WorldWideScience

Sample records for power plant critical-issue

  1. Field-Reversed Configuration Power Plant Critical-Issue Scoping Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarius, J. F.; Mogahed, E. A.; Emmert, G. A.; Khater, H. Y.; Nguyen, C. N.; Ryzhkov, S. V.; Stubna, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    A team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed an engineering scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis for deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core. For the engineering conceptual design of the fusion core, the project team focused on intermediate-term technology. For example, one decision was to use steele structure. The FRC systems analysis led to a fusion power plant with attractive features including modest size, cylindrical symmetry, good thermal efficiency (52%), relatively easy maintenance, and a high ratio of electric power to fusion core mass, indicating that it would have favorable economics

  2. Field-Reversed Configuration Power Plant Critical-Issue Scoping Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarius, J. F.; Mogahed, E. A.; Emmert, G. A.; Khater, H. Y.; Nguyen, C. N.; Ryzhkov, S. V.; Stubna, M. D.

    2000-03-31

    A team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed an engineering scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis for deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core. For the engineering conceptual design of the fusion core, the project team focused on intermediate-term technology. For example, one decision was to use steele structure. The FRC systems analysis led to a fusion power plant with attractive features including modest size, cylindrical symmetry, good thermal efficiency (52%), relatively easy maintenance, and a high ratio of electric power to fusion core mass, indicating that it would have favorable economics.

  3. Final report for the field-reversed configuration power plant critical-issue scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarius, John F.; Mogahed, Elsayed A.; Emmert, Gilbert A.; Khater, Hesham Y.; Nguyen, Canh N.; Ryzhkov, Sergei V.; Stubna, Michael D.; Steinhauer, Loren C.; Miley, George H.

    2001-03-01

    This report describes research in which a team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed a scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis of deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core.

  4. Some power uprate issues in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipping, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Issues and themes concerned with nuclear power plant uprating are examined. Attention is brought to the fact that many candidate nuclear power plants for uprating have anyway been operated below their rated power for a significant part of their operating life. The key issues remain safety and reliability in operation at all times, irrespective of the nuclear power plant's chronological or design age or power rating. The effects of power uprates are discussed in terms of material aspects and expected demands on the systems, structures and components. The impact on operation and maintenance methods is indicated in terms of changes to the ageing surveillance programmes. Attention is brought to the necessity checking or revising operator actions after power up-rating has been implemented

  5. The critical issue of nuclear power plant safety in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1977-01-01

    A little more than a decade from now, large commercial nuclear power facilities will be in operation in almost 40 countries, of which approximately one-half are presently considered industrially less developed. Ambitious nuclear programmes coupled with minimal and frequently under-staffed regulatory and utility organizations are only one aspect of the difficulties related to the safety of nuclear plants that face these developing countries. Inherent problems of meeting current safety standards and requirements for the significantly non-standard nuclear power plant exports can be compounded by financial considerations that may lead to purchases of reactors of various types, from more than one supplier country and with different safety standards and requirements. An examination of these issues points to the necessity and opportunity for effective action which could include provision for adequate funding for safety considerations in the purchase contract, and for sufficient regulatory assistance and training from the developed countries. The article will introduce the topic, discuss specific examples, and offer some suggestions. (author)

  6. Cyber security issues imposed on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Provide history of cyber attacks targeting at nuclear facilities. • Provide cyber security issues imposed on nuclear power plants. • Provide possible countermeasures for protecting nuclear power plants. - Abstract: With the introduction of new technology based on the increasing digitalization of control systems, the potential of cyber attacks has escalated into a serious threat for nuclear facilities, resulting in the advent of the Stuxnet. In this regard, the nuclear industry needs to consider several cyber security issues imposed on nuclear power plants, including regulatory guidelines and standards for cyber security, the possibility of Stuxnet-inherited malware attacks in the future, and countermeasures for protecting nuclear power plants against possible cyber attacks

  7. An Overview of Risk Quantification Issues for Digitalized Nuclear Power Plants using a Static Fault Tree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Gook; Kim, Man Cheol; Lee, Seung Jun; Lee, Ho Jung; Eom, Heung Seop; Chol, Jong Gyun; Jang, Seung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    Risk caused by safety-critical instrumentation and control (I and C) systems considerably affects overall plant risk. As digitalization of safety-critical systems in nuclear power plants progresses, a risk model of a digitalized safety system is required and must be included in a plant safety model in order to assess this risk effect on the plant. Unique features of a digital system cause some challenges in risk modeling. This article aims at providing an overview of the issues related to the development of a static fault-tree-based risk model. We categorize the complicated issues of digital system probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) into four groups based on their characteristics: hardware module issues, software issues, system issues, and safety function issues. Quantification of the effect of these issues dominates the quality of a developed risk model. Recent research activities for addressing various issues, such as the modeling framework of a software-based system, the software failure probability and the fault coverage of a self monitoring mechanism, are discussed. Although these issues are interrelated and affect each other, the categorized and systematic approach suggested here will provide a proper insight for analyzing risk from a digital system

  8. Minimum critical power ratio control device for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Tsuneo.

    1991-01-01

    Reactor core flowrate is determined by comparing a minimum critical power ratio calculated based on the status amount of a nuclear power plant and a control value for the minimum critical power ratio that depends on the reactor core flowrate. Further, the minimum critical power ratio and a control value for the minimum critical power ratio that depends on the reactor thermal power are compared to set a reactor thermal power converted to a reactor core flowrate. Deviation between the thus determined reactor core flowrate and the present reactor core flowrate is calculated. When the obtained deviation is lower than a rated value, a reactor core flowrate set signal is generated to a reactor flowrate control means, to control the reactor power by a recycling flowrate control system of the reactor. On the other hand, when the deviation exceeds the determined value, the reactor core flowrate set signal is converted into a reactor thermal power, to control the position of control rods and control the reactor power. Then, monitor and control can be conducted safely and automatically without depending on operator's individual ability over the entire operation range corresponding to load following operation. (N.H.)

  9. Critical issues for the early introduction of commercial fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Yoshida, Tomoaki

    1996-01-01

    Critical issues for the realization of commercial fusion reactor are discussed on the basis of a prediction of power source composition in the next century. The key issue is rather a relaxation in the construction site condition than a competitive cost in comparison with the nuclear fission power plant. It seems a logical conclusion that the competitor of the fusion plant in the cost will be a future CCT (Clean Coal Technology) and/or LNG plant loaded with a CO 2 recovery system. (author)

  10. Regulatory issues for nuclear power plant life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, J.

    2000-01-01

    The workshop of 26-27 june 2000, on nuclear power Plant LIfe Management (PLIM), also included working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for nuclear power plants were identified and discussed. The second group was on Regulation. The Regulatory Working Group will attempt to identify some of the more pertinent issues affecting nuclear plant regulation in a changing PLIM environment, to identify some possible actions to be taken to address these issues, and to identify some of the parties responsible for taking these actions. Some preliminary regulatory issues are noted below. This is not intended to be a comprehensive list of such issues but rather is intended to stimulate discussion among the experts attending this Workshop. One of the concerns in the regulatory arena is how the structural integrity of the plants can be assured for an extended lifetime. Technological advances directed toward the following are likely to be important factors in the regulatory process of life extension. - Preventive and corrective maintenance (e.g., water chemistry control, pressure vessel annealing, and replacement of core internals). - Ageing and degradation mechanisms and evaluation (e.g., embrittlement, wear, corrosion/erosion, fatigue, and stress corrosion). - Monitoring, surveillance, and inspection (e.g., fatigue monitoring and non-destructive testing). - Optimisation of maintenance (e.g., using risk-based analysis). On the business side, there is concern about technical support by manufacturers, fuel companies, and construction companies. Maintaining a strong technical base and skilled workers in a potentially declining environment is another concern in the regulatory community. Waste management and decommissioning remain significant issue regarding PLIM. These issues affect all three areas of concern - technology, business, and regulation. It is against this background, that the issues put forth in this paper are presented. The objective of presenting these

  11. Recommendations relating to safety-critical real-time software in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety (ACNS) has reviewed safety issues associated with the software for the digital computers in the safety shutdown systems for the Darlington NGS. From this review the ACNS has developed four recommendations for safety-critical real-time software in nuclear power plants. These recommendations cover: the completion of the present efforts to develop an overall standard and sub-tier standards for safety-critical real-time software; the preparation of schedules and lists of responsibilities for this development; the concentration of AECB efforts on ensuring the scrutability of safety-critical real-time software; and, the collection of data on reliability and causes of failure (error) of safety-critical real-time software systems and on the probability and causes of common-mode failures (errors). (9 refs.)

  12. Some issues related to the development of nuclear power plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panggabean, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Indonesia being a member of ASEAN belongs to the group of developing country. If Indonesia decides to embark on the establishment of nuclear power plan then the country will have no choice but to discuss the following issues: Safe operation of the plant and management of the nuclear waste. Safe operation of the power plant is important not only from the point of view of hazards to human being, or economic loss, or even death, but equally important it is also from the psychological point of view in that not to loose the society's confidence in the overall nuclear power plant programme in the future. The issue of safe operation involves both a safely designed system as well as skilled personnels to execute a well designed operation procedure. The issue of nuclear safety is getting more and more attention lately for various, some due to a deep concern about the quality of the inherent safety of the nuclear power plant to be built, others may just use their emotion to ask question like ''what its''. The issue of nuclear waste is as fundamental as the plant safety. Common people make very little difference between an atomic bomb and waste from a nuclear power plant. Another issue is one of transfer of technology which needs to be tied up with the overall industrialization process, meaning that embarking on nuclear power programme needs to contribute to local industrial activities, at least for some parts or components which can be manufactured locally. (author)

  13. Power plant cycle chemistry - a currently neglected power plant chemistry discipline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursik, A.

    2005-01-01

    Power plant cycle chemistry seems to be a stepchild at both utilities and universities and research organizations. It is felt that other power plant chemistry disciplines are more important. The last International Power Cycle Chemistry Conference in Prague may be cited as an example. A critical review of the papers presented at this conference seems to confirm the above-mentioned statements. This situation is very unsatisfactory and has led to an increasing number of component failures and instances of damage to major cycle components. Optimization of cycle chemistry in fossil power plants undoubtedly results in clear benefits and savings with respect to operating costs. It should be kept in mind that many seemingly important chemistry-related issues lose their importance during forced outages of units practicing faulty plant cycle chemistry. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear power plant alarm systems: Problems and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite the incorporation of advanced technology into nuclear power plant alarm systems, human factors problems remain. This paper identifies to be addressed in order to allow advanced technology to be used effectively in the design of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The operator's use and processing of alarm system information will be considered. Based upon a review of alarm system research, issues related to general system design, alarm processing, display and control are discussed. It is concluded that the design of effective alarm systems depends on an understanding of the information processing capabilities and limitations of the operator. 39 refs

  15. Nuclear power plant alarm systems: Problems and issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite the incorporation of advanced technology into nuclear power plant alarm systems, human factors problems remain. This paper identifies to be addressed in order to allow advanced technology to be used effectively in the design of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The operator's use and processing of alarm system information will be considered. Based upon a review of alarm system research, issues related to general system design, alarm processing, display and control are discussed. It is concluded that the design of effective alarm systems depends on an understanding of the information processing capabilities and limitations of the operator. 39 refs.

  16. High-power FEL design issues - a critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.; O`Shea, P.G. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The high-average power capability of FELs has been much advertised but little realized. In this paper we provide a critical analysis of the technological and economic issues associated with high-average power FEL operation from the UV to near IR. The project of IR FEL for the Siberian Center of photochemical researches is described. The distinguished features of this project are the use of the race-track microtron-recuperator and the {open_quotes}electron output of radiation{close_quotes}. The building for the machine is under reconstruction now. About half of hardware has been manufactured. The assembly of installation began.

  17. COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vine, Gary

    2010-01-01

    This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes 'Best Technology Available' for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plant's steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R and D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

  18. Actual issues concerning nuclear power plants and interconnected grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medjimorec, D.; Brkic, S.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear power plants and transmission grid have always been mutually of special relevance. In countries and/or regions where nuclear power plants are located they are almost as a rule counted among strongest nodes of the grid. Hence, they are treated as such from grid point of view in various aspects (operational, planning). In interconnected high-voltage transmission grid of European mainland, usually called UCTE interconnected system, this importance could be shown in a range of issues and several cases, particularly under present situation in which there are numerous demanding and challenging tasks put on transmission system operators, largely due to the opening of electricity markets in the most of European countries. Among these issues definitely worth of mentioning is relevant influence to both commercial paths and physical power flows, and also to exchange programmes between control areas and blocks. In this context there is also relation to cross-border transactions and mechanism applied to them. In respect to security of supply issues and future of nuclear power generation under present regulative framework of most European countries it is needed to comply with connecting conditions (and other stipulations) from national grid codes where different approaches could be observed. Furthermore, nuclear issues significantly influence approach to extension of UCTE system. In certain extent this also applies to pending re-connection of present two synchronous zones of UCTE, particularly to area of broader region directly affected with this complex process. Some of these also reflect to Croatian high-voltage transmission grid as a part of UCTE interconnected system with certain peculiarities.(author)

  19. Reactivation of nuclear power plant construction projects. Plant status, policy issues and regulatory options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangler, M.B.

    1986-07-01

    Prior to the TMI-2 accident on March 28, 1979, four nuclear power plant units that had previously been issued a construction permit were cancelled, principally because of reduced projections of regional power demand. Since that time, an additional 31 units with CPs have been cancelled and eight units deferred. On December 23, 1985 one of the deferred units (Limerick-2) was reactivated and construction resumed. The primary objective of this policy study is to identify the principal issues requiring office-level consideration in the event of reactivation of the construction of one or more of the nuclear power plants falling into two categories: (1) LWR units issued a construction permit whose construction has been cancelled, and (2) LWR units whose construction has been deferred. The study scope is limited to identifying regulatory issues or questions deserving analysis rather than providing, at this time, answers or recommended actions. Five tasks are addressed: a tabulation and discussion of the status of all cancelled and deferred LWR units; and identification of potential safety and environmental issues; an identification of regulatory or policy issues and needed information to determine the desirability of revising certain rules and policies; and identification of regulatory options and decision criteria; and an identification of decision considerations in determining staff requirements and organizational coordination of LWR reactivation policy and implementation efforts. 41 refs

  20. COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Vine

    2010-12-01

    This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes “Best Technology Available” for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plant’s steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

  1. Draft report on compilation of generic safety issues for light water reactor nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    A generally accepted approach to characterizing the safety concerns in nuclear power plants is to express them as safety issues which need to be resolved. When such safety issues are applicable to a generation of plants of a particular design or to a family of plants of similar design, they are termed generic safety issues. Examples of generic safety issues are those related to reactor vessel embrittlement, control rod insertion reliability or strainer clogging. The safety issues compiled in this document are based on broad international experience. This compilation is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. Refs.

  2. Draft report on compilation of generic safety issues for light water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    A generally accepted approach to characterizing the safety concerns in nuclear power plants is to express them as safety issues which need to be resolved. When such safety issues are applicable to a generation of plants of a particular design or to a family of plants of similar design, they are termed generic safety issues. Examples of generic safety issues are those related to reactor vessel embrittlement, control rod insertion reliability or strainer clogging. The safety issues compiled in this document are based on broad international experience. This compilation is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. Refs

  3. Generic safety issues for nuclear power plants with light water reactors and measures taken for their resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The IAEA Conference on 'The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future' in 1991 was a milestone in nuclear safety. Two of the important items addressed by this conference were ensuring and enhancing safety of operating plants and treatment of nuclear power plants built to earlier safety standards. A number of publications related to these two items issued subsequent to this conference were: A Common Basis for Judging the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants Built to Earlier Standards, INSAG-9 (1995), the IAEA Safety Guide 50-SG-O12, periodic Safety Review of Operational Nuclear Power Plants (1994) and an IAEA publication on the Safety Evaluation of Operating Nuclear Power Plants Built to Earlier Standards - A Common Basis for Judgement (1997). Some of the findings of the 1991 Conference have not yet been fully addressed. An IAEA Symposium on reviewing the Safety of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in 1996 showed that there is an urgent need for operating organizations and national authorities to review operating nuclear power plants which do not meet the high safety levels of the vast majority of plants and to undertake improvements with assistance from the international community if required. Safety reviews of operating nuclear power plants take on added importance in the context of the Convention on Nuclear safety and its implementation. The purpose of this TECDOC compilation based on broad international experience, is to assist the Member States in the reassessment of operating plants by providing a list of generic safety issues identified in nuclear power plants together with measures taken to resolve these issues. These safety issues are generic in nature with regard to light water reactors and the measures for their resolution are for use as a reference for the safety reassessment of operating plants. The TECDOC covers issues thought to be significant to Member States based on consensus process. It provides an introduction to the use of generic safety issues for

  4. Special issue on start of construction of the Ohma nuclear power plant of J-Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Taizo

    2008-01-01

    The Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. (J-Power) started construction of its Ohma nuclear power plant - a 1383 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) - in Aomori prefecture on May 2008. The reactor of the Ohma plant will be the first to load MOX fuels in all of its reactor cores. It will be able to consume a quarter of all the recycled MOX fuels produced at Rokkasho reprocessing plant and hence make a major contribution to Japan's policy of recycling plutonium recovered from spent fuels. Special issue reviewed history and overview of the Ohma plant as well as its significance to enhance power generation portfolio in corresponding with national interests. Local governor's expectations and present state of the Ohma plant were also described. After preparation works, construction began on excavation of foundation for the service building, proceeding as always with safety the foremost priority during construction. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Evaluation issues on real-time operating system in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. M.; Jeong, C. H.; Koh, J. S. [Regulatory Research Div., Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    In the recent few years, using the hard real-time operating system (RTOS) of safety-critical applications has gained increased acceptance in the nuclear safety system. Failure of this software could cause catastrophic consequences for human life. The digital I and C systems of nuclear power plants also have used hard RTOSs which are executing a required mission completely within its deadline. Because the nuclear power plants have to maintain a very high level of safety, the hard RTOS software should be reliable and safe. The RTOS used in safety-critical I and C systems is the base software used for the purpose of satisfying the real-time constraints, So, careful evaluation of its safety and functionality is very important, So far, the nuclear power plants of Korea have adopted commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) RTOS software. But, these days the RTOS embedded in safety grade PLC has been developed by KNICS project controlled by Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Energy of Korea. Whether COTS RTOS or newly developed RTOS, it must be evaluated its safety and reliability. (authors)

  6. Evaluation issues on real-time operating system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Jeong, C. H.; Koh, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    In the recent few years, using the hard real-time operating system (RTOS) of safety-critical applications has gained increased acceptance in the nuclear safety system. Failure of this software could cause catastrophic consequences for human life. The digital I and C systems of nuclear power plants also have used hard RTOSs which are executing a required mission completely within its deadline. Because the nuclear power plants have to maintain a very high level of safety, the hard RTOS software should be reliable and safe. The RTOS used in safety-critical I and C systems is the base software used for the purpose of satisfying the real-time constraints, So, careful evaluation of its safety and functionality is very important, So far, the nuclear power plants of Korea have adopted commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) RTOS software. But, these days the RTOS embedded in safety grade PLC has been developed by KNICS project controlled by Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Energy of Korea. Whether COTS RTOS or newly developed RTOS, it must be evaluated its safety and reliability. (authors)

  7. POWER-GEN '90 conference papers: Volume 7 (Fossil plant performance availability and improvement) and Volume 8 (Nuclear power issues)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This is book 4 of papers presented at the Third International Exhibition and Conference for the Power Generation Industries, December 4-6, 1990. This book contains Volume 7, Fossil Plant Performance Availability and Improvement, and Volume 8, Nuclear Power Issues. The topics of the papers include computer applications in plant operations and maintenance, managing aging plants, plant improvements, plant operations and maintenance, the future of nuclear power, achieving cost effective plant operation, managing nuclear plant aging and license renewal, and the factors affecting a decision to build a new nuclear plant

  8. Generic safety issues for nuclear power plants with pressurized heavy water reactors and measures for their resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    The IAEA Conference on The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future in 1991 was a milestone in nuclear safety. The objective of this conference was to review nuclear power safety issues for which achieving international consensus would be desirable, to address concerns on nuclear safety and to formulate recommendations for future actions by national and international authorities to advance nuclear safety to the highest level. Two of the important items addressed by this conference were ensuring and enhancing safety of operating plants and treatment of nuclear power plants built to earlier safety standards. Publications related to these two items, that have been issued subsequent to this conference, include: A Common Basis for Judging the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants Built to Earlier Standards, INSAG-8 (1995), the IAEA Safety Guide 50-SG-O12, Periodic Safety Review of Operational Nuclear Power Plants (1994) and an IAEA publication on the Safety Evaluation of Operating Nuclear Power Plants Built to Earlier Standards - A Common Basis for Judgement (1997). Some of the findings of the 1991 conference have not yet been fully addressed. An IAEA Symposium on Reviewing the Safety of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in 1996 showed that there is an urgent need for operating organizations and national authorities to review operating nuclear power plants which do not meet the high safety levels of the vast majority of plants and to undertake improvements, with assistance from the international community if required. Safety reviews of operating nuclear power plants take on added importance in the context of the Convention on Nuclear Safety and its implementation. To perform safety reviews and to reassess the safety of operating nuclear power plants in a uniform manner, it is imperative to have an internationally accepted reference. Existing guidance needs to be complemented by a list of safety issues which have been encountered and resolved in other plants and which can

  9. Regulatory issues on using programmable logic device in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, G. Y.; Yu, Y. J.; Kim, H. T.; Kwon, Y. I.; Park, H. S.; Jeong, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    For replacing obsolete analog equipment in nuclear power plant, the Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) using Hardware Description Language (HDL) have been widely adopted in digitalized Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems because of its flexibility. For safety reviews on Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs,) qualifying digitalized safety I and C system using PLDs is an important issue. As an effort to provide regulatory position on using PLDs in safety I and C system, there is a research project to provide the regulatory positions against emerging issues involved with digitalisation of I and C system including using PLDs. Therefore, this paper addresses the important considerations for using PLDs in safety I and C systems such as diversity, independence and qualification, etc. In this point, this study focuses on technical reports for Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) from EPRI,. U.S. NRC, and relevant technical standards

  10. Regulatory issues on using programmable logic device in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, G. Y.; Yu, Y. J.; Kim, H. T.; Kwon, Y. I.; Park, H. S.; Jeong, C. H. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    For replacing obsolete analog equipment in nuclear power plant, the Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) using Hardware Description Language (HDL) have been widely adopted in digitalized Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems because of its flexibility. For safety reviews on Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs,) qualifying digitalized safety I and C system using PLDs is an important issue. As an effort to provide regulatory position on using PLDs in safety I and C system, there is a research project to provide the regulatory positions against emerging issues involved with digitalisation of I and C system including using PLDs. Therefore, this paper addresses the important considerations for using PLDs in safety I and C systems such as diversity, independence and qualification, etc. In this point, this study focuses on technical reports for Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) from EPRI,. U.S. NRC, and relevant technical standards.

  11. Control system security in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianghai; Huang Xiaojin

    2012-01-01

    The digitalization and networking of control systems in nuclear power plants has brought significant improvements in system control, operation and maintenance. However, the highly digitalized control system also introduces additional security vulnerabilities. Moreover, the replacement of conventional proprietary systems with common protocols, software and devices makes these vulnerabilities easy to be exploited. Through the interaction between control systems and the physical world, security issues in control systems impose high risks on health, safety and environment. These security issues may even cause damages of critical infrastructures and threaten national security. The importance of control system security by reviewing several control system security incidents that happened in nuclear power plants was showed in recent years. Several key difficulties in addressing these security issues were described. Finally, existing researches on control system security and propose several promising research directions were reviewed. (authors)

  12. Overview of nuclear power plant equipment qualification issues and practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torr, K.G.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents a view of and commentary on the current status of equipment qualification (EQ) in nuclear industries of the major western nations. The introductory chapters discuss the concepts of EQ, the elements of EQ process and highlight some of the key issues in EQ. A brief review of industry practices and some of the prevalent industrial standards is presented, followed by an overview of current regulatory positions in the USA, France, Germany and Sweden. A summary and commentary on the latest research findings on issues relating to accident simulation, to aging simulation and some special topics related to EQ, has been contributed by Franklin Research Centre of Philadelphia. The last part of the report deals with equipment qualification in Canada and gives recommendations on EQ for new plants as well as currently operational CANDU nuclear power plants

  13. Plant Production Systems for Microgravity: Critical Issues in Water, Air, and Solute Transport Through Unsaturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan L. (Editor); Ming, Doug W. (Editor); Henninger, Don (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Technical Memorandum is a compilation of presentations and discussions in the form of minutes from a workshop entitled 'Plant Production Systems for Microgravity: Critical Issues in Water, Air, and Solute Transport Through Unsaturated Porous Media' held at NASA's Johnson Space Center, July 24-25, 2000. This workshop arose from the growing belief within NASA's Advanced Life Support Program that further advances and improvements in plant production systems for microgravity would benefit from additional knowledge of fundamental processes occurring in the root zone. The objective of the workshop was to bring together individuals who had expertise in various areas of fluid physics, soil physics, plant physiology, hardware development, and flight tests to identify, discuss, and prioritize critical issues of water and air flow through porous media in microgravity. Participants of the workshop included representatives from private companies involved in flight hardware development and scientists from universities and NASA Centers with expertise in plant flight tests, plant physiology, fluid physics, and soil physics.

  14. Identification of environmental issues: Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California: First phase report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-14

    The development of a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California, has been proposed. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize goethermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power. This report identifies environmental issues and constraints which may impact the proposed hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. (ACR)

  15. Diagnosis and on-line displacement monitoring for critical pipe of fossil power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, J. S.; Hyun, J. S. [Korea Electric Power Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Heo, J. R.; Lee, S. K.; Cho, S. Y. [Korea South-East Power Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    High temperature steam pipes of fossil power plant are subject to a severe thermal range and usually operates well into the creep range. Cyclic operation of the plant subjects the piping system to mechanical and thermal fatigue mechanisms and poor or malfunctional support assemblies can impose massive loads or stress onto the piping system. In order to prevent the serious damage and failure of the critical pipe system, various inspection methods such as visual inspection, computational analysis and on-line piping displacement monitoring were developed. 3-Dimensional piping displacement monitoring system was developed with using he aluminum alloy rod and rotary encoder type sensors, this system was installed and operated on the 'Y' fossil power plant successfully. It is expected that this study will contribute to the safety of piping system, which could minimize stress and extend the actual life of critical piping.

  16. Staffing decision processes and issues: Case studies of seven US Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.; Roussel, A.; Baker, K.; Durbin, N.; Hunt, P.; Hauth, J.; Forslund, C.; Terrill, E.; Gore, B.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this report is to identify how decisions are made regarding staffing levels and positions for a sample of U.S. nuclear power plants. In this report, a framework is provided for understanding the major forces driving staffing and the implications of staffing decisions for plant safety. The focus of this report is on driving forces that have led to changes in staffing levels and to the establishment of new positions between the mid-1980s and the early 1990s. Processes used at utilities and nuclear power plants to make and implement these staffing decisions are also discussed in the report. While general trends affecting the plant as a whole are presented, the major emphasis of this report is on staffing changes and practices in the operations department, including the operations shift crew. The findings in this report are based on interviews conducted at seven nuclear power plants and their parent utilities. A discussion of the key findings is followed by a summary of the implications of staffing issues for plant safety

  17. Technology Issues and Benefits of a Fast Ignition Power Plant with Cone Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W J; Meier, W R

    2003-01-01

    The use of cone focus, fast ignition targets, either for direct or indirect drive, promises to lower the required driver size and relax the symmetry requirements in IFE power plants. It may also allow use of chamber concepts previously thought infeasible with a laser driver. These benefits will lower the COE and make IFE plants more competitive at smaller size. Their use also raises unique issues that will impact the design and development of power plant subsystems. Cone targets have a significant mass of high Z material whether or not they have a hohlraum and they are not spherically symmetric. This has implications for target injection, tracking and chamber background gas allowable

  18. A multi-criteria decision making system for damage assessment of critical components in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, A.; Auerkari, P.; Brear, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-criteria decision making tool for engineering applications has been developed in the European project BE5935. The tool has been developed and applied in the area of power plants, primarily for the decisions regarding the inspection and maintenance planning in the area of power plants. Practical application of the methodology and of the software is shown here for the damage assessment of critical components. (authors)

  19. Nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaziz Yunus

    1986-01-01

    A number of issues have to be taken into account before the introduction of any nuclear power plant in any country. These issues include reactor safety (site and operational), waste disposal and, lastly, the decommissioning of the reactor inself. Because of the radioactive nature of the components, nuclear power plants require a different approach to decommission compared to other plants. Until recently, issues on reactor safety and waste disposal were the main topics discussed. As for reactor decommissioning, the debates have been academic until now. Although reactors have operated for 25 years, decommissioning of retired reactors has simply not been fully planned. But the Shippingport Atomic Power Plant in Pennysylvania, the first large scale power reactor to be retired, is now being decommissioned. The work has rekindled the debate in the light of reality. Outside the United States, decommissioning is also being confronted on a new plane. (author)

  20. Resolution of Generic Safety Issue 29: Bolting degradation or failure in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.E.

    1990-06-01

    This report describes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Generic Safety Issue 29, ''Bolting Degradation or Failure in Nuclear Power Plants,'' including the bases for establishing the issue and its historical highlights. The report also describes the activities of the Atomic Industrial Forum (AIF) relevant to this issue, including its cooperation with the Materials Properties Council (MPC) to organize a task group to help resolve the issue. The Electric Power Research Institute, supported by the AIF/MPC task group, prepared and issued a two-volume document that provides, in part, the technical basis for resolving Generic Safety Issue 29. This report presents the NRC's review and evaluation of the two-volume document and NRC's conclusion that this document, in conjunction with other information from both industry and NRC, provides the bases for resolving this issue

  1. Technology of Inspection and Real-time Displacement Monitoring on Critical Pipe for Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Jung Seob; Heo, Jae Sil [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sun Young [KLES, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Jeong Yeol; Lee, Seong Kee [Korea South-East Power Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    High temperature steam pipes of thermal power plant are subject to a severe thermal range and usually operates well into the creep range. Cyclic operation of the plant subjects the piping system to mechanical and thermal fatigue damages. Also, poor or malfunctional supports can impose massive loads or stress onto the piping system. In order to prevent the serious damage and failure of the critical piping system, various inspection methods such as visual inspection, computational analysis and on-line piping displacement monitoring were developed. 3-dimensional piping displacement monitoring system was developed with using the aluminum alloy rod and rotary encoder sensors, this system was installed and operated on the high temperature steam piping of 'Y' thermal power plant successfully. It is expected that this study will contribute to the safety of piping system, which could minimize stress and extend the actual life of critical piping.

  2. Thermal Power Plant Performance Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the reliability and availability of power plants is frequently based on simple indexes that do not take into account the criticality of some failures used for availability analysis. This criticality should be evaluated based on concepts of reliability which consider the effect of a component failure on the performance of the entire plant. System reliability analysis tools provide a root-cause analysis leading to the improvement of the plant maintenance plan.   Taking in view that the power plant performance can be evaluated not only based on  thermodynamic related indexes, such as heat-rate, Thermal Power Plant Performance Analysis focuses on the presentation of reliability-based tools used to define performance of complex systems and introduces the basic concepts of reliability, maintainability and risk analysis aiming at their application as tools for power plant performance improvement, including: ·         selection of critical equipment and components, ·         defini...

  3. Design issues concerning Iran's Bushehr nuclear power plant VVER-1000 conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    On January 8, 1995, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) signed a contract for $800 million with the Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (Minatom) to complete Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP) unit 1. The agreement called for a Russian VVER-1000/320 pressurized water reactor (PWR) to be successfully installed into the existing German-built BNPP facilities in 5 yr. System design differences, bomb damage, and environmental exposure are key issues with which Minatom must contend in order to fulfill the contract. The AEOI under the Shah of Iran envisioned Bushehr as the first of many nuclear power plants, with Iran achieving 24 GW(electric) by 1993 and 34 GW(electric) by 2000. Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) began construction of the two-unit plant near the Persian Gulf town of Halileh in 1975. Unit 1 was ∼80% complete and unit 2 was ∼50% complete when construction was interrupted by the 1979 Iranian Islamic revolution. Despite repeated AEOI attempts to lure KWU and other companies back to Iran to complete the plant, Western concerns about nuclear proliferation in Iran and repeated bombings of the plant during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war dissuaded Germany from resuming construction

  4. Nuclear power plants in post-war thought

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    This paper overviews how nuclear power plants have been talked about in the post-war thought. Science and technology sometimes significantly change the thinking way of humans, and nuclear power generation is an extreme technology. This paper overviews how nuclear power plants and humans are correlated. The following three points are discussed as the major issues of contemporary thought over nuclear power plants. First, on the danger of nuclear power plants, the risk of destructive power that nuclear energy has, and the danger of unreasoning development in science and technology civilization are discussed. Second, on the ethics issues surrounding nuclear power plants, the ethics that are based on unbalanced power relations, and democratic responsibility ethics based on discussion ethics are discussed. Third, on the issues of nuclear power plants and imagination, the limitations of democratic discussion surrounding nuclear power plants, the formation of imagination commensurate with the destructive power of nuclear power plants, and the formation of imagination that can represent the distant future are discussed. (A.O.)

  5. Liquid lithium loop system to solve challenging technology issues for fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, M.; Majeski, R.; Jaworski, M. A.; Hirooka, Y.; Kaita, R.; Gray, T. K.; Maingi, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Christenson, M.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2017-11-01

    Steady-state fusion power plant designs present major divertor technology challenges, including high divertor heat flux both in steady-state and during transients. In addition to these concerns, there are the unresolved technology issues of long term dust accumulation and associated tritium inventory and safety issues. It has been suggested that radiation-based liquid lithium (LL) divertor concepts with a modest lithium-loop could provide a possible solution for these outstanding fusion reactor technology issues, while potentially improving reactor plasma performance. The application of lithium (Li) in NSTX resulted in improved H-mode confinement, H-mode power threshold reduction, and reduction in the divertor peak heat flux while maintaining essentially Li-free core plasma operation even during H-modes. These promising results in NSTX and related modeling calculations motivated the radiative liquid lithium divertor concept and its variant, the active liquid lithium divertor concept, taking advantage of the enhanced or non-coronal Li radiation in relatively poorly confined divertor plasmas. To maintain the LL purity in a 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant, a closed LL loop system with a modest circulating capacity of ~1 l s-1 is envisioned. We examined two key technology issues: (1) dust or solid particle removal and (2) real time recovery of tritium from LL while keeping the tritium inventory level to an acceptable level. By running the LL-loop continuously, it can carry the dust particles and impurities generated in the vacuum vessel to the outside where the dust/impurities can be removed by relatively simple dust filter, cold trap and/or centrifugal separation systems. With ~1 l s-1 LL flow, even a small 0.1% dust content by weight (or 0.5 g s-1) suggests that the LL-loop could carry away nearly 16 tons of dust per year. In a 1 GW-electric (or ~3 GW fusion power) fusion power plant, about 0.5 g s-1 of tritium is needed to maintain the fusion fuel cycle

  6. Critical Power Response to Power Oscillations in Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farawila, Yousef M.; Pruitt, Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    The response of the critical power ratio to boiling water reactor (BWR) power oscillations is essential to the methods and practice of mitigating the effects of unstable density waves. Previous methods for calculating generic critical power response utilized direct time-domain simulations of unstable reactors. In this paper, advances in understanding the nature of the BWR oscillations and critical power phenomena are combined to develop a new method for calculating the critical power response. As the constraint of the reactor state - being at or slightly beyond the instability threshold - is removed, the new method allows the calculation of sensitivities to different operation and design parameters separately, and thus allows tighter safety margins to be used. The sensitivity to flow rate and the resulting oscillation frequency change are given special attention to evaluate the extension of the oscillation 'detect-and-suppress' methods to internal pump plants where the flow rate at natural circulation and oscillation frequency are much lower than jet pump plants

  7. Nuclear and energy. Special issue on the Fukushima power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This issue analyses the first consequences of the Fukushima accident at the world level, i.e. impacts which are either already noticeable or predictable. A first article proposes a portrait of Japan (its historical relationship with nature, the cultural education, the role of its bureaucracy, the Japanese business and political worlds) and evokes the nuclear safety organization at the institutional level. It also evokes the different companies involved in nuclear energy production. The second article discusses and comments the environmental and radiological impact of the accident (protection of the inhabitants, environment monitoring, comparison with Chernobyl, main steps of degradation of the reactors, releases in the sea, total release assessment, soil contamination, food contamination, radiation protection). A third article discusses the international impact, notably for the existing or projected power plants in different countries, in terms of public opinion, and with respect to negotiations on climate. The fourth article discusses the reactions of different countries possessing nuclear reactors. The last article questions the replacement of the lost production (that of Fukushima and maybe another power plant) by renewable energies

  8. Storage of plutonium and nuclear power plant actinide waste in the form of critical-mass-free ceramics containing neutron poisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadykto, B.A. [RFNC-VNIIEF, Nizhni Novgorod Region (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The nuclear weapons production has resulted in accumulation of a large quantity of plutonium and uranium highly enriched with uranium-235 isotope (many tons). The work under ISTC Project 332B-97 treated the issues of safe plutonium storage through making critical-mass-free plutonium oxide compositions with neutron poisons. This completely excludes immediate utilization (without chemical reprocessing) of retained plutonium in nuclear devices. It is therewith possible to locate plutonium most compactly in the storage facility, which would allow reduction in required storage areas and costs. The issues of the surplus weapon-grade plutonium management and utilization have been comprehensively studied in the recent decade. The issues are treated in multiple scientific publications, conferences, and seminars. At the same time, issues of nuclear power engineering actinide waste storage are studied no less extensively. The general issues are material radioactivity and energy release and nuclear accident hazards due to critical mass generation. Plutonium accumulated in nuclear power plant spent fuel is more accessible than weapon-grade plutonium and can become of higher and higher interest with time as its activity reduces, including as material for nuclear devices. The urgency of plutonium management is presently related not only to accumulation of surplus weapon-grade plutonium, but also to the fact that it is high time to decide what has to be done regarding reactor plutonium. Presently, the possibility of actinide separation from NPP spent nuclear fuel and compact underground burial separately from other (mainly fragment) activity is being considered. Actinide and neutron poison base critical-mass-free ceramic materials (similar to plutonium ceramics) may be useful for this burial method. (author)

  9. Storage of plutonium and nuclear power plant actinide waste in the form of critical-mass-free ceramics containing neutron poisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadykto, B.A.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear weapons production has resulted in accumulation of a large quantity of plutonium and uranium highly enriched with uranium-235 isotope (many tons). The work under ISTC Project 332B-97 treated the issues of safe plutonium storage through making critical-mass-free plutonium oxide compositions with neutron poisons. This completely excludes immediate utilization (without chemical reprocessing) of retained plutonium in nuclear devices. It is therewith possible to locate plutonium most compactly in the storage facility, which would allow reduction in required storage areas and costs. The issues of the surplus weapon-grade plutonium management and utilization have been comprehensively studied in the recent decade. The issues are treated in multiple scientific publications, conferences, and seminars. At the same time, issues of nuclear power engineering actinide waste storage are studied no less extensively. The general issues are material radioactivity and energy release and nuclear accident hazards due to critical mass generation. Plutonium accumulated in nuclear power plant spent fuel is more accessible than weapon-grade plutonium and can become of higher and higher interest with time as its activity reduces, including as material for nuclear devices. The urgency of plutonium management is presently related not only to accumulation of surplus weapon-grade plutonium, but also to the fact that it is high time to decide what has to be done regarding reactor plutonium. Presently, the possibility of actinide separation from NPP spent nuclear fuel and compact underground burial separately from other (mainly fragment) activity is being considered. Actinide and neutron poison base critical-mass-free ceramic materials (similar to plutonium ceramics) may be useful for this burial method. (author)

  10. Plant critical concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Regan, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the effort summarized in this paper is to support O and M cost reduction efforts by focusing resources on components and processes critical to plant performance. This effort will identify where resources on nonplant critical components and processes can be reduced or eliminated. This method will use a functional assessment as the basis for component-specific evaluations and ranking. This effort consists of two stages conducted in series. The first stage is to deterministically identify that set of plant components that are relevant from a plant performance perspective (i.e., safety, economics, reliability). The second stage probabilistically ranks that set of plant components from an importance perspective, where importance pertains to the particular application and is probabilistically weighted. The results of a pilot study identified that only a relatively small set of components are truly critical from an integrated plant performance perspective. These results are consistent with work being conducted at other nuclear power plants, as well as other commercial facilities. Initial implementation of this effort is estimated to reduce O and M costs on the order of $1 million per year. Subsequent applications are anticipated to increase that savings to $4--$5 million per year

  11. Critical channel power calculation for nominal operation in the CNE (Embalse nuclear power plant): sensitivity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.E.; Parkansky, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    In the Embalse nuclear power plant (CNE), the Regional Overpower Protection System acting on the Shutdown Systems number 1 and number 2 protects the reactor against overpowers in the reactor field for a localized peaking or a power increase in the reactor as a whole. This report summarizes the results of the critical channel power calculation for the time average powers configuration for the 380 reactor field channels. The final purpose of this work is to analyze and eventually modify the detector set points. Other reactor configurations are being analyzed. The report also presents a sensitivity analysis in order to evaluate potential sources of error and uncertainties which could affect the ROP performance. (author)

  12. Nuclear power plants maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plants maintenance now appears as an important factor contributing to the competitivity of nuclea energy. The articles published in this issue describe the way maintenance has been organized in France and how it led to an actual industrial activity developing and providing products and services. An information note about Georges Besse uranium enrichment plant (Eurodif) recalls that maintenance has become a main data not only for power plants but for all nuclear industry installations. (The second part of this dossier will be published in the next issue: vol. 1 January-February 1989) [fr

  13. Power plants and safety 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The papers of this volume deal with the whole range of safety issues from planning and construction to the operation of power plants, and discuss also issues like availability and safety of power plants, protective clothes and their incommodating effect, alternatives for rendering hot-water generators safe and the safety philosophy in steam turbine engineering. (HAG) [de

  14. A Study on Evaluation Issues of Real-Time Operating System in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Jeong, C. H.; Koh, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    Control applications such as aircraft, robotics and nuclear power plant have to maintain a very high level of safety, typically defined as the avoidance of unplanned events resulting in hazard. These applications usually operate with hard real-time operating system (RTOS). In this case, hard RTOS software should be reliable and safe. RTOS used in safety-critical I and C system is the base software for the purpose of satisfying the real-time constraints. So, careful evaluation of its safety and functionality is very important. In this paper, we present the case study for RTOSs used in real nuclear power plants (NPP), and suggest the evaluation approach for the RTOS

  15. A Study on Evaluation Issues of Real-Time Operating System in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. M.; Jeong, C. H.; Koh, J. S. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Control applications such as aircraft, robotics and nuclear power plant have to maintain a very high level of safety, typically defined as the avoidance of unplanned events resulting in hazard. These applications usually operate with hard real-time operating system (RTOS). In this case, hard RTOS software should be reliable and safe. RTOS used in safety-critical I and C system is the base software for the purpose of satisfying the real-time constraints. So, careful evaluation of its safety and functionality is very important. In this paper, we present the case study for RTOSs used in real nuclear power plants (NPP), and suggest the evaluation approach for the RTOS.

  16. Guidelines for Electromagnetic Interference Testing of Power Plant Equipment: Revision 3 to TR-102323

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.; Shank, J.

    2004-01-01

    To continue meeting safety and reliability requirements while controlling costs, operators of nuclear power plants must be able to replace and upgrade equipment in a cost-effective manner. One issue that has been problematic for new plant equipment and especially for digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in recent years is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). The EMC issue usually involves testing to show that critical equipment will not be adversely affected by electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the plant environment. This guide will help nuclear plant engineers address EMC issues and qualification testing in a consistent, comprehensive manner

  17. Guidelines for Electromagnetic Interference Testing of Power Plant Equipment: Revision 3 to TR-102323

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Cunningham and J. Shank

    2004-11-01

    To continue meeting safety and reliability requirements while controlling costs, operators of nuclear power plants must be able to replace and upgrade equipment in a cost-effective manner. One issue that has been problematic for new plant equipment and especially for digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in recent years is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). The EMC issue usually involves testing to show that critical equipment will not be adversely affected by electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the plant environment. This guide will help nuclear plant engineers address EMC issues and qualification testing in a consistent, comprehensive manner.

  18. State-of-art report on digital I and C system reliability issues for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, In Koo; Lee, Dong Gyoung; Cha, Kyung Ho; Kwon, Kee Choon; Wood, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    As the instrumentation and control (Iand C) equipment suppliers tend to provide digital components rather than conventional analog type components for instrument and control systems of nuclear power plants(NPPs), it is unavoidable to adopt digital equipment for safety I and C systems as well as non-safety systems. However, the full introduction of digital equipment to I and C systems of nuclear power plants raises several concerns which have not been considered for conventional analog I and C systems. The two major examples of the issues of digital systems are electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and software reliability. KAERI invited a technical expert, Dr. Richard T. Wood, from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Unites States and held seminars to recognize the state-of-art of the above issues and to share the information on techniques dealing with the problems. Dr. Wood has been working on the development of EMC guidelines and technical basis in using digital equipment for safety systems in nuclear power plants on the sponsorship of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Being based on his statements and discussions during his visit, this report describes technical considerations and issues on digital safety I and C system application in NPPs, EMC methods, environmental effects vulnerable to digital components, reliability assurance methods, etc. (author)

  19. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, a program has been established whereby an annual NUREG report will be published on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirement areas. This report, the second volume of a three-volume series, addresses the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs) at licensed plants. The data contained in these NUREG reports are a product of the NRC's Safety Issues Management System (SIMS) database, which is maintained by the Project Management Staff in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and by NRC regional personnel. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of the status of implementation and verification of the 27 safety issues designated as USIs and to make this information available to other interested parties, including the public. A corollary purpose of this NUREG report is to serve as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues up until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Investigation toward laser driven IFE power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, S.; Kozaki, Y.; Izawa, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) is becoming feasible due to the increasing understanding of implosion physics. Reactor technology issues have begun to be developed. Based on the conceptual design of Laser Driven IFE Power Plant, the technical and physical issues have been examined. R and D on key issues that affect the feasibility of power plant have been proceeded taking into account the collaboration in the field of laser driver, fuel pellet, reaction chamber and system design. It is concluded that the technical feasibility of IFE power plant seems to be reasonably high. Coordination and collaboration scheme of reactor technology experts in Japan on Laser Driven IFE Power Plant is being proceeded. (author)

  1. High level issues in reliability quantification of safety-critical software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Cheol

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a consensus method for the reliability assessment of safety-critical digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants, several high level issues in reliability assessment of the safety-critical software based on Bayesian belief network modeling and statistical testing are discussed. Related to the Bayesian belief network modeling, the relation between the assessment approach and the sources of evidence, the relation between qualitative evidence and quantitative evidence, how to consider qualitative evidence, and the cause-consequence relation are discussed. Related to the statistical testing, the need of the consideration of context-specific software failure probabilities and the inability to perform a huge number of tests in the real world are discussed. The discussions in this paper are expected to provide a common basis for future discussions on the reliability assessment of safety-critical software. (author)

  2. Selected review of regulatory standards and licensing issues for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.; Thomas, F.A.

