Propulsion Needs for Future Space Missionsclose quotes. The United States has not launched a nuclear reactor since SNAP 10A in April 1965 although many Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) have been launched. An RTG powered system is planned for launch as part of the Cassini mission to Saturn in 1997. Recently the Ballistic Missile Defense Office (BMDO) sponsored the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) which was to demonstrate and evaluate the Russian-built TOPAZ II nuclear reactor as a power source in space. As of late 1993 the flight portion of this program was canceled but work to investigate the attributes of the reactor were continued but at a reduced level. While the future of space nuclear power systems is uncertain there are potential space missions which would require space nuclear power systems. The differences between space nuclear power systems and RTG devices are sufficient that safety and facility requirements warrant a review in the context of the unique features of a space nuclear reactor power system

  7. Regulation for delivery of subsidies for urgent safety measures for atomic power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This rule is established under the provisions of the law for the proper enforcement of subsidy budgets and the ordinance for the execution of this law and to practice these provisions. It is applied to the delivery of subsidies for the expenses of the measures taken beforehand for the security of inhabitants in the surrounding areas of atomic power generating facilities in the emergency time of hazard or the danger of the occurrence of hazard by such facilities. Basic terms are defined, such as atomic power generating facilities and others, prefecture concerned, cities, towns and villages concerned, emergency communication network arrangement business, emergency medical facility arrangement business, business of holding hazard prevention course and expected date of beginning operation. Directors of ministries and agencies concerned deliver, if necessary, to prefectures concerned subsidies for all or a part of the expenses needed for the businesses of emergency communication network arrangement, emergency medical facility arrangement and holding hazard prevention course. The terms of delivery and the amounts of subsidies vary according to the kinds of businesses. Prefectures which intend to apply for the delivery of subsidies shall file to the director of the ministry or agency concerned the specified application attaching the operation plans of businesses and the general explanation of atomic power generating facilities, etc. The decision and conditions of delivery, reports on the situations and results of businesses and other related matters are defined, respectively. (Okada, K.)

  8. Replacement Power Facility site selection report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wike, L.D.; Toole, G.L.; Specht, W.L.

    1992-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of a Replacement Power Facility (RPF) for supplementing and replacing existing sources of steam and possibly electricity at the Savannah River Site (SRS). DOE is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for this project As part of the impact analysis of the proposed action, the EIS will include a detailed description of the environment where the RPF will be constructed. This description must be specific to the recommended site at SRS, which contains more than 300 square miles of land including streams, lakes, impoundments, wetlands, and upland areas. A formal site-selection process was designed and implemented to identify the preferred RPF site.

  9. An overview of technical requirements on durable concrete production for near surface disposal facilities for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolentino, Evandro; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive waste can be generated by a wide range of activities varying from activities in hospitals to nuclear power plants, to mines and mineral processing facilities. General public have devoted nowadays considerable attention to the subject of radioactive waste management due to heightened awareness of environmental protection. The preferred strategy for the management of all radioactive waste is to contain it and to isolate it from the accessible biosphere. The Federal Government of Brazil has announced the construction for the year of 2014 and operation for the year of 2016 of a near surface disposal facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of technical requirements related to production of durable concrete to be used in near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste concrete structures. These requirements have been considered by researchers dealing with ongoing designing effort of the Brazilian near surface disposal facility. (author)

  10. Study on system integration of robots operated in nuclear fusion facility and nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    A present robot is required to apply to many fields such as amusement, welfare and protection against disasters. The are however only limited numbers of the robots, which can work under the actual conditions as a robot system. It is caused by the following reasons: (1) the robot system cannot be realized by the only collection of the elemental technologies, (2) the performance of the robot is determined by that of the integrated system composed of the complicated elements with many functions, and (3) the respective elements have to be optimized in the integrated robot system with a well balance among them, through their examination, adjustment and improvement. Therefore, the system integration of the robot composed of a large number of elements is the most critical issue to realize the robot system for actual use. In the present paper, I describe the necessary approaches and elemental technologies to solve the issues on the system integration of the typical robot systems for maintenance in the nuclear fusion facility and rescue in the accident of the nuclear power plant facilities. These robots work under the intense radiation condition and restricted space in place of human. In particular, I propose a new approach to realize the system integration of the robot for actual use from the viewpoints of not only the environment and working conditions but also the restructure and optimization of the required elemental technologies with a well balance in the robot system. Based on the above approach, I have a contribution to realize the robot systems working under the actual conditions for maintenance in the nuclear fusion facility and rescue in the accident of the nuclear power plant facilities. (author)

  11. Situation of the radioactive waste management and the employee radiation exposure in commercial power generation reactor facilities in fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    (1) Situation of the radioactive waste management in commercial power generating reactor facilities: The owners of power generation reactor facilities are obligated not to exceed the target dose around the sites by law in the radioactive waste management. The release of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes and the storage of radioactive solid wastes in respective reactor facilities in fiscal 1980 are presented in tables (for the former, the data since 1971 are also given). The release control values were satisfied in all the facilities. (2) Situation of employe radiation exposure in commercial power generating reactor facilities: The owners of power generation reactor facilities are obligated not to exceed the permissible exposure doses by law. The Employe exposure doses in respective reactor facilities in fiscal 1980 are given in tables. All exposure doses were below the permissible levels. (J.P.N.)

  12. Multimegawatt space nuclear power open-cycle MHD-facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavshuk, V.A.; Panchenko, V.P.

    2008-01-01

    Paper presents the results of the efforts to calculate the characteristics, the layout and the engineering design of the open cycle space power propulsion on the basis of the high-temperature nuclear reactor for a nuclear rocket engine and the Faraday 20 MW capacity MHD-generator. The IVG-1 heterogeneous channel-vessel reactor ensuring in the course of the experiments hydrogen heating up to 3100 K, up to 5 MPa pressure at the reactor core outlet, up to 5 kg/s flowsheet, up to 220 MW thermal power served as a reactor is considered. One determined the MHD-generator basic parameters, namely: the portion of Cs dope was equal to 20%, the outlet stagnation pressure - 2 MPa, the electric conductivity - ≅30 S/m, the Mach number - ≅0.7, the magnetic field induction - 6 T, the capacity - 20 MW, the specific power removal - ∼4 MJ/kg. Paper describes the design of the MHD-facility with the working fluid momentless discharge and its basic characteristics [ru

  13. Control of Listeria species food safety at a poultry food production facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Edward M; Wall, Patrick G; Fanning, Séamus

    2015-10-01

    Surveillance and control of food-borne human pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, is a critical aspect of modern food safety programs at food production facilities. This study evaluated contamination patterns of Listeria species at a poultry food production facility, and evaluated the efficacy of procedures to control the contamination and transfer of the bacteria throughout the plant. The presence of Listeria species was studied along the production chain, including raw ingredients, food-contact, non-food-contact surfaces, and finished product. All isolates were sub-typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to identify possible entry points for Listeria species into the production chain, as well as identifying possible transfer routes through the facility. The efficacy of selected in-house sanitizers against a sub-set of the isolates was evaluated. Of the 77 different PFGE-types identified, 10 were found among two or more of the five categories/areas (ingredients, food preparation, cooking and packing, bulk packing, and product), indicating potential transfer routes at the facility. One of the six sanitizers used was identified as unsuitable for control of Listeria species. Combining PFGE data, together with information on isolate location and timeframe, facilitated identification of a persistent Listeria species contamination that had colonized the facility, along with others that were transient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Alteration in reactor installations (Unit 1 and 2 reactor facilities) in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station of The Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A report by the Nuclear Safety Commission to the Ministry of International Trade and Industry concerning the alteration in Unit 1 and 2 reactor facilities in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., was presented. The technical capabilities for the alteration of reactor facilities in Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., were confirmed to be adequate. The safety of the reactor facilities after the alteration was confirmed to be adequate. The items of examination made for the confirmation of the safety are as follows: reactor core design (nuclear design, mechanical design, mixed reactor core), the analysis of abnormal transients in operation, the analysis of various accidents, the analysis of credible accidents for site evaluation. (Mori, K.)

  15. The state of improvement of security management setup in the Japan Atomic Power Company and improvement of facilities in its Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In connection with the series of accidents in the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station of the Japan Atomic Power Company, the state of security management in JAPC and the safety of facilities in the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station, which have resulted from improvement efforts, are described on the following items: security management setup - communication and reporting in emergency, the management of inspection and maintenance records, work control and supervision in repair, improvement, etc., functional authority and responsibility in maintenance management, operation management, radiation control, personnel education; improvement of facilities - feed water heaters, laundry waste-water filter room, radioactive waste treatment facility, general drainage, concentrated waste liquid storage tanks in newly-built waste treatment building, etc. (Mori, K.)

  16. An effective heuristic for combined heat-and-power production planning with power ramp constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong, Aiying; Lahdelma, Risto

    2007-01-01

    Combined heat-and-power (CHP) production is an increasingly important technology for its efficient utilization of primary-energy resources and for reducing CO 2 emissions. In the CHP plant, the generation of heat-and-power follows a joint characteristic, which makes the determination of both the marginal power production cost (MPPC) and the feasible operating region for the plant more complicated than for the power-only generation plant. Due to the interdependence between heat and power production, the power-ramp constraints, which limit how much the power production of a CHP plant may increase or decrease between two successive periods, may also imply constraints on the heat production. In this paper, we investigate the impact of power-ramp constraints on CHP production planning and develop a robust heuristic for dealing with the power-ramp constraints based on the solution to the problem with relaxed ramp-constraints (RRC). Numerical results based on realistic production models show that the heuristic can generate high-quality solutions efficiently. (author)

  17. Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conocophillips

    2007-09-30

    The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project was established to evaluate integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project was under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP), after it acquired Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC) and the E-Gas gasification technology from Global Energy Inc. in July 2003. The project has completed both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of development. The two project phases include the following: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at SG Solutions LLC (SGS), previously the Wabash River Energy Limited, Gasification Facility located in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plant (CEP) operated at the Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations. (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. Phase 1 of this project was supported by a multi-industry team consisting of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while Phase 2 was supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The SGS integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other carbonaceous fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas (syngas) is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine

  18. Hydroelectric power in Switzerland: large growth potential by increasing the installed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleiss, A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its important hydroelectric power generation facilities (about 525 plants with a total power of 13,314 MW producing about 35.3 TWh annually) Switzerland plays an important role in the interconnected European power system. Large artificial storage lakes in the Swiss Alps can generate peak power during hours of highest demand: 9700 MW are available from accumulated energy and the total power of pumped-storage facilities amounts to 1700 MW. The latter allow refilling the reservoirs at periods of low power demand and generating power at periods of peak demand. In the case of favorable conditions, the yearly average power production could be increased by 6% and the production during the winter period (October to March) by 20% by the year 2020. However, looking forward to the year 2050, the annual production is expected to decrease by 3% despite a possible extension of hydropower. This decrease is due to the enforcement of the minimum residual water flow rates required by a new legislation to protect the rivers. The enforcement is due at latest when the present licenses for water utilization expire. On the other hand, the installed (peak) power might be further increased by 50% by retrofitting the existing installations and constructing the pumped-storage plants currently at the planning stage

  19. Distributed power production in Mexico and Argentina: what are the new perspectives linked with the institutional reforms of the electric power sector?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islas, J.; Menanteau, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the power systems are made from the progressive aggregation of small size local networks. Todays, this structure shows its limitations with an apparent exhausting of the gains linked with the size of production units, with the increasing difficulties to develop new transportation infrastructures, and with a fast performance improvement of the modular production technologies under the effect of the deregulation of the electric sector and of the policies of greenhouse gases abatement. Thus, it is not excluded that the distributed power production systems (i.e. gas and diesel engines, micro-turbines, small gas turbines and combined cycles, fuel cells, technologies using renewable energy sources) will play a more and more important role in the power supply, beside big production facilities. The factors influencing the development of these technologies can greatly change from one country to the other but some common established factors remain such as the search for a better reliability of supplies, the implementation of policies against climatic change or the deregulation of the electrical sector. The influence of these different factors are examined in this document which stresses more particularly on the consequences of the liberalization of network industries by using first, an analysis of the international experience, and then by examining the particular cases of Mexico and Argentina. (J.S.)

  20. Nuclear power plant simulation facility evaluation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.M.; Carter, R.J.; Laughery, K.R. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology for evaluation of nuclear power plant simulation facilities with regard to their acceptability for use in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) operator licensing exam is described. The evaluation is based primarily on simulator fidelity, but incorporates some aspects of direct operator/trainee performance measurement. The panel presentation and paper discuss data requirements, data collection, data analysis and criteria for conclusions regarding the fidelity evaluation, and summarize the proposed use of direct performance measurment. While field testing and refinement of the methodology are recommended, this initial effort provides a firm basis for NRC to fully develop the necessary methodology

  1. Final environmental assessment for a refinement of the power delivery component of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Treatment and Transmission Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    The Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) is designing and constructing a system of regional water supply facilities to meet current and projected water demands and increase system reliability. The existing Southern Nevada Water system is being upgraded with a number of improvements to increase the capacity of the system. However, even the expanded system is expected to be unable to meet projected peak daily water demands by the year 1999. As a result, new facilities are being designed and constructed to operate in conjunction with the upgraded Southern Nevada Water system. These new facilities, known as the Southern Nevada Water Authority Treatment and Transmission Facility (SNWA-TTF), include four primary components: a new raw water intake; new transmission facilities including below ground pipelines, tunnels, and above ground pumping stations; a water treatment facility; and new power supply facilities. Because existing power supplies would not be adequate for the new water treatment facilities, new power facilities, consisting of two new 230 kV-69 kV substations and new 69 and 230 kV power lines, are being constructed. This environmental assessment is specifically on the new power facilities

  2. Electromagnetic Fields Associated with Commercial Solar Photovoltaic Electric Power Generating Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, R A; Hooper, H C; Sias, G G; Mezei, G; Hung, P; Kavet, R

    2015-01-01

    The southwest region of the United States is expected to experience an expansion of commercial solar photovoltaic generation facilities over the next 25 years. A solar facility converts direct current generated by the solar panels to three-phase 60-Hz power that is fed to the grid. This conversion involves sequential processing of the direct current through an inverter that produces low-voltage three-phase power, which is stepped up to distribution voltage (∼12 kV) through a transformer. This study characterized magnetic and electric fields between the frequencies of 0 Hz and 3 GHz at two facilities operated by the Southern California Edison Company in Porterville, CA and San Bernardino, CA. Static magnetic fields were very small compared to exposure limits established by IEEE and ICNIRP. The highest 60-Hz magnetic fields were measured adjacent to transformers and inverters, and radiofrequency fields from 5-100 kHz were associated with the inverters. The fields measured complied in every case with IEEE controlled and ICNIRP occupational exposure limits. In all cases, electric fields were negligible compared to IEEE and ICNIRP limits across the spectrum measured and when compared to the FCC limits (≥0.3 MHz).

  3. The regulation for delivery of subsidies for measures of promoting power source location for nuclear power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    According to the law for the arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities, the regulations concern the allocation of subsidies to promote the most efficient way of siting nuclear power facilities. The contents consist of the following: limits on the subsidies, terms of subsidy allocations, the sum of subsidies for each respective year, applications for subsidies, determination of subsidy allocations, withdrawal of applications, the conditions attached to the allocations, a report on the work proceedings, a report on the results, confirmation on the sum of the subsidies, withdrawal of the decision for subsidies, limitations for disposal of the properties, payment of subsidies, accounting of the subsidy operations, a record of the subsidies, and the chief in the governmental office concerned. (Mori, K.)

  4. Safety issues relating to the design of fusion power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasko, R.R.; Wong, K.Y.; Russell, S.B.

    1986-06-01

    In order to make fusion power a viable future source of energy, it will be necessary to ensure that the cost of power for fusion electric generation is competitive with advanced fission concepts. In addition, fusion power will have to live up to its original promise of being a more radiologically benign technology than fission, and be able to demonstrate excellent operational safety performance. These two requirements are interrelated, since the selection of an appropriate safety philosophy early in the design phase could greatly reduce or eliminate the capital costs of elaborate safety related and protective sytems. This paper will briefly overview a few of the key safety issues presently recognized as critical to the ultimate achievement of licensable, environmentally safe and socially acceptable fusion power facilities. 12 refs

  5. Upgrade of DC power supply system in ITER CS model coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimono, Mitsugu; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Keita; Kawano, Katsumi; Isono, Takaaki

    2014-03-01

    Objective of the ITER CS Model Coil Test Facility is to evaluate a large scale superconducting conductor for fusion using the Central Solenoid (CS) Model Coil, which can generate a 13T magnetic field in the inner bore with a 1.5 m diameter. The facility is composed of a helium refrigerator / liquefier system, a DC power supply system, a vacuum system and a data acquisition system. The DC power supply system supplies currents to two superconducting coils, the CS Model Coil and an insert coil. A 50-kA DC power supply is installed for the CS Model Coil and two 30 kA DC power supplies are installed for an insert coil. In order to evaluate superconducting performance of a conductor used for ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coils whose operating current is 68 kA, the line for an insert coil is upgraded. A 10 kA DC power supply was added, DC circuit breakers were upgraded, bus bars and current measuring instrument were replaced. In accordance to the upgrade, operation manual was revised. (author)

  6. Outline of construction and facility features of Onagawa nuclear power station Unit No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umimura, Yoshiharu; Tsunoda, Ryohei; Watanabe, Kazunori

    1996-01-01

    Tohoku Electric Power Company promotes development of various power sources to provide a stable supply of electricity in the future, and nuclear power takes a leading part. In August 1989, construction of Onagawa nuclear power plant Unit No. 2 (825MW) was started, following Unit No. 1 (524MW) which went on line in 1984 as Tohoku Electric's first nuclear power plant unit. Unit No. 2 began commercial operation in July 1995 through satisfactory construction work such as RPV hydraulic test in March 1994, fuel loading in October 1994, and various startup tests in each power stage. The design and construction of Unit No. 2 reflect construction and operation experience gained from Unit No. 1, and the latest technology, including that of the LWR Improvement and Standardization Program, was adopted to enhance facility reliability, improve operation and maintenance performance, and reduce worker dosage. Features of the facility, construction techniques, and a description of preoperation of Onagawa nuclear power plant Unit No. 2 are described in this paper. (author)

  7. Technical Proposal Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1975-03-28

    The proposed Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program comprises two phases. The objective of Phase 1 is to develop the technology for power generation from high-temperature, high-salinity geothermal brines existing in the Salton Sea known geothermal resources area. Phase 1 work will result in the following: (a) Completion of a preliminary design and cost estimate for a pilot geothermal brine utilization facility. (b) Design and construction of an Area Resource Test Facility (ARTF) in which developmental geothermal utilization concepts can be tested and evaluated. Program efforts will be divided into four sub-programs; Power Generation, Mineral Extraction, Reservoir Production, and the Area Resources Test Facility. The Power Generation Subprogram will include testing of scale and corrosion control methods, and critical power cycle components; power cycle selection based on an optimization of technical, environmental and economic analyses of candidate cycles; preliminary design of a pilot geothermal-electric generating station to be constructed in Phase 2 of this program. The Mineral Extraction Subprogram will involve the following: selection of an optimum mineral recovery process; recommendation of a brine clean-up process for well injection enhancement; engineering, construction and operation of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities; analysis of facility operating results from environmental, economical and technical point-of-view; preliminary design of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities of sufficient size to match the planned pilot power plant. The Reservoir Production Subprogram will include monitoring the operation and maintenance of brine production, handling and injection systems which were built with private funding in phase 0, and monitoring of the brine characteristics and potential subsidence effects during well production and injection. Based on the above, recommendations and specifications will be prepared for production and

  8. 18 CFR 292.204 - Criteria for qualifying small power production facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... shall be measured from the electrical generating equipment of a facility. (3) Waiver. The Commission may... sources. (ii) Any primary energy source which, on the basis of its energy content, is 50 percent or more... adding paragraph (a)(4), effective June 1, 2010. For the convenience of the user, the added and revised...

  9. Facilities for treatment of radioactive contaminated water in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The standard applies to processes applied in facilities for treatment of radioactive contaminated water in nuclear power plants with LWR- and HTR-type reactors. It does not apply to the treatment of concentrates obtained in the decontamination of water. (orig.) [de

  10. Regulation of fuel cycle facilities in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascroft-Hutton, H.W.

    2001-01-01

    The UK has facilities for the production of uranium hexafluoride, its enrichment, conversion into fuel and for the subsequent reprocessing of irradiated fuel and closure of the fuel cycle. All of these facilities must be licensed under UK legislation. HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate has delegated powers to issue the licence and to attach any conditions it considers necessary in the interests of safety. The fuel cycle facilities in the UK have been licensed since 1971. This paper describes briefly the UK nuclear regulatory framework and the fuel cycle facilities involved. It considers the regulatory practices adopted together with similarities and differences between regulation of fuel cycle facilities and power reactors. The safety issues associated with the fuel cycle are discussed and NII's regulatory strategy for these facilities is set out. (author)

  11. Allocating resources and products in multi-hybrid multi-cogeneration: What fractions of heat and power are renewable in hybrid fossil-solar CHP?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretta, Gian Paolo; Iora, Paolo; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    A general method for the allocation of resources and products in multi-resource/multi-product facilities is developed with particular reference to the important two-resource/two-product case of hybrid fossil and solar/heat and power cogeneration. For a realistic case study, we show how the method allows to assess what fractions of the power and heat should be considered as produced from the solar resource and hence identified as renewable. In the present scenario where the hybridization of fossil power plants by solar-integration is gaining increasing attention, such assessment is of great importance in the fair and balanced development of local energy policies based on granting incentives to renewables resources. The paper extends to the case of two-resource/two-product hybrid cogeneration, as well as to general multi-resource/multi-generation, three of the allocation methods already available for single-resource/two-product cogeneration and for two-resource/single-product hybrid facilities, namely, the ExRR (Exergy-based Reversible-Reference) method, the SRSPR (Single Resource Separate Production Reference) method, and the STALPR (Self-Tuned-Average-Local-Productions-Reference) method. For the case study considered we show that, unless the SRSPR reference efficiencies are constantly updated, the differences between the STALPR and SRSPR methods become important as hybrid and cogeneration plants take up large shares of the local energy production portfolio. - Highlights: • How much of the heat and power in hybrid solar-fossil cogeneration are renewable? • We define and compare three allocation methods for hybrid cogeneration. • Classical and exergy allocation are based on prescribed reference efficiencies. • Adaptive allocation is based on the actual average efficiencies in the local area. • Differences among methods grow as hybrid CHP (heat and power cogeneration) gains large market fractions

  12. Adequacy of power-to-volume scaling philosophy to simulate natural circulation in Integral Test Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.; Venkat Raj, V.; Aritomi, Masanori

    1998-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations were carried out to study the adequacy of power-to-volume scaling philosophy for the simulation of natural circulation and to establish the scaling philosophy applicable for the design of the Integral Test Facility (ITF-AHWR) for the Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). The results indicate that a reduction in the flow channel diameter of the scaled facility as required by the power-to-volume scaling philosophy may affect the simulation of natural circulation behaviour of the prototype plants. This is caused by the distortions due to the inability to simulate the frictional resistance of the scaled facility. Hence, it is recommended that the flow channel diameter of the scaled facility should be as close as possible to the prototype. This was verified by comparing the natural circulation behaviour of a prototype 220 MWe Indian PHWR and its scaled facility (FISBE-1) designed based on power-to-volume scaling philosophy. It is suggested from examinations using a mathematical model and a computer code that the FISBE-1 simulates the steady state and the general trend of transient natural circulation behaviour of the prototype reactor adequately. Finally the proposed scaling method was applied for the design of the ITF-AHWR. (author)

  13. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-12-30

    The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at the Power Systems Development Facility supports the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of promoting the United States’ energy security through reliable, clean, and affordable energy produced from coal. Work at the NCCC supports the development of new power technologies and the continued operation of conventional power plants under CO2 emission constraints. The NCCC includes adaptable slipstreams that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity and accelerate their development path to commercialization. During its first contract period, from October 1, 2008, through December 30, 2014, the NCCC designed, constructed, and began operation of the Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Center (PC4). Testing of CO2 capture technologies commenced in 2011, and through the end of the contract period, more than 25,000 hours of testing had been achieved, supporting a variety of technology developers. Technologies tested included advanced solvents, enzymes, membranes, sorbents, and associated systems. The NCCC continued operation of the existing gasification facilities, which have been in operation since 1996, to support the advancement of technologies for next-generation gasification processes and pre-combustion CO2 capture. The gasification process operated for 13 test runs, supporting over 30,000 hours combined of both gasification and pre-combustion technology developer testing. Throughout the contract period, the NCCC incorporated numerous modifications to the facilities to accommodate technology developers and increase test capabilities. Preparations for further testing were ongoing to continue advancement of the most promising technologies for

  14. Social power, product conspicuousness, and the demand for luxury brand counterfeit products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xuemei; Haque, Sadia; Smith, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this article is twofold: (1) to achieve a better understanding of the psychological determinants of the demand for luxury brand counterfeit products (LBCP) through exploring the effects of social power; (2) to extend power literature by identifying boundary conditions of the relationship between social power and compensatory consumption identified by Rucker and Galinsky (2008, J. Consum. Res., 35, 257-267) and Rucker and Galinsky (2009, J. Exp. Soc. Psychol., 45, 549-555). Findings from three experiments demonstrate that social power holds key insights into understanding consumers' purchase propensity for LBCP; product conspicuousness moderates the effects of social power on purchase propensity for status products; these moderation effects are only observed when the status products are LBCP but not genuine products. This article, therefore, contributes to the literature regarding the demand for counterfeits as well as the social power and compensatory consumption literature. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Upgrade of the facility EXOTIC for the in-flight production of light Radioactive Ion Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzocco, M., E-mail: marco.mazzocco@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitá di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Torresi, D.; Strano, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitá di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Boiano, A. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Boiano, C. [INFN-Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Costa, L. [INFN-LNL, Viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro, PD (Italy); Glodariu, T. [NIPNE, 407 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Guglielmetti, A. [INFN-Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica,Università di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); La Commara, M. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Parascandolo, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitá di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Pierroutsakou, D. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Signorini, C.; Soramel, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universitá di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Stroe, L. [NIPNE, 407 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Production of in-flight Radioactive Ion Beams via two-body reactions. • Development of a cryogenic gas target. • Event-by-event tracking via Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs). -- Abstract: The facility EXOTIC for the in-flight production of light weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) has been operating at INFN-LNL since 2004. RIBs are produced via two-body reactions induced by high intensity heavy-ion beams impinging on light gas targets and selected by means of a 30°-dipole bending magnet and a 1-m long Wien filter. The facility has been recently upgraded (i) by developing a cryogenic gas target, (ii) by replacing the power supplies of the middle lenses of the two quadrupole triplets, (iii) by installing two y-steerers and (iv) by placing two Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters upstream the secondary target to provide an event-by-event reconstruction of the position hit on the target. So far, RIBs of {sup 7}Be, {sup 8}B and {sup 17}F in the energy range 3–5 MeV/u have been produced with intensities about 3 × 10{sup 5}, 1.6 × 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 5} pps, respectively. Possible light RIBs (up to Z = 10) deliverable by the facility EXOTIC are also reviewed.

  16. Plutonium production story at the Hanford site: processes and facilities history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-20

    This document tells the history of the actual plutonium production process at the Hanford Site. It contains five major sections: Fuel Fabrication Processes, Irradiation of Nuclear Fuel, Spent Fuel Handling, Radiochemical Reprocessing of Irradiated Fuel, and Plutonium Finishing Operations. Within each section the story of the earliest operations is told, along with changes over time until the end of operations. Chemical and physical processes are described, along with the facilities where these processes were carried out. This document is a processes and facilities history. It does not deal with the waste products of plutonium production.

  17. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, July 1 through September 30, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; Combustion Gas Turbine; and Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility.

  18. Italian steam power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Rautenkranz, J

    1939-01-01

    A brief history of geothermal power production in Italy is presented. Boric acid has been produced on an industrial scale since 1818. The first electrical power was generated in 1904, and by 1939 the output of geothermal power plants had reached 500 GWh, with major expansion of facilities planned.

  19. Reference costs of the electric power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    This study periodically realized by the DGEMP aims to compare the competitiveness of the different channels of electric power production, for different utilization conditions. The first part ''reference costs of the 2003 electric power production'' examines the prices of the electric power produced by different channels in particular in the framework of the industrial implementing in 2015. The nuclear and thermal power plants are concerned. The second part is devoted to the decentralized production channels (wind energy, photovoltaic, cogeneration heat-electricity) is under construction and will be presented next year. (A.L.B.)

  20. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: (1) Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. (2) Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. (3) Combustion Gas Turbine. (4) Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  1. Differential infrared thermography applied to power generation facilities -- A case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, H.; Zayicek, P.

    1995-01-01

    The controlled and systematic application of differential thermal imaging (DIT) can be a highly promising tool for condition monitoring and predictive maintenance of electronic, electrical and mechanical elements and can dramatically improve the reliability, maintainability and operational life of certain types of elements in the power generation and distribution community. The expanded applicability of this technique has been brought about by improvements in commercial IR thermal imaging equipment and advances in the related data and image processing capacities. This paper summarizes the advantages and limitations of DIT and describes several variations of the technique. It goes on to provide an update of progress on a program initiated by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center to apply DIT to operating elements within a power generating station environment (Wolf Creek Nuclear Facility). It traces the selection of candidate elements at some of EPRI's member facilities, the implementation of exploratory measurements on selected candidates using available on-site infrared imaging equipment and the analysis of significant findings on one specific critical element. Finally, a projection for the potential future applicability of the DIT technique is provided

  2. Coordination Between Wind Power, Hydro Storage Facility and Conventional Generating Units According to the Annual Growth Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh Shojaeean

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the growing trend of the consumption of the electric power and the global tendency to substitute new renewable sources of energy, this paper proposes a Monte Carlo based method to determine an optimal level of this change. Considering the limitation of the wind farms in continuous supply of electric power, hydrostatic power storage facilities are used beside wind farms so that the electric power could be stored and fed in a continuous flow into power systems. Due to the gradual exclusion of conventional generators and 5 percent annual load increments, LOLE index was used in order to calculate the amount of the wind power and the capacity of the necessary power storage facility. To this end, LOLE index was calculated for the first year as the reference index for the estimation of the amount of wind power and the capacity of the storage facility in consequent years. For the upcoming years, calculations have been made to account for the gradual exclusion of conventional generators in proportion to load increments. The proposed method has been implemented and simulated on IEEE-RTS test system.

  3. Medical Isotope Production With The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckner, M.; Cappiello, M.; Pitcher, E.; O'Brien, H.

    1998-01-01

    In order to meet US tritium needs to maintain the nuclear weapons deterrent, the Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing a dual track program to provide a new tritium source. A record of decision is planned for late in 1998 to select either the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) or the Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) as the technology for new tritium production in the next century. To support this decision, an APT Project was undertaken to develop an accelerator design capable of producing 3 kg of tritium per year by 2007 (START I requirements). The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was selected to lead this effort with Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc. (BREI) / General Atomics (GA) as the prime contractor for design, construction, and commissioning of the facility. If chosen in the downselect, the facility will be built at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and operated by the SRS Maintenance and Operations (M ampersand O) contractor, the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), with long-term technology support from LANL. These three organizations (LANL, BREI/GA, and WSRC) are working together under the direction of the APT National Project Office which reports directly to the DOE Office of Accelerator Production which has program authority and responsibility for the APT Project

  4. Design and development of microcontroller based programmable ramp generator for AC-DC converter for simulating decay power transient in experimental facility for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Gaurava Deep; Kulkarni, R.D.