    1982-11-01

    This report presents a compilation and description of current foreign regulatory standards and licensing issues in the areas of interest associated with Siting, Structural Engineering, Metallurgy and Materials, and Mechanical Engineering. In addition, summary comparisons of the requirements of both the US and foreign nuclear power plant regulatory standards are provided. The selected foreign countries surveyed include Canada, France, Japan, Sweden, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the Federal Republic of Germany

  3. Application of a methodology to determine priorities for nuclear power plant safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daling, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) is sponsoring a research program to determine priorities of nuclear power plant safety issues. A methodology has been developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in the development of risk and cost estimates for implementing resolutions to the safety issues. The information development methods are intended to provide the NRC with a consistent level of information for use in ranking the issues. The NRC uses this information, along with judgmental factors, to rank the issues for further consideration by the NRC staff. The primary purpose of the priority rankings are to assist in the allocation of resources to issues that have high potential for reducing public risk as well as to remove issues from further consideration that have little safety significance

  4. Development of a web-based fatigue life evaluation system for primary components in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hyong Won; Lee, Sang Min; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Sung Nam; Jang, Ki Sang; Hong, Sung Yull

    2004-01-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of a number of primary components. Maintaining the integrity of these components is one of the most critical issues in nuclear industry. In order to maintain the integrity of these primary components, a complicated procedure is required including regular in-service inspection, failure assessment, fracture mechanics analysis, etc. Also, experts in different fields have to co-operate to resolve the integrity issues on the basis of inspection results. This integrity evaluation process usually takes long, and thus, is detrimental for the plant productivity. Therefore, an effective safety evaluation system is essential to manage the integrity issues on a nuclear power plant. In this paper, a web-based fatigue life evaluation system for primary components in nuclear power plant is proposed. This system provides engineering knowledge-based information and concurrent and collaborative working environment through internet, and thus, is expected to raise the efficiency of integrity evaluation procedures on primary components of a nuclear power plant

  5. Regional Issue Identification and Assessment Program (RIIA). A methodology for analyzing the short-term air quality impacts of new power plants: issue paper 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1979-07-01

    A simplified methodology is presented, based on Gaussian plume relationships, which could be used to assess regulatory constraints and vegetation damage for new power plants. Data input requirements include: (a) power plant size (MW), (b) fuel type, sulfur content, and level of control, and (c) nearby terrain elevation difference, with respect to stack base, for critical receptors. Based on sample calculations the 24-hour PSD increment is seen to be the most restrictive, using the ASME dispersion coefficients. An 800-MW plant (which is close to the optimum size from cost and reliability considerations according to a recent analysis), could be forced to reduce emissions below the levels assumed in this paper if adverse conditions were encountered. For example, terrain features higher than about 300 m at the critical distance from the plant could be restrictive, as could sufficiently persistent winds that would confine 24-hour plume spreading to <10/sup 0/.

  6. A study on methodologies for assessing safety critical network's risk impact on Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, T. J.; Lee, H. J.; Park, S. K.; Seo, S. J.

    2006-08-01

    The objectives of this project is to investigate and study existing reliability analysis techniques for communication networks in order to develop reliability analysis models for Nuclear Power Plant's safety-critical networks. It is necessary to make a comprehensive survey of current methodologies for communication network reliability. Major outputs of the first year study are design characteristics of safety-critical communication networks, efficient algorithms for quantifying reliability of communication networks, and preliminary models for assessing reliability of safety-critical communication networks

  7. Nuclear power plant safety related pump issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaccino, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper summarizes of a number of pump issues raised since the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing in 1994. General issues discussed include revision of NRC Inspection Procedure 73756, issuance of NRC Information Notice 95-08 on ultrasonic flow meter uncertainties, relief requests for tests that are determined by the licensee to be impractical, and items in the ASME OM-1995 Code, Subsection ISTB, for pumps. The paper also discusses current pump vibration issues encountered in relief requests and plant inspections - which include smooth running pumps, absolute vibration limits, and vertical centrifugal pump vibration measurement requirements. Two pump scope issues involving boiling water reactor waterlog and reactor core isolation cooling pumps are also discussed. Where appropriate, NRC guidance is discussed.

  8. Nuclear power plant safety related pump issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colaccino, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes of a number of pump issues raised since the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing in 1994. General issues discussed include revision of NRC Inspection Procedure 73756, issuance of NRC Information Notice 95-08 on ultrasonic flow meter uncertainties, relief requests for tests that are determined by the licensee to be impractical, and items in the ASME OM-1995 Code, Subsection ISTB, for pumps. The paper also discusses current pump vibration issues encountered in relief requests and plant inspections - which include smooth running pumps, absolute vibration limits, and vertical centrifugal pump vibration measurement requirements. Two pump scope issues involving boiling water reactor waterlog and reactor core isolation cooling pumps are also discussed. Where appropriate, NRC guidance is discussed

  9. I and C upgrading at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiri, A.

    2003-01-01

    Continuing the operation of existing nuclear power plants will help reduce the number of new base-load nuclear and fossil power plants that need to be built. Old nuclear power plants in Canada are operating with analog instrumentation and control systems. For a number of reasons, such as changes and improvements in the applicable standards and design, maintenance problems due to the lack of spares, technical obsolescence, the need to increase power production, availability, reliability and safety, and in order to reduce operation and maintenance costs, instrumentation and control upgrading at nuclear power plants in a cost effective manner should be considered the greatest priority. Failures of instrumentation and control (I and C) due to aging and obsolescence issues may have an immediate negative impact on plant reliability and availability and also affect long-term plant performance and safety. In today's competitive marketplace, power plants are under pressure to cut spending on maintenance while reducing the risk of equipment failure that could cause unplanned outage. To improve plant safety and availability, old nuclear power plants will require investment in new technologies that can improve the performance and reduce the costs of generation by addressing the long term reliability of systems by up-grading to modem digital instrumentation and control and optimization opportunities. Boiler drum level control at nuclear power plants is critical for both plant protection and equipment safety and applies equality to high and low levels of water within the boiler drum. Plant outage studies at Pickering Nuclear have identified boiler drum level control and feed water control systems as major contributors to plant unavailability. Ways to improve transient and steady state response, upgrading existing poor analog control systems for boiler level and feed-water control systems at Pickering Nuclear, with enhanced and robust controller will be discussed in this paper

  10. Safety culture and organisational issues specific to the transitional phase from operation to decommissioning of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeliene, D.

    2005-01-01

    The PHARE project Support to State Nuclear Power Safety Inspectorate for safety culture and organisational issues specific to the pre-shutdown phase of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant was aimed at providing assistance to VATESI in their task to oversee that the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant's management and staff are able to provide an acceptable level of reactor safety taking into account possible safety culture related problems that may occur due to the decision of an early closure of both units. Safety culture is used as a concept to characterise the attitudes, behaviour and perceptions of people that are important in ensuring the safety of nuclear power facility. Since the Chernobyl accident, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been active in creating guidance for ensuring that an adequate safety culture can be created and maintained. The transition from operation to decommissioning introduces uncertainty for both the organisation and individuals. This creates new challenges that need to be dealt with. Although safety culture and organisational issues have to be addressed during the entire life cycle of a nuclear power plant, owing to these special challenges, it should be especially highlighted during the transitional period from operation to decommissioning. Nuclear safety experts from Sweden, Finland, Italy, the UK and Germany, as well as Lithuanian specialists, participated in the project, and it proved to be a most effective way to share experience. The aim of this brochure is to provide information about: the importance of safety culture issues during the transitional phase from operation to decommissioning of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant; the purpose, activities and results of this PHARE project; recommendations that are provided by western experts concerning the management of safety culture issues specific to the pre-decommissioning phase of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  11. Symposium on operational and environmental issues concerning use of water as a coolant in power plants and industries: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    The symposium is organised to bring together researchers, plant operators and regulatory agencies working in the area of operational and environmental problems associated with use of water as a coolant in power plants and other allied industries. The symposium targets chemists, biologists, environmental scientists, power plant operating engineers and plant designers working in various academic, governmental and non-governmental organisations. The major themes of the symposium are: water chemistry of coolant systems in power plants and other industries, chemistry of primary and moderator systems in nuclear power plants and research reactors, corrosion issues including Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and its control in water coolant systems, chemistry of steam and water at elevated temperature in nuclear power plants, once through steam generator chemistry, industrial fire water systems, ion-exchange purification, innovative water treatment in power and industrial units, chemical cleaning and chemical decontamination, biofouling and biocorrosion, cooling water treatment chemicals and their environmental fate and environmental impact of thermal effluents. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. Discussion on several issues of the accidents management of nuclear power plants in operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xuewu; Wang Zhe; Zhang Yingzhen

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses several issues of the accident management of nuclear power plants in operation, for example: the necessity, implementation principle of accident management and accident management program etc. For conducting accident management for beyond design basis accidents, this article thinks that the accident management program should be developed and implemented to ensure that the plant and its personnel with responsibilities for accident management are adequately prepared to take effective on-site actions to prevent or mitigate the consequences of severe accident. (authors)

  13. Maintenance Issues in Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contri, P.; Bieth, M.; Rieg, C.

    2006-01-01

    Due to current social and economical framework, in last years many nuclear power plant owners started a program for the Long Term Operation (LTO)/PLEX (Plant Life Extension) of their older nuclear facilities. This process has many nuclear safety implications, other than strategic and political ones. The need for tailoring the available safety assessment tools to such applications has become urgent in recent years and triggered many research actions. The review of regular maintenance and ageing management programs are tools widely used in LTO/PLEX context in many Countries. However, most of these tools are rather general and in many cases they need reshaping in an LTO/PLEX framework before application, with focus to the safety implications of the LTO/PLEX. Many Countries and plants radically modified their maintenance rules towards a condition based approach as a precondition for the implementation of LTO/PLEX programs. In 2004 a network of European Organisations operating Nuclear Power Plants, SENUF, under the coordination of the JRC-IE, carried out an extensive questionnaire on maintenance practice in their facilities aiming at capturing the aspects of the maintenance programs where research is mostly needed. This paper uses some results of the questionnaire, which was not oriented to LTO/PLEX, to draw some conclusions on how the current maintenance programs could support a potential LTO/PLEX, among the other programs running at NPPs. In this sense, it is spin-off of the SENUF WG on maintenance. The paper aims at identifying the technical attributes of the maintenance programs more directly affecting the decision for a long-term safe operation of a nuclear facility, the issues related to their implementation and safety review. The paper includes an analysis of the questionnaire circulated among the SENUF participants and a discussion on the implications of optimised maintenance programs in existing plants. Some examples at WWER plants taken by sources other than

  14. Real-time power plant monitoring and verification and validation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, Oe.; Tuerkcan, E.

    1993-03-01

    By means of the advances in the computer technology, the implementation of a real-time power plant monitoring and dynamic signal analysis system is described. As hardware and software, the system has several essential components to perform the task. Among these, mention may be made of a remote-controlled data acquisition system, a fast data processing system and a dynamic signal analysis system. For a complex system like an NPP, the system verification and validation is an important issue as the plant operation involves many engineering disciplines and also the 'soft sciences'. Additionally, the real-time requirements impose substantial time limitation for the implementation of tasks. The system V and V is accomplished partly by means of V and V of the system components which are monitored by the help of sensory signals. Therefore, an essential part of the V and V task involves the real-time analyses of the data provided by these signals. In this respect the NPP real-time monitoring system described possesses the required design features to carry out this task which provides enhanced reliability and availability in plant operation. (orig./HP)

  15. Large-scale integration of wind power into power systems as well as on transmission networks for offshore wind power plants. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancourt, Uta; Ackermann, Thomas (eds.)

    2013-11-01

    This proceedings contains contributions to the followings main topics: Grid integration experiences; Flexibility and economics of integration; Voltage control issues; Offshore wind power plants; Forecasting; Grid code issues; HVDC connection issues; Frequency control issues; National grid's perspective; Power system balancing; Power system issues; New grid and generators issues; Flexibility with storage and demand side management; AC connected offshore wind power plants; Economic and market issues; Modelling issues; Offshore grid issues.

  16. Survey and analysis of work structure in nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, M.B.; Pain, R.F.; Van Cott, H.P.; Davidson, M.K.

    1983-06-01

    Work-structure factors are those factors that relate to the way in which work at all levels in a plant is organized, staffed, managed, rewarded, and perceived by plant personnel. Research over many years has demonstrated that these work-structure factors are closely correlated with organizational effectiveness, safety, and profitability. The work structure of ten nuclear power plants was assessed using questionnaires. Structured critical incident interviews were conducted to verify the questionnaire results. The study revealed that a variety of work-structure factor problem areas do exist in nuclear power plants. The study recommends a prioritized set of candidate research issues to be considered as part of EPRI's Work Structure and Performance Research Program

  17. Study of time-critical diagnostic method for emergency operation of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofuku, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Itoh, K.; Wakabayashi, J.

    1986-01-01

    In order to support the emergency operation of nuclear power plant, the method of time-critical diagnostic plant analyzer has been investigated. The conception of the emergency operation support center is proposed and two types of plant analyzer may be installed in this center. One analyzer is a real-time tracking simulation code using the observed signals and another is a fast trend-prediction code. A real-time tracking code, TOKRAC, has been developed for analyzing the PWR primary loop thermo-hydraulics at SBLOCA, and the applicability of this code was examined by the numerical experiments for the initial phase transient of both TMI-2 accident and 6% coldleg SBLOCA of a Westinghouse-type PWR plant. The results showed that fairly good tracking was carried out by TOKRAC. The CPU time of TOKRAC was about 12-14 percent of real-time

  18. Common issues found in operating safety peer review of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Meijing; Zhang Fengping

    2004-01-01

    The 3rd stage of the safety culture promotion in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is characterized by establishing learning organization and continuous self-improvement. Peer Review was used as an effective tool by a lot of NPPs to improve the overall management and performance. This Paper provided the WANO Peer Review Methodology, the common issues found, the recommendation or suggestions to correct the area for improvement. It may be beneficial to other NPP which planning to have Peer Review or Self Evaluation. (authors)

  19. Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Graves, H.L. III; Norris, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Research is being conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under US nuclear regulatory commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a structural materials information center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of non-destructive evaluation techniques, assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  20. Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    Research is being conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the US-NRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques, assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants. (author). 29 refs., 2 figs

  1. Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Graves, H.L. III; Norris, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    Research is being conducted by ORNL under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques. assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants

  2. A New Approach of Modeling an Ultra-Super-Critical Power Plant for Performance Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolian Hou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A suitable model of coordinated control system (CCS with high accuracy and simple structure is essential for the design of advanced controllers which can improve the efficiency of the ultra-super-critical (USC power plant. Therefore, with the demand of plant performance improvement, an improved T-S fuzzy model identification approach is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the improved entropy cluster algorithm is applied to identify the premise parameters which can automatically determine the cluster numbers and initial cluster centers by introducing the concept of a decision-making constant and threshold. Then, the learning algorithm is used to modify the initial cluster center and a new structure of concluding part is discussed, the incremental data around the cluster center is used to identify the local linear model through a weighted recursive least-square algorithm. Finally, the proposed approach is employed to model the CCS of a 1000 MW USC one-through boiler power plant by using on-site measured data. Simulation results show that the T-S fuzzy model built in this paper is accurate enough to reflect the dynamic performance of CCS and can be treated as a foundation model for the overall optimizing control of the USC power plant.

  3. Dispatchable Solar Power Plant Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Henry [Solar Dynamics LLC, Broomfield, CO (United States)

    2018-01-31

    As penetration of intermittent renewable power increases, grid operators must manage greater variability in the supply and demand on the grid. One result is that utilities are planning to build many new natural gas peaking power plants that provide added flexibility needed for grid management. This report discusses the development of a dispatchable solar power (DSP) plant that can be used in place of natural gas peakers. Specifically, a new molten-salt tower (MST) plant has been developed that is designed to allow much more flexible operation than typically considered in concentrating solar power plants. As a result, this plant can provide most of the capacity and ancillary benefits of a conventional natural gas peaker plant but without the carbon emissions. The DSP system presented was designed to meet the specific needs of the Arizona Public Service (APS) utility 2017 peaking capacity request for proposals (RFP). The goal of the effort was to design a MST peaker plant that had the operational capabilities required to meet the peaking requirements of the utility and be cost competitive with the natural gas alternative. The effort also addresses many perceived barriers facing the commercial deployment of MST technology in the US today. These include MST project development issues such as permitting, avian impacts, visual impacts of tower CSP projects, project schedule, and water consumption. The DSP plant design is based on considerable analyses using sophisticated solar system design tools and in-depth preliminary engineering design. The resulting DSP plant design uses a 250 MW steam power cycle, with solar field designed to fit on a square mile plot of land that has a design point thermal rating of 400 MWt. The DSP plant has an annual capacity factor of about 16% tailored to deliver greater than 90% capacity during the critical Arizona summer afternoon peak. The table below compares the All-In energy cost and capacity payment of conventional combustion turbines

  4. Super thermal power plants and environment: a critical appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the possible impact on the environment by the particulate matters, oxides of sulphur and nitrogen, trace metals and solid/liquid wastes, which are emitted during the combustion of coal in the super thermal power plants of National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC). The coal consumed by these plants have sufficient sulphur content and ash. Of all the mineral in coal, pyrite is one of the most deleterious in combustion and a major source of oxide of sulphur pollution of the atmosphere. The impact of these on the terrestrial and aquatic environment in and around power plants and on region have been discussed. To arresting such contaminants, some remedial measures are suggested. (author). 14 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  5. Grid Integration Issues for Large Scale Wind Power Plants (WPPs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei; Xu, Zhao; Østergaard, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    transmission system operators (TSOs) over the world have come up the grid codes to request the wind power plants (WPPs) to have more or less the same operating capability as the conventional power plants. The grid codes requirements from other TSOs are under development. This paper covers the steady state......The penetration level of wind power into the power system over the world have been increasing very fast in the last few years and is still keeping the fast growth rate. It is just a matter of time that the wind power will be comparable to the conventional power generation. Therefore, many...

  6. Key Regulatory Issues for Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, Kofi; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2008-01-01

    To help reduce the uncertainty associated with application of digital instrumentation and controls (I and C) technology in nuclear power plants, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued six Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) documents that address the current regulatory positions on what are considered the significant digital I and C issues. These six documents address the following topics: Cyber Security, Diversity and Defense-in-Depth, Risk Informed Digital I and C Regulation, Communication issues, Human Factors and the Digital I and C Licensing Process (currently issued as Draft). After allowing for further refinement based on additional technical insight gathered by NRC staff through near-term research and detailed review of relevant experience, it is expected that updated positions ultimately will be incorporated into regulatory guides and staff review procedures. This paper presents an overview of the guidance provided by the NRC-issued ISGs on key technology considerations (i.e., the first five documents above) for safety-related digital I and C systems.

  7. Human factors: A major issue in plant aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widrig, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Humans play a significant role in the effects of aging on safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. These human issues may be more important than the issues of materials and component degradation with age. Human actions can accelerate or decelerate physical aging of a plant. And an aging plant can have a significant negative impact on staff quality and performance. The purpose of this paper is to provide some insights into the nature of these human factors issues and their relationship to plant aging. An early awareness of these issues facilitates timely action to at least mitigate these problems before they become insurmountable

  8. Nuclear power plant operating experience, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports issued annually that summarize the operating experience of U.S. nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure and radioactive effluents for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1976 data from 55 plants--23 boiling water reactor plants and 32 pressurized water reactor plants

  9. Software important to safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The report provides guidance on current practices, documenting their strengths and weaknesses for dealing with the important issues of software engineering that nuclear power plant system designers, software producers and regulators are facing. The focus of the report is on safety critical applications of general purpose processors controlled by custom developed software; however, it should also have application in safety related applications and for other types of computers. In addition to system designers, software producers and regulators, the intended readership of this report includes users of software based systems, who should be aware of the relevant issues in specifying and obtaining software for systems important to safety. Refs, 1 fig., tabs

  10. Assessing Risk-Based Performance Indicators in Safety-Critical Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    OpenAIRE

    TONT Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    The paper proposes framework for a multidisciplinary nuclear risk and safety assessment by modeling uncertainty and combining diverse evidence provided in such a way that it could be used to represent an entire argument about a system's dependability. The identified safety issues are being treated by means of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The behavior simulation of power plant in thepresence of risk factors is analyzed from the vulnerability, risk and functional safety viewpoints, hi...

  11. Evaluation of systems interactions in nuclear power plants: Technical findings related to Unresolved Safety Issue A-17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, D.

    1989-05-01

    This report presents a summary of the activities related to Unresolved Safety Issue (USI)A-17, ''Systems Interactions in Nuclear Power Plants,'' and also includes the NRC staff's conclusions based on those activities. The staff's technical findings provide the framework for the final resolution of this unresolved safety issue. The final resolution will be published later as NUREG-1229. 52 refs., 4 tabs

  12. Analysis to the criticality the storage and containers to the Juragua Nuclear Power Plant Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra Valdes, R.

    1998-01-01

    Presently analysis the criticality the warehouses and containers the nuclear fuels in Juragua nuclear power plant the property multiplicity determined in these system and it is verified that for the geometry and operation conditions defined in the design as well as in accidents situations, the arrangement the fuel stays subcritical with an appropriate margin

  13. Modernizing and Maintaining Instrumentation and Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, Joseph; Torok, Raymond; Shankar, Ramesh

    2003-01-01

    Deregulation of the electric utilities has made a major impact on nuclear power plants. To be competitive, more emphasis is being put on cost-effective production of electricity with a more critical look at whether a system should be modernized due to obsolescence, reliability, or productivity concerns. Instrumentation and control (I and C) systems play an important role in reducing the cost of producing electricity while maintaining or enhancing safety. Systems that are well designed, reliable, enhance productivity, and are cost-effective to operate and maintain can reduce the overall costs. Modern technology with its ability to better provide and use real-time information offers an effective platform for modernizing systems. At the same time, new technology brings new challenges and issues, especially for safety systems in nuclear power plants. To increase competitiveness, it is important to take advantage of the opportunities offered by modern technology and to address the new challenges and issues in a cost-effective manner. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and its member utilities have been working together with other members of the nuclear industry since 1990 to address I and C modernization and maintenance issues. The EPRI I and C Program has developed a life-cycle management approach for I and C systems that involves the optimization of maintenance, monitoring, and capital resources to sustain safety and performance throughout the plant life. Strategic planning methodologies and implementation guidelines addressing digital I and C issues in nuclear power plants have been developed. Work is ongoing in diverse areas to support the design, implementation, and operation of new digital systems. Technology transfer is an integral part of this I and C program

  14. The year 2000 power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, H.T.

    1989-01-01

    Every utility seeks extended service life from its existing power plants before building new ones. It is not easy to justify a new power plant. The licensing and cost of new plants have become uncertain. In response to these conditions, electric utilities are undertaking plant life-extension studies and, in some cases, reconditioning/upgrading old power plants to significantly increase useful service life. Other technologies like robotics and artificial intelligence/expert systems are also being developed to reduce operating and maintenance (O and M) expenses, to remove workers from potentially hazardous environments, and to reduce plant downtime. Together, these steps represent an interim solution, perhaps providing some relief for the next few decades. However, there are serious physical and economic limits to retrofitting new technology into existing power plants. Some old plants will simply be beyond their useful life and require retirement. In nuclear plants, for instance, retrofit may raise important and time-consuming licensing/safety issues. Based on their robotics and artificial intelligence experience, the authors of this article speculate bout the design of the year 2000 power plant - a power plant they feel will naturally incorporate liberal amounts of robotic and artificial intelligence technologies

  15. Analysis of articles in weekly magazines on scientific issues related to Fukushima nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Kazumi; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2012-01-01

    The large area was polluted by the radioactive fallout released after the nuclear fuel meltdown of Fukushima first nuclear plant of Tokyo electric power company. The news media that reported the accident were required to have scientific knowledge on the structure of the nuclear reactor and the physics and health issues of the radioactivity. In this paper, we focus on how the weekly magazines reported this critical accident. The weekly magazines are not regarded as a neutral news media. Rather, their articles in general strongly reflect the editorial opinions. In this sense, the weekly magazines are 'biased media'. So, there are many points to discuss from the view point of the science communication. We analyze the articles appeared in the seven major weekly magazines published during the first half year after the earthquake. We found that the differences in the scientific literacy between magazines are reflected, for example, in selection of the experts who made comments in articles. (author)

  16. Probabilistic safety assessment technology for commercial nuclear power plant security evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liming, J.K.; Johnson, D.H.; Dykes, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Commercial nuclear power plant physical security has received much more intensive treatment and regulatory attention since September 11, 2001. In light of advancements made by the nuclear power industry in the field of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for its power plants over that last 30 years, and given the many examples of successful applications of risk-informed regulation at U. S. nuclear power plants during recent years, it may well be advisable to apply a 'risk-informed' approach to security management at nuclear power plants from now into the future. In fact, plant PSAs developed in response to NRC Generic Letter 88-20 and related requirements are used to help define target sets of critical plant safety equipment in our current security exercises for the industry. With reasonable refinements, plant PSAs can be used to identify, analyze, and evaluate reasonable and prudent approaches to address security issues and associated defensive strategies at nuclear power plants. PSA is the ultimate scenario-based approach to risk assessment, and thus provides a most powerful tool in identifying and evaluating potential risk management decisions. This paper provides a summary of observations of factors that are influencing or could influence cost-effective or 'cost-reasonable' security management decision-making in the current political environment, and provides recommendations for the application of PSA tools and techniques to the nuclear power plant operational safety response exercise process. The paper presents a proposed framework for nuclear power plant probabilistic terrorist risk assessment that applies these tools and techniques. (authors)

  17. Assessing nuclear power plant safety and recovery from earthquakes using a system-of-systems approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrario, E.; Zio, E.

    2014-01-01

    We adopt a ‘system-of-systems’ framework of analysis, previously presented by the authors, to include the interdependent infrastructures which support a critical plant in the study of its safety with respect to the occurrence of an earthquake. We extend the framework to consider the recovery of the system of systems in which the plant is embedded. As a test system, we consider the impacts produced on a nuclear power plant (the critical plant) embedded in the connected power and water distribution, and transportation networks which support its operation. The Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment of such system of systems is carried out by Hierarchical modeling and Monte Carlo simulation. First, we perform a top-down analysis through a hierarchical model to identify the elements that at each level have most influence in restoring safety, adopting the criticality importance measure as a quantitative indicator. Then, we evaluate by Monte Carlo simulation the probability that the nuclear power plant enters in an unsafe state and the time needed to recover its safety. The results obtained allow the identification of those elements most critical for the safety and recovery of the nuclear power plant; this is relevant for determining improvements of their structural/functional responses and supporting the decision-making process on safety critical-issues. On the test system considered, under the given assumptions, the components of the external and internal water systems (i.e., pumps and pool) turn out to be the most critical for the safety and recovery of the plant. - Highlights: • We adopt a system-of-system framework to analyze the safety of a critical plant exposed to risk from external events, considering also the interdependent infrastructures that support the plant. • We develop a hierarchical modeling framework to represent the system of systems, accounting also for its recovery. • Monte Carlo simulation is used for the quantitative evaluation of the

  18. Key considerations and safety issues for the stretch power uprate at Chinshan Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, P., E-mail: u808966@taipower.com.tw [Taiwan Power Company, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    The Taiwan Power Company (TPC) has elected in recent years to implement the power uprate program as a key measure to improve the performance for TPC's nuclear power plants. The Measurement Uncertainty Recapture (MUR) power uprate for the TPC's three operating plants (reported in 16th PBNC) had been successfully implemented by July 2009. For the stretch power uprate (SPU) followed, the magnitude of uprate (~3%) is determined based on the available margins for original plant design, constant pressure approach (BWR) is adopted to simplify the evaluation, and major plant modifications are not considered. As the first application, the SPU safety analysis report (SAR) for the Chinshan plant was submitted to the ROCAEC in December 2010. A review task force was organized by the ROCAEC to perform a very thorough review. As the licensing bases are fully re-examined during the review process, many important issues have been identified and addressed. The key issues resolved include: conformance of SAR to ROCAEC's review guidance; re-examination of post-Fukushima comprehensive safety assessment; qualification of containment protective coatings; GL 96-06 (Assurance of Equipment Operability and Containment Integrity During DBA Conditions); credit for Containment Accident Pressure; issue for Annulus Pressurization Loads Evaluation. These issues required very extensive efforts to resolve. With the cooperative efforts by TPC and contractor (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research), however, all the issues were fully clarified and SAR was approved by ROCAEC on November 15, 2012. The first step SPU (2% OLTP) was successfully implemented in November 2012 at both units. (author)

  19. VGB Congress 'Power Plants 2006'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    The VGB Congress 'Power Plants' took place in Dresden, 27 th to 29 th September 2006 under the auspices of the Federal Minister for Economics and Technology, Michael Glos. The motto of this year's Congress was 'Future becomes Reality - Investments in New Power Plants'. More than 1,200 participants from Germany and abroad attended the plenary and technical lectures on the topics 'Market and Competition' as well as 'Technology, Operation and Environment' for information and discussion. Special papers were dealing with further issues like 'Generation Market in Europe', 'Clean Power Technology Platform', French policy for new power plants as well as potentials and technology of renewables. (orig.)

  20. Criticality safety analysis of TK-13 cask in Bushehr nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Ashgar; Omidvari, Nima [Iran Radioactive Waste Management Company, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hassanzadeh, Mostafa [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-12-15

    Spent fuel production is one of the main problems of nuclear power plants that should be managed properly considering the strategy of each country. Today, in most of nuclear power owner countries, the interim storage has been selected as the temporary solution of spent fuel management because of absence of deep geological repositories and no tendency for reprocessing. On the other side, considering the merits of storage in dual purpose casks based on dry storage, this method was chosen for interim storage. By taking into account that the only operating reactor of Iran is of Water-Water Energetic Reactor (WWER)-1000 type, proposed TK-13 cask by Russia which is the manufacturer of these types of reactors has been considered. In this study, the calculation of basket holding spent fuel assembly criticality of this cask has been analyzed for two modes of fresh and spent fuel by ORIGEN2.1 and MCNPX2.6 nuclear codes. The criterion of the nuclear criticality safety for effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) should be 0.95 and 0.98 for many ordinary and accident conditions, respectively. Therefore, the results show that a cylindrical basket with 66 cm diameter and 28 cm pitch with internal holding basket made of borated steel with 0.1% borate and steel free from borate would meet the criticality of cask, respectively.

  1. Criticality safety analysis of TK-13 cask in Bushehr nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Ashgar; Omidvari, Nima; Hassanzadeh, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Spent fuel production is one of the main problems of nuclear power plants that should be managed properly considering the strategy of each country. Today, in most of nuclear power owner countries, the interim storage has been selected as the temporary solution of spent fuel management because of absence of deep geological repositories and no tendency for reprocessing. On the other side, considering the merits of storage in dual purpose casks based on dry storage, this method was chosen for interim storage. By taking into account that the only operating reactor of Iran is of Water-Water Energetic Reactor (WWER)-1000 type, proposed TK-13 cask by Russia which is the manufacturer of these types of reactors has been considered. In this study, the calculation of basket holding spent fuel assembly criticality of this cask has been analyzed for two modes of fresh and spent fuel by ORIGEN2.1 and MCNPX2.6 nuclear codes. The criterion of the nuclear criticality safety for effective multiplication factor (k eff ) should be 0.95 and 0.98 for many ordinary and accident conditions, respectively. Therefore, the results show that a cylindrical basket with 66 cm diameter and 28 cm pitch with internal holding basket made of borated steel with 0.1% borate and steel free from borate would meet the criticality of cask, respectively.

  2. RBMK nuclear power plants: Generic safety issues. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This report has been prepared on the basis of above mentioned report and it is intended to provide information on RBMK NPPs generic safety issues. As all other insights, recommendations and conclusions resulting from the IAEA Programme, this report is intended to assist national decision makers, who have sole responsibility for the regulation and safe operation of their nuclear power plants. It also serves to focus national and international projects on priority of the RBMK safety improvements. 23 refs, 10 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Sulphate issues and learning for secondary loop system at Dayabay Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changchun; Fang Jun; Yao Xuehong; He Yanhong; Chen Bin

    2014-01-01

    Dayabay NPP started up from 1994. There is no condensate polishing system (CPP) with initial design. Unfortunately there happened few times serious issues with sea water leakage into condensate. It was reconstructed and be added CPP from 1997. But we found sulphate concentration in SG will increased after ATE was put into operating, when CPP was out of service, then sulphate concentration decreased. Through the study and research for a few years, we found the root cause and we took these following improvements at site step by step, steam generation blow down water quality was significantly improved: Optimize feed water distribution condition in resin bed. Since the shortcomings of resin bed design, resin is moving up and down during operating. To prevent resin re-separation and broken issue, we improved the structure of feed distribution and better the resin condition in resin bed; Optimize regeneration process. Optimize mixed bed resin transferring, separation, regeneration process, re-separation and re-mixing process during regeneration; Optimize operating process. Regular clean resin beads under the water chamber and resin trap to prevent resin leak into SG system; Other actions. Check nozzles one by one in resin bed and change these nozzles with shortcomings to prevent resin leakage into resin chamber. Upgrade cation resin type from 12% DVB to 16% DVB. According to Dayabay nuclear power plant steam generator sulphate issue experience, now in China we have improved a lot for the secondary loop condensate polishing system design, equipment manufacturing, operation process, etc. We have achieved good results in our new projects such as LingAo Phase II nuclear power plant. (author)

  4. Harmonics in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preciado, V.; Madrigal, M.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2015-04-02

    Wind power generation has been growing at a very fast pace for the past decade, and its influence and impact on the electric power grid is significant. As in a conventional power plant, a wind power plant (WPP) must ensure that the quality of the power being delivered to the grid is excellent. At the same time, the wind turbine should be able to operate immune to small disturbances coming from the grid. Harmonics are one of the more common power quality issues presented by large WPPs because of the high switching frequency of the power converters and the possible nonlinear behavior from electric machines (generator, transformer, reactors) within a power plant. This paper presents a summary of the most important issues related to harmonics in WPPs and discusses practical experiences with actual Type 1 and Type 3 wind turbines in two WPPs.

  5. Nuclear power plant operation 2016. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2017-05-15

    A report is given on the operating results achieved in 2016, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from nuclear power plants in Germany. Reports about nuclear power plants in Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain will be published in a further issue.

  6. Fireside corrosion of superheaters/reheaters in advanced power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, A.U.; Simms, N.J.; Oakey, J.E. [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Centre

    2010-07-01

    The generation of increasing amounts of electricity while simultaneously reducing environmental emissions (CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} particles, etc) has become a goal for the power industry worldwide. Co-firing biomass and coal in new advanced pulverised fuel power plants is one route to address this issue, since biomass is regarded as a CO{sub 2} neutral fuel (i.e. CO{sub 2} uptake during its growth equals the CO{sub 2} emissions produced during its combustion) and such new advanced power plants operate at higher efficiencies than current plants as a result of using steam systems with high temperatures and pressures. However, co-firing has the potential to cause significant operational challenges for such power plants as amongst other issues, it will significantly change the chemistry of the deposits on the heat exchanger surfaces and the surrounding gas compositions. As a result these critical components can experience higher corrosion rates, and so shorter lives, causing increased operational costs, unless the most appropriate materials are selected for their construction. This paper reports the results of a series of 1000 hour laboratory corrosion tests that have been carried out in controlled atmosphere furnaces, to assess the effect of biomass/coal co-firing on the fireside corrosion of superheaters/reheaters. The materials used for the tests were one ferritic alloy (T92), two austenitic alloys (347HFG and HR3C) and one nickel based alloy (alloy 625). Temperatures of 600 and 650 C were used to represent the metal temperatures in advanced power plants. During these exposures, traditional mass change data were recorded as the samples were recoated with the simulated deposits. After these exposures, cross-sections through samples were prepared using standard metallographic techniques and then analysed using SEM/EDX. Pre-exposure micrometer and post-exposure image analyser measurements were used so that the metal wastage could be calculated. These data are

  7. Intrusion detection techniques for plant-wide network in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekhar, P.; Shrikhande, S.V.; Biswas, B.B.; Patil, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have a lot of critical data to be sent to the operator workstations. A plant wide integrated communication network, with high throughput, determinism and redundancy, is required between the workstations and the field. Switched Ethernet network is a promising prospect for such an integrated communication network. But for such an integrated system, intrusion is a major issue. Hence the network should have an intrusion detection system to make the network data secure and enhance the network availability. Intrusion detection is the process of monitoring the events occurring in a network and analyzing them for signs of possible incidents, which are violations or imminent threats of violation of network security policies, acceptable user policies, or standard security practices. This paper states the various intrusion detection techniques and approaches which are applicable for analysis of a plant wide network. (author)

  8. Nuclear power plant decommissioning. The nature of problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunus, Yaziz

    1986-04-01

    A number of issues have to be taken into account before the introduction of any nuclear power plant in any country. These issues include reactor safety (site and operational), waste disposal and, lastly, the decommissioning of the reactor inself. Because of the radioactive nature of the components, nuclear power plants require a different approach to decommission compared to other plants. Until recently, issues on reactor safety and waste disposal were the main topics discussed. As for reactor decommissioning, the debates have been academic until now. Although reactors have operated for 25 years, decommissioning of retired reactors has simply not been fully planned. But the Shippingport Atomic Power Plant in Pennysylvania, the first large-scale power reactor to be retired, is now being decommissioned. The work has rekindled the debate in the light of reality. Outside the United States, decommissioning is also being confronted on a new plane.

  9. Issues arising with the application of optical fiber transmission in class 1E systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, K.; Antonescu, C.

    1993-01-01

    The application of fiber optic links and networks in safety-critical systems in the next generation of nuclear power plants, as well as in some digital upgrades in present-day plants, will mean that these links must be highly reliable and able to withstand the effect of environmental stressors present at the installation location. This paper discusses the failure modes and age-related mechanisms of fiber optic transmission components and identifies environmental stressors that could adversely affect their reliability over the long term. Some of the standards that could be used in their qualification for safety-critical applications are also discussed briefly

  10. Nuclear power plant operating experience. Annual report, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, M.R.

    1979-12-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of reports issued annually that summarizes the operating experience of US nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1978 data from 65 plants - 25 boiling water reactor plants and 40 pressurized water reactor plants. Discussion of radioactive effluents which has been a part of this report in previous years, has not been included in this issue because of late acquisition of data

  11. Reactor pressure vessel life cycle management at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshuk, B.W.; Bowman, M.E.; Henry, S.A.; Pavinich, W.A.; Lapides, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Life Cycle Management (LCM) seeks to manage the aging process of important systems, structures, and components during licensed operation. The goal of Baltimore Gas and Electric Company's (BG and E) Life Cycle Management Program is to assure attainment of 40 years of operation and to preserve the option of an additional 20 years of operation for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP). Since the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) has been identified as one of the most critical components with regard to long-term operation of a nuclear power plant, BG and E initiated actions to manage life limiting or aging issues for the CCNPP RPVs. To achieve long-term operation, technical RPV issues must be effectively managed. This paper describes methods BG and E uses for managing RPV age-related degradation. (author)

  12. Regulatory issues in the maintenance of Argentine nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, E.; Caruso, G.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of maintenance activities upon nuclear safety and their relevance as means to detect and prevent aging make them play an outstanding role among the fields of interest of the Argentine nuclear regulatory body (ENREN). Such interest is reinforced by the fact that the data obtained during maintenance are used - among other - as inputs in the Probabilistic Safety Analyses required for those nuclear power plants. This paper provides a brief description of the original requirements by the regulatory body concerning maintenance, of the factors that led to review the criteria involved in such requirements and of the key items identified during the reviewing process. The latter shall be taken into account in the maintenance regulatory policy, for the consequent issue of new requirements from the utilities and for the eventual publication of a specific regulatory standard. (author)

  13. Ranking of safety issues for WWER-440 model 230 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    In response to requests from Member States operating Soviet designed WWER-440/230 nuclear power plants (NPPs) for assistance through the IAEA's nuclear safety services, a major international project was established to evaluate these first generation reactors as a complement to relevant ongoing national, bilateral and multilateral activities. The objective is to assist countries operating WWER-440/230 NPPs in performing comprehensive safety reviews aimed at identifying design and operational weaknesses. The scope of the project includes a review of the conceptual design of WWER-440/230 NPPs, safety review missions to each one of the operating reactors to review design and operational aspects and studies to resolve issues of generic safety concern. This report was prepared by a group of international experts and the IAEA staff and discussed by the Project Steering Committee, December 9-13, 1991 in Vienna. An overview of the safety issues identified is presented indicating their effect on the performance of the basic safety functions. Conceptual recommendations related to design issues are given as a technical basis for the safety modifications required

  14. Nuclear waste management in Canada : critical issues, critical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durant, D.; Fuji Johnson, G.

    2009-01-01

    As oil reserves decline and the environment takes centre stage in public policy discussions, the merits and dangers of nuclear power and nuclear waste management continue to be debated. Canada is intent on building more reactors to increase energy production without destroying the planet, but it and other nuclear energy-producing countries face not only technical problems but also social and ethical issues. This book provides a critical antidote to the favourable position of government and industry. The contributors build their case by exploring key issues and developments. What do frequently used terms such as safety, risk, and acceptability really mean? How and why did the public consultation process in Canada fail to address ethical and social issues? What is the significance and potential of a public consultation process that involves diverse interests, epistemologies, and actors, including Aboriginal peoples? And how do we ensure that our frameworks for discussion are inclusive and ethical? This timely collection defuses the uncertainty, ambiguity, and ignorance that surrounds nuclear energy. It will appeal to academics, students, and stakeholders in public policy or environmental studies who want to think critically and more broadly about how we approach energy generation and waste management.

  15. Design Provisions for Withstanding Station Blackout at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    plant may lead to fuel damage. It is current practice that the design of the electrical power systems for both operating plants and new builds considers events such as station blackout. The intent of a controlled station blackout event is to manage consequences prior to degrading to design basis accidents. This publication provides information for new plant designs as well as modifications to existing operating nuclear power plants to cope with extended station blackout (or similar). It describes a common international technical basis to be considered when establishing all the criteria for a station blackout event, and outlines critical issues which reflect the lessons learned applicable to electrical systems from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The publication also describes current plant practices and design provisions for withstanding a station blackout event already implemented at some nuclear power plants, as well as proposals for improvement of existing plant design and qualification requirements to increase the robustness of the plant electrical design for contending with a station blackout event

  16. Aspects of nuclear safety at power plants and fuel cycle plants in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, N.I.; Efimov, E.; Dubovskij, B.G.; Dikarev, V.; Lyubchenko, V.; Kruglov, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses the problems of organizing inspection monitoring of power plants including the development of some regulations and norms and the interaction between the USSR State Nuclear Safety Organization, scientific and designing organizations and power plants. The principles of computer use to work out advice for operational staff and warning signals and commands for the reactor control and protection system are discussed. Some attention is turned to the importance of using high-speed computers to calculate prompt reactivity values and to determine impurity concentrations in the coolant and margins to permissible operational limits. In particular, reactimeters are considered as signal generators in monitor and protection systems. Some problems of nuclear safety inspection, the issue and inculcation of some regulations and operational documents on nuclear safety, and instrumentation of plants reprocessing or processing fuel elements are presented. Methods of determining the critical parameters of technological units are described, together with the fundamental principles of fuel cycle plant nuclear safety, providing margin coefficients, accounting for deviations from the normal operational process and other problems, as well as methods of keeping the restrictions on nuclear safety requirements at fuel cycle plants. (author)

  17. Survey on the technological development issues for large-scale methanol engine power generation plant; Ogata methanol engine hatsuden plant ni kansuru gijutsu kaihatsu kadai chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    Based on the result of `Survey on the feasibility of large-scale methanol engine power generation plant` in fiscal 1992, concrete technological development issues were studied for its practical use, and the technological R & D scheme was prepared for large-scale methanol engine power plant featured by low NOx and high efficiency. Technological development issues of this plant were as follows: improvement of thermal efficiency, reduction of NOx emission, improvement of the reliability and durability of ignition and fuel injection systems, and reduction of vibration. As the economical effect of the technological development, the profitability of NOx control measures was compared between this methanol engine and conventional heavy oil diesel engines or gas engines. As a result, this engine was more economical than conventional engines. It was suggested that development of the equipment will be completed in nearly 4 years through every component study, single-cylinder model experiment and real engine test. 21 refs., 43 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. Nuclear power plants: a unique challenge to fire safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowlen, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The evaluation of fire safety in a nuclear power plant must include the consideration of the impact of a fire on the operability of plant safety equipment and systems. This issue is not typical of the life safety and property protection issues which dominate traditional fire safety concerns. This paper provides a general discussion of the issue of nuclear power plant fire safety as it currently exists in the USA. Included is a discussion of the past history of nuclear power plant fire events, the development of nuclear industry specific fire safety guidelines, the adverse experience associated with the inadvertent operation of fire suppression systems, and the anticipated direction of fire safety requirements for future reactor designs in the USA. (Author)

  19. Licensing issues in the context of terrorist attacks on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danwitz, T. von

    2002-01-01

    The terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in September 2001 has prompted enhanced nuclear risk awareness among the German population. But in the current public debate about the safety of nuclear power plants in Germany in times of new dimensions of danger, aspects such as the role of the constitutional law, the German Atomic Energy Act, and the regulatory system governing nuclear power plant licensing in the context of protection and safety have not been addressed. The author therefore discusses the German nuclear power plant licensing law and administrative regime, elaborating on the significance attributed in those bodies of law to risks like terrorist attacks on nuclear power plants. (orig./CB) [de

  20. Qualification of safety-critical software for digital reactor safety system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee-Choon; Park, Gee-Yong; Kim, Jang-Yeol; Lee, Jang-Soo

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the software qualification activities for the safety-critical software of the digital reactor safety system in nuclear power plants. The main activities of the software qualification processes are the preparation of software planning documentations, verification and validation (V and V) of the software requirements specifications (SRS), software design specifications (SDS) and codes, and the testing of the integrated software and integrated system. Moreover, the software safety analysis and software configuration management are involved in the software qualification processes. The V and V procedure for SRS and SDS contains a technical evaluation, licensing suitability evaluation, inspection and traceability analysis, formal verification, software safety analysis, and an evaluation of the software configuration management. The V and V processes for the code are a traceability analysis, source code inspection, test case and test procedure generation. Testing is the major V and V activity of the software integration and system integration phases. The software safety analysis employs a hazard operability method and software fault tree analysis. The software configuration management in each software life cycle is performed by the use of a nuclear software configuration management tool. Through these activities, we can achieve the functionality, performance, reliability, and safety that are the major V and V objectives of the safety-critical software in nuclear power plants. (author)

  1. Technical report on dc power supplies in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    Emergency electrical power supplies, both a.c. and d.c. for nuclear power plants are important to safety. For this reason, the electric power systems for operating nuclear plants and those plants under licensing review have been required to provide a high degree of reliability. It is this high reliability that provides confidence that sufficient safety margin exists against loss of all d.c. power for extended periods of time to allow an orderly examination of safety issues, such as this. However, because of the importance of the a.c. and d.c. power systems, the staff has been expending effort to review the reliability of these systems and shall continue to do so in the future

  2. Training of power plant operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftwerksschule, E.V.

    1986-01-01

    In Germany, professional training of power plant operating personnel became an important issue in the fifties, when power plant parameters as well as complexity of instrumentation and control increased considerably. Working Groups of VGB Technische Vereiningung der Grosskraftwerketreiber e.v. (Association of Large Power Plant Operators) developed a professional career for power plant operating personnel and defined pre-requisites, scope and objectives of training. In 1957 the German utilities founded KRAFTWERKSSCHULE E.V. (kws) as a school for theoretical training and for guidance of practical training in the power plants. KWS is a non-profit organisation and independent of authorities. Today KWS has 127 members in Germany and in 6 other countries. The objectives of KWS include the training of: -Kraftwerker (control room operators; - Kraftwerksmesiter (shift supervisors); and - shift engineers; according the guidelines of the VGB

  3. Proceedings of the 2006 international congress on advances in nuclear power plants - ICAPP'06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Following the highly successful ICAPP'05 meeting held in Seoul Korea, the 2006 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants brought together international experts of the nuclear industry involved in the operation, development, building, regulation and research related to Nuclear Power Plants. The program covers the full spectrum of Nuclear Power Plant issues from design, deployment and construction of plants to research and development of future designs and advanced systems. The program covers lessons learned from power, research and demonstration reactors from over 50 years of experience with operation and maintenance, structures, materials, technical specifications, human factors, system design and reliability. The program by technical track deals with: - 1. Water-Cooled Reactor Programs and Issues Evolutionary designs, innovative, passive, light and heavy water cooled reactors; issues related to meeting medium term utility needs; design and regulatory issues; business, political and economic challenges; infrastructure limitations and improved construction techniques including modularization. - 2. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Design and development issues, components and materials, safety, reliability, economics, demonstration plants and environmental issues, fuel design and reliability, power conversion technology, hydrogen production and other industrial uses; advanced thermal and fast reactors. - 3. Long Term Reactor Programs and Strategies Reactor technology with enhanced fuel cycle features for improved resource utilization, waste characteristics, and power conversion capabilities. Potential reactor designs with longer development times such as, super critical water reactors, liquid metal reactors, gaseous and liquid fuel reactors, Gen IV, INPRO, EUR and other programs. - 4. Operation, Performance and Reliability Management Training, O and M costs, life cycle management, risk based maintenance, operational experiences, performance and

  4. Proceedings of the 2008 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants - ICAPP '08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    ICAPP 2008 congress brought together international experts of the nuclear industry involved in the operation, development, building, regulation and research related to Nuclear Power Plants. The program covered the full spectrum of Nuclear Power Plant issues from design, deployment and construction of plants to research and development of future designs and advanced systems. It covered also lessons learned from power, research and demonstration reactors from over 50 years of experience with operation and maintenance, structures, materials, technical specifications, human factors, system design and reliability. The program comprised 13 technical tracks: 1. Water-Cooled Reactor Programs and Issues: Evolutionary designs, innovative, passive, light and heavy water cooled reactors; issues related to meeting near term utility needs; design issues; business, economical cost challenges; infrastructure limitations and improved construction techniques including modularization. 2. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors: Design and development issues, components and materials, safety, reliability, economics, demonstration plants and environmental issues, fuel design and reliability, power conversion technology, impact of non electricity applications on reactor design; advanced thermal and fast reactors. 3. LMFR and Longer Term Reactor Programs: Reactor technology with enhanced fuel cycle features for improved resource utilization, waste characteristics, and power conversion capabilities. Potential reactor designs with longer development times such as super critical water reactors and liquid fuel reactors, Gen IV, INPRO, EUR and other programs. 4. Operation, Performance and Reliability Management: Training, O and M costs, life cycle management, risk based maintenance, operational experiences, performance and reliability improvements, outage optimization, human factors, plant staffing, outage reduction features, major component reliability, repair and replacement, in

  5. Issues behind Radiation management of workers at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company. From the viewpoint of radiation exposure of the ocular lens and the biological effects to the lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Hatsusaka, Natsuko; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Akahane, Keiichi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2017-01-01

    In March 2011, the accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company. During recovery from critical situations, the radiation dose for some emergency workers exceeded the effective dose limit recommended for an emergency situation. A month after the accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection issued a statement on tissue reactions recommending significant reduction of the equivalent dose limit to the lens of the eye. Many radiation workers will need to be involved in treatment of water contaminated with radionuclides, fuel debris retrieval, and decommissioning of reactors for a long period of time. Thus, the optimized radiation control in the fields, exposure reduction, prevention of tissue reactions, and reduction of stochastic risks for workers becomes necessary. This paper discusses issues in relation to radiation protection of the ocular lens in such recovery workers, from the viewpoint of radiation exposure of workers, its management, manifestations and mechanisms of the lens effects. (author)

  6. Operating results 2015. Nuclear power plants. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2016-05-15

    A report is given on the opening results achieved in 2015, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from nuclear power plants in Germany. Reports about nuclear power plants in Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain will be published in further issue.