    2015-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, fuel is subjected to a wide range of power and temperature transients during normal and abnormal conditions. The reactor setback and step-back power pattern, fast temperature profile occurred during Loss of Coolant Accident and decay power followed by shutdown of power plant are the typical transients in nuclear power plant. For a variety of reactor engineering and reactor safety related study, one needs to simulate these transients in experimental facility. In experimental facilities, high response AC-DC converters are used to handle these power and temperature transients safely in a controlled manner for generating a database which is utilized for design of thermal hydraulic system, development of computer codes, study of reliability of reactor safety system, etc. for nuclear power plants. The paper presents the methodology developed for simulating the typical reactor decay power transient in an experimental facility. The design and simulation of AC-DC power electronic converter of 3 MW capacity is also presented. The microcontroller based programmable ramp generator is designed and hardware implemented for feeding reference voltage to the closed loop control system of AC-DC converter for obtaining the decay power profile at the converter output. The typical decay power transient of the nuclear power plant is divided into several small power ramps for simulating the transient. The signal corresponding to each power ramp is generated by programmable ramp generator and fed to the comparator for generating control signal for the converter. The actual decay power transient obtained from the converter is compared with the theoretical decay power transient. (author)

  5. The regulation for delivery of subsidies for measures of promoting power source location for nuclear power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The regulation is defined under the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities and the law concerning subsidies and others. Limits of the subsidies are stipulated respectively for establishment of a unit and simultaneous construction of more than 2 units of power generating facilities in the area of self-governing bodies concerned. Limits of the subsidies for an arrangement business out of the area of self-governing bodies where the facilities are set up shall be equal to those of the subsidies for such bodies. The Director General of Science and Technology Agency and the Minister of International Trade and Industry may make the amounts otherwise determined the limits of the subsidies, when considered necessary successfully to build the facilities. The term of delivery is from a fiscal year in which a later one of either the day of beginning of the construction concerned or the day of acknowledgment of the arrangement program of the business is included, through a fiscal year when the work finishes. An application for subsidies shall be filed to the head of the authorities concerned with gists of the business according to the forms attached. Receiving the application, the head of the authorities shall examine it and notify to the applicant without delay in writing the decision of delivery and its conditions, when such settlement is made. (Okada, K.)

  6. Issues resulting from separation of production and facilities interests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, Canadian oil and gas producers have had full control over the exploration, production, marketing, processing and transportation aspects of their business. The disadvantages and recent changes to this traditional structure were discussed. It was shown how the deregulation of gas markets and prices in the 1980s led to some major changes in the industry. The separation of production interests from the processing and gathering facilities required a new focus by both producers and owners of the facilities. The concerns of both sides (i.e. producers and processors) were outlined. The importance of the Petroleum Joint Venture Agreement (PJVA) in defining obligations in plant expansion and development, and the jurisdictional issues over gathering and processing were described

  7. Proceedings of the 8. National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y.; Aziz, Ferhat; Untoro, Pudji; Su'ud, Zaki; Zarkasi, Amin Santosa; Umar, Faraz H.; Teguh Bambang; Hafnan, M.; Mustafa, Bustani; Rosfian, H.

    2002-10-01

    The eight proceeding of National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plant and Nuclear Facilities held by National Atomic Energy Agency and University of Trisakti. The aims of Seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about safety and nuclear Power Plant Temperature Reactor and Application for National Development sustain able and High Technology. This Seminar covers all aspect Technology, Power Reactor : Research Reactor; High Temperature Reactor and Nuclear Facilities. There are 33 articles have separated index

  8. Development of 3He-BOCA power ramping facility, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hirokatsu; Ishii, Tadahiko; Itoh, Haruhiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Nakazaki, Chozaburo

    1979-11-01

    Development of a He-3 power controlled boiling water capsule, 3 He-BOCS, for LWR fuels power ramping test in JMTR has been carried out since 1978 on a five-year program; in the reactor, irradiation tests of various fuels and structual materials have been made since 1969. Using stagnant-pressurized water as a thermal medium, the capsule provides pressure and temperature conditions similar to those in LWRs. Heat generation of a fuel pin can be controlled by a He-3 gas screen surrounding the capsule. The facility is capable of testing numbers of both fresh and irradiated fuel pins under LWR operating conditions for power ramping and cycling. After explaining the operating priciples of 3 He-BOCA and the development program, the following are described: the results of preliminary out-of-pile test on heat conductive characteristics of the capsule and a conceptual design of the 3 He-BOCA for power ramping of a short fuel pin from 250 W/cm to 500 W/cm under BWR conditions. (author)

  9. Design and Testing of a Breadboard Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluid Combustion Facility Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.

    1999-01-01

    The Fluid Combustion Facility (FCF) Project and the Power Technology Division at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) at Lewis Field in Cleveland, OH along with the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL are jointly developing an Electrical Power Converter Unit (EPCU) for the Fluid Combustion Facility to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The FCF facility experiment contains three racks: A core rack, a combustion rack, and a fluids rack. The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS 120V(sub dc) power distribution system by each FCF experiment rack which requires 28V(sub dc). The EPCU is a modular design which contains three 120V(sub dc)-to-28V(sub dc) full-bridge, power converters rated at 1 kW(sub e) each bus transferring input relays and solid-state, current-limiting input switches, 48 current-limiting, solid-state, output switches; and control and telemetry hardware. The EPCU has all controls required to autonomously share load demand between the power feeds and--if absolutely necessary--shed loads. The EPCU, which maximizes the usage of allocated ISS power and minimizes loss of power to loads, can be paralleled with other EPCUs. This paper overviews the electrical design and operating characteristics of the EPCU and presents test data from the breadboard design.

  10. Hybrid gas turbine–organic Rankine cycle for seawater desalination by reverse osmosis in a hydrocarbon production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eveloy, Valérie; Rodgers, Peter; Qiu, Linyue

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Seawater reverse osmosis driven by hybrid gas turbine–organic Rankine power cycle. • High ambient air and seawater temperatures, and high seawater salinity. • Energy–exergy analysis of power and desalination systems for six organic fluids. • Economic viability of waste heat recovery in subsidized utility pricing context. - Abstract: Despite water scarcity, the use of industrial waste heat for seawater desalination has been limited in the Middle East to date. This study evaluates the technical and economic feasibility of integrating on-site gas turbine power generation and reverse osmosis equipment for the production of both electricity and fresh water in a coastal hydrocarbon production facility. Gas turbine exhaust gas waste heat is recovered using an intermediate heat transfer fluid and fed to an organic Rankine cycle evaporator, to generate mechanical power to drive the reverse osmosis high pressure pump. Six candidate organic working fluids are evaluated, namely toluene, benzene, cyclohexane, cyclopentane, n-pentane and R245fa. Thermodynamic and desalination performance are assessed in the harsh climatic and salinity conditions of the Arabian Gulf. The performance metrics considered incorporate electric power and permeate production, thermal and exergy efficiency, specific energy consumption, system size, and permeate quality. Using toluene in the bottoming power cycle, a gain in power generation efficiency of approximately 12% is achieved relative to the existing gas turbine cycle, with an annual average of 2260 m"3/h of fresh water produced. Depending upon the projected evolution of local water prices, the investment becomes profitable after two to four years, with an end-of-life net present value of 220–380 million USD, and internal rate of return of 26–48%.

  11. Performance test results of mock-up test facility of HTTR hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Inaba, Yoshitomo; Nishihara, Tetsuo

    2004-01-01

    For the purpose to demonstrate effectiveness of high-temperature nuclear heat utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing a hydrogen production system and has planned to connect the hydrogen production system to High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Prior to construction of a HTTR hydrogen production system, a mock-up test facility was constructed to investigate transient behavior of the hydrogen production system and to establish system controllability. The Mock-up test facility with a full-scale reaction tube is an approximately 1/30-scale model of the HTTR hydrogen production system and an electric heater is used as a heat source instead of a reactor. After its construction, a performance test of the test facility was carried out in the same pressure and temperature conditions as those of the HTTR hydrogen production system to investigate its performance such as hydrogen production ability, controllability and so on. It was confirmed that hydrogen was stably produced with a hot helium gas about 120m 3 /h, which satisfy the design value, and thermal disturbance of helium gas during the start-up could be mitigated within the design value by using a steam generator. The mock-up test of the HTTR hydrogen production system using this facility will continue until 2004. (author)

  12. FY 1999 report on the results of the joint study - project on the public facility use photovoltaic power generation field test; 1999 nendo kokyo shisetsunadoyo taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo kyodo kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In the field test, solar cell panels were installed on rooftop, and inverters were installed indoors. The electric power generated was connected at high pressure with electric installation of facilities and was also supplied to power equipment, lighting, air conditioning, etc. in facilities. The FY 1999 results were summarized. The installation of photovoltaic power generation facilities at 137 places and the results of the study were summarized in this report including a new university co-op building, Tokyo Metropolitan Advanced Technology Education Center, Suwano Center House of Fukushima prefecture, Environment Center of Saga prefecture, Educational Foundation Utsukushino Kindergarten, Hikarigaoka Park of Yamagata prefecture, Koiwai factory of Koiwai Dairy Products Co., Social Welfare Corporation Kameyama Ayumi Nursery School, etc. (NEDO)

  13. Developing maximal neuromuscular power: Part 1--biological basis of maximal power production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2011-01-01

    This series of reviews focuses on the most important neuromuscular function in many sport performances, the ability to generate maximal muscular power. Part 1 focuses on the factors that affect maximal power production, while part 2, which will follow in a forthcoming edition of Sports Medicine, explores the practical application of these findings by reviewing the scientific literature relevant to the development of training programmes that most effectively enhance maximal power production. The ability of the neuromuscular system to generate maximal power is affected by a range of interrelated factors. Maximal muscular power is defined and limited by the force-velocity relationship and affected by the length-tension relationship. The ability to generate maximal power is influenced by the type of muscle action involved and, in particular, the time available to develop force, storage and utilization of elastic energy, interactions of contractile and elastic elements, potentiation of contractile and elastic filaments as well as stretch reflexes. Furthermore, maximal power production is influenced by morphological factors including fibre type contribution to whole muscle area, muscle architectural features and tendon properties as well as neural factors including motor unit recruitment, firing frequency, synchronization and inter-muscular coordination. In addition, acute changes in the muscle environment (i.e. alterations resulting from fatigue, changes in hormone milieu and muscle temperature) impact the ability to generate maximal power. Resistance training has been shown to impact each of these neuromuscular factors in quite specific ways. Therefore, an understanding of the biological basis of maximal power production is essential for developing training programmes that effectively enhance maximal power production in the human.

  14. Study of surface potential contamination in radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facilities and alternative solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaedi Muhammad; Rimin Sumantri; Farida Tusafariah; Djarwanti Rahayu Pipin Soedjarwo

    2013-01-01

    Radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facilities that exist in their operations around the world in the form of radiological impacts of radiation exposure, contamination of surface and air contamination. Given the number of existing open source in radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facility, then the possibility of surface contamination in the work area is quite high. For that to protect the safety and health of both workers, the public and the environment, then the licensee must conduct an inventory of some of the potential that could result in contamination of surfaces in radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facilities. Several potential to cause surface contamination in radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production facilities consist of loss of resources, the VAC system disorders, impaired production facilities, limited resources and lack of work discipline and radioactive waste handling activities. From the study of some potential, there are several alternative solutions that can be implemented by the licensee to address the contamination of the surface so as not to cause adverse radiological impacts for both radiation workers, the public or the environment. (author)

  15. Upgrade and development of nuclear data production test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Won; Ko, I. S.; Cho, M. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Kang, H. S. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G. N. [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Koh, S. K. [Univ. of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ro, T. I. [Donga Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, G. U. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-04-15

    It is necessary to improve the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF) in order to be used as a nuclear data production facility for users in both domestic and abroad. We improved following items: upgrade the electron linac, collimators inside the TOF beam pipe, the development and installation of an automatic sample changer, the extension of the TOF beam line, and the data acquisition system. We would like to establish a utilization system for users to measure the nuclear data at the PNF. To do this, we made manuals for the accelerator operation and the data acquisition system. We also made an application form to apply for users to measure the nuclear data in both domestic and abroad. The main object of the Pohang Neutron Facility is to measure the nuclear data in the neutron energy region from thermal neutron to few hundreds of eV. In addition to neutron beams produced at the PNF, photon and electron beams are produced in this facility. We thus utilize this facility for other fields, such as test facility for detectors, activation experiments, polarized neutron beam source, and so on. In addition to these, we could use this facility for training students.

  16. Administrative limits for tritium concentrations found in non-potable groundwater at nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, R.; Hart, D.; WIllert, C.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is a regulatory limit available for tritium in drinking water, but no such limit for non-potable groundwater. Voluntary administrative limits for site groundwater may be established at nuclear power facilities to ensure minimal risk to human health and the environment, and provide guidance for investigation or other actions intended to prevent exceedances of future regulatory or guideline limits. This work presents a streamlined approach for nuclear power facilities to develop three tiers of administrative limits for tritium in groundwater so that facilities can identify abnormal/uncontrolled releases of tritium at an early stage, and take appropriate actions to investigate, control, and protect groundwater. Tier 1 represents an upper limit of background, Tier 2 represents a level between background and Tier 3, and Tier 3 represents a risk-based concentration protective of down-gradient receptors. (author)

  17. A new digital pulse power supply in heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongkun; Chen, Youxin; Huang, Yuzhen; Gao, Daqing; Zhou, Zhongzu; Yan, Huaihai; Zhao, Jiang; Shi, Chunfeng; Wu, Fengjun; Yan, Hongbin; Xia, Jiawen; Yuan, Youjin

    2013-11-01

    To meet the increasing requirements of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR), a new digital pulse power supply, which employs multi-level converter, was designed. This power supply was applied with a multi H-bridge converters series-parallel connection topology. A new control model named digital power supply regulator system (DPSRS) was proposed, and a pulse power supply prototype based on DPSRS has been built and tested. The experimental results indicate that tracking error and ripple current meet the requirements of this design. The achievement of prototype provides a perfect model for HIRFL-CSR power supply system.

  18. An Integrated Assessment of Location-Dependent Scaling for Microalgae Biofuel Production Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Abodeely, Jared; Skaggs, Richard; Moeglein, William AM; Newby, Deborah T.; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-06-19

    Successful development of a large-scale microalgae-based biofuels industry requires comprehensive analysis and understanding of the feedstock supply chain—from facility siting/design through processing/upgrading of the feedstock to a fuel product. The evolution from pilot-scale production facilities to energy-scale operations presents many multi-disciplinary challenges, including a sustainable supply of water and nutrients, operational and infrastructure logistics, and economic competitiveness with petroleum-based fuels. These challenges are addressed in part by applying the Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF)—an integrated multi-scale modeling, analysis, and data management suite—to address key issues in developing and operating an open-pond facility by analyzing how variability and uncertainty in space and time affect algal feedstock production rates, and determining the site-specific “optimum” facility scale to minimize capital and operational expenses. This approach explicitly and systematically assesses the interdependence of biofuel production potential, associated resource requirements, and production system design trade-offs. The IAF was applied to a set of sites previously identified as having the potential to cumulatively produce 5 billion-gallons/year in the southeastern U.S. and results indicate costs can be reduced by selecting the most effective processing technology pathway and scaling downstream processing capabilities to fit site-specific growing conditions, available resources, and algal strains.

  19. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1990: Twenty-third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1990. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1990 annual reports submitted by about 443 licensees indicated that approximately 214,568 individuals were monitored, 110,204 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.19 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.36 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 113,361 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 443 covered licensees during 1990. Some 77,633 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 11,083 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.67 rem (cSv)

  20. Decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of power reactors with high burnup at long-term storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ternovykh Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay heat power of actinides and fission products from spent nuclear fuel of power VVER-1000 type reactors at long-term storage is calculated. Two modes of storage are considered: mode in which single portion of actinides or fission products is loaded in storage facility, and mode in which actinides or fission products from spent fuel of one VVER reactor are added every year in storage facility during 30 years and then accumulated nuclides are stored without addition new nuclides. Two values of fuel burnup 40 and 70 MW·d/kg are considered for the mode of storage of single fuel unloading. For the mode of accumulation of spent fuel with subsequent storage, one value of burnup of 70 MW·d/kg is considered. Very long time of storage 105 years accepted in calculations allows to simulate final geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Heat power of fission products decreases quickly after 50-100 years of storage. The power of actinides decreases very slow. In passing from 40 to 70 MW·d/kg, power of actinides increases due to accumulation of higher fraction of 244Cm. These data are important in the back end of fuel cycle when improved cooling system of the storage facility will be required along with stronger radiation protection during storage, transportation and processing.

  1. Decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of power reactors with high burnup at long-term storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovykh, Mikhail; Tikhomirov, Georgy; Saldikov, Ivan; Gerasimov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Decay heat power of actinides and fission products from spent nuclear fuel of power VVER-1000 type reactors at long-term storage is calculated. Two modes of storage are considered: mode in which single portion of actinides or fission products is loaded in storage facility, and mode in which actinides or fission products from spent fuel of one VVER reactor are added every year in storage facility during 30 years and then accumulated nuclides are stored without addition new nuclides. Two values of fuel burnup 40 and 70 MW·d/kg are considered for the mode of storage of single fuel unloading. For the mode of accumulation of spent fuel with subsequent storage, one value of burnup of 70 MW·d/kg is considered. Very long time of storage 105 years accepted in calculations allows to simulate final geological disposal of radioactive wastes. Heat power of fission products decreases quickly after 50-100 years of storage. The power of actinides decreases very slow. In passing from 40 to 70 MW·d/kg, power of actinides increases due to accumulation of higher fraction of 244Cm. These data are important in the back end of fuel cycle when improved cooling system of the storage facility will be required along with stronger radiation protection during storage, transportation and processing.

  2. Demonstration of persistent contamination of a cooked egg product production facility with Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee and characterization of the persistent strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociune, D.; Bisgaard, M.; Pedersen, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate whether continuous contamination of light pasteurized egg products with Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee (S. Tennessee) at a large European producer of industrial egg products was caused by persistent contamination of the production facility......, members of the persistent clone were weak producers of H2S in laboratory medium. S. Tennessee isolated from the case was able to grow better in pasteurized egg product compared with other serovars investigated. Conclusions: It was concluded that the contamination was caused by a persistent strain...... in the production facility and that this strain apparently had adapted to grow in the relevant egg product. Significance and Impact of the Study: S. Tennessee has previously been associated with persistence in hatching facilities. This is the first report of persistent contamination of an egg production facility...

  3. Annual monitoring and surveillance report for Piqua Nuclear Power Facility, Piqua, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosho, G.D.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the decommissioned Piqua Nuclear Power Facility which is located in Piqua, Ohio near the Greater Miami River. The Facility was built by the US Atomic Energy Commission (now U. S. Department of Energy) and was operated from 1963 to 1966. The reactor was retired prior to 1970 and the facility was leased to the city of Piqua for use as offices and equipment storage. In December 1991, a radiological survey was done of the facility to document its radiological condition. The data show that all radiological parameters measured were essentially the same as that found in the natural environment. The only exception was that low levels of radioactive contamination were detected in one drain on the 56.5 ft elevation, but the radiation exposure rate in that area was also typical of natural background

  4. Strategies for the co-operation between power generation facilities and power sales organisations in the European electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bammert, U.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how the public utilities in Hannover, Germany, have developed a strategy for the operation of their power generation facilities and power distribution network as independent yet co-operating units. Three models that were examined are described: 'free-sailing', where generation and distribution were kept completely independent, the 'wedding' model, where they were closely tied together and 'Enercity', a mixture of both models. The various rules necessary and the degrees of freedom needed to implement the 'Enercity' model are discussed, as are the advantages it offers to both the power generation and the sales units

  5. Considerations in the development and implementation of a maintenance robot for nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrabacher, A.; Carlton, R.; Gelhaus, F.

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Division of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) began its automated nuclear plant maintenance research (research project 2232) in 1982 with surveys of domestic and Japanese ongoing and potential uses of robotic systems in nuclear power facilities. After studying these potential research areas, EPRI initiated a three-pronged effort. All surveys concluded that a mobile system for general environmental, visual, and auto surveillance would be beneficial, and EPRI contracted for the development and evaluation of the Surveyor robot. Work also began to catalog existing systems and to quantify the methodology that a utility could use to optimally complete the plant-mission, robot-system selection process. The conceptualizing phase of the effort defined the necessary physical attributes for the machine to perform a variety of maintenance tasks. Characteristics such as mobility, strength, conditions of service, materials of construction, tool functional requirements, facility interfaces, and operator interface were defined to the extent practical. Substantial versatility is required for the variability of the targeted maintenance tasks and for the variability of facility layouts and designs found throughout the nuclear industry. A key contribution to this development effort comes from the project's Utility Advisors Group. The contract's host utility provides membership to lead this group, and that company will train in the use of the machine for 6 months prior to utilizing it in their power plant for 2 yr

  6. Development of post-irradiation test facility for domestic production of 99Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Taketoshi; Yonekawa, Minoru; Kato, Yoshiaki; Kurosawa, Makoto; Nishikata, Kaori; Ishida, Takuya; Kawamata, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    JMTR focus on the activation method. By carrying out the preliminary tests using irradiation facilities existing, and verification tests using the irradiation facility that has developed in the cutting-edge research and development strategic strengthening business, as irradiation tests towards the production of 99 Mo, we have been conducting research and development that can contribute to supply about 25% for 99 Mo demand in Japan and the stable supply of radiopharmaceutical. This report describes a summary of the status of the preliminary tests for the production of 99 Mo: Maintenance of test equipment in the facility in JMTR hot laboratory in preparation for research and development for the production of 99 Mo in JMTR and using MoO 3 pellet irradiated at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KUR). (author)

  7. Systems work for Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) near-real-time accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.R.; Hafer, J.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.; Takahashi, S.; Ohtani, T.; Eguchi, K.; Seya, M.

    1990-01-01

    A joint effort by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan examines materials accounting for the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility. A unique feature of the systems work is a sophisticated data generator. This software follows individual items throughout the process, creating detailed data files for variance propagation. The data generator deals with user-specified process operations and handles related accounting problems, such as the tracking of individual measurements through numerous blending and splitting procedure, frequent decay correction (important for large inventories), scrap recovery, and automated determination of static inventory. There is no need to rely on simplified assumptions regarding process operation and material measurement. Also, the joint study applies recent theoretical work on stratified inspection of nonhomogeneous inventories and sequential analysis of MUF -- D. 4 refs

  8. White source gamma-ray production spectral measurement facilities in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.C.; Dickens, J.K.; Nelson, R.O.; Wender, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The two primary neutron sources for measuring gamma-ray production (GRP) cross sections for basic and applied work in the USA are the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ORELA is based on a 180-MeV electron linear accelerator, while the WNR facility uses the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility 800 MeV proton beam to produce neutrons. The facilities collectively cover the neutron-energy range from thermal to over 700 MeV. The paper describes the present capabilities for GRP measurements at each facility. 18 refs

  9. Test facility for investigation of heat transfer of promising coolants for the nuclear power industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, I. A.; Sviridov, V. G.; Batenin, V. M.; Biryukov, D. A.; Nikitina, I. S.; Manchkha, S. P.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    The results are presented of experimental investigations into liquid metal heat transfer performed by the joint research group consisting of specialist in heat transfer and hydrodynamics from NIU MPEI and JIHT RAS. The program of experiments has been prepared considering the concept of development of the nuclear power industry in Russia. This concept calls for, in addition to extensive application of water-cooled, water-moderated (VVER-type) power reactors and BN-type sodium cooled fast reactors, development of the new generation of BREST-type reactors, fusion power reactors, and thermonuclear neutron sources. The basic coolants for these nuclear power installations will be heavy liquid metals, such as lead and lithium-lead alloy. The team of specialists from NRU MPEI and JIHT RAS commissioned a new RK-3 mercury MHD-test facility. The major components of this test facility are a unique electrical magnet constructed at Budker Nuclear Physics Institute and a pressurized liquid metal circuit. The test facility is designed for investigating upward and downward liquid metal flows in channels of various cross-sections in a transverse magnetic field. A probe procedure will be used for experimental investigation into heat transfer and hydrodynamics as well as for measuring temperature, velocity, and flow parameter fluctuations. It is generally adopted that liquid metals are the best coolants for the Tokamak reactors. However, alternative coolants should be sought for. As an alternative to liquid metal coolants, molten salts, such as fluorides of lithium and beryllium (so-called FLiBes) or fluorides of alkali metals (so-called FLiNaK) doped with uranium fluoride, can be used. That is why the team of specialists from NRU MPEI and JIHT RAS, in parallel with development of a mercury MHD test facility, is designing a test facility for simulating molten salt heat transfer and hydrodynamics. Since development of this test facility requires numerical predictions and verification

  10. Dry spent fuel storage facility at Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goehring, R.; Stoev, M.; Davis, N.; Thomas, E.

    2004-01-01

    The Dry Spent Fuel Storage Facility (DSF) is financed by the Kozloduy International Decommissioning Support Fund (KIDSF) which is managed by European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). On behalf of the Employer, the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant, a Project Management Unit (KPMU) under lead of British Nuclear Group is managing the contract with a Joint Venture Consortium under lead of RWE NUKEM mbH. The scope of the contract includes design, manufacturing and construction, testing and commissioning of the new storage facility for 2800 VVER-440 spent fuel assemblies at the KNPP site (turn-key contract). The storage technology will be cask storage of CONSTOR type, a steel-concrete-steel container. The licensing process complies with the national Bulgarian regulations and international rules. (authors)

  11. An overview of the transportation of radioactive waste at Ontario Power Generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Material Transportation Department (RMT) ensures regulatory compliance in radioactive material shipping within Ontario Power Generation (OPG). OPG provides a radioactive shipping program, high quality carrier service, stringent packaging maintenance, and quality assurance oversight to the corporation's nuclear facilities and its customers. This paper will speak to the transport of radioactive waste in Ontario Power Generation. It will also mention non-waste shipments and the quality assurance programme used at Ontario Power Generation to ensure a high quality transportation system. (author)

  12. ARC: A compact, high-field, disassemblable fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Palmer, Timothy; Mangiarotti, Franco; Sierchio, Jennifer; Bonoli, Paul; Kasten, Cale; Sutherland, Derek; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Goh, Jon; Sung, Choongki; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable, Robust, Compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils with joints to allow disassembly, allowing for removal and replacement of the vacuum vessel as a single component. Inboard-launched current drive of 25 MW LHRF power and 13.6 MW ICRF power is used to provide a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing Fluorine Lithium Beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket acts as a working fluid, coolant, and tritium breeder, and minimizes the solid material that can become activated. The large temperature range over which FLiBe is liquid permits blanket operation at 800-900 K with single phase fluid cooling and allows use of a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity production in the secondary coolant loop.

  13. Upgrade and Development of Nuclear Data Production Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-15

    It is necessary to improve the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF) in order to be used as a nuclear data production facility for users in both domestic and abroad. We improved following items: (1) upgrade the electron linac, (2) collimators inside the TOF beam pipe, (3) the development and installation of an automatic sample changer, (4) the extension of the TOF beam line, and (5) the data acquisition system. We would like to establish a utilization system for users to measure the nuclear data at the PNF. To do this, we made manuals for the accelerator operation and the data acquisition system. We also made an application form to apply for users to measure the nuclear data in both domestic and abroad. The main object of the Pohang Neutron Facility is to measure the nuclear data in the neutron energy region from thermal neutron to few hundreds of eV. In addition to neutron beams produced at the PNF, photon and electron beams are produced in this facility. We thus utilize this facility for other fields, such as test facility for detectors, activation experiments, polarized neutron beam source, and so on. In addition to these, we could use this facility for training students

  14. A Swedish nuclear fuel facility and public acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Bengt A [ABB Atom (Sweden)

    1989-07-01

    For more than ten years the ABB Atom Nuclear Fuel Facility has gained a lot of public attention in Sweden. When the nuclear power debate was coming up in the middle of the seventies, the Nuclear Fuel Facility very soon became a spectacular object. It provided a possibility to bring factual information about nuclear power to the public. Today that public interest still exists. For ABB Atom the Facility works as a tool of information activities in several ways, as a solid base for ABB Atom company presentations. but also as a very practical demonstration of the nuclear power technology to the public. This is valid especially to satisfy the local school demand for a real life object complementary to the theoretical nuclear technology education. Beyond the fact that the Nuclear Fuel Facility is a very effective fuel production plant, it is not too wrong to see it as an important resource for education as well as a tool for improved public relations.

  15. A Swedish nuclear fuel facility and public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Bengt A.

    1989-01-01

    For more than ten years the ABB Atom Nuclear Fuel Facility has gained a lot of public attention in Sweden. When the nuclear power debate was coming up in the middle of the seventies, the Nuclear Fuel Facility very soon became a spectacular object. It provided a possibility to bring factual information about nuclear power to the public. Today that public interest still exists. For ABB Atom the Facility works as a tool of information activities in several ways, as a solid base for ABB Atom company presentations. but also as a very practical demonstration of the nuclear power technology to the public. This is valid especially to satisfy the local school demand for a real life object complementary to the theoretical nuclear technology education. Beyond the fact that the Nuclear Fuel Facility is a very effective fuel production plant, it is not too wrong to see it as an important resource for education as well as a tool for improved public relations

  16. Analysis of federal and state policies and environmental issues for bioethanol production facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Chandra; Chan Hilton, Amy B

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate incentives and barriers to fuel ethanol production from biomass in the U.S. during the past decade (2000-2010). In particular, we examine the results of policies and economic conditions during this period by way of cellulosic ethanol activity in four selected states with the potential to produce different types of feedstocks (i.e., sugar, starch, and cellulosic crops) for ethanol production (Florida, California, Hawaii, and Iowa). Two of the four states, Iowa and California, currently have commercial ethanol production facilities in operation using corn feedstocks. While several companies have proposed commercial scale facilities in Florida and Hawaii, none are operating to date. Federal and state policies and incentives, potential for feedstock production and conversion to ethanol and associated potential environmental impacts, and environmental regulatory conditions among the states were investigated. Additionally, an analysis of proposed and operational ethanol production facilities provided evidence that a combination of these policies and incentives along with the ability to address environmental issues and regulatory environment and positive economic conditions all impact ethanol production. The 2000-2010 decade saw the rise of the promise of cellulosic ethanol. Federal and state policies were enacted to increase ethanol production. Since the initial push for development, expansion of cellulosic ethanol production has not happened as quickly as predicted. Government and private funding supported the development of ethanol production facilities, which peaked and then declined by the end of the decade. Although there are technical issues that remain to be solved to more efficiently convert cellulosic material to ethanol while reducing environmental impacts, the largest barriers to increasing ethanol production appear to be related to government policies, economics, and logistical issues. The numerous federal and state

  17. CALCULATION OF OPERATING PARAMETERS OF HIGH-VOLTAGE POWER TAKE-OFF SYSTEM FOR THE PHOTOVOLTAIC FACILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Zaitsev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To ensure maximum production of electric power by photovoltaic vacilities, in addition to using highly efficient photovoltaic modules equipped with solar radiation concentrators must use a highly effective power take-off system. This paper is inscribed to solving the problem of a highly efficient and economic power take-off system development. Methodology. To solving the problem, we implemented three stages. On the first stage examines the dependence of electrical power from the intensity of the incident solar radiation. Based on this, the second stage is calculated the DC-DC converter resonant circuit and its working parameters, and developed circuit diagram of DC-DC converter. On the third stage, we carry out an analysis of power take-off system with step up DC-DC converter working. Results. In this paper, we carry out the analysis of working efficiency for photovoltaic facility power take-off system with step-up boost converter. The result of such analysis show that the efficiency of such system in a wide range of photovoltaic energy module illumination power is at 0.92, whereas the efficiency of classic power take-off systems does not exceed 0.70. Achieved results allow designing a circuit scheme of a controlled bridge resonant step-up converter with digital control. Proposed scheme will ensure reliable operation, fast and accurate location point of maximum power and conversion efficiency up to 0.96. Originality. Novelty of proposed power take-off system solution constitute in implementation of circuit with DC-DC converters, which as it shown by results of carrying out modeling is the most effective. Practical value. Practical implementation of proposed power take-off system design will allow reducing losses in connective wires and increasing the efficiency of such a system up to 92.5% in wide range of photovoltaic energy modules illumination.