  7. Investigation toward laser driven IFE (inertial fusion energy) power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, S.; Kozaki, Y.; Izawa, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Kanabe, T.; Kato, Y.; Norimatsu, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakatsuka, M.; Jitsuno, T.; Yamanaka, T.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the conceptual design of Laser Driven IFE Power Plant, the technical and physical issues have been examined. R and D on key issues which affect the feasibility of power plant has been performed taking into account the collaboration in the field of laser driver, fuel pellet, reaction chamber and system design. The coordination and collaboration organization of reactor technology experts in Japan on Laser Driven IFE Power Plant are reviewed. (authors)

  8. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, a program has been established whereby an annual NUREG report will be published on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirement areas. This report, the third volume of a three-volume series, addresses the status of generic safety issues (GSIs) at licensed plants. Volume 1 addressed the status of Three Mile Island Action Plan requirements and was published in March 1991. Volume 2 addressed the status of implementation and verification of unresolved safety issues and was published in May 1991. The annual NUREG report will combine these three areas in a single volume to be published in late 1991. The data contained in these NUREG reports are a product of the NRC's Safety Issues Management System (SIMS) database, which is maintained by the Project Management Staff in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and by NRC regional personnel. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of the status of implementation and verification of the 34 GSIs and sub-issues that have been resolved by the NRC and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This NUREG report also serves as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues up until a request for action by licensees is issued by NRC. 3 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Several issues related to regional environmental investigation to inland nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xinshan; Zhang Xiaofeng

    2010-01-01

    Based on the goal of carrying out regional environmental investigation and review of recent environmental investigations toward inland nuclear power plant(NPP) site, and combined with the characteristics between inland and coastal sites, this paper is to make deeply analysis on population distribution, environmental characteristics, feasibility of performing emergency plan, characteristics of received water and external human-induced incident of NPP vicinity, then advance several significant issues related regional environmental investigation to inland sites, and make comparison with the investigation to coastal sites. Meantime, on guarantee of the integrity of collected materials during investigation, this paper also makes several proposals to provide reference for carrying out regional environmental investigation to inland NPP site. (authors)

  10. Electromagnetic compatibility of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabayan, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    Lately, there has been a mounting concern about the electromagnetic compatibility of nuclear-power-plant systems mainly because of the effects due to the nuclear electromagnetic pulse, and also because of the introduction of more-sophisticated and, therefore, more-susceptible solid-state devices into the plants. Questions have been raised about the adequacy of solid-state-device protection against plant electromagnetic-interference sources and transients due to the nuclear electromagnetic pulse. In this paper, the author briefly reviews the environment, and the coupling, susceptibility, and vulnerability assessment issues of commercial nuclear power plants

  11. The use of ferritic materials in light water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of ferritic materials in LWR power plant components. The two principal types of LWR systems, the boiling water reactor (BWR) and the pressurized water reactor (PWR) are described. The evolution of the construction materials, including plates and forgings, is presented. The fabrication process for both reactors constructed with plates and forgings are described in detail. Typical mechanical properties of the reactor vessel materials are presented. Finally, one critical issue radiation embrittlement dealing with ferritic materials is discussed. This has been one of the major issues regarding the use of ferritic material in the construction of LWR pressure vessels

  12. Design and development of self-powered sensors on wireless sensor network for standalone plant critical data management during SBO and beyond design basis events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparna, J.; Dulera, I.V.; Rama Rao, A.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced reactors are designed with an aim of maximum safety, optimized fuel utilization and effective system design. Safety aspects in reactor designs are being viewed for all possible vulnerabilities, and as a result, robust self-regulating passive safety features have been favored in Gen IV and advanced reactor designs. In addition to passive systems, the accidents scenarios at Fukushima indicate the dire need of reliable and stand-alone self-powered sensors, for monitoring plant critical parameters for effective damage control actions. There is a strong need for plant critical data management and situation awareness during the unavailability of all conventional power sources in a nuclear power plant, during extended station blackout (SBO) conditions. These self-powered sensors would assist the operators in managing events like SBO and help in containing any Beyond Design Basis Events (BDBE) conditions, well away from the public domain

  13. Enhancing leadership at a nuclear power plant - a systematic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jupiter, P.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of advanced technology, greater regulatory oversight, and critical public scrutiny create numerous pressures for leaders within nuclear power plant systems (NPPSs). These large, complex industrial installations have unusually high expectations imposed for safety and efficiency of operation - without the luxury of trial-and-error learning. Industry leaders assert that enhanced leadership and management can substantially improve the operating performance of a nuclear power plant. The need has been voiced within the nuclear industry for systematic and effective methods to address leadership and management issues. This paper presents a step-by-step model for enhancing leadership achievement within NPPS, which is defined as the combined structural, equipment, and human elements involved in a plant's operation. Within the model, key areas for which the leader is responsible build upon each other in sequential order to form a solid strategic structure; teachable actions and skills form an ongoing cycle for leadership achievement. Through the model's continued and appropriate functioning, a NPPS is likely to maintain its viability, productivity, and effectiveness for the full licensed term of a plant

  14. Safety criteria for siting a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The guide sets forth requirements for safety of the population and the environment in nuclear power plant siting. It also sets out the general basis for procedures employed by other competent authorities when they issue regulations or grant licences. On request STUK (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland) issues case-specific statements about matters relating to planning and about other matters relating to land use in the environment of nuclear power plants

  15. Specific issues for seismic performance of power plant equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrotzki, Peter [GERB Vibration Control Systems, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Power plant machinery can be dynamically decoupled from the substructure by the effective use of helical steel springs and viscous dampers. Turbine foundations, coal mills, boiler feed pumps and other machine foundations benefit from this type of elastic support systems to mitigate the transmission of operational vibration. The application of these devices may also be used to protect against earthquakes and other catastrophic events, i.e. airplane crash, of particular importance in nuclear facilities. This article illustrates basic principles of elastic support systems and applications on power plant equipment and buildings in medium and high seismic areas. Spring damper combinations with special stiffness properties are used to reduce seismic acceleration levels of turbine components and other safety or non-safety related structures. For turbine buildings, the integration of the turbine sub-structure into the machine building can further reduce stress levels in all structural members. The application of this seismic protection strategy for a spent fuel storage tank in a high seismic area is also discussed. Safety in nuclear facilities is of particular importance and recent seismic events and the resulting damage in these facilities again brings up the discussion. One of the latest events is the 2007 Chuetsu earthquake in Japan. The resulting damage in the Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant can be found in several reports, e.g. in Yamashita. (orig.)

  16. Application of Advanced Technology to Improve Plant Performance in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in computer technologies, signal processing, analytical modeling, and the advent of wireless sensors have provided the nuclear industry with ample means to automate and optimize maintenance activities and improve safety, efficiency, and availability, while reducing costs and radiation exposure to maintenance personnel. This paper provides a review of these developments and presents examples of their use in the nuclear power industry and the financial and safety benefits that they have produced. As the current generation of nuclear power plants have passed their mid-life, increased monitoring of their health is critical to their safe operation. This is especially true now that license renewal of nuclear power plants has accelerated, allowing some plants to operate up to 60 years or more. Furthermore, many utilities are maximizing their power output through uprating projects and retrofits. This puts additional demand and more stress on the plant equipment such as the instrumentation and control (I and C) systems and the reactor internal components making them more vulnerable to the effects of aging, degradation, and failure. In the meantime, the nuclear power industry is working to reduce generation costs by adopting condition-based maintenance strategies and automation of testing activities. These developments have stimulated great interest in on-line monitoring (OLM) technologies and new diagnostic and prognostic methods to anticipate, identify, and resolve equipment and process problems and ensure plant safety, efficiency, and immunity to accidents. The foundation for much of the required technologies has already been established through 40 years of research and development (R and D) efforts performed by numerous organizations, scientists, and engineers around the world including the author. This paper provides examples of these technologies and demonstrates how the gap between some of the more important R and D efforts and end users have been filled

  17. An improved gate valve for critical applications in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, M.S.; Alvarez, P.D.; Wang, J.K.; Somagyi, D.

    1996-01-01

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Generic Letters 89-10 for motor-operated valves (MOVs) and 95-07 for all power-operated valves document in detail the problems related to the performance of the safety-related valves in nuclear power plants. The problems relate to lack of reliable operation under design basis conditions including higher than anticipated stem thrust, unpredictable valve behavior, damage to the valve internals under blowdown/high flow conditions, significant degradation of performance when cycled under AP and flow, thermal binding, and pressure locking. This paper describes an improved motor-operated flexible wedge gate valve design, the GE Sentinel Valve, which is the outcome of a comprehensive and systematic development effort undertaken to resolve the issues identified in the NRC Generic Letters 89-10 and 95-07. The new design provides a reliable, long-term, low maintenance cost solution to the nuclear power industry. One of the key features incorporated in the disc permits the disc flexibility to be varied independently of the disc thickness (pressure boundary) dictated by the ASME Section III Pressure Vessel ampersand Piping Code stress criteria. This feature allows the desired flexibility to be incorporated in the disc, thus eliminating thermal binding problems. A matrix of analyses was performed using finite element and computational fluid dynamics approaches to optimize design for stresses, flexibility, leak-tightness, fluid flow, and thermal effects. The design of the entire product line was based upon a consistent set of analyses and design rules which permit scaling to different valve sizes and pressure classes within the product line. The valve meets all of the ASME Section III Code design criteria and the N-Stamp requirements. The performance of the valve was validated by performing extensive separate effects and plant in-situ tests. This paper summarizes the key design features, analyses, and test results

  18. An improved gate valve for critical applications in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalsi, M.S.; Alvarez, P.D.; Wang, J.K.; Somagyi, D. [Kalsi Engineering, Inc., Sugar Land, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Generic Letters 89-10 for motor-operated valves (MOVs) and 95-07 for all power-operated valves document in detail the problems related to the performance of the safety-related valves in nuclear power plants. The problems relate to lack of reliable operation under design basis conditions including higher than anticipated stem thrust, unpredictable valve behavior, damage to the valve internals under blowdown/high flow conditions, significant degradation of performance when cycled under AP and flow, thermal binding, and pressure locking. This paper describes an improved motor-operated flexible wedge gate valve design, the GE Sentinel Valve, which is the outcome of a comprehensive and systematic development effort undertaken to resolve the issues identified in the NRC Generic Letters 89-10 and 95-07. The new design provides a reliable, long-term, low maintenance cost solution to the nuclear power industry. One of the key features incorporated in the disc permits the disc flexibility to be varied independently of the disc thickness (pressure boundary) dictated by the ASME Section III Pressure Vessel & Piping Code stress criteria. This feature allows the desired flexibility to be incorporated in the disc, thus eliminating thermal binding problems. A matrix of analyses was performed using finite element and computational fluid dynamics approaches to optimize design for stresses, flexibility, leak-tightness, fluid flow, and thermal effects. The design of the entire product line was based upon a consistent set of analyses and design rules which permit scaling to different valve sizes and pressure classes within the product line. The valve meets all of the ASME Section III Code design criteria and the N-Stamp requirements. The performance of the valve was validated by performing extensive separate effects and plant in-situ tests. This paper summarizes the key design features, analyses, and test results.

  19. Exploration of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants: Initial Results from ARIES-CS Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    2005-01-01

    A detailed and integrated study of compact stellarators as power plants, ARIES-CS, was initiated recently to advance our understanding of attractive compact stellarator configurations and to define key R and D areas. We have completed phase 1 of ARIES-CS study - our results are described in this paper. We have identified several promising stellarator configurations. High α particle loss of these configurations is a critical issue. It appears that devices with an overall size similar to those envisioned for tokamak power plants are possible. A novel approach was developed in ARIES-CS in which the blanket at the critical areas of minimum stand-off is replaced by a highly efficient WC-based shield. In this manner, we have been able to reduce the minimum stand-off by ∼20%-30% compared to a uniform radial build which was assumed in previous studies. Our examination of engineering options indicates that overall assembly and maintenance procedure plays a critical role in identifying acceptable engineering design and has a major impact on the optimization of a plasma/coil configuration

  20. Safety issues and their ranking for 'small series' WWER-1000 nuclear power plants. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    This report presents the safety issues in 'small series' WWER-1000 nuclear power plants (NPPs). Safety issues are deviations from current recognized safety practices in design and operation judged to be safety significant by their impact on the plants' defence in depth. This report is intended to serve as reference for the development of plant specific safety improvement programmes and for the evaluation of measures proposed and/or implemented. The identification of safety issues is based on safety studies conducted by the operators of 'small series' WWER-1000 units and by organizations dealing with these reactors, on findings of IAEA safety missions to 'small series' WWER-1000 plants in South Ukraine, at Novovoronezh and Kalinin, and on information obtained from specialists from various countries during an IAEA consultants meeting, 8-12 September 1997 in Vienna, within the framework of the Extra budgetary Programme on the Safety of WWER and RBMK NPPs. Safety issues are first presented according to their impact on the main safety functions and are then described individually. The safety issues are characterized by issue title and specified by issue clarification. Safety issues connected with plant design are followed by the ranking of the issue and ranking justification. Altogether 85 safety issues have been identified, 12 of which are in Category III (defence in depth is insufficient, immediate corrective action is necessary), 38 in Category 11 (defence in depth is degraded, action is needed to resolve the issue) and 22 in Category I (departure from international practices, to be addressed as part of actions to resolve higher priority issues). In the case of operational safety issues (13 safety issues) no ranking is provided as the available material was considered insufficient. For each safety issue, comments and recommendations are made by the IAEA; the status of corresponding measures to improve safety implemented or planned at each site are presented in the

  1. Safety issues and their ranking for 'small series' WWER-1000 nuclear power plants. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    This report presents the safety issues in 'small series' WWER-1000 nuclear power plants (NPPs). Safety issues are deviations from current recognized safety practices in design and operation judged to be safety significant by their impact on the plants' defence in depth. This report is intended to serve as reference for the development of plant specific safety improvement programmes and for the evaluation of measures proposed and/or implemented. The identification of safety issues is based on safety studies conducted by the operators of 'small series' WWER-1000 units and by organizations dealing with these reactors, on findings of IAEA safety missions to 'small series' WWER-1000 plants in South Ukraine, at Novovoronezh and Kalinin, and on information obtained from specialists from various countries during an IAEA consultants meeting, 8-12 September 1997 in Vienna, within the framework of the Extra budgetary Programme on the Safety of WWER and RBMK NPPs. Safety issues are first presented according to their impact on the main safety functions and are then described individually. The safety issues are characterized by issue title and specified by issue clarification. Safety issues connected with plant design are followed by the ranking of the issue and ranking justification. Altogether 85 safety issues have been identified, 12 of which are in Category III (defence in depth is insufficient, immediate corrective action is necessary), 38 in Category 11 (defence in depth is degraded, action is needed to resolve the issue) and 22 in Category I (departure from international practices, to be addressed as part of actions to resolve higher priority issues). In the case of operational safety issues (13 safety issues) no ranking is provided as the available material was considered insufficient. For each safety issue, comments and recommendations are made by the IAEA; the status of corresponding measures to improve safety implemented or planned at each site are presented in the

  2. Nuclear power debate: moral, economic, technical, and political issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, D. III.

    1977-01-01

    The pace at which nuclear power will develop is clouded with uncertainties. At the end of 1976 in the United States, 61 nuclear reactors were operating, representing slightly more than 9 percent of the country's total generating capacity. Another 168 reactors were either planned, under construction, or on order. Outside the United States, commitments to nuclear power grew by 17 percent in 1975 over 1974. Indonesia, Turkey, and Poland ordered nuclear plants, bringing to 41 the number of countries committed to nuclear energy. In 1976, 112 nuclear reactors were operating in 18 countries; an additional 342 plants were planned, on order, or under construction. The speed at which nuclear power will continue to grow is dependent on a number of factors: the rate at which demand for energy increases, the changing economics of alternative methods of energy production, the processes by which decisions affecting nuclear power development are made, and the degree to which they satisfy public concerns about the safety of nuclear energy. This book addresses itself to these factors as follows: Economic issues: At what rate will demand for energy increase, and how can that demand be met. (Chapter 2.) How cost-competitive are the major alternative methods of producing electricity that now exist--nuclear power and coal. (Chapter 3.) Decision making issues: Are the processes by which decisions to proceed with development of nuclear power, both in government and in industry, adequate to protect the interests of the public and of investors. (Chapters 4 and 5.) Safety issues: Are nuclear power plants themselves safe. (Chapters 6 and 7.) Can adequate safeguards be established to ensure protection against misuse of the products or by-products of those plants and to ensure the permanent safe storage of radioactive wastes

  3. Power plant conceptual studies in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonnier, D.; Campbell, D.; Cook, I.; Pace, L. Di; Giancarli, L.; Hayward, J.; Puma, A. Li; Medrano, M.; Norajitra, P.; Roccella, M.; Sardain, P.; Tran, M.Q.; Ward, D.

    2007-01-01

    The European fusion programme is 'reactor oriented' and it is aimed at the successive demonstration of the scientific, the technological and the economic feasibility of fusion power. The European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) has been a study of conceptual designs of five commercial fusion power plants and the main emphasis was on system integration. It focused on five power plant models which are illustrative of a wider spectrum of possibilities. They are all based on the tokamak concept and they have approximately the same net electrical power output, 1500 MWe. These span a range from relatively near-term, based on limited technology and plasma physics extrapolations, to an advanced conception. The PPCS allows one to clarify the concept of DEMO, the device that will bridge the gap between ITER and the first-of-a-kind fusion power plant. An assessment of the PPCS models with limited extrapolations highlighted a number of issues that must be addressed to establish the DEMO physics and technological basis

  4. Critical defect size assessment in pipelines on a nuclear power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimova Galya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In many energy industry structures, pipeline systems are subject to the impact of mechanical forces, moments of forces and fluid flows of high pressure and temperature. These load factors cause defects in the pipeline metal. As the years of operation increase, defects may occur and grow, which may lead to the destruction of pipeline walls. Special measures have been planned and implemented to ensure the safe operation of high-energy facilities. This study focused on pipelines and nozzles of nuclear power plant equipment with bimetal welded joints on which the size of critical defects was assessed. The base of assessment covers material properties, temperature and stress fields, fracture mechanics calculations. This study involves developing of finite element models and implementing simulations on them in order to obtain temperature fields and determine the stress-strain state of the component.

  5. Design verification enhancement of field programmable gate array-based safety-critical I&C system of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jaecheon, E-mail: jcjung@kings.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Power Plant Engineering, KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, 658-91 Haemaji-ro, Seosang-myeon, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 45014 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • An enhanced, systematic and integrated design verification approach is proposed for V&V of FPGA-based I&C system of NPP. • RPS bistable fixed setpoint trip algorithm is designed, analyzed, verified and discussed using the proposed approaches. • The application of integrated verification approach simultaneously verified the entire design modules. • The applicability of the proposed V&V facilitated the design verification processes. - Abstract: Safety-critical instrumentation and control (I&C) system in nuclear power plant (NPP) implemented on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) plays a vital role in safe operation of the plant. The challenges such as fast obsolescence, the vulnerability to cyber-attack, and other related issues of software systems have currently led to the consideration of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as an alternative to PLCs because of their advantages and hardware related benefits. However, safety analysis for FPGA-based I&C systems, and verification and validation (V&V) assessments still remain important issues to be resolved, which are now become a global research point of interests. In this work, we proposed a systematic design and verification strategies from start to ready-to-use in form of model-based approaches for FPGA-based reactor protection system (RPS) that can lead to the enhancement of the design verification and validation processes. The proposed methodology stages are requirement analysis, enhanced functional flow block diagram (EFFBD) models, finite state machine with data path (FSMD) models, hardware description language (HDL) code development, and design verifications. The design verification stage includes unit test – Very high speed integrated circuit Hardware Description Language (VHDL) test and modified condition decision coverage (MC/DC) test, module test – MATLAB/Simulink Co-simulation test, and integration test – FPGA hardware test beds. To prove the adequacy of the proposed

  6. Design verification enhancement of field programmable gate array-based safety-critical I&C system of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Jung, Jaecheon; Heo, Gyunyoung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An enhanced, systematic and integrated design verification approach is proposed for V&V of FPGA-based I&C system of NPP. • RPS bistable fixed setpoint trip algorithm is designed, analyzed, verified and discussed using the proposed approaches. • The application of integrated verification approach simultaneously verified the entire design modules. • The applicability of the proposed V&V facilitated the design verification processes. - Abstract: Safety-critical instrumentation and control (I&C) system in nuclear power plant (NPP) implemented on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) plays a vital role in safe operation of the plant. The challenges such as fast obsolescence, the vulnerability to cyber-attack, and other related issues of software systems have currently led to the consideration of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as an alternative to PLCs because of their advantages and hardware related benefits. However, safety analysis for FPGA-based I&C systems, and verification and validation (V&V) assessments still remain important issues to be resolved, which are now become a global research point of interests. In this work, we proposed a systematic design and verification strategies from start to ready-to-use in form of model-based approaches for FPGA-based reactor protection system (RPS) that can lead to the enhancement of the design verification and validation processes. The proposed methodology stages are requirement analysis, enhanced functional flow block diagram (EFFBD) models, finite state machine with data path (FSMD) models, hardware description language (HDL) code development, and design verifications. The design verification stage includes unit test – Very high speed integrated circuit Hardware Description Language (VHDL) test and modified condition decision coverage (MC/DC) test, module test – MATLAB/Simulink Co-simulation test, and integration test – FPGA hardware test beds. To prove the adequacy of the proposed

  7. Strengthening of nuclear power plant construction safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jun

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the warning of the Fukushima nuclear accident, and analyzes the major nuclear safety issues in nuclear power development in China, problems in nuclear power plants under construction, and how to strengthen supervision and management in nuclear power construction. It also points out that the development of nuclear power must attach great importance to the safety, and nuclear power plant construction should strictly implement the principle of 'safety first and quality first'. (author)

  8. Maintenance planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattu, R.K.; Cooper, S.E.; Lauderdale, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Maintenance planning for nuclear power plants is similar to that in other industrial plants but it is heavily influenced by regulatory rules, with consequent costs of compliance. Steps by the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address that problem include development of guidelines for maintenance of risk-critical equipment, using PRA-based techniques to select a set of equipment that requires maintenance and reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) approaches for determining what maintenance is required. The result of the process is a program designed to ensure effective maintenance of the equipment most critical to plant safety. (author)

  9. Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fran

    1979-01-01

    Presents a nuclear power plant simulation game which is designed to involve a class of 30 junior or senior high school students. Scientific, ecological, and social issues covered in the game are also presented. (HM)

  10. NuPEER Dijon 2005 Symposium. Ageing issues in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emond, David (ed.) [BCCN, Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, ASN, 6, place du Colonel Bourgoin, 75572 Paris Cedex 12 (France)

    2005-07-01

    The French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) organized an international symposium on regulatory aspects of ageing issues for nuclear pressure equipment. The ageing of nuclear pressure equipment is an issue of growing importance for nuclear regulators and material experts worldwide as age-related degradation of major pressure-retaining components challenges the remaining operating life of nuclear power plants. This symposium aimed at providing a forum for technical exchange among the staffs responsible for nuclear pressure equipment within the safety authorities and the associated expertise organisations. The contents of the symposium is as follows: 1. Control and supervision of safety of nuclear pressure equipment in France and abroad; 1.1. Position of the French Nuclear Safety Authority (1 paper); 1.2. Regulatory practices worldwide (4 papers); 1.3. Licence renewal: Field experience (2 papers); 1.4. Role of international organisations (1 paper); 2. Management of equipment and materials: From design to degradation mechanisms; 2.1. Operation and equipment (4 papers); 2. Evolution of materials (4 papers); 2.3. Fatigue degradation mechanisms (3 papers); 2.4. Contribution of research and development (4 papers); 3. In-service inspection: Evolutions, methods and strategies; 3.1. Methods and evolution (1 paper); 3.2. Qualification of methods (2 papers); 3.3. Surveillance strategies (2 papers); 4. Testimonies and points of view of utilities (3 papers); 5. Ageing issues taken into account in non nuclear fields (2 papers). The symposium began with workshops devoted to: Operation and equipment; Behaviour of materials; Fatigue degradations; Contributions of research and development. The symposium continued with plenary session that addressed the following issues: Control and supervision of safety of nuclear pressure equipment; Role of international organisations; In-service inspection: Objectives, methods and strategies; Point of view of utilities; Technical summary and

  11. A framework for the system-of-systems analysis of the risk for a safety-critical plant exposed to external events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zio, E.; Ferrario, E.

    2013-01-01

    We consider a critical plant exposed to risk from external events. We propose an original framework of analysis, which extends the boundaries of the study to the interdependent infrastructures which support the plant. For the purpose of clearly illustrating the conceptual framework of system-of-systems analysis, we work out a case study of seismic risk for a nuclear power plant embedded in the connected power and water distribution, and transportation networks which support its operation. The technical details of the systems considered (including the nuclear power plant) are highly simplified, in order to preserve the purpose of illustrating the conceptual, methodological framework of analysis. Yet, as an example of the approaches that can be used to perform the analysis within the proposed framework, we consider the Muir Web as system analysis tool to build the system-of-systems model and Monte Carlo simulation for the quantitative evaluation of the model. The numerical exercise, albeit performed on a simplified case study, serves the purpose of showing the opportunity of accounting for the contribution of the interdependent infrastructure systems to the safety of a critical plant. This is relevant as it can lead to considerations with respect to the decision making related to safety critical-issues. -- Highlights: ► We consider a critical plant exposed to risk from external events. ► We consider also the interdependent infrastructures that support the plant. ► We use Muir Web as system analysis tool to build the system-of-systems model. ► We use Monte Carlo simulation for the quantitative evaluation of the model. ► We find that the interdependent infrastructures should be considered as they can be a support for the critical plant safety

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on future control station designs and human performance issues in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear community is currently at a stage where new reactors are being built, advanced reactors are being planned, and existing reactors are undergoing various forms of modernization of their control stations. Nuclear power plants are characterised by a high degree of complexity, where efficient and safe performance is dependent on both a sound technical design and effective teamwork and work practices. Team interactions have long traditions in current nuclear power plants. The way people operate and maintain the plants may need to accommodate technical advances associated with control station modernization and advanced plant control stations. The nuclear community likely to see the introduction of new designs, new tools to support the staff, changes to staffing types and levels, concepts of operation for new reactors that are different from current reactors, e.g., multi-unit control, possible remote operation, distributed decision making, and cooperation across distances. Based on recent experience, there is limited knowledge about human performance issues with regard to upgraded control rooms. However, even less knowledge exists regarding operation and maintenance of control stations for future and more advanced reactor designs. In order to explore these issues, the CSNI Special Experts' Group on Human and Organisational Factors (SEGHOF), now the Working Group on Human and Organizational Factors (WGHOF), and the Halden Reactor Project (HRP) hosted a joint workshop which provided an international forum for utilities, vendors, research bodies and regulators to discuss human performance issues related to control stations for future nuclear power plant designs and for modified control rooms for existing plants. The Norwegian petroleum industry also shared their experiences, especially with integrated and distributed operations among off-shore and on-shore control centres. There were 74 participants from 20 countries at the workshop. Twenty-two papers were

  13. Countermeasure to plant life management of the nuclear power plants out of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Some investigations on countermeasure to plant life management of the nuclear power plants were begun since beginning of 1990s under cooperation with Ministry of International Trade and Industry and all electric power companies under consideration of recent state on abroad and at concept of preventive conservation implementation against the plant life management. As a result, the Tokyo Electric Power Company, the Kansai Electric Power Company and the Japan Atomic Power Company settled each program on countermeasure to plant life management of the Fukushima-1 Power Plant, the Mihama-1 Power Plant and the Tsuruga-1 Power Plant, respectively, which were reported to the Atomic Energy Safety Commission to issue on February, 1999, after deliberation in the Adviser Group of Ministry of International Trade and Industry. Such investigations on countermeasure to the plant life management are also conducted out of Japan in parallel to those in Japan, which contain programs reflecting states of operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants and atmosphere around atomic energy in each country. Here were described on some present states of the countermeasures to plant life management in U.S.A., France, Germany, Sweden, England and so forth. (G.K.)

  14. Critical corrosion issues and mitigation strategies impacting the operability of LWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent corrosion experience in US light water reactor nuclear power plants is reviewed with emphasis on mitigation strategies to control the cost of corrosion to LWR operators. Many components have suffered corrosion problems resulting in industry costs of billions of dollars. The most costly issues have been stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel coolant piping in boiling water reactors and corrosion damage to steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactors. Through industry wide R and D programs these problems are now understood and mitigation strategies have been developed to address the issues in a cost effective manner. Other significant corrosion problems for both reactor types are briefly reviewed. Tremendous progress has been made in controlling corrosion, however, minimizing its impact on plant operations will present a continuing challenge throughout the remaining service lives of these power plants

  15. Human factors: a major issue in plant aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widrig, R.D.

    1985-07-01

    Human factors issues will be of great significance in the safe and reliable operation of aging nuclear power plants, and they may be more important than materials/component-type issues. Human actions can accelerate or decelerate te physical aging process. And an aging plant can have significant negative implications on staff performance and actions. Some examples include difficulties in attracting and retaining good managers, financial decisions based on a short and uncertain remaining plant life, difficulties in replacing retiring staff, increased maintenance complexity, and increased burden on training. These problems can be dealt with more effectively by early recognition and a well conceived mitigation effort

  16. Nuclear plant requirements during power system restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamski, G.; Jenkins, R.; Gill, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is one of a series presented on behalf of the System Operation Subcommittee with the intent of focusing industry attention on power system restoration issues. This paper discusses a number of nuclear power plant requirements that require special attention during power system restoration

  17. Preventive maintenance instrumentation results in Spanish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curiel, M.; Palomo, M. J.; Verdu, G.; Arnaldos, A.

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a recompilation of the most significance results in relation to the researching in preventive and predictive maintenance in critical nuclear instrumentation for power plant operation, which it is being developed by Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales and the Isirym Institute of the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Instrumentation verification and test, it is a priority of the power plants control and instrumentation department's technicians. These procedures are necessary information for the daily power plant work. It is performed according to different procedures and in different moments of the fuel cycle depending on the instrumentation critical state and the monitoring process. Normally, this study is developed taking into account the instantaneous values of the instrumentation measures and, after their conversion to physical magnitude, they are analyzed according to the power plant operation point. Moreover, redundant sensors measurements are taken into consideration to the equipment and/or power plant monitoring. This work goes forward and it is in advanced to the instrument analysis as it is, independently of the operation point, using specific signal analysis techniques for preventive and predictive maintenance, with the object to obtain not only information about possible malfunctions, but the degradation scale presented in the instrument or in the system measured. We present seven real case studies of Spanish nuclear power plants each of them shall give a significant contribution to problem resolution and power plant performance. (Author)

  18. Managed maintenance, the next step in power plant maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, G.; Anderson, T.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Westinghouse Nuclear Services Integration Division managed maintenance services are described. Essential to the management and control of a total plant maintenance programme is the development of a comprehensive maintenance specification. During recent years Westinghouse has jointly developed total plant engineering-based maintenance specifications with a number of utilities. The process employed and the experience to date are described. To efficiently implement the maintenance programme Westinghouse has developed a computer software program specifically designed for day to day use at the power plant by maintenance personnel. This program retains an equipment maintenance history, schedules maintenance activities, issues work orders and performs a number of sophisticated analyses of the maintenance backlog and forecast, equipment failure rates, etc. The functions of this software program are described and details of Westinghouse efforts to support the utilities in reducing outage times through development of predefined outage plans for critical report maintenance activities are given. Also described is the experience gained in the training of specialized maintenance personnel, employing competency-based training techniques and equipment mock-ups, and the benefits experienced, in terms of improved quality and productivity of maintenance performed. The success experienced with these methods has caused Westinghouse to expand the use of these training techniques to the more routine skill areas of power plant maintenance. A significant reduction in the operating costs of nuclear power plants will only be brought about by a significant improvement in the quality of maintenance. Westinghouse intends to effect this change by expanding its international service capabilities and to make major investments in order to promote technological developments in the area of power plant maintenance. (author)

  19. International construction trends for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armor, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    In this review of trends in new, worldwide plant construction it is apparent that the technologies being applied are often geared to the cost of money issue. In an era when interest rates can fluctuate widely, particularly in Third World countries, the need to put new power plants on-line quickly has become a key issue. For example, this has largely triggered the move to smaller, more dispersed plants, with unit sizes 400 MW and below, compared with the 1,000 MW + sizes of 10-20 years ago. It has also renewed the emphasis on modular methods of building components, and on innovative transportation procedures. It has given support to the packaged power plants, such as PFBC, which can be largely pre-assembled. In the US, it has spawned a new infrastructure of independent constructors and power generators, who have partially lifted the burden of new plant financing from the shoulders of the utilities. Yet, national needs are not always the same. Fuels may or may not be indigenous. Environmental restrictions are nationally, or even locally, imposed. Government subsidies and strategic needs can override the short-term objectives. This paper briefly surveys current approaches to new generating plants in some key areas of the world. One aspect of electric power generation seems clear. In terms of power consumption, the world is on the move again - not only in third world countries, but also in the developed nations as the memories of the oil embargo of 15 years ago fade. Trends are discussed for the US, Japan, the rest of Asia, South Africa, Western Europe, Russia, and Eastern Europe

  20. Design Provisions for Station Blackout at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchac, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A station blackout (SBO) is generally known as 'a plant condition with complete loss of all alternating current (AC) power from off-site sources, from the main generator and from standby AC power sources important to safety to the essential and nonessential switchgear buses. Direct current (DC) power supplies and un-interruptible AC power supplies may be available as long as batteries can supply the loads. Alternate AC power supplies are available'. A draft Safety Guide DS 430 'Design of Electrical Power Systems for Nuclear Power Plants' provides recommendations regarding the implementation of Specific Safety Requirements: Design: Requirement 68 for emergency power systems. The Safety Guide outlines several design measures which are possible as a means of increasing the capability of the electrical power systems to cope with a station blackout, without providing detailed implementation guidance. A committee of international experts and advisors from numerous countries is currently working on an IAEA Technical Document (TECDOC) whose objective is to provide a common international technical basis from which the various criteria for SBO events need to be established, to support operation under design basis and design extension conditions (DEC) at nuclear power plants, to document in a comprehensive manner, all relevant aspects of SBO events at NPPs, and to outline critical issues which reflect the lessons learned from the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident. This paper discusses the commonly encountered difficulties associated with establishing the SBO criteria, shares the best practices, and current strategies used in the design and implementation of SBO provisions and outline the structure of the IAEA's SBO TECDOC under development. (author)

  1. Seismic review of existing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, P.I.; Mayes, R.L.; Jones, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    Because of developments in the fields of earthquake and structural engineering over the last two decades, the codes, standards and design criteria for Nuclear Power Plants and other critical structures have changed substantially. As a result, plants designed only a few years ago do not satisfy the requirements for new plants. Accordingly, the Regulatory Agencies are requiring owners of older Nuclear Power Plants to re-qualify the plants seismically, using codes, standards, analytical techniques and knowledge developed in recent years. Seismic review consists of three major phases: establishing the design and performance criteria, re-qualifying the structures, and re-qualifying the equipment. The authors of the paper have been recently involved in the seismic review of existing nuclear power plants in the United States. This paper is a brief summary of their experiences

  2. Stade. Decommissioning and dismantling of the nuclear power plant - from the nuclear power plant to the green lawn. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear power plant Stade (KKS) was shutdown in 2003 and is being dismantled since 2005. The contribution covers the following issues: What means decommissioning and dismantling? What was the reason for decommissioning? What experiences on the dismantling of nuclear power plants are available? What is the dismantling procedure? What challenges for the power plant personal result from dismantling? What happens with the deconstruction material? What happens with the resulting free area (the ''green lawn'')? What is the legal frame work for dismantling?

  3. New technology for optimized I and C maintenance and management of ageing of critical equipment in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced sensors and new testing and maintenance technologies have become available over the last ten years for nuclear power plants (NPPs) to replace outdated, obsolete, and troublesome instruments, provide for management of ageing of critical plant equipment, optimize maintenance activities, reduce maintenance costs and personnel radiation exposure, and at the same time, improve plant safety and availability. These new developments are reviewed in this TECDOC. The material covered here has been summarized from NUREG/CR-5501, a 1998 report written by H.M. Hashemian and his co-authors for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. (author)

  4. Application of Solar Chimney Concept to Solve Potential Safety Issues of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasawneh, Khalid; PARK, Youn Won

    2014-01-01

    In this paper two main events and their causes have been investigated and a potential alternative supporting system will be provided. The first event to be addressed is the Station Blackout (SBO) caused by the inherent unreliability of the Emergency Diesel Generators (EDGs) and Alternative AC (AAC) power sources. Different parameters affect The EDG unreliability; for instance, mechanical, operational, maintenance and surveillance. Those parameters will be analyzed and linked to plant safety and Core Damage Frequency (CDF). Also the AACs, the SBO diesel generators, will be studied and their operational requirements similarity with the EDGs will be discussed. The second event to be addressed is the Loss of Ultimate Heat Sink (LUHS) caused by the degradation of heat exchange effectiveness, that is, the poor heat transfer to the Ultimate Heat Sink (UHS). Different causes to such case were observed; intake lines blockages due to ice and foreign biological matters formation and oil spill near the heat sink causing the oil leakage to the heat exchangers tubes. The later cause, oil spill, has been given a special attention here due its potential effects for different nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the world; for example, Finland and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). For the Finnish case, the Finnish nuclear regulator (STUK) took already countermeasures for such scenario by introducing alternative heat sink, cooling towers, for the primary used heat sink, sea water, for one of its nuclear power plants. The abundance of the solar irradiation in the UAE region provides a perfect condition for the implementation of solar power applications. Utilizing this unique characteristic of that region may provide promising alternative and diverse options for solving potential safety related issues of their NPPs. The Solar Chimney Power Plant (SCPP) could be employed to serve as a supporting system to provide emergency power, in the case of SBO, and emergency cooling, in the case of

  5. Application of Solar Chimney Concept to Solve Potential Safety Issues of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khasawneh, Khalid; PARK, Youn Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper two main events and their causes have been investigated and a potential alternative supporting system will be provided. The first event to be addressed is the Station Blackout (SBO) caused by the inherent unreliability of the Emergency Diesel Generators (EDGs) and Alternative AC (AAC) power sources. Different parameters affect The EDG unreliability; for instance, mechanical, operational, maintenance and surveillance. Those parameters will be analyzed and linked to plant safety and Core Damage Frequency (CDF). Also the AACs, the SBO diesel generators, will be studied and their operational requirements similarity with the EDGs will be discussed. The second event to be addressed is the Loss of Ultimate Heat Sink (LUHS) caused by the degradation of heat exchange effectiveness, that is, the poor heat transfer to the Ultimate Heat Sink (UHS). Different causes to such case were observed; intake lines blockages due to ice and foreign biological matters formation and oil spill near the heat sink causing the oil leakage to the heat exchangers tubes. The later cause, oil spill, has been given a special attention here due its potential effects for different nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the world; for example, Finland and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). For the Finnish case, the Finnish nuclear regulator (STUK) took already countermeasures for such scenario by introducing alternative heat sink, cooling towers, for the primary used heat sink, sea water, for one of its nuclear power plants. The abundance of the solar irradiation in the UAE region provides a perfect condition for the implementation of solar power applications. Utilizing this unique characteristic of that region may provide promising alternative and diverse options for solving potential safety related issues of their NPPs. The Solar Chimney Power Plant (SCPP) could be employed to serve as a supporting system to provide emergency power, in the case of SBO, and emergency cooling, in the case of

  6. Cyber security for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Ruchi; Razdan, Mayuri; Munshi, Prabhat

    2005-01-01

    Cyber Security, cyber terrorism and cyber crime are the buzzwords in security related aspects of information technology. These terms are related to computers and networks that are critical for normal functionality and operations of nuclear power plants. At one end, this inter connected era is giving us the ease to perform various critical operation with a click of command, but on the other end it is giving rise to the new world of terrorism. In today's internet connected world, terrorism has left all the boundaries back and taken the new form, term it cyber terrorism or cyber crime. This paper aims to spread the awareness about cyber terrorism and how it can affect the overall security of nuclear power plants and establishments. (author)

  7. Plans for new nuclear power plants in the U.S.: first steps have been taken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroll, M.; Tveiten, B.

    2008-01-01

    In the past, American electricity utilities did everything in order to do without new nuclear power plants. They drastically improved the availability of existing plants, increased plant power, and laid the foundations for longer service lives of the plants. These possibilities have been exhausted by now. In the past decade, mainly new gas-fired power plants were commissioned. Building coal-fired plants has become very difficult. For these reasons, utilities now initiated a new nuclear beginning. Five applications for combined construction and operating permits have been filed so far. The first four projects are considered reference projects for the different reactor lines, i.e. ABWR, AP1000, ESBWR, and US-EPR. Another fourteen applications are expected to be filed in the course of this year. The applications field and expected cover a total of 29 new nuclear generating units. The utilities so far have spent triple-digit millions on preparing the applications, on design work, and on the precautionary purchase of components on the critical path. The first permits will be issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission probably in 2010/2011. Factors critical to the success of the projects on the side of vendors and utilities above all are a reliable supply chain and the training of qualified manpower. The measures necessary to achieve these goals have been initiated. (orig.)

  8. Independent verification in operations at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donderi, D.C.; Smiley, A.; Ostry, D.J.; Moray, N.P.

    1995-09-01

    A critical review of approaches to independent verification in operations used in nuclear power plant quality assurance programs in other countries, was conducted for this study. This report identifies the uses of independent verification and provides an assessment of the effectiveness of the various approaches. The findings indicate that at Canadian nuclear power plants as much, if not more, independent verification is performed than at power plants in the other countries included in the study. Additional requirements in this area are not proposed for Canadian stations. (author)

  9. Education Studies: Issues & Critical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Derek; Mufti, Emmanuel; Robinson, John

    2006-01-01

    This major text for Education Studies students provides a critical account of key issues in education today. The text features: (1) A critical analysis of key issues in Education Studies to encourage students' thinking about education in the broadest terms; (2) Themed sections with introductions to link the issues discussed in each chapter; (3)…

  10. Floating nuclear power plant safety assurance principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvonarev, B.M.; Kuchin, N.L.; Sergeev, I.V.

    1993-01-01

    In the north regions of the Russian federation and low density population areas, there is a real necessity for ecological clean energy small power sources. For this purpose, floating nuclear power plants, designed on the basis of atomic ship building engineering, are being conceptualized. It is possible to use the ship building plants for the reactor purposes. Issues such as radioactive waste management are described

  11. Evolution of Italian thermal power plants in the 2003-2008 period: evaluation of most important critical states and operative experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michi, L.; Camponeschi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Italian thermal power plants park is characterized by a dept transformation that is significantly changing the technological mix. The main aspects of these developments and related issues were analyzed in the last two years of operating experience [it

  12. Trends in radiation protection: possible effects on fusion power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eurajoki, Tapani; Frias, Manuel Pascual; Orlandi, Sergio

    2003-01-01

    Since the design of fusion power plants involves long-term issues, ranging over several decades, it is useful to try to foresee under what kind of regulations the first fusion plants are to be operated. Application of present radiological regulations and practice to a fusion power plant concept is considered. The current design phase of fusion power plants motivates the top-down dose assessment, but it is crucial to aim at bottom-up assessments to ensure radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable. Since several issues, relating both to our knowledge on radiation as well as to the practice of radiation protection, may change in the future, it is necessary to continuously follow the development in the further design of fusion power plants

  13. Fire Risk Scoping Study: Investigation of nuclear power plant fire risk, including previously unaddressed issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambright, J.A.; Nowlen, S.P.; Nicolette, V.F.; Bohn, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of nuclear power plant fire risk issues raised as a result of the USNRC sponsored Fire Protection Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories has been performed. The specific objectives of this study were (1) to review and requantify fire risk scenarios from four fire probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) in light of updated data bases made available as a result of USNRC sponsored Fire Protection Research Program and updated computer fire modeling capabilities, (2) to identify potentially significant fire risk issues that have not been previously addressed in a fire risk context and to quantify the potential impact of those identified fire risk issues where possible, and (3) to review current fire regulations and plant implementation practices for relevance to the identified unaddressed fire risk issues. In performance of the fire risk scenario requantifications several important insights were gained. It was found that utilization of a more extensive operational experience base resulted in both fire occurrence frequencies and fire duration times (i.e., time required for fire suppression) increasing significantly over those assumed in the original works. Additionally, some thermal damage threshold limits assumed in the original works were identified as being nonconservative based on more recent experimental data. Finally, application of the COMPBRN III fire growth model resulted in calculation of considerably longer fire damage times than those calculated in the original works using COMPBRN I. 14 refs., 2 figs., 16 tabs

  14. Maintenance management of emergency power supply equipment (uninterruptible power supply) in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Kyosuke; Hiyama, Hisao; Shibata, Satomi; Iwasaki, Shogo; Inami, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    Uninterruptible power supply systems are installed in the Tokai reprocessing plant in preparation for the emergency case that the commercial power supply is stopped by an accidental or intentional interruption in the supply of electricity. The uninterruptible power supply system particularly provides a temporary power source to the important devices for the radiation control of nuclear critical monitoring in the plant. Thus, the system is potentially important and essential for nuclear plants. The paper reports the current activities such as regular inspections, replacement of parts and system update, to maintain the function of uninterruptible power supply systems. (author)

  15. Knowledge acquisition for nuclear power plant unit diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaodong; Xi Shuren

    2003-01-01

    The process of acquiring knowledge and building a knowledge base is critical to realize fault diagnostic system at unit level in a nuclear power plant. It directly determines whether the diagnostic system can be applied eventually in a commercial plant. A means to acquire knowledge and its procedures was presented in this paper for fault diagnostic system in a nuclear power plant. The work can be carried out step by step and it is feasible in a commercial nuclear power plant. The knowledge base of the fault diagnostic system for a nuclear power plant can be built after the staff finish the tasks according to the framework presented in this paper

  16. RAM investigation of coal-fired thermal power plants: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bose

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Continuous generation of electricity of a power plant depends on the higher availability of its components/equipments. Higher availability of the components/equipments is inherently associated with their higher reliability and maintainability. This paper investigates the reliability, availability and maintainability (RAM characteristics of a 210 MW coal-fired thermal power plant (Unit-2 from a thermal power station in eastern region of India. Critical mechanical subsystems with respect to failure frequency, reliability and maintainability are identified for taking necessary measures for enhancing availability of the power plant and the results are compared with Unit-1 of the same Power Station. Reliability-based preventive maintenance intervals (PMIs at various reliability levels of the subsystems are estimated also for performing their preventive maintenance (PM. The present paper highlights that in the Unit-2, Economizer (ECO & Furnace Wall Tube (FWT exhibits lower reliability as compared to the other subsystems and Economizer (ECO & Baffle Wall Tube (BWT demands more improvement in maintainability. Further, it has been observed that FSH followed Decreasing Failure Rate (DFR and Economizer (ECO is the most critical subsystem for both the plants. RAM analysis is very much effective in finding critical subsystems and deciding their preventive maintenance program for improving availability of the power plant as well as the power supply.

  17. Critical Issues for Particle-Bed Reactor Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert S.; Husser, Dewayne L.; Jensen, Russell R.; Kerr, John M.

    1994-07-01

    Particle-Bed Reactors (PBRs) potentially offer performance advantages for nuclear thermal propulsion, including very high power densities, thrust-to-weight ratios, and specific impulses. A key factor in achieving all of these is the development of a very-high-temperature fuel. The critical issues for all such PBR fuels are uranium loading, thermomechanical and thermochemical stability, compatibility with contacting materials, fission product retention, manufacturability, and operational tolerance for particle failures. Each issue is discussed with respect to its importance to PBR operation, its status among current fuels, and additional development needs. Mixed-carbide-based fuels are recommended for further development to support high-performance PBRs.

  18. Development of web-based integrity evaluation system for primary components in a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.M.; Kim, J.C.; Choi, J.B.; Kim, Y.J. [SAFE Research Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea); Choi, S.N.; Jang, K.S.; Hong, S.Y. [Korea Electronic Power Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea)

    2004-07-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of a number of primary components. Maintaining the integrity of these components is one of the most critical issues in nuclear industry. In order to maintain the integrity of these primary components, a complicated procedure is required including periodical in-service inspection, failure assessment, fracture mechanics analysis, etc. Also, experts in different fields have to co-operate to resolve the integrity issues on the basis of inspection results. This integrity evaluation process usually takes long, and thus, is detrimental for the plant productivity. Therefore, an effective safety evaluation system is essential to manage integrity issues on a nuclear power plant. In this paper, a web-based integrity evaluation system for primary components in a nuclear power plant is proposed. The proposed system, which is named as WEBIES (web-based integrity evaluation system), has been developed in the form of 3-tier system architecture. The system consists of three servers; application program server, user interface program server and data warehouse server. The application program server includes the defect acceptance analysis module and the fracture mechanics analysis module which are programmed on the basis of ASME sec. XI, appendix A. The data warehouse server provides data for the integrity evaluation including material properties, geometry information, inspection data and stress data. The user interface program server provides information to all co- workers in the field of integrity evaluation. The developed system provides engineering knowledge-based information and concurrent and collaborative working environment through internet, and thus, is expected to raise the efficiency of integrity evaluation procedures on primary components of a nuclear power plant. (orig.)

  19. Development of web-based integrity evaluation system for primary components in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.M.; Kim, J.C.; Choi, J.B.; Kim, Y.J.; Choi, S.N.; Jang, K.S.; Hong, S.Y.

    2004-01-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of a number of primary components. Maintaining the integrity of these components is one of the most critical issues in nuclear industry. In order to maintain the integrity of these primary components, a complicated procedure is required including periodical in-service inspection, failure assessment, fracture mechanics analysis, etc. Also, experts in different fields have to co-operate to resolve the integrity issues on the basis of inspection results. This integrity evaluation process usually takes long, and thus, is detrimental for the plant productivity. Therefore, an effective safety evaluation system is essential to manage integrity issues on a nuclear power plant. In this paper, a web-based integrity evaluation system for primary components in a nuclear power plant is proposed. The proposed system, which is named as WEBIES (web-based integrity evaluation system), has been developed in the form of 3-tier system architecture. The system consists of three servers; application program server, user interface program server and data warehouse server. The application program server includes the defect acceptance analysis module and the fracture mechanics analysis module which are programmed on the basis of ASME sec. XI, appendix A. The data warehouse server provides data for the integrity evaluation including material properties, geometry information, inspection data and stress data. The user interface program server provides information to all co- workers in the field of integrity evaluation. The developed system provides engineering knowledge-based information and concurrent and collaborative working environment through internet, and thus, is expected to raise the efficiency of integrity evaluation procedures on primary components of a nuclear power plant. (orig.)

  20. Preventive maintenance instrumentation results in Spanish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiel, M. [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Palomo, M. J.; Verdu, G. [ISIRYM, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos, A., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.co [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    This paper is a recompilation of the most significance results in relation to the researching in preventive and predictive maintenance in critical nuclear instrumentation for power plant operation, which it is being developed by Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales and the Isirym Institute of the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Instrumentation verification and test, it is a priority of the power plants control and instrumentation department's technicians. These procedures are necessary information for the daily power plant work. It is performed according to different procedures and in different moments of the fuel cycle depending on the instrumentation critical state and the monitoring process. Normally, this study is developed taking into account the instantaneous values of the instrumentation measures and, after their conversion to physical magnitude, they are analyzed according to the power plant operation point. Moreover, redundant sensors measurements are taken into consideration to the equipment and/or power plant monitoring. This work goes forward and it is in advanced to the instrument analysis as it is, independently of the operation point, using specific signal analysis techniques for preventive and predictive maintenance, with the object to obtain not only information about possible malfunctions, but the degradation scale presented in the instrument or in the system measured. We present seven real case studies of Spanish nuclear power plants each of them shall give a significant contribution to problem resolution and power plant performance. (Author)

  1. Demonstration tokamak power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Mattas, R.; Smith, D.L.; DeFreece, D.; Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design for a tokamak demonstration power plant (DEMO) was developed. A large part of the study focused on examining the key issues and identifying the R and D needs for: (1) current drive for steady-state operation, (2) impurity control and exhaust, (3) tritium breeding blanket, and (4) reactor configuration and maintenance. Impurity control and exhaust will not be covered in this paper but is discussed in another paper in these proceedings, entitled Key Issues of FED/INTOR Impurity Control System

  2. Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, P.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.

    1999-01-01

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I ampersand C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I ampersand C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper

  3. Transient evaluation using EMTP at single open phase with the offsite power transformer for the emergency power supply systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    The emergency power supply systems of nuclear power plants, as the objects of this research, are critical in supplying stable electric power to such systems as the emergency core cooling system (ECCS), and in maintaining safety of the nuclear power reactor; this was apparent in the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) issued regulatory documents (BL 2012-011, IN 2012-032), and has commenced evaluations on newly discovered vulnerability in the design of power supply systems which cannot be detected with under-voltage protection relays, with certain kinds of configuration of coils and iron core structures, such as when the offsite power supply side is a Y-connection and the load side is a ⊿-connection etc., when the detection of single open phase fault with the circuit of a transformer which is without a ground fault connected to the offsite power supply system. This report uses simulation by the electro magnetic transients program (EMTP) and clearly describe the response at the time of the power supply single open phase without ground fault for various configuration of coils and various iron core structures of the three-phase transformer, and identify the important issues in the response of emergency power supply systems and the safety related components of representative domestic PWR plants when the single open phase fault occurred without ground fault. This report describes the results of the simulations of operations of the protection relays of the emergency power supply systems and the safety related components of representative a domestic PWR plant with EMTP. This report explains the method to detect open-phase when the transformer is no-load which United States Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed. As the detailed analyses data from EPRI related to the detection method concerned have not been disclosed officially yet, in this paper, the quantitative and detailed verification results

  4. Fossil power plant automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divakaruni, S.M.; Touchton, G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper elaborates on issues facing the utilities industry and seeks to address how new computer-based control and automation technologies resulting from recent microprocessor evolution, can improve fossil plant operations and maintenance. This in turn can assist utilities to emerge stronger from the challenges ahead. Many presentations at the first ISA/EPRI co-sponsored conference are targeted towards improving the use of computer and control systems in the fossil and nuclear power plants and we believe this to be the right forum to share our ideas

  5. PWSCC issues and material aging management for nuclear power plants in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seong Sik; Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Sung Woo; Kim, Hong Pyo [Nuclear Materials Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Industries) and universities (SNU, KAIST, UNIST), etc. The objective of the present work is to review the corrosion issues in Korea and introduce a strategy of Material Aging Management for Nuclear Power Plants in Korea.

  6. Markov approach to evaluate the availability simulation model for power generation system in a thermal power plant ,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdhesh Kr. Sharma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the availability of power plants has become increasingly important issue in most developed and developing countries. This paper aims to propose a methodology based on Markov approach to evaluate the availability simulation model for power generation system (Turbine in a thermal power plant under realistic working environment. The effects of occurrence of failure/course of actions and availability of repair facilities on system performance have been investigated. Higher availability of the components/equipments is inherently associated with their higher reliability and maintainability. The power generation system consists of five subsystems with four possible states: full working, reduced capacity, reduced efficiency and failed state. So, its availability should be carefully evaluated in order to foresee the performance of the power plant. The availability simulation model (Av. has been developed with the help of mathematical formulation based on Markov Birth-Death process using probabilistic approach. For this purpose, first differential equations have been generated. These equations are then solved using normalizing condition so as to determine the steady state availability of power generation system. In fact, availability analysis is very much effective in finding critical subsystems and deciding their preventive maintenance program for improving availability of the power plant as well as the power supply. From the graphs illustrated, the optimum values of failure/repair rates for maximum availability, of each subsystem is analyzed and then maintenance priorities are decided for all subsystems.The present paper highlights that in this system, Turbine governing subsystem is most sensitive demands more improvement in maintainability as compared to the other subsystems. While Turbine lubrication subsystem is least sensitive.

  7. Examining work structure in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, M.B.; Boulette, M.D.; Van Cott, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the assessment of the work structure of ten nuclear power plants. Work structure factors are those factors that relate to the way in which work at all levels in a plant is organized, staffed, managed, rewarded, and perceived by plant personnel. Questionnaires given to a cross-section of personnel at the plants were the primary source of data collection. Structured ''critical incident'' interviews were conducted to verify the questionnaire results. The study revealed that a variety of work structure factor problem areas do exist in nuclear power plants. The paper highlights a prioritized set of candidate research themes to be considered in EPRI's Work Structure and Performance Research Program

  8. Quality assurance program manual for nuclear power plants. Volume I. Policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The Consumers Power Company Quality Assurance Program Manual for Nuclear Power Plants consists of policies and procedures which comply with current NRC regulatory requirements and industry codes and standards in effect during the design, procurement, construction, testing, operation, refueling, maintenance, repair and modification activities associated with nuclear power plants. Specific NRC and industry documents that contain the requirements, including the issue dates in effect, are identified in each nuclear power plant's Safety Analysis Report. The requirements established by these documents form the basis for the Consumer Power Quality Assurance Program, which is implemented to control those structures, systems, components and operational safety actions listed in each nuclear power plant's Quality List (Q-List). As additional and revised requirements are issued by the NRC and professional organizations involved in nuclear activities, they will be reviewed for their impact on this manual, and changes will be made where considered necessary. CP Co 1--Consumers Power Company QA Program Topical Report is Volume I of this manual and contains Quality Assurance Program Policies applicable during all phases of nuclear power plant design, construction and operation

  9. Nuclear power plant status diagnostics using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, E.B.; Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    In this work, the nuclear power plant operating status recognition issue is investigated using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The objective is to train an ANN to classify nuclear power plant accident conditions and to assess the potential of future work in the area of plant diagnostics with ANNS. To this end, an ANN was trained to recognize normal operating conditions as well as potentially unsafe conditions based on nuclear power plant training simulator generated accident scenarios. These scenarios include; hot and cold leg loss of coolant, control rod ejection, loss of offsite power, main steam line break, main feedwater line break and steam generator tube leak accidents. Findings show that ANNs can be used to diagnose and classify nuclear power plant conditions with good results

  10. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements, unresolved safety issues, generic safety issues, other multiplant action issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This report is to provide a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as Unresolved Safety Issues (USIs), Generic Safety Issues(GSIs), and other Multiplant Actions (MPAs) that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. An additional purpose of this NUREG report is to serve as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues up until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees

  11. Environmental protection in thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This workbook is a compilation of the most important facts and data that are relevant today for environmental protection in thermal power plants. Unlike the other issues the text is not in the form of a random collection of data but in the form of a complete presentation. Possible elaboration projects for pupils can be easily derived from the individual sections. These deal with: the discussion about environmental protection; forest decline; sources of emission; nuisances in the Federal Republic of Germany; environmental protection in fossil-fuel power plants - clean air - cooling water utilization and water protection - noise; environmental protection in nuclear power plants - radioactive material produced in nuclear reactors and the retention of such materials - radioactive waste materials - monitoring of radioactive emissions; accessory materials and hints. (orig./HSCH) [de

  12. Thermal power blocks with ultra-super-critical steam parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aličić Merim M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New generation of thermal power plants are required to have increased utilization rates, in addition to reduced emissions of pollutants, in order to reach optimal solutions, from both technical and economic point of view. One way to achieve greater utilization efficiency is operation of the plant at super critical (SC or ultra super critical steam parameters (USC. However, achieving high parameters depends on use of new materials, which have better properties at high temperatures and pressures, use of new welding technologies and by solving the problem of corrosion. The paper gives an overview of some of the plants with these parameters.

  13. Environmental effects of thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlitzky, M.; Friedrich, R.; Unger, H.

    1986-02-01

    Reviewing critically the present literature, the effects of thermal power plants on the environment are studied. At first, the loads of the different power plant types are compiled. With regard to the effects of emission reduction proceedings the pollutant emissions are quantified. The second chapter shows the effects on the ecological factors, which could be caused by the most important emission components of thermal power plants. Where it is possible, relations between immissions respectively depositions and their effects on climate, man, flora, fauna and materials will be given. This shows that many effects depend strongly on the local landscape, climate and use of natural resources. Therefore, it appears efficient to ascertain different load limits. The last chapter gives a suggestion for an ecological compatibility test (ECT) of thermal power plants. In modular form the ECT deals with the emission fields, waste heat, pollution burden of air and water, noise, loss of area and aesthetical aspects. Limits depending on local conditions and use of area will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  14. Issues to improve the prospects of financing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    A changing global environment with increasing energy consumption and a need for international energy security is influencing nuclear power projects and the means of obtaining financial backing for such projects. The development of a national nuclear infrastructure can provide significant benefits that influence financial resources. The effects of other factors - such as financing arrangements for capital intensive plants, international design acceptance, harmonization of codes and standards, and assurances of fuel cycle services - need to be considered. An improvement in international cooperation may lower investment risks and contribute to reducing costs. The effects of all these issues need to be assessed and means for supporting the application of nuclear power in the current changing social and commercial environment need to be developed. A key question addressed in this publication is whether financing is the real barrier to nuclear power development or if financing difficulties are simply a consequence of other barriers. It recognizes that there is no single solution and that circumstances in different countries, with different starting points, ambitions and drivers, inevitably affect the balance of approaches followed. The importance of credible, practical, costed and substantiated plans is emphasized. Risks have to be mitigated through an effective strategy and the allocation of risks between parties must be logical. A project has to be demonstrably viable to attract financing. There are three broad areas which must be addressed to improve prospects of investment in nuclear power reactor construction. The first area, and probably the most important, is government and utility commitment and preparedness to adopt and implement a nuclear power programme using internationally recognized standards of safety. The second area is the application of lessons learned from technological and project developments. The third area is financing itself. The conclusions

  15. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Data concerning the existing nuclear power plants in the world are presented. The data was retrieved from the SIEN (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: nuclear plants, its status and type; installed nuclear power plants by country; nuclear power plants under construction by country; planned nuclear power plants by country; cancelled nuclear power plants by country; shut-down nuclear power plants by country. (E.G.) [pt

  16. Issues and decisions for nuclear power plant management after fuel damage events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    Experience has shown that the on-site activities following an incident that results in severely damaged fuel at a nuclear power plant required extraordinary effort. Even in cases that are not extreme but in which fuel damage is greater than mentioned in the specifications for operation, the recovery will require extensive work. This publication includes information from several projects at the IAEA since 1989 that have resulted in a Technical Report, a TECDOC and a Workshop. While the initial purpose of the projects was focused on providing technical information transfer to the experts engaged in recovery work at the damaged unit of Chernobyl NPP, the results have led to a general approach to managing events in which there is substantial fuel damage. This TECDOC summarizes the work to focus on management issues that may be encountered in any such event whether small or large. 11 refs, 2 figs, 5 tabs

  17. Spherical tokamak power plant design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Bond, A.; Edwards, J.; Karditsas, P.J.; McClements, K.G.; Mustoe, J.; Sherwood, D.V.; Voss, G.M.; Wilson, H.R.

    2000-01-01

    The very high β potential of the spherical tokamak has been demonstrated in the START experiment. Systems code studies show the cost of electricity from spherical tokamak power plants, operating at high β in second ballooning mode stable regime, is comparable with fossil fuels and fission. Outline engineering designs are presented based on two concepts for the central rod of the toroidal field (TF) circuit - a room temperature water cooled copper rod or a helium cooled cryogenic aluminium rod. For the copper rod case the TF return limbs are supported by the vacuum vessel, while for the aluminium rod the TF coils form an independent structure. In both cases thermohydraulic and stress calculations indicate the viability of the design. Two-dimensional neutronics calculations show the feasibility of tritium self-sufficiency without an inboard blanket. The spherical tokamak has unique maintenance possibilities based on lowering major component structures into a hot cell beneath the device and these are discussed

  18. An improved basis for evaluating continued service of Category I concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Mori, Y.; Arndt, E.G.

    1992-01-01

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program has the overall objective of preparing technical bases for regulatory criteria which will provide the NRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in nuclear power plant evaluations for continued service. In meeting this objective three primary activities are underway: (1) development of a structural materials information center containing data and information on the variation of concrete and concrete-related material properties over time; (2) establishment of procedures to make quantitative evaluations of the presence, magnitude, and significance of environmental stressors or aging factors that can impact critical component performance, as well as techniques which can be used for repair of degraded concrete structures; and (3) formulation of a quantitative methodology for performing current condition assessments and making reliability-based life predictions of critical concrete structures in nuclear power plants. Accomplishments to date under each of these tasks are presented

  19. Legal and Institutional Issues of Transportable Nuclear Power Plants: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    jointly the international and national actions required for ensuring the sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. A transportable nuclear power plant (TNPP) is a factory manufactured, transportable and relocatable nuclear power plant which, when fuelled, is capable of producing final energy products such as electricity and heat. Introducing a TNPP may require fewer financial and human resources from the host State. However, the deployment of such reactors will face new legal issues in the international context which need to be resolved to enable the deployment of such reactors in countries other than the country of origin. The objective of this report is to study the legal and institutional issues for the deployment of TNPPs, to reveal challenges that might be faced in their deployment, and to outline pathways for resolution of the identified issues and challenges in the short and long terms. It is addressed to senior legal, regulatory and technical officers in Member States planning to embark on a nuclear power programme or to expand an existing one by considering the introduction of a TNPP

  20. Integrated approach to fire safety at the Krsko nuclear power plant - fire protection action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambright, J.A.; Cerjak, J.; Spiler, J.; Ioannidi, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (NPP Krsko) is a Westinghouse design, single-unit, 1882 Megawatt thermal (MWt), two-loop, pressurized water nuclear power plant. The fire protection program at NPP Krsko has been reviewed and reports issued recommending changes and modifications to the program, plant systems and structures. Three reports were issued, the NPP Krsko Fire Hazard Analysis (Safe Shout down Separation Analysis Report), the ICISA Analysis of Core Damage Frequency Due to Fire at the NPP Krsko and IPEEE (Individual Plant External Event Examination) related to fire risk. The Fire Hazard Analysis Report utilizes a compliance - based deterministic approach to identification of fire area hazards. This report focuses on strict compliance from the perspective of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), standards, guidelines and acceptance criteria and does not consider variations to comply with the intent of the regulations. The probabilistic analysis methide used in the ICISA and IPEEE report utilizes a risk based nad intent based approach in determining critical at-risk fire areas. NPP Krsko has already completed the following suggestions/recommendations from the above and OSART reports in order to comply with Appendix R: Installation of smoke detectors in the Control Room; Installation of Emergency Lighting in some plant areas and of Remote Shout down panels; Extension of Sound Power Communication System; Installation of Fire Annunciator Panel at the On-site Fire Brigade Station; Installation of Smoke Detection System in the (a) Main Control Room Panels, (b) Essential Service Water Building. (c) Component Cooling Building pump area, chiller area and HVAC area, (d) Auxiliary Building Safety pump rooms, (e) Fuel Handling room, (f) Intermediate Building AFFW area and compressor room, and (g) Tadwaste building; inclusion of Auxiliary operators in the Fire Brigade; training of Fire Brigade Members in Plant Operation (9 week course); Development of Fire Door Inspection and

  1. Analysis of the environmental issues concerning the deployment of an OTEC power plant in Martinique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devault, Damien A; Péné-Annette, Anne

    2017-11-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a form of power generation, which exploits the temperature difference between warm surface seawater and cold deep seawater. Suitable conditions for OTEC occur in deep warm seas, especially the Caribbean, the Red Sea and parts of the Indo-Pacific Ocean. The continuous power provided by this renewable power source makes a useful contribution to a renewable energy mix because of the intermittence of the other major renewable power sources, i.e. solar or wind power. Industrial-scale OTEC power plants have simply not been built. However, recent innovations and greater political awareness of power transition to renewable energy sources have strengthened the support for such power plants and, after preliminary studies in the Reunion Island (Indian Ocean), the Martinique Island (West Indies) has been selected for the development of the first full-size OTEC power plant in the world, to be a showcase for testing and demonstration. An OTEC plant, even if the energy produced is cheap, calls for high initial capital investment. However, this technology is of interest mainly in tropical areas where funding is limited. The cost of innovations to create an operational OTEC plant has to be amortized, and this technology remains expensive. This paper will discuss the heuristic, technical and socio-economic limits and consequences of deploying an OTEC plant in Martinique to highlight respectively the impact of the OTEC plant on the environment the impact of the environment on the OTEC plant. After defining OTEC, we will describe the different constraints relating to the setting up of the first operational-scale plant worldwide. This includes the investigations performed (reporting declassified data), the political context and the local acceptance of the project. We will then provide an overview of the processes involved in the OTEC plant and discuss the feasibility of future OTEC installations. We will also list the extensive marine

  2. Knowledge preservation strategies for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koruna, S.; Bachmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear industry is currently facing several challenges. An internal threat to the safety and operations of nuclear power plants is the loss of those employees who hold knowledge that is either critical to operations or safety. This report discusses the possibilities to preserve knowledge in nuclear power plants. Dependent on the degree of tacitness two different knowledge preservation strategies can be discerned: personalization and codification. The knowledge preservation activities discussed are valued according to the criteria: cost, immediacy of availability and completeness

  3. Seismic safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerpinar, A.; Godoy, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of safety reviews and applied research in support of programmes for the assessment and enhancement of seismic safety in Eastern Europe and in particular WWER type nuclear power plants during the past seven years. Three major topics are discussed; engineering safety review services in relation to external events, technical guidelines for the assessment and upgrading of WWER type nuclear power plants, and the Coordinated Research Programme on 'Benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER type nuclear power plants'. These topics are summarized in a way to provide an overview of the past and present safety situation in selected WWER type plants which are all located in Eastern European countries. Main conclusion of the paper is that although there is now a thorough understanding of the seismic safety issues in these operating nuclear power plants, the implementation of seismic upgrades to structures, systems and components are lagging behind, particularly for those cases in which the re-evaluation indicated the necessity to strengthen the safety related structures or install new safety systems. (author)

  4. LNG plant combined with power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, I; Kikkawa, Y [Chiyoda Chemical Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    The LNG plant consumers a lot of power of natural gas cooling and liquefaction. In some LNG plant location, a rapid growth of electric power demand is expected due to the modernization of area and/or the country. The electric power demand will have a peak in day time and low consumption in night time, while the power demand of the LNG plant is almost constant due to its nature. Combining the LNG plant with power plant will contribute an improvement the thermal efficiency of the power plant by keeping higher average load of the power plant, which will lead to a reduction of electrical power generation cost. The sweet fuel gas to the power plant can be extracted from the LNG plant, which will be favorable from view point of clean air of the area. (Author). 5 figs.

  5. LNG plant combined with power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, I.; Kikkawa, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The LNG plant consumers a lot of power of natural gas cooling and liquefaction. In some LNG plant location, a rapid growth of electric power demand is expected due to the modernization of area and/or the country. The electric power demand will have a peak in day time and low consumption in night time, while the power demand of the LNG plant is almost constant due to its nature. Combining the LNG plant with power plant will contribute an improvement the thermal efficiency of the power plant by keeping higher average load of the power plant, which will lead to a reduction of electrical power generation cost. The sweet fuel gas to the power plant can be extracted from the LNG plant, which will be favorable from view point of clean air of the area. (Author). 5 figs

  6. Sulfur balance in power plant plumes: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    William E. Wilson

    1976-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to measure the rate of loss of SO2 in power plant plumes. If SO2 decreases more rapidly than an inert pollutant, the control measures necessary to meet SO2 standards would be eased. More recently, Swedish studies of acid rain, thought to be due to long range transport...

  7. Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The report contains the results of the NRC Staff's evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements

  8. Power plants investment decision-making in consideration of investment risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Junichiro; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Yoshida, Yoshikuni; Takashima, Ryuta

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the investment risk of nuclear power plants using the real options approach. It is essential that the Japanese society evaluate the investment risk, because nuclear power plants are facing definite uncertainty and Japanese governments intend to promote and assist nuclear power plants through subsidies and policy actions. We assumed that the wholesale market prices of electricity constitute the definite uncertainty and that the wholesale market prices follow the geometric Brownian motion with drift. Using the Bellman equation and a lattice framework, we evaluated the value of investment opportunity, the value of equipment, and the critical prices that are optimal prices to invest in a nuclear power plant in the finite time horizon. This analysis shows that higher volatility of the wholesale market prices would give power companies lower incentive to construct electric power plants, particularly capital-intensive power plants. In order to deliberate and hold the Japanese governments accountable for the economics of nuclear power plants, multifaceted evaluation is needed. (author)

  9. IAEA Issues Report on Mission to Review Japan's Nuclear Power Plant Safety Assessment Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A team of international nuclear safety experts has delivered its report on a mission it conducted from 21-31 January 2012 to review Japan's process for assessing nuclear safety at the nation's nuclear power plants. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) officials delivered the IAEA Mission Report to Japanese officials yesterday and made it publicly available today. Following the 11 March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) announced the development of a revised safety assessment process for the nation's nuclear power reactors. At the request of the Government of Japan, the IAEA organized a team of five IAEA and three international nuclear safety experts and visited Japan to review NISA's approach to the Comprehensive Assessments for the Safety of Existing Power Reactor Facilities and how NISA examines the results submitted by nuclear operators. A Preliminary Summary Report was issued on 31 January. 'The mission report provides additional information regarding the team's recommendations and overall finding that NISA's instructions to power plants and its review process for the Comprehensive Safety Assessments are generally consistent with IAEA Safety Standards', said team leader James Lyons, Director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division. National safety assessments and their peer review by the IAEA are a key component of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was approved by the Agency's Member States following last year's nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The IAEA safety review mission held meetings in Tokyo with officials from NISA, the Japanese Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES), and the Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO), and the team visited the Ohi Nuclear Power Station to see an example of how Japan's Comprehensive Safety Assessment is being implemented by nuclear operators. In its report delivered today

  10. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-09-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear safety and radiation protection which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Safety-enhancing modifications at the nuclear power plants and issues relating to the use of nuclear energy which are of general interest are also reported. The reports include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the first quarter of 1993, a primary feedwater system pipe break occurred at Loviisa 2, in a section of piping after a feedwater pump. The break was erosion-corrosion induced. Repairs and inspections interrupted power generation for seven days. On the International Nuclear Event Scale the event is classified as a level 2 incident. Other events in the first quarter of 1993 had no bearing on nuclear safety and radiation protection

  11. 10 CFR 50.120 - Training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training and qualification of nuclear power plant... Training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel. (a) Applicability. The requirements of this... each holder of a combined license issued under part 52 of this chapter for a nuclear power plant of the...

  12. RIMAP demonstration project. Risk-based life management of piping system in power plant Heilbronn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bareiss, J.; Buck, P.; Matschecko, B.; Jovanovic, A.; Balos, D.; Perunicic, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of EU project RIMAP [Risk Based Inspection and Maintenance Procedures for European Industry (2000)] a new European Guideline for optimized risk based maintenance and inspection planning of industrial plants (RBLM, Risk Based Life Management) is being developed. The RIMAP project consists of the three clustered projects: - development (RTD); - demonstration (DEMO): - thematic network (TN). Current work and future, planned work in RIMAP demonstration project on applications of the RIMAP methodology in power plants are presented briefly in the first part of the paper. Also presented in the paper are the results of a preliminary analysis of piping system in power plant Heilbronn using the concept of risk-based monitoring as part of overall concept of risk-based life management. Shortly the following issues are discussed in the paper: - identification of critical components; - application of a multilevel risk analysis (...from 'screening' to 'detailed analysis'); - determination of PoF (Probability of Failure); - determination of CoF (Consequence of Failure); - optimation of inspection and maintenance plan. From our experience with the application of the RIMAP methodology the following conclusions can be drawn: The use of risk-based methods in inspection and maintenance of piping systems in power plants gives transparency to the decision making process and gives an optimized maintenance policy based on current state of the components. The results of the work clearly show the power of the proposed method for concentration on critical items: out of 64 monitored components 5 were selected for intermediate analysis and only 1 for the detailed analysis (probabilistic high temperature fracture mechanics)

  13. Preventive maintenance instrumentation results in Spanish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo Anaya, M. Jose; Verdu Martin, Gumersindo; Arnaldos Gonzalvez, Adoracion; Nieva, Marcelino Curiel

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a recompilation of the most significant results in relation to the researching in Preventive and Predictive Maintenance in critical nuclear instrumentation for power plant operation, which it is being developed by Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales and The Isirym Institute of the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Instrumentation verification and test, it is a priority of the Power Plants Control and Instrumentation Department technicians. These procedures are necessary information for the daily power plant work. It is performed according to different procedures and in different moments of the fuel cycle depending on the instrumentation critical state and the monitoring process. Normally, this study is developed taking into account the instantaneous values of the instrumentation measures and, after their conversion to physical magnitude, they are analyzed according to the power plant operation point. Moreover, redundant sensors measurements are taken into consideration to the equipment and/or power plant monitoring. This work goes forward and it is in advanced to the instrument analysis as it is, independently of the operation point, using specific signal analysis techniques for preventive and predictive maintenance, with the aim to obtain not only information about possible malfunctions, but the degradation scale presented in the instrument or in the system measured. We present seven real case studies of Spanish Nuclear Power Plants each of them shall give a significant contribution to problem resolution and power plant performance: Fluctuations in sensor lines (case 1), Air presence in feed water lines (case 2), Root valve partially closed (case 3), Sensor malfunctions (case 4), Electrical source malfunctions (case 5), RTD malfunctions (case 6) and LPRM malfunctions (case 7). (author)

  14. Preventive maintenance instrumentation results in Spanish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo Anaya, M. Jose; Verdu Martin, Gumersindo, E-mail: mpalomo@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [ISIRYM Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos Gonzalvez, Adoracion, E-mail: a.arnaldos@titaniast.com [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Valencia (Spain); Nieva, Marcelino Curiel, E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.com [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU (LAINSA), Valencia (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    This paper is a recompilation of the most significant results in relation to the researching in Preventive and Predictive Maintenance in critical nuclear instrumentation for power plant operation, which it is being developed by Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales and The Isirym Institute of the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Instrumentation verification and test, it is a priority of the Power Plants Control and Instrumentation Department technicians. These procedures are necessary information for the daily power plant work. It is performed according to different procedures and in different moments of the fuel cycle depending on the instrumentation critical state and the monitoring process. Normally, this study is developed taking into account the instantaneous values of the instrumentation measures and, after their conversion to physical magnitude, they are analyzed according to the power plant operation point. Moreover, redundant sensors measurements are taken into consideration to the equipment and/or power plant monitoring. This work goes forward and it is in advanced to the instrument analysis as it is, independently of the operation point, using specific signal analysis techniques for preventive and predictive maintenance, with the aim to obtain not only information about possible malfunctions, but the degradation scale presented in the instrument or in the system measured. We present seven real case studies of Spanish Nuclear Power Plants each of them shall give a significant contribution to problem resolution and power plant performance: Fluctuations in sensor lines (case 1), Air presence in feed water lines (case 2), Root valve partially closed (case 3), Sensor malfunctions (case 4), Electrical source malfunctions (case 5), RTD malfunctions (case 6) and LPRM malfunctions (case 7). (author)

  15. Evaluation of Station Blackout accidents at nuclear power plants. Technical findings related to Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Draft report for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranowsky, P.W.

    1985-05-01

    ''Station Blackout,'' which is the complete loss of alternating current (ac) electrical power in a nuclear power plant, has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on ac power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. This report documents the findings of technical studies performed as part of the program to resolve this issue. The important factors analyzed include: the frequency of loss of offsite power; the probability that emergency or onsite ac power supplies would be unavailable; the capability and reliability of decay heat removal systems independent of ac power; and the likelihood that offsite power would be restored before systems that cannot operate for extended periods without ac power fail, thus resulting in core damage. This report also addresses effects of different designs, locations, and operational features on the estimated frequency of core damage resulting from station blackout events

  16. Integration of new nuclear power plants into transmission grids part I: Transmission system issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abi-Samra, N.

    2008-01-01

    Integration of new nuclear plants into a transmission system is a two sided problem. On one side, adding the nuclear plant into an existing grid will change the attributes of that grid: e.g., loading of certain transmission lines will increase; voltages will be affected, etc. On the other side, the grid itself will affect the plant, and the plant needs to be designed to accommodate the specifics of the grid. Based on that, this paper is divided into two parts. Part I addresses the grid issues with the integration of the new plant, with emphasis on the electrical aspects of these issues. Part II of this paper, concentrates on the vulnerability of the plant from grid disturbances. Part II reintroduces a relatively new concept by this author called the Zone of Vulnerability (ZoV) for the new nuclear plants. (authors)

  17. Key issues for the control of refueling outage duration and costs in PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrave, C.; Martin-Onraet, M.

    2000-01-01

    For several years, EDF, within the framework of the CIDEM project and in collaboration with some German Utilities, has undertaken a detailed review of the operating experience both of its own NPP and of foreign units, in order to improve the performances of future units under design, particularly the French-German European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) project. This review made it possible to identify the key issues allowing to decrease the duration of refueling and maintenance outages. These key issues can be classified in 3 categories: Design; Maintenance and Logistic Support; Outage Management. Most key issues in the design field and some in the logistic support field have been studied and could be integrated into the design of any future PWR unit, as for the EPR project. Some of them could also be adapted to current plants, provided they are feasible and profitable. The organization must be tailored to each country, utility or period: it widely depends on the power production environment, particularly in a deregulation context. (author)

  18. Radiological protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorrilla R, S.

    2008-12-01

    This presentation sharing experiences which correspond to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. This nuclear power plant is located at level 2 of four possible, in the classification performance of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), which means the mexican nuclear power plant is classified in terms of its performance indicators and above the average achieved by their counterparts americans and canadians. In the national context, the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde has also been honored with several awards such as the National Quality Award, the Clean Industry Certificate, the distinction of Environmental Excellence and others of similar importance. For the standards of WANO, the basic idea is that there are shortcomings in one of nuclear power plant concern to all partners. The indicators used for the classification will always go beyond more compliance with regulations, which are assumed, and rather assume come or a path to excellence. Among the most important indicators are: the collective dose, the percentage of areas declared as contaminated, the number, type and tendency of contamination personal cases, the number of dosimetry alarms, the number of unplanned exposures, loss control of high radiation areas and the release of contaminated material outside the restricted areas. Furthermore, as already indicated, nuclear power plants are of special care situations, such as, carrying out work in areas with radiation fields of more than 15 mSv h -1 , the movement of spent fuel in the reload floor. The consideration of the minimum total effective dose equivalent as a criterion for prescribing tools that reduce exposures, but may increase the external cases of contaminated casualties, the experience in portals such as workers subject to radiology, where exposure in industrial radiography, and so on. Special mention deserve the conditions generated during fuel reload stops, which causes a massive personnel movement, working simultaneously on

  19. Method for building a nuclear power plant and layout thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tadashi; Ushiroda, Kouchi; Tajiri, Akinori; Yoshida, Naoto; Takeda, Masakado; Makita, Tasuo; Maezawa, Sumito; Yoshizaki, Masatoshi.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to a technical field of building a nuclear power plant, and its technical issue is to reduce the scale of investment for cranes to be used in building a plurality of nuclear power plant units. In order to resolve the technical issue, in the present invention, a nuclear power plant building method is employed in building a plurality of nuclear plant units in which while an earlier building unit out of the plurality of units which is started to be built earlier is being built, a later building unit that is to be started to be built later than the earlier building unit is started to be built, and in which a common mobile crane is adapted to move between a crane operating area for the earlier building unit and a crane operating area for the later building unit so that the common mobile crane ban be used in building the plurality of units. The present invention is primarily intended for the construction of a nuclear power plant. (author) figs

  20. Modular He-cooled divertor for power plant application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diegele, Eberhard; Kruessmann, R.; Malang, S.; Norajitra, P.; Rizzi, G.

    2003-01-01

    Gas cooled divertor concepts are regarded as a suitable option for fusion power plants because of an increased thermal efficiency for power conversion systems and the use of a coolant compatible with all blanket systems. A modular helium cooled divertor concept is proposed with an improved heat transfer. The concept employs small tiles made of tungsten and brazed to a finger-like structure made of Mo-alloy (TZM). Design goal was a heat flux of at least 15 MW/m 2 and a minimum temperature of the structure of 600 deg.C. The divertor has to survive a number of cycles (100-1000) between operating temperature and room temperature even for the steady state operation assumed. Thermo-hydraulic design requirements for the concepts include to keep the pumping power below 10% of the thermal power to the divertor plates, and simultaneously achieving a heat transfer coefficient in excess of 60 kW/m 2 K. Inelastic stress analysis indicates that design allowable stress limits on primary and secondary (thermal) stresses as required by the ITER structural design criteria are met even under conservative assumptions. Finally, critical issues for future development are addressed

  1. Water-Related Power Plant Curtailments: An Overview of Incidents and Contributing Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, James [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Water temperatures and water availability can affect the reliable operations of power plants in the United States. Data on water-related impacts on the energy sector are not consolidated and are reported by multiple agencies. This study provides an overview of historical incidents where water resources have affected power plant operations, discusses the various data sources providing information, and creates a publicly available and open access database that contains consolidated information about water-related power plant curtailment and shut-down incidents. Power plants can be affected by water resources if incoming water temperatures are too high, water discharge temperatures are too high, or if there is not enough water available to operate. Changes in climate have the potential to exacerbate uncertainty over water resource availability and temperature. Power plant impacts from water resources include curtailment of generation, plant shut-downs, and requests for regulatory variances. In addition, many power plants have developed adaptation approaches to reducing the potential risks of water-related issues by investing in new technologies or developing and implementing plans to undertake during droughts or heatwaves. This study identifies 42 incidents of water-related power plant issues from 2000-2015, drawing from a variety of different datasets. These incidents occur throughout the U.S., and affect coal and nuclear plants that use once-through, recirculating, and pond cooling systems. In addition, water temperature violations reported to the Environmental Protection Agency are also considered, with 35 temperature violations noted from 2012-2015. In addition to providing some background information on incidents, this effort has also created an open access database on the Open Energy Information platform that contains information about water-related power plant issues that can be updated by users.

  2. Management of delayed nuclear power plant projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    According to the available information at the IAEA PRIS (Power Reactor Information System) at the end of 1998 there were more than 40 nuclear power plant projects with delays of five or more years with respect to the originally scheduled commercial operation. The degree of conformance with original construction schedules showed large variations due to several issues, including financial, economic and public opinion factors. Taking into account the number of projects with several years delay in their original schedules, it was considered useful to identify the subject areas where exchange of experience among Member States would be mutually beneficial in identification of problems and development of guidance for successful management of the completion of these delayed projects. A joint programme of the IAEA Departments of Nuclear Energy (Nuclear Power Engineering Section) and Technical Co-operation (Europe Section, with additional support from the Latin America and West Asia Sections) was set up during the period 1997-1998. The specific aim of the programme was to provide assistance in the management of delayed nuclear power plants regarding measures to maintain readiness for resuming the project implementation schedule when the conditions permit. The integration of IAEA interdepartmental resources enabled the participation of 53 experts from 14 Member States resulting in a wider exchange of experience and dissemination of guidance. Under the framework of the joint programme, senior managers directly responsible for delayed nuclear power plant projects identified several issues or problem areas that needed to be addressed and guidance on management be provided. A work plan for the development of several working documents, addressing the different issues, was established. Subsequently these documents were merged into a single one to produce the present publication. This publication provides information and practical examples on necessary management actions to preserve

  3. Management of delayed nuclear power plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    According to the available information at the IAEA PRIS (Power Reactor Information System) at the end of 1998 there were more than 40 nuclear power plant projects with delays of five or more years with respect to the originally scheduled commercial operation. The degree of conformance with original construction schedules showed large variations due to several issues, including financial, economic and public opinion factors. Taking into account the number of projects with several years delay in their original schedules, it was considered useful to identify the subject areas where exchange of experience among Member States would be mutually beneficial in identification of problems and development of guidance for successful management of the completion of these delayed projects. A joint programme of the IAEA Departments of Nuclear Energy (Nuclear Power Engineering Section) and Technical Co-operation (Europe Section, with additional support from the Latin America and West Asia Sections) was set up during the period 1997-1998. The specific aim of the programme was to provide assistance in the management of delayed nuclear power plants regarding measures to maintain readiness for resuming the project implementation schedule when the conditions permit. The integration of IAEA interdepartmental resources enabled the participation of 53 experts from 14 Member States resulting in a wider exchange of experience and dissemination of guidance. Under the framework of the joint programme, senior managers directly responsible for delayed nuclear power plant projects identified several issues or problem areas that needed to be addressed and guidance on management be provided. A work plan for the development of several working documents, addressing the different issues, was established. Subsequently these documents were merged into a single one to produce the present publication. This publication provides information and practical examples on necessary management actions to preserve

  4. Purchasing and supply quality management in a power plant : a case study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M. Ing. This research study aims at presenting the management of quality problem issues that often result from procured items in a power plant. The motivation for carrying out this research was an unacceptable risk of undesirable impact on plant availability, or operating costs that arises from quality problem issues of procured items in a particular power plant. In this dissertation, the author aims to provide an overview of quality management and procurement management, by focusing on ho...

  5. Current status of countermeasures for ageing of nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Tajima, K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes ageing coutermeasure program of the nuclear power plants performed by the Japanese Government and industries and related activities, and describes current research program and utilization of the research results for the aged nuclear power plants. Regulatory bodies (NISA of METI: Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) reviewed the ageing issues of nuclear power plants to enhance countermeasures for the aged plants. Nuclear Power Plant Life Engineering Center (PLEC) entrusted by NISA is carrying out the task relating to the aged plants. (orig.)

  6. Chemistry in power plants 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Within the VGB Powertech conference from 25th to 27th October, 2011, in Munich (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures and poster contributions were presented: (1) The revised VGB standard for water-steam-cycle Chemistry; (2) Switchover from neutral operation to oxygen treatment at the power station Stuttgart-Muenster of EnBW Kraftwerke AG; (3) Steam contamination with degradation products of organic matters present in the feedwater of the Lanxess-Rubber cogeneration plant; (4) Laboratory scale on-line noble metal deposition experiments simulating BWR plant conditions; (5) Building a new demin installation for the power plant EPZ in Borssele; (6) Replacement of the cooling tower installations in the nuclear power plant Goesgen-Daenien AG; (7) Aging of IEX resins in demin plants - Cost optimisation by adaptation of regenerants; (8) The largest DOW trademark EDI System at a combined cycled plant in Europe; (9) Upgrading river Main water to boiler feed water - Experiences with ultrafiltration; (10) Experiences with treatment of the water-steam-cycle in the RDF power plant Nehlsen Stavenhagen with film-forming amines; (11) Comparative modelling of the bubbles thermal collapse and cavitations for estimation of bubbles collapse influence; (12) Overcoming the steam quality - issues from an HRSG for the production of process steam; (13) Legionella - new requirements for power plant operation; (14) How the right chemistry in the FGD helps to improve the removal in the waste water treatment plant; (15) High efficiency filtration in dry/semi-dry FGD plants; (16) Expanding the variety of renewable fuels in the biomass power plant Timelkam using the chemical input control; (17) Corrosion, operating experiences and process improvements to increase the availability and operating time of the biomass power plant Timelkam; (18) The influence of temperature on the measurement of the conductivity of highly diluted solutions; (19) A multiparameter instrumentation approach

  7. Safety design of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Yu; Zhang Lian; Du Shenghua; Zhao Jiayu

    1984-01-01

    Safety issues have been greatly emphasized through the design of the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant. Reasonable safety margine has been taken into account in the plant design parameters, the design incorporated various safeguard systems, such as engineering safety feature systems, safety protection systems and the features to resist natural catastrophes, e. g. earthquake, hurricanes, tide and so on. Preliminary safety analysis and environmental effect assessment have been done and anti-accident provisions and emergency policy were carefully considered. Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant safety related systems are designed in accordance with the common international standards established in the late 70's, as well as the existing engineering standard of China

  8. Bibliography of the Maryland Power Plant Research Program, fourteenth edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, R.I.