  18. Assessment of Potential Capacity Increases at Combined Heat and Power Facilities Based on Available Corn Stover and Forest Logging Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald L. Grebner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Combined Heat and Power (CHP production using renewable energy sources is gaining importance because of its flexibility and high-energy efficiency. Biomass materials, such as corn stover and forestry residues, are potential sources for renewable energy for CHP production. In Mississippi, approximately 4.0 MT dry tons of woody biomass is available annually for energy production. In this study, we collected and analyzed 10 years of corn stover data (2001–2010 and three years of forest logging residue data (1995, 1999, and 2002 in each county in Mississippi to determine the potential of these feed stocks for sustainable CHP energy production. We identified six counties, namely Amite, Copiah, Clarke, Wayne, Wilkinson and Rankin, that have forest logging residue feedstocks to sustain a CHP facility with a range of capacity between 8.0 and 9.8 MW. Using corn stover alone, Yazoo and Washington counties can produce 13.4 MW and 13.5 MW of energy, respectively. Considering both feedstocks and based on a conservative amount of 30% available forest logging residue and 33% corn stover, we found that 20 counties have adequate supply for a CHP facility with a capacity of 8.3 MW to 19.6 MW.

  19. Technology standards for structure, etc. concerning nuclear power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Based on the Ordinance for the Technology Standards concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities, the technology standards are established for the vessels of class 1 to 4 (including reactor pressure vessels, reactor containment vessels, etc.), the pipes of class 1 to 3, safety valves, pressure test and monitoring test specimens. Those specified are materials, nondestructive tests, structures, shapes, shells, flanges, etc. for the vessels and the pipes, and so on. (Mori, K.)

  20. ALARA implementation in 131I therapeutic capsule production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumawat, Lalit; Swaminathan, N.; Sudheer, T.S.; Sachdev, S.S.; Arora, S.S.; Vairalkar, K.G.

    2005-01-01

    Sodium iodide 131 I solution had been invariably administered to patients for both diagnosis and therapy of thyrotoxicosis. The undue exposure to non-target organs has been over come by introducing NaI ( 131 I) in a gelatin capsule. BRIT has set up experimental facility for the preparation and the production volume has augmented into four fold due to increase in demand and the same facility is being used to cater the need. However, the adequately shielded facility (fume hood) used for (manual) dispensing activity in capsules, capsules and product vial capping, transfer of the vials into lead pots and activity measurement of each vial has resulted in significant increase in the personnel exposure. The sources had been identified and efforts were made to reduce the exposure in these operations. An annular shield was introduced around the dispenser, resulted in the reduction of radiation field at wrist level by a factor of three. Introduction of shielded automated dispenser and usage of longer tools for transfer and capping of vials has effected in two times reduction of collective wrist dose. Currently, the relocated capping station two meters away from the source certainly will bring down further exposure. (author)

  1. Diffusion of green power products in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuestenhagen, Rolf; Markard, Jochen; Truffer, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    As in many other European countries, green electricity is an emerging product in Switzerland as well. Although the market is yet to be liberalised, more than 100 of the 1200 Swiss electric utilities offer some sort of green electricity product to their customers. Successful companies like the municipal utilities of the cities of Zurich and Berne have reached customer response rates of up to 4%, while still maintaining cost-based pricing, i.e. charging their customers price premiums of 400-700% per kWh. While most of the products still rely on mainly photovoltaics, some utilities have started to introduce mixed green electricity products also including wind power. With a share of 60% in the Swiss generation mix, hydropower's role in the green electricity mix was also an issue to emerge causing controversial debate. While being renewable, hydropower is not considered environmentally benign by all the stakeholders, and unlike new renewables (solar, wind, biomass), there is little room for new hydropower generation facilities in Switzerland. The green electricity labelling scheme 'Naturemade' tackles that issue. The labelling organisation has evolved from a process with broad stakeholder involvement, which included environmental NGOs, scientific institutions, green electricity providers, renewable energy advocates, government bodies and consumer organisations. The analysis in this paper is based on a diffusion theory framework. It identifies and characterises different phases of (past and future) market development, and stresses the importance of eco-labelling as a tool to facilitate the transition from niche to mass market. Finally, we also discuss conclusions that can be drawn from the Swiss case towards market development and labelling on a European level

  2. Electricity production by advanced biomass power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solantausta, Y [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies; Bridgwater, T [Aston Univ. Birmingham (United Kingdom); Beckman, D [Zeton Inc., Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-11-01

    This report gives the results of the Pyrolysis Collaborative Project organized by the International Energy Agency (IEA) under Biomass Agreement. The participating countries or organizations were Canada, European Community (EC), Finland, United States of America, and the United Kingdom. The overall objective of the project was to establish baseline assessments for the performance and economics of power production from biomass. Information concerning the performance of biomass-fuelled power plants based on gasification is rather limited, and even less data is available of on pyrolysis based power applications. In order to gain further insight into the potential for these technologies, this study undertook the following tasks: (1) Prepare process models to evaluate the cost and performance of new advanced biomass power production concepts, (2) Assess the technical and economic uncertainties of different biomass power concepts, (3) Compare the concepts in small scale and in medium scale production (5 - 50 MW{sub e}) to conventional alternatives. Processes considered for this assessment were biomass power production technologies based on gasification and pyrolysis. Direct combustion technologies were employed as a reference for comparison to the processes assessed in this study. Wood was used a feedstock, since the most data was available for wood conversion

  3. Economic impacts of zebra mussels on drinking water treatment and electric power generation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Nancy A; O'Neill, Charles R; Knuth, Barbara A; Brown, Tommy L

    2007-07-01

    Invasions of nonnative species such as zebra mussels can have both ecological and economic consequences. The economic impacts of zebra mussels have not been examined in detail since the mid-1990s. The purpose of this study was to quantify the annual and cumulative economic impact of zebra mussels on surface water-dependent drinking water treatment and electric power generation facilities (where previous research indicated the greatest impacts). The study time frame was from the first full year after discovery in North America (Lake St. Clair, 1989) to the present (2004); the study area was throughout the mussels' North American range. A mail survey resulted in a response rate of 31% for electric power companies and 41% for drinking water treatment plants. Telephone interviews with a sample of nonrespondents assessed nonresponse bias; only one difference was found and adjusted for. Over one-third (37%) of surveyed facilities reported finding zebra mussels in the facility and almost half (45%) have initiated preventive measures to prevent zebra mussels from entering the facility operations. Almost all surveyed facilities (91%) with zebra mussels have used control or mitigation alternatives to remove or control zebra mussels. We estimated that 36% of surveyed facilities experienced an economic impact. Expanding the sample to the population of the study area, we estimated 267 million dollars (BCa 95% CI = 161 million dollars - 467 million dollars) in total economic costs for electric generation and water treatment facilities through late 2004, since 1989. Annual costs were greater (44,000 dollars/facility) during the early years of zebra mussel infestation than in recent years (30,000 dollars). As a result of this and other factors, early predictions of the ultimate costs of the zebra mussel invasion may have been excessive.

  4. A lignite-geothermal hybrid power and hydrogen production plant for green cities and sustainable buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilkis, B. [Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2011-02-15

    Turkey is rich in both geothermal energy and lignite reserves, which in many cases, are co-located. This condition makes it feasible to utilize both lignite and geothermal energy in a hybrid form for combined power heat, and cold generation, which may lead to optimally energy and exergy efficient, environmentally benign, and economically sound applications. This paper presents a novel concept of hybrid lignite-geothermal plant for a district energy system and hydrogen production facility in Aydin with special emphasis on high performance, green buildings and green districts. In this concept, lignite is first introduced to a partially fluidized-bed gasifier and then to a fluidized-bed gas cleaning unit, which produces synthetic gas and finally hydrogen. The by-products, namely char and ash are used in a fluidized-bed combustor to produce power. Waste heat from all these steps are utilized in a district heating system along with heat received from geothermal production wells after power is generated there. H{sub 2}S gas obtained from the separator system is coupled with hydrogen production process at the lignite plant. Absorption cooling systems and thermal storage tanks complement the hybrid system for the tri-generation district energy system. On the demand side, the new, green OSTIM OSB administration building in Ankara is exemplified for greener, low-exergy buildings that will compound the environmental benefits.

  5. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2005-08-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details Test Campaign TC18 of the PSDF gasification process. Test campaign TC18 began on June 23, 2005, and ended on August 22, 2005, with the gasifier train accumulating 1,342 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Some of the testing conducted included commissioning of a new recycle syngas compressor for gasifier aeration, evaluation of PCD filter elements and failsafes, testing of gas cleanup technologies, and further evaluation of solids handling equipment. At the conclusion of TC18, the PSDF gasification process had been operated for more than 7,750 hours.

  6. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program : Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Ronald L.; Woodward-Lilengreen, Kelly L.; Vitale, Angelo J.

    1999-09-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) receives and reviews proposals to mitigate for fish and wildlife losses and refers approved measures to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding. The Northwest Power Act (Act) calls on the Council to include measures in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) to address system-wide fish and wildlife losses. The Act further states that the Council may include in its Program measures that provide off-site mitigation--mitigation physically removed from the hydro project(s) that caused the need to mitigate. The Program includes a goal ''to recover and preserve the health of native resident fish injured by the hydropower system, where feasible, and, where appropriate, to use resident fish to mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the system.'' Among those recommended measures are off-site mitigation for losses of anadromous fisheries including the measure under analysis in this Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan, proposed by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. To meet the need for off-site mitigation for anadromous fish losses in the Columbia River Basin in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operations and maintenance of a trout production facility on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. Measures for establishing a Coeur d'Alene fish production facility have been a part of the Council's Program since 1987. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility is intended to rear and release westslope cutthroat trout into rivers and streams with the express purpose of increasing the numbers of fish spawning, incubating and rearing in the natural environment. It will use the modern technology that hatcheries offer to overcome the mortality resulting from habitat degradation in lakes, rivers, and

  7. Evaluation of syngas production unit cost of bio-gasification facility using regression analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yangyang; Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Evaluation of economic feasibility of a bio-gasification facility needs understanding of its unit cost under different production capacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the unit cost of syngas production at capacities from 60 through 1800Nm 3/h using an economic model with three regression analysis techniques (simple regression, reciprocal regression, and log-log regression). The preliminary result of this study showed that reciprocal regression analysis technique had the best fit curve between per unit cost and production capacity, with sum of error squares (SES) lower than 0.001 and coefficient of determination of (R 2) 0.996. The regression analysis techniques determined the minimum unit cost of syngas production for micro-scale bio-gasification facilities of $0.052/Nm 3, under the capacity of 2,880 Nm 3/h. The results of this study suggest that to reduce cost, facilities should run at a high production capacity. In addition, the contribution of this technique could be the new categorical criterion to evaluate micro-scale bio-gasification facility from the perspective of economic analysis.

  8. Power Burst Facility: power oscillation problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussie, W.G.; Wadkins, R.P.; Wells, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    In late 1973 PBF achieved a power level of 15 MW. During this period of operation fluctuations in reactor power were observed. Many possible causes of these fluctuations were considered and a number of nuclear and non-nuclear tests were conducted. Initial instrumentation installed in the core showed coolant outlet temperature variations of 10 0 F for several fuel cannisters and approximately 10 percent power variations at 15 MW. Power spectral density analysis showed a predominant frequency of 0.05 to 0.06 HZ. The testing program to determine the cause of the power oscillations is described

  9. HTTR hydrogen production system. Structure and main specifications of mock-up test facility (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Michio; Aita, Hideki; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Koji; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Iwatsuki, Jin; Takada, Shoji; Inaba, Yoshitomo

    2007-03-01

    The mock-up test facility was fabricated to investigate performance of the steam generator for mitigation of the temperature fluctuation of helium gas and transient behavior of the hydrogen production system for HTTR and to obtain experimental data for verification of a dynamic analysis code. The test facility has an approximate hydrogen production capacity of 120Nm 3 /h and the steam reforming process of methane; CH 4 +H 2 O=3H 2 +CO, was used for hydrogen production of the test facility. An electric heater was used as a heat source instead of the reactor in order to heat helium gas up to 880degC (4MPa) at the chemical reactor inlet which is the same temperature as the HTTR hydrogen production system. Fabrication of the test facility was completed in February in 2002, and seven cycle operations were carried out from March in 2002 to December in 2004. This report describes the structure and main specifications of the test facility. (author)

  10. Nuclear power and health. The implications for health of nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear power production is, in principle, a safe technology when practised in accordance with the well established and very strict national and international rules and regulations. Yet management failures have occurred, resulting in injuries to personnel and, occasionally, escape of radioactive material. Such events may cause potential health problems, affecting physical, mental and social well-being. Public concern still tends to concentrate on nuclear-power-related facilities, yet the public's desire for a reduction in environmental pollution has led to increased demand for the development and use of low-waste or non-waste energy technologies. Nuclear energy production is one such technology, which has become established and well developed, particularly in highly industrialized countries. This was recognized by the WHO Regional Office for Europe as early as the 1970s, and led to a series of scientific working groups to discuss the most urgent issues related to the impact on health of the generation of electrical power by means of nuclear energy. Five major meetings took place between 1975 and 1985, resulting in five publications (1 - 5) covering various aspects of particular concern to the general public (and thus also to national authorities) such as handling plutonium, managing high-level radioactive waste, and preparing for accidental releases of radioactive material. The first such publication was issued in 1977. All five books were based on the collective knowledge and experience of groups of experts, and were published following the meetings of the respective working groups. The project was initiated at the request and with the support of the Government of Belgium, to study and discuss the effects of the nuclear power industry on people and the environment. The project served two objectives. First, it assisted Member States in developing the capacity to understand the public health implications of the widespread use of nuclear power. Second, it

  11. Radioisotope handling facilities and automation of radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    If a survey is made of the advances in radioisotope handling facilities, as well as the technical conditions and equipment used for radioisotope production, it can be observed that no fundamental changes in the design principles and technical conditions of conventional manufacture have happened over the last several years. Recent developments are mainly based on previous experience aimed at providing safer and more reliable operations, more sophisticated maintenance technology and radioactive waste disposal. In addition to the above observation, significant improvements have been made in the production conditions of radioisotopes intended for medical use, by establishing aseptic conditions with clean areas and isolators, as well as by introducing quality assurance as governing principle in the production of pharmaceutical grade radioactive products. Requirements of the good manufacturing practice (GMP) are increasingly complied with by improving the technical and organizational conditions, as well as data registration and documentation. Technical conditions required for the aseptic production of pharmaceuticals and those required for radioactive materials conflicting in some aspects are because of the contrasting contamination mechanisms and due consideration of the radiation safety. These can be resolved by combining protection methods developed for pharmaceuticals and radioactive materials, with the necessary compromise in some cases. Automation serves to decrease the radiation dose to the operator and environment as well as to ensure more reliable and precise radiochemical processing. Automation has mainly been introduced in the production of sealed sources and PET radiopharmaceuticals. PC controlled technologies ensure high reliability for the production and product quality, whilst providing automatic data acquisition and registration required by quality assurance. PC control is also useful in the operation of measuring instruments and in devices used for

  12. Future technological and economic performance of IGCC and FT production facilities with and without CO2 capture: Combining component based learning curve and bottom-up analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoope, M.M.J.; Meerman, J.C.; Ramirez, C.A.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the technological and economic prospects of integrated gasification facilities for power (IGCC) and Fischer–Tropsch (FT) liquid production with and without CCS over time. For this purpose, a component based experience curve was constructed and applied to identify the

  13. Analysis and results of a hydrogen-moderated isotope production assembly in the Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootan, D.W.; Rawlins, J.A.; Carter, L.L.; Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a cobalt test assembly containing yttrium hydride pins for neutron moderation irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during cycle 9A for 137.7 equivalent full-power days at a power level of 291 MW. The 36 test pins consisted of a batch of 32 pins containing cobalt metal used to produce 60 Co and a set of four pins with europium oxide to produce 153 Gd, a radioisotope used in detection of the bone disease osteoporosis. Postirradiation examination of the cobalt pins determined the 60 Co production to be predictable to an accuracy of ∼ 5%. The measured 60 Co spatially distributed concentrations were within 20% of the calculated concentrations. The assembly average 60 Co measured activity was 4% less than the calculated value. The europium oxide pins were gamma scanned for the europium isotopes 152 Eu and 154 Eu to an absolute accuracy of ≅ 10%. The measured europium radioisotope and 153 Gd concentrations were within 20% of calculated values. The hydride assembly performed well and is an excellent vehicle for many FFTF isotope production applications. The results also demonstrate the accuracy of the calculational methods developed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for predicting isotope production rates in this type of assembly

  14. An environmental testing facility for Space Station Freedom power management and distribution hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackola, Arthur S.; Hartjen, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    The plans for a new test facility, including new environmental test systems, which are presently under construction, and the major environmental Test Support Equipment (TSE) used therein are addressed. This all-new Rocketdyne facility will perform space simulation environmental tests on Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) hardware to Space Station Freedom (SSF) at the Engineering Model, Qualification Model, and Flight Model levels of fidelity. Testing will include Random Vibration in three axes - Thermal Vacuum, Thermal Cycling and Thermal Burn-in - as well as numerous electrical functional tests. The facility is designed to support a relatively high throughput of hardware under test, while maintaining the high standards required for a man-rated space program.

  15. Visibility and Visual Characteristics of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System Power Tower Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Robert [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Abplanalp, Jennifer M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to document the visibility and visual characteristics of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS), a utility-scale solar power tower facility located on land administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management in southern California. Study activities consisted of field observations of the ISEGS facility and comparison of the observations made in the field with the visual contrast assessments and visual simulations in the ISEGS Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) and supporting documents created prior to ISEGS construction. Field observations of ISEGS were made from 19 locations within 35 mi (56 km) of the facility in the course of one week in September 2014. The study results established that reflected sunlight from the receivers was the primary source of visual contrast from the operating ISEGS facility. The ISEGS facility was found to be a major source of visual contrast for all observations up to 20 mi (32 km), and was easily visible at 35 mi. Glare from individual heliostats was frequently visible, and often brighter than the reflected light from the receivers. Heliostat glare caused discomfort for one or more viewers at distances up to 20 mi. The ISEGS power blocks were brightly lit at night, and were conspicuous at the observation distance of approximately 6 mi (10 km). The facility is substantially brighter and is seen more clearly in the field than in photographs of the facility or in the prepared simulations, which were based on photographs. The simulations of the ISEGS facility in the Final EIS, which were evaluated as part of this study, sometimes lacked spatial accuracy and realism. The evaluated simulations generally under-represented the actual visual contrast from the project, and some of the contrast ratings in the Final EIS predicted substantially lower levels of visual contrast than were actually observed for the operating facility.

  16. Cooling and heating facility for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Atsuro

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a cooling and heating facility for a nuclear power plant. Namely, a cooling water supply system supplies cooling water prepared by a refrigerator for cooling the inside of the plant. A warm water supply system supplies warm water having its temperature elevated by using an exhausted heat from a reactor water cleanup system. The facility comprises a heat pump-type refrigerator disposed in a cold water supply system for producing cold water and warm water, and warm water pipelines for connecting the refrigerator and the warm water supply system. With such a constitution, when the exhaust heat from the reactor water cleanup system can not be used, warm water prepared by the heat pump type refrigerator is supplied to the warm water supply system by way of the warm water pipelines. Accordingly, when the exhaust heat from the reactor water cleanup system can not be used such as upon inspection of the plant, a portion of the refrigerators in a not-operated state can be used for heating. Supply of boiler steams in the plant is no more necessary or extremely reduced. (I.S.)

  17. Development of protection system for power supply facilities in JT-60U P-NBI for long pulse operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Katsumi; Okano, Fuminori; Honda, Atsushi; Shinozaki, Shin-ichi; Usui, Katsutomi; Noto, Katsuya; Kawai, Mikito; Ikeda, Yoshitaka

    2007-06-01

    In the positive ion based NBI (P-NBI) system, we have developed a protection system to protect the power supply facilities from over load during long pulse operation. The protection system monitors the voltage (V) and current (I) in the power supply facilities, and calculates the parameters of V2t and I2t in real-time, where T is the pulse duration. It turns off the power supply facilities when V2t and I2t are beyond the critical values. After two development stages, we have completed the protection system using a package typed PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) which has a high expandability of multi-unit operation. Moreover, we have constructed a user-friendly system by using a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system. (author)

  18. Balance of natural radionuclides in the brown coal based power generation and harmlessness of the residues and side product utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Hartmut; Kunze, Christian; Hummrich, Holger

    2017-01-01

    During brown coal combustion a partial enrichment of natural radionuclides occurs in different residues. Residues and side product from brown coal based power generation are used in different ways, for example filter ashes and gypsum from flue gas desulfurization facilities are used in the construction materials fabrication and slags for road construction. Detailed measurement and accounting of radionuclides in the mass throughputs in coal combustion power plants have shown that the utilized gypsum and filter ashes are harmless in radiologic aspects.

  19. Research Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, H.

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the ENS Class 1 Topical Meeting on Research facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy include contributions on large research facilities, designed for tests in the field of nuclear energy production. In particular, issues related to facilities supporting research and development programmes in connection to the operation of nuclear power plants as well as the development of new concepts in material testing, nuclear data measurement, code validation, fuel cycle, reprocessing, and waste disposal are discussed. The proceedings contain 63 papers

  20. Daily storage management of hydroelectric facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chappin, E.J.L.; Ferrero, M.; Lazzeroni, P.; Lukszo, Z.; Olivero, M.; Repetto, M.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a management procedure for hydroelectric facilities with daily storage. The water storage gives an additional degree of freedom allowing to shift in time power production when it is more convenient and to work at the maximum efficiency of hydraulic turbine. The management is

  1. Nuclear energy products except the electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Technically the fission reactors, on service or under construction, can produce other products than the electric power. Meanwhile, these applications are known since the beginning of the reactors exploitation, they never have been developed industrially. This report examines the necessary technical characteristics for using the nuclear systems on non electric power applications with an economical efficiency. What are the markets for these products? What are the strategical challenges to favor the development of non electric power applications of the nuclear energy? (A.L.B.)

  2. Consideration of external events in the design of nuclear facilities other than nuclear power plants, with emphasis on earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The design of nuclear facilities other than nuclear power plants in relation to external events is not a well harmonized practice around the world. Traditionally, the design of these facilities has either been left to the provisions collected in national building codes and other industrial codes not specifically intended for nuclear facilities, or it has been the subject of complex analyses of the type usually performed for nuclear power plants. The IAEA has recently started a programme of development of safety standards for such facilities. The need to define the appropriate safety requirements for nuclear installations prompted a generic review of siting and design approaches for these facilities in relation to external events. Therefore the assessment methods for siting and design were reviewed by the engineering community to provide the overall design of such facilities with the necessary reliability level. This report aims to provide guidelines for the assessment of the safety of nuclear facilities other than nuclear power plants in relation to external events through the application of simplified methods and procedures for their siting and design. The approach adopted is both simplified and conservative compared with that used for power reactors. It seeks to provide a rational balance for a suitable combination of sustainable effort in site investigations and refinement in design procedures, compatible with the assigned safety objectives. This publication is related to IAEA-TECDOC-348 'Earthquake Resistant Design of Nuclear Facilities with Limited Radioactive Inventory' (1985) which focused on the seismic design of nuclear facilities with limited radioactive inventory. After some 17 years, parts of IAEA-TECDOC-348 needed modification, as new operational data have become available from many facilities. In addition, sophisticated design methodologies are now more easily obtainable, and experts felt that the trade-off between sustainable investment in the

  3. Utilisation of real-scale renewable energy test facility for validation of generic wind turbine and wind power plant controller models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeni, Lorenzo; Gevorgian, Vahan; Wallen, Robb

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an example of application of a modern test facility conceived for experiments regarding the integration of renewable energy in the power system. The capabilities of the test facility are used to validate dynamic simulation models of wind power plants and their controllers....... The models are based on standard and generic blocks. The successful validation of events related to the control of active power (control phenomena in...

  4. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, J.; Norton, J.L.; Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments. The major application is in the health care industry where irradiators are used to sterilize single use medical products. These irradiators are designed and built by MDS Nordion and are used by manufacturers of surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes and other medical products. The irradiator is a large shielded room with a storage pool for the cobalt-60 sources. The medical products are circulated through the shielded room and exposed to the cobalt-60 sources. This treatment sterilizes the medical products which can then be shipped to hospitals for immediate use. Other applications for this irradiation technology include sanitisation of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials and food irradiation. The cobalt-60 sources are manufactured by MDS Nordion in their Cobalt Operations Facility in Kanata. More than 75,000 cobalt-60 sources for use in irradiators have been manufactured by MDS Nordion. The cobalt-60 sources are double encapsulated in stainless steel capsules, seal welded and helium leak tested. Each source may contain up to 14,000 curies. These sources are shipped to over 170 industrial irradiators around the world. This paper will focus on the MDS Nordion proprietary technology used to produce the cobalt-60 isotope in CANDU reactors. Almost 55 years ago MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada developed the process for manufacturing cobalt-60 at the Chalk River Labs, in Ontario, Canada. A cobalt-59 target was introduced into a research reactor where the cobalt-59 atom absorbed one neutron to become cobalt-60. Once the cobalt-60 material was removed from the research reactor it was encapsulated in stainless steel and seal welded using a Tungsten Inert Gas weld. The first cobalt-60 sources manufactured using material from the Chalk River Labs were used in cancer

  5. Microscale air quality impacts of distributed power generation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaguer, Eduardo P; Knipping, Eladio; Shaw, Stephanie; Ravindran, Satish

    2016-08-01

    The electric system is experiencing rapid growth in the adoption of a mix of distributed renewable and fossil fuel sources, along with increasing amounts of off-grid generation. New operational regimes may have unforeseen consequences for air quality. A three-dimensional microscale chemical transport model (CTM) driven by an urban wind model was used to assess gaseous air pollutant and particulate matter (PM) impacts within ~10 km of fossil-fueled distributed power generation (DG) facilities during the early afternoon of a typical summer day in Houston, TX. Three types of DG scenarios were considered in the presence of motor vehicle emissions and a realistic urban canopy: (1) a 25-MW natural gas turbine operating at steady state in either simple cycle or combined heating and power (CHP) mode; (2) a 25-MW simple cycle gas turbine undergoing a cold startup with either moderate or enhanced formaldehyde emissions; and (3) a data center generating 10 MW of emergency power with either diesel or natural gas-fired backup generators (BUGs) without pollution controls. Simulations of criteria pollutants (NO2, CO, O3, PM) and the toxic pollutant, formaldehyde (HCHO), were conducted assuming a 2-hr operational time period. In all cases, NOx titration dominated ozone production near the source. The turbine scenarios did not result in ambient concentration enhancements significantly exceeding 1 ppbv for gaseous pollutants or over 1 µg/m(3) for PM after 2 hr of emission, assuming realistic plume rise. In the case of the datacenter with diesel BUGs, ambient NO2 concentrations were enhanced by 10-50 ppbv within 2 km downwind of the source, while maximum PM impacts in the immediate vicinity of the datacenter were less than 5 µg/m(3). Plausible scenarios of distributed fossil generation consistent with the electricity grid's transformation to a more flexible and modernized system suggest that a substantial amount of deployment would be required to significantly affect air quality on

  6. Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Development and Status

    CERN Document Server

    Tatum, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a national user facility dedicated to nuclear structure, reactions, and nuclear astrophysics research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) using the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) technique. An integrated strategic plan for physics, experimental systems, and RIB production facilities have been developed and implementation of the plan is under way. Specific research objectives are defined for studying the nature of nucleonic matter, the origin of elements, solar physics, and synthesis of heavy elements. Experimental systems upgrade plans include new detector arrays and beam lines, and expansion and upgrade of existing devices. A multifaceted facility expansion plan includes a $4.75M High Power Target Laboratory (HPTL), presently under construction, to provide a facility for testing new target materials, target geometries, ion sources, and beam preparation techniques. Additional planned upgrades include a second RIB production system (IRIS2), an external axi...

  7. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992. Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv)

  8. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1993. Volume 15, Twenty-six annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1995-01-01

    This report the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1993. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1993 annual reports submitted by about 360 licensees indicated that approximately 189,711 individuals were monitored, 169,872 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measured dose of about 0.31 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 99,749 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 360 covered licensees during 1993. Some 91,000 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 12,685 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.49 rem (cSv)

  9. Comparison of risk assessment methodologies for nuclear power and nuclear fuels processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durant, W.S.; Walker, D.H.

    1986-08-01

    The utilization of nuclear fission for the generation of electric power or other purposes has as its by-product radioactive fission products. These radioactive fission products represent a potential hazard different in nature from that associated with other process operations or other methods of electrical power generation. As a result the electrical power stations and the facilities designed to process the irradiated fuel to recover the still useful fuel and the products of the irradiation are designed with multiple physical barriers to contain the radioactive fission products in the event that an accident were to occur. In recent years, a disciplined approach has evolved for developing detailed models of a facility and its processes. These models can be used to assess the response for the facility to upset or accident events. The approach is based on an ordered application of available data employing fault tree/event tree methodologies. Data and/or engineering judgment are applied in a probabilisitc framework so the approach has been called Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). The approach has been applied to nuclear electric generating facilities and to nuclear fuel processing facilities to assess the potential for release of fission product and transuranium element radionuclides (the hazard) and the resulting risks. The application of the methodology to the electrical generating facilities and to the fuel processing facilities has evolved somewhat differently because of differences in the facilities, availability of failure rate data, and expected outputs. This paper summarizes the two approaches and the differences in them compares the risk results from the existing studies

  10. Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meibom, P. [Risoe National Lab., DTU, System Analysis Dept., Roskilde (Denmark); Weber, C. [Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Chai og Energy Management (Germany); Barth, R.; Brand, H. [Univ. of Stuttgart, Inst. of Energy Economics and the Rational Use of Energy (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Adding wind power generation in a power system changes the operational patterns of the existing units due to the variability and unpredictability of wind power production. For large amounts of wind power production the expectation is that the operational costs of the other power plants will increase due to more operation time in part-load and more start-ups. The change in operational costs induced by the wind power production can only be calculated by comparing the operational costs in two power system configurations: with wind power production and with alternative production having properties like conventional production, i.e. being predictable and less variable. The choice of the characteristics of the alternative production is not straight forward and will therefore influence the operational costs induced by wind power production. This paper presents a method for calculating the change in operational costs due to wind power production using a stochastic optimization model covering the power systems in Germany and the Nordic countries. Two cases of alternative production are used to calculate the change in operational costs namely perfectly predictable wind power production enabling calculation of the costs connected to unpredictability, and constant wind power production enabling calculation of the operational costs connected to variability of wind power production. A 2010 case with three different wind power production penetration levels is analysed in the paper. (au)

  11. Reliability centred maintenance of nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Zoltan; Novakova, Helena; Hlavac, Pavol; Janicek, Frantisek

    2011-01-01

    A method for the optimization of preventive maintenance nuclear power plant equipment, i.e. reliability centred maintenance, is described. The method enables procedures and procedure schedules to be defined such as allow the maintenance cost to be minimized without compromising operational safety or reliability. Also, combinations of facilities which remain available and ensure reliable operation of the reactor unit during the maintenance of other pieces of equipment are identified. The condition-based maintenance concept is used in this process, thereby preventing unnecessary operator interventions into the equipment, which are often associated with human errors. Where probabilistic safety assessment is available, the most important structures, systems and components with the highest maintenance priority can be identified. (orig.)