    1993-02-01

    The Power Plant Siting Act of 1971 (Sec. 3-303) established the Power Plant Research Program to ensure that demands for electric power would be met in a timely manner at a reasonable cost while assuring that the associated environmental impact would be acceptable. The scope of the Program extends to estimating the impact of proposed new generating facilities, evaluating the acceptability of proposed transmission line routes, assessing the impact of existing generation facilities, and investigating generic issues related to power plant site evaluation and associated environmental and land use considerations. The bibliography is a compilation of all the studies performed for and/or by the Power Plant and Environmental Review Division since its inception

  9. Recent Operating Experience involving Power Electronics Failure in Korea Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaedo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, modern power electronics devices for electrical component were steadily increased in electrical systems which used for main power control and protection. To upgrade the system reliability we recommended the redundancy for electrical equipment trip system. The past several years, Korean Nuclear power plants have changed the electrical control and protection systems (Auto Voltage Regulator, Power Protection Relay) for main generator and main power protection relay systems. In this paper we deal with operating experience involving modern solid state power electronics failure in Korean nuclear power plants. One of the failures we will discuss the degraded phenomenon of power electronics device for CEDMCS(Control Element Drive Mechanism Control System). As the result of the failure we concerned about the modification for trip source of main generator excitation systems and others. We present an interesting issue for modern solid state devices (IGBT, Thyristors). (authors)

  10. Are atomic power plants saver than nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeglin, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    It is rather impossible to establish nuclear power plants against the resistance of the population. To prevail over this resistance, a clarification of the citizens-initiatives motives which led to it will be necessary. This is to say: It is quite impossible for our population to understand what really heappens in nuclear power plants. They cannot identify themselves with nuclear power plants and thus feel very uncomfortable. As the total population feels the same way it is prepared for solidarity with the citizens-initiatives even if they believe in the necessity of nuclear power plants. Only an information-policy making transparent the social-psychological reasons of the population for being against nuclear power plants could be able to prevail over the resistance. More information about the technical procedures is not sufficient at all. (orig.) [de

  11. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-12-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO 1 and II were in operation for almost the whole second quarter of 1991. The load factor average was 87.4 %. In consequence of a fire, which broke out in the switchgear building, connections to both external grids were lost and TVO II relied on power supplied by four back-up diesels for 7.5 hrs. The event is classified as Level 2 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The process of examining the non-leaking fuel bundles removed from the Loviisa nuclear reactors has continued. The examinations have revealed, so far, that the uppermost spacing lattices of the bundles exhibit deformations similar to those detected in the leaking fuel bundles removed from the reactors. This event is classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Other events in this quarter which are classified according to the International Nuclear Event Scale are Level Zero (Below Scale) on the Scale. The Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety has assessed the safety of the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants based on the new regulations issued on 14.2.1991 by the Council of State. The safety regulations are much more stringent than those in force when the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants were built. The assessment indicated that the TVO nuclear power plant meets these safety regulations. The Loviisa nuclear power plant meets the requirements with the exception of certain requirements related to the ensuring of safety functions and provision for accidents. At the Loviisa nuclear power plant there are several projects under consideration to enhance safety

  12. An approach to evaluating alternatives for wind power plant locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman, Ateekh Ur

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-criteria decision approaches are preferred for achieving multi-dimensional sustainable renewable energy goals. A more critical issue faced by the wind power industry is the selection of a location to tap prospective energy, which needs to be evaluated on multiple measures. In this paper, the aim is to assess and rank alternative wind power plant locations in Saudi Arabia. The approach presented here takes multiple criteria into consideration, such as wind speed, wind availability, site advantages, terrain details, risk and uncertainty, technology used, third party support, projected demand, types of customers, and government policies. A comparative analysis of feasible alternatives that satisfy all multi- criteria objectives is carried out. The results obtained are subjected to sensitivity analysis. Concepts such as ‘threshold values’ and ‘attribute weights’ make the approach more sensitive.

  13. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

    2003-01-20

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to

  14. Employing modern power plant simulators in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedorf, V.; Storm, J.

    2005-01-01

    At the present state of the art, modern power plant simulators are characterized by new qualitative features, thus enabling operators to use them far beyond the traditional field of training. In its first part, this contribution presents an overview of the requirements to be met by simulators for multivalent uses. In part two, a survey of the uses and perspectives of simulation technology in power plants is presented on the basis of experience accumulated by Rheinmetall Defence Electronics (RDE).Modern simulators are shown to have applications by far exceeding traditional training areas. Modular client - sever systems on standard computers allow inexpensive uses to be designed at several levels, thus minimizing maintenance cost. Complex development and running time environments, like the SEMS developed by RDE, have made power plant simulators the workhorses of power plant engineers in all power plant areas. (orig.)

  15. Power quality event classification: an overview and key issues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... used for PQ events' classifications. Various artificial intelligent techniques which are used in PQ event classification are also discussed. Major Key issues and challenges in classifying PQ events are critically examined and outlined. Keywords: Power quality, PQ event classifiers, artificial intelligence techniques, PQ noise, ...

  16. Radiation effects on power cables for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, R.; Munshi, P.; Badshah, M.G.Q.

    1988-01-01

    A large number of power and control cables, insulated with organic/polymeric materials, are installed quite near the reactor in nuclear power plants. The reliability of electrical equipment, receiving power through these cables, is critically important for the design and safety of the power stations. The radiation intensity inside the containment varies significantly from one location to another. The extent of material degradation is associated with the local radiation intensity. The cables used in the nuclear environment require several unique properties, the most obvious of these being radiation resistance, fire resistance, and the ability to withstand the loss-of-coolant accident in a nuclear power plant as specified in Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Standard 383. In this study, four specific electrical power cable samples insulated with polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, ethylene propylene rubber, and silicone rubber were chosen to investigate the effect of radiation in reactor environments on the electrical properties of the samples. Voltage breakdown tests and dielectric loss factor (tan δ) and conductor resistance measurements were carried out on each sample before and after irradiating them to near lifetime doses at ambient temperatures in atmospheric conditions

  17. Westinghouse ICF power plant study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucov, E.W.

    1980-10-01

    In this study, two different electric power plants for the production of about 1000 MWe which were based on a CO 2 laser driver and on a heavy ion driver have been developed and analyzed. The purposes of this study were: (1) to examine in a self consistent way the technological and institutional problems that need to be confronted and solved in order to produce commercially competitive electricity in the 2020 time frame from an inertial fusion reactor, and (2) to compare, on a common basis, the consequences of using two different drivers to initiate the DT fuel pellet explosions. Analytic descriptions of size/performance/cost relationships for each of the subsystems comprising the power plant have been combined into an overall computer code which models the entire plant. This overall model has been used to conduct trade studies which examine the consequences of varying critical design values around the reference point

  18. Survey of bayesian belif nets for quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software used in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, H.S.; Sung, T.Y.; Jeong, H.S.; Park, J.H.; Kang, H.G.; Lee, K

    2001-03-01

    As part of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of safety grade digital systems used in Nuclear Power plants research, measures and methodologies applicable to quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software were surveyed. Among the techniques proposed in the literature we selected those which are in use widely and investigated their limitations in quantitative software reliability assessment. One promising methodology from the survey is Bayesian Belief Nets (BBN) which has a formalism and can combine various disparate evidences relevant to reliability into final decision under uncertainty. Thus we analyzed BBN and its application cases in digital systems assessment area and finally studied the possibility of its application to the quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software.

  19. Survey of bayesian belif nets for quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software used in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, H. S.; Sung, T. Y.; Jeong, H. S.; Park, J. H.; Kang, H. G.; Lee, K.

    2001-03-01

    As part of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of safety grade digital systems used in Nuclear Power plants research, measures and methodologies applicable to quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software were surveyed. Among the techniques proposed in the literature we selected those which are in use widely and investigated their limitations in quantitative software reliability assessment. One promising methodology from the survey is Bayesian Belief Nets (BBN) which has a formalism and can combine various disparate evidences relevant to reliability into final decision under uncertainty. Thus we analyzed BBN and its application cases in digital systems assessment area and finally studied the possibility of its application to the quantitative reliability assessment of safety critical software

  20. Essays on the economics of licensing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    Regulation and licensing of nuclear power plants by the United States Atomic Energy Commission and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission are discussed. Chapter 1 overviews the licensing process and issues raised in licensing cases. Based on a sample of plants licensed between 1967 and 1978, a statistical study of the impact of public participation in licensing is performed. The study concludes that public participation has had a major impact on licensing and power-plant costs. The impact is due to a fundamental weakness of the Commissions: their inability to resolve certain issues related to acceptable social risk. The study has important policy implications for reforming the Federal licensing process. Chapter 2 contains an analysis of the Price-Anderson Act, a Federal program for compensating victims of large nuclear accidents. The Price-Anderson Act is placed within the context of generalized federal disaster relief. A model is developed that allows an evaluation programs on the basis of moral hazard and equity principles. Chapter 3 analyzes the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's treatment of its mandatory antitrust review of applicants for nuclear power plants. The main conclusion of the chapter is that the reviews have not addressed the central economic issues of antitrust that are relevant to nuclear power. Instead, the reviews contribute to further cartelization of the electric utility industry. While politically expedient, the reviews are counter-productive to the development of an optimal industry structure

  1. Power plant technology 2014. Strategies, systems engineering and operation; Kraftwerkstechnik 2014. Strategien, Anlagentechnik und Betrieb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Michael; Hurtado, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The book on power plant technology 2014 (strategies, systems engineering and operation) covers the following issues: Climate, politics and economy; wind power; fossil-fuel power plants, flexible power plants - plant operation, flexible power plants- materials, materials for energy technology, fuel feed and incineration, modeling of the water-vapor-circuit, corrosion, deposits and cleaning, vapor turbines, GUD power plants, fluidized bed combustion, energetic biomass use, combined heat and power generation and decentralized units, storage facilities, emissions - mitigation and measuring techniques.

  2. In-depth analysis of accidental criticality in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.; Gmal, B.

    1989-01-01

    An in-depth-analysis including probabilistic considerations has been performed for a potential criticality excursion in two large vessels in a planned reprocessing plant. Criticality safety of these components is based on limitation of uranium and plutonium concentration. The main intention of this study was to investigate the potential and probable magnitude of a criticality in greater detail and to detect possible weaknesses of criticality safety provisions. The results of the analysis show, that the calculated probability of less than 5 · 10 -4 /a a for a criticality excursion in the most relevant rework tank may be further reduced. The peak power rework tank may be further reduced by design modifications. The peak power and total fissions of the critical excursion as assessed in a preceding analysis for licensing are conservative by factors of 10 and 4, respectively

  3. Integration of a nuclear power plant in electrical systems, alternative programs, optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, J.A.M. de.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of integration of a nuclear power plants in a electrical power system, to support the power demand of the system, and mainly also support the power demand at the critical period, I.E., peak demands, is analysed. The factors considered in this analysis are: the demand structure of the region, the availability of others power plants in the electrical net and the capacity factor. (author)

  4. Voltage stability issues in a distribution grid with large scale PV plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Alvaro Ruiz; Marinopoulos, Antonios; Reza, Muhamad; Srivastava, Kailash [ABB AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden). Corporate Research Center; Hertem, Dirk van [Katholieke Univ. Leuven, Heverlee (Belgium). ESAT-ELECTA

    2011-07-01

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) has become a competitive renewable energy source. The production of solar PV cells and panels has increased significantly, while the cost is reduced due to economics of scale and technological achievements in the field. At the same time, the increase in efficiency of PV power systems and high energy prices are expected to lead PV systems to grid parity in the coming decade. This is expected to boost even more the large scale implementation of PV power plants (utility scale PV) and therefore the impact of such large scale PV plants to power system needs to be studies. This paper investigates the voltage stability issues arising from the connection of a large PV power plant to the power grid. For this purpose, a 15 MW PV power plant was implemented into a distribution grid, modeled and simulated using DIgSILENT Power Factory. Two scenarios were developed: in the first scenario, active power injected into the grid by the PV power plants was varied and the resulted U-Q curve was analyzed. In the second scenario, the impact of connecting PV power plants to different points in the grid - resulting in different strength of the connection - was investigated. (orig.)

  5. Fusion power plant studies in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonnier, D.

    2007-01-01

    -of-a-kind fusion power plant. A detailed assessment of the PPCS models with limited extrapolations identified the physics issues that must be addressed to establish the DEMO physics basis. In parallel, a number of technological issues are being addressed to establish the basic features of DEMO: they are primarily related to the divertor and blanket concepts, to the maintenance scheme of the internal components and to structural materials. In order to clarify the concept of DEMO it is necessary to have a clear view of the fusion development strategy that is being pursued. A summary of the present European development strategy will also be presented in this paper, together with an assessment of the underlying assumptions (author)

  6. The ARIES-ST study: Assessment of the spherical tokamak concept as fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, F.; Tillack, M.; Miller, R.; Mau, T.K.; Jardin, S.; Stambaugh, R.; Steiner, D.; Waganer, L.

    2001-01-01

    Recent experimental achievements and theoretical studies have generated substantial interest in the spherical tokamak concept. The ARIES-ST study was undertaken as a national U.S. effort to investigate the potential of the spherical tokamak concept as a fusion power plant and as a vehicle for fusion development. The 1000-MWe ARIES-ST power plant has an aspect ratio of 1.6, a major radius of 3.2 m, a plasma elongation (at 95% flux surface) of 3.4 and triangularity of 0.64. This configuration attains a β of 54% (which is 90% of the maximum theoretical β). While the plasma current is 31 MA, the almost perfect alignment of bootstrap and equilibrium current density profiles results in a current-drive power of only 31 MW. The on-axis toroidal field is 2.1 T and the peak field at the TF coil is 7.6 T, which leads to 288 MW of Joule losses in the normal-conducting TF system. The ARIES-ST study has highlighted many areas where tradeoffs among physics and engineering systems are critical in determining the optimum regime of operation for spherical tokamaks. Many critical issues also have been identified which must be resolved in R and D programs. (author)

  7. Key Issues for the control of refueling outage duration and costs in PWR Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrave, Claude

    2002-01-01

    For several years, EDF, within the framework of the CIDEM1 project and in collaboration with some German Utilities, has undertaken a detailed review of the operating experience both of its own NPP and of foreign units, in order to improve the performances of future units under design, particularly the French-German European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) project. This review made it possible to identify the key issues allowing to decrease the duration of refueling and maintenance outages. These key issues can be classified in 3 categories Design, Maintenance and Logistic Support, Outage Management. Most of the key issues in the design field and some in the logistic support field have been studied and could be integrated into the design of any future PWR unit, as for the EPR project. Some of them could also be adapted to current plants, provided they are feasible and profitable. The organization must be tailored to each country, utility or period: it widely depends on the power production environment, particularly in a deregulation context. (author)

  8. Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Henry W.; Kistner, Rainer

    1999-01-01

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies

  9. Financing solar thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistner, R.; Price, H.

    1999-01-01

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been built following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply states, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects form the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies

  10. Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistner, Rainer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Price, Henry W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    1999-04-14

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier’s perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies.

  11. Quality assurance program manual for nuclear power plants. Volume I. Policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Policies and procedures are presented which comply with current NRC regulatory requirements and industry codes and standards in effect during the design, procurement, construction, testing, operation, refueling, maintenance, repair and modification activities associated with nuclear power plants. Specific NRC and industry documents that contain the requirements, including the issue dates in effect, are identified in each nuclear power plant's Safety Analysis Report. The requirements established by these documents form the basis for the Consumers Power Quality Assurance Program, which is implemented to control those structures, systems, components and operational safety actions listed in each nuclear power plant's Quality List (Q-List). As additional and revised requirements are issued by the NRC and professional organizations involved in nuclear activities, they will be reviewed for their impact on this manual, and changes will be made where considered necessary

  12. Control room systems design for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This publication provides a resource for those who are involved in researching, managing, conceptualizing, designing, manufacturing or backfitting power plant control room systems. It will also be useful to those responsible for performing reviews or evaluations of the design and facilities associated with existing power plant control room systems. The ultimate worth of the publication, however, will depend upon how well it can support its users. Readers are invited to provide comments and observations to the IAEA, Division of Nuclear Power. If appropriate, the report will subsequently be re-issued, taking such feedback into account. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Control room systems design for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This publication provides a resource for those who are involved in researching, managing, conceptualizing, designing, manufacturing or backfitting power plant control room systems. It will also be useful to those responsible for performing reviews or evaluations of the design and facilities associated with existing power plant control room systems. The ultimate worth of the publication, however, will depend upon how well it can support its users. Readers are invited to provide comments and observations to the IAEA, Division of Nuclear Power. If appropriate, the report will subsequently be re-issued, taking such feedback into account. Refs, figs and tabs.

  14. GT-MHR power conversion system: Design status and technical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etzel, K.; Baccaglini, G.; Schwartz, A.; Hillman, S.; Mathis, D.

    1994-12-01

    The Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) builds on 30 years of international gas-cooled reactor experience utilizing the unique properties of helium gas coolant, graphite moderator and coated particle fuel. To efficiently utilize the high temperature potential of the MHR, an innovative power conversion system has been developed featuring an intercooled and recuperated gas turbine. The gas turbine replaces a conventional steam turbine and its many auxiliary components. The Power Conversion System converts the thermal energy of the helium directly into electrical energy utilizing a closed Brayton cycle. The Power Conversion System draws on even more years of experience than the MHR: the world's first closed-cycle plant, fossil fired and utilizing air as working fluid, started operation in Switzerland in 1939. Shortly thereafter, in 1945, the coupling of a closed-cycle plant to a nuclear heat generation system was conceived. Directly coupling the closed-cycle gas turbine concept to a modern, passively safe nuclear reactor opens a new chapter in power generation technology and brings with it various design challenges. Some of these challenges are associated with the direct coupling of the Power Conversion System to a nuclear reactor. Since the primary coolant is also the working fluid, the Power Conversion System has to be designed for reactor radionuclide plateout. As a result, issues like component maintainability and replaceability, and fission product effects on materials must be addressed. Other issues concern the integration of the Power Conversion System components into a single vessel. These issues include the selection of key technologies for the power conversion components such as submerged generator, magnetic bearings, seals, compact heat exchangers, and the overall system layout

  15. Improving the safety of LWR power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Study to identify current, potential research issues and efforts for improving the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plants. This final report describes the work accomplished, the results obtained, the problem areas, and the recommended solutions. Specifically, for each of the issues identified in this report for improving the safety of LWR power plants, a description is provided in detail of the safety significance, the current status (including information sources, status of technical knowledge, problem solution and current activities), and the suggestions for further research and development. Further, the issues are ranked for action into high, medium, and low priority with respect to primarily (a) improved safety (e.g. potential reduction in public risk and occupational exposure), and secondly (b) reduction in safety-related costs

  16. Power plants Novaky wishes a new block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janoska, J.; Beer, G.

    2004-01-01

    In 2007 two undesulphurized blocks - the 3 rd and 4 th of Novaky Power plant (ENO) in Zemianske Kostolany can no longer burn a domestic brown coal. It means the stopping of around a half of production of the biggest Slovak miner - Hornonitrianske bane Prievidza, a.s. (HBP). HBP together with Swiss partner Advanced Power began the project of their own power plant several years ago. This project is halted because of high capital expenses, but the mining engineers see also the other way - project of construction of new source with capacity 125 MW instead of ENO 3 and 4 in patronage of Slovenske elektrarne (SE). However Slovenske elektrarne is in process of privatisation and there is a question how will the investor accede to several millions Slovak crowns project. This issue deals with project of new power plant and with related possibilities of the next mining of brown coal in the region of Horna Nitra

  17. Kansas Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Power Plants database depicts, as point features, the locations of the various types of power plant locations in Kansas. The locations of the power plants...

  18. Analysis of the emergency plan of Angra dos Reis Nuclear Power Plants: a critical view related to accessibility and mobility of people with special needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Luanda C.A.; Correa, Samanda C.A.; Santos, Geissa; Souza, Edmilson M.

    2014-01-01

    This work intends to make a critical analysis of the emergency plan of the Angra dos Reis Nuclear Power Plants related to appropriate transportation, accommodation and infrastructure for people with special needs

  19. Three technical issues in fatigue damage assessment of nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Shah, V.N.

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses three technical issues that affect the fatigue damage assessment of nuclear power plant components: the effect of the environment on the fatigue life, the importance of the loading sequence in calculating the fatigue crack-initiation damage, and the adequacy of current inservice inspection requirements and methods to characterize fatigue cracks. The environmental parameters that affect the fatigue life of carbon and low alloy steel components are the sulphur content in the steel, the temperature, the amount of dissolved oxygen in the coolant, and the presence of oxidizing agents such as copper oxide. The occurrence of large-amplitude stress cycles early in a component's life followed by low-amplitude stress cycles may cause crack initiation at a cumulative usage factor less than 1.0. The current inservice inspection requirements include volumetric inspections of welds but not of some susceptible sites in the base metal. In addition, the conventional ultrasonic testing techniques need to be improved for reliable detection and accurate sizing of fatigue cracks. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

    2008-02-14

    This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant

  1. Human reliability in non-destructive inspections of nuclear power plant components: modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Soares, Wellington Antonio; Marques, Raíssa Oliveira; Silva Júnior, Silvério Ferreira da; Raso, Amanda Laureano, E-mail: vasconv@cdtn.br, E-mail: soaresw@cdtn.br, E-mail: raissaomarques@gmail.com, E-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br, E-mail: amandaraso@hotmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Non-destructive inspection (NDI) is one of the key elements in ensuring quality of engineering systems and their safe use. NDI is a very complex task, during which the inspectors have to rely on their sensory, perceptual, cognitive, and motor skills. It requires high vigilance once it is often carried out on large components, over a long period of time, and in hostile environments and restriction of workplace. A successful NDI requires careful planning, choice of appropriate NDI methods and inspection procedures, as well as qualified and trained inspection personnel. A failure of NDI to detect critical defects in safety-related components of nuclear power plants, for instance, may lead to catastrophic consequences for workers, public and environment. Therefore, ensuring that NDI methods are reliable and capable of detecting all critical defects is of utmost importance. Despite increased use of automation in NDI, human inspectors, and thus human factors, still play an important role in NDI reliability. Human reliability is the probability of humans conducting specific tasks with satisfactory performance. Many techniques are suitable for modeling and analyzing human reliability in NDI of nuclear power plant components. Among these can be highlighted Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction). The application of these techniques is illustrated in an example of qualitative and quantitative studies to improve typical NDI of pipe segments of a core cooling system of a nuclear power plant, through acting on human factors issues. (author)

  2. Human reliability in non-destructive inspections of nuclear power plant components: modeling and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Soares, Wellington Antonio; Marques, Raíssa Oliveira; Silva Júnior, Silvério Ferreira da; Raso, Amanda Laureano

    2017-01-01

    Non-destructive inspection (NDI) is one of the key elements in ensuring quality of engineering systems and their safe use. NDI is a very complex task, during which the inspectors have to rely on their sensory, perceptual, cognitive, and motor skills. It requires high vigilance once it is often carried out on large components, over a long period of time, and in hostile environments and restriction of workplace. A successful NDI requires careful planning, choice of appropriate NDI methods and inspection procedures, as well as qualified and trained inspection personnel. A failure of NDI to detect critical defects in safety-related components of nuclear power plants, for instance, may lead to catastrophic consequences for workers, public and environment. Therefore, ensuring that NDI methods are reliable and capable of detecting all critical defects is of utmost importance. Despite increased use of automation in NDI, human inspectors, and thus human factors, still play an important role in NDI reliability. Human reliability is the probability of humans conducting specific tasks with satisfactory performance. Many techniques are suitable for modeling and analyzing human reliability in NDI of nuclear power plant components. Among these can be highlighted Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction). The application of these techniques is illustrated in an example of qualitative and quantitative studies to improve typical NDI of pipe segments of a core cooling system of a nuclear power plant, through acting on human factors issues. (author)

  3. Preserving and sharing tacit knowledge in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuronen, T.; Saeaemaenen, K.; Jaervenpaeae, E.; Rintala, N.

    2007-01-01

    Tacit knowledge of nuclear experts is essential for reliable and competent performance of nuclear power plants. This report discusses preserving and sharing tacit knowledge in nuclear power plant context. Tacit knowledge as well as its structure and content in this complex and safety-critical context are described, and the role of tacit knowledge in expertise is discussed. In order to contribute to tacit knowledge preserving the challenges in and prerequisites for tacit knowledge sharing are identified. In addition, based on empirical case studies and literature, good practices and methods for tacit knowledge sharing are described. The report is based on the results of DIAMOND research project conducted in 2004-2006 in Finnish nuclear power plants, tacit knowledge, nuclear power plant, tacit knowledge sharing methods, expertise. (author abstract)

  4. The issue of the fourth nuclear power plant and its impact on 3-E problems in Taiwan - empirical evidence from the energy forecasting (EnFore) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, Y.J.; Chou, F.-Y.

    2003-01-01

    Taiwan has placed considerable emphasis on economic, energy and environmental (3-E) problems in recent decades. Following President Chen's inauguration, one particular issue of concern has been the current dispute over the fourth nuclear power plant (FNPP) in northern Taiwan. This dispute has had a serious impact on Taiwan's economy, including its energy structure and general policy towards CO 2 emission controls. It is estimated, for example, that the loss to Taiwan's capital market as a result of the FNPP dispute, reached NT$7 trillion (about US$219 billion) by the end of 2000. If Taiwan Power Company (Taipower) were to replace the nuclear power plant capacity with liquified natural gas generators, average utility prices would go up by around 4.6% over the next 10 years. The alternative would be for low-cost coal-fired power plants to assume the major position in future power generation; however, this could cause significant damage to Taiwan's CO 2 emission control policy. This paper uses an integrated computerized system model of energy forecasting to simulate the complex interrelationship between the various issues. Empirical results reveal that there are no perfect solutions available; thus, this is an important learning process for the government in terms of administration, as well as for other academic studies

  5. Operator psychological selection system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xuhong; Huang Xiangrui

    2004-01-01

    Based on a detailed job analysis of nuclear power plant operator including operation procedures analysis, interview with personnel familiar with operator job, and 9 events happened in the past in the plant involved operator error analysis, several operator work characteristics and performance influence factors are obtained. According to these specific characteristics and factors, referring to the psychological selection research results in the other related critical occupational fields, a full psychological selection system of nuclear power plant operator is forwarded in this paper, including 21 dimensions in 3 facets as general psychological ability, personality and psychological healthy. Practical measurement methods for the proposed selection dimensions are discussed in the end

  6. PMU-Aided Voltage Security Assessment for a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, H.; Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, J. J.; Muljadi, E.

    2015-04-08

    Because wind power penetration levels in electric power systems are continuously increasing, voltage stability is a critical issue for maintaining power system security and operation. The traditional methods to analyze voltage stability can be classified into two categories: dynamic and steady-state. Dynamic analysis relies on time-domain simulations of faults at different locations; however, this method needs to exhaust faults at all locations to find the security region for voltage at a single bus. With the widely located phasor measurement units (PMUs), the Thevenin equivalent matrix can be calculated by the voltage and current information collected by the PMUs. This paper proposes a method based on a Thevenin equivalent matrix to identify system locations that will have the greatest impact on the voltage at the wind power plant’s point of interconnection. The number of dynamic voltage stability analysis runs is greatly reduced by using the proposed method. The numerical results demonstrate the feasibility, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed approach for voltage security assessment for a wind power plant.

  7. Current experience with nuclear power plant simulators and analysers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozd, A.

    1998-01-01

    Topics of a Specialist Meeting are presented on Simulators and Plant Analyzers: Current Issues in Nuclear Power Plant Simulation (Espoo, Finland). They dealt with the need for maintaining expertise, training and education, control rooms and operator support tools, simulators as tools for plant safety analysis. The major conclusions of the payers and the meeting are discussed. (R.P.)

  8. High performance multi-scale and multi-physics computation of nuclear power plant subjected to strong earthquake. An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Shinobu; Kawai, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Shin'ichiro; Hori, Muneo; Nakajima, Norihiro; Kobayashi, Kei

    2010-01-01

    Recently importance of nuclear energy has been recognized again due to serious concerns of global warming and energy security. In parallel, it is one of critical issues to verify safety capability of ageing nuclear power plants (NPPs) subjected to strong earthquake. Since 2007, we have been developing the multi-scale and multi-physics based numerical simulator for quantitatively predicting actual quake-proof capability of ageing NPPs under operation or just after plant trip subjected to strong earthquake. In this paper, we describe an overview of the simulator with some preliminary results. (author)

  9. Nuclear Power Plant Temelin Technical Support Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krizek, K.

    2000-01-01

    The erection of the Technical Support Centre for the Nuclear Power Plant Temelin has been a relatively sophisticated and costly issue. It was by proper use of the existing systems, as e.g. I and C, ISE and other systems, that a robust system has been created that is able to meet any requirements laid on the performance of the Technical Support Centre. The decision of the utility CEZ, a.s. that made it possible to establish the Technical Support Centre at the Nuclear Power Plant Temelin has been a right step which shows the level of safety culture within the utility. (author)

  10. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Kyne

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives.

  11. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyne, Dean; Bolin, Bob

    2016-07-12

    Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP) reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives.

  12. Life Limiting Issues for Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esselman, Thomas; Gaertner, John

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a study which identified and characterized life limiting issues for consideration by nuclear plant owners in their decision to extend plant life or seek subsequent license renewal. As nuclear plants operate for longer periods, the risk that a condition in the plant or an event that occurs, at the plant or elsewhere, will cause a plant owner not to extend plant life increases. The Fukushima accident has made this concept concrete. This paper defines 'Life Limiting' concepts for nuclear plants. It identifies the highest risk conditions and events that may limit duration of continued operation in nuclear plants and employs a survey to prioritize these concerns. Methods for evaluating these risks and changing the capability of systems, structures, and components (SSC) to reduce and manage this risk in long term operation are presented. Integrated obsolescence -the existence of an accumulation of events or condition that can threaten long term operation- is discussed. Many of the life limiting conditions or events may be controllable by early identification, recognition, and mitigation of the potential threat. The recognition of conditions may allow measures to be taken to mitigate the condition. Recognition of the potential for events that may be life limiting may allow actions to be taken that will minimize the likelihood or consequences of the event. These actions may include enhanced research on the expected behavior of the SSC, risk assessment and management, and enhanced monitoring and aging management at the plant. (author)

  13. Typical calculation and analysis of carbon emissions in thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Zhi-jie; Zhao, Jian-gang; Zhang, Gang

    2018-03-01

    On December 19, 2017, the national development and reform commission issued the national carbon emissions trading market construction plan (power generation industry), which officially launched the construction process of the carbon emissions trading market. The plan promotes a phased advance in carbon market construction, taking the power industry with a large carbon footprint as a breakthrough, so it is extremely urgent for power generation plants to master their carbon emissions. Taking a coal power plant as an example, the paper introduces the calculation process of carbon emissions, and comes to the fuel activity level, fuel emissions factor and carbon emissions data of the power plant. Power plants can master their carbon emissions according to this paper, increase knowledge in the field of carbon reserves, and make the plant be familiar with calculation method based on the power industry carbon emissions data, which can help power plants positioning accurately in the upcoming carbon emissions trading market.

  14. Hydroelectric Power Plants Dobsina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majercak, V.; Srenkelova, Z.; Kristak, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    In this brochure the Hydroelectric Power Plants Dobsina, (VED), subsidiary of the utility Slovenske Elektrarne, a.s. (Slovak Electric, plc. Bratislava) are presented. VED is mainly aimed at generating peak-load electrical energy and maintenance of operational equipment. Reaching its goals, company is first of all focused on reliability of production, economy and effectiveness, keeping principles of work safety and industry safety standards and also ecology. VED operates eight hydroelectric power plants, from which PVE Ruzin I and PVE Dobsina I are pump storage ones and they are controlled directly by the Slovak Energy Dispatch Centre located in Zilina thought the system LS 3200. Those power plants participate in secondary regulation of electrical network of Slovakia. They are used to compensate balance in reference to foreign electrical networks and they are put into operation independently from VED. Activity of the branch is focused mainly on support of fulfilment of such an important aim as electric network regulation. Beginnings of the subsidiary Hydroelectric Power Plants Dobsina are related to the year of 1948. After commissioning of the pump storage Hydroelectric Power Plants Dobsina in 1953, the plant started to carry out its mission. Since that time the subsidiary has been enlarged by other seven power plants, through which it is fulfilling its missions nowadays. The characteristics of these hydroelectric power plants (The pump-storage power plant Dobsina, Small hydroelectric power plant Dobsina II, Small hydroelectric power plant Rakovec, Small hydroelectric power plant Svedlar, Hydroelectric power plant Domasa, The pump-storage power plant Ruzin, and Small hydroelectric power plant Krompachy) are described in detail. Employees welfare and public relations are presented

  15. Efficient and equitable spatial allocation of renewable power plants at the country scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Martin; Egerer, Jonas; Lange, Martin; Masurowski, Frank; Meyerhoff, Jürgen; Oehlmann, Malte

    2017-09-01

    Globally, the production of renewable energy is undergoing rapid growth. One of the most pressing issues is the appropriate allocation of renewable power plants, as the question of where to produce renewable electricity is highly controversial. Here we explore this issue through analysis of the efficient and equitable spatial allocation of wind turbines and photovoltaic power plants in Germany. We combine multiple methods, including legal analysis, economic and energy modelling, monetary valuation and numerical optimization. We find that minimum distances between renewable power plants and human settlements should be as small as is legally possible. Even small reductions in efficiency lead to large increases in equity. By considering electricity grid expansion costs, we find a more even allocation of power plants across the country than is the case when grid expansion costs are neglected.

  16. A critical review on energy, exergy, exergoeconomic and economic (4-E analysis of thermal power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing energy supply, demand has created an interest towards the plant equipment efficiency and the optimization of existing thermal power plants. Also, a thermal power plant dependency on fossil fuel makes it a little bit difficult, because of environmental impacts has been always taken into consideration. At present, most of the power plants are going to be designed by the energetic performance criterion which is based on the first law of thermodynamics. Sometimes, the system energy balance is not sufficient for the possible finding of the system imperfections. Energy losses taking place in a system can be easily determined by using exergy analysis. Hence, it is a powerful tool for the measurement of energy quality, thereby helps to make complex thermodynamic systems more efficient. Nowadays, economic optimization of plant is also a big problem for researchers because of the complex nature. At a viewpoint of this, a comprehensive literature review over the years of energy, exergy, exergoeconomic and economic (4-E analysis and their applications in thermal power plants stimulated by coal, gas, combined cycle and cogeneration system have been done thoroughly. This paper is addressed to those researchers who are doing their research work on 4-E analysis in various thermal power plants. If anyone extracts an idea for the development of the concept of 4-E analysis using this article, we will achieve our goal. This review also indicates the scope of future research in thermal power plants.

  17. Internal transport barriers: critical physics issues?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litaudon, X [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM, Departement de Recherches sur La Fusion Controlee, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2006-05-15

    Plasmas regimes with improved core energy confinement properties, i.e. with internal transport barriers (ITB), provide a possible route towards simultaneous high fusion performance and continuous tokamak reactor operation in a non-inductive current drive state. High core confinement regimes should be made compatible with a dominant fraction of the plasma current self-generated (pressure-driven) by the bootstrap effect while operating at high normalized pressure and moderate current. Furthermore, ITB regimes with 'non-stiff' plasma core pressure break the link observed in standard inductive operation between fusion performances and plasma pressure at the edge, thus offering a new degree of freedom in the tokamak operational space. Prospects and critical issues for using plasmas with enhanced thermal core insulation as a basis for steady tokamak reactor operation are reviewed in the light of the encouraging experimental and modelling results obtained recently (typically in the last two years). An extensive set of data from experiments carried out worldwide has been gathered on ITB regimes covering a wide range of parameters (q-profile, T{sub i}/T{sub e}, gradient length, shaping, normalized toroidal Larmor radius, collisionality, Mach number, etc). In the light of the progress made recently, the following critical physics issues relevant to the extrapolation of ITB regimes to next-step experiments, such as ITER, are addressed: 1. conditions for ITB formation and existence of a power threshold,; 2. ITB sustainment at T{sub i} {approx} T{sub e}, with low toroidal torque injection, low central particle fuelling but at high density and low impurity concentration,; 3. control of confinement for sustaining wide ITBs that encompass a large volume at high {beta}{sub N},; 4. real time profile control (q and pressure) with high bootstrap current and large fraction of alpha-heating and; 5. compatibility of core with edge transport barriers or with external core

  18. Comparative studies between nuclear power plants and hydroelectric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menegassi, J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper shows the quantitative evolution of the power plants in the main countries of the world. The Brazilian situation is analysed, with emphasys in the technical and economical aspects related to power production by hidroelectric or nuclear power plants. The conclusion is that the electricity produced by hidro power plants becomes not economics when is intended to be produced at large distances from the demand centers. (Author) [pt

  19. Power uprates in nuclear power plants: international experiences and approaches for implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ki Sig

    2008-01-01

    The greater demand for electricity and the available capacity within safety margins in some operating NPPs are prompting nuclear utilities to request license modification to enable operation at a higher power level, beyond their original license provisions. Such plant modifications require an in-depth safety analysis to evaluate the possible safety impact. The analysis must consider the thermo hydraulic, radiological and structural aspects, and the plant behavior, while taking into account the capability of the structures, systems and components, and the reactor protection and safeguard systems set points. The purpose of this paper is to introduce international experiences and approaches for implementation of power uprates related to the reactor thermal power of nuclear power plants. The paper is intended to give the reader a general overview of the major processes, work products, issues, challenges, events, and experiences in the power uprates program. The process of increasing the licensed power level of a nuclear power plants is called a power uprate. One way of increasing the thermal output from a reactor is to increase the amount of fissile material in use. It is also possible to increase the core power by increasing the performance of the high power bundles. Safety margins can be maintained by either using fuels with a higher performance, or through the use of improved methods of analysis to demonstrate that the required margins are retained even at the higher power levels. The paper will review all types of power uprates, from small to large, and across various reactor types, including light and heavy water, pressurized, and boiling water reactors. Generally, however, the content of the report focuses on power uprates of the stretch and extended type. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is developing a technical guideline on power uprates and side effects of power uprates in nuclear power plants

  20. A critical review on energy, exergy, exergoeconomic and economic (4-E) analysis of thermal power plants

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The growing energy supply, demand has created an interest towards the plant equipment efficiency and the optimization of existing thermal power plants. Also, a thermal power plant dependency on fossil fuel makes it a little bit difficult, because of environmental impacts has been always taken into consideration. At present, most of the power plants are going to be designed by the energetic performance criterion which is based on the first law of thermodynamics. Sometimes, the system energy ba...

  1. Safety assessment of emergency power systems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This publication is intended to assist the safety assessor within a regulatory body, or one working as a consultant, in assessing the safety of a given design of the emergency power systems (EPS) for a nuclear power plant. The present publication refers closely to the NUSS Safety Guide 50-SG-D7 (Rev. 1), Emergency Power Systems at Nuclear Power Plants. It covers therefore exactly the same technical subject as that Safety Guide. In view of its objective, however, it attempts to help in the evaluation of possible technical solutions which are intended to fulfill the safety requirements. Section 2 clarifies the scope further by giving an outline of the assessment steps in the licensing process. After a general outline of the assessment process in relation to the licensing of a nuclear power plant, the publication is divided into two parts. First, all safety issues are presented in the form of questions that have to be answered in order for the assessor to be confident of a safe design. The second part presents the same topics in tabulated form, listing the required documentation which the assessor has to consult and those international and national technical standards pertinent to the topics. An extensive reference list provides information on standards. 1 tab

  2. Second ANS workshop on the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, R.A.

    1995-03-01

    The Second American Nuclear Society Workshop on the Safety of Soviet-Designed Nuclear Power Plants was held in Washington, DC, in November, 1994. The Workshop consisted of both plenary sessions and working sessions with three hundred participants overall. All countries with operating Soviet-Designed nuclear power plants were represented and representatives from several other countries also participated. In addition to the status and plans related to technical issues, the Workshop also included discussions of economic, political, legal, and social issues as they relate to the safety of these nuclear power plants

  3. Maryland power plants and the environment. A review of the impacts of power plants and transmission lines on Maryland's natural resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) is required by Maryland law to review and evaluate the potential impacts to Maryland's environment from the construction and operation of electric power generating and transmission systems. PPRP summarizes these evaluations every other year in a document known as the Cumulative Environmental Impact Report (CEIR). This volume represents the tenth edition (CEIR-10), and it summarizes the current state of knowledge which PPRP has gained from more than 25 years of continuous monitoring of power plant impacts in Maryland. PPRP conducts a range of research and monitoring projects on the topics addressed in this CEIR and many other issues as well. In fact, PPRP publishes a Bibliography every year that lists the general and site-specific power plant related reports that PPRP has produced since the early 1970s

  4. International environmental issues and requirements for new power projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, J.R. [Golder Associates Inc., Gainesville, FL (United States); Maltby, J.H. [Golder Associates Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this presentation was to discuss the emerging role of financial entities in determining environmental requirements for international power projects. The paper outlines the following: emerging conditions; examples of announced privatization energy projects by country; types of government and international financial entity sources; problems for IPPs; similarity and differences between the World Bank and the USEPA; comparison of the international standards and regulations for power plants; recent trends/issues involving international power project approval; and recommendations for understanding/expediting the financial entities` environmental approval process and how to expedite this process.

  5. Actions concerning nuclear power plant life evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, M.; Fabbri, S.; Mizrahi, R.; Savino, E.J.; Versaci, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the main activities to be undertaken by CNEA will be to provide technological assistance to NASA in problems concerning NPP operation. Works on life extensions of NPP are included in these activities. To fulfill these requirements the Atomic Energy National Commission (CNEA) has constituted a technical committee for Nuclear Power Plants Support (CAPCEN). CAPCEN should be the knowledge reservoir of those issues concerning the performance, safety and life extension of Nuclear Power Plants. One of CAPCEN's most important activities is to promote research work connected with such issues. The main technical areas are: Pressure Vessel and Piping, Heat Exchanges and Fuel Channels and Reactor Inner Components. Efforts are focused on the identification of the main components susceptible of ageing, the study of their ageing mechanisms, the follow-up of their behaviour during operation, and the measures taken to extend their life. (author)

  6. Sea water pumping-up power plant system combined with nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Tanaka, Masayuki.

    1991-01-01

    It is difficult to find a site suitable to construction for a sea water pumping-up power plant at a place relatively near the electric power consumption area. Then, a nuclear power plant is set at the sea bottom or the land portion of a sea shore near the power consumption area. A cavity is excavated underground or at the bottom of the sea in the vicinity of the power plant to form a lower pond, and the bottom of the sea, as an upper pond and the lower pond are connected by a water pressure pipe and a water discharge pipe. A pump water turbine is disposed therebetween, to which electric power generator is connected. In addition, an ordinary or emergency cooling facility in the nuclear power plant is constituted such that sea water in the cavity is supplied by a sea water pump. Accordingly, the sea water pumping-up plant system in combination with the nuclear power plant is constituted with no injuring from salts to animals and plants on land in the suburbs of a large city. The cost for facilities for supplying power from a remote power plant to large city areas and power loss are decreased and stable electric power can be supplied. (N.H.)

  7. Linking empowering leadership to safety participation in nuclear power plants: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Córcoles, Mario; Schöbel, Markus; Gracia, Francisco J; Tomás, Inés; Peiró, José M

    2012-07-01

    Safety participation is of paramount importance in guaranteeing the safe running of nuclear power plants. The present study examined the effects of empowering leadership on safety participation. Based on a sample of 495 employees from two Spanish nuclear power plants, structural equation modeling showed that empowering leadership has a significant relationship with safety participation, which is mediated by collaborative team learning. In addition, the results revealed that the relationship between empowering leadership and collaborative learning is partially mediated by the promotion of dialogue and open communication. The implications of these findings for safety research and their practical applications are outlined. An empowering leadership style enhances workers' safety performance, particularly safety participation behaviors. Safety participation is recommended to detect possible rule inconsistencies or misunderstood procedures and make workers aware of critical safety information and issues. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nuclear power plant personnel training process management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona Vazquez, Orison; Venegas Bernal, Maria del Carmen; Armeteros Lopez, Ana L.

    1996-01-01

    The system in charge the management of the training process personnel from a nuclear power plant was designed taking into account all the requirements stated in the training guide for nuclear power plant personnel and their evaluation, which were prepared by the IAEA in 1995 in order to implement the SAT in the training programs for nuclear plant personnel. In the preparations of formats and elements that shape the system, account has been taken of the views expressed in such a guide, in some other bibliography that was consulted, and in the authors own opinion mainly with regard to those issues which the guide does not go deeper into

  9. Fusion power core engineering for the ARIES-ST power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; Wang, X.R.; Pulsifer, J.; Malang, S.; Sze, D.K.; Billone, M.; Sviatoslavsky, I.

    2003-01-01

    ARIES-ST is a 1000 MWe fusion power plant based on a low aspect ratio 'spherical torus' (ST) plasma. The ARIES-ST power core was designed to accommodate the unique features of an ST power plant, to meet the top-level requirements of an attractive fusion energy source, and to minimize extrapolation from the fusion technology database under development throughout the world. The result is an advanced helium-cooled ferritic steel blanket with flowing PbLi breeder and tungsten plasma-interactive components. Design improvements, such as the use of SiC inserts in the blanket to extend the outlet coolant temperature range were explored and the results are reported here. In the final design point, the power and particle loads found in ARIES-ST are relatively similar to other advanced tokamak power plants (e.g. ARIES-RS [Fusion Eng. Des. 38 (1997) 3; Fusion Eng. Des. 38 (1997) 87]) such that exotic technologies were not required in order to satisfy all of the design criteria. Najmabadi and the ARIES Team [Fusion Eng. Des. (this issue)] provide an overview of ARIES-ST design. In this article, the details of the power core design are presented together with analysis of the thermal-hydraulic, thermomechanical and materials behavior of in-vessel components. Detailed engineering analysis of ARIES-ST TF and PF systems, nuclear analysis, and safety are given in the companion papers

  10. Development of CFD fire models for deterministic analyses of the cable issues in the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-H.; Ferng, Y.-M.; Pei, B.-S.