  12. Impacts of facility size and location decisions on ethanol production cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocoloski, Matt; Michael Griffin, W.; Scott Matthews, H.

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosic ethanol has been identified as a promising alternative to fossil fuels to provide energy for the transportation sector. One of the obstacles cellulosic ethanol must overcome in order to contribute to transportation energy demand is the infrastructure required to produce and distribute the fuel. Given a nascent cellulosic ethanol industry, locating cellulosic ethanol refineries and creating the accompanying infrastructure is essentially a greenfield problem that may benefit greatly from quantitative analysis. This study models cellulosic ethanol infrastructure investment using a mixed integer program (MIP) that locates ethanol refineries and connects these refineries to the biomass supplies and ethanol demands in a way that minimizes the total cost. For the single- and multi-state regions examined in this study, larger facilities can decrease ethanol costs by $0.20-0.30 per gallon, and placing these facilities in locations that minimize feedstock and product transportation costs can decrease ethanol costs by up to $0.25 per gallon compared to uninformed placement that could result from influences such as local subsidies to encourage economic development. To best benefit society, policies should allow for incentives that encourage these low-cost production scenarios and avoid politically motivated siting of plants. - Research highlights: → Mixed-integer programming can be used to model ethanol infrastructure investment. → Large cellulosic ethanol facilities can decrease production cost by $0.20/gallon. → Optimized facility placement can save $0.25/gallon.

  13. Cost allocation. Combined heat and power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidzikauskas, V.

    2002-01-01

    The benefits of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) generation are discussed. The include improvement in energy intensity of 1% by 2010, 85-90% efficiency versus 40-50% of condensation power and others. Share of CHP electricity production in ERRA countries is presented.Solutions for a development CHP cost allocation are considered. Conclusion are presented for CHP production cost allocation. (R.P.)

  14. Optimizing Waste Heat Recovery for Class A Biosolids Production from a Combined Cycle Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soroushian, Fred

    2003-07-01

    The City of Corona serves a rapidly growing area of Southern California, The City operates three wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) that produce reclaimed water for unrestricted reuse. The sludge from the three WWTPs is transported to a central sludge treatment facility located at WWTP No. 1. The sludge treatment facility consists of sludge receiving, thickening, anaerobic digestion, and dewatering. In the year 2000, the City was faced with two crises. First, the California power shortage and escalating cost of power severely impacted the industry and businesses. Second, bans on Class B biosolids land application and the shutdown of a local privatized composting facility where the bulk of the City's biosolids were processed or reused forced the City to transport bulk waste a much greater distance. To cost-effectively respond to these crises, the City decided to start generating and supplying power to its constituents by constructing a nominal 30-megawatt (MW) power plant. The feasibility study proved that locating the power plant at the City's largest WWTP produced significant synergies. The reclaimed water from the WWTP could be used for power plant cooling, the waste heat from the power plant could be recovered and used in Class A biosolids processes, the digester gas could be used for supplementing the fuel needs of the sludge dryer, and the combined facilities operation was more efficient than physically separate facilities. This paper presents the results of this analysis as well as the construction and operational aspects of the project. (author)

  15. Current status of personnel exposure at nuclear power plants and other medical, industrial and educational facilities in JAPAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Fumiaki

    1991-01-01

    The state of radiation exposure of the workers engaging in radiation works in Japanese nuclear power stations, the factors of the radiation exposure of the workers engaging in radiation works, the countermeasures for reducing exposure in nuclear power stations, the state of radiation exposure of doctors, the workers engaging in radiation works, researchers and others in medical, industrial, research and educational and other facilities in Japan, the factors of their radiation exposure and the countermeasures for reducing the exposure, and the comparison of the exposure in nuclear power stations with that in medical, industrial, research and educational facilities are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Calculation of displacement and helium production at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Davidson, D.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    CT: Differential and total displacement and helium production rates are calculated for copper irradiated by spallation neutrons and 760 MeV protons at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The calculations are performed using the SPECTER and VNMTC computer codes, the latter being specially designed for spallation radiation damage calculations. For comparison, similar SPECTER calculations are also described for irradiation of copper in EBR-II and RTNS-II. The results indicate substantial contributions to the displacement and helium production rates due to neutrons in the high-energy tail (above 20 MeV) of the LAMPF spallation neutron spectrum. Still higher production rates are calculated for irradiations in the direct proton beam. These results will provide useful background information for research to be conducted at a new irradiation facility at LAMPF

  17. Power Producer Production Valuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kněžek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing developments in the electricity market, in particular the establishment of the Prague Energy Exchange (PXE and the associated transfer from campaign-driven sale to continuous trading, represent a significant change for power companies.  Power producing companies can now optimize the sale of their production capacities with the objective of maximizing profit from wholesale electricity and supporting services. The Trading Departments measure the success rate of trading activities by the gross margin (GM, calculated by subtracting the realized sales prices from the realized purchase prices and the production cost, and indicate the profit & loss (P&L to be subsequently calculated by the Control Department. The risk management process is set up on the basis of a business strategy defining the volumes of electricity that have to be sold one year and one month before the commencement of delivery. At the same time, this process defines the volume of electricity to remain available for spot trading (trading limits. 

  18. Production of High Intracavity UV Power From a CW Laser Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, R. T.; Chyba, T. H.; Keppel, C. E.; Gaskell, D.; Ent, R.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to create a prototype high power CW source of ultraviolet (UV) photons for photon-electron scattering at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Hall B. The facility will use optical resonant cavities to produce a high photon flux. The technical approach will be to frequency-double the 514.5 mn light from an Argon-Ion Laser to create 0.1 to 1.0 watt in the UV. The produced UV power will be stored in a resonant cavity to generate an high intracavity UV power of 102 to 103 watts. The specific aim of this project is to first design and construct the low-Q doubling cavity and lock it to the Argon-Ion wavelength. Secondly, the existing 514.5 nm high-Q build-up cavity and its locking electronics will be modified to create high intracavity UV power. The entire system will then be characterized and evaluated for possible beam line use.

  19. Communication grounding facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gye Seong

    1998-06-01

    It is about communication grounding facility, which is made up twelve chapters. It includes general grounding with purpose, materials thermal insulating material, construction of grounding, super strength grounding method, grounding facility with grounding way and building of insulating, switched grounding with No. 1A and LCR, grounding facility of transmission line, wireless facility grounding, grounding facility in wireless base station, grounding of power facility, grounding low-tenton interior power wire, communication facility of railroad, install of arrester in apartment and house, install of arrester on introduction and earth conductivity and measurement with introduction and grounding resistance.

  20. Development of wind power production in arctic climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltola, E.; Kaas, J.; Aarnio, E. [Kemijoki Oy (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    The project Development of wind power production in arctic climate is a direct continuation of Arctic wind energy research project, which started in 1989. The main topics in 1996-97 have been production development and commercialising the blade heating systems, development of operation and maintenance practices of arctic wind power plants, preparations for new wind farms and various network connection and energy system studies. Practical operations have taken place in Pyhaetunturi test power plant and in Paljasselkae and Lammashovi power plants, which are in commercial operation

  1. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  2. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA [Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator] II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards

  3. Meson facility. Powerful new research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobashev, V.M.; Tavkhelidze, A.N.

    A meson facility is being built at the Institute of Nuclear Research, USSR Academy of Sciences, in Troitsk, where the Scientific Center, USSR Academy of Sciences is located. The facility will include a linear accelerator for protons and negative hydrogen ions with 600 MeV energy and 0.5-1 mA beam current. Some fundamental studies that can be studied at a meson facility are described in the areas of elementary particles, neutron physics, solid state physics, and applied research. The characteristics of the linear accelerator are given and the meson facility's experimental complex is described

  4. International inventory of training facilities in nuclear power and its fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Because the development of trained manpower is important for full use of nuclear power, the International Atomic Energy Agency has compiled this first inventory of training facilities and programs. It is based on information submitted by Member States and received up to 31 January 1977. The inventory is arranged by country, type of training organization, and by subject

  5. Design considerations and analysis of potential applications of a high power ultraviolet FEL at the TESLA test facility at DESY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, C.; Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    A possibility of constructing a high power ultraviolet free electron laser at the TESLA test facility at DESY is discussed. The proposed facility consists of a tunable master oscillator (P av ∼10 mW, P peak ∼10 kW, λ≅200-350 nm) and an FEL amplifier with a tapered undulator. The average and peak radiation power at the exit of the FEL amplifier is about 7 kW and 220 GW, respectively. Installation of such a facility can significantly extend scientific potential of the TESLA test facility. The UV free electron laser can be used to construct a polarized, monochromatic gamma-source with the ultimate yield up to 10 12 gamma-quanta per second and the maximal energy of about 100 MeV. An intensive gamma-source can also form the base for constructing the test facility for the TESLA positron generation system. Another accelerator application of the proposed facility is verification of the main technical solutions for the laser and the optical system to be used in the gamma-gamma option of the TESLA collider. A high average power UV laser is also promising for industrial applications

  6. Operation status and prospect of radioisotope production facility in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minjin; Jung, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    At the RIPF at HANARO, Radioisotopes for industrial and medical purpose are produced and research and development for various radioisotopes are carried out. Major products include Ir-192 for NDT, I-131 for treatment and diagnosis of thyroid cancer, Mo-99/Tc-99m Generator for imaging diagnosis of cancer. Production of radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical is being increased every year. Due to world-wide unstableness in the supply of Mo-99, a technology to produce (n,γ)Mo-99 generator at HANARO had been developed as a short term countermeasure. It will be available by the end of 2012. As a long term countermeasure, we are trying to build a new fully dedicated isotope reactor that will produce Fission Mo-99. At present, utilization of RIPF at HANARO is being increased. However when the construction of a new dedicated isotope reactor is completed in 2016, the role of the existing facility and new facility should be established accordingly so that none of the facilities are idling. In the near future, when the prospect of a utilization plan is completed, we expect an opportunity to present the result. (author)

  7. Green certificates will lead to increased electric power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, Oddvar

    2004-01-01

    The implementation of green certificates will lead to increased electricity production from renewable energy sources and less risk of price crises. For the time being, a common market for green certificates will be established with Sweden from January 1, 2006. It is possible to realise a ''compulsory total quota'' of 20 TWh by 2016. Green certificates will imply a premium on the electricity bill. However, the quota system will imply increased power generation, which in turn tends to lower the price. Norway should in principle follow Sweden's definition of renewable energy: all new hydroelectric power, wind power, solar energy, wave and tidal power, biomass energy, and energy recovery. The certificate regime will apply to new investments in renewable power production. However, it would be natural to include the established renewable power production that is currently receiving support. Some critics fear that the consumers rather than the authorities will subsidize the production of green power. The point is being made that central EU countries may save great sums by investing in renewable energy in Norway

  8. Developing maximal neuromuscular power: part 2 - training considerations for improving maximal power production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2011-02-01

    This series of reviews focuses on the most important neuromuscular function in many sport performances: the ability to generate maximal muscular power. Part 1, published in an earlier issue of Sports Medicine, focused on the factors that affect maximal power production while part 2 explores the practical application of these findings by reviewing the scientific literature relevant to the development of training programmes that most effectively enhance maximal power production. The ability to generate maximal power during complex motor skills is of paramount importance to successful athletic performance across many sports. A crucial issue faced by scientists and coaches is the development of effective and efficient training programmes that improve maximal power production in dynamic, multi-joint movements. Such training is referred to as 'power training' for the purposes of this review. Although further research is required in order to gain a deeper understanding of the optimal training techniques for maximizing power in complex, sports-specific movements and the precise mechanisms underlying adaptation, several key conclusions can be drawn from this review. First, a fundamental relationship exists between strength and power, which dictates that an individual cannot possess a high level of power without first being relatively strong. Thus, enhancing and maintaining maximal strength is essential when considering the long-term development of power. Second, consideration of movement pattern, load and velocity specificity is essential when designing power training programmes. Ballistic, plyometric and weightlifting exercises can be used effectively as primary exercises within a power training programme that enhances maximal power. The loads applied to these exercises will depend on the specific requirements of each particular sport and the type of movement being trained. The use of ballistic exercises with loads ranging from 0% to 50% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) and

  9. Decommissioning Work Modeling System for Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. K.; Cho, W. H.; Choi, Y. D.; Moon, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    During the decommissioning activities of the KRR-1 and 2 (Korea Research Reactor 1 and 2) and UCP (Uranium Conversion Plant), all information and data, which generated from the decommissioning project, were record, input and managed at the DECOMMIS (DECOMMissioning Information management System). This system was developed for the inputting and management of the data and information of the man-power consumption, operation time of the dismantling equipment, the activities of the radiation control, dismantled waste management and Q/A activities. When a decommissioning is planed for a nuclear facility, an investigation into the characterization of the nuclear facility is first required. The results of such an investigation are used for calculating the quantities of dismantled waste volume and estimating the cost of the decommissioning project. That is why, the DEFACS (DEcommissioning FAcility Characterization DB System) was established for the management of the facility characterization data. The DEWOCS (DEcommissioning WOrk-unit productivity Calculation System) was developed for the calculation of the workability on the decommissioning activities. The work-unit productivities are calculated through this system using the data from the two systems, DECOMMIS and DEFACS. This result, the factors of the decommissioning work-unit productivities, will be useful for the other nuclear facility decommissioning planning and engineering. For this, to set up the items and plan for the decommissioning of the new objective facility, the DEMOS (DEcommissioning work Modeling System) was developed. This system is for the evaluation the cost, man-power consumption of workers and project staffs and technology application time. The factor of the work-unit productivities from the DEWOCS and governmental labor cost DB and equipment rental fee DB were used for the calculation the result of the DEMOS. And also, for the total system, DES (Decommissioning Engineering System), which is now

  10. Reference costs of the electric power production; Couts de reference de la production electrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    This study periodically realized by the DGEMP aims to compare the competitiveness of the different channels of electric power production, for different utilization conditions. The first part ''reference costs of the 2003 electric power production'' examines the prices of the electric power produced by different channels in particular in the framework of the industrial implementing in 2015. The nuclear and thermal power plants are concerned. The second part is devoted to the decentralized production channels (wind energy, photovoltaic, cogeneration heat-electricity) is under construction and will be presented next year. (A.L.B.)

  11. Managing risks during the construction of a power generation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loulakis, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    The construction of a power generation facility is a substantial undertaking that involves considerable risks to all parties involved. While contractors are accustomed to dealing with risks, construction owners are typically more naive about not only the risks they are assuming in the construction of a project, but also about the role they play on the project itself. Owners and developers of power facilities must understand at the outset that their role during the construction of a project is as integral to the success of the project as that of the designer and contractor. In addition, owners should also understand that there are virtually no risks on a construction project that cannot be shifted among the contracting parties as part of the business deal. Consequently, an owner may contractually be assuming the risks of (1) unusually severe weather, (2) unexpected subsurface conditions, (3) strikes at the turbine supplier's plant or (4) changes in law - as well as the increases in price and delays to project completion associated with such risks. In light of this, a prudent owner will evaluate more than just whether there is sufficient financing to complete the construction of a contemplated project. Prudent owners will conduct a risk management review of the project structure and the contracting terms, with the primary focus being (1) the identification and analysis of the most significant risks faced, (2) a determination of how such risks can be either mitigated or eliminated, and (3) the assessment of the financial exposure to the owner should the potential risk become a reality. This paper will present the framework that owners and developers of power generation projects can use in undertaking such a risk management review

  12. Radiocesium Discharges and Subsequent Environmental Transport at the Major U.S. Weapons Production Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten, Jr. C.T.; Hamby, D.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1999-11-14

    Radiocesium is one of the more prevalent radionuclides in the environment as a result of weapons production related atomic projects in the United States and the former Soviet Union. Radiocesium discharges during the 1950's account for a large fraction of the historical releases from U.S. weapons production facilities. Releases of radiocesium to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems during the early ,years of nuclear weapons production provided the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary studies on the transport mechanisms of this potentially hazardous radionuclide. The major U.S. Department of Energy facilities (Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina) are located in regions of the country that have different geographical characteristics. The facility siting provided diverse backgrounds for the development of an understanding of environmental factors contributing to the fate and transport of radiocesium. In this paper, we summarize the significant environmental releases of radiocesium in the early -years of weapons production and then discuss the historically significant transport mechanisms for r37Cs at the three facilities that were part of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex.

  13. VHTR-based Nuclear Hydrogen Plant Analysis for Hydrogen Production with SI, HyS, and HTSE Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Youngjoon; Lee, Taehoon; Lee, Kiyoung; Kim, Minhwan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, analyses of material and heat balances on the SI, HyS, and HTSE processes coupled to a Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) were performed. The hydrogen production efficiency including the thermal to electric energy ratio demanded from each process is found and the normalized evaluation results obtained from three processes are compared to each other. The currently technological issues to maintain the long term continuous operation of each process will be discussed at the conference site. VHTR-based nuclear hydrogen plant analysis for hydrogen production with SI, HyS, and HTSE facilities has been carried out to determine the thermal efficiency. It is evident that the thermal to electrical energy ratio demanded from each hydrogen production process is an important parameter to select the adequate process for hydrogen production. To improve the hydrogen production efficiency in the SI process coupled to the VHTR without electrical power generation, the demand of electrical energy in the SI process should be minimized by eliminating an electrodialysis step to break through the azeotrope of the HI/I_2/H_2O ternary aqueous solution

  14. Safety evaluation of the loss of fluid test facility project No. 394

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    Assessment of the safety of the LOFT facility and subsequent recommendations have been based on a comparison of the LOFT facility to requirements for commercial power reactors. In this comparison, the many unique features of the LOFT facility were considered including the low power level, the limited operational use as a test reactor, and the remoteness of the site. Based on this assessment, it is concluded, that while the likelihood of an accidental release of fission products may be greater than for a commercial power reactor, the consequences of such a release are reduced by the lower fission product inventory, the remoteness of the site and the capability of evacuating the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. There is reasonable assurance that the public health and safety will not be endangered due to operation of this facility, specifically: The INEL site is acceptable with respect to location, land use, population distribution, controlled access, hydrology, meteorology, geology and seismology. Sufficient engineered safety features have been included to assure that the potential offsite doses are well within 10 CFR Part 100 guidelines. The LOFT facility has been designed in general accordance with standards, guides and codes which are comparable to those applied to commercial power reactors and any exceptions to these have been based on the unique features of the LOFT facility. Certain matters including the final safety analyses based on detailed component designs, Technical Specifications, LOCE controls and detailed program plan have not been reviewed but we assume will properly be resolved by ERDA, which has the ultimate responsibility for the safety of this facility. Changes to the facility design or program plan such as removal of the fueled Mobile Test Assembly or blowdowns to the containment vessel also will require additional analyses and review. (U.S.)

  15. A distributed process monitoring system for nuclear powered electrical generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweney, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    Duke Power Company is one of the largest investor owned utilities in the United States, with a service area of 20,000 square miles extending across North and South Carolina. Oconee Nuclear Station, one of Duke Power's three nuclear generating facilities, is a three unit pressurized water reactor site and has, over the course of its 15-year operating lifetime, effectively run out of plant processing capability. From a severely overcrowded cable spread room to an aging overtaxed Operator Aid Computer, the problems with trying to add additional process variables to the present centralized Operator Aid Computer are almost insurmountable obstacles. This paper reports that for this reason, and to realize the inherent benefits of a distributed process monitoring and control system, Oconee has embarked on a project to demonstrate the ability of a distributed system to perform in the nuclear power plant environment

  16. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Norton, J.L.; Slack, J.

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments, but are primarily used to sterilize single-use medical products including; surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes, and cotton swabs. Other applications include sanitization of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials, and food irradiation. The technology for producing the cobalt-60 isotope was developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) almost 55 years ago using research reactors at the AECL Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The first cobalt-60 source produced for medical applications was manufactured by MDS Nordion and used in cancer therapy. The benefits of cobalt-60 as applied to medical product manufacturing, were quickly realized and the demand for this radioisotope quickly grew. The same technology for producing cobalt-60 in research reactors was then designed and packaged such that it could be conveniently transferred to a utility/power reactor. In the early 1970's, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production for industrial irradiation applications was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology for producing cobalt-60 in additional CANDU reactors. CANDU is unique among the power reactors of the world, being heavy water moderated and fuelled with natural uranium. They are also designed and supplied with stainless steel adjusters, the primary function of which is to shape the neutron flux to optimize reactor power and fuel bum-up, and to provide excess reactivity needed to overcome xenon-135 poisoning following a reduction of power. The reactor is designed to develop full power output with all of the adjuster

  17. Research on adoption of graphic processing system into electric power facilities operation management. Denryoku setsubi kanri gyomu ni okeru zukei shori system no tekiyo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitsubuchi, Yoshiyasu; Uryu, Kenji; Terasaki, Naoaki (Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc., Fukuoka (Japan))

    1989-03-30

    In the technical department of electric power companies, there are innumerable single line diagram, machinery arrangement plan and other facilities drawings. Based on those drawings, facilities planning, work design, construction plan, maintenance and management data, etc. are made, for which making heightening is desired in efficiency of drawing filing management. Therefore, research was made on the adoption of CAD technology through modeling power transmission line, and power generating and transforming station operation management. First for the application of power transmission facilities, the power transmission line plan and facilities information were planned to be unified in management. Ie., the power transmission line plan and profile being shown on the display, symbols of steel towers, cable lines, etc. were further picked by mouth to easily substantiate the facilities. While image input and CAD of drawing were made in combined treatment. Then for the application to the power generating and transforming facilities, the single line diagram and facilities information were unified in management, together with demonstration of data interchangeability among different kinds of CAD system. 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Analysis of Opportunity to Create Self-Regulating Reactor Facility of Extra-Low Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazansky, Y.A.; Levtchenko, V.A.; Yuriev, Y.S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with fundamental possibilities (economy, safety, self-regulation) of creating an extra-low power reactor facility for heat supply. It contains the results of calculations for thermal and fast neutron reactors. The concept of this type of a reactor had been developed by the contributors earlier

  19. Ownership and efficiency in nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollitt, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the relatively small amount of academic literature on the efficiency of nuclear power production. The author draws on world-wide comparisons to illustrate the situation in the United Kingdom, where the nuclear generating capacity, conceived of and constructed as a public concern, has recently been privatised. The theory and evidence for links between ownership and productive efficiency is received. Efficiency measures used are explained as are the linear programs required to generate them. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is used to analyse productive efficiency of nuclear power plants before and after privatisation. Results of the DEA are used to test the hypothesis that ownership has no effect on productive efficiency. (UK)

  20. Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides: Guidance on Facility Design and Production of [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has advanced rapidly in recent years and is becoming an indispensable imaging modality for the evaluation and staging of cancer patients. A key component of the successful operation of a PET centre is the on-demand availability of radiotracers (radiopharmaceuticals) labelled with suitable positron emitting radioisotopes. Of the hundreds of positron labelled radiotracers, 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the most successful and widely used imaging agent in PET today. While FDG is utilized largely in oncology for the management of cancer patients, its applications in neurology and cardiology are also steadily growing. A large number of PET facilities have been established in Member States over the past few years, and more are being planned. The design and operation of a facility for the production of FDG requires attention to detail, in particular the application of good manufacturing practices (GMP) guidelines and quality assurance. The product must conform to the required quality specifications and must be safe for human use. This book is intended to be a resource manual with practical information for planning and operating an FDG production facility, including design and implementation of the laboratories, facility layout, equipment, personnel and FDG quality assessment. GMP and quality management are discussed only briefly, since these topics are covered extensively in the IAEA publication Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides: Guidelines for Setting up a Facility (Technical Reports Series No. 471). It should be noted that manufacturing processes and quality specifications for FDG are not currently globally harmonized, and these do vary to some extent. However, there is no disagreement over the need to ensure that the product is manufactured in a controlled manner, that it conforms to applicable quality specifications and that it is safe for human use. Administrators, managers, radiopharmaceutical scientists, production

  1. Thermo-economic analysis of integrated membrane-SMR ITM-oxy-combustion hydrogen and power production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanusi, Yinka S.; Mokheimer, Esmail M.A.; Habib, Mohamed A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A methane reforming reactor integrated to an oxy-combustion plant is proposed. •Co-production of power and hydrogen was investigated and presented. •Optimal thermo-economic operating conditions of the system were identified and presented. •The ion transport membrane oxygen separation unit has the highest capital cost. •The combustor has the highest exergy destruction. -- Abstract: The demand for hydrogen has greatly increased in the last decade due to the stringent regulations enacted to address environmental pollution concerns. Natural gas reforming is currently the most mature technology for large-scale hydrogen production. However, it is usually associated with greenhouse gas emissions. As part of the strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, new designs need to be developed to integrate hydrogen production facilities that are based on natural gas reforming with carbon capture facilities. In this study, we carried out energy, exergy and economic analysis of hydrogen production in a steam methane reforming reactor integrated with an oxy-combustion plant for co-production of power and hydrogen. The results show that the overall system efficiency and hydrogen production efficiency monotonically increase with increasing the combustor exit temperature (CET), increasing the amount of hydrogen extracted and decreasing the auxiliary fuel added to the system. The optimal thermo-economic operating conditions of the system were obtained as reformer pressure of 15 bar, auxiliary fuel factor of 0.8 and hydrogen extraction factor of 0.6. The production cost of hydrogen using the proposed system, under these optimal operating conditions, is within the range suggested by the International Energy Agency (IEA). Further analysis shows that the capital cost of the membrane-air separation unit (ITM) has the major share in the total investment cost of the system and constitutes 37% of the total capital cost of the system at the CET of 1500 K. The exergy

  2. Design Basis Provisions for New and Existing Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    India has 3-Stage Nuclear Power Program. • Various facilities under design, construction or operation. • Design Basis Knowledge Management (DBKM) is an important and challenging task. • Design Basis Knowledge contributes towards: - Safe operation of running plants; - Design and construction of new facilities; - Addresses issues related to future decommissioning activities

  3. Capabilities for managing high-volume production of electric engineering equipment at the Electrochemical Production Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlednev, V.M.

    1996-04-01

    The Electromechanical Production Plant is essentially a research center with experimental facilities and power full testing base. Major products of the plant today include heat pipes and devices of their basis of different functions and power from high temperature ranges to cryogenics. This report describes work on porous titanium and carbon-graphite current collectors, electrocatalyst synthesis, and electrocatalyst applications.

  4. Defense waste processing facility at Savannah River Plant. Instrument and power jumpers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckendorm, F.M. II.

    1983-06-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for waste vitrification at the Savannah River Plant is in the final design stage. Development of equipment interconnecting devices or jumpers for use within the remotely operated processing canyon is now complete. These devices provide for the specialized instrument and electrical requirements of the DWPF process for low-voltage, high-frequency, and high-power interconnections

  5. State-of-the-art WEB -technologies and ecological safety of nuclear power engineering facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batij, V.G.; Batij, E.V.; Rud'ko, V.M.; Kotlyarov, V.T.

    2004-01-01

    Prospects of web-technologies using in the field of improvement radiation safety level of nuclear power engineering facilities is seen. It is shown that application of such technologies will enable entirely using the data of all information systems of radiation control

  6. The state of radioactive waste management and of personnel radiation exposure in nuclear power generating facilities in fiscal 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    (1) The state of radioactive waste management in nuclear power generating facilities: In the nuclear power stations, the released quantities of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes are all below the control objective levels. For the respective nuclear power stations, the released quantities of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes in fiscal 1983 and the objective levels are given in table. And, the quantities of solid wastes taken into storage and the cumulative amounts are given. For reference, the results each year since fiscal 1974 are shown. (2) The state of personnel radiation exposure in nuclear power generating facilities: In the nuclear power stations, the personnel radiation exposures are all below the permissible levels. The dose distribution etc. in the respective nuclear power stations are given in table. For reference, the results each year since fiscal 1974 are shown. (Mori, K.)

  7. Present state of inspection robot technology in nuclear power facilities. Case of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, Kuniaki

    1995-01-01

    In the maintenance works in nuclear power facilities such as checkup, inspection and repair, for the main purpose of radiation protection, remote operation technology was introduced since relatively early stage, and at present, the robots that carry out the inspection works for confirming the soundness of main equipment have been developed and put to practical use. At the time of introducing these technologies, in addition to the research and development of robots proper, the coordination with the design of plant machinery and equipment facilities as the premise of introducing robots is an important requirement. In this report, the present state of the development of remote inspection technology for fast breeder reactors is introduced, and the matters to which attention is paid in the plant design for introducing robots are explained. First, fast breeder reactors are described. The needs of robotizing and adopting remote operation in nuclear power facilities are explained, using the examples of the inspection system for a reactor vessel and the inspection system for steam generator heat transfer tubes. (K.I.)

  8. Ship nuclear power plants: system approach designing and optimal parameter selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    Dependence of basic indices of naval nuclear power installations on combination of thermotechnical parameters is considered. The necessity of new approach to designing naval nuclear power facilities, based on combined analysis of the above facilities and the ship, as a single complex system, is demonstrated. The conclusion is made that unjustified increase in the ship metal capacity, terms and costs of their production takes place in case of disregarding the role of mass and dimensions of nuclear power facilities and consequently their thermotechnical characteristics in formation of the ship displacement tonnage. 2 refs., 3 figs

  9. Licensing of digital Instrumentation and Control in Radioisotope Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aziz, L.Kh.; Lashin, R.; Mostafa, W.

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the rapid development of digital I and C systems in all major industries, it has for several reasons been slower in nuclear power plants. The most important reason is that only a few new plants have been ordered worldwide during the last ten years. A second reason is connected to the efforts needed in providing adequate evidence that the digital I and C system can be used in safety and safety related applications. This issue is connected to the effort needed in obtaining adequate assurance that the digital I and C will fulfill its intended function and contain no unintended function in all possible operational states during its entire life cycle. This paper presents an acceptance criteria for licensing a digital instrumentation and control system in a Radioisotope Production Facility(1), which is under commissioning. The acceptance criteria ensure that the I and C systems are designed to reach the highest degree of reliability with respect to the function they perform, operators will have clear and accessible availability to data on every plant parameter, and also ensure that the safety objectives have been covered

  10. Targetry at the LANL 100 MeV isotope production facility: lessons learned from facility commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nortier, F. M. (Francois M.); Fassbender, M. E. (Michael E.); DeJohn, M.; Hamilton, V. T. (Virginia T.); Heaton, R. C. (Richard C.); Jamriska, David J.; Kitten, J. J. (Jason J.); Lenz, J. W.; Lowe, C. E.; Moddrell, C. F.; McCurdy, L. M. (Lisa M.); Peterson, E. J. (Eugene J.); Pitt, L. R. (Lawrence R.); Phillips, D. R. (Dennis R.); Salazar, L. L. (Louie L.); Smith, P. A. (Paul A.); Valdez, Frank O.

    2004-01-01

    The new Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been commissioned during the spring of 2004. Commissioning activities focused on the establishment of a radionuclide database, the review and approval of two specific target stack designs, and four trial runs with subsequent chemical processing and data analyses. This paper highlights some aspects of the facility and the targetry of the two approved target stacks used during the commissioning process. Since one niobium encapsulated gallium target developed a blister after the extended irradiation of 4 days, a further evaluation of the gallium targets is required. Beside this gallium target, no other target showed any sign of thermal failure. Considering the uncertainties involved, the production yields obtained for targets irradiated in the same energy slot are consistent for all three 'Prototype' stacks. A careful analysis of the temperature profile in the RbCl targets shows that energy shifts occur in the RbCl and Ga targets. Energy shifts are a result of density variations in the RbCl disk under bombardment. Thickness adjustments of targets in the prototype stack are required to ensure maximum production yields of {sup 82}Sr and {sup 68}Ge in the design energy windows. The {sup 68}Ge yields obtained are still consistently lower than the predicted yield value, which requires further investigation. After recalculation of the energy windows for the RbCl and Ga targets, the measured {sup 82}Sr production yields compare rather well with values predicted on the basis of evaluated experimental excitation function data.

  11. AMS data production facilities at science operations center at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choutko, V.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Shan, B.

    2017-10-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy physics experiment on the board of the International Space Station (ISS). This paper presents the hardware and software facilities of Science Operation Center (SOC) at CERN. Data Production is built around production server - a scalable distributed service which links together a set of different programming modules for science data transformation and reconstruction. The server has the capacity to manage 1000 paralleled job producers, i.e. up to 32K logical processors. Monitoring and management tool with Production GUI is also described.

  12. Eco-power called 'Jade'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirvani, A.

    2005-01-01

    This short article describes how an ecological centre in the Jura mountains in the western part of Switzerland purchases electricity from certified ecological production. The centre is briefly described, which is home both to 'Mycorama', an exhibition of fungi and mushrooms, as well as 'Evologia', an exhibition with domesticated animals and their ancestors. The electricity utility EEF.ENSA that supplies the ecologically-produced power is introduced and the production of ecological power with the 'Naturemade' label is discussed. The financing of ecological improvements to power generation facilities that is provided by the 'Naturemade' label system is described and the advantages offered to all involved are discussed

  13. Demonstration of persistent contamination of a cooked egg product production facility with Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee and characterization of the persistent strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakočiūnė, D; Bisgaard, M; Pedersen, K; Olsen, J E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether continuous contamination of light pasteurized egg products with Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee (S. Tennessee) at a large European producer of industrial egg products was caused by persistent contamination of the production facility and to characterize the persistent strains. Seventy-three S. Tennessee isolates collected from products over a 3-year period with intermittent contamination, and 15 control strains were compared by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using two enzymes. Forty-five case isolates distributed throughout the full period were shown to belong to one profile type. Isolates representing different PFGE profiles were all assigned to ST 319 by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The case isolates did not show a higher ability to form biofilm on a plastic surface than noncase isolates. Characteristically, members of the persistent clone were weak producers of H2 S in laboratory medium. S. Tennessee isolated from the case was able to grow better in pasteurized egg product compared with other serovars investigated. It was concluded that the contamination was caused by a persistent strain in the production facility and that this strain apparently had adapted to grow in the relevant egg product. S. Tennessee has previously been associated with persistence in hatching facilities. This is the first report of persistent contamination of an egg production facility with this serovar. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Facility design consideration for continuous mix production of class 1.3 propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, K. L.; Schirk, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    In November of 1989, NASA awarded the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) contract to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC) for production of advanced solid rocket motors using the continuous mix process. Aerojet ASRM division (AAD) was selected as the facility operator and RUST International Corporation provided the engineering, procurement, and construction management services. The continuous mix process mandates that the mix and cast facilities be 'close-coupled' along with the premix facilities, creating unique and challenging requirements for the facility designer. The classical approach to handling energetic materials-division into manageable quantities, segregation, and isolation-was not available due to these process requirements and quantities involved. This paper provides a description of the physical facilities, the continuous mix process, and discusses the monitoring and detection techniques used to mitigate hazards and prevent an incident.

  15. Photovoltaic power production figures in 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Worldwide figures of photovoltaic power production (in Mw) along 1992 are presented. Worldwide production of modules per manufacturing technology and per manufacturing companies in Europe, USA and Japan are provided as well. The review has used the following sources: ''PV News'', ''PV insider's report'' and ''systems solars''. (Author)

  16. A Strategic Framework for the Establishment of International Production Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.P.; Riis, Jens Ove

    2000-01-01

    Departing from the empirical observation that there often is a weak link between the corporate internationalisation strategies and the actual establishment of international production facilities. This paper describes a framework to overcome this problem. The basic idea in the framework is the dis...

  17. CHP in Switzerland from 1990 to 1998. Thermal power generation including combined heat and power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, U.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a study on thermal power generation in Switzerland show that combined heat and power (CHP) systems have grown rapidly. Statistics are presented on the development of CHP-based power and also on thermal power stations without waste heat usage. Figures are given for gas and steam turbine installations, combined gas and steam turbine stations and motor-driven CHP units. Power production is categorised, separating small and large (over 1 Megawatt electrical) power generation facilities. On-site, distributed power generation at consumers' premises and the geographical distribution of plant is described

  18. Soft x-ray power diagnostic improvements at the Omega Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorce, C.; Schein, J.; Weber, F.; Widmann, K.; Campbell, K.; Dewald, E.; Turner, R.; Landen, O.; Jacoby, K.; Torres, P.; Pellinen, D.

    2006-01-01

    Soft x-ray power diagnostics are essential for evaluating high temperature laser plasma experiments. The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer, a core diagnostic for radiation flux and temperature measurements of Hohlraums, installed on the Omega Laser Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics has recently undergone a series of upgrades. Work performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the development of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Dante spectrometer enables the Omega Dante to offer a total of 18 absolutely calibrated channels in the energy range from 50 eV to 20 keV. This feature provides Dante with the capability to measure higher, NIF relevant, radiation temperatures with increased accuracy including a differentiation of higher energy radiation such as the Au M and L bands. Diagnostic monitoring using experimental data from directly driven Au spherical shots is discussed

  19. Acoustic assessment report for Toronto Hydro Energy Services Inc. Ashbridge's Bay power generation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, F.; Shinbin, N.

    2010-04-01

    This acoustic assessment report was conducted to determine the potential noise impacts of a biogas cogeneration plant that will be located on a street in a primarily industrial area of Toronto, Ontario. The facility will be comprised of seven 1.416 MW biogas-fired reciprocating engine generators and a single flare. The report presented results obtained from noise level calculations and noise modelling studies of the on-site equipment at the planned facility. The cogeneration plant will utilize biogas produced in existing digesters to generate electricity and hot water. The biogas will be produced by anaerobic digestion from municipal sewage waste at an adjacent facility. It is expected that the facility will generate 9.912 MW of electricity from the generators. Heat resulting from the biogas combustion process is recovered from engine and exhaust flue gases by heat exchangers. The facility will operate continuously. Significant noise sources at the facility include generator exhaust gas stacks; air intake points; building ventilation fans; and roof-top heat dump radiators. Sound power levels determined for each of the noise sources were based upon worst-case operating scenarios. Results of the assessment indicated that the facility is in compliance with all Ministry of the Environment (MOE) requirements. 5 refs., 10 tabs., 4 figs.

  20. Ground Shock Resistant of Buried Nuclear Power Plant Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornai, D.; Adar, A.; Gal, E.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) might be subjected to hostile attacks such as Earth Penetrating Weapons (EPW) that carry explosive charges. Explosions of these weapons near buried NPP facility might cause collapse, breaching, spalling, deflection, shear, rigid body motion (depending upon the foundations), and in-structure shock. The occupants and the equipment in the buried facilities are exposed to the in-structure motions, and if they are greater than their fragility values than occupants might be wounded or killed and the equipment might be damaged, unless protective measures will be applied. NPP critical equipment such as pumps are vital for the normal safe operation since it requires constant water circulation between the nuclear reactor and the cooling system, including in case of an immediate shut down. This paper presents analytical- semi empirical formulation and analysis of the explosion of a penetrating weapon with a warhead of 100kgs TNT (Trinitrotoluene) that creates ground shock effect on underground NPP structure containing equipment, such as a typical pump. If the in-structure spectral shock is greater than the pump fragility values than protective measures are required, otherwise a real danger to the NPP safety might occur

  1. Economic feasibility constraints for renewable energy source power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondi, L.

    1992-01-01

    Suitable analysis criteria for use in economic feasibility studies of renewable energy source power plants are examined for various plant types, e.g., pumped storage hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, refuse-fuelled, etc. The paper focusses on the impacts, on operating cost and rate structure, of the necessity, depending on demand characteristics, to integrate renewable energy source power production with conventional power production in order to effectively and economically meet peak power demand. The influence of commercialization and marketing trends on renewable energy source power plant economic feasibility are also taken into consideration

  2. Study of the proper contribution of independent power producing business in the long-range power supply and demand plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, S.B. [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    The independent power producing business has expanded its size and process through the Long-range Power Supply and Demand Plan of 1993, 1995, and it is high time that full-scale competition in the power generation market began to emerge. This report assesses the marginal costs of independent and general power producing businesses on a theoretical basis on the proper size of independent power producing business, and presents the methods to compare these. But, since there follows several problems in applying this theoretical model, a practical standard to decide the proper level of independent power production amount is presented. That is, while not much burdening the existing industrial structure, I search for ways to present the amount of independent power production and the methods of power generation to make sure that the competition effect is maximized when full-scale competition started. However, in the long-term, the allotment of independent power production itself could be a violation to the basic spirit of competition. A more desirable way is to allow independent power producers and the Korea Power Corp. to freely compete on all types of power generation and facilities. The supply plan should be also operated smoothly and flexibly since the types of power generation and the amounts reflect the result of competition not the predetermined ones. Therefore, a long-range power supply and demand plan should be converted from a planning-oriented concept to a market-oriented base with the structural overhaul of the power generation industry for the effective resources distribution of power supply facilities. 18 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Operation and utilization of low power research reactor critical facility for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, S.K.; Karhadkar, C.G.

    2017-01-01

    An Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been designed and developed for maximum power generation from thorium considering large reserves of thorium. The design envisages using 54 pin MOX cluster with different enrichment of "2"3"3U and Pu in Thoria fuel pins. Theoretical models developed to neutron transport and the geometrical details of the reactor including all reactivity devices involve approximations in modelling, resulting in uncertainties. With a view to minimize these uncertainties, a low power research reactor Critical Facility was built in which cold clean fuel can be arranged in a desired and precise geometry. Different experiments conducted in this facility greatly contribute to understand and validate the physics design parameters

  4. State regulation and power plant productivity: background and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    This report was prepared by representatives of several state regulatory agencies. It is a guide to some of the activities currently under way in state agencies to promote increased availability of electrical generating power plants. Standard measures of plant performance are defined and the nature of data bases that report such measures is discussed. It includes reviews of current state, federal, and industry programs to enhance power plant productivity and provides detailed outlines of programs in effect in California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas. A number of actions are presented that could be adopted by state regulatory agencies, depending on local conditions. They include: develop a commission position or policy statement to encourage productivity improvements by utilities; coordinate state efforts with ongoing industry and government programs to improve the acquisition of power plant performance data and the maintenance of quality information systems; acquire the capability to perform independent analyses of power plant productivity; direct the establishment of productivity improvement programs, including explicit performance objectives for both existing and planned power plants, and a performance program; establish a program of incentives to motivate productivity improvement activities; and participate in ongoing efforts at all levels and initiate new actions to promote productivity improvements

  5. Seismic experience in power and industrial facilities as it relates to small magnitude earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swan, S.W.; Horstman, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    The data base on the performance of power and industrial facilities in small magnitude earthquakes (M = 4.0 - 5.5) is potentially very large. In California alone many earthquakes in this magnitude range occur every year, often near industrial areas. In 1986 for example, in northern California alone, there were 76 earthquakes between Richter magnitude 4.0 and 5.5. Experience has shown that the effects of small magnitude earthquakes are seldom significant to well-engineered facilities. (The term well-engineered is here defined to include most modern industrial installations, as well as power plants and substations.) Therefore detailed investigations of small magnitude earthquakes are normally not considered worthwhile. The purpose of this paper is to review the tendency toward seismic damage of equipment installations representative of nuclear power plant safety systems. Estimates are made of the thresholds of seismic damage to certain types of equipment in terms of conventional means of measuring the damage potential of an earthquake. The objective is to define thresholds of damage that can be correlated with Richter magnitude. In this manner an earthquake magnitude might be chosen below which damage to nuclear plant safety systems is not considered credible

  6. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD, is summarized. Main elements of the design, systems, and plant facilities are illustrated. System design descriptions are included for closed cycle cooling water, industrial gas systems, fuel oil, boiler flue gas, coal management, seed management, slag management, plant industrial waste, fire service water, oxidant supply, MHD power ventilating

  7. Dictionary of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    2012-06-01

    The actualized version (June 2012) of the dictionary on nuclear power includes all actualizations and new inputs since the last version of 2001. The original publication dates from 1980. The dictionary includes definitions, terms, measuring units and helpful information on the actual knowledge concerning nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management, nuclear physics, reactor physics, isotope production, biological radiation effects, and radiation protection.

  8. Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meibom, Peter; Weber, C.; Barth, R.

    2009-01-01

    Adding wind power generation in a power system changes the operational patterns of the existing units due to the variability and partial predictability of wind power production. For large amounts of wind power production, the expectation is that the specific operational costs (fuel costs, start......-up costs, variable operation and maintenance costs, costs of consuming CO2 emission permits) of the other power plants will increase due to more operation time in part-load and more start-ups. The change in operational costs induced by the wind power production can only be calculated by comparing...... the operational costs in two power system configurations: with wind power production and with alternative wind production having properties such as conventional production, that is, being predictable and less variable. The choice of the characteristics of the alternative production is not straightforward...

  9. Intervention in independent spent fuel storage facility license application proceedings for storage on the power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, J.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the intervention in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process for currently operating Independent Spent fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) projects at Carolina Power and Light's Company's H.B. Robinson, Duke Power Company's Oconee, and Virginia Power Company's Surry. In addition, intervention at dry storage facilities that are currently under development are also described. The utilities and reactors include Baltimore Gas and Electric Company's Calvert Cliffs, Public Service Company of Colorado's Fort St. Vrain plant, Northern States Power Company's Prairie Island, Wisconsin Electric Power Company's Point Beach, and Consumers Power Company's Palisades

  10. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2003-04-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

  11. A Study on Methodology of Assessment for Hydrogen Explosion in Hydrogen Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gun Hyo

    2007-02-01

    Due to the exhaustion of fossil fuel as energy sources and international situation insecurity for political factor, unstability of world energy market is rising, consequently, a substitute energy development have been required. Among substitute energy to be discussed, producing hydrogen from water by nuclear energy which does not release carbon is a very promising technology. Very high temperature gas cooled reactor is expected to be utilized since the procedure of producing hydrogen requires high temperature over 1000 .deg. C. Hydrogen production facility using very high temperature gas cooled reactor lies in situation of high temperature and corrosion which makes hydrogen release easily. In case of hydrogen release, there lies a danger of explosion. Moreover explosion not only has a bad influence upon facility itself but very high temperature gas cooled reactor which also result in unsafe situation that might cause serious damage. However, from point of thermal-hydraulics view, long distance makes low efficiency result. In this study, therefore, outlines of hydrogen production using nuclear energy is researched. Several methods for analyzing the effects of hydrogen explosion upon high temperature gas cooled reactor are reviewed. Reliability physics model which is appropriate for assessment is used. Using this model, leakage probability, rupture probability and structure failure probability of very high temperature gas cooled reactor is evaluated classified by detonation volume and distance. Also based on standard safety criteria which is a value of 1x10 -6 , the safety distance between very high temperature and hydrogen production facility is calculated. In the future, assessment for characteristic of very high temperature gas cooled reactor, capacity to resist pressure from outside hydrogen explosion and overpressure for large amount of detonation volume in detail is expected to identify more precise distance using reliability physics model in this paper. This

  12. Small scale wind power harnessing in Colombian oil industry facilities: Wind resource and technology issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo, Mauricio; Nieto, Cesar; Escudero, Ana C.; Cobos, Juan C.; Delgado, Fernando

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Looking to improve its national and international standing, Colombia's national oil company, Ecopetrol, has set its goal on becoming involved on the production of energy from multiple sources, most importantly, on having an important percentage of its installed capacity from renewable sources. Part of this effort entices the evaluation of wind power potential on its facilities, including production, transportation and administrative, as well as identifying those technologies most suitable for the specific conditions of an equatorial country such as Colombia. Due to the lack of adequate site information, the first step consisted in superimposing national data to the facilities map of the company; this allowed for the selection of the first set of potential sites. From this set, the terminal at Covenas-Sucre was selected taking into account not only wind resource, but ease of access and power needs, as well as having a more or less representative wind potential in comparison to the rest of the country. A weather station was then installed to monitor wind variables. Measurements taken showed high variations in wind direction, and relatively low velocity profiles, making most commercially available wind turbines difficult to implement. In light of the above, a series of iterative steps were taken, first considering a range of individual Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT), given their capacity to adapt to changing wind directions. However, wind speed variations proved to be a challenge for individual VAWT's, i.e. Darriues turbines do not work well with low wind speeds, and Savonius turbines are not efficient of high wind speeds. As a result, a combined Darrieus- Savonius VAWT was selected given the capacity to adapt to both wind regimes, while at the same time modifying the size and shape of the blades in order to adapt to the lower average wind speeds present at the site. The resulting prototype is currently under construction and is scheduled to

  13. Production of 165 Dy for radiation synovectomy, in a low-power (slowpoke) nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, C.; Duke, M.J.M.; McQuarrie, S.A.; Wiebe, L.I.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Severe, debilitating pain accompanies inflammation of the synovial membrane in rheumatoid arthritis. Under certain conditions, radiation synovectomy is an effective alternative to surgery for relief of these symptoms. Radionuclides which decay by the emission of beta particles, or beta plus low yields of gamma/x-rays are indicated for this medical application. Of the radionuclides with appropriate decay emissions, half-life and physical/chemical properties, 165 Dy is a suitable candidate for production in a low-power reactor. Literature methods for production of this radiopharmaceutical usually involve irradiating solid Dy(OH) 3 , which is dissolved in HCl to form DyCl 3 and then re-precipitated under controlled conditions using NaOH, to produce the desired particle size for medical use. A procedure in which most or all of this post-irradiation processing can be eliminated is particularly important when using low neutron flux reactors, in order to avoid reductions in the amount of deliverable radiopharmaceutical. Radiological safety considerations may also necessitate avoiding post-irradiation processing, since low-power reactor facilities usually have no appropriate hot cells for extensive manipulation of highly active samples. Appropriately-sized, pre-formed Dy(OH) 3 particles were produced under a variety of conditions in attempts to produce a stable, sodium-free product that would be suitable for irradiation and use without further processing. Sodium content could be reduced to about 165 Dy production yields and particle characteristics will be presented in support of this concept

  14. Green power programs in Canada : 2003 : overview of Government green power policies, utility green power implementation initiatives, green power and certificate marketing programs, and their benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmore, J.; Bramley, M.; Holmes, R.

    2004-09-01

    Green power is defined as electricity produced from renewable sources, and whose production has low adverse impacts on the environment, human health and communities. Green power has near-zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and includes sources such as wind, hydro, and solar power. It offers several environmental benefits, as well as the enhancement of energy security, regional development, economic diversification and the creation of skilled jobs. There are four categories of programs related to green power development in Canada: government green power policies, utility green power development programs, green power marketing initiatives, and green power certificate marketing initiatives. Most of the activities in Canada associated with these four categories in 2003 were discussed in this report. However, difficulties with quantification prevented the inclusion of some green power activities such as (1) the generation of green power not certified or identified by the generator as green power, (2) industry or residential self-generation, (3) net metering, and (4) small government programs. Green power generation facilities in 2003 totaled 775 MW of capacity compared to 539 MW in 2002. Hydro capacity represented 41 per cent, followed by wind capacity at 40 per cent and wood waste at 17 per cent. Most of the green power generation facilities in 2003 were located in Alberta, followed by British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec. 230 refs., 8 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Laser peening applications for next generation of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, J.; Truong, C.; Walter, M.; Chen, H.-L.; Hackel, L.

    2008-01-01

    Generation of electricity by nuclear power can assist in achieving goals of reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Increased safety and reliability are necessary attributes of any new nuclear power plants. High pressure, hot water and radiation contribute to operating environments where Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement can lead to potential component failures. Desire for improved steam conversion efficiency pushes the fatigue stress limits of turbine blades and other rotating equipment. For nuclear reactor facilities now being designed and built and for the next generations of designs, laser peening could be incorporated to provide significant performance life to critical subsystems and components making them less susceptible to fatigue, SCC and radiation induced embrittlement. These types of components include steam turbine blades, hubs and bearings as well as reactor components including cladding material, housings, welded assemblies, fittings, pipes, flanges, vessel penetrations, nuclear waste storage canisters. Laser peening has proven to be a commercial success in aerospace applications and has recently been put into use for gas and steam turbine generators and light water reactors. An expanded role for this technology for the broader nuclear power industry would be a beneficial extension. (author)

  16. Power Production and Economical Feasibility of Tideng Tidal Stream Power Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Frigaard, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    This report is a product of the contract between Aalborg University and TIDENG (by Bent Hilleke) on the evaluation and development of the TIDENG Tidal Energy Conversion System (TECS). The work has focused on the evaluation of the yearly power production of the device and its economical feasibility...

  17. ESOL facility for the generation and radiochemical separation of short half-life fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Baker, J.D.; Anderl, R.A.; Novick, V.J.; Greenwood, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A facility has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the generation and rapid radiochemical separation of short half-life mixed fission products. This facility, referred to as the Idaho Elemental Separation On Line (ESOL), consists of electro-plated sources of spontaneously fissioning 252 Cf with a helium jet transport arrangement to continuously deliver short half-life, mixed fission products to the radiochemistry laboratory for rapid, computer controlled, radiochemical separations. 18 refs., 13 figs

  18. Short time ahead wind power production forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapronova, Alla; Meissner, Catherine; Mana, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    An accurate prediction of wind power output is crucial for efficient coordination of cooperative energy production from different sources. Long-time ahead prediction (from 6 to 24 hours) of wind power for onshore parks can be achieved by using a coupled model that would bridge the mesoscale weather prediction data and computational fluid dynamics. When a forecast for shorter time horizon (less than one hour ahead) is anticipated, an accuracy of a predictive model that utilizes hourly weather data is decreasing. That is because the higher frequency fluctuations of the wind speed are lost when data is averaged over an hour. Since the wind speed can vary up to 50% in magnitude over a period of 5 minutes, the higher frequency variations of wind speed and direction have to be taken into account for an accurate short-term ahead energy production forecast. In this work a new model for wind power production forecast 5- to 30-minutes ahead is presented. The model is based on machine learning techniques and categorization approach and using the historical park production time series and hourly numerical weather forecast. (paper)

  19. Short time ahead wind power production forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapronova, Alla; Meissner, Catherine; Mana, Matteo

    2016-09-01

    An accurate prediction of wind power output is crucial for efficient coordination of cooperative energy production from different sources. Long-time ahead prediction (from 6 to 24 hours) of wind power for onshore parks can be achieved by using a coupled model that would bridge the mesoscale weather prediction data and computational fluid dynamics. When a forecast for shorter time horizon (less than one hour ahead) is anticipated, an accuracy of a predictive model that utilizes hourly weather data is decreasing. That is because the higher frequency fluctuations of the wind speed are lost when data is averaged over an hour. Since the wind speed can vary up to 50% in magnitude over a period of 5 minutes, the higher frequency variations of wind speed and direction have to be taken into account for an accurate short-term ahead energy production forecast. In this work a new model for wind power production forecast 5- to 30-minutes ahead is presented. The model is based on machine learning techniques and categorization approach and using the historical park production time series and hourly numerical weather forecast.

  20. Economic evaluation of private power production under uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiguo Xing; Wu, F.F. [University of Hong Kong (China). Centre for Electrical Energy Systems

    2003-02-01

    Private power production is becoming an increasingly important source of electricity generation. In developing countries, build-operate-transfer (BOT) arrangement has emerged as a dominant form of private investment. Pricing private power production at its avoided cost is the breakeven point for the utility in economic evaluation, and uncertainties must be taken into account. In this paper, an approach of calculating the breakeven cost to the utility of a BOT power plant whose contract lasts for 10-25 years is proposed. The proposed approach requires the computation of production costs from long-term generation expansion planning (GEP) under future uncertainties. To facilitate the inclusion of constraints introduced by BOT plants in GEP and uncertainties, a genetic algorithm method is utilized in GEP. The breakeven cost is a useful measure in the economic evaluation of BOT power plants. An example is presented to illustrate the economic evaluation of BOT plants using the concept of breakeven cost.(author)

  1. Capital cost models for geothermal power plants and fluid transmission systems. [GEOCOST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, S.C.

    1977-09-01

    The GEOCOST computer program is a simulation model for evaluating the economics of developing geothermal resources. The model was found to be both an accurate predictor of geothermal power production facility costs and a valid designer of such facilities. GEOCOST first designs a facility using thermodynamic optimization routines and then estimates costs for the selected design using cost models. Costs generated in this manner appear to correspond closely with detailed cost estimates made by industry planning groups. Through the use of this model, geothermal power production costs can be rapidly and accurately estimated for many alternative sites making the evaluation process much simpler yet more meaningful.

  2. Radioactivity measuring and control method and the system for facility of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu.

    1996-01-01

    In measurement and control for radioactivity in an inspection operation in radiation circumstance for nuclear power plant facilities, radioactive materials in air are sometimes suspended together with ordinary dusts. Then, when a radiation level is low, light is applied to the suspended dusts to measure the quantity and the number of the dusts thereby estimating the radiation level based on the amount of the dusts. Then, the level of the equipments is informed to an operator based on the estimated value, and an operation time is determined. Since the optical dust monitor is inexpensive, a number of dust monitors can be brought into an operation chamber. In addition, they are reduced in the size and the weight, an operator can carry and bring them into the operation chamber. A distribution of dusts can be determined by measuring the concentration of dusts using a plurality of dust monitors thereby enabling to improve safety and economical property of periodical inspection for nuclear power plant facilities. (T.M.)

  3. Radioactivity measuring and control method and the system for facility of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Megumu

    1996-12-03

    In measurement and control for radioactivity in an inspection operation in radiation circumstance for nuclear power plant facilities, radioactive materials in air are sometimes suspended together with ordinary dusts. Then, when a radiation level is low, light is applied to the suspended dusts to measure the quantity and the number of the dusts thereby estimating the radiation level based on the amount of the dusts. Then, the level of the equipments is informed to an operator based on the estimated value, and an operation time is determined. Since the optical dust monitor is inexpensive, a number of dust monitors can be brought into an operation chamber. In addition, they are reduced in the size and the weight, an operator can carry and bring them into the operation chamber. A distribution of dusts can be determined by measuring the concentration of dusts using a plurality of dust monitors thereby enabling to improve safety and economical property of periodical inspection for nuclear power plant facilities. (T.M.)

  4. The Canadian nuclear power industry. Background paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.

    1993-12-01

    Nuclear power, the production of electricity from uranium through nuclear fission, is by far the most prominent segment of the nuclear industry. The value of the electricity produced, $3.7 billion in Canada in 1992, far exceeds the value of any other product of the civilian nuclear industry. Power production employs many more people than any other sector, the capital investment is much greater, and nuclear power plants are much larger and more visible than uranium mining and processing facilities. They are also often located close to large population centres. This paper provides an overview of some of the enormously complex issues surrounding nuclear power. It describes the Canadian nuclear power industry, addressing i particular its performance so far and future prospects. (author). 1 tab

  5. The Canadian nuclear power industry. Background paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nixon, A [Library of Parliament, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Science and Technology Div.

    1993-12-01

    Nuclear power, the production of electricity from uranium through nuclear fission, is by far the most prominent segment of the nuclear industry. The value of the electricity produced, $3.7 billion in Canada in 1992, far exceeds the value of any other product of the civilian nuclear industry. Power production employs many more people than any other sector, the capital investment is much greater, and nuclear power plants are much larger and more visible than uranium mining and processing facilities. They are also often located close to large population centres. This paper provides an overview of some of the enormously complex issues surrounding nuclear power. It describes the Canadian nuclear power industry, addressing i particular its performance so far and future prospects. (author). 1 tab.

  6. Facilities for the treatment of radioactively contaminated water in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The regulation is to be applied to design, construction and operation of facilities for the treatment of contaminated water in stationary nuclear power plants with LWR and HTR. The facilities are to be designed, constructed and operated in such manner that (a) imcontrolled discharge of contaminated water is avoided (Paragraph 46 section 1, no. 1 Radiation Protection Regulation) (b) the activity discharged with water is as low as possible ( paragraph 46, section 2, no. 2 Radiation Protection Regulation) (c)contaminated water will not get into the ground, unless this is permitted by a license (paragraph 46 section 6 Radiation Protection Regulation) (d) the radiation exposure resulting from direct radiation, contamination and inhalation of the personnel working with the facility is as low as possible and, at the most, corresponds to the values fixed in the regulation (paragraph 28 section 1 Radiation Protection Regulation) or the values given in the discharge permit. The regulation is not to be applied to installations for reactor coolant or fuel pit clean-up. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Description of the blowdown test facility COG program on in-reactor fission product release, transport, and deposition under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbach, P.J.; Wood, J.C.

    1987-06-01

    Loss-of-coolant accidents with additional impairment of emergency cooling would probably result in high fuel temperatures leading to severe fuel damage (SFD) and significant fission product activity would then be transported along the PHTS to the break where a fraction of it would be released and transport under such conditions, there are many interacting and sometimes competing phenomena to consider. Laboratory simulations are being used to provide data on these individual phenomena, such as UO 2 oxidation and Zr-UO 2 interaction, from which mathematical models can be constructed. These are then combined into computer codes to include the interaction effects and assess the overall releases. In addition, in-reactor tests are the only source of data on release and transport of short-lived fission product nuclides, which are important in the consequence analysis of CANDU reactor accidents. Post-test decontamination of an in-reactor test facility also provides a unique opportunity to demonstrate techniques and obtain decontamination data relevant to post-accident rehabilitation of CANDU power reactors. Specialized facilities are required for in-reactor testing because of the extensive release of radioactive fission products and the high temperatures involved (up to 2500 degrees Celsius). To meet this need for the Canadian program, the Blowdown Test Facility (BTF) has been built in the NRU reactor at Chalk River. Between completion of construction in mid-1987 and the first Zircaloy-sheathed fuel test in fiscal year 1987/88, several commissioning tests are being performed. Similarly, extensive development work has been completed to permit application of instrumentation to irradiated fuel elements, and in support of post-test fuel assembly examination. A program of decontamination studies has also been developed to generate information relevant to post-accident decontamination of power reactors. The BTF shared cost test program funded by the COG High Temperature

  8. Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides: Guidance on Facility Design and Production of [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has advanced rapidly in recent years and is becoming an indispensable imaging modality for the evaluation and staging of cancer patients. A key component of the successful operation of a PET centre is the on-demand availability of radiotracers (radiopharmaceuticals) labelled with suitable positron emitting radioisotopes. Of the hundreds of positron labelled radiotracers, 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the most successful and widely used imaging agent in PET today. While FDG is utilized largely in oncology for the management of cancer patients, its applications in neurology and cardiology are also steadily growing. A large number of PET facilities have been established in Member States over the past few years, and more are being planned. The design and operation of a facility for the production of FDG requires attention to detail, in particular the application of good manufacturing practices (GMP) guidelines and quality assurance. The product must conform to the required quality specifications and must be safe for human use. This book is intended to be a resource manual with practical information for planning and operating an FDG production facility, including design and implementation of the laboratories, facility layout, equipment, personnel and FDG quality assessment. GMP and quality management are discussed only briefly, since these topics are covered extensively in the IAEA publication Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides: Guidelines for Setting up a Facility (Technical Reports Series No. 471). It should be noted that manufacturing processes and quality specifications for FDG are not currently globally harmonized, and these do vary to some extent. However, there is no disagreement over the need to ensure that the product is manufactured in a controlled manner, that it conforms to applicable quality specifications and that it is safe for human use. Administrators, managers, radiopharmaceutical scientists

  9. Electrical power systems for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudici, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    Electrical power system options for Mars Manned Modules and Mars Surface Bases were evaluated for both near-term and advanced performance potential. The power system options investigated for the Mission Modules include photovoltaics, solar thermal, nuclear reactor, and isotope power systems. Options discussed for Mars Bases include the above options with the addition of a brief discussion of open loop energy conversion of Mars resources, including utilization of wind, subsurface thermal gradients, and super oxides. Electrical power requirements for Mission Modules were estimated for three basic approaches: as a function of crew size; as a function of electric propulsion; and as a function of transmission of power from an orbiter to the surface of Mars via laser or radio frequency. Mars Base power requirements were assumed to be determined by production facilities that make resources available for follow-on missions leading to the establishment of a permanently manned Base. Requirements include the production of buffer gas and propellant production plants.