    2009-01-01

    Additional fire barriers of electrical cables are required for the nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Taiwan due to the separation requirements of Appendix R to 10 CFR Part 50. The risk-informed fire analysis (RIFA) may provide a viable method to resolve these fire barrier issues. However, it is necessary to perform the fire scenario analyses so that RIFA can quantitatively determine the risk related to the fire barrier wrap. The CFD fire models are then proposed in this paper to help the RIFA in resolving these issues. Three typical fire scenarios are selected to assess the present CFD models. Compared with the experimental data and other model's simulations, the present calculated results show reasonable agreements, rendering that present CFD fire models can provide the quantitative information for RIFA analyses to release the cable wrap requirements for NPPs

  11. Configuration management of plant modifications for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritsch, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of nuclear power plant operation, regulatory pressure, and the large numbers of people required to operate and support the stations, the control of plant modifications at these plants needs to be expanded and improved. The aerospace and defense industries, as well as the owners or operators of large energy projects have established configuration management programs (CMPs) to control plant design changes. These programs are composed of well-defined functions for identifying, evaluating, recording, tracking, issuing, and documenting the established baseline conditions, as well as required changes to these baseline conditions. The purpose of this paper is to describe a recommended CMP for plant modifications consisting of a computerized data base installed on the utility's computer to provide a central storage of plant design and operations data necessary to control the following activities as they are affected by plant design changes: training; record management; operations; maintenance; health physics; planning/scheduling; procurement/inventory control; outage management (including modifications); and emergency response

  12. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI action plan requirements, unresolved safety issues, generic safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, a program was established whereby an annual NUREG report would be published on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirements areas. This information was compiled and reported in three NUREG volumes. Volume 1, published in March 1991, addressed the status of of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan Requirements. Volume 2, published in May 1991, addressed the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs). Volume 3, published in June 1991, addressed the implementation and verification status of generic safety issues (GSIs). This annual NUREG report combines these volumes into a single report and provides updated information as of September 30, 1991. The data contained in these NUREG reports are a product of the NRC's Safety Issues Management System (SIMS) database, which is maintained by the Project Management Staff in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and by NRC regional personnel. This report is to provide a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of TMI Action Plan Requirements, safety issues designated as USIs, and GSIs that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. An additional purpose of this NUREG report is to serve as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues up until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees

  13. Armenian nuclear power plant: US NRC assistance programme for seismic upgrade and safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.; Perkins, K.; Jo, J.; Carew, J.; Ramsey, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (US NRC) technical support program activities associated with the Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) safety upgrade. The US NRC program, integrated within the overall IAEA-led initiative for safety re-evaluation of the WWER plants, has as its main thrust the technical support to the Armenian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ANRA) through close collaboration with the scientific staff at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Several major technical areas of support to ANRA form the basis of the NRC program. These include the seismic re-evaluation and upgrade of the ANPP, safety evaluation of critical systems, and the generation of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Specifically, the seismic re-evaluation of the ANPP is part of a broader activity that involves the re-assessment of the seismic hazard at the site, the identification of the Safe Shutdown Equipment at the plant and the evaluation of their seismic capacity, the detailed modeling and analysis of the critical facilities at ANPP, and the generation of the Floor Response Spectra (FRS). Based on the new spectra that incorporate all new findings (hazard, site soil, structure, etc.), the overall capacity of the main structures and the seismic capacity of the critical systems are being re-evaluated. In addition, analyses of critical safe shutdown systems and safe shutdown processes are being performed to ensure both the capabilities of the operating systems and the enhancement of safety due to system upgrades. At present, one of the principal goals of the US NRC's regulatory assistance activities with ANRA is enhancing ANRA's regulatory oversight of high-priority safety issues (both generic and plant-specific) associated with operation of the ANPP. As such, assisting ANRA in understanding and assessing plant-specific seismic and other safety issues associated with the ANPP is a high priority given the ANPP's being located in a seismically active area

  14. Tactical supply chain planning for a forest biomass power plant under supply uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabani, Nazanin; Sowlati, Taraneh; Ouhimmou, Mustapha; Rönnqvist, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty in biomass supply is a critical issue that needs to be considered in the production planning of bioenergy plants. Incorporating uncertainty in supply chain planning models provides improved and stable solutions. In this paper, we first reformulate a previously developed non-linear programming model for optimization of a forest biomass power plant supply chain into a linear programming model. The developed model is a multi-period tactical-level production planning problem and considers the supply and storage of forest biomass as well as the production of electricity. It has a one-year planning horizon with monthly time steps. Next, in order to incorporate uncertainty in monthly available biomass into the planning, we develop a two-stage stochastic programming model. Finally, to balance the risk and profit, we propose a bi-objective model. The results show that uncertainty in availability of biomass has an additional cost of $0.4 million for the power plant. Using the proposed stochastic optimization model could reduce this cost by half. - Highlights: • Developed a two-stage stochastic optimization model to consider supply uncertainty. • Maximized the profit of a forest biomass power plant value chain. • Minimized two risk measures, variability index and downside risk, to manage risks. • Stochastic optimization model provided feasible solution for all scenarios. • Results showed a trade-off between profit and risk management

  15. The prospects of improving nuclear power station's safety based on nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Sharaevskij, I.G.; Fialko, N.M.; Zimin, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the main areas of application of modern high-tech developments in nanothermophysics to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. Performed an analysis of the possibilities of practical applications of efficient nanotechnology for nuclear energy.The article describes the complex issues of concern with the use of nanofluids as a coolant for the most critical equipment of nuclear power plants. It's examined among these equipment the first line of water-cooled nuclear reactor, as well as its emergency cooling system. Performed an analysis of the main issues that relate to the definition of the critical heat flux at boiling liquid on the work surface. From these positions, evaluated the known results on the data og the critical heat flux using nanofluids. In this article was given the main tasks of advanced research in nano-thermal physics for increase nuclear power plant safety in Ukraine

  16. An analysis on human factor issues in criticality accident at a uranium processing plant. Investigation on human behavior contributing to the criticality accident. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasou, Kuonihide; Goda, Hideki; Hirotsu, Yuko

    1999-01-01

    At 10:30 am, September 30th, 1999, a criticality accident occurred in a conversion building of a uranium processing plant in Tokai, Ibaraki prefecture. 69 people including 3 workers who then worked at the building, 3 fire fighters who dispatched to rescue them were exposed to the radiation. People with a 350 m-radius of the site were recommended to evacuate themselves from the region to a temporarily prepared evacuation center. And about one hundred thousand people within a 10 km-radius were also advised to stay inside of their home. Nuclear Safety Commission's Accident Investigation Committee is investigating causes of this accident and have been revealing that deviation from government-authorized processing method and negligence of its illegal procedure had contributed to the accident. The influence of this accident is expanding not only to the plant operating company, local people but also to Japanese nuclear power policy, the whole nuclear industry in Japan. Especially pervasion of 'Safety Culture' is strongly being required. This report analyses latent factors of some human behavior directly contributing to the criticality accident. It also mentions that 4 critical points on the poor climate for safety in the work place, the inadequate safety management, the unsuitable equipment and the production-biased company's policy are the latent factors of this accident. It also finds that the poor climate and the production-biased policy are the most important factors. It can be said that some people directly or indirectly having caused the accident are the victims of them. (author)

  17. Effects of delaying the operation of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, L.J.; Rainey, J.A.; Tepel, R.C.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1983-12-01

    This report documents a study of an actual 24-month nuclear power plant licensing delay. A representative utility was chosen for examination. The research was oriented toward determination of the licensing delay's impact on the utility's operating results, ratepayers, and security issues. The methodology utilized to estimate those impacts involved the recursive interaction of a generation costing program to estimate replacement fuel costs and a financial regulatory model to concomitantly determine the impact on the utility, its ratepayers and security issues. The latter model was executed under six alternate scenarios: (1) no delay in the plant's operation; (2) a 24-month delay; (3) a 24-month delay but further assuming all replacement power was generated by coal-fired plants; (4) a 24-month delay assuming all replacement power from oil-fired plants; (5) no delay but assuming the capital cost of the plant was twice as large; and (6) a 24-month delay with the capital cost of the plant twice as large. Three primary conclusions were made. First, under all scenarios, a 24-month delay in operation of the plant has an adverse impact on the utility's internal generation of funds. Second, although electricity rates are not appreciably affected by the delay, the direction of electricity price changes is contingent on the source of fuel used for replacement power. Finally, a 24-month delay has an adverse impact on the indicators used to evaluate the financial soundness of the utility in all cases under consideration

  18. Video camera use at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, M.L.; Langan, M.O.; Owen, D.E.

    1990-08-01

    A survey of US nuclear power plants was conducted to evaluate video camera use in plant operations, and determine equipment used and the benefits realized. Basic closed circuit television camera (CCTV) systems are described and video camera operation principles are reviewed. Plant approaches for implementing video camera use are discussed, as are equipment selection issues such as setting task objectives, radiation effects on cameras, and the use of disposal cameras. Specific plant applications are presented and the video equipment used is described. The benefits of video camera use --- mainly reduced radiation exposure and increased productivity --- are discussed and quantified. 15 refs., 6 figs

  19. Japan's policy on the nuclear power plant life management, life management for nuclear power plants and measures to cope with aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takuma, Masao

    2002-01-01

    response, decided to evaluate the long term soundness of overall plant facilities and issued plans for necessary measures to cope with the plant aging. As the efforts hereafter on the aging measures, implementation of 'Long-term Maintenance Programs', issuing 'Periodic Safety Reviews' and the establishment of 'Nuclear Power Plant Life Engineering Center' (April, 2002), are thought to be important in Japan. (author)

  20. Human factors review of power plant maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.; Parsons, S.O.; Schmidt, W.J.; Gonzalez, W.R.; Dove, L.E.

    1980-10-01

    Human factors engineering is an interdisciplinary science and technology concerned with shaping the design of machines, facilities, and operational environments to promote safe, efficient, and reliable performance on the part of operators and maintainers of equipment systems. The human factors aspects of five nuclear power plants and four fossil fuel plants were evaluated using such methods as a checklist guided observation system, structured interviews with maintenance personnel, direct observations of maintenance tasks, reviews of procedures, and analyses of maintenance errors or accidents by means of the critical incident technique. The study revealed a wide variety of human factors problem areas, most of which are extensively photodocumented. The study recommends that a more systematic and formal approach be adopted to ensure that future power plants are human engineered to the needs of maintenance personnel

  1. Plant critical concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Regan, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The achievement of operation and maintenance (O ampersand M) cost reductions is a prime concern for plant operators. Initiatives by the nuclear industry to address this concern are under way and/or in development. These efforts include plant reliability studies, reliability-centered maintenance, risk ranking and testing philosophies, performance-based testing philosophies, graded quality assurance, and so forth. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop a methodology that integrates and applies the common data and analysis requirements for a number of risk-based and performance-based initiatives. This initial phase of the effort applied the methodology and its results to two initiatives. These were the procurement function and the preventive maintenance function. This effort integrated multiple programs and functions to identify those components that are truly critical from an integrated plant performance perspective. The paper describes the scope of the effort, the development of a methodology to identify plant critical components, and the application of these results to the maintenance rule compliance, preventive maintenance, and procurement functions at the candidate plant

  2. Operational characteristics of nuclear power plants - modelling of operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studovic, M.

    1984-01-01

    By operational experience of nuclear power plants and realize dlevel of availability of plant, systems and componenst reliabiliuty, operational safety and public protection, as a source on nature of distrurbances in power plant systems and lessons drawn by the TMI-2, in th epaper are discussed: examination of design safety for ultimate ensuring of safe operational conditions of the nuclear power plant; significance of the adequate action for keeping proess parameters in prescribed limits and reactor cooling rquirements; developed systems for measurements detection and monitoring all critical parameters in the nuclear steam supply system; contents of theoretical investigation and mathematical modeling of the physical phenomena and process in nuclear power plant system and components as software, supporting for ensuring of operational safety and new access in staff education process; program and progress of the investigation of some physical phenomena and mathematical modeling of nuclear plant transients, prepared at faculty of mechanical Engineering in Belgrade. (author)

  3. Seismic fragilities for nuclear power plant risk studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Ravindra, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic fragilities of critical structures and equipment are developed as families of conditional failure frequency curves plotted against peak ground acceleration. The procedure is based on available data combined with judicious extrapolation of design information on plant structures and equipment. Representative values of fragility parameters for typical modern nuclear power plants are provided. Based on the fragility evaluation for about a dozen nuclear power plants, it is proposed that unnecessary conservatism existing in current seismic design practice could be removed by properly accounting for inelastic energy absorption capabilities of structures. The paper discusses the key contributors to seismic risk and the significance of possible correlation between component failures and potential design and construction errors

  4. Nuclear power plant transients: where are we

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, D.

    1984-05-01

    This document is in part a postconference review and summary of the American Nuclear Society sponsored Anticipated and Abnormal Plant Transients in Light Water Reactors Conference held in Jackson, Wyoming, September 26-29, 1983, and in part a reflection upon the issues of plant transients and their impact on the viability of nuclear power. This document discusses state-of-the-art knowledge, deficiencies, and future directions in the plant transients area as seen through this conference. It describes briefly what was reported in this conference, emphasizes areas where it is felt there is confidence in the nuclear industry, and also discusses where the experts did not have a consensus. Areas covered in the document include major issues in operational transients, transient management, transient events experience base, the status of the analytical tools and their capabilities, probabilistic risk assessment applications in operational transients, and human factors impact on plant transients management

  5. Efficiency improvement of thermal coal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourfar, D. [VEBA Kraftwerke Ruhr Ag, Gelsenkirchen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    The discussion concerning an increase of the natural greenhouse effect by anthropogenic changes in the composition of the atmosphere has increased over the past years. The greenhouse effect has become an issue of worldwide debate. Carbon dioxide is the most serious emission of the greenhouse gases. Fossil-fired power plants have in the recent past been responsible for almost 30 % of the total CO{sub 2} emissions in Germany. Against this background the paper will describe the present development of CO{sub 2} emissions from power stations and present actual and future opportunities for CO{sub 2} reduction. The significance attached to hard coal as one of today`s prime sources of energy with the largest reserves worldwide, and, consequently, its importance for use in power generation, is certain to increase in the years to come. The further development of conventional power plant technology, therefore, is vital, and must be carried out on the basis of proven operational experience. The main incentive behind the development work completed so far has been, and continues to be, the achievement of cost reductions and environmental benefits in the generation of electricity by increasing plant efficiency, and this means that, in both the short and the long term, power plants with improved conventional technology will be used for environmentally acceptable coal-fired power generation.

  6. The economics of coal and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper is largely based on a comparison of electrical generating costs from coal-fired power plants and thermal nuclear reactors. Following an introductory section, the subject is considered under the following headings: methodology; cost basis (capital costs, fuel costs, plant factors); generating costs; the fast breeder reactor -general issues; the economics of fast breeder reactors; conclusions and questions. (U.K.)

  7. Probabilistic safety assessment for digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, L.; Jiang, J.

    2003-01-01

    Deregulation in electricity market has created a great deal of challenges for nuclear power industries [1]. To stay competitive, Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) will have to find ways to reduce their operational costs and to improve the plant safety. Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems play an important role in this regard. Thus, new methodologies need to be developed to manage the operation of I and C systems more economically without jeopardizing the overall plant safety. Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) technique is one of the promising methods to deal with such an issue, because PSA analyzes various system operational issues from a probabilistic sense, rather than a worst-case approach. However, there are several limitations when PSA is applied to I and C systems directly. A possible solution to this problem can be found by incorporating PSA with several other approaches. To better understand the issues involved, an attempt has been made in this paper to carry out a literature survey on this and related subject, particularly the effort will be made on: 1) the development of digital I and C systems in NPP, 2) PSA and its potential benefits and limitations, and 3) applications of PSA in various aspects of I and C systems including the resource allocation, the determination of surveillance testing strategies and the design of I and C systems. Finally, some solutions to overcome the aforementioned obstacles when applying PSA in I and C systems are also examined critically. (author)

  8. Qualification issues associated with the use of advanced instrumentation and control systems hardware in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, K.; Antonescu, C.

    1993-01-01

    The instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and Tiber-optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I ampersand C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying I ampersand C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I ampersand C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light water reactor. The template was then used to address reliability issues for microprocessor-based protection systems. Standards (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I ampersand C systems were also identified. This approach addresses in part issues raised in Nuclear Regulatory Commission policy document SECY-91-292. which recognizes that advanced I ampersand C systems for the nuclear industry are ''being developed without consensus standards, as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.''

  9. Modeling cognitive behavior in nuclear power plants: An overview of contributing theoretical traditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.D.; Roth, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the major theoretical literatures that are relevant to modeling human cognitive activities important to nuclear power plant safety. The traditions considered include control theory, communication theory, statistical decision theory, information processing models and symbolic processing models. The review reveals a gradual convergence towards models that incorporate elements from multiple traditions. Models from the control theory tradition have gradually evolved to include rich knowledge representations borrowed from the symbolic processing work. At the same time theorists in the symbolic processing tradition are beginning to grapple with some of the critical issues involved in modeling complex real world domain

  10. Grid Support in Large Scale PV Power Plants using Active Power Reserves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craciun, Bogdan-Ionut

    to validate the performance of the frequency support functions, a flexible grid model with IEEE 12 bus system characteristics has been developed and implemented in RTDS. A power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) system composed by 20 kW plant (2 x 10 kW inverters and PV linear simulator) and grid simulator (RTDS......Photovoltaic (PV) systems are in the 3rd place in the renewable energy market, after hydro and wind power. The increased penetration of PV within the electrical power system has led to stability issues of the entire grid in terms of its reliability, availability and security of the supply....... As a consequence, Large scale PV Power Plants (LPVPPs) operating in Maximum Power Point (MPP) are not supporting the electrical network, since several grid triggering events or the increased number of downward regulation procedures have forced European Network of Transmission System Operators for Electricity...

  11. A Denoising Based Autoassociative Model for Robust Sensor Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Shaheryar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensors health monitoring is essentially important for reliable functioning of safety-critical chemical and nuclear power plants. Autoassociative neural network (AANN based empirical sensor models have widely been reported for sensor calibration monitoring. However, such ill-posed data driven models may result in poor generalization and robustness. To address above-mentioned issues, several regularization heuristics such as training with jitter, weight decay, and cross-validation are suggested in literature. Apart from these regularization heuristics, traditional error gradient based supervised learning algorithms for multilayered AANN models are highly susceptible of being trapped in local optimum. In order to address poor regularization and robust learning issues, here, we propose a denoised autoassociative sensor model (DAASM based on deep learning framework. Proposed DAASM model comprises multiple hidden layers which are pretrained greedily in an unsupervised fashion under denoising autoencoder architecture. In order to improve robustness, dropout heuristic and domain specific data corruption processes are exercised during unsupervised pretraining phase. The proposed sensor model is trained and tested on sensor data from a PWR type nuclear power plant. Accuracy, autosensitivity, spillover, and sequential probability ratio test (SPRT based fault detectability metrics are used for performance assessment and comparison with extensively reported five-layer AANN model by Kramer.

  12. RIMAP demonstration project. Pat. 1: Risk based life management of piping system in power plant Heilbronn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bareiss, J.; Puck, P.; Matschecko, B.; Jovanovic, A.; Balos, D.; Perunicic

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of EU project RIMAP [1] a new European Guideline for optimized risk based maintenance and inspection planning of industrial plants (RBLM - Risk Based Life Management) is being developed. The RIMAP project consists of the three clustered projects: development (RTD), demonstration (DEMO) and thematic network (TN). Current work and future, planned work in RIMAP demonstration project on applications of the RIMAP methodology in power plants are presented briefly in the first part of the paper. Also presented in the paper are the results of a preliminary analysis of piping system in power plant Heilbronn using the concept of risk-based monitoring as part of overall concept of risk-based life management. Shortly the following issues are discussed in the paper: identification of critical components, application of a multilevel risk analysis (..from ''screening'' to ''detailed analysis''), determination of PoF - Probability of Failure, determination of COF - Consequence of Failure and optimation of inspection and maintenance plan. (orig.)

  13. Power Quality Issues on Wind Power Installations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio; Lund, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    offshore wind farms connected at transmission level. In this perspective, the power quality issues are divided into local issues particularly related to the voltage quality in the distribution systems and global issues related to the power system control and stability. Power quality characteristics of wind...

  14. Managing the first nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-05-01

    Energy is essential for national development. Nearly every aspect of development - from reducing poverty and raising living standards to improving health care, industrial and agricultural productivity - requires reliable access to modern energy resources. States may have different reasons for considering starting a nuclear power project to achieve their national energy needs, such as: lack of available indigenous energy resources, the desire to reduce dependence upon imported energy, the need to increase the diversity of energy resources and/or mitigation of carbon emission increases. The start of a nuclear power plant project involves several complex and interrelated activities with long duration. Experience shows that the time between the initial policy decision by a State to consider nuclear power up to the start of operation of its first nuclear power plant is about 10 to 15 years and that before specific project management can proceed, several key infrastructure issues have to be in place. The proper management of the wide scope of activities to be planned and implemented during this period represents a major challenge for the involved governmental, utility, regulatory, supplier and other supportive organizations. The main focus is to ensure that the project is implemented successfully from a commercial point of view while remaining in accordance with the appropriate engineering and quality requirements, safety standards and security guides. This publication is aimed at providing guidance on the practical management of a first nuclear power project in a country. There are many other issues, related to ensuring that the infrastructure in the country has been prepared adequately to ensure that the project will be able to be completed, that are only briefly addressed in this publication. The construction of the first nuclear power plant is a major undertaking for any country developing a nuclear power programme. Worldwide experience gained in the last 50 years

  15. Neutronics requirements for a DEMO fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion Consortium , Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Villari, R. [ENEA UT-FUS C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Discussion and specification of neutronic requirements for a DEMO power plant. • TBR uncertainties are reviewed/discussed and design margins are elaborated. • Limits are given for radiation loads to super-conducting magnets and steel structural components. • Available DEMO results are compared to recommended limits and TBR design target. - Abstract: This paper addresses the neutronic requirements a DEMO fusion power plant needs to fulfil for a reliable and safe operation. The major requirement is to ensure Tritium self-sufficiency taking into account the various uncertainties and plant-internal losses that occur during DEMO operation. A further major requirement is to ensure sufficient protection of the superconducting magnets against the radiation penetrating in-vessel components and vessel. Reliable criteria for the radiation loads need to be defined and verified to ensure the reliable operation of the magnets over the lifetime of DEMO. Other issues include radiation induced effects on structural materials such as the accumulated displacement damage, the generation of gases such as helium which may deteriorate the material performance. The paper discusses these issues and their impact on design options for DEMO taking into account results obtained in the frame of European Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) 2013 programme activities with DEMO models employing the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB), the helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL), and the water-cooled (WCLL) blanket concepts.

  16. EnergiTools(R) - a power plant performance monitoring and diagnosis tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancion, P.V.; Bastien, R.; Ringdahl, K.

    2000-01-01

    Westinghouse EnergiTools(R) is a performance diagnostic tool for power generation plants that combines the power of on-line process data acquisition with advanced diagnostics methodologies. The system uses analytical models based on thermodynamic principles combined with knowledge of component diagnostic experts. An issue in modeling expert knowledge is to have a framework that can represent and process uncertainty in complex systems. In such experiments, it is nearly impossible to build deterministic models for the effects of faults on symptoms. A methodology based on causal probabilistic graphs, more specifically on Bayesian belief networks, has been implemented in EnergiTools(R) to capture the fault-symptom relationships. The methodology estimates the likelihood of the various component failures using the fault-symptom relationships. The system also has the ability to use neural networks for processes that are difficult to model analytically. An application is the estimation of the reactor power in nuclear power plant by interpreting several plant indicators. EnergiTools(R) is used for the on-line performance monitoring and diagnostics at Vattenfall Ringhals nuclear power plants in Sweden. It has led to the diagnosis of various performance issues with plant components. Two case studies are presented. In the first case, an overestimate of the thermal power due to a faulty instrument was found, which led to a plant operation below its optimal power. The paper shows how the problem was discovered, using the analytical thermodynamic calculations. The second case shows an application of EnergiTools(R) for the diagnostic of a condenser failure using causal probabilistic graphs

  17. Changes in control room at Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecklund, Lena

    2005-09-01

    The Swedish nuclear power plants were commissioned during a period between 1972 and 1985 and the instrumentation and control equipment are basically from that period. For several years there have been plans made for changes in all the nuclear power plants and to a certain extent the changes in control equipment and monitoring rooms have also been implemented. The object of this project was to make a comprehensive review of the changes in control room design implemented in the Swedish nuclear power plants and to describe how the MTO- (Man-Technology-Organisation) and (Man-Machine-Interface) -issues have been integrated in the process. The survey is intended to give an overall picture of the changes in control room design and man-machine-interface made in the Swedish control rooms, in order to get a deeper knowledge of the change management process and its results as well as of the management of MTO-issues in these projects. The units included in this survey are: Oskarhamn reactor 2 and 3; Ringhals reactor 2, 3 and 4; Forsmark reactor 1, 2 and 3. The Oskarshamn 1 unit has not been included in this report as it has recently undergone an extensive modernisation program as well as a detailed inspection by the SKI (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate). At Ringhals 2 the modernisation work is carried out at present and the unit is also subjected to extensive inspection activities carried out by SKI and is therefore not part of this survey. This report also includes a short description of relevant standards and requirements. Then follows a presentation of the results of the plant survey, presented as case studies for three companies OKG, Ringhals and FKA. Control room changes are summarized as well as the results on specific MTO issues which has been surveyed. In all the power companies there is a joint way of working with projects concerning plant modifications. This process is described for each company separately. In the concluding of the report the strengths and

  18. Nuclear waste management in Canada: critical issues, critical perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Genevieve Fuji; Durant, Darrin

    2009-01-01

    ... on FSC-certified ancient-forest-free paper (100 percent post-consumer recycled) that is processed chlorineand acid-free. Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication Nuclear waste management in Canada : critical issues, critical perspectives / edited by Darrin Durant and Genevieve Fuji Johnson. Includes bibliographical references an...

  19. Technical Meeting/Workshop on Topical Issues on Infrastructure Development: Managing the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the TM/Workshop is to provide an opportunity for exchange of specific information on the management of the development of a sustainable national infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants as it is recommended in the Agency's Milestones approach. Taking into account the actual status of new nuclear power programmes in Member States, this Agency event shall focus on the moving beyond the consideration of the nuclear power and advancing to the next phase, when future partners (Consultants, NPP Vendors, EPC Contractors, etc.) shall be selected and contracted for the first Nuclear Power Plant. The objectives of the Technical Meeting/Workshop are the following: 1. To exchange specific information and to facilitate the management and coordination of the development and implementation of a national infrastructure for nuclear power; 2. To present and discuss case studies, good practices and lessons learned about recent experiences in implementing an appropriate infrastructure for nuclear power, including management methods and self-evaluation processes; 3. To allow participants to improve their knowledge of various aspects of nuclear infrastructure development; and 4. To provide a forum in which participants can discuss common challenges, opportunities for cooperation, concerns and issues their countries face in the infrastructure implementation process.

  20. Anti-nuclear activities and critics concerning nuclear power plant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, We-Beg

    2000-01-01

    Korea has dynamic nuclear power expansion programs, operating 16 nuclear units producing 13710 MW in total located on 4 different sites. Last year, nuclear power supplied over 40 % of national total electricity demands. In 1998, Korean government initiated re-designation work investigating circumstance changes to rule out the unnecessary sites in consideration of a long-term power supply. Korean government has determined to expand the Ulchin site and to designate one point of Woolju county as a new candidate site, and ruled out the rest candidate sites at the end of 1998. About such a governmental measure, the two areas show different reactions. Ulchin where nuclear power plant has been operated safely for about 10 years was likely to accept the governmental determination in spite of some opposition and called for several financial supports for local development. WooIju county, however, showed a strong opposition among local environmental groups and autonomous politicians, and they presented a variety of anti-nuclear activities including demonstrations mainly at the neighbouring metropolis, Ulsan city

  1. Modeling issues in nuclear plant fire risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siu, N.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses various issues associated with current models for analyzing the risk due to fires in nuclear power plants. Particular emphasis is placed on the fire growth and suppression models, these being unique to the fire portion of the overall risk analysis. Potentially significant modeling improvements are identified; also discussed are a variety of modeling issues where improvements will help the credibility of the analysis, without necessarily changing the computed risk significantly. The mechanistic modeling of fire initiation is identified as a particularly promising improvement for reducing the uncertainties in the predicted risk. 17 refs., 5 figs. 2 tabs

  2. Recent Advances in Ocean Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Heon Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, recent advances in Ocean Nuclear Power Plants (ONPPs are reviewed, including their general arrangement, design parameters, and safety features. The development of ONPP concepts have continued due to initiatives taking place in France, Russia, South Korea, and the United States. Russia’s first floating nuclear power stations utilizing the PWR technology (KLT-40S and the spar-type offshore floating nuclear power plant designed by a research group in United States are considered herein. The APR1400 and SMART mounted Gravity Based Structure (GBS-type ONPPs proposed by a research group in South Korea are also considered. In addition, a submerged-type ONPP designed by DCNS of France is taken into account. Last, issues and challenges related to ONPPs are discussed and summarized.

  3. Studies of safety and critical work situations in nuclear power plants: A human factors perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson Kecklund, L.

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop and apply different approaches for analyzing safety in critical work situations in real work settings in nuclear power plants, and also to identify safety enhancing measures by using the framework of interaction between human, organizational and technical subsystems. A Cognitive Psychology as well as a Stress Psychology framework was used. All studies were related to the annual outage operational state where the need for coping with many infrequent tasks, often carried out under high time pressure, puts great strain on the staff and organisation of the plant. In three studies the natural variations in the plant state, normal operation and annual outage operation, were used to explore human performance, work-related factors as well as coping and the operators' own resources and the relationship between them. In the annual outage condition high work demands, decreased sleepiness at night shift, more errors and less satisfaction with work performance quality was reported by maintenance as well as by control room operators. A relationship between high work demands and more organizational problems and reports of more frequent human errors and lower satisfactions with work performance quality was also identified in the annual outage condition. Moreover, a relationship between increased sleepiness during night shift, more frequent use of coping strategies and a higher frequency of human errors was reported. In two studies the Event and Barrier Function Model was applied to analyze the safety of barrier function systems inserted into work process sequences to protect the systems from the negative consequences of failures and errors. The model was also used to assess safety in relation to a technical and organizational change. The last study addressed changes in work performance and work-related factors in relation to a technical and organizational change of a safety significant work process involving increased automation and new

  4. Summary and conclusions of a program addressing aging of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Hookham, C.J.; Graves, H.L. III

    1999-01-01

    Research has been conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. The purpose was to identify potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments. The focus of this program was on structural integrity rather than on leaktightness or pressure retention of concrete structures. Primary program accomplishments include formulation of a Structural Materials Information Center that contains data and information on the time variation of material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors for 144 materials, an aging assessment methodology to identify critical structures and degradation factors that can potentially impact their performance, guidelines and evaluation criteria for use in condition assessments of reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current condition assessments and estimations of future performance of reinforced concrete nuclear power plant structures. In addition, in-depth evaluations were conducted of several nondestructive evaluation and repair-related technologies to develop guidance on their applicability. (orig.)

  5. Inventory studies of hydroelectric power plants: the methodological differences for small and large power plants; Estudos de inventario de usinas hidreletricas: as diferencas metodologicas para pequenas e grandes centrais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajay, Sergio Valdir [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia; Martinez, Carlos Barreira [Faculdade de Engenharia Civil de Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    1992-12-31

    The hydroelectric potential handbook produced by ELETROBRAS provides procedures to guides the hydro power studies of river sites. In this paper, a critical analysis of these procedures is carried out, for both large and small hydro power plants, pin pointing the plant`s planning/design interface there, several proposals are put forward in the order to adapt these procedures to small hydro plants, optimizing their planning and design for the several situation, found in Brazilian reality. (author) 5 refs.

  6. Safety of nuclear power plants: Design. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The present publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design (Safety Series No. 50-C-D (Rev. 1), issued in 1988). It takes account of developments relating to the safety of nuclear power plants since the Code on Design was last revised. These developments include the issuing of the Safety Fundamentals publication, The Safety of Nuclear Installations, and the present revision of various safety standards and other publications relating to safety. Requirements for nuclear safety are intended to ensure adequate protection of site personnel, the public and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation arising from nuclear power plants. It is recognized that technology and scientific knowledge advance, and nuclear safety and what is considered adequate protection are not static entities. Safety requirements change with these developments and this publication reflects the present consensus. This Safety Requirements publication takes account of the developments in safety requirements by, for example, including the consideration of severe accidents in the design process. Other topics that have been given more detailed attention include management of safety, design management, plant ageing and wearing out effects, computer based safety systems, external and internal hazards, human factors, feedback of operational experience, and safety assessment and verification. This publication establishes safety requirements that define the elements necessary to ensure nuclear safety. These requirements are applicable to safety functions and the associated structures, systems and components, as well as to procedures important to safety in nuclear power plants. It is expected that this publication will be used primarily for land based stationary nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors designed for electricity generation or for other heat production applications (such as district heating or desalination). It is recognized that in the case of

  7. Safety of nuclear power plants: Design. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The present publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design (Safety Series No. 50-C-D (Rev. 1), issued in 1988). It takes account of developments relating to the safety of nuclear power plants since the Code on Design was last revised. These developments include the issuing of the Safety Fundamentals publication, The Safety of Nuclear Installations, and the present revision of various safety standards and other publications relating to safety. Requirements for nuclear safety are intended to ensure adequate protection of site personnel, the public and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation arising from nuclear power plants. It is recognized that technology and scientific knowledge advance, and nuclear safety and what is considered adequate protection are not static entities. Safety requirements change with these developments and this publication reflects the present consensus. This Safety Requirements publication takes account of the developments in safety requirements by, for example, including the consideration of severe accidents in the design process. Other topics that have been given more detailed attention include management of safety, design management, plant ageing and wearing out effects, computer based safety systems, external and internal hazards, human factors, feedback of operational experience, and safety assessment and verification. This publication establishes safety requirements that define the elements necessary to ensure nuclear safety. These requirements are applicable to safety functions and the associated structures, systems and components, as well as to procedures important to safety in nuclear power plants. It is expected that this publication will be used primarily for land based stationary nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors designed for electricity generation or for other heat production applications (such as district heating or desalination). It is recognized that in the case of

  8. The impact of the year 2000 issue on electricity grid performance and nuclear power plant operation in Bulgaria, the Russian Federation and Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Y2K date conversion is a potential source of problems to the operation of nuclear power plants through external events and interfaces with electrical power systems, telecommunication systems, and other supporting infrastructures, even if diagnostic and corrective actions within the plant itself, both planned or implemented, are successful. At the end of 1998 there were 425 nuclear power plants in operation in 31 Member States. Most countries and regions are conducting intensive diagnostic and corrective activities to 'find and fix' Y2K software (including embedded software) and equipment problems in their nuclear power plants. These efforts are supplemented by contingency plans. Other countries and regions have not been making comparable efforts and are relying mainly on contingency planning and preparedness. Results of diagnostic and corrective activities can be of benefit to all Member States. Activities on 'find and fix' Y2K problems in electricity grid control systems and computer related technology in national and regional dispatch centers could be of considerable benefit due to the widespread use of the same components, equipment, and software. Consistent with the objectives of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Y2K program, an experts meeting was convened to collect information on Y2K activities related to grid operation in countries that operate nuclear power plants and also to identify specific actions to be taken and issues to be addressed in connection with expected grid disturbances. The countries of eastern Europe and the Russian Federation were considered to be a very important region due to delays in taking Y2K corrective actions but also due to the similarity of their electricity grid systems both in components and design but also in mode of operation. Most of these countries either operate their own nuclear power plants or are linked through their electricity grid interconnections to a neighboring country that operates nuclear power

  9. Inertial Fusion Power Plant Concept of Operations and Maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anklam, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Knutson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunne, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kasper, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sheehan, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lang, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mau, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Parsons and LLNL scientists and engineers performed design and engineering work for power plant pre-conceptual designs based on the anticipated laser fusion demonstrations at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Work included identifying concepts of operations and maintenance (O&M) and associated requirements relevant to fusion power plant systems analysis. A laser fusion power plant would incorporate a large process and power conversion facility with a laser system and fusion engine serving as the heat source, based in part on some of the systems and technologies advanced at NIF. Process operations would be similar in scope to those used in chemical, oil refinery, and nuclear waste processing facilities, while power conversion operations would be similar to those used in commercial thermal power plants. While some aspects of the tritium fuel cycle can be based on existing technologies, many aspects of a laser fusion power plant presents several important and unique O&M requirements that demand new solutions. For example, onsite recovery of tritium; unique remote material handling systems for use in areas with high radiation, radioactive materials, or high temperatures; a five-year fusion engine target chamber replacement cycle with other annual and multi-year cycles anticipated for major maintenance of other systems, structures, and components (SSC); and unique SSC for fusion target waste recycling streams. This paper describes fusion power plant O&M concepts and requirements, how O&M requirements could be met in design, and how basic organizational and planning issues can be addressed for a safe, reliable, economic, and feasible fusion power plant.

  10. Ageing management of electrical and C/I-systems in power plants of RWE Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, Reinhard; Kochs, Wolfgang; Zander, Ralf-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance and enhancement of the availability and safety of fossil-fired and nuclear power plants currently in operation are increasing in importance with plants' age. The paper deals with issues related to e.g. the operation of C and I-systems at the end of production and with the challenges involved in their replacement during plant operation and describes the various measures taken for monitoring electrical equipment. Taking the improvement of the existing protection systems against internal arcs in electrical bus bars as an example, practical approaches for ageing management are described. In addition, the strategic approaches will be explained that were developed within a VGB working group due to the introduction of a new regulation on ageing management in nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  11. Consideration of early closure or continued operation of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    This publication provides information to management and executives of electrical utilities responsible for the operation of nuclear power plants who are tasked with decision making related to early closures or continued operation. This information is based on the experiences of a number of countries in addressing a spectrum of issues broader than only the economics of the operation of the plant itself. Any major decision involving changes in direction for a major investment such as a nuclear power plant has the potential to incur considerable additional costs for stakeholders. Major economic risks can be unexpectedly encountered when decisions based on a simplified economic understanding of energy options are successfully challenged on the grounds that choices and decisions have been made without accounting for some environmental, social or economic issues which are considered of prime significance to important stakeholders. Such risks include not only changes in project scope and delays in project implementation due to re-evaluations necessitated by such challenges, but risks related to the effectiveness, efficiency and safety of ongoing operations or shutdown maintenance of the nuclear power plant. Additional risks encountered at this stage are the adequacy of the decommissioning fund and the need to establish a process whereby the availability of adequate funds will be assured at the time of the final plant shutdown. This publication provides information on several of these additional issues important to key stakeholders, and on methods that allow for their assessment and consideration when developing recommendations related to early closures or continued operations of a NPP. This publication consists of two parts: Part I: Includes a discussion of the main issues for consideration, with emphasis on issues important to stakeholders in addition to plant owners. Part II: Provides an example of a basic analytical approach to the assessment of plant life cycle

  12. Cable fire risk of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulamo, H.

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the study is to carry out a comprehensive review of cable fire risk issues of nuclear power plants (NPP) taking into account latest fire and risk assessment research results. A special emphasis is put on considering the fire risk analysis of cable rooms in the framework of TVO Olkiluoto NPP probabilistic safety assessment. The assumptions made in the analysis are assessed. The literature study section considers significant fire events at nuclear power plants, the most severe of which have nearly led to a reactor core damage (Browns Ferry, Greifswald, Armenia, Belojarsk, Narora). Cable fire research results are also examined

  13. Electrical Structure of Future Off-shore Wind Power Plant with a High Voltage Direct Current Power Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Ranjan

    The increasing demand of electric power and the growing consciousness towards the changing climate has led to a rapid development of renewable energy in the recent years. Among all, wind energy has been the fastest growing energy source in the last decade. But the growing size of wind power plants......, better wind conditions at off-shore and the general demand to put them out of sight have all contributed to the installation of large wind power plants in off-shore condition. However, moving wind power plants far out in the off-shore comes with many associated problems. One of the main challenges...... is the transmission of power over long distance. Historically, the power transmission from off-shore wind power plants has been done via HVAC submarine cables. This provides a simple solution, but AC cables cannot be arbitrarily long. It is shown in the report that major issues with HVAC cable transmission system...

  14. Less power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TASR

    2003-01-01

    In the Slovak Republic the number of company power plants decreased as against 2001 by two sources. In present time only 35 companies have their own power plants. The companies Slovnaft, Kappa Sturovo, Slovensky hodvab Senica, Matador Puchov, Maytex Liptovsky MikuIas, Kovohuty Krompachy, Chemko Strazske and some Slovak sugar factories belong to the largest company power plants in force of distributing companies. Installed output of present 35 company sources is 531 MW. The largest of separate power plants as Paroplynovy cyklus Bratislava (218 MW) and VD Zilina (72 MW) belong to independent sources. Total installed output of Slovak sources was 8306 MW in the end of last year

  15. A Study on Establishment of Nuclear Power Plant Technical Support System and Activation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wi, M. H.; Park, W. S.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. H.; Won, B. C.; Kim, Y. H.; Goo, D. S.; Choi, H. B.

    2009-11-01

    This report includes activities related to establishment of 'BaroBaro nuclear plant technical support center', 'selection of nuclear plant applicable technology', and 'various information interchange between KAERI and nuclear power plant'. 'BaraBaro center was newly organized to support on resolving the technical difficulties in operation of nuclear power plant'. The center consists of 10 technical parts and a leading expert is assigned to each part to support more efficiently. This center is always served for 24 hour. The plant operators can register their problem to the center by a call, e-mail, or internet and they can receive the answer about what they issued from KAERI experts. To make a brochure, we selected 32 technologies which are applicable in nuclear plant without additional R and D activity. The brochure was distributed to the officer in charge of nuclear plant operations. Various meetings were held to increase interchange of experience and technology between KAERI and nuclear power plant and we discussed many different issues at that meeting

  16. A Market-Based Virtual Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, Shi; Træholt, Chresten; Poulsen, Bjarne

    2009-01-01

    The fast growing penetration of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) and the continuing trend towards a more liberalized electricity market requires more efficient energy management strategies to handle both emerging technical and economic issues. In this paper, a market-based Virtual Power Plant...... (MBVPP) model is proposed which provides individual DER units the accesses to current electricity markets. General bidding scenario and price signal scenario as two optional operation scenarios are operated by one MBVPP. In the end, a use case of a MBVPP with micro Combined Heat and Power (μCHP) systems...

  17. Availability Performance Analysis of Thermal Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangu, Navneet Singh; Singh, Rupinder; Pahuja, G. L.

    2018-03-01

    This case study presents the availability evaluation method of thermal power plants for conducting performance analysis in Indian environment. A generic availability model has been proposed for a maintained system (thermal plants) using reliability block diagrams and fault tree analysis. The availability indices have been evaluated under realistic working environment using inclusion exclusion principle. Four year failure database has been used to compute availability for different combinatory of plant capacity, that is, full working state, reduced capacity or failure state. Availability is found to be very less even at full rated capacity (440 MW) which is not acceptable especially in prevailing energy scenario. One of the probable reason for this may be the difference in the age/health of existing thermal power plants which requires special attention of each unit from case to case basis. The maintenance techniques being used are conventional (50 years old) and improper in context of the modern equipment, which further aggravate the problem of low availability. This study highlights procedure for finding critical plants/units/subsystems and helps in deciding preventive maintenance program.

  18. Guidelines for wireless technology in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, Ramesh

    2003-01-01

    As a result of technological breakthroughs, increased demand for the use of wireless technology is common in all industries today, and the electric power industry is no exception. Already, wireless technology has many applications in our industry, including - but not limited to - cellular phone systems, paging systems, two-way radio communication systems, dose management and tracking systems, and operator logs. EPRI has prepared a comprehensive guidelines document to support evaluation of wireless technologies in power plants for integrated (voice/data/video) communication, remote equipment and system monitoring, and to complement an electronic procedures support system (EPSS). The guidelines effort focuses on the development of a rules structure to support the deployment of wireless devices in a plant without compromising continuous, safe, and reliable operation. The guidelines document consists of two volumes. The first volume is introductory in nature and lays out the business case for applying wireless technologies. The intended audience is senior plant management personnel and utility industry executives. This volume contains background information, templates, worksheets, processes, and presentations that will allow internal sponsors to create business cases for piloting wireless projects. The second volume includes guidance on implementation and regulatory issues relevant to plant implementation. It covers the following application areas: implementation of integrated communication capability, equipment monitoring, work quality control, time and knowledge management, and business process automation. It details regulatory issues relevant to the adoption of wireless technology within nuclear power plants and offers guidance on preparing for and executing pilot and implementations of wireless technologies. The paper will cover important aspects on the guidelines. (author)

  19. Waste generation comparison: Coal-fired versus nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGuardia, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste generation and disposal attract a great deal of attention whenever the nuclear industry is scrutinized by concerned parties, be it the media, the public, or political interests. It is therefore important to the nuclear industry that this issue be put into perspective relative to other current forms of energy production. Most of the country's fossil-fueled power comes from coal-fired plants, with oil and gas as other fuel sources. Most of the generated waste also comes from coal plants. This paper, therefore, compares waste quantities generated by a typical (1150-MW(electric)) pressurized water reactor (PWR) to that of a comparably sized coal-fired power plant

  20. The basic planning for the environmental relationship of improved nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seungho; Jung, Hoonseok; Lee, Dongheup

    2003-01-01

    The Improved Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) which design has been emphasized on the safety, technology and environmental relationship is about to be realized after hard works of design improvements, largely changes made from existing PWR nuclear power plants for three years. It will undoubtedly play a leading role of nuclear power generation industry as a main electric power source and secure a place as a successful issue between development and environment throughout nation-wide understanding and support. (author)

  1. Integration of renewable energies into the German power system and their influence on investments in new power plants. Integrated consideration of effects on power plant investment and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harthan, Ralph Oliver

    2015-01-14

    The increasing share of renewable energies in the power sector influences the economic viability of investments in new conventional power plants. Many studies have investigated these issues by considering power plant operation or the long-term development of the power plant fleet. However, power plant decommissioning, investment and operation are intrinsically linked. This doctoral thesis therefore presents a modelling framework for an integrated consideration of power plant decommissioning, investment and operation. In a case study focusing on Germany, the effects of the integration of renewable energies on power plant decommissioning, investment and operation are evaluated in the context of different assumptions regarding the remaining lifetime of nuclear power plants. With regard to the use of nuclear power, a phase-out scenario and a scenario with lifetime extension of nuclear power plants (by on average 12 years) are considered. The results show that static decommissioning (i.e. considering fixed technical lifetimes) underestimates the capacity available in the power sector in the scenario without lifetime extension since retrofit measures (versus decommissioning) are not taken into account. In contrast, capacity available in the case of nuclear lifetime extension is overestimated since mothballing (versus regular operation) is not considered. If the impact on decommissioning decisions of profit margins accrued during power plant operation are considered (''dynamic decommissioning''), the electricity price reduction effect due to a lifetime extension is reduced by more than half in comparison to static decommissioning. Scarcity situations do not differ significantly between the scenarios with and without lifetime extension with dynamic decommissioning; in contrast, there is a significantly higher need for imports without lifetime extension with static decommissioning. The case study demonstrates that further system flexibility is needed for

  2. Integration of renewable energies into the German power system and their influence on investments in new power plants. Integrated consideration of effects on power plant investment and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harthan, Ralph Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The increasing share of renewable energies in the power sector influences the economic viability of investments in new conventional power plants. Many studies have investigated these issues by considering power plant operation or the long-term development of the power plant fleet. However, power plant decommissioning, investment and operation are intrinsically linked. This doctoral thesis therefore presents a modelling framework for an integrated consideration of power plant decommissioning, investment and operation. In a case study focusing on Germany, the effects of the integration of renewable energies on power plant decommissioning, investment and operation are evaluated in the context of different assumptions regarding the remaining lifetime of nuclear power plants. With regard to the use of nuclear power, a phase-out scenario and a scenario with lifetime extension of nuclear power plants (by on average 12 years) are considered. The results show that static decommissioning (i.e. considering fixed technical lifetimes) underestimates the capacity available in the power sector in the scenario without lifetime extension since retrofit measures (versus decommissioning) are not taken into account. In contrast, capacity available in the case of nuclear lifetime extension is overestimated since mothballing (versus regular operation) is not considered. If the impact on decommissioning decisions of profit margins accrued during power plant operation are considered (''dynamic decommissioning''), the electricity price reduction effect due to a lifetime extension is reduced by more than half in comparison to static decommissioning. Scarcity situations do not differ significantly between the scenarios with and without lifetime extension with dynamic decommissioning; in contrast, there is a significantly higher need for imports without lifetime extension with static decommissioning. The case study demonstrates that further system flexibility is needed for

  3. Bibliography of the Maryland Power Plant Research Program, Thirteenth Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, R.I.

    1992-02-01

    The Power Plant Siting Act of 1971 (Sec. 3-303) established the Power Plant Research Program to insure that demands for electric power would be met in a timely manner at a reasonable cost while assuring that the associated environmental impact would be acceptable. The scope of the Program extends to estimating the impact of proposed new generating facilities, evaluating the acceptability of proposed transmission line routes, assessing the impact of existing generation facilities, and investigating generic issues related to power plant site evaluation and associated environmental and land use considerations. The bibliography is a compilation of all the studies performed for and or by the Power Plant and Environmental Review Division since its inception. Reports published by the Division considered to be of general interest are routinely made available through the National Technical Information Service. Those reports so registered may be identified by the NTIS accession number immediately following the citation in the bibliography

  4. Qualification issues associated with the use of advanced instrumentation and control systems hardware in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, K.; Antonescu, C.

    1993-01-01

    The instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and fiber-optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I ampersand C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying I ampersand C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I ampersand C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light water reactor. The template was then used to address reliability issues for microprocessor-based protection systems. Standards (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I ampersand C systems were also identified. This approach addresses in part issues raised in Nuclear Regulatory Commission policy document SECY-91-292, which recognizes that advanced I ampersand C systems for the nuclear industry are open-quotes being developed without consensus standards, as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.close quotes

  5. Study of Real Time Location System For Worker in Containment Building at Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y.; Kim, G. S. [Samchang Enterprise Company, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H. S. [Ulsan Univ., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Workers are required special management to minimize radiation exposure in nuclear power plant. Especially, there are many limitation in their activities at containment building in nuclear power plant. Test personnel shall administer the workers by tracing the location of them inside containment building in nuclear power plant. They may be exposed to the unnecessary radiation due to a complex and high radiation area in the building. Test personnel needs to manage efficiently for worker's safety and work hours at containment building. Therefore, it is critical for the test personnel to notice the risk to the workers by identifying the location when the workers are facing the dangerous situation on the high area. In this paper, we introduce requirements and design method to develop the one and two dimensional RTLS(Real Time Locating System) by using CSS(Chirp Spread Spectrum) which enables precise location measurement and robust data communication even indoor environment with serious electromagnetic interference caused by complicated structure such as the inside of containment building in the nuclear power plant. In the algorithm to compute the distance, it is suggested to use SDS-TWR(Symmetrical Double-Sided Two-Way Ranging) to solve the issue of indirect routes, and develop the power circuit with 10mW of designing gain for output power to meet the KCC standard in order to increase the raging distance, in addition, communication between Anchor and distance measuring computer shall be designed to increase energy using time of Tags(nodes) by using CAN(Controller Area Network) communication.

  6. Enhancing nuclear power plant performance through the use of artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maren, A.J.; Miller, L.F.; Tsoukalas, L.H.; Uhrig, R.E.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research was to advance the state-of-the-art of applying artificial intelligence technology (both expert systems and neural networks) to enhancing the performance (safety, efficiency, control and management) of nuclear power plants. A second, but equally important objective, was to build a broadly based critical mass of expertise in the artificial intelligence field that can be brought to bear on the technology of nuclear power plants

  7. Research on U.S. nuclear power plant major equipment aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakos, J.T.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with nuclear power plant utilities and the Nuclear Energy Institute, have prepared equipment aging evaluations of nuclear power plant equipment for life extension considerations. Specifically, these evaluations focused on equipment considered important for plant license renewal (U.S. Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR54). open-quotes Industry Reportsclose quotes (IRs), jointly funded by DOE and EPRI, evaluated the aging of major systems, structures, and components (e.g., reactor pressure vessels, Class I structures, PWR and BWR containments, etc.) and contain a mixture of technical and licensing information. open-quotes Aging Management Guidelinesclose quotes (AMGs), funded by DOE, evaluate aging for commodity types of equipment (e.g., pumps, electrical switchgear, heat exchangers, etc.) and concentrate on technical issues only. AMGs are intended for systems engineers and plant maintenance staff. A significant number of technical issues were resolved during IR interactions with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). However, certain technical issues have not been resolved and are considered open-quotes openclose quotes. Examples include certain issues related to fatigue, neutron irradiation embrittlement, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and electrical cable equipment qualification. Direct NRC interaction did not take place during preparation of individual AMGs due to their purely technical nature. The eventual use of AMGs in a future license renewal application will likely require NRC interaction at that time. With a few noted exceptions, the AMG process indicated that current aging management practices of U.S. utilities were effective in preventing age-related degradation. This paper briefly describes the IR and AMG processes and summarizes the unresolved technical issues identified through preparation of the documents

  8. Issues of integrating high-tech concepts into nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.; Carter, R.J.; Lindsay, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    The stockpile of new ideas continues to grow for monitoring nuclear power plant parameters, characteristics, and vital signs and for controlling systems, subsystems, and components. This wide selection of monitoring and control software increases the difficulty of designing an integrated control room. As plant control room operators increase their reliance on computerized systems, including real-time plant data and data base systems, the integration of monitoring, diagnostics, and control software into uniform and seamless environment becomes imperative. A systematic approach to evaluating the usefulness of such high-tech control concepts is needed. This paper concentrates on methods to evaluate control concepts by assessing factors that determine a system's potential effectiveness within the context of the overall environment, including both human and machine components. Although not an in-depth study, this paper serves to outline several measures of utility. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulova, T.Ch.

    1976-01-01

    The textbook focuses on the technology and the operating characteristics of nuclear power plants equiped with pressurized water or boiling water reactors, which are in operation all over the world at present. The following topics are dealt with in relation to the complete plant and to economics: distribution and consumption of electric and thermal energy, types and equipment of nuclear power plants, chemical processes and material balance, economical characteristics concerning heat and energy, regenerative preheating of feed water, degassing and condenser systems, water supply, evaporators, district heating systems, steam generating systems and turbines, coolant loops and pipes, plant siting, ventilation and decontamination systems, reactor operation and management, heat transfer including its calculation, design of reactor buildings, and nuclear power plants with gas or sodium cooled reactors. Numerous technical data of modern Soviet nuclear power plants are included. The book is of interest to graduate and post-graduate students in the field of nuclear engineering as well as to nuclear engineers

  10. Quality surveillance at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviney, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Quality surveillance (QS) of nuclear power plants has been occurring for a number of years and is growing in importance as a management tool for assuring that power plants are operated and maintained safely. Quality surveillance can be identified by many terms, such as monitoring, assessment, technical audits, and others. The name given to the function is not important. Quality surveillance at nuclear power plants developed out of a need. Historically, audits were performed to verify compliance to quality program requirements. Verification of day-to-day implementation of activities was not being performed. This left a void in verification activities since inspections were mainly directed at hardware verification. Quality surveillance, therefore, was born out of a need to fill this void in verification. This paper discusses quality surveillance definition; objectives of QS, activities considered for QS, personnel performing QS. As in any human endeavor, people and the attitudes of those people make a program succeed or fail. In the case of QS this is even more critical because of the overview and exposure given to the nuclear industry. Properly trained and experienced personnel performing QS combined with the right attitude contribute to the successful performance of a QS. This is only one side of the success equation, however; acceptance of and actions taken by plant management establish the total success of a QS program

  11. Process management - critical safety issues with focus on risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanne, Johan M.

    2005-12-01

    Organizational changes focused on process orientation are taking place among Swedish nuclear power plants, aiming at improving the operation. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate has identified a need for increased knowledge within the area for its regulatory activities. In order to analyze what process orientation imply for nuclear power plant safety a number of questions must be asked: 1. How is safety in nuclear power production created currently? What significance does the functional organization play? 2. How can organizational forms be analysed? What consequences does quality management have for work and for the enterprise? 3. Why should nuclear power plants be process oriented? Who are the customers and what are their customer values? Which customers are expected to contribute from process orientation? 4. What can one learn from process orientation in other safety critical systems? What is the effect on those features that currently create safety? 5. Could customer values increase for one customer without decreasing for other customers? What is the relationship between economic and safety interests from an increased process orientation? The deregulation of the electricity market have caused an interest in increased economic efficiency, which is the motivation for the interest in process orientation. among other means. It is the nuclear power plants' owners and the distributors (often the same corporations) that have the strongest interest in process orientation. If the functional organization and associated practices are decomposed, the prerequisites of the risk management regime changes, perhaps deteriorating its functionality. When nuclear power operators consider the introduction of process orientation, the Nuclear Power Inspectorate should require that 1. The operators perform a risk analysis beforehand concerning the potential consequences that process orientation might convey: the analysis should contain a model specifying how safety is currently

  12. An assessment of criticality safety at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado, July--September 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Roger J.

    1989-09-01

    This is a report on the 1989 independent Criticality Safety Assessment of the Rocky Flats Plant, primarily in response to public concerns that nuclear criticality accidents involving plutonium may have occurred at this nuclear weapon component fabrication and processing plant. The report evaluates environmental issues, fissile material storage practices, ventilation system problem areas, and criticality safety practices. While no evidence of a criticality accident was found, several recommendations are made for criticality safety improvements. 9 tabs.

  13. Independent verification in operations at nuclear power plants: Summaries of site visits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donderi, D.C.; Smiley, A.; Ostry, D.J.; Moray, N.P.

    1995-09-01

    A critical review of approaches to independent verification in operations used in nuclear power plant quality assurance programs in other countries was conducted and are detailed in volume 1. This paper is a compilation of the visits to nuclear power plant sites to study independent verification in operations at sites in Canada, USA, Japan, United Kingdom, France and Germany. 3 tabs., 22 figs

  14. Transient evaluation using EMTP at one phase opening of the offsite power transformer of the emergency power supply systems for nuclear power plants. This report is a follow-up the last year's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    The emergency power supply systems of nuclear power plants, as the objects of this research, are critical to supplying stable electric power to such systems as the emergency core cooling system (ECCS), and to maintaining the safety of the nuclear power reactor; this was apparent from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The USNRC issued regulatory documents (BL 2012-01, IN 2012-03), and has commenced to review those problems which cannot be detected by degraded-voltage protection relays such as new design vulnerability of the power supply systems that are certain kinds of winding structures and iron core structures when the one-phase open fault occurs without a ground fault of the transformer connected to the offsite power supply system, including when the offsite power supply side is a wye connection and the load side is a delta connection etc. The report of the INSS JOURNAL 2013 used simulation by the electro-magnetic transients program (EMTP) and obtained findings that clearly specified the response at the time of the power supply side one-phase open without ground fault of various winding structures and various iron core structures of the three-phase transformer and identified the important issues for the response of emergency power supply systems and the safety related components of representative domestic PWR plants when the one-phase open fault occurred without ground fault. In a continuation of the previous report, this paper summarizes the previous results, and then presents the principles by which normal voltages are maintained by both the primary and the secondary sides when the one-phase open failure without ground fault occurs on the primary side of the transformer, and the results of the analysis of operations of the protection relays of the emergency power systems and the safety related components of representative a domestic PWR plant by the simulation using EMTP. (author)

  15. Accident prevention in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyrer, H.

    Large thermal power plants are insured to a great extent at the Industrial Injuries Insurance Institute of Instrument and Electric Engineering. Approximately 4800 employees are registered. The accident frequency according to an evaluation over 12 months lies around 79.8 per year and 1000 employees in fossil-fired power plants, around 34.1 per year and 1000 employees in nuclear power plants, as in nuclear power plants coal handling and ash removal are excluded. Injuries due to radiation were not registered. The crucial points of accidents are mechanical injuries received on solid, sharp-edged and pointed objects (fossil-fired power plants 28.6%, nuclear power plants 41.5%), stumbling, twisting or slipping (fossil-fired power plants 21.8%, nuclear power plants 19.5%) and injuries due to moving machine parts (only nuclear power plants 12.2%). However, accidents due to burns or scalds obtain with 4.2% and less a lower portion than expected. The accident statistics can explain this fact in a way that the typical power plant accident does not exist. (orig./GL) [de

  16. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Fusion contains 13 informative papers that were initially presented at the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety held in Vienna, Austria, 10-13 July 2006. Following recommendation from the International Fusion Research Council, the IAEA organizes Technical Meetings on Fusion Safety with the aim to bring together experts to discuss the ongoing work, share new ideas and outline general guidance and recommendations on different issues related to safety and environmental (S&E) aspects of fusion research and power facilities. Previous meetings in this series were held in Vienna, Austria (1980), Ispra, Italy (1983), Culham, UK (1986), Jackson Hole, USA (1989), Toronto, Canada (1993), Naka, Japan (1996) and Cannes, France (2000). The recognized progress in fusion research and technology over the last quarter of a century has boosted the awareness of the potential of fusion to be a practically inexhaustible and clean source of energy. The decision to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents a landmark in the path to fusion power engineering. Ongoing activities to license ITER in France look for an adequate balance between technological and scientific deliverables and complying with safety requirements. Actually, this is the first instance of licensing a representative fusion machine, and it will very likely shape the way in which a more common basis for establishing safety standards and policies for licensing future fusion power plants will be developed. Now that ITER licensing activities are underway, it is becoming clear that the international fusion community should strengthen its efforts in the area of designing the next generations of fusion power plants—demonstrational and commercial. Therefore, the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Safety focused on the safety aspects of power facilities. Some ITER-related safety issues were reported and discussed owing to their potential

  17. Power distribution changes caused by subcooled nucleate boiling at Callaway Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konya, M.J.; Bryant, K.R.; Hopkins, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an evaluation undertaken by Union Electric (UE) and Westinghouse to explain anomalous behavior of the core axial power distribution at the Callaway Nuclear Power Plant. The behavior was characterized by a gradual unexpected power shift toward the bottom of the core and was first detected during cycle 4 at a core average burnup of approximately 7,000 MWD/MTU. Once started, the power shift continued until burnup effects became dominant and caused power to shift back to the top of the core at the end of the cycle. In addition to the anomalous power distribution, UE observed that estimated critical control rod position (ECP) deviations increased to over 500 pcm (0.5%Δk/k) during Cycles 4 and 5. ECPs for plant restarts that occurred early in each cycle agreed well with measured critical conditions. However, this agreement disappeared for restarts that occurred later in core life. After analyzing relevant data, performing scoping calculations and reviewing industry experience, the authors concluded that the power distribution anomaly was most likely caused by subcooled nucleate boiling. Crud deposition on the fuel was believed to enhance the subcooled boiling. The ECP deviations were a secondary effect of the power shift, since void fraction, axial burnup and xenon distributions departed design predictions during a substantial portion of the fuel cycles. Significant evidence supporting these conclusions include incore detector indications of flux depressions between intermediate flow mixing (IFM) and structural grids. In addition, visual exam results show the presence of crud deposits on fuel pins

  18. Economical analyses of build-operate-transfer model in establishing alternative power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumurtaci, Zehra [Yildiz Technical University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Y.T.U. Mak. Fak. Mak. Muh. Bolumu, Besiktas, 34349 Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: zyumur@yildiz.edu.tr; Erdem, Hasan Hueseyin [Yildiz Technical University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Y.T.U. Mak. Fak. Mak. Muh. Bolumu, Besiktas, 34349 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-01-15

    The most widely employed method to meet the increasing electricity demand is building new power plants. The most important issue in building new power plants is to find financial funds. Various models are employed, especially in developing countries, in order to overcome this problem and to find a financial source. One of these models is the build-operate-transfer (BOT) model. In this model, the investor raises all the funds for mandatory expenses and provides financing, builds the plant and, after a certain plant operation period, transfers the plant to the national power organization. In this model, the object is to decrease the burden of power plants on the state budget. The most important issue in the BOT model is the dependence of the unit electricity cost on the transfer period. In this study, the model giving the unit electricity cost depending on the transfer of the plants established according to the BOT model, has been discussed. Unit electricity investment cost and unit electricity cost in relation to transfer period for plant types have been determined. Furthermore, unit electricity cost change depending on load factor, which is one of the parameters affecting annual electricity production, has been determined, and the results have been analyzed. This method can be employed for comparing the production costs of different plants that are planned to be established according to the BOT model, or it can be employed to determine the appropriateness of the BOT model.

  19. Economical analyses of build-operate-transfer model in establishing alternative power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumurtaci, Zehra; Erdem, Hasan Hueseyin

    2007-01-01

    The most widely employed method to meet the increasing electricity demand is building new power plants. The most important issue in building new power plants is to find financial funds. Various models are employed, especially in developing countries, in order to overcome this problem and to find a financial source. One of these models is the build-operate-transfer (BOT) model. In this model, the investor raises all the funds for mandatory expenses and provides financing, builds the plant and, after a certain plant operation period, transfers the plant to the national power organization. In this model, the object is to decrease the burden of power plants on the state budget. The most important issue in the BOT model is the dependence of the unit electricity cost on the transfer period. In this study, the model giving the unit electricity cost depending on the transfer of the plants established according to the BOT model, has been discussed. Unit electricity investment cost and unit electricity cost in relation to transfer period for plant types have been determined. Furthermore, unit electricity cost change depending on load factor, which is one of the parameters affecting annual electricity production, has been determined, and the results have been analyzed. This method can be employed for comparing the production costs of different plants that are planned to be established according to the BOT model, or it can be employed to determine the appropriateness of the BOT model

  20. Development and validation of advanced oxidation protective coatings for super critical steam power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, M.B.; Scheefer, M. [Alstom Power Ltd., Rugby (United Kingdom); Agueero, A. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA) (Spain); Allcock, B. [Monitor Coatings Ltd. (United Kingdom); Norton, B. [Indestructible Paints Ltd. (United Kingdom); Tsipas, D.N. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece); Durham, R. [FZ Juelich (Germany); Xiang, Z. [Northumbria Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Increasing the efficiency of coal-fired power plant by increasing steam temperatures and pressures brings benefits in terms of cheaper electricity and reduced emissions, particularly CO{sub 2}. In recent years the development of advanced 9%Cr ferritic steels with improved creep strength has enabled power plant operation at temperatures in excess of 600 C, such that these materials are being exploited to construct a new generation of advanced coalfired plant. However, the move to higher temperatures and pressures creates an extremely hostile oxidising environment. To enable the full potential of the new steels to be achieved, it is vital that protective coatings are developed, validated under high temperature steam and applied to candidate components from the steam path. This paper reviews recent work conducted within the Framework V project ''Coatings for Supercritical Steam Cycles'' (SUPERCOAT) to develop and demonstrate advanced slurry and thermal spray coatings capable of providing steam oxidation protection at temperatures in excess of 620 C and up to 300 bar. The programme of work has demonstrated the feasibility of applying a number of candidate coatings to steam turbine power plant components and has generated long-term steam oxidation rate and failure data that underpin the design and application work packages needed to develop and establish this technology for new and retrofit plant. (orig.)

  1. System Definition and Analysis: Power Plant Design and Layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This is the Topical report for Task 6.0, Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The report describes work by Westinghouse and the subcontractor, Gilbert/Commonwealth, in the fulfillment of completing Task 6.0. A conceptual design for critical and noncritical components of the gas fired combustion turbine system was completed. The conceptual design included specifications for the flange to flange gas turbine, power plant components, and balance of plant equipment. The ATS engine used in the conceptual design is an advanced 300 MW class combustion turbine incorporating many design features and technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals. Design features of power plant equipment and balance of plant equipment are described. Performance parameters for these components are explained. A site arrangement and electrical single line diagrams were drafted for the conceptual plant. ATS advanced features include design refinements in the compressor, inlet casing and scroll, combustion system, airfoil cooling, secondary flow systems, rotor and exhaust diffuser. These improved features, integrated with prudent selection of power plant and balance of plant equipment, have provided the conceptual design of a system that meets or exceeds ATS program emissions, performance, reliability-availability-maintainability, and cost goals

  2. Safety issues and their ranking for WWER-1000 model 320 nuclear power plants. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this report is to present a consolidated list of safety deficiencies, called safety issues, ranked according to their safety significance and the corrective measures to improve overall safety. It is intended for use as a reference to facilitate the development of plant specific safety improvement programmes and to serve as a basis for reviewing their implementation. To the extent that information was made available to the IAEA, the country/plant specific status with respect to each safety issue is described. Section 2 provides an overview of the impact of the relevant issues on the main safety functions in different operational conditions and other aspects important to overall plant safety. A summary of the safety issues and their respective ranking is given in Tables 1 and 2 at the end of Section 2. Section 3 deals with individual safety issues identified in the design which are presented according to the structure below. Section 4 presents the safety issues related to operational safety according to a similar structure but without the ranking. 73 refs, 3 tabs

  3. Safety issues and their ranking for WWER-1000 model 320 nuclear power plants. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this report is to present a consolidated list of safety deficiencies, called safety issues, ranked according to their safety significance and the corrective measures to improve overall safety. It is intended for use as a reference to facilitate the development of plant specific safety improvement programmes and to serve as a basis for reviewing their implementation. To the extent that information was made available to the IAEA, the country/plant specific status with respect to each safety issue is described. Section 2 provides an overview of the impact of the relevant issues on the main safety functions in different operational conditions and other aspects important to overall plant safety. A summary of the safety issues and their respective ranking is given in Tables 1 and 2 at the end of Section 2. Section 3 deals with individual safety issues identified in the design which are presented according to the structure below. Section 4 presents the safety issues related to operational safety according to a similar structure but without the ranking

  4. Flow-accelerated corrosion in power plants. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chexal, B.; Horowitz, J.; Dooley, B.

    1998-07-01

    Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) is a phenomenon that results in metal loss from piping, vessels, and equipment made of carbon steel. FAC occurs only under certain conditions of flow, chemistry, geometry, and material. Unfortunately, those conditions are common in much of the high-energy piping in nuclear and fossil-fueled power plants. Undetected, FAC will cause leaks and ruptures. Consequently, FAC has become a major issue, particularly for nuclear plants. Although major failures are rare, the consequences can be severe. In 1986, four men in the area of an FAC-induced pipe rupture were killed. Fossil plants too, are subject to FAC. In 1995, a failure at a fossil-fired plant caused two fatalities. In addition to concerns about personnel safety, FAC failures can pose challenges to plant safety. Regulatory agencies have therefore required nuclear utilities to institute formal programs to address FAC. Finally, a major FAC failure (like the one that happened in 1997 at a US nuclear power plant) can force a plant to shutdown and purchase replacement power at a price approaching a million dollars per day depending upon the MWe rating of the plant. A great deal of time and money has been spent to develop the technology to predict, detect, and mitigate FAC in order to prevent catastrophic failures. Over time, substantial progress has been made towards understanding and preventing FAC. The results of these efforts include dozens of papers, reports, calculations, and manuals, as well as computer programs and other tools. This book is written to provide a detailed treatment of the entire subject in a single document. Any complex issue requires balancing know-how, the risk of decision making, and a pragmatic engineering solution. This book addresses these by carrying out the necessary R and D and engineering along with plant knowledge to cover all quadrants of Chexal's four quadrant known-unknown diagram, as seen in Figure i

  5. Some recent human performance issues at U.S. nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, John V.

    1998-01-01

    Some recent events at U.S. operating nuclear power plants revealed interesting human performance issues. Events discussed in this paper are: (1) a September 1996 event at Clinton, (2) a February 1997 event at Zion 1, and (3) March 1997 operator failures of 'in-house' examinations at LaSalle. The specific human performance weaknesses exhibited in these events, some underlying organizational or institutional issues and factors which influenced operators and their management, and implications regarding regulatory oversight are discussed. (author)

  6. Potential of light water reactors for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueldner, R.

    2003-01-01

    Energy consumption worldwide is going to increase further in the next few decades. Reliable supplies of electricity can be achieved only by centralized power plant structures. In this scenario, nuclear power plants are going to play a leading role as reliable and competitive plants, also under deregulated market conditions. Today, light water reactors have achieved a leading position, both technically and economically, contributing 85% to worldwide electricity generation in nuclear plants. They will continue to be a proven technology in power generation. In many countries, activities therefore are concentrated on extending the service life of plants beyond a period of forty years. New nuclear generating capacities are expected to be created and added from the end of this decade onward. Most of this capacity will be in light water reactors. The concepts of third-generation reactors will meet all economic and technical safety requirements of the 21st century and will offer considerable potential for further development. Probably some thirty years from now, fourth-generation nuclear power plants will be ready for commercial application. These plants will penetrate especially new sectors of the energy markets. Public acceptance of new nuclear power plants is not a matter of reactor lines, provided that safety requirements are met. The important issue is the management of radioactive waste. The construction of new nuclear power plants in Western Europe and North America mainly hinges on the ability to explain to the public that there is a need for new plants and that nuclear power is fundamental to assuring sustainable development. (orig.)

  7. Radiation safety and protection on the nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Bogorad, V.I.; Vasil'chenko, V.N.; Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Litvinskaya, T.V.; Slepchenko, A.Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The main issues of the radiation safety and protection provision on the nuclear power plants are considered in this monograph. The description of the basic sources of the radiation danger on NPPs, the principles, the methods and the means of the safety and radiation monitoring provision are shown. The special attention is paid to the issues of the ionizing radiation regulation

  8. Critical Clearing Time and Wind Power in Small Isolated Power Systems Considering Inertia Emulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Jesús Medina-Domínguez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The stability and security of small and isolated power systems can be compromised when large amounts of wind power enter them. Wind power integration depends on such factors as power generation capacity, conventional generation technology or grid topology. Another issue that can be considered is critical clearing time (CCT. In this paper, wind power and CCT are studied in a small isolated power system. Two types of wind turbines are considered: a squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG and a full converter. Moreover, the full converter wind turbine’s inertia emulation capability is considered, and its impact on CCT is discussed. Voltage is taken into account because of its importance in power systems of this kind. The study focuses on the small, isolated Lanzarote-Fuerteventura power system, which is expected to be in operation by 2020.

  9. Cyber security assessment of a power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nai Fovino, Igor; Masera, Marcelo; Stefanini, Alberto [Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen, Ispra (Italy); Guidi, Luca [Enel Ingegneria e Innovazione, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    Critical infrastructures and systems are today exposed not only to traditional safety and availability problems, but also to new kinds of security threats. These are mainly due to the large number of new vulnerabilities and architectural weaknesses introduced by the extensive use of information and communication technologies (ICT) into such complex systems. In this paper we present the outcomes of an exhaustive ICT security assessment, targeting an operational power plant, which consisted also of the simulation of potential cyber attacks. The assessment shows that the plant is considerably vulnerable to malicious attacks. This situation cannot be ignored, because the potential outcomes of an induced plant malfunction can be severe. (author)

  10. Nuclear power plants - a solution for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinn, D.

    1978-01-01

    This book is not written for experts, but for interested laymen. The arguments in favour of nuclear power plants are presented in an intelligible and critical manner. The problem of nuclear power is reviewed at a moment where the nuclear controversy has even led to lawsuits. Still, there is hope for a secure energy supply - and fear of the risks that the future might bring and which may even endanger our lives. (GL) [de

  11. Coal-fired power plant: airborne routine discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    2005-01-01

    The radiological impact from non-nuclear industries is a growing matter of concern to stake holders and regulators. It has been demonstrated that atmospheric discharges from coal-fired power plants can lead to higher dose-impacts to critical groups of the population than nuclear power plants. In Belgium, in the frame of an agreement between electricity producers and national authorities, measures were taken in conventional power plants to restrict airborne discharges of SO 2 , NO x and suspended particles. In the 500 MWe coal-fired power plant of Langerlo, a flue gas purification system was installed, consisting of a denitrification unit and a desulphurization unit, next to the electrostatic dust filter units. These measures have also an important effect on the radioactive atmospheric discharges. The objective of this study was to assess the radiological impact of the airborne releases of the power plant under normal working conditions and in particular the influence of the installation of the flue gas purification system. As a first step, we measured the natural radioactivity content of the coal and the radium content of the fly ash . The quantities of the other radioelements discharged through the chimney, were estimated, assuming the same behaviour as radium, except for the more volatile lead and polonium, which will condense preferably on finer ash particles, against which the electro filters are less effective. (A concentration factor of 4 has been adopted). The radon, present in the coal, is assumed to be discharged completely through the chimney. The atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition of the discharged radionuclides were modelled, applying the bi-Gaussian plume model IFDM. For the calculations, we used hourly averages of the meteorological observations at Mol over the year 1991. The transfers of the radionuclides from air and soil to the biospheric media, exposing man, were calculated with our biosphere model and the radiological impact to the

  12. Water vulnerabilities for existing coal-fired power plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D.; Kuiper, J.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-19

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Water consumption by all users in the United States over the 2005-2030 time period is projected to increase by about 7% (from about 108 billion gallons per day [bgd] to about 115 bgd) (Elcock 2010). By contrast, water consumption by coal-fired power plants over this period is projected to increase by about 21% (from about 2.4 to about 2.9 bgd) (NETL 2009b). The high projected demand for water by power plants, which is expected to increase even further as carbon-capture equipment is installed, combined with decreasing freshwater supplies in many areas, suggests that certain coal-fired plants may be particularly vulnerable to potential water demand-supply conflicts. If not addressed, these conflicts could limit power generation and lead to power disruptions or increased consumer costs. The identification of existing coal-fired plants that are vulnerable to water demand and supply concerns, along with an analysis of information about their cooling systems and related characteristics, provides information to help focus future research and development (R&D) efforts to help ensure that coal-fired generation demands are met in a cost-effective manner that supports sustainable water use. This study identified coal-fired power plants that are considered vulnerable to water demand and supply issues by using a geographical information system (GIS) that facilitated the analysis of plant-specific data for more than 500 plants in the NETL's Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) (NETL 2007a) simultaneously with 18 indicators of water demand and supply. Two types of demand indicators were

  13. Optimization of Boiler Control to Improve the Load-following Capability of Power-plant Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J. H.; Mølbak, T.; Andersen, Palle

    The capability to perform fast load changes has been an important issue in the power market, and will become increasingly more so due to the incresing commercialisation of the European power market. An optimizing control system for improving the load-following capability of power-plant units has...... tests on a 265 MW coal-fired power-plant unit reveals that the maximum allowable load gradient that can be imposed on the plant, can be increased from 4 MW/min. to 8 MW/min....

  14. Optimization of Boiler Control to Improve the Load-following Capability of Power-plant Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J. H.; Mølbak, T.; Andersen, Palle

    1998-01-01

    The capability to perform fast load changes has been an important issue in the power market, and will become increasingly more so due to the incresing commercialisation of the European power market. An optimizing control system for improving the load-following capability of power-plant units has...... tests on a 265 MW coal-fired power-plant unit reveals that the maximum allowable load gradient that can be imposed on the plant, can be increased from 4 MW/min. to 8 MW/min....

  15. Discussion on management of decommissioning funds for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hailiang

    2013-01-01

    Decommissioning funding is one of the major issues with regard to the policy and management of nuclear power. This paper describes current status of decommissioning of nuclear power plants in some foreign countries and narrates the practices in these countries on the estimation of decommissioning cost, the retrieval and management of decommissioning funds, and the guarantee of fund sufficiency. Based on a brief analysis of the status of decommissioning funding management for nuclear power plants in China, suggestions on tasks or activities needed to be carried out at present in the field of decommissioning funding are proposed. (authors)

  16. Seismic safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurpinar, A.; Godoy, A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of safety reviews and applied research in support of programmes for the assessment and enhancement of seismic safety in WWER type nuclear power plants during the past five years. Three major topics are discussed; engineering safety review services in relation to external events, technical guidelines for the assessment and upgrading of WWER type nuclear power plants, and the Coordinated Research Programme on B enchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER type nuclear power plants . These topics are summarized in a way to provide an overview of the past and present safety situation in selected WWER type plants which are all located in Eastern European countries. Main conclusion of the paper is that although there is now a thorough understanding of the seismic safety issues in these operating nuclear power plants, the implementation of seismic upgrades to structures, systems and components are lagging behind, particularly for those cases in which the re-evaluation indicated the necessity to strengthen the safety related structures or install new safety systems. (author)

  17. Nuclear Power Plant Preventive Maintenance Scheduling Problem with Fuzziness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, S.A.; Abdallah, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance activity is regarded as the most important key factor for the safety, reliability and economy of a nuclear power plant. Preventive maintenance refers to set of planned activities which include nondestructive testing and periodic inspection as well as maintenance. In this paper, we address the problem of nuclear power plant preventive maintenance scheduling with uncertainty. The uncertainty will be represented by fuzzy parameters. The problem is how to determine the period for which generating units of an electric system should be taken off line for planned preventive maintenance over specific time horizon. Preventive maintenance activity of a nuclear power plant is an important issue as it designed to extend the plant life . It is more required to review the maintenance not only from the view point of safety and reliability but also economy. Preventive maintenance program exists to ensure that nuclear safety significant equipment will function when it is supposed to. Also this problem is extremely important because a failure in a power plant may cause a general breakdown in an electric network. In this paper a mixed integer programming model is used to express this problem. In proposed model power demand is taken as fuzzy parameters. A case study is provided to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed model.

  18. New design procedure development of future reactor critical power estimation. (1) Practical design-by-analysis method for BWR critical power design correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Mitsutake, Toru

    2007-01-01

    For present BWR fuels, the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic test, such as the critical power measurement test, pressure drop measurement test and so on, has been needed. However, the full mock-up test required the high costs and large-scale test facility. At present, there are only a few test facilities to perform the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic test in the world. Moreover, for future BWR, the bundle size tends to be larger, because of reducing the plant construction costs and minimizing the routine check period. For instance, AB1600, improved ABWR, was proposed from Toshiba, whose bundle size was 1.2 times larger than the conventional BWR fuel size. It is too expensive and far from realistic to perform the full mock-up thermal-hydraulic test for such a large size fuel bundle. The new design procedure is required to realize the large scale bundle design development, especially for the future reactor. Therefore, the new design procedure, Practical Design-by-Analysis (PDBA) method, has been developed. This new procedure consists of the partial mock-up test and numerical analysis. At present, the subchannel analysis method based on three-fluid two-phase flow model only is a realistic choice. Firstly, the partial mock-up test is performed, for instance, the 1/4 partial mock-up bundle. Then, the first-step critical power correlation coefficients are evaluated with the measured data. The input data, such as the spacer effect model coefficient, on the subchannel analysis are also estimated with the data. Next, the radial power effect on the critical power of the full-bundle size was estimated with the subchannel analysis. Finally, the critical power correlation is modified by the subchannel analysis results. In the present study, the critical power correlation of the conventional 8x8 BWR fuel was developed with the PDBA method by 4x4 partial mock-up tests and the subchannel analysis code. The accuracy of the estimated critical power was 3.8%. The several themes remain to

  19. Critical plasma-materials issues for fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.; Bauer, W.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma-materials interactions are a dominant driving force in the design of fusion power reactors. This paper presents a summary of plasma-materials interactions research. Emphasis is placed on critical aspects related to reactor design. Particular issues to be addressed are plasma edge characterization, hydrogen recycle, impurity introduction, and coating development. Typical wall fluxes in operating magnetically confined devices are summarized. Recent calculations of tritium inventory and first wall permeation, based on laboratory measurements of hydrogen recycling, are given for various reactor operating scenarios. Impurity introduction/wall erosion mechanisms considered include sputtering, chemical erosion, and evaporation (melting). Finally, the advanced material development for in-vessel components is discussed. (author)

  20. NRC program for the resolution of generic issues related to nuclear power plants. (Includes plans for the resolution of ''unresolved safety issues'' pursuant to Section 210 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    This report provides a description of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Program for the Resolution of Generic Issues Related to Nuclear Power Plants. The NRC program is of considerably broader scope than the ''Unresolved Safety Issues Plan'' required by Section 210. The NRC program does include plans for the resolution of ''Unresolved Safety Issues''; however, in addition, it includes generic tasks for the resolution of environmental issues, for the development of improvements in the reactor licensing process and for consideration of less conservative design criteria or operating limitations in areas where over conservatisms may be unnecessarily restrictive or costly

  1. Approaches that use seismic hazard results to address topics of nuclear power plant seismic safety, with application to the Charleston earthquake issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, R.T.; McGuire, R.K.; Toro, G.R.; Stepp, J.C.; Cornell, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Plant seismic safety indicators include seismic hazard at the SSE (safe shut-down earthquake) acceleration, seismic margin, reliability against core damage, and reliability against offsite consequences. This work examines the key role of hazard analysis in evaluating these indicators and in making rational decisions regarding plant safety. The paper outlines approaches that use seismic hazard results as a basis for plant seismic safety evaluation and applies one of these approaches to the Charleston earthquake issue. This approach compares seismic hazard results that account for the Charleston tectonic interpretation, using the EPRI-Seismicity Owners Group (SOG) methodology, with hazard results that are consistent with historical tectonic interpretations accepted in regulation. Based on hazard results for a set of 21 eastern U.S. nuclear power plant sites, the comparison shows that no systematic 'plant-to-plant' increase in hazard accompanies the Charleston hypothesis; differences in mean hazards for the two interpretations are generally insignificant relative to current uncertainties in seismic hazard. (orig.)

  2. Power plants 2020+. Power plant options for the future and the related demand for research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This short overview already demonstrates that in the foreseeable future all generation options - nuclear power, fossil-fired power plants and renewable sources of energy - will continue to be applied. If, however, due to climate protection targets, energy conversion processes are to be to switched to CO 2 -free or -low carbon energy sources, comprehensive research endeavours will be required in order to advance existing technology options and to adjust them to changing conditions. This paper is bound to recommend individual fields of research from the viewpoint of the VGB Scientific Advisory Board for the period 2020 and beyond. Firstly, the generation structure in the European high-voltage grid and its development until 2020 will be considered, then the research demand for - Hard coal- and lignite-fired power plants, - Renewables-based electricity generation (wind, solar energy) and - Nuclear-based electricity generation will be outlined briefly, listing the main technology issues to be answered by researchers in order to increase efficiency and to settle any ''loose ends''. Apart from generation technologies, the options for storing electrical energy will also be dealt with. These options can contribute to make the feed-in of renewables-based electricity more permanent and sustainable. (orig.)

  3. Two-phase water hammer in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Water hammer events keep recurring in nuclear power plants. In the mid-1970s, water hammer was designated to be an unresolved safety issue (USI A-1) due to its high frequency of occurrence and the severity of the attendant damages. Between 1969 and 1981, a significant number of water hammer incidents (more than 12 events per year) involving BWRs and PWRs have been reported and evaluated. After intensive evaluations of the events, in late 1983, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff concluded that water hammer was not a serious contributor to the degradation of plant safety and it has been taken off the list of the unresolved safety issues. The frequency decreased to around 11 events per year between 1981 and 1985. Nevertheless, 11 events per year are still unacceptable high, especially in light of the financial losses caused by most events. Some events are not required to be reported. The number of the unreported events are estimated to be five to ten times as many as the reported events. The implication is that water hammer in nuclear power plants still needs attention and is a problem that has not been fundamentally resolved

  4. Multi-Level Risk Assessment of a Power Plant Gas Turbine Applying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multi-Level Risk Assessment of a Power Plant Gas Turbine Applying the Criticality Index Model. ... Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... This study has carefully shown and expressed a step by step computation of the severity level of the Turbine component parts, using the Criticality Index model.

  5. Application of Integrated Verification Approach to FPGA-based Safety-Critical I and C System of Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jaecheon [KEPCO, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Safety-critical instrumentation and control (I and C) system in nuclear power plant (NPP) implemented on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) plays a vital role in safe operation of the plant. The challenges such as fast obsolescence, the vulnerability to cyber-attack, and other related issues of software systems have currently led to the consideration of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as an alternative to PLCs because of their advantages and hardware related benefits. Generally in FPGA design verification, the designers make use of verification techniques by writing the test benches which involved various stages of verification activities of register-transfer level (RTL), gate-level, and place and route. Writing the test benches is considerably time consuming and require a lot of efforts to achieve a satisfied desire results. Furthermore, performing the verification at each stage is a major bottleneck and demanded much activities and time. In addition, verification is conceivably, the most difficult and complicated aspect of any design. Therefore, in view of these, this work applied an integrated verification approach to the verification of FPGA-based I and C system in NPP that simultaneously verified the whole design modules using MATLAB/Simulink HDL Co-simulation models. Verification is conceivably, the most difficult and complicated aspect of any design, and an FPGA design is not an exception. Therefore, in this work, we introduced and discussed how an application of integrated verification technique to the verification and testing of FPGA-based I and C system design in NPP can facilitate the verification processes, and verify the entire design modules of the system simultaneously using MATLAB/Simulink HDL co-simulation models. In conclusion, the results showed that, the integrated verification approach through MATLAB/Simulink models, if applied to any design to be verified, could speed up the design verification and reduce the V and V tasks.

  6. Application of Integrated Verification Approach to FPGA-based Safety-Critical I and C System of Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Heo, Gyunyoung; Jung, Jaecheon

    2016-01-01

    Safety-critical instrumentation and control (I and C) system in nuclear power plant (NPP) implemented on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) plays a vital role in safe operation of the plant. The challenges such as fast obsolescence, the vulnerability to cyber-attack, and other related issues of software systems have currently led to the consideration of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as an alternative to PLCs because of their advantages and hardware related benefits. Generally in FPGA design verification, the designers make use of verification techniques by writing the test benches which involved various stages of verification activities of register-transfer level (RTL), gate-level, and place and route. Writing the test benches is considerably time consuming and require a lot of efforts to achieve a satisfied desire results. Furthermore, performing the verification at each stage is a major bottleneck and demanded much activities and time. In addition, verification is conceivably, the most difficult and complicated aspect of any design. Therefore, in view of these, this work applied an integrated verification approach to the verification of FPGA-based I and C system in NPP that simultaneously verified the whole design modules using MATLAB/Simulink HDL Co-simulation models. Verification is conceivably, the most difficult and complicated aspect of any design, and an FPGA design is not an exception. Therefore, in this work, we introduced and discussed how an application of integrated verification technique to the verification and testing of FPGA-based I and C system design in NPP can facilitate the verification processes, and verify the entire design modules of the system simultaneously using MATLAB/Simulink HDL co-simulation models. In conclusion, the results showed that, the integrated verification approach through MATLAB/Simulink models, if applied to any design to be verified, could speed up the design verification and reduce the V and V tasks

  7. Evaluation of the feasibility, economic impact, and effectiveness of underground nuclear power plants. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Information on underground nuclear power plants is presented concerning underground nuclear power plant concepts; public health impacts; technical feasibility of underground concepts; economic impacts of underground construction; and evaluation of related issues

  8. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements; unresolved safety issues; generic safety issues; other multiplant action issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, the NRC established a program for publishing an annual report on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirements areas. This information was initially compiled and reported in three NUREG-series volumes. Volume 1, published in March 1991, addressed the status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan Requirements. Volume 2, published in May 1991, addressed the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs). Volume 3, published in June 1991, addressed the implementation and verification status of generic safety issues (GSIs). The first annual supplement, which combined these volumes into a single report and presented updated information as of September 30, 1991, was published in December 1991. The second annual supplement, which provided updated information as of September 30, 1992, was published in December 1992. Supplement 2 also provided the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of other multiplant action (MPA) issues not related to TMI Action Plan requirements, USIs, or GSIs. This third annual NUREG report, Supplement 3, presents updated information as of September 30, 1993. This report gives a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of TMI Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as USIs, GSIs, and other MPAs that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. Additionally, this report serves as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,'' which tracks safety issues until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees

  9. The operating organization for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  10. The operating organization for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  11. The operating organization for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  12. Economic analysis to compare fabrication of nuclear power and fossil fuel power plants at Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasouliye Koohi, Mojtaba

    1997-01-01

    Electric power due to its many advantages over other forms of energies covers most of the world's energy demands.The electric power can be produced by various energy converting systems fed by different energy resources like fossil fuels, nuclear, hydro and renewable energies, each having their own appropriate technologies. The fossil fuel not only consumes the deplete and precious sources of non conventional energies but they add pollution to environment too. The nuclear power plants has its own share of radioactive pollutions which, of course can be controlled by taking precautionary measures. The investing cost of each generated unit (KWh) in the nuclear power plants, comparing with its equivalent production by fossil fuels is investigated. The various issues of economical analysis, technical, political and environmental are the different aspects, which individually can influence the decisions for kind of power plant to be installed. Finally, it is concluded that the fossil and nuclear power generations both has its own advantages and disadvantages. Hence, from a specializing point of view, it may not be proper to prefer one over the others

  13. Evaluation of safety issues on newly regulated nuclear power plant by tsunami-level 1 PRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Yutaro; Miwa, Shuichiro; Mori, Michitsugu

    2014-01-01

    The tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake triggered severe accidents involving the units 1 to 4 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station (NPS). In order to re-operate existing nuclear power plants it should be necessary to reduce the core damage frequency on risk by tsunami. In this work, effects of the off-site power supply installation on resuming operation of nuclear power plants were investigated by utilizing the Tsunami-Level 1 Probability Risk Assessment (PRA). Unit 2 of the Onagawa nuclear power station, which resembled units 2 and 3 of Fukushima Dai-ichi, was selected for PRA. First, event-tree was created for the units of the Onagawa nuclear power station with the safety systems such as Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), investigating the plant situation at the time of the earthquake and tsunami occurrences. It was assumed that the magnitude of the tsunami was equivalent to the Great East Japan Earthquake. The accident-analytical progression-time was 36 hours, determined from the core-damage occurrence of the unit 3 of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. Failure probabilities were calculated by the fault tree, which was created from the elements listed in the event tree. For the calculation, failure rates reported by the NUCIA (NUClear Information Archives) were primarily utilized. Then, obtained failure probabilities were embedded to the event tree. Core damage probabilities were evaluated by calculating success and failure rates for each accidental progression and scenarios. Restoration of the failed equipment and machineries was not considered in the analysis. Installation of the power supply vehicles at the nuclear power plant site reduced the core damage probability from 2.58×10 -6 to 8.56×10 -7 . However, continued addition of the power supply vehicles could not lower the core damage probability further more. In the case of Unit 2 of Onagawa nuclear power station, there could be a limit to lower the core damage

  14. Vibrations in pipelines of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, M.R.L.V.; Bevilacqua, L.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented the main causes of vibrations in nuclear power plants pipelines to allow the identification of critical areas and correct the errors during the specification design. The methods of vibration analysis to give subsidies in the determination of the corrective providences when the problem appears during the commissioning or the generation energy, are also presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. Information needs in nuclear power plants during low power operation modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tommila, Teemu; Fantoni, Paolo F.; Zander, Ralf M.