  10. Automated laser fusion target production concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1977-01-01

    A target production concept is described for the production of multilayered cryogenic spherical inertial confinement fusion targets. The facility is to deliver targets to the reactor chamber at rates up to 10 per second and at costs consistent with economic production of power

  11. Special scientific programme on use of high energy accelerators for transmutation of actinides and power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Various techniques for the transmutation of radioactive waste through the use of high energy accelerators are reviewed and discussed. In particular, the present publication contains presentations on (i) requirements and the technical possibilities for the transmutation of long-lived radionuclides (background paper); (ii) high energy particle accelerators for bulk transformation of elements and energy generation; (iii) the resolution of nuclear energy issues using accelerator-driven technology; (iv) the use of proton accelerators for the transmutation of actinides and power production; (v) the coupling of an accelerator to a subcritical fission reactor (with a view on its potential impact on waste transmutation); (vi) research and development of accelerator-based transmutation technology at JAERI (Japan); and (vii) questions and problems with regard to accelerator-driven nuclear power and transmutation facilities. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Computerized radionuclidic analysis in production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, A.

    1978-03-01

    The Savannah River Plant Laboratories Department has been using a dual computer system to control all radionuclidic pulse height analyses since 1971. This computerized system analyzes 7000 to 8000 samples per month and has allowed the counting room staff to be reduced from three persons to one person. More reliable process information is being returned to the production facilities and for environmental evaluations and being returned faster, even though the sample load has more than tripled. This information is now more easily retrievable for other evaluations. The computer is also used for mass spectrometer data reduction and for quality control data analysis. The basic system is being expanded by interfacing microcomputers which provide data input from all of the laboratory modules for quality assurance programs

  13. A cyclotron isotope production facility designed to maximize production and minimize radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickie, W.J.; Stevenson, N.R.; Szlavik, F.F.

    1993-01-01

    Continuing increases in requirements from the nuclear medicine industry for cyclotron isotopes is increasing the demands being put on an aging stock of machines. In addition, with the 1990 recommendations of the ICRP publication in place, strict dose limits will be required and this will have an effect on the way these machines are being operated. Recent advances in cyclotron design combined with lessons learned from two decades of commercial production mean that new facilities can result in a substantial charge on target, low personnel dose, and minimal residual activation. An optimal facility would utilize a well engineered variable energy/high current H - cyclotron design, multiple beam extraction, and individual target caves. Materials would be selected to minimize activation and absorb neutrons. Equipment would be designed to minimize maintenance activities performed in high radiation fields. (orig.)

  14. 7 CFR Appendix D to Subpart E of... - Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing, Development and Project Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing... of Part 1980—Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing, Development and Project Control (I..., without recourse to the Government, for the settlement and satisfaction of all contractual and...

  15. RF power source for the compact linear collider test facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, G; Brown, Peter; Carron, G; Hanni, R; Mourier, J; Rossat, G; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L; Thorndahl, L

    2004-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility will test and demonstrate many vital components of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider). This paper describes the pulsed RF power source at 2998.55 MHz for the drive-beam accelerator (DBA), which produces a beam with an energy of 150 MeV and a current of 3.5 Amps. Where possible, existing equipment from the LEP preinjector, especially the modulators and klystrons, is being used and upgraded to achieve this goal. A high power RF pulse compression system is used at the output of each klystron, which requires sophisticated RF phase programming on the low level side to achieve the required RF pulse. In addition to the 3 GHz system two pulsed RF sources operating at 1.5 GHz are being built. The first is a wide-band, low power, travelling wave tube (TWT) for the subharmonic buncher (SHB) system that produces a train of "phase coded" subpulses as part of the injector scheme. The second is a high power narrow band system to produce 20 MW RF power to the 1.5 GHz RF deflectors in the delay loop situate...

  16. Isotope Production Facility Conceptual Thermal-Hydraulic Design Review and Scoping Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Shelton, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic design of the target for the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) is reviewed. In support of the technical review, scoping calculations are performed. The results of the review and scoping calculations are presented in this report

  17. Gamma and X-rays Production for Experiments at ELSA Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, J

    2004-01-01

    The ELSA facility is a high brightness 18 MeV electron source dedicated to electron radiation, gamma-rays and picosecond hard and soft X-rays. It consists of a 144 MHz RF photoinjector producing short bunches which are further accelerated to a final energy varying from 2 to 18 MeV thanks to three 433 MHz RF cavities. Former beam compression design used a half turn magnet compressor system. It has been recently replaced by a double alpha magnet compressor. Electron beams are now delivered to a new experimental room. We present the new panel of interests offered by this facility in term of gamma-ray and X-ray production.

  18. Offering model for a virtual power plant based on stochastic programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    PandŽić, Hrvoje; Morales González, Juan Miguel; Conejo, Antonio J.

    2013-01-01

    A virtual power plant aggregates various local production/consumption units that act in the market as a single entity. This paper considers a virtual power plant consisting of an intermittent source, a storage facility, and a dispatchable power plant. The virtual power plant sells and purchases e...

  19. Emergency and backup power supplies at Department of Energy facilities: Augmented Evaluation Team -- Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This report documents the results of the Defense Programs (DP) Augmented Evaluation Team (AET) review of emergency and backup power supplies (i.e., generator, uninterruptible power supply, and battery systems) at DP facilities. The review was conducted in response to concerns expressed by former Secretary of Energy James D. Watkins over the number of incidents where backup power sources failed to provide electrical power during tests or actual demands. The AET conducted a series of on-site reviews for the purpose of understanding the design, operation, maintenance, and safety significance of emergency and backup power (E&BP) supplies. The AET found that the quality of programs related to maintenance of backup power systems varies greatly among the sites visited, and often among facilities at the same site. No major safety issues were identified. However, there are areas where the AET believes the reliability of emergency and backup power systems can and should be improved. Recommendations for improving the performance of E&BP systems are provided in this report. The report also discusses progress made by Management and Operating (M&O) contractors to improve the reliability of backup sources used in safety significant applications. One area that requires further attention is the analysis and understanding of the safety implications of backup power equipment. This understanding is needed for proper graded-approach implementation of Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, and to help ensure that equipment important to the safety of DOE workers, the public, and the environment is identified, classified, recognized, and treated as such by designers, users, and maintainers. Another area considered important for improving E&BP system performance is the assignment of overall ownership responsibility and authority for ensuring that E&BP equipment performs adequately and that reliability and availability are maintained at acceptable levels.

  20. Power production and energy consumption in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    The main electrical resource of Norway comes from its rivers: 99% of the electric power is produced by hydroelectric power plants. Other sources, like wind and natural gas, are envisaged for the enhancement of Norway's energy production capacity. In this document, the part devoted to power production presents the different electricity production sources and their impact on the Norwegian economy. The energy consumption is detailed in the third part with an historical review of its evolution and a description of the main sectors involved in this consumption. The forth part describes the main actors of the energy sector with their industrial structure, the research institutes and universities performing R and D in this domain, and the energy trades with surrounding countries. The fifth part stresses on the research projects, on the government promoting actions through the Norwegian Research Council, and gives some examples of todays research projects. The sixth part deals with international cooperation in the R and D domain with a particular attention given to the relations between Norway, France and Europe. (J.S.)

  1. Power Sales to Electric Utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-02-01

    The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of

  2. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume I of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01

    In fulfillment of the NWPPC's 3-Step Process for the implementation of new hatcheries in the Columbia Basin, this Step 1 submission package to the Council includes four items: (1) Cover letter from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Interdisciplinary Team Chair, and the USFWS; (2) References to key information (Attachments 1-4); (3) The updated Master Plan for the Tribe's native cutthroat restoration project; and (4) Appendices. In support of the Master Plan submitted by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe the reference chart (Item 2) was developed to allow reviewers to quickly access information necessary for accurate peer review. The Northwest Power Planning Council identified pertinent issues to be addressed in the master planning process for new artificial production facilities. References to this key information are provided in three attachments: (1) NWPPC Program language regarding the Master Planning Process, (2) Questions Identified in the September 1997 Council Policy, and (3) Program language identified by the Council's Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP). To meet the need for off-site mitigation for fish losses on the mainstem Columbia River, in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of a trout production facility located adjacent to Coeur d'Alene Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The updated Master Plan (Item 3) represents the needs associated with the re-evaluation of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Trout Production Facility (No.199004402). This plan addresses issues and concerns expressed by the NWPPC as part of the issue summary for the Mountain Columbia provincial review, and the 3-step hatchery review process. Finally, item 4 (Appendices) documents the 3-Step process correspondence to date between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and additional relevant entities. Item 4

  3. Process for decontamination of surfaces in an facility of natural uranium hexafluoride production (UF6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Claudio C. de; Silva, Teresinha M.; Rodrigues, Demerval L.; Carneiro, Janete C.G.G.

    2017-01-01

    The experience acquired in the actions taken during the decontamination process of an IPEN-CNEN / SP Nuclear and Energy Research Institute facility, for the purpose of making the site unrestricted, is reported. The steps of this operation involved: planning, training of facility operators, workplace analysis and radiometric measurements. The facility had several types of equipment from the natural uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) production tower and other facility materials. Rules for the transportation of radioactive materials were established, both inside and outside the facility and release of materials and installation

  4. Operational Performance and Improvements to the RF Power Sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses in the injector and a narrow band high power L-Band klystron powering the transverse 1.5GHz RF deflector in the Delay Loop immediately after the DBA. This paper describes these different systems and discusses their operational performance.

  5. Operational performance and improvements to the rf power sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses in the injector and a narrow band high power L-Band klystron powering the transverse 1.5 GHz RF deflector in the Delay Loop immediately after the DBA. This paper describes these different systems and discusses their operational performance.

  6. 77 FR 64999 - Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food Product Categories in Food Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ...] Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food Product Categories in Food Facility Registrations and... industry entitled ``Necessity of the Use of Food Product Categories in Food Facility Registrations and... made available a draft guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Necessity of the Use of Food [[Page...

  7. Research and design of pulsed switching power supply for deep tumor therapy facility with heavy ions accelerator in Lanzhou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chunfeng; Zhao Jiang; Yan Hongbin; Wu Fengjun; Gao Daqing

    2012-01-01

    The pulsed switching power supply was developed for deep tumor therapy facility with heavy ions in cooler-storage-ring of the heavy ions research facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR). The control principle of the dual closed-loop scheme was described and the open-loop Bode diagrams were given. The results of simulation and prototype experiment show that the current error gets much smaller than that of the single closed-loop pulsed switching power supply. Moreover, the simulation and test results were analyzed, and the circuit configuration and dual closed-loop strategy selected are practicable. (authors)

  8. Testing of the Engineering Model Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluids and Combustion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.; Fox, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (GRC) in Cleveland, OH and the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL have designed and developed an Engineering Model (EM) Electrical Power Control Unit (EPCU) for the Fluids Combustion Facility, (FCF) experiments to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS power distribution system for the FCF's space experiments'test and telemetry hardware. Furthermore. it is proposed to be the common power interface for all experiments. The EPCU is a three kilowatt 12OVdc-to-28Vdc converter utilizing three independent Power Converter Units (PCUs), each rated at 1kWe (36Adc @ 28Vdc) which are paralleled and synchronized. Each converter may be fed from one of two ISS power channels. The 28Vdc loads are connected to the EPCU output via 48 solid-state and current-limiting switches, rated at 4Adc each. These switches may be paralleled to supply any given load up to the 108Adc normal operational limit of the paralleled converters. The EPCU was designed in this manner to maximize allocated-power utilization. to shed loads autonomously, to provide fault tolerance. and to provide a flexible power converter and control module to meet various ISS load demands. Tests of the EPCU in the Power Systems Facility testbed at GRC reveal that the overall converted-power efficiency, is approximately 89% with a nominal-input voltage of 12OVdc and a total load in the range of 4O% to 110% rated 28Vdc load. (The PCUs alone have an efficiency of approximately 94.5%). Furthermore, the EM unit passed all flight-qualification level (and beyond) vibration tests, passed ISS EMI (conducted, radiated. and susceptibility) requirements. successfully operated for extended periods in a thermal/vacuum chamber, was integrated with a proto-flight experiment and passed all stability and functional requirements.

  9. Coupling of AST-500 heating reactors with desalination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourachenkov, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The general issues regarding NHR and desalination facility joint operation for potable water production are briefly considered. AST-500 reactor plant and DOU GTPA-type evaporating desalination facilities, both relying on proven technology and solid experience of construction and operation, are taken as a basis for the design of a large-output nuclear desalination complex. Its main design characteristics are given. Similarity of NHR operation for a heating grid and a desalination facility in respect of reactor plant operating conditions and power regulation principles is pointed out. The issues of nuclear desalination complexes composition are discussed briefly as well. (author)

  10. Japanese aquaculture: use of thermal water from power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Takeya

    1983-01-01

    There is some merit of thermal water from power plants in the effect to marine life. Since 1963, the research and development on the aquaculture using this warm water have been carried out at some twenty power plants, seven nuclear and thirteen thermal, some of which are now in the commercial stage. These fish farming projects are operated variously from seed to adult fish production. They can also be classified as land and sea facilities, conforming to the characteristics of the respective sea areas. The current situation in this field and the future prospect are described: thermal aquaculture including seed production and adult fish farming; the projects in nuclear and thermal power plants, respectively; future problems in the facilities, breeding environment and marine life for cultivation. (Mori, K.)

  11. Maintenance in nuclear production power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights the importance and quality of maintenance in the complete phases of development, in a sector which has been often questioned by the public opinion, and that is always subject to national and international standards. The aim of maintenance is to guarantee the production of electric power in a reliable, safe, economic and friendly environmentally way, assuring a long-term production. (Author)

  12. Decommissioning and decontamination of licensed reactor facilities and demonstration nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, G.; Erickson, P.B.

    1975-01-01

    Decommissioning of licensed reactors and demonstration nuclear power plants has been accomplished by mothballing (protective storage), entombment, and dismantling or a combination of these three. The alternative selected by a licensee seems to be primarily based on cost. A licensee must, however, show that the decommissioning process provides adequate protection of the health and safety of the public and no adverse impact on the environment. To date the NRC has approved each of the alternatives in the decommissioning of different facilities. The decommissioning of small research reactors has been accomplished primarily by dismantling. Licensed nuclear power plants, however, have been decommissioned primarily by being placed in a mothballed state in which they continue to retain a reactor license and the associated licensee responsibilities

  13. The safe production of hydrogen by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl

    2009-01-01

    One of the most promising 'GEN-IV' nuclear reactor concepts is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). It is characterized by a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor core of 400-600 MW(th). Coolant outlet temperatures of 900-1000 .deg. C ideally suited for a wide spectrum of high temperature process heat or process steam applications, which allow to deliver, besides the classical electricity, also non-electrical products such as hydrogen or other fuels. In a future energy economy, hydrogen as a storable medium could adjust a variable demand for electricity by means of fuel cell power plants providing much more flexibility in optimized energy structures. The mass production of hydrogen is a major goal for Gen-IV systems. In a nuclear hydrogen production facility, the coupling between the nuclear plant and the process heat/steam application side is given by an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), a component which provides a clear separation preventing the primary coolant from accessing the heat application plant and, vice versa, any process gases from being routed through the reactor containment. The physical separation has the advantage that the heat application facility can be conventionally designed, and repair works can be conducted under non-nuclear conditions. With regard to the safety of combined nuclear and chemical facilities, apart from their own specific categories of hazards, a qualitatively new class of events will have to be taken into account characterized by interacting influences. Arising problems to be covered by a decent overall safety concept are the questions of safety of the nuclear plant in case of fire and explosion hazards resulting from the leakage of flammable substances, the tolerable tritium contamination of the product hydrogen, or the situations of thermo-dynamic feedback in case of a loss of heat source (nuclear) or heat sink (chemical) resulting in thermal turbulences. A safety-related issue is the

  14. Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

    2005-09-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the military’s nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

  15. Results from the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Bossart, Rudolf; Chautard, F; Corsini, R; Delahaye, J P; Godot, J C; Hutchins, S; Kamber, I; Madsen, J H B; Rinolfi, Louis; Rossat, G; Schreiber, S; Suberlucq, Guy; Thorndahl, L; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the principle of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) based on the Two Beam Acceleration (TBA) scheme at high frequency, a CLIC Test Facility (CTF) has been set-up at CERN. After four years of successful running, the experimental programme is now fully completed and all its objectives reached, particularly the generation of a high intensity drive beam with short bunches by a photo-injector, the production of 30 GHz RF power and the acceleration of a probe beam by 30 GHz structures. A summary of the CTF results and their impact on linear collider design is given. This covers 30 GHz high power testing, study of intense, short single bunches; as well as RF-Gun, photocathode and beam diagnostic developments. A second phase of the test facility (CTF2) is presently being installed to demonstrate the feasibility of the TBA scheme by constructing a fully engineered, 10 m long, test section very similar to the CLIC drive and main linacs, producing up to 480 MW of peak RF power at 30 GHz and acceleratin...

  16. 10 CFR 170.21 - Schedule of fees for production and utilization facilities, review of standard referenced design...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Schedule of fees for production and utilization facilities, review of standard referenced design approvals, special projects, inspections and import and export... AMENDED Schedule of Fees § 170.21 Schedule of fees for production and utilization facilities, review of...

  17. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, Chitra

    2014-01-14

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

  18. FOAM FORMATION IN THE SALTSTONE PRODUCTION FACILITY: EVALUATION OF SOURCES AND MITIGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A.

    2011-01-18

    The Saltstone Production Facility receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. Influents into Tank 50H include the Effluent Treatment Project waste concentrate, H-Canyon low activity waste and General Purpose Evaporator bottoms, Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit decontaminated salt solution, and salt solution from the Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjust campaign. Using the Waste Characterization System (WCS), this study tracks the relative amounts of each influent into Tank 50H, as well as the total content of Tank 50H, in an attempt to identify the source of foaming observed in the Saltstone Production Facility hopper. Saltstone has been using antifoam as part of routine processing with the restart of the facility in December 2006. It was determined that the maximum admix usage in the Saltstone Production Facility, both antifoam and set retarder, corresponded with the maximum concentration of H-Canyon low activity waste in Tank 50H. This paper also evaluates archived salt solutions from Waste Acceptance Criteria analysis for propensity to foam and the antifoam dosage required to mitigate foaming. It was determined that Effluent Treatment Project contributed to the expansion factor (foam formation) and General Purpose Evaporator contributed to foaminess (persistence). It was also determined that undissolved solids contribute to foam persistence. It was shown that additions of Dow Corning Q2-1383a antifoam reduced both the expansion factor and foaminess of salt solutions. The evaluation of foaming in the grout hopper during the transition from water to salt solution indicated that higher water-to-premix ratios tended to produce increased foaming. It was also shown that additions of Dow Corning Q2-1383a antifoam reduced foam formation and persistence.

  19. Study of the production mechanism of the η meson in proton-proton collisions by means of analysing power measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czyzykiewicz, R.

    2007-02-01

    The analysing power measurements for the #vector#pp→ppη reaction studied in this dissertation are used in the determination of the reaction mechanism of the η meson production in nucleon-nucleon collisions. Measurements have been performed in the close-to-threshold energy region at beam momenta of p beam =2.010 and 2.085 GeV/c, corresponding to the excess energies of Q=10 and 36 MeV, respectively. The experiments were realised by means of a cooler synchrotron and storage ring COSY along with a cluster jet target. For registration of the reaction products the COSY-11 facility has been used. The identification of the η meson has been performed with the missing mass method. The results for the angular dependence of the analysing power combined with the hitherto determined isospin dependence of the total cross section for the η meson production in the nucleon-nucleon collisions, reveal a statistically significant indication that the excitation of the nucleon to the S 11 resonance, the process which intermediates the production of the η meson, is predominantly due to the exchange of a π meson between the colliding nucleons. The determined values of the analysing power at both excess energies are consistent with zero implying that the η meson is produced predominantly in the s-wave at both excess energies. (orig.)

  20. A UV pre-ionized dual-wavelength short-pulse high-power CO{sub 2} laser facility for laser particle acceleration research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahim, N A; Mouris, J F; Davis, R W

    1994-12-01

    In this report we describe the Chalk River dual-wavelength, short-pulse, single-mode, high-power CO{sub 2} laser facility for research in laser particle acceleration and CANDU materials modifications. The facility is designed and built around UV-preionized transversely-excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) Lumonics CO{sub 2} laser discharge modules. Peak focussed power densities of up to 2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in 500 ps pulses have been obtained. (author). 10 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Gas storage facilities. Investigation of their social value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    The socio-economic factors resulting from location of gas storage facilities are evaluated. Various alternatives to the existing projects are estimated, for instance 11 new pipelines, in some cases combined with new production capacity, LNG facilities, differentiated tariffs, reconstruction of decentralized heat/power plants etc. Theoretical considerations and models, among others involving gas storage abroad, are presented. Seasonal storage, emergency storage, storage controlled by economic optimization (profitable purchases, sales at highest market) are described for various types of facilities, like aquifers, caverns and LNG-stores. Natural gas supplies in Europe, infrastructure and resources are compared to the Danish conditions. Sensitivity of the Danish heating market for natural gas consumption is investigated. Reduction in energy use for space heating by 2005 will change the needs of storage of 740 Mm 3 gas to 650 Mm 3 . Extra consumption by the decentralized power/heat plants is not accounted for in this estimation. Dynamic models of the future gas consumption are based on the EU 'European Energy 2020'. (EG)

  2. Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 68 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs

  3. Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 49 refs., 44 figs., 14 tabs

  4. Wind power. Production in 2012; Vindkraft. Produksjon i 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, David Edward; Nybakke, Karen

    2013-02-01

    In 2012 it was installed more wind power in Norway than in any year before. There was also production record with a total power generation from wind energy at ca. 1.57 TWh, equivalent to 1.1% of Norway's electricity production. 2012 was a relatively good 'wind year', with a production index of 107% for Norwegian wind farms as a whole. The length of time for wind was also relatively high compared to previous years with a national average of 2734 full load hours, corresponding to a capacity factor of 31%. Turbine availability also reached a record value of 95.6% in 2012 indicating more efficient operation of wind power plants in Norway.(eb)

  5. Integrated approach to economical, reliable, safe nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    An Integrated Approach to Economical, Reliable, Safe Nuclear Power Production is the latest evolution of a concept which originated with the Defense-in-Depth philosophy of the nuclear industry. As Defense-in-Depth provided a framework for viewing physical barriers and equipment redundancy, the Integrated Approach gives a framework for viewing nuclear power production in terms of functions and institutions. In the Integrated Approach, four plant Goals are defined (Normal Operation, Core and Plant Protection, Containment Integrity and Emergency Preparedness) with the attendant Functional and Institutional Classifications that support them. The Integrated Approach provides a systematic perspective that combines the economic objective of reliable power production with the safety objective of consistent, controlled plant operation

  6. Power and LPG production with LNG import

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, J.Y.

    2004-01-01

    When used in power cogeneration, Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is both energy efficient and can eliminate seawater or fuel gas consumption as well as the associated environmental impacts of conventional regasification processes. However, some liquefied natural gas (LNG) sources have heating values higher than current North American natural gas pipelines can allow for. LNG from these cannot be injected into gas pipelines without several heating control processing steps. This paper outlines two new technologies developed to address this issue. The first is a power cogeneration process using LNG as a heat sink. The second technology involves a fractionation process removing Liquid Propane Gas (LPG) components from imported LNG, thereby controlling heat value. Both technologies are applicable in grassroots installations as well as being suitable for retrofitting to existing LNG regasification for power generation and LPG production. It was concluded that power cogeneration with a mixed fluid power cycle recovered a significant portion of energy in LNG liquefaction plants. Additionally, it was also possible to fractionate high quality LPG from LNG at a low cost, with the residue being further re-condensed and re-utilized for power generation. It was also concluded that the LNG fractionation process would add flexibility to the LNG receiving terminals, allowing the import of lower quality LNG to North America, while also generating additional revenues from LPG production. 3 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  7. Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design

  8. Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design.

  9. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Floating Production Storage and Offloading Facilities with Liquefaction Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Sánchez, Yamid Alberto Carranza; Junior, Silvio de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Floating, production, storage and offloading (FPSO) plants are facilities used in upstream petroleum processing.They have gained interest because they are more flexible than conventional plants and can be used for producingoil and gas in deep-water fields. In general, gas export is challenging...... because of the lack of infrastructure in remotelocations. The present work investigates the possibility of integrating liquefaction processes on such facilities, consideringfour possible petroleum compositions, which differ in their contents of carbon dioxide, light and heavy hydrocarbons.The performance...

  10. Plan 96 - Costs for management of the radioactive waste from nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    This report presents a calculation of the costs for implementing all measures needed to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes from the Swedish nuclear power reactors. The cost calculations include costs for R,D and D as well as for decommissioning and dismantling the reactor plants etc. The following facilities and systems are already in operation: Transportation system for radioactive waste products, Central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, Final repository for radioactive operational wastes. Plans exist for: Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel, Deep repository for spent fuel and other long-lived waste, Final repository for decommissioning waste. The total future costs, in Jan 1996 prices, for the Swedish waste system from 1997 have been calculated to be 42.2 billion SEK (about 6.4 billion USD). The total costs apply for the waste obtained from 25 years of operation of all Swedish reactors. It is estimated that 10.6 billion SEK in current money has been spent through 1996. Costs based on waste quantities from operation of the reactors for 40 years are also reported. 6 refs

  11. Physical‐chemical and microbiological characterization, and mutagenic activity of airborne PM sampled in a biomass‐fueled electrical production facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohn, Corey A.; Lemieux, Christine L.; Long, Alexandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Biomass combustion is used in heating and electric power generation in many areas of the world. Airborne particulate matter (PM) is released when biomass is brought to a facility, stored, and combusted. Occupational exposure to airborne PM within biomass‐fueled facilities may lead to health probl...... includes PM from biomass combustion as well as internal combustion vehicles, may contribute to an elevated risk of adverse health effects. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2011. © 2010 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.......Biomass combustion is used in heating and electric power generation in many areas of the world. Airborne particulate matter (PM) is released when biomass is brought to a facility, stored, and combusted. Occupational exposure to airborne PM within biomass‐fueled facilities may lead to health...... collected in March was more toxic than PM collected in August. Overall, airborne PM collected from the facility, especially that from the boiler room, were more toxic than PM generated from straw and wood chips. The results suggest that exposure to combustion PM in a biomass‐fueled facility, which likely...

  12. Hydrogen production from small hyropower sites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-01

    A synergistic relationship was not found to exist between low-head hydropower and electrolytic hydrogen production. The storageability of hydrogen was expected to mitigate problems of hydrogen generation variability associated with the use of low-head hydropower as the power source. The expense of gaseous hydrogen storage equipment effectively eliminates storage as a means to decouple hydrogen demand and power/hydrogen production. From the opposite perspective, the availability of a low and stable cost of power from low-head hydro was expected to improve the competitiveness of electrolysis. In actuality, the results indicated that hydroelectric power from small dams would be comparatively expensive by current grid power standards (mid-1979). Electrolysis, in the capacity range considered here, is less sensitive to the cost of the power than originally presumed. Other costs including depreciation and capital related charges are more significant. Due to power generation variability, sole reliance on low-head hydropower to provide electricity to the cells would reduce the utilization of the hydrogen production investment, resulting in an increase in unit production costs. These factors were paramount in the Air Products recommendation to discontinue the study before continuing to more detailed stages of analysis, including an analysis of a site specific facility and the construction of a demonstration facility. Another major factor was the unavailability of a pipeline hydrogen supply situation which, because of lower distribution and capital costs, could have been commercially viable. An unfavorable judgment on the combined facility should not be misinterpreted and extended to the component systems. Although a detailed analysis of the individual prospects for electrolysis and low-head hydropower was beyond the study scope, the reader will realize, as the study is reviewed, that each is worthy of individual consideration.

  13. Development of the radioisotope production facility for the HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Bok; Wu, J. S.; Baik, S. T.

    1998-06-01

    Hot cell and related facilities were developed in the RI production building of the HANARO. 1. development of concrete H/C and related components 2. development of lead H/C and related components 3. development of the hydraulic transfer system 4. development of radiation monitoring system 5. development of purification system for Co-60 storage pool 6. development of the fire fighting system for H/C 7. development of the experimental equipment. (author). 15 figs

  14. Operational Performance and Improvements to the RF Power Sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses ...

  15. Environmental aspects of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feates, F.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: background (scope of paper is a consideration of the radioactive by-products that arise from normal operation of nuclear power generating facilities; how regulated and their relative significance); legislation and regulation; the fuel cycle - fuel fabrication; use (of the fuel in the reactor; wastes from a typical CEGB Magnox power station); reprocessing (wastes from reprocessing); other wastes; disposal (including sea disposal). (U.K.)

  16. Feasibility study on replacement of power plant and desalination plant in Aktau City, Manghistau Region, Republic of Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of conserving energy and reducing greenhouse effect gas emission, feasibility study was conducted for improvement of efficiency of power generation/desalination facilities at MAEK Energy Center, Aktau City, Manghistau, Kazakhstan. Presently, the main facilities are the conventional natural gas fired power plant, evaporation type seawater desalination facility, hot water production facility, etc. In the project, introduction of the following was planned to be made: cogeneration facility composed of two units of 1,100-degree C class gas turbine and reverse osmosis (RO) type desalination facility for drinking water production with a capacity of 50,000 t/d. As a result of the study, the energy conservation amount in this project was 151,900-165,400 toe/y in power generation facility, and the greenhouse effect gas reduction amount was 355,000-387,000 t-CO2/y in power generation facility and 268,000 t-CO2/y in desalination facility. The construction cost and operational cost of the plant were 45.7 billion yen and 2.8 billion yen/y. In the economical estimation, ROI and ROE before tax were 7.4 and 34.8, respectively, which were considered to be appropriate values as social infrastructure related conditions. (NEDO)

  17. One year's experience of the WA medical cyclotron and radiopharmaceutical production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeRoach, J.; Tuchyna, T.; Jones, C.; Price, R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The WA PET Centre Medical Cyclotron, a facility novel in Western Australia, produced its first bolus of FDG for patient injection for PET scanning in August 2003. This paper describes the methodology and practices employed during the past 12 months for ensuring that reliable routine provision of FDG is maintained, in parallel with facilitating the development and production of achievable new radiopharmaceuticals. An FDG production team of six staff and, a maintenance and development team of 4 staff were created from the 3.4 staff specifically recruited for this service and from incumbent staff. Teams were also set up to carry out development projects related to the service. Training procedures were created under the department's ISO9001:2000 accreditation system for the certification of production and maintenance staff. Practices and documentation systems were put in place in anticipation of a pending cGMP audit. Several unplanned major changes to equipment and infrastructure were necessary post commissioning. These changes included purchase of a different FDG synthesis module from that originally supplied, and modifications to engineering services, including changes to air conditioning, changes to supply of vacuum and upgrading of drainage in the laboratory area. A device for the measurement of end of bombardment yield was built, so that the efficiencies of the various synthesis modules could be accurately determined. Strict radiation protection procedures were put in place. All staff were provided with luxels and finger TLDs for monthly reporting of their radiation levels, as well as electronic monitors for real-time monitoring. From August 2003 to June 2004 (11 months) 2229 FDG patient doses were produced and dispensed by this facility. An average of 8.0 patient doses per available working day were dispensed during the 2003 period, rising to 11.1 patient doses per day in 2004. Several 11 NH3 doses were also delivered. The cyclotron was unavailable for

  18. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, C. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for Value-Added Products (VAPs) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun; (2) progress on existing VAPs; (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved; (4) other work that leads to a VAP; (5) top requested VAPs from the ARM Data Archive; and (6) a summary of VAP and data releases to production and evaluation. New information is highlighted in blue text. New information about processed data by the developer is highlighted in red text. The upcoming milestones and dates are highlighted in green.

  19. Dry-type cooling systems in electric power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.W.

    1973-01-01

    This study indicates that the dry-type cooling tower could be adopted in this country as an alternative method for removing waste heat from power plants. The use of dry cooling towers would not only lead to a change of cooling system design, but also to a change of overall thermal design in a power generating system. The principal drawbacks to using dry cooling towers in a large steam-turbine plant are the generating capacity loss, increased fuel consumption and the high capital cost of the dry cooling towers. These economic penalties must be evaluated in each specific case against the benefits that may result from the use of dry cooling towers. The benefits are principally these: (1) Fewer constraints in the selection of power plant sites, (2) No thermal discharge to the natural water bodies, (3) Elimination of vapor plumes and water evaporation loss, and (4) Freedom of adding new units to an existing facility where inadequate water supply may otherwise rule out this possibility

  20. Treatment of measurement uncertainties at the power burst facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    The treatment of measurement uncertainty at the Power Burst Facility provides a means of improving data integrity as well as meeting standard practice reporting requirements. This is accomplished by performing the uncertainty analysis in two parts, test independent uncertainty analysis and test dependent uncertainty analysis. The test independent uncertainty analysis is performed on instrumentation used repeatedly from one test to the next, and does not have to be repeated for each test except for improved or new types of instruments. A test dependent uncertainty analysis is performed on each test based on the test independent uncertainties modified as required by test specifications, experiment fixture design, and historical performance of instruments on similar tests. The methodology for performing uncertainty analysis based on the National Bureau of Standards method is reviewed with examples applied to nuclear instrumentation

  1. Detailed description of an SSAC at the facility level for light water moderated (off-load refueled) power reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.J.

    1985-03-01

    This report is intended to provide the technical details of an effective State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC) which Member States may use, if they wish, to establish and maintain their SSACs. It is expected that systems designed along the lines described would be effective in meeting the objectives of both national and international systems for nuclear material accounting and control. This document accordingly provides a detailed description of a system for the accounting for and control of nuclear material in an off-load refueled light water moderated power reactor facility which can be used by a facility operator to establish his own system to comply with a national system for nuclear material accounting and control and to facilitate application of IAEA safeguards. The scope of this document is limited to descriptions of the following elements: (1) Nuclear Material Measurements; (2) Measurement Quality; (3) Records and Reports; (4) Physical Inventory Taking; (5) Material Balance Closing

  2. Ten years operating experience at the Fast Flux Test Facility: A decade of excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaim, D.J.; Waldo, J.B.; Farabee, O.A.

    1991-07-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is a 400 MW(t) fast reactor cooled by three sodium loops. The Fast Flux Test Facility is managed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. The Fast Flux Test Facility was designed and constructed to provide irradiation testing of fuels and materials for the US Department of Energy Liquid Metal Reactor research program. Facility activities have increased to include fusion power materials testing, passive safety testing, isotope production, and international collaboration. 5 figs

  3. 75 FR 15949 - Revisions to Form, Procedures, and Criteria for Certification of Qualifying Facility Status for a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... technologies. \\20\\ Interstate Renewable Energy Council and SolarCity (Interstate Renewable); Sun Edison LLC... being small power production facilities, and 90 percent were made by solar-powered and wind-powered... electric energy solely by the use, as a primary energy source, of solar energy, wind energy, waste...

  4. The competitiveness of biofuels in heat and power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosunen, P.; Leino, P.

    1995-01-01

    The paper showed that natural gas is the most competitive fuel in all the energy production alternatives under review, ie both in separate heat production and electricity generation and in combined heat and power production. Even though the heavy fuel oil taxes have grown more rapidly than taxes on domestic fuels, oil continues to be cheaper than solid fuels in heating and steam plants. According to the feasibility calculations made, combined heat and power production is the least-cost production form of electricity, and the larger the plant unit, the lower the cost. Looking to the future, in respect of merely the development in fuel taxes the competitiveness of domestic fuels will improve markedly if the taxation structure remains unchanged. It seems that at smaller points of consumption, such as heating and steam plants and small-scale power plants, fuel chips would be the most competitive fuel. In larger units, such as heat and power production plants and condensing power plants, fuel peat, primarily milled peat, would be the most competitive. The competitiveness of fuel chips at larger plants will probably be limited by the supply of sufficient volumes from such an area where the delivery costs would not raise the price of fuel chips too high. Coal would remain competitive only if the real import price of coal rose clearly more slowly than the real prices of domestic fuels. It seems that heavy fuel oil will be used only as a start-up, support and back-up fuel. Evaluating the future competitiveness of natural gas is difficult, since the impact of new pipeline investments on the price of natural gas is not known

  5. Development of small and medium reactors for power and heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becka, J.

    1978-01-01

    Data are given on the current state of development of small and medium-power reactors designed mainly for electric power production in small power grids, for heat production for small- and medium-power desalination plants with possible electric power generation, for process steam production and heat development for district heating systems, again combined with electric power generation, and for propelling big and fast passenger ships. A diagram is shown of the primary system of an integrated PWR derived from the Otto Hahn reactor. The family is listed of the standard sizes of the integral INTERATOM company pressurized water reactors. Also listed are the specifications and design of CAS 2CG and AS 3G type reactors used mainly for long-distance heating systems. (J.B.)

  6. Estimating generation costs for wind power production in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benazet, J.F.; Probert, E.J.

    1997-01-01

    Wind power is being exploited in several European countries as one of a possible number of sources of renewable energy. However, in France there is a heavy reliance on nuclear and hydro-electric power and the potential of wind power as part of the energy mix has been virtually ignored. One of the reasons advanced for the under utilisation of this technology is that it is financially unattractive. In this paper the contribution which wind power could potentially make to overall power production levels in France is examined. A cost estimate model is developed which derives electricity generation costs and determines realistic levels of production for the future. The model automatically determines the associated number of wind turbines required and the geographical areas in which they should be located. (author)

  7. Lean coding machine. Facilities target productivity and job satisfaction with coding automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Genna

    2010-07-01

    Facilities are turning to coding automation to help manage the volume of electronic documentation, streamlining workflow, boosting productivity, and increasing job satisfaction. As EHR adoption increases, computer-assisted coding may become a necessity, not an option.

  8. Facilities and medical care for on-site nuclear power plant radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The operation of a nuclear power plant introduces risks of injury or accidents that could also result in the exposure of personnel to radiation or radioactive materials. It is important in such an event to have adequate first aid and medical facilities, supplies, equipment, transportation capabilities and trained personnel available to provide necessary care. This standard provides guidance for first aid during an emergency and for initial medical care of those overexposed to penetrating radiation or contaminated with radioactive material or radionuclides. Recommendations cover facilities, supplies, equipment and the extent of care on-site, where first aid and initial care may be provided, and off-site at a local hospital, where further medical and surgical care may be provided. Additional recommendations are also provided for the transportation of patients and the training of personnel. A brief discussion of specialized care is provided in an appendix

  9. Production and utilization of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Toshiaki; Matsuoka, Hiromitsu

    1999-01-01

    A plan of developing radioisotopes with a high power proton accelerator of the Neutron Science Project is presented. The status of production and utilization of radioisotopes in Japan is briefly discussed. The radioisotopes to be produced for biomedical use are discussed together with the facility for production of those radioisotopes and for research with the products. (author)

  10. The Portuguese gamma irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, C.M.; Almeida, J.C.; Botelho, M.L.; Cavaco, M.C.; Almeida-Vara, E.; Andrade, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    A Gamma Radiation Facility was built up in the National Laboratory of Industrial Technology and Engineering (LNETI), Lisbon, Portugal. This plant (UTR GAMA-Pi) is a Cobalt-60 dry storage continuous facility with a nominal capacity of 1.5 x 10 16 Bq. The initial activity is 1.1 x 10 16 Bq and the throughput capacity 10 3 ton/year for product with a bulk density of 0.2 g/cm 3 treated with a minimum absorbed dose of 25 kGy. Complementary control devices were installed: ventilation system, closed water refrigeration circuit, internal TV system, detection and extinction fire system and emergency power group. It must be emphasized that the best attention was given to the conception and efficiency of the interlock safety systems. This facility will be utilized mainly for radiosterilization of medical articles and decontamination of wine cork stoppers. (author)

  11. Evaluation of rubber seal products for gamma facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobhy, M.S.; Shafy, M.A.; Shahin, F.

    2005-01-01

    Ageing behavior by employing the prolonged exposures of high-energy radiation such as gamma-rays on the physicomechanical properties of some rubber seal products are studied. The proposed binary-rubber blends, SBR/NBR, EPDM/NBR and EPDM/EPM. have overcome their problem of inhomogeneity and incompatibility between the two rubber phases. Such enhancements are acquired by either the replacement of part of NBR by SBR during mastication, or the incorporation of maleic anhydride. Results show that the EPDM/EPM rubber blend has possessed the radiation resistance property towards the deterioration due to higher gamma-irradiation dose. The SEM images have c early observed the role of the used antioxidant, where a thin film is usually produced, degraded; with the appearance of surface cracks, and repaired with further gamma-irradiation up to high doses. Such enhancement is necessary for the definition of the requirements to be put on rubber seal materials. Finally, these products ought to assure the quality control in production and evaluate their application suitability that may employ in the pneumatic system in gamma facility

  12. Ethanol production in small- to medium-size facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiler, E. A.; Coble, C. G.; Oneal, H. P.; Sweeten, J. M.; Reidenbach, V. G.; Schelling, G. T.; Lawhon, J. T.; Kay, R. D.; Lepori, W. A.; Aldred, W. H.

    1982-04-01

    In early 1980 system design criteria were developed for a small-scale ethanol production plant. The plant was eventually installed on November 1, 1980. It has a production capacity of 30 liters per hour; this can be increased easily (if desired) to 60 liters per hour with additional fermentation tanks. Sixty-six test runs were conducted to date in the alcohol production facility. Feedstocks evaluated in these tests include: corn (28 runs); grain sorghum (33 runs); grain sorghum grits (1 run); half corn/half sorghum (1 run); and sugarcane juice (3 runs). In addition, a small bench-scale fermentation and distillation system was used to evaluate sugarcane and sweet sorghum feedstocks prior to their evaluation in the larger unit. In each of these tests, evaluation of the following items was conducted: preprocessing requirements; operational problems; conversion efficiency (for example, liters of alcohol produced per kilogram of feedstock); energy balance and efficiency; nutritional recovery from stillage; solids separation by screw press; chemical characterization of stillage including liquid and solids fractions; wastewater requirements; and air pollution potential.

  13. Electrons without borders: legal issues in exporting power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atcheson, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Miller Thomson LLP provides a range of personal and business law legal services to a variety of projects, particularly those involving renewable energy generation. This paper discusses the legal issues the company has faced in exporting power. There are three ways to export electricity, sale of environmental attributes/carbon credits across borders, via existing transmission facilities and via new transmission facilities. Authorizations by the relevant provincial entity are required to export via the existing transmission. To export power across into the US, permission is needed from both the National Energy Board (NEB) and from the US authorities. The history and the process of obtaining this permission through the NEB are discussed in detail. The approvals and considerations necessary to transport power through new transmission facilities and sale of environmental attributes are given in detail. The paper concludes that a special project is needed with unique opportunities to make the export of power the destination for all production.

  14. DISTRIBUTED ELECTRICAL POWER PRODUCTION SYSTEM AND METHOD OF CONTROL THEREOF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a distributed electrical power production system wherein two or more electrical power units comprise respective sets of power supply attributes. Each set of power supply attributes is associated with a dynamic operating state of a particular electrical power unit....

  15. Several new thermo-hydraulic test facilities in NPIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Shurong; Sun Yufa; Ji Fuyun; Zong Guifang; Guo Zhongchuan

    1997-01-01

    Several new thermo-hydraulic test facilities are under construction in Nuclear Power Institute of Chinese (NPIC) at Chengdu. These facilities include: 1. Nuclear Power Component Comprehensive Test Facility. 2. Reactor Hydraulic Modeling Test Facility. 3. Control Rod Drive Line Hydraulic Test Facility. 4. Large Scale Thermo-Hydraulic Test Facility. The construction of these facilities will make huge progress in the research and development capability of nuclear power technology in CHINA. The author will present a brief description of the design parameters flowchart and test program of these facilities

  16. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2008-12-01

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC25, the second test campaign using a high moisture lignite coal from the Red Hills mine in Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC25 was conducted from July 4, 2008, through August 12, 2008. During TC25, the PSDF gasification process operated for 742 hours in air-blown gasification mode. Operation with the Mississippi lignite was significantly improved in TC25 compared to the previous test (TC22) with this fuel due to the addition of a fluid bed coal dryer. The new dryer was installed to dry coals with very high moisture contents for reliable coal feeding. The TC25 test campaign demonstrated steady operation with high carbon conversion and optimized performance of the coal handling and gasifier systems. Operation during TC25 provided the opportunity for further testing of instrumentation enhancements, hot gas filter materials, and advanced syngas cleanup technologies. The PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane with syngas from the Transport Gasifier.

  17. Current status of irradiation facilities in JRR-3 and JRR-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Naohiko; Wada, Shigeru; Sasajima, Fumio; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    The Department of Research Reactor has operated two research reactors, JRR-3 and JRR-4. These reactors were constructed in the Tokai Research Establishment. Many researchers and engineers use these joint-use facilities. JRR-3 is a light water moderated and cooled, pool type research reactor using low-enriched silicide fuel. JRR-3's maximum thermal power is 20MW. JRR-3 has nine vertical irradiation holes for RI production, nuclear fuels and materials irradiation at reactor core area. JRR-3 has many kinds of irradiation holes in a heavy water tank around the reactor core. These are two hydraulic rabbit irradiation facilities, two pneumatic rabbit irradiation facilities, one activation analysis irradiation facilities, one uniform irradiation facility, one rotating irradiation facility and one capsule irradiation facility. JRR-3 has nine horizontal experimental holes, that are used by many kinds of neutron beam experimental facilities using these holes. JRR-4 is a light water moderated and cooled, swimming pool type research reactor using low-enriched silicide fuel. JRR-4's maximum thermal power is 3.5MW. JRR-4 has five vertical irradiation tubes at reactor core area, three capsule irradiation facilities, one hydraulic rabbit irradiation facility, and one pneumatic rabbit irradiation facility. JRR-4 has a neutron beam hole, and it has used neutron beam experiments, irradiations for activation analysis and medical neutron irradiations. (author)

  18. Towards a more efficient energy use in photovoltaic powered products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, S.Y.; Strijk, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the energy saving and power management solutions necessary to improve the energy consumption efficiency in photovoltaic powered products. Important in the design of such products is not only the energy supply optimization required to deliver the actual energy to fulfil their

  19. Investigation of the radionuclide inventory and the production yields of the target stacks at the PEFP radioisotope production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang-Pil; Hong, In-Seok; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2010-01-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) will construct a radioisotope production facility by using the nuclear reaction between the 100-MeV proton beam and the solid target. For investigating the radionuclide inventory and the production yield of the radioisotope production facility, we have optimized the thickness of the prototype target stacks by using a SRIM calculation. The target stacks consist of RbCl encapsulated in inconel alloy, Zn metal, and Ga metal encapsulated in niobium. Typical beam parameters were 300 μA and 95 hours. An inventory of all generated radionuclide activities is mandatory in order to prepare the operation scenario and design the hot cell. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to investigate what radionuclide is generated. The obtained radionuclide inventory indicated that about 100 radionuclides were generated and that the total radioactivity of the irradiated target stacks was 1324.1 Ci at the end of the bombardment. The production yields of Sr-82, Cu-67, and Ge-68 were 3.79 Ci, 2.74 Ci, and 1.23 Ci at the end of the bombardment.

  20. Synfuel (hydrogen) production from fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Cox, K.E.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Booth, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    A potential use of fusion energy for the production of synthetic fuel (hydrogen) is described. The hybrid-thermochemical bismuth-sulfate cycle is used as a vehicle to assess the technological and economic merits of this potential nonelectric application of fusion power

  1. The national carbon capture center at the power systems development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-09-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Three reporting period, efforts at the NCCC/PSDF focused on testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; commissioning and initial testing at the post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  2. THE NATIONAL CARBON CAPTURE CENTER AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-05-11

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Two reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on new technology assessment and test planning; designing and constructing post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  3. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-09-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC09 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC09 in air- and oxygen-blown modes. Test Run TC09 was started on September 3, 2002, and completed on September 26, 2002. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run, with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen was smooth. The gasifier temperature varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 125 to 270 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC09, 414 hours of solid circulation and over 300 hours of coal feed were attained with almost 80 hours of pure oxygen feed.

  4. Coupling of AST-500 heating reactors with desalination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gureyeva, L.V.; Egorov, V.V.; Podberezniy, V.L.

    1997-01-01

    The general issues regarding the joint operation of a NHR and a desalination facility for potable water production are briefly considered. The AST-500 reactor plant and the DOUGTPA-type evaporating desalination facilities, both relying on proven technology and solid experience of construction and operation, are taken as a basis for the design of a large-output nuclear desalination complex. Its main design characteristics are given. The similarity of NHR operation for heating grid and desalination facility in respect of reactor plant operating conditions and power regulation principles is pointed out. The issues of nuclear desalination complexes composition are discussed briefly as well. (author). 2 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. Coupling of AST-500 heating reactors with desalination facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gureyeva, L V; Egorov, V V [OKBM, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Podberezniy, V L [Scientific Research Inst. of Machine Building, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    The general issues regarding the joint operation of a NHR and a desalination facility for potable water production are briefly considered. The AST-500 reactor plant and the DOUGTPA-type evaporating desalination facilities, both relying on proven technology and solid experience of construction and operation, are taken as a basis for the design of a large-output nuclear desalination complex. Its main design characteristics are given. The similarity of NHR operation for heating grid and desalination facility in respect of reactor plant operating conditions and power regulation principles is pointed out. The issues of nuclear desalination complexes composition are discussed briefly as well. (author). 2 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Schey

    2009-07-01

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 – Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 – Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 – Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 – Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study

  7. Simulation of power maneuvering experiment of MASLWR test facility by MARS-KS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Yeop [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this ICSP, experimental data obtained from MASLWR (Mulit-Application Small Light Water Reactor) test facility located at Oregon state university in the US have been simulated by various thermal-hydraulic codes of each participant of the ICSP and compared among others. MASLWR test facility is a mock-up of a passive integral type reactor equipped with helical coil steam generator. Since SMART reactor which is currently being developed in Korea also adopts a helical coil steam generator, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) has joined this ICSP to assess the applicability of a domestic regulatory audit thermal-hydraulic code (i. e. MARS-KS code) for the SMART reactor including wall-to-fluid heat transfer model modification based on independent international experiment data. In the ICSP, two types of transient experiments have been focused and they are 1) loss of feedwater transient with subsequent ADS operation and long term cooling (SP-2) and normal operating conditions at different power levels. In the present study, KINS simulation result by the MARS-KS code (KS-002 version) for the SP-3 experiment is presented in detail and conclusion on MARS-KS code performance drawn through this simulation is described. Performance of the MARS-KS code is evaluated through the simulation of the power maneuvering experiment of the MASLWR test facility. Steady run shows the helical coil specific heat transfer model of the code is reasonable. However, identified discrepancy of the primary mass flowrate at transient run shows code performance for pressure drop needs to be improved considering sensitivity of the flowrate to the pressure drop at natural circulation.

  8. Production of medical radioactive isotopes using KIPT electron driven subcritical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2008-01-01

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a plan to construct an electron accelerator driven subcritical assembly. One of the facility objectives is the production of medical radioactive isotopes. This paper presents the ANL collaborative work performed for characterizing the facility performance for producing medical radioactive isotopes. First, a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Then, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes have been considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n, γ), (n, 2n), (n, p), and (γ, n). In the second part, the parent isotopes with high reaction rate were explicitly modeled in the calculations. Four irradiation locations were considered in the analyses to study the medical isotope production rate. The results show the self-shielding effect not only reduces the specific activity but it also changes the irradiation location that maximizes the specific activity. The axial and radial distributions of the parent capture rates have been examined to define the irradiation sample size of each parent isotope

  9. Production of medical radioactive isotopes using KIPT electron driven subcritical facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: alby@anl.gov; Gohar, Yousry [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a plan to construct an electron accelerator driven subcritical assembly. One of the facility objectives is the production of medical radioactive isotopes. This paper presents the ANL collaborative work performed for characterizing the facility performance for producing medical radioactive isotopes. First, a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Then, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes have been considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n, {gamma}), (n, 2n), (n, p), and ({gamma}, n). In the second part, the parent isotopes with high reaction rate were explicitly modeled in the calculations. Four irradiation locations were considered in the analyses to study the medical isotope production rate. The results show the self-shielding effect not only reduces the specific activity but it also changes the irradiation location that maximizes the specific activity. The axial and radial distributions of the parent capture rates have been examined to define the irradiation sample size of each parent isotope.

  10. Production of medical radioactive isotopes using KIPT electron driven subcritical facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2008-05-01

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a plan to construct an electron accelerator driven subcritical assembly. One of the facility objectives is the production of medical radioactive isotopes. This paper presents the ANL collaborative work performed for characterizing the facility performance for producing medical radioactive isotopes. First, a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Then, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes have been considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n, gamma), (n, 2n), (n, p), and (gamma, n). In the second part, the parent isotopes with high reaction rate were explicitly modeled in the calculations. Four irradiation locations were considered in the analyses to study the medical isotope production rate. The results show the self-shielding effect not only reduces the specific activity but it also changes the irradiation location that maximizes the specific activity. The axial and radial distributions of the parent capture rates have been examined to define the irradiation sample size of each parent isotope.

  11. Change in plan for installation of nuclear reactor in Genkai Nuclear Power Plant of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. (change in plan for No.3 and No.4 nuclear reactor facilities) (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report, compiled by the Nuclear Safety Commission to be submitted to the Minister of International Trade and Industry, deals with studies on a proposed change in the plan for the installation of nuclear reactors in the Genkai Nuclear Power Plant of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. (change in the plan for the No.3 and No.4 nuclear reactor facilities). The conclusions of and principles for the examination and evaluation are described first. The studies carried out are focused on the safety of the facilities, and it is concluded that part of the proposed change is appropriate with respect to the required technical capability and that part of the change will not have adverse effects on the safety design of the facilities. The examination of the safety design of the reactor facilities cover the reactivity control, new material for the steam generator, design of chemical and volume control systems, design of liquid waste treatment facilities, integration of all confinement vessel spray rings, and design of the diesel power generator. It is confirmed that all of them can meet the safety requirements. Studies and analyses are also made of the emission of radiations to the surrounding environment, abnormal transient changes during operations, and possible accidents. (Nogami, K.)

  12. Power Burst Reactor Facility as an epithermal neutron source for brain cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactor is considered for modification to provide an intense, clean source of intermediate-energy (epithermal) neutrons desirable for clinical studies of neutron capture therapy (NCT) for malignant tumors. The modifications include partial replacement of the reflector, installation of a neutron-moderating, shifting region, additional shielding, and penetration of the present concrete shield with a collimating (and optionally) filtering region. The studies have indicated that the reactor, after these modifications, will be safely operable at full power (28 MW) within the acceptable limits of the plant protection systems. The neutron beam exiting from the collimator port is predicted to be of sufficient intensity (approx.10 10 neutrons/cm 2 -s) to provide therapeutic doses in very short irradiation times. The beam would be relatively free of undesirable fast neutrons, thermal neutrons and gamma rays. The calculated neutron energy spectrum and associated gamma rays in the beam were provided as input in simulation studies that used a computer model of a patient with a brain tumor to determine predicted dose rates to the tumor and healthy tissue. The results of this conceptual study indicate an intense, clean beam of epithermal neutrons for NCT clinical trials is attainable in the PBF facility with properly engineered design modifications. 9 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  13. An approach for prediction of petroleum production facility performance considering Arctic influence factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xueli; Barabady, Javad; Markeset, Tore

    2010-01-01

    As the oil and gas (O and G) industry is increasing the focus on petroleum exploration and development in the Arctic region, it is becoming increasingly important to design exploration and production facilities to suit the local operating conditions. The cold and harsh climate, the long distance from customer and suppliers' markets, and the sensitive environment may have considerable influence on the choice of design solutions and production performance characteristics such as throughput capacity, reliability, availability, maintainability, and supportability (RAMS) as well as operational and maintenance activities. Due to this, data and information collected for similar systems used in a normal climate may not be suitable. Hence, it is important to study and develop methods for prediction of the production performance characteristics during the design and operation phases. The aim of this paper is to present an approach for prediction of the production performance for oil and gas production facilities considering influencing factors in Arctic conditions. The proportional repair model (PRM) is developed in order to predict repair rate in Arctic conditions. The model is based on the proportional hazard model (PHM). A simple case study is used to demonstrate how the proposed approach can be applied.

  14. What about improving the productivity of electric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawroski, H.; Knecht, P.D.; Prideaux, D.L.; Zahner, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    The FEA in April of 1974 established an Interagency Task Group on Power Plant Reliability, which was charged with the broad objective of improving the productivity of existing and planned large fossil-fueled and nuclear power plants. It took approximately 11 months for the task force to publish a report, ''Report on Improving the Productivity of Electrical Power Plants'' (FEA-263-G), a detailed analysis and comparison of successful and below-average-performance power plants. The Nuclear Service Corp. portion of this study examined four large central-station power plants: two fossil (coal) and two nuclear plants. Only plants with electrical generation capacities greater than 400 MWe were considered. The study included the following: staff technical skill, engineering support, QA program, plant/corporate coordination, operation philosophy, maintenance programs, federal/state regulations, network control, and equipment problems. Personnel were interviewed, and checklists providing input from some 21 or more plant and corporate personnel of each utility were utilized. Reports and other documentation were also reviewed. It was recognized early that productivity is closely allied to technical skills and positive motivation. For this reason, considerable attention was given to people in this study

  15. Use of Sound for Fish Protection at Power Facilities : A Historical Perspective of the State of the Art : Phase 1 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    1994-11-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of the knowledge of fish hearing, i.e., what is known about fish response to sound, and provides a starting place for investigation into the use of sonic behavior modification to help solve pressing problems in the maintenance and recovery of anadromous and resident fish stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The challenge for scientists and engineers is to understand (1) how and what fish hear, and (2) how to use this knowledge to influence fish behavior or to factor fish sensory systems and behavior into the design of fish protection devices at power-production and water-control facilities. The sections that follow are a studied response to this challenge. In many respects, the search for effective and economical ways to modify fish behavior without physical intervention is one of the grails of fish management, particularly (although not exclusively), relative to electric power production. Within the Columbia River Basin and elsewhere, water is put to many uses not conducive to the health of indigenous fish. Irrigation, impoundment, and hydropower production frequently modify the riverine environment to the detriment of indigenous stocks while creating productive environments for competing or predatory species. The mechanisms of impact are numerous. Water project managers, when faced with the need to reduce impacts of their operations on fish health, generally attempt to divert fish from high-risk to lower-risk regions or manage the environment in such a way as to increase the survival prospects of impacted species. Almost without exception, risk reduction is accomplished by using physical barriers of one form or another. Unfortunately, physical barriers at water projects have several drawbacks, e.g., reducing available water flow for energy production and incurring high maintenance costs. In addition, recent studies (Sale et al. 1991) have documented that once these barriers are installed, they are rarely evaluated for

  16. Cogeneration/auto production influences form sugar cane bagasse for the electric power market in Northeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, P.G. da; Fiscina, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    This work intends to evaluate to what extent the co-generation/auto production influences the electric power market. For that purpose, two sceneries have been developed considering sugar cane bagasse remains, taking as a basis the historic content (per Northeast state) and the energy policy for PROALCOOL. The installed potential in plants/distilleries for utilization of the bagasse industrial remains has also been considered. It has been determined the investments required for new facilities, enabling the use of all bagasse remains for electric energy, the benefits for the North/Northeast electric system resulting from such measures (as the decrease in deficit risks), and the value of energy sale by the system auto producers/co-generators. (author)

  17. Gas storage facilities. Investigation of their social value. Supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    The socio-economic factors resulting from location of gas storage facilities are evaluated. Various alternatives to the existing projects are estimated, for instance 11 new pipelines, in some cases combined with new production capacity, LNG facilities, differentiated tariffs, reconstruction of decentralized heat/power plants etc. Theoretical considerations and models, among others involving gas storage abroad, are presented. Seasonal storage, emergency storage, storage controlled by economic optimization (profitable purchases, sales at highest market) are described for various types of facilities, like aquifers, caverns and LNG-stores. Natural gas supplies in Europe, infrastructure and resources are compared to the Danish conditions. Sensitivity of the Danish heating market for natural gas consumption is investigated. Reduction in energy use for space heating by 2005 will change the needs of storage of 740 Mm 3 gas to 650 Mm 3 . Extra consumption by the decentralized power/heat plants is not accounted for in this estimation. Dynamic models of the future gas consumption are based on the EU 'European Energy 2020'. (EG)

  18. Optimization of wind farm power production using innovative control strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duc, Thomas

    Wind energy has experienced a very significant growth and cost reduction over the past decade, and is now able to compete with conventional power generation sources. New concepts are currently investigated to decrease costs of production of electricity even further. Wind farm coordinated control...... deficit caused by the wake downstream, or yawing the turbine to deflect the wake away from the downwind turbine. Simulation results found in the literature indicate that an increase in overall power production can be obtained. However they underline the high sensitivity of these gains to incoming wind...... aligned wind turbines. The experimental results show that the scenarios implemented during the first measurement campaign did not achieve an increase in overall power production, which confirms the difficulty to realize wind farm power optimization in real operating conditions. In the curtailment field...

  19. Study of the productivity evolution in the operation of CLAB[CLAB=Central Storage Facility for Spent Fuel]; Undersoekning av produktivitetsutveckling vid driften av CLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, H. [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-07-01

    SKB shall every year, on behalf of the power companies, send SKI a cost calculation for spent fuel handling and dismantling of the Swedish nuclear power plants. SKI has tried to investigate the future impact which the growth of money in the Nuclear Waste Fund might give in relation to the change of consumer price index, CPI. The long term yield of the Fund has been related to the change of CPI, as the bigger part of the fund money has been invested in real interest rate bonds. The cost development has been studied by SKI with an index named 'KBS-3-index', which is a basket of weighted factor price indexes made out of the SKB programme. Since 1986 and up to 1998, the KBS-3-index has increased about 14% more than CPI. If this discrepancy should continue during the whole period when Fund money should be available, the Fund would be insufficient. But the difference between KBS-3-index and CPI might be eliminated due to a future productivity development. At the moment, SKI has no knowledge about future productivity development in the SKB programme. A closer analysis of the facilities operated by SKB is therefore important. Nearest to study is the productivity at the operation of CLAB, Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel. The work in CLAB is receiving and storing of spent nuclear fuel and core components and reloading from normal to compact cassettes. The consumption of all production factors can be measured in money. Here the total production factors are defined as the sum of the annual operation costs and the sum of annuities for reinvestments during the year. The development for total productivity is slightly increasing. Normal for a new business is that the productivity rises sharply in the beginning. Here the productivity is slightly decreasing in the beginning, and then rising, sinking and at last a sharp rising. Project compact storing was finished in 1992, and relocation to compact cassettes started in 1993. This is said to be the

  20. Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,γ), (n,2n), (n,p), and (γ,n). In the second part, the parent

  1. Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-05-15

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,{gamma}), (n,2n), (n,p), and ({gamma},n). In the second part

  2. Power Quality Experimental Analysis on Rural Home Grid-Connected PV Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Jorge Cerqueira Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgeneration is the small-scale generation of heat or electric power or both, by individuals or buildings to meet their own needs. Recently, microgeneration is being regarded as a means to decentralize the power production of renewable energies, reducing the impacts on the grid caused by unexpected energy demands. Given the increase in microgeneration facilities, determining the quantity of energy produced and the power quality assumes growing importance in low, medium, or high voltage facilities. This paper presents a power quality analysis of two different facilities with photovoltaic generation localized in a rural area of Portugal, describing the voltage and frequency behaviour, the harmonic contents, and the total harmonic distortion. Statistical data are presented regarding the number of voltage events and occurrence of dips and swells in both facilities as a percentage of rated voltage. We conclude that some PV systems can severely affect voltage quality, forcing the grid to work at and even above the maximum voltage standard limit.

  3. Farm scale electrical power production from animal waste. Volume I. Final report, 30 June 1981-30 December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, P.A.

    1984-01-31

    A 1 1/2 (dry) tons per day biodigester cogeneration plant has been designed and constructed. This project is part of a federal program to promote energy conservation and the use of non-conventional energy resources. The main purpose of the project is to demonstrate that a dairy farm can generate its own power and supply excess power to a local utility. Such a facility can produce significant energy savings to livestock farms and small communities by allowing them to get energy from raw animal and human waste. Also, an odorless by-product is produced that is nearly pathogenically free and has the possibility of several end uses such as: fertilizer and soil conditioner, protein-rich animal refeed, livestock bedding material, and aquatic food for fish farming. 53 references, 18 figures, 4 tables.

  4. A flexible testing facility for high-power targets (Tiara FP7 program)

    CERN Document Server

    Fusco, Y.; Samec, K.; Kadi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Building on recent experience in the field of applied physics, TIARA Work package n° 9 focuses on target applications for accelerators in Europe. A roadmap for target development has been derived from major achievements in the EU-FP6 and EU-FP7 programs such as the MEGAPIE and EURISOL experiments. The TIARA management board concluded that a worthwhile continuation of such projects would be in the development of a flexible material irradiation facility easily transportable and which could be installed in different laboratories. The power is limited to 100 kW in a very compact arrangement so as to obtain the best neutron economy from a moderate beam power which is more likely to be found in laboratories across Europe. The challenges posed by such a compact design and accompanying calculations are presented in the current work.

  5. Reliability analysis for power supply system in a reprocessing facility based on GO methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Renze

    2014-01-01

    GO methodology was applied to analyze the reliability of power supply system in a typical reprocessing facility. Based on the fact that tie breakers are set in the system, tie breaker operator was defined. Then GO methodology modeling and quantitative analysis were performed sequently, minimal cut sets and average unavailability of the system were obtained. Parallel analysis between GO methodology and fault tree methodology was also performed. The results showed that setup of tie breakers was rational and necessary and that the modeling was much easier and the chart was much more succinct for GO methodology parallel with fault tree methodology to analyze the reliability of the power supply system. (author)

  6. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 2: Engineering. Volume 3: Costs and schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Engineering design details for the principal systems, system operating modes, site facilities, and structures of an engineering test facility (ETF) of a 200 MWE power plant are presented. The ETF resembles a coal-fired steam power plant in many ways. It is analogous to a conventional plant which has had the coal combustor replaced with the MHD power train. Most of the ETF components are conventional. They can, however, be sized or configured differently or perform additional functions from those in a conventional coal power plant. The boiler not only generates steam, but also performs the functions of heating the MHD oxidant, recovering seed, and controlling emissions.

  7. Breathing new life into your production irradiator the case for reinvesting in your facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aube, Robert; Wynnyk, Mike

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on one of the important technology issues facing the gamma processing industry today: that of strategically planning for extending the useful life of a production irradiator. Production irradiator owners are typically faced with the difficult question of whether or not to significantly reinvest in their facilities after 15-20 years of service. At this point in time the irradiator has likely provided many years of safe, reliable service and has paid for itself many times over. As the equipment ages, it may become less reliable, due to wear and maintenance practices, and more costly to operate. The cost of refurbishing the equipment may be significant and the downtime required to complete the refurbishment is also likely to be a challenge. This makes it essential to present a clear and rational justification for reinvesting in the facility. There has been a growing trend in recent years for irradiator owners to refurbish or upgrade their facilities. This trend is driven by the need to keep the facilities operating efficiently and safely as well as by the desire to take advantage of advancements that have occurred in the technology over the years. These advancements can enhance equipment efficiency, improve operational effectiveness and maintain or exceed quality assurance requirements. This paper illustrates the value of reinvesting in irradiator facilities, and highlights the significant benefits derived

  8. Feasibility Assessment of Using Power Plant Waste Heat in Large Scale Horticulture Facility Energy Supply Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Gyung Yu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Korean government has been carrying out projects to construct several large scale horticulture facilities. However, it is difficult for an energy supply to operate stably and economically with only a conventional fossil fuel boiler system. For this reason, several unused energy sources have become attractive and it was found that power plant waste heat has the greatest potential for application in this scenario. In this study, we performed a feasibility assessment of power plant waste heat as an energy source for horticulture facilities. As a result, it was confirmed that there was a sufficient amount of energy potential for the use of waste heat to supply energy to the assumed area. In Dangjin, an horticultural area of 500 ha could be constructed by utilizing 20% of the energy reserves. In Hadong, a horticulture facility can be set up to be 260 ha with 7.4% of the energy reserves. In Youngdong, an assumed area of 65 ha could be built utilizing about 19% of the energy reserves. Furthermore, the payback period was calculated in order to evaluate the economic feasibility compared with a conventional system. The initial investment costs can be recovered by the approximately 83% reduction in the annual operating costs.

  9. How do users interact with photovoltaic-powered products? Investigating 100 'lead-users' and 6 PV products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolou, G.; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand how 'lead-users' interact with PV-powered products, the behaviour of 100 people interacting with six different PV-powered products in their daily life was analysed. The sample of respondents to be observed consisted of 20 groups, each one formed by five students of

  10. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Status report. Humboldt Bay Power Plant Unit 3, SAFSTOR decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, B.L.; Haffner, D.R.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-06-01

    This document explains the purpose of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program and summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 facility. Preparations to put this facility into a custodial safe storage (SAFSTOR) mode are currently scheduled for completion by June 30, 1986. This report gives the status of activities as of June 1985. A final summary report will be issued after completion of this SAFSTOR decommissioning activity. Information included in this status report has been collected from the facility decommissioning plan, environmental report, and other sources made available by the licensee. This data has been placed in a computerized data base system which permits data manipulation and summarization. A description of the computer reports that can be generated by the decommissioning data system (DDS) for Humboldt Bay and samples of those reports are included in this document

  11. High heat flux facility GLADIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuner, H.; Boeswirth, B.; Boscary, J.; McNeely, P.

    2007-01-01

    The new ion beam facility GLADIS started the operation at IPP Garching. The facility is equipped with two individual 1.1 MW power ion sources for testing actively cooled plasma facing components under high heat fluxes. Each ion source generates heat loads between 3 and 55 MW/m 2 with a beam diameter of 70 mm at the target position. These parameters allow effective testing from probes to large components up to 2 m length. The high heat flux allows the target to be installed inclined to the beam and thus increases the heated surface length up to 200 mm for a heat flux of 15 MW/m 2 in the standard operating regime. Thus the facility has the potential capability for testing of full scale ITER divertor targets. Heat load tests on the WENDELSTEIN 7-X pre-series divertor targets have been successfully started. These tests will validate the design and manufacturing for the production of 950 elements

  12. Comparing costs of power and heat production by prospective and present sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, S.

    1979-01-01

    Capital and running costs are compared of power and heat production from different sources. The lowest capital costs were found for coal-fired power plants followed by light water reactor power plants. The capital costs of other types of power plants, such as wind, geothermal, solar, thermonuclear power plants are significantly higher. The estimated specific cost for electric power production in 1985 for a nuclear power plant is lower than for a fossil-fuel power plant. It is estimated that in 1985 coal will be the cheapest heat source. (Ha)

  13. Production facility site selection factors for Texas value-added wood producers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd H. Michael; Joanna Teitel; James E. Granskog

    1998-01-01

    Value-added wood products manufacturers serve an important role in the economies of many U.S. regions and are therefore sought after by entities such as economic development agencies. The reasons why certain locations for a prospective prodution facility would be more attractive to secondary wood industry producers are not clearly understood. Therefore, this research...

  14. Overview of high intensity proton accelerator facility, J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The J-PARC project of high intensity proton accelerator research complex, conducted jointly by JAERI and KEK, has been completed with demonstration of all beam productions in 2009 as the facility construction phase, and the operation started to offer the secondary beams of neutron, muon, kaon, and neutrino, to the advanced scientific experimental research aiming at making breakthroughs in materials and life science, nuclear and elementary physics, etc. This text describes the overview of the J-PARC present status with emphasis of a performance toward to 1MW power as user facilities. (author)

  15. RAMI modeling of plant systems for proposed tritium production and extraction facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-01-01

    The control of life-cycle cost is a primary concern during the development, construction, operation, and decommissioning of DOE systems and facilities. An effective tool that can be used to control these costs, beginning with the design stage, is called a reliability, availability, maintainability, and inspectability analysis or, simply, RAMI for short. In 1997, RAMI technology was introduced to the Savannah River Site with applications at the conceptual design stage beginning with the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project and later extended to the Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) Project. More recently it has been applied to the as-build Water Treatment Facilities designed for ground water environmental restoration. This new technology and database was applied to the assessment of balance-of-plant systems for the APT Conceptual Design Report. Initial results from the Heat Removal System Assessment revealed that the system conceptual design would cause the APT to fall short of its annual production goal. Using RAM technology to immediately assess this situation, it was demonstrated that the product loss could be gained back by upgrading the system's chiller unit capacity at a cost of less than $1.3 million. The reclaimed production is worth approximately $100 million. The RAM technology has now been extended to assess the conceptual design for the CLWR-TEF Project. More specifically, this technology and database is being used to translate high level availability goals into lower level system design requirements that will ensure the TEF meets its production goal. Results, from the limited number of system assessments performed to date, have already been used to modify the conceptual design for a remote handling system, improving its availability to the point that a redundant system, with its associated costs of installation and operation may no longer be required. RAMI results were also used to justify the elimination

  16. Advanced Education Facilities for Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Lungeanu, Marian; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    A new approach for the project- and problem-based learning method is achieved at Aalborg University. Two new laboratories called Flexible Drives System Laboratory (FDSL) and Green Power Laboratory (GPL) have been developed. A common feature is that these facilities are using entirely Simulink for...... for programming, a very user-friendly block-oriented tool for designing control and different setups have been realized for practical implementation. Both the hardware and the course content is described in this paper....

  17. Energy Systems Integration Facility Videos | Energy Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility | NREL Energy Systems Integration Facility Videos Energy Systems Integration Facility Integration Facility NREL + SolarCity: Maximizing Solar Power on Electrical Grids Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration Robot-Powered Reliability Testing at NREL's ESIF Microgrid

  18. Thermal Heat and Power Production with Models for Local and Regional Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saether, Sturla

    1999-07-01

    The primary goal of this thesis is the description and modelling of combined heat and power systems as well as analyses of thermal dominated systems related to benefits of power exchange. Large power plants with high power efficiency (natural gas systems) and heat production in local heat pumps can be favourable in areas with low infrastructure of district heating systems. This system is comparable with typical combined heat and power (CHP) systems based on natural gas with respect to efficient use of fuel energy. The power efficiency obtainable from biomass and municipal waste is relatively low and the advantage of CHP for this system is high compared to pure power production with local heat pumps for heat generation. The advantage of converting pure power systems into CHP systems is best for power systems with low power efficiency and heat production at low temperature. CHP systems are divided into two main groups according to the coupling of heat and power production. Some CHP systems, especially those with strong coupling between heat and power production, may profit from having a thermal heat storage subsystem. District heating temperatures direct the heat to power ratio of the CHP units. The use of absorption chillers driven by district heating systems are also evaluated with respect to enhancing the utilisation of district heating in periods of low heat demand. Power exchange between a thermal dominated and hydropower system is found beneficial. Use of hydropower as a substitute for peak power production in thermal dominated systems is advantageous. Return of base load from the thermal dominated system to the hydropower system can balance in the net power exchange.

  19. Active seismic response control systems for nuclear power plant equipment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobori, Takuji; Kanayama, Hiroo; Kamagata, Shuichi

    1989-01-01

    To sustain severe earthquake ground motion, a new type of anti-seismic structure is proposed, called a Dynamic Intelligent Building (DIB) system, which is positioned as an active seismic response controlled the structure. The structural concept starts from a new recognition of earthquake ground motion, and the structural natural frequency is actively adjusted to avoid resonant vibration, and similarly the external counter-force cancels the resonant force which comes from the dynamic structural motion energy. These concepts are verified using an analytical simulator program. The advanced application of the DIB system, is the Active Supporting system and the Active Stabilizer system for nuclear power plant equipment facilities. (orig.)

  20. Simulation of power maneuvering experiment of MASLWR test facility by MARS-KS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Yeop [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In the present study, KINS simulation result by the MARS-KS code (KS-002 version) for the SP-3 experiment is presented in detail and conclusion on MARS-KS code performance drawn through this simulation is described. Performance of the MARS-KS code is evaluated through the simulation of the power maneuvering experiment of the MASLWR test facility. Steady run shows the helical coil specific heat transfer model of the code is reasonable. However, identified discrepancy of the primary mass flowrate at transient run shows code performance for pressure drop needs to be improved considering sensitivity of the flowrate to the pressure drop at natural circulation. Since 2009, IAEA has conducted a research program entitled as ICSP (International Collaborative Standard Problem) on integral PWR design to evaluate current the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic code in simulating natural circulation flow within integral type reactor. In this ICSP, experimental data obtained from MASLWR (Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor) test facility located at Oregon state university in the US have been simulated by various thermal-hydraulic codes of each participant of the ICSP and compared among others. MASLWR test facility is a mock-up of a passive integral type reactor equipped with helical coil steam generator. Since SMART reactor which is currently being developed in Korea also adopts a helical coil steam generator, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) has joined this ICSP to assess the applicability of a domestic regulatory audit thermal-hydraulic code (i. e. MARS-KS code) for the SMART reactor including wall-to-fluid heat transfer model modification based on independent international experiment data. In the ICSP, two types of transient experiments have been focused and they are loss of feedwater transient with subsequent ADS operation and long term cooling (SP-2) and normal operating conditions at different power levels (SP-3)

  1. Model business plan for a sterile insect production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    For over 50 years the sterile insect technique (SIT) is a pest control strategy which has been used for eradication, and more recently for suppression, containment and prevention, of unwanted insect pest populations. Examples of successful applications of SIT, almost always applied in conjunction with other control methods in an area-wide integrated approach, are available from around the world. The development and application of SIT has relied overwhelmingly on public or donor initiative and funding throughout its history, although the private sector has always been involved as participants, cooperators or partners in funding. The demand for SIT, and therefore the market for sterile insects, has increased in recent years. This increase coincides with the introduction of new pests through the expansion of global trade and, at the same time, widespread pressure to find alternatives to pesticides. Recent improvements in the technology supporting SIT facilitate its application and suggest lower costs can be achieved. The conditions are therefore met for a greater commercialization of the technique to bring it in line with other pest control approaches that are fully integrated into a market approach. Several challenges arise, however, in pursuing sterile insect production as a commercial venture, ranging from intellectual property protection to pricing of the product. Routine insurance requirements, for instance, are complicated by the biological aspects of the business. This report is aimed at facilitating private sector involvement in the production of sterile insects for use in pest control. It provides guidelines and tools to support the development of specific business plans for a new SIT venture. By providing an international perspective on such issues as initial capital costs and recurring operational expenditures for a sterile insect facility, it may be used to evaluate the feasibility of proceeding with the construction or expansion of a sterile insect

  2. Performance test results of helium gas circulator of mock-up test facility with full-scale reaction tube for HTTR hydrogen production system. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Akira; Kato, Michio; Hayashi, Koji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    Hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane will be connected to the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) against development of nuclear heat utilization system. To obtain design and safety database of the HTTR hydrogen production system, mock-up test facility with full-scale reaction was constructed in FY 2001 and hydrogen of 120m{sup 3}N{sub /}h was successfully produced in overall performance test. This report describes performance test results of a helium gas circulator in this facility. The circulator performance curves regarding to pressure-rise, input power and adiabatic thermal efficiency at standard revolution number were made based on the measured flow-rate, temperature and pressure data in overall performance test. The circulator performance prediction code was made based on these performance curves. The code can calculate revolution number, electric power and temperature-rise of the circulator using flow-rate, inlet temperature, inlet pressure and pressure-rise data. The verification of the code was carried out with the test data in FY 2002. Total pressure loss of the helium gas circulation loop was also evaluated. The circulator should be operated in conditions such as pressure from 2.7MPa to 4.0MPa and flow-rate from 250g/s to 400g/s and at maximum pressure-rise of 250 kPa in test operation. It was confirmed in above verification and evaluations that the circulator had performance to satisfy above conditions within operation limitation of the circulator such as maximum input-power of 150 kW and maximum revolution number of 12,000 rpm. (author)

  3. Siting locally-unwanted facilities: What can be learnt from the location of Italian power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrone, Paola; Groppi, Angelamaria

    2012-01-01

    The reaction of communities to the development of energy facilities is based on the environmental impact of the investment, but it also reflects the ex-ante propensity of residents to engage in collective actions. In this work we have examined the requests of authorization of Italian power producers for new thermal plants with the purpose of testing the efficiency of market-based siting policies. The classical location factors, e.g., infrastructure availability, have been confirmed to play a role, and there is a weak evidence that authorization demands have targeted communities that suffer less environmental damage. However our findings have also revealed that power producers are likely to avoid potentially suitable sites if they host a highly activistic community. The paper also discusses some modifications concerning siting policies that could improve the alignment between community responses and the environmental costs of new energy facilities. - Highlights: ► We model location choices for polluting power plants by Italian producers in 1999–2006. ► The efficiency of market-based siting policies is tested (i.e., plants located where environmental damage is lower). ► More than environmental costs, voice factors prevailed on the location choices. ► We conclude that market-based siting policies does not ensure an efficient outcome. ► Developers and communities relationship may suffer from relevant transaction costs

  4. Wood power in North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, J.G.; Guessous, L. [Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    North Carolina (NC) is one of the most forested states, and supports a major wood products industry. The NC Department of Natural Resources sponsored a study by Research Triangle Institute to examine new, productive uses of the State`s wood resources, especially electric power generation by co-firing with coal. This paper summarizes our research of the main factors influencing wood power generation opportunities, i.e., (1) electricity demand; (2) initiative and experience of developers; (3) available fuel resources; (4) incentives for alternate fuels; and (5) power plant technology and economics. The results cover NC forests, short rotation woody crops, existing wood energy facilities, electrical power requirements, and environmental regulations/incentives. Quantitative assessments are based on the interests of government agencies, utilities, electric cooperatives, developers and independent power producers, forest products industries, and the general public. Several specific, new opportunities for wood-to-electricity in the State are identified and described. Comparisons are made with nationwide resources and wood energy operations. Preferred approaches in NC are co-generation in existing or modified boilers and in dedicated wood power plants in forest industry regions. Co-firing is mainly an option for supplementing unreliable primary fuel supplies to existing boilers.

  5. Compendium of Low-Cost Pacific Salmon and Steelhead Trout Production Facilities and Practices in the Pacific Northwest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senn, Harry G.

    1984-09-01

    The purpose was to research low capital cost salmon and steelhead trout production facilities and identify those that conform with management goals for the Columbia Basin. The species considered were chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), sockeye salmon (O. nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This report provides a comprehensive listing of the facilities, techniques, and equipment used in artificial production in the Pacific Northwest. (ACR)

  6. The effect of microwave power on the production of biodiesel from nyamplung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadariyah, L.; Mujaddid, F.; Raka; Dhonny, S. B.; Mahfud, M.

    2017-12-01

    Today, energy needs in Indonesia still rely on fossil energy sources that its availability in the world is increasingly depleted. Therefore, the research for alternative energy of petroleum must be developed, one of them is biodiesel. The use of microwave as energy source of biodiesel production can speed up the reaction time. So the microwave is considered more efficient. Seeds of nyamplung has an oil content of 71.4% (w/w) by weight. With the oil content of the nyamplung seeds has great potential when used as a raw material for biodiesel production. The aim of this research to study the effect of microwave power on the production of biodisel from nyamplung oil. Microwave power affects density, viscosity and yield of the product. The used of alkali catalyst, with higher the power, the lower the density and viscosity of the resulting product, but the resulting yield is 300 W. The power of more than 300 W is the opposite, resulting in the production of biodiesel using the optimum base catalyst at 300 W power.

  7. PLAN 98 - Costs for management of the radioactive waste from nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The nuclear utilities in Sweden are responsible for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from the nuclear power reactors in a safe manner. The most important measures are to plan, build and operate the facilities and systems needed, and to conduct related R and D. This report presents a calculation of the costs for implementing all of these measures. The following facilities and systems are in operation: Transportation system for radioactive waste products. Central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel, CLAB. Final repository for radioactive operational waste, SFR I. Plans also exist for: Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel. Deep repository for spent fuel and other long-lived waste. Final repository for decommissioning waste. The cost calculations also include costs for research, development and demonstration, as well as for decommissioning and dismantling the reactor plants etc. At the end of 1995, certain amendments were made in the Financing Act which influence the calculations presented in this report. The most important amendment is that the reactor owners, besides paying a fee or charge on nuclear energy production, must also give guarantees as security for remaining costs. In this way the fee can be based on a probable cost for waste management. This cost includes uncertainties and variations that are normal for this type of project. Cost increases as a consequence of major changes, disruptions etc. can instead be covered via the given guarantees. The total future costs, in January 1998 prices, for the Swedish waste management system from 1999 onward has been calculated to be SEK 45.8 billion. The total costs apply for the waste obtained from 25 years of operation of all Swedish reactors. They will fall due over a total period of approximately 50 years up to the middle of the 2l st century, but the greater part will fall due during the next 20 years. It is estimated that SEK 12.1 billion in current money terms

  8. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward F. Kiczek

    2007-08-31

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

  9. A conversion development program to LEU targets for medical isotope production in the MAPLE Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). The molybdenum extraction process from the HEU targets provided predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. A reliable supply of HEU for the NRU research reactor targets has enabled MDS Nordion to develop a secure chain of medical isotope supply for the international nuclear medicine community. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to patient application, has been established on a proven method of HEU target irradiation and processing. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, the design of the MAPLE facilities was based on our established process - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a program to convert the MAPLE facilities to LEU targets. An initial feasibility study was initiated to identify the technical issues to convert the MAPLE targets from HEU to LEU. This paper will present the results of the feasibility study. It will also describe future challenges and opportunities in converting the MAPLE facilities to LEU targets for large scale, commercial medical isotope production. (author)

  10. Dictionary of nuclear power. January 2013 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, Winfried

    2013-01-01

    The actualized version (January 2013) of the dictionary on nuclear power includes all actualizations and new inputs since the last version of 2001. The original publication dates from 1980. The dictionary includes definitions, terms, measuring units and helpful information on the actual knowledge concerning nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management, nuclear physics, reactor physics, isotope production, biological radiation effects, and radiation protection.

  11. S. 2415: Title I may be cited as the Uranium Enrichment Act of 1990; Title II may be cited as the Uranium Security and Tailings Reclamation Act of 1989; and Title III may be cited as The Solar, Wind, Waste, and Geothermal Power Production Incentives Act of 1990, introduced in the Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, April 4, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    S. 2415 (which started out as a bill to encourage solar and geothermal power generation) now would amend the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to redirect uranium enrichment enterprises to further the national interest, respond to competitive market forces, and to ensure the nation's common defense and security. It would establish a United States Enrichment Corporation for the following purposes: to acquire feed materials, enriched uranium, and enrichment facilities; to operate these facilities; to market enriched uranium for governmental purposes and qualified domestic and foreign persons; to conduct research into uranium enrichment; and to operate as a profitable, self-financing, reliable corporation and in a manner consistent with the health and safety of the public. The bill describes powers and duties of the corporation; the organization, finance, and management; decontamination and decommissioning. The second part of the bill would ensure an adequate supply of domestic uranium for defense and power production; provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry; and establish, facilitate, and expedite a comprehensive system for financing reclamation and remedial action at active uranium and thorium processing sites. The third part of the bill would remove the size limitations on power production facilities now part of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Solar, wind, waste, or geothermal power facilities would no longer have to be less than 80 MW to qualify as a small power production facility

  12. Improvement of uranium production efficiency to meet China's nuclear power requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.

    1997-01-01

    Recently China put the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, with an installed capacity of 300 MW, in the province of Zhejiang and the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant, with a total installed capacity of 2 x 900 MW, in commercial operation. China plans a rapid growth in nuclear power from 1995 to 2010. China's uranium production will therefore also enter a new period with nuclear power increasing. In order to meet the demand of nuclear power for uranium special attention has been paid to both technical progress improvement using management with the aim of reducing the cost of uranium production. The application of the trackless mining technique has enhanced the uranium mining productivity significantly. China has produced a radiometric sorter, model 5421-2 for pre-concentrating uranium run-of-mine ore. This effectively increases the uranium content in mill feed and decreases the operating cost of hydrometallurgical treatment. The in situ leach technique after blasting is applied underground in the Lantian Mine, in addition to the surface heap leaching, and has obtained a perfect result. The concentrated acid-curing, and ferric sulphate trickle leaching process, will soon be used in commercial operation for treating uranium ore grading -5 to -7 mm in size. The annual production capability of the Yining Mine will be extended to 100 tonnes U using improving in situ leaching technology. For the purpose of improving the uranium production efficiency much work has been done optimizing the distribution of production centres. China plans to expand its uranium production to meet the uranium requirements of the developing nuclear power plants. (author). 4 tabs

  13. Corrosion products in power generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, D.H.

    1980-06-01

    The important mechanisms of corrosion and corrosion product movement and fouling in the heat transport systems of thermal electric generating stations are reviewed. Oil- and coal-fired boilers are considered, along with nuclear power systems - both direct and indirect cycle. Thus, the fireside and waterside in conventional plants, and the primary coolant and steam-raising circuits in water-cooled reactors, are discussed. Corrosion products in organic- and liquid-metal-cooled reactors also are shown to cause problems if not controlled, while their beneficial effects on the cooling water side of condensers are described. (auth)

  14. Comparison of facility-level methane emission rates from natural gas production well pads in the Marcellus, Denver-Julesburg, and Uintah Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omara, M.; Li, X.; Sullivan, M.; Subramanian, R.; Robinson, A. L.; Presto, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The boom in shale natural gas (NG) production, brought about by advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, has yielded both economic benefits and concerns about environmental and climate impacts. In particular, leakages of methane from the NG supply chain could substantially increase the carbon footprint of NG, diminishing its potential role as a transition fuel between carbon intensive fossil fuels and renewable energy systems. Recent research has demonstrated significant variability in measured methane emission rates from NG production facilities within a given shale gas basin. This variability often reflect facility-specific differences in NG production capacity, facility age, utilization of emissions capture and control, and/or the level of facility inspection and maintenance. Across NG production basins, these differences in facility-level methane emission rates are likely amplified, especially if significant variability in NG composition and state emissions regulations are present. In this study, we measured methane emission rates from the NG production sector in the Marcellus Shale Basin (Pennsylvania and West Virginia), currently the largest NG production basin in the U.S., and contrast these results with those of the Denver-Julesburg (Colorado) and Uintah (Utah) shale basins. Facility-level methane emission rates were measured at 106 NG production facilities using the dual tracer flux (nitrous oxide and acetylene), Gaussian dispersion simulations, and the OTM 33A techniques. The distribution of facility-level average methane emission rate for each NG basin will be discussed, with emphasis on how variability in NG composition (i.e., ethane-to-methane ratios) and state emissions regulations impact measured methane leak rates. While the focus of this presentation will be on the comparison of methane leak rates among NG basins, the use of three complimentary top-down methane measurement techniques provides a unique opportunity to explore the

  15. Guidelines for Risk-Based Changeover of Biopharma Multi-Product Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Rob; Barabani, David; Bellorado, Kathy; Canisius, Peter; Heathcote, Doug; Johnson, Alan; Wyman, Ned; Parry, Derek Willison

    2018-01-01

    In multi-product biopharma facilities, the protection from product contamination due to the manufacture of multiple products simultaneously is paramount to assure product quality. To that end, the use of traditional changeover methods (elastomer change-out, full sampling, etc.) have been widely used within the industry and have been accepted by regulatory agencies. However, with the endorsement of Quality Risk Management (1), the use of risk-based approaches may be applied to assess and continuously improve established changeover processes. All processes, including changeover, can be improved with investment (money/resources), parallel activities, equipment design improvements, and standardization. However, processes can also be improved by eliminating waste. For product changeover, waste is any activity not needed for the new process or that does not provide added assurance of the quality of the subsequent product. The application of a risk-based approach to changeover aligns with the principles of Quality Risk Management. Through the use of risk assessments, the appropriate changeover controls can be identified and controlled to assure product quality is maintained. Likewise, the use of risk assessments and risk-based approaches may be used to improve operational efficiency, reduce waste, and permit concurrent manufacturing of products. © PDA, Inc. 2018.

  16. Experience in independent power production: Two projects that closed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappaz, M.H.

    1994-12-31

    K and M Engineering and Consulting Corporation`s experience in independent power production is outlined. The following topics are discussed: the KMR Power Corporation, K and M strengths and strategy, key success factors, project experience, selected projects, and capital structure.

  17. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  18. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  19. SUPER-CAPACITOR APPLICATION IN ELECTRICAL POWER CABLE TESTING FACILITIES IN THERMAL ENDURANCE AND MECHANICAL BRACING TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Oleksyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current-carrying cores of the electrical power cables should be resistant to effects of short-circuit currents whose values depend on the material of the core, its cross-sectional area, cable insulation properties, environment temperature, and the duration of the short-circuit current flow (1 and 3–4 sec. when tested for thermal endurance and mechanical bracing. The facilities for testing the 10 kV aluminum core cables with short-circuit current shall provide mechanical-bracing current 56,82 kA and thermal endurance current 11,16 kA. Although capacitors provide such values of the testing currents to the best advantage, utilizing conventional capacitor-units will involve large expenditures for erecting and  running a separate building. It is expedient to apply super-capacitors qua the electric power supply for testing facilities, as they are capacitors with double-electrical layer and involve the current values of tens of kilo-amperes.The insulation voltage during short-circuit current testing being not-standardized, it is not banned to apply voltages less than 10 kV when performing short-circuit thermal endurance and mechanical bracing tests for electrical power cables of 10 kV. The super-capacitor voltage variation-in-time graph consists of two regions: capacitive and resistive. The capacitive part corresponds to the voltage change consequent on the energy change in the super-capacitors. The resistive part shows the voltage variation due to the active resistance presence in the super-capacitor.The author offers the algorithm determining the number of super capacitors requisite for testing 10 kV-electrical power cables with short-circuit currents for thermal endurance and mechanical bracing. The paper shows that installation of super-capacitors in the facilities testing the cables with short-circuit currents reduces the area needed for the super-capacitors in comparison with conventional capacitors more than by one order of magnitude.

  20. Northwest Territories Power Corporation annual report 1991/92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The Northwest Territories Power Corporation is a crown corporation of the government of the Northwest Territories. The Corporation operates diesel and hydroelectric production facilities to provide utility services on a self-sustaining basis in the Northwest Territories. Total revenue for 1991/92 amounted to $92,872,000 with $84,954,000 coming from the sale of power. Financial statements are presented. 3 figs