    1998-02-01

    During the past few years an increasing attention has been paid to the safety of shutdown and refuelling operations. It has turned out that the risks during shutdown may be comparable to the risks of power operation. The goal of this report is to identify information requirements related to low power operating modes of nuclear power plants. These include, for example, warm and cold shutdowns, refuelling and maintenance, as well as related state transitions such as start-up and shut-down. The focus of the report is on planned refuelling outages and the role of the control room in managing the outage activities. As a starting point, the basic terminology and characteristics of low power operation are discussed. The current situation at nuclear power plants and some recent developments in information technology are reviewed. End-users' requirements and enabling technologies are combined in order to identify the opportunities for new information technology tools in low power operation. The required features of process control systems and maintenance information systems are described. Common plant modelling techniques, open software architectures and functional structuring of the process control system are suggested to be the key issues in the long-term development of operator support systems. On a shorter time scale, new tools solving limited practical problems should be developed and evaluated. This would provide a basis for the features needed for low power operation, including for example, outage planning, on-line risk monitoring, management of outage tasks, adaptive alarm handling, computerised procedures and task-oriented human interfaces. (author)

  16. Technology Trend in the Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kyungsup; Lee, Unjang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, overall technology evolution is reviewed and the improvements in the plant safety, reliability and productivity are described. And the issue and some recommendation for better maintenance of Korean nuclear power plants are presented as the interim study results on the 'Management and Regulatory Policy for the Nuclear Power Plant Maintenance and Equipment Reliability' under the agreement with the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission. The future trend in the maintenance technologies is also covered. Maintenance is the essential element for the enhancement of plant safety, reliability and economics and also for public safety. Therefore the regulator's involvements and the utility's active participation is inevitable for the better maintenance. For the better sustainability of our nuclear power plants the followings are recommended. ·Establishment of the good maintenance program and continuous improvement. ·Application of OLM on the safety related and non-safety related components by step-by-step approach. ·Improvement PRA technology for the accurate and reliable risk analysis. ·Continuous training and cultivation for the qualified maintenance personnel

  17. Technology Trend in the Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kyungsup; Lee, Unjang [CTO and CEO, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, overall technology evolution is reviewed and the improvements in the plant safety, reliability and productivity are described. And the issue and some recommendation for better maintenance of Korean nuclear power plants are presented as the interim study results on the 'Management and Regulatory Policy for the Nuclear Power Plant Maintenance and Equipment Reliability' under the agreement with the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission. The future trend in the maintenance technologies is also covered. Maintenance is the essential element for the enhancement of plant safety, reliability and economics and also for public safety. Therefore the regulator's involvements and the utility's active participation is inevitable for the better maintenance. For the better sustainability of our nuclear power plants the followings are recommended. ·Establishment of the good maintenance program and continuous improvement. ·Application of OLM on the safety related and non-safety related components by step-by-step approach. ·Improvement PRA technology for the accurate and reliable risk analysis. ·Continuous training and cultivation for the qualified maintenance personnel.

  18. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of this...

  19. Off-shore nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, T.

    1980-01-01

    In order to avoid losses of energy and seawater pollution an off-shore nuclear power plant is coupled with a power plant which utilizes the temperature difference between seawater and hot reactor cooling water. According to the invention the power plant has a working media loop which is separated from the nuclear power plant. The apparative equipment and the operational characteristics of the power plant are the subject of the patent. (UWI) [de

  20. Effects of nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, P.R.; Manweiler, R.W.; Davis, R.R.

    1977-09-01

    The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from a high-altitude nuclear detonation consists of a transient pulse of high intensity electromagnetic fields. These intense fields induce current and voltage transients in electrical conductors. Although most nuclear power plant cables are not directly exposed to these fields, the attenuated EMP fields that propagate into the plant will couple some EMP energy to these cables. The report predicts the probable effects of the EMP transients that could be induced in critical circuits of safety-related systems. It was found that the most likely consequence of EMP for nuclear plants is an unscheduled shutdown. EMP could prolong the shutdown period by the unnecessary actuation of certain safety systems. In general, EMP could be a nuisance to nuclear power plants, but it is not considered a serious threat to plant safety

  1. Flood risk analysis procedure for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology and procedure for determining the impact of floods on nuclear power plant risk. The procedures are based on techniques of fault tree and event tree analysis and use the logic of these techniques to determine the effects of a flood on system failure probability and accident sequence occurrence frequency. The methodology can be applied independently or as an add-on analysis for an existing risk assessment. Each stage of the analysis yields useful results such as the critical flood level, failure flood level, and the flood's contribution to accident sequence occurrence frequency. The results of applications show the effects of floods on the risk from nuclear power plants analyzed in the Reactor Safety Study

  2. Solar thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnatbaum, L.

    2009-01-01

    The solar thermal power plant technology, the opportunities it presents and the developments in the market are outlined. The focus is on the technology of parabolic trough power plants, a proven technology for solar power generation on a large scale. In a parabolic trough power plant, trough-shaped mirrors concentrate the solar irradiation onto a pipe in the focal line of the collector. The thermal energy thus generated is used for electricity generation in a steam turbine. Parabolic trough plants can be combined with thermal storage and fossil or biomass fired heat exchangers to generate electricity even when the sun is not shining. Solar Millennium AG in Erlangen has developed the first power plant of this kind in Europe. After two years of construction the plant started operation in Southern Spain in 2008. This one and its sister projects are important steps leading the way for the whole market. The paper also covers the technological challenges, the key components used and the research and development activities concerning this technology. Solar thermal power plants are ideal for covering peak and medium loads in power grids. In hybrid operation they can also cover base-load. The Solar Chimney power plant, another striking technology for the conversion of solar into electric energy, is described briefly. The paper concludes with a look at the future - the import of solar energy from the deserts of North Africa to central Europe. (author)

  3. Conditions and possibilities for inclusion the hydro-power plants from the 'Shara' hydroelectric system into the power system of the Republic of Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumenova, Evica; Naumoski, Kliment

    2001-01-01

    At the and of 1998, a study on conditions and possibilities of the 'Shara' hydroelectric system construction was prepared. The study considers an interesting idea for building up three reversible power plants. From electricity point of view the study emphasizes several significant issues that require comprehensive analyses in order to define the conditions and possibilities for their development. This paper attempts to give an overview of one of this issues: Conditions and possibilities for inclusion the hydro-power plants from the 'Shara' - system into the power supply system of Republic of Macedonia. (Original)

  4. Toward autonomous operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, M.

    1994-01-01

    Issues toward realization of autonomous operation as well as maintenance of nuclear power plants are reviewed in this paper. First, the necessity and significance of the technical program aiming at the establishment of autonomous nuclear plant are discussed through reviewing the history and current status computerized operation of complex artifacts. Then, key technologies currently studied to meet the need within the framework of artificial intelligence (AI) and advanced robotics are described. Among such AI-technologies are distributed multi-agent system, operator thinking model, and advanced man-machine interface design. Advances in robot technology attained include active sensing technique and multi-unit autonomous maintenance robot systems. Techniques for simulation of human action have been pursued as basic issues for understanding mechanisms behind human behavior. In addition to the individual developments, methodological topics relevant to the autonomy of nuclear facilities are briefly addressed. The concepts called methodology diversity and dynamic functionality restoration (realization) are introduced and discussed as the underlining principles to be considered in the development of the autonomous nuclear power plants. (author)

  5. Turbines for nuclear power plants. 2.ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyanovskij, B.M.

    1978-01-01

    In the second edition of the book considered are practically all the main problems of calculation and operation of turbines and turbine installations of nuclear power plants. As compared to the first edition, essentially addes is the reproduction of the problem on combined generation of heat and electric energy. Also represented is detailed material on methods of preliminary evaluation of turbine effectiveness. Considered are peculiarities of turbine operation on wet steam and the basis of their thermal calculation. Much attention is payed to the problem of wet stream current in the turbine elements and wetness effect on their characteristics. Problems of wetness separation and moving blade erosion as well as other turbine elements are extracted in a special section. Given are structural schemes of different methods of innerchannel and periphery wet removal as well as experimental materials on their effectiveness. Given are descriptions and critical analysis of a great number of typical constructions of nuclear power plant steam turbines, produced by native plants as well as by the main foreign firms. Considered also are constructions of outside separators and steam superheaters. Separately given is the problem of rotation frequency choise of nuclear power plant wet steam turbines. Represented are materials on turbine installation tests, considered are the problems of turbine starting and manoeuvrability, analyzed are their typical jailures and damages. One of the sections of the book is devoted to gas turbine installations of nuclear power plants. Different material on this theme scattered before in various sources is summarized in the book

  6. Public perspectives on proposed license renewal regulations for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligon, D.; Hughes, A.; Seth, S.

    1991-01-01

    On 17 July 1990, the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued for public comment its proposed rule for renewing the operating licenses of nuclear power plants (55 FR 29043). This solicitation marked the fourth time that NRC has Invited public comments on its efforts to develop regulatory requirements for re licensing nuclear power plants. Previously, NRC solicited public comments on establishing a policy statement on plant life extension, and on the issues and options for license renewal discussed in NUREG-1317. On 13-14 November 1989, NRC held a public workshop where the NRC staff discussed a conceptual approach to the rule and solicited written comments on the regulatory philosophy, conceptual rule, and on certain questions. NRC is taking into account all comments received in its development of the final rule which is scheduled for issuance in the summer of 1991

  7. Nuclear power as a public issue protection of the public interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doederlein, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    In evaluating the future role of nuclear power, it should be required to perform a rational and quantitative comparison of power production alternatives on at least the following four parameters: health effects, environmental effects, economy and resource availability. The evaluations should cover all steps from fuel production through waste disposal. We have less detailed knowledge on health effects from air pollution than from radioactivity. However our present body of knowledge clearly indicates that large scale use of nuclear power instead of fossil fuels will save thousands of human lives annually. This is probably one of the most compelling arguments for nuclear power. Clearly a number of irrational political, ethical and emotional factors may be of decisive importance in a large scale choice of power plant types. However an evaluation of rational and quantifiable factors may serve one important function in telling us how many lives, which environmental improvements and what economical advantages we have to sacrifice in order to satisfy such irrational demands. In any case it should be recognized that the public interest is best served by maximum use of the broad knowledge we have on costs and benefits of alternative electric power generation forms. Obviously energy policy is not an area where all questions can be tackled in an absolutely rational and objective way. However a number of absolute restrictions are set by the laws of nature, others by our present technological abilities. Such restrictions can not be changed by wishful thinking, political or otherwise. On the one hand this may serve to define the role of the technological community in making both the nuclear and other more important decisions. On the other hand these are facts which are not fully appreciated by those making a controversial issue of nuclear power. One disturbing aspect of the discussions in many countries, is the plethora of manifestos for or against nuclear power. These are issued

  8. Alternative off-site power supply improves nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjorgiev, Blaže; Volkanovski, Andrija; Kančev, Duško; Čepin, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Additional power supply for mitigation of the station blackout event in NPP is used. • A hydro power plant is considered as an off-site alternative power supply. • An upgrade of the probabilistic safety assessment from its traditional use is made. • The obtained results show improvement of nuclear power plant safety. - Abstract: A reliable power system is important for safe operation of the nuclear power plants. The station blackout event is of great importance for nuclear power plant safety. This event is caused by the loss of all alternating current power supply to the safety and non-safety buses of the nuclear power plant. In this study an independent electrical connection between a pumped-storage hydro power plant and a nuclear power plant is assumed as a standpoint for safety and reliability analysis. The pumped-storage hydro power plant is considered as an alternative power supply. The connection with conventional accumulation type of hydro power plant is analysed in addition. The objective of this paper is to investigate the improvement of nuclear power plant safety resulting from the consideration of the alternative power supplies. The safety of the nuclear power plant is analysed through the core damage frequency, a risk measure assess by the probabilistic safety assessment. The presented method upgrades the probabilistic safety assessment from its common traditional use in sense that it considers non-plant sited systems. The obtained results show significant decrease of the core damage frequency, indicating improvement of nuclear safety if hydro power plant is introduced as an alternative off-site power source

  9. Six month suspension of Tsuruga nuclear power plant ordered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report first describes on brief review of the troubles at Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station. All these accidents or troubles were settled within the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station, and none was reported either to the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy (ANRE) of Ministry of International Trade and Industry, which is responsible for the supervision of nuclear power plants, or even to the head of Japan Atomic Power Co. (JAPCO). JAPCO criticized itself for the failure to recognize the importance of proper communication. It has been decided that Mr. Suzuki, President of JAPCO, will be succeeded by Mr. Okabe, Managing Director of Tokyo Electric Power Co. It was ordered that the operation of the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station should be suspended for six months, in accordance with the Reactor Regulation Law, because of the violation of the safety regulations. The final report of ANRE said that ANRE has determined to make maximum efforts to ensure the safety of nuclear power plants, in order to prevent the recurrence of such an accident, and to restore public confidence in nuclear power plants. Nuclear Safety Commission declared that there would be no present or future effect of the radiation leakage on the local people. Local people's organization is lodging complaint against JAPCO. It is expected that the talks between the Ministries of Home Affairs and International Trade and Industry will center on the strengthening of contacts between nuclear power plants and local self-government bodies. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Primary circuit contamination in nuclear power plants: contribution to occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provens, H.

    2002-01-01

    In every country since the 80's, a clear downward trend is observed concerning the occupational doses at nuclear power plants, as shows the regularly decreasing annual collective dose per operating reactor. Even if technology and work management are improving, the reduction and the control of radiation sources remain one critical point. This paper summarizes the results of an extended study on the primary circuit contamination in nuclear power plants and its contribution to workers' exposure. The paper reviews the origin and mechanisms of radiation production and the different ways of radiation control or reduction based on physical and chemical parameters and not organisational or human factors. It underlines that chemistry control of the primary circuit is one essential component of radiation protection optimisation in nuclear power plants. Results reported come from scientific data in open literature and cannot be generalized to all the power plants

  11. Lifetime Management in Non-US-Technology Nuclear Power Plants using US Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius Steenkamp, J.; Encabo Espartero, J.; Garcia Iglesias, R.

    2013-01-01

    In July 2009 the Spanish Nuclear Regulator (CSN) issued a Safety Instruction (IS-22) for the development of Lifetime Management in the Nuclear Power Plants within Spain. The context of this Safety Instruction is based on the American Regulations 10CFR54, NUREG1800/1801 and the technical guide NEI95-10. All these regulations are aimed at US-Technology Nuclear Power Plants. Lifetime Management of Nuclear Power Plants with a plant design different from US technologies can most certainly be developed with the mentioned US regulations. The successful development of Lifetime Management in these cases depends on the adaptation of the different requirements of the regulations. Challenges resulting from the adaptation process can be resolved by taking into consideration the plant design of the plant in question.

  12. Control of power plants and power systems. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canales-Ruiz, R.

    1996-01-01

    The 88 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the International Federation of Automatic Control Symposium held in Mexico in 1995. The broad areas which they cover are: self tuning control; power plant operations; dynamic stability; fuzzy logic applications; power plants modelling; artificial intelligence applications; power plants simulation; voltage control; control of hydro electric units; state estimation; fault diagnosis and monitoring systems; system expansion and operation planning; security assessment; economic dispatch and optimal load flow; adaptive control; distribution; transient stability and preventive control; modelling and control of nuclear plant; knowledge data bases for automatic learning methods applied to power system dynamic security assessment; control of combined cycle units; power control centres. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the three papers relating to nuclear power plants. (UK)

  13. Safety of nuclear power plants: Operation. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant is ensured by means of its proper siting, design, construction and commissioning, followed by the proper management and operation of the plant. In a later phase, proper decommissioning is required. This Safety Requirements publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which was issued in 1988 as Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1). The purpose of this revision was: to restructure Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1) in the light of the basic objectives, concepts and principles in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. To be consistent with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. And to reflect current practice and new concepts and technical developments. Guidance on fulfillment of these Safety Requirements may be found in the appropriate Safety Guides relating to plant operation. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements which, in the light of experience and the present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. These requirements are governed by the basic objectives, concepts and principles that are presented in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. This publication deals with matters specific to the safe operation of land based stationary thermal neutron nuclear power plants, and also covers their commissioning and subsequent decommissioning

  14. Safety of nuclear power plants: Operation. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant is ensured by means of its proper siting, design, construction and commissioning, followed by the proper management and operation of the plant. In a later phase, proper decommissioning is required. This Safety Requirements publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which was issued in 1988 as Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1). The purpose of this revision was: to restructure Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1) in the light of the basic objectives, concepts and principles in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. To be consistent with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. And to reflect current practice and new concepts and technical developments. Guidance on fulfillment of these Safety Requirements may be found in the appropriate Safety Guides relating to plant operation. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements which, in the light of experience and the present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. These requirements are governed by the basic objectives, concepts and principles that are presented in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. This publication deals with matters specific to the safe operation of land based stationary thermal neutron nuclear power plants, and also covers their commissioning and subsequent decommissioning

  15. Safety of nuclear power plants: Operation. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant is ensured by means of its proper siting, design, construction and commissioning, followed by the proper management and operation of the plant. In a later phase, proper decommissioning is required. This Safety Requirements publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which was issued in 1988 as Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1). The purpose of this revision was: to restructure Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1) in the light of the basic objectives, concepts and principles in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations; to be consistent with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources; and to reflect current practice and new concepts and technical developments. Guidance on fulfillment of these Safety Requirements may be found in the appropriate Safety Guides relating to plant operation. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements which, in the light of experience and the present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. These requirements are governed by the basic objectives, concepts and principles that are presented in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. This publication deals with matters specific to the safe operation of land based stationary thermal neutron nuclear power plants, and also covers their commissioning and subsequent decommissioning

  16. Developing an economic performance system to enhance nuclear power plant competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 about 16% of the world's electricity was produced by nuclear power, and the total worldwide operating experience of nuclear power plants was over 9200 reactor-years. Some 16 countries are dependent on nuclear power for more than 25% of their electricity generation. In some countries deregulation of the electricity market has either happened or is currently ongoing, while in others it is planned for the future. Nevertheless, many countries are already facing open electricity markets and operating costs are under unprecedented pressure, with competition expected to come soon to the nuclear industry worldwide. To a certain extent, however, the industry has already prepared or is currently preparing to face competition. This report is primarily intended for nuclear power plant and utility managers. It discusses the means and principal issues for the development of the nuclear economic performance international system (NEPIS), which should enhance nuclear power plant competitiveness. The following issues are addressed: The major transformations occurring in the electricity generation industry that require reductions in operations and maintenance costs at nuclear utilities; The methods that nuclear plant management use to identify and justify the economic optimum level of a plant and its use of resources; The value of collecting cost and performance data and the analysis techniques that use that data; The cost data required to be collected; The difficulty of collecting data with existing cost accounting systems; The new cost accounting and collection systems that will be required, The cost effectiveness of the overall process. This report also presents the preliminary results of a pilot project that was established to collect cost data on a few nuclear power plants and was used to verify the adequacy of the definitions and terminology set for NEPIS

  17. IAEA activity on operator support systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dounaev, V.; Fujita, Y.; Juslin, K.; Haugset, K.; Lux, I.; Naser, J.

    1994-01-01

    Various operator support systems for nuclear power plants are already operational or under development in the IAEA Member States. Operator support systems are based on intelligent data processing and, in addition to plant operation, they are also becoming more important for safety. A key feature of operator support systems is their availability to restructure data to increase its relevance for a given situation. This can improve the user's ability to identify plant mode, system state, and component state and to identify and diagnose faults. Operator support systems can also assist the user in planning and implementing corrective actions to improve the nuclear power plant's availability and safety. In September 1991, the IAEA Committee for Contractual Scientific Services approved the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Operator Support Systems in Nuclear Power Plants'' in the framework of the Project ''Man-Machine Interface Studies''. The main objective of this programme is to provide guidance and technology transfer for the development and implementation of operator support systems. This includes the experience with human-machine interfaces and closely related issues such as instrumentation and control, the use of computers in nuclear power plants, and operator qualification. (author)

  18. Ageing management of nuclear power plant - the Tarapur experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anilkumar, K.R.; Das, P.K.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Ramamurty, U.

    2006-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station, the longest serving Nuclear Power Plant in the Asian continent has completed 36 years of successful operation and generated more than 70,000 million units of electric power. Built in late sixties, with the state-of-the-art safety features prevailing then, TAPS through the process of evolution has become safer plant due to efforts of upgradation, renovation and refurbishment prompted by the station's operating experience, feed back from overseas reactors, lessons learnt from nuclear incidents, accidents and fresh review of design basis and safety analysis of the plant. All components of a Nuclear power plant experience some degradation with time. The Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV) designed for 40 effective full power years (EFPY) of operation have operated for less than 20 EFPY and the material condition is assessed to be fit for some more years of service. The condition of the containment and main plant buildings was assessed to be satisfactory. The Ageing Management Programme (AMP) involved identification of key systems, structures and components (SSCs) that may experience degradation due to ageing, and take corrective measures through maintenance, repair and/or replacement. The identified components were classified as major critical components, important systems and other critical components. For each component mode of degradation was identified, ageing assessment was done and action plan was finalized. Replacement of some important equipment like 3 x 50 % capacity Emergency Diesel Generators (EDG) with 3 x 100 % capacity EDG, Salt Service Water (SSW) pumps, Control rod drive (CRD) pumps, Emergency Condenser tube bundles, Station battery has been done on the basis of condition monitoring and to obviate common cause failure and enhance the system reliability. Samples of Safety related cables were subjected to residual life assessment (RLA) and replacement action firmed up on the basis of the RLA findings. Condition survey of Main

  19. Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-04-03

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir

  20. The experiences to improve plant performance and reliability of Ko-Ri nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ho Weon

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a discussion of the lessons learned from operational experience and the future plans to improve performance of the Ko-Ri plant. To operate nuclear power plants safely with good performance is the only way to mitigate the negative image of nuclear power generation to the public and to enhance the economical benefit compared to other electrical generation method. Therefore, in a continuous effort to overcome a negative challenge from outside, we have driven an aggressive 'OCTF' campaign as part of safety. As a result of our efforts, the following remarkable achievements have been accomplished. (1) 3 times of OCTF during recent three years (2) Selected twice as a top notch power plant on the list of NEI magazine in terms of plant capacity factor (3) No scram recorded in 1997 for all 4 units at Ko-Ri site. Ko-Ri is now undergoing the large scale plant betterment projects for retaking-off our operating performance to the level of new challenge target. Such improvement of critical components in the reactor coolant system and turbine system greatly contribute to increase the safety and reliability of the plant and to shortening of the planned outage period as well as to reduction of radiation exposure and radwaste. (Cho, G. S.). 5 tabs., 10 figs

  1. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal [ed.

    2009-09-15

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Technologies of national importance, by Tsutomu Ohkubo, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan; Modeling and simulation advances brighten future nuclear power, by Hussein Khalil, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy and desalination projects, by Ratan Kumar Sinha, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India; A plant with simplified design, by John Higgins, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; A forward thinking design, by Ray Ganthner, AREVA; A passively safe design, by Ed Cummins, Westinghouse Electric Company; A market-ready design, by Ken Petrunik, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Canada; Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, by Jacques Bouchard, French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France, and Ralph Bennett, Idaho National Laboratory; Innovative reactor designs, a report by IAEA, Vienna, Austria; Guidance for new vendors, by John Nakoski, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Road map for future energy, by John Cleveland, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria; and, Vermont's largest source of electricity, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovation article is titled Intelligent monitoring technology, by Chris Demars, Exelon Nuclear.

  2. Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

    2009-03-01

    Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

  3. Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, Sherrell R.; Flanagan, George F.; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2009-01-01

    Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

  4. Experiences with drug testing at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, H.B.

    1987-01-01

    After more than 2 yr of operation of a drug testing program at the San Onofre nuclear power plant site, the Southern California Edison Co. has had a number of experiences and lessons considered valuable. The drug testing program at San Onofre, implemented in September of 1984, continues in essentially the same form today. Prior to describing the program, the paper reviews several underlying issues that believed to be simultaneously satisfied by the program: trustworthiness, fitness and safety, public trust, and privacy and search. The overall drug testing program, periodic drug monitoring program, and unannounced drug testing program are described. In addition to the obvious features of a good drug testing program, which are described in the EEI guide, it is essential to consider such issues as the stated program rationale, employee relations, and disciplinary action measures when contemplating or engaging in drug testing at nuclear power plants

  5. Study on the coal mixing ratio optimization for a power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y. A.; Cheng, J. W.; Bai, Q.; Li, W. B.

    2017-12-01

    For coal-fired power plants, the application of blended coal combustion has been a great issue due to the shortage and rising prices of high-rank coal. This paper describes the optimization of blending methods between Xing'an lignite coal, Shaltala lignite coal, Ura lignite coal, and Inner Mongolia bituminous coal. The multi-objective decision-making method based on fuzzy mathematics was used to determine the optimal blending ratio to improve the power plant coal-fired economy.

  6. Technical evaluation of bids for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In continuation of its efforts to provide comprehensive and impartial guidance to Member States facing the need to introduce nuclear power, the International Atomic Energy Agency is issuing this guidebook as part of a series of guidebooks and codes of practice and, in particular, as a necessary supplement to 'Economic Evaluation of Bids for Nuclear Power Plants: A Guidebook', published by the IAEA in 1976 as Technical Reports Series No.175. The present publication is intended for project managers and senior engineers of electric utilities who are concerned with the evaluation of bids for a nuclear power project. It assumes that the reader has a good knowledge of the technical characteristics of nuclear power plants and of nuclear power project implementation. Its purpose is to provide the information necessary to organize, guide and supervise the technical evaluation of bids for a nuclear power project. It goes without saying that the technical staff carrying out the evaluation must have prior technical experience which cannot be provided by a guidebook

  7. Engineering management at feasibility study stage of nuclear power plant under EPC mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    After the investment reform by the State Council in 2004, NDRC carries out approval system for enterprises to invest in nuclear power plants. Feasibility study stage is a critical stage on the mainline of nuclear power project approval, which intersects with the license application, and engineering design. The owners of nuclear power plants are required stringently in engineering management. From the owners' management point of view under EPC mode, this paper sorts the preliminary project process for nuclear power plants, focusing on the management in the feasibility study stage. License application and engineering design management in the feasibility study stage are also discussed. (author)

  8. Erosion/corrosion-induced pipe wall thinning in US Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, P.C.

    1989-04-01

    Erosion/corrosion in single-phase piping systems was not clearly recognized as a potential safety issue before the pipe rupture incident at the Surry Power Station in December 1986. This incident reminded the nuclear industry and the regulators that neither the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) nor Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code require utilities to monitor erosion/corrosion in the secondary systems of nuclear power plants. This report provides a brief review of the erosion/corrosion phenomenon and its major occurrence in nuclear power plants. In addition, efforts by the NRC, the industry, and the ASME Section XI Committee to address this issue are described. Finally, results of the survey and plant audits conducted by the NRC to assess the extent of erosion/corrosion-induced piping degradation and the status of program implementation regarding erosion/corrosion monitoring are discussed. This report will support a staff recommendation for an additional regulatory requirement concerning erosion/corrosion monitoring. 21 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Nuclear power plant cost underestimation: mechanisms and corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Criticisms of inaccurate nuclear power plant cost estimates have commonly focused upon what factors have caused actual costs to increase and not upon the engineering cost estimate methodology itself. This article describes two major sources of cost underestimation and suggests corrections for each which can be applied while retaining the traditional engineering methodology in general

  10. Industrial safety in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings of the VGB conference 'Industrial safety in power plants' held in the Gruga-Halle, Essen on January 21 and 22, 1987, contain the papers reporting on: Management responsibility for and legal consequences of industrial safety; VBG 2.0 Industrial Accident Prevention Regulation and the power plant operator; Operational experience gained with wet-type flue gas desulphurization systems; Flue gas desulphurization systems: Industrial-safety-related requirements to be met in planning and operation; the effects of the Hazardous Substances Ordinance on power plant operation; Occupational health aspects of heat-exposed jobs in power plants; Regulations of the Industrial Accident Insurance Associations concerning heat-exposed jobs and industrial medical practice; The new VBG 30 Accident Prevention Regulation 'Nuclear power plants'; Industrial safety in nuclear power plants; safe working on and within containers and confined spaces; Application of respiratory protection equipment in power plants. (HAG) [de

  11. Thermoeconomic analysis of a power/water cogeneration plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamed, Osman A.; Al-Washmi, Hamed A.; Al-Otaibi, Holayil A.

    2006-01-01

    Cogeneration plants for simultaneous production of water and electricity are widely used in the Arabian Gulf region. They have proven to be more thermodynamically efficient and economically feasible than single purpose power generation and water production plants. Yet, there is no standard or universally applied methodology for determining unit cost of electric power generation and desalinated water production by dual purpose plants. A comprehensive literature survey to critically assess and evaluate different methods for cost application in power/water cogeneration plants is reported in this paper. Based on this analysis, an in-depth thermoeconomic study is carried out on a selected power/water cogeneration plant that employs a regenerative Rankine cycle. The system incorporates a boiler, back pressure turbine (supplying steam to two MSF distillers), a deaerator and two feed water heaters. The turbine generation is rated at 118 MW, while MSF distiller is rated at 7.7 MIGD at a top brine temperature of 105 deg. C. An appropriate costing procedure based on the available energy accounting method which divides benefits of the cogeneration configuration equitably between electricity generation and water production is used to determine the unit costs of electricity and water. Capital charges of common equipment such as the boiler, deaerator and feed water heaters as well as boiler fuel costs are distributed between power generated and desalinated water according to available energy consumption of the major subsystems. A detailed sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the impact of the variation of fuel cost, load and availability factors in addition to capital recovery factor on electricity and water production costs

  12. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

    1963-05-14

    A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

  13. Regulatory control of maintenance activities in Argentine nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, J.C.; Caruso, G.

    2000-01-01

    The main maintenance objective is to assure that the safety features of structures, components and systems of nuclear power plants are kept as designed. Therefore, there is a direct relationship between safety and maintenance. Owing to the above mentioned, maintenance activities are considered a relevant regulatory issue for the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN). This paper describes the regulatory control to maintenance activities of Argentine nuclear power plants. It also addresses essential elements for maintenance control, routine inspections, special inspections during planned outages, audits and license conditions and requirements. (author)

  14. A methodology for evaluating ''new'' technologies in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Holcomb, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    As obsolescence and spare parts issues drive nuclear power plants to upgrade with new technology (such as optical fiber communication systems), the ability of the new technology to withstand stressors present where it is installed needs to be determined. In particular, new standards may be required to address qualification criteria and their application to the nuclear power plants of tomorrow. This paper discusses the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber optic communication systems, and suggests a methodology for identifying when accelerated aging should be performed during qualification testing

  15. Evaluation of a Generic Virtual Power Plant Framework Using Service Oriented Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bach; Poulsen, Bjarne; Decker, Morten

    2008-01-01

    interesting properties that can influence the future shape of power markets. The concept holds many promises including cheaper power to the consumer, a more flexible and responsive power production and the support of a more environment- friendly development. In order to realize a software solution supporting...... the generic virtual power plant, an array of different software design principles, patterns and architectures must be applied. Especially Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) can aid in implementing the generic virtual power plant. An analysis of the Nordic power market has been carried out in order...... to identify potential issues and barriers, henceforth mentioned as challenges, connected with the introduction of the generic virtual power plant concept. In this paper, three use case scenarios will show how each of these challenges can be overcome by the proposed solution framework. The use case scenarios...

  16. Reliability Analysis Techniques for Communication Networks in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, T. J.; Jang, S. C.; Kang, H. G.; Kim, M. C.; Eom, H. S.; Lee, H. J.

    2006-09-01

    The objectives of this project is to investigate and study existing reliability analysis techniques for communication networks in order to develop reliability analysis models for nuclear power plant's safety-critical networks. It is necessary to make a comprehensive survey of current methodologies for communication network reliability. Major outputs of this study are design characteristics of safety-critical communication networks, efficient algorithms for quantifying reliability of communication networks, and preliminary models for assessing reliability of safety-critical communication networks

  17. Estimation of reliability on digital plant protection system in nuclear power plants using fault simulation with self-checking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun Seok; Kim, Suk Joon; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2004-01-01

    Safety-critical digital systems in nuclear power plants require high design reliability. Reliable software design and accurate prediction methods for the system reliability are important problems. In the reliability analysis, the error detection coverage of the system is one of the crucial factors, however, it is difficult to evaluate the error detection coverage of digital instrumentation and control system in nuclear power plants due to complexity of the system. To evaluate the error detection coverage for high efficiency and low cost, the simulation based fault injections with self checking are needed for digital instrumentation and control system in nuclear power plants. The target system is local coincidence logic in digital plant protection system and a simplified software modeling for this target system is used in this work. C++ based hardware description of micro computer simulator system is used to evaluate the error detection coverage of the system. From the simulation result, it is possible to estimate the error detection coverage of digital plant protection system in nuclear power plants using simulation based fault injection method with self checking. (author)

  18. The effect of plant aging on equipment qualification and human performance issues related to license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.E.; Higgins, J.C.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The aging of nuclear power plants is one of the most important issues facing the nuclear industry worldwide. Aging encompasses as forms of degradation to nuclear power plant components, systems, and structures that result from exposure to environmental conditions or from operational stresses. Both the degradation from aging and actions taken to address the aging, such as increased maintenance and testing, can significantly impact human performance in the plant. Research into the causes and effects of aging as obtained through the assessment of operating experience and testing have raised questions regarding the adequacy of existing industry standards for addressing the concerns raised by this research. This paper discusses these issues, with particular emphasis in the area of equipment qualification and human performance

  19. The effect of plant aging on equipment qualification and human performance issues related to license renewal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, W.E.; Higgins, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Aggarwal, S.K. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The aging of nuclear power plants is one of the most important issues facing the nuclear industry worldwide. Aging encompasses as forms of degradation to nuclear power plant components, systems, and structures that result from exposure to environmental conditions or from operational stresses. Both the degradation from aging and actions taken to address the aging, such as increased maintenance and testing, can significantly impact human performance in the plant. Research into the causes and effects of aging as obtained through the assessment of operating experience and testing have raised questions regarding the adequacy of existing industry standards for addressing the concerns raised by this research. This paper discusses these issues, with particular emphasis in the area of equipment qualification and human performance.

  20. The effect of plant aging on equipment qualification and human performance issues related to license renewal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, W.E.; Higgins, J.C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Aggarwal, S.K. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The aging of nuclear power plants is one of the most important issues facing the nuclear industry worldwide. Aging encompasses as forms of degradation to nuclear power plant components, systems, and structures that result from exposure to environmental conditions or from operational stresses. Both the degradation from aging and actions taken to address the aging, such as increased maintenance and testing, can significantly impact human performance in the plant. Research into the causes and effects of aging as obtained through the assessment of operating experience and testing have raised questions regarding the adequacy of existing industry standards for addressing the concerns raised by this research. This paper discusses these issues, with particular emphasis in the area of equipment qualification and human performance.

  1. The working lifetime of nuclear power plants and new types of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, Ch.; Birraux, C.

    2003-01-01

    The report on the working lifetime of nuclear power plants and new reactor types, by Mr Christian Bataille, deputy for the Nord, and Mr Claude Birraux, deputy for Haute-Savoie as well as President of the Office, supplements the studies carried out by the Parliamentary Office on the Safety of Nuclear Installations and Radioactive Wastes: it examines the remaining working life of the EDF nuclear power plants and the current status of projects that might, if circumstances were right, replace the reactors at present in service. The report investigates the different physical and other factors that influence the ageing of nuclear power plants and tackles the question of whether the design life of 40 years could be exceeded in practice. The whole issue of French nuclear power plant is put in perspective and compared with the situation of nuclear plants in Finland, Sweden, Germany and the United States, from the technical and regulatory standpoints. Believing that any attempt to optimise the working lifetime of the power plants currently in service must be accompanied by simultaneous moves aimed at their replacement, Messrs. Christian Bataille and Claude Birraux go on to review in detail the various light water reactor projects being proposed around the world for completion by 2015, as developments of existing models, in particular the EPR reactor of Framatome ANP, characterised by its competitiveness. They suggest that a first such reactor should be built as quickly as possible. Describing the other nuclear systems being investigated by research organisations not only in France but also in the United States and Sweden, Mrs. Christian Bataille and Claude Birraux review the objectives of these and the circumstances in which they might be developed, which would be unlikely to be before 2035 in view of the technological problems to be overcome and the industrial demonstration plants that would be needed

  2. Human Reliability analysis for digitized nuclear power plants: Case study on the LingAo II nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yan Hua; Zhang, Li [Institute of Human Factors Engineering AND Safety Management, Hunan Institute of Technology, Hengyang (China); Dai, Cao; Li, Peng Cheng; Qing, Tao [Human Factors Institute, University of South China, Hengyang (China)

    2017-03-15

    The main control room (MCR) in advanced nuclear power plants (NPPs) has changed from analog to digital control system (DCS). Operation and control have become more automated, centralized, and accurate due to the digitalization of NPPs, which has improved the efficiency and security of the system. New issues associated with human reliability inevitably arise due to the adoption of new accident procedures and digitalization of main control rooms in NPPs. The LingAo II NPP is the first digital NPP in China to apply the state-oriented procedure. In order to address issues related to human reliability analysis for DCS and DCS + state-oriented procedure, the Hunan Institute of Technology conducted a research project based on a cooperative agreement with the LingDong Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. This paper is a brief introduction to the project.

  3. Human Reliability Analysis for Digitized Nuclear Power Plants: Case Study on the LingAo II Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Zou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main control room (MCR in advanced nuclear power plants (NPPs has changed from analog to digital control system (DCS. Operation and control have become more automated, centralized, and accurate due to the digitalization of NPPs, which has improved the efficiency and security of the system. New issues associated with human reliability inevitably arise due to the adoption of new accident procedures and digitalization of main control rooms in NPPs. The LingAo II NPP is the first digital NPP in China to apply the state-oriented procedure. In order to address issues related to human reliability analysis for DCS and DCS + state-oriented procedure, the Hunan Institute of Technology conducted a research project based on a cooperative agreement with the LingDong Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. This paper is a brief introduction to the project.

  4. Assessing the impact of power plant mortality on the compensatory reserve of fish populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodyear, C.P.

    1977-01-01

    A technique is presented to quantify the concepts of compensation and compensatory reserve in exploited fish populations. The technique was used to examine the impact of power plant mortality on a hypothetical striped bass population. Power plant mortality had a more severe impact on the compensation ratio and compensatory reserve for an exploited stock. The technique can be applied to determine a critical compensation ratio which could serve as a standard against which additional sources of mortality, such as those caused by power plants, could be measured

  5. Strategy and system of fire protection at Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weihong

    1999-12-01

    The fire protection is an important safety issue of nuclear power utilities. The author depicts the strategy and management system of fire protection implemented successfully at Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant of China

  6. Conceptual design of a laser fusion power plant. Part I. An integrated facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    This study is a new preliminary conceptual design and economic analysis of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plant performed by Bechtel under the direction of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of a new conceptual design is to examine alternatives to the LLNL HYLIFE power plant and to incorporate information from the recent liquid metal cooled power plant conceptual design study (CDS) into the reactor system and balance of plant design. A key issue in the design of a laser fusion power plant is the degree of symmetry in the illumination of the target that will be required for a proper burn. Because this matter is expected to remain unresolved for some time, another purpose of this study is to determine the effect of symmetry requirements on the total plant size, layout, and cost

  7. Configuration management in nuclear power plants

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Configuration management (CM) is the process of identifying and documenting the characteristics of a facility's structures, systems and components of a facility, and of ensuring that changes to these characteristics are properly developed, assessed, approved, issued, implemented, verified, recorded and incorporated into the facility documentation. The need for a CM system is a result of the long term operation of any nuclear power plant. The main challenges are caused particularly by ageing plant technology, plant modifications, the application of new safety and operational requirements, and in general by human factors arising from migration of plant personnel and possible human failures. The IAEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) shows that on average 25% of recorded events could be caused by configuration errors or deficiencies. CM processes correctly applied ensure that the construction, operation, maintenance and testing of a physical facility are in accordance with design requirements as expressed in the d...

  8. Regulatory Guidance for Lightning Protection in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, Roger A.; Wilgen, John B.; Ewing, Paul D.; Korsah, Kofi; Antonescu, Christina E.

    2006-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects.

  9. Nuclear power. Volume 1. Nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DESIGN is intended to be used as a working reference book for management, engineers and designers, and as a graduate-level text for engineering students. The book is designed to combine theory with practical nuclear power engineering and design experience, and to give the reader an up-to-date view of the status of nuclear power and a basic understanding of how nuclear power plants function. Volume 1 contains the following chapters; (1) nuclear reactor theory; (2) nuclear reactor design; (3) types of nuclear power plants; (4) licensing requirements; (5) shielding and personnel exposure; (6) containment and structural design; (7) main steam and turbine cycles; (8) plant electrical system; (9) plant instrumentation and control systems; (10) radioactive waste disposal (waste management) and (11) conclusion

  10. Economic issues relating to power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.K.N.; Mohan, Rakesh

    1998-01-01

    Financial distress alongside high rates of growth, stagnant organizations coexistent with upgraded technologies, richly endowed regions marked by low levels of electricity consumption and the long wait for private power in face of mounting shortfalls are among the contradictions marking the power sector. Decades of public financing support could shore up the rates of growth but forms of past intervention failed to address critical institutional and regulatory issues. Key areas that need intervention have now been identified, although several are yet to be tackled. This paper discusses the more important of the problem areas holding up significant economic gains that could be realized through cost reductions, the needed levels of investments, operation of market forces and targeting of resources to promote equitable growth. The slow pace of progress is a matter for concern. Effectiveness of many of the policy initiatives of government is also dependent on providing well thought out policy supports. (author)

  11. Reliability Issues in Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey; Shah, Ashwin

    2005-01-01

    Stirling power conversion is a potential candidate for use in a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) for space science missions because it offers a multifold increase in the conversion efficiency of heat to electric power and reduced requirement of radioactive material. Reliability of an RPS that utilizes Stirling power conversion technology is important in order to ascertain long term successful performance. Owing to long life time requirement (14 years), it is difficult to perform long-term tests that encompass all the uncertainties involved in the design variables of components and subsystems comprising the RPS. The requirement for uninterrupted performance reliability and related issues are discussed, and some of the critical areas of concern are identified. An overview of the current on-going efforts to understand component life, design variables at the component and system levels, and related sources and nature of uncertainties are also discussed. Current status of the 110 watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) reliability efforts is described. Additionally, an approach showing the use of past experience on other successfully used power systems to develop a reliability plan for the SRG110 design is outlined.

  12. Climate change – a critical emerging issue

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Archer van Garderen, Emma RM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available amount of what are termed 'greenhouse gases', including carbon dioxide (CO2) (the best known); but also water vapour and methane (amongst others). Without the presence of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the planet would be unable to sustain life... critical emerging issue 1 Climate Change ? a critical emerging issue 1. Introduction We inhabit a dynamic and changing planet, and a changing climate is, clearly, nothing new. In fact, the earth has undergone significant climatic change...

  13. Power plants 2010. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The proceedings include the following lectures: Facing the challenges - new structures for electricity production. Renewable energies in Europe - chances and challenges. Nuclear outlook in the UK. Sustainable energy for Europe. Requirements of the market and the grid operator at the electricity production companies. Perspectives for the future energy production. Pumped storage plants - status and perspectives. Nuclear power/renewable energies -partners or opponents? New fossil fired power stations in Europe - status and perspectives. Nuclear energy: outlook for new build and lifetime extension in Europe. Biomass in the future European energy market - experiences for dong energy. Meeting the EU 20:20 renewable energy targets: the offshore challenges. DESERTEC: sustainable electricity for Europe, Middle East and North Africa. New power plants in Europe - a challenge for project and quality management. Consideration of safely in new build activities of power plants. Challenges to an integrated development in Maasvlakte, Netherlands. Power enhancement in EnBW power plants. Operational experiences of CCS pilot plants worldwide. Two years of operational experiences with Vattenfall's oxyfuel pilot plant. Pre-conditions for CCS. Storage technologies for a volatile generation. Overview: new generation of gas turbines.

  14. Resilience framework for critical infrastructures: An empirical study in a nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaka, Leire; Hernantes, Josune; Sarriegi, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The safety and proper functioning of Critical Infrastructures (CIs) are essential for ensuring the welfare of society, which puts the issue of improving their resilience level at the forefront of the field of crisis management. Most of the resilience-building principles defined in the literature do not cover all the dimensions that make up resilience and most of them only focus within the boundaries of the CI, neglecting the role of the external agents that also have an influence on enhancing resilience. Furthermore, most of the principles that are present in the literature are theoretical and difficult to implement in practice. In light of this situation, the aim of this research is to present a holistic resilience framework for critical infrastructures in order to improve their resilience level by taking into account internal and external agents and covering all the resilience dimensions. Furthermore, this framework has been defined in close collaboration with the general management of CIs to facilitate its implementation in practice. Finally, in order to illustrate the value added of this framework it was implemented in a nuclear plant. - Highlights: • Resilience protects against foreseen and unpredicted events. • There are two types of resilience: internal resilience and external resilience. • Sixteen policies and thirty sub-policies assist on building resilience. • Power nuclear plant focused on risk management approach rather than resilience. • The plant’s event driven risk management was enhanced with an all hazard approach

  15. Security of supply and line flow following the shut-down of nuclear power plants in Germany. Have shortages to be expected?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, Friedrich; Moest, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    This paper, which examines the impacts of phasing out nuclear power in Germany, is the first to include an analysis of energy supply security and critical line flows in both the German and Central European electricity networks. The technical-economic model of the European electricity market, ELMOD, is used to simulate alternative power plant dispatch, imports, exports, and network use for a representative winter day. The results suggest that the shutdown of Germany's nuclear plants will result in higher net imports, especially from the Netherlands, Austria, and Poland, and that electricity generation from fossil fuels will increase slightly in Germany and in Central Europe. We find that no additional imports will come from nuclear plants since they are already fully utilized in the merit order, and that electricity prices will rise on average by a few Euros per MWh. We conclude that closing the seven nuclear power plants within the government's moratorium will cause no significant supply security issues or network constraints and an eventual full phase-out seem to be possible due to the completion of several new conventional power plants now under construction. Finally, we suggest that a nuclear phase-out in Germany within the next 3-7 years will not undermine security of supply and network stability in Germany and Central Europe.

  16. Heavy water physical verification in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, S.; Schuricht, V.; Beetle, T.; Szabo, E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is a report on the Agency experience in verifying heavy water inventories in power plants. The safeguards objectives and goals for such activities are defined in the paper. The heavy water is stratified according to the flow within the power plant, including upgraders. A safeguards scheme based on a combination of records auditing, comparing records and reports, and physical verification has been developed. This scheme has elevated the status of heavy water safeguards to a level comparable to nuclear material safeguards in bulk facilities. It leads to attribute and variable verification of the heavy water inventory in the different system components and in the store. The verification methods include volume and weight determination, sampling and analysis, non-destructive assay (NDA), and criticality check. The analysis of the different measurement methods and their limits of accuracy are discussed in the paper

  17. Human factors review of power plant maintainability. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.; Parsons, S.O.

    1981-02-01

    Human factors engineering is an interdisciplinary science and technology concerned with shaping the design of machines, facilities, and operational environments to promote safe, efficient, and reliable performance on the part of operators and maintainers of equipment systems. The human factors aspects of five nuclear power plants and four fossil fuel plants were evaluated using such methods as a check list guided observation system, structured interviews with maintenance personnel, direct observation of maintenance tasks, reviews of procedures, and analyses of maintenance errors or accidents by means of the critical incident technique. The study revealed a wide variety of human factors problem areas, most of which are extensively photodocumented. The study recommends that a more systematic and formal approach to ensure that future power plants are human engineered to the needs of maintenance personnel

  18. Dismantling and decommissioning of Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.

    2009-01-01

    With the start of the dismantling works at the Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant now in sight, this is an appropriate moment to look back and consider recent history. The first time that the issue of nuclear power plant dismantling was dealt with was in 1975, at a conference in Paris entitled Nuclear Energy Maturity. Up until then the entire question had been one of design, construction and operation, but since that moment and it has been quite a while since that conference dismantling has begun to be seen as just another activity in the nuclear cycle, a final activity that will sooner or later affect all the facilities, an activity different from its predecessors and with the ultimate objective of restoring the sites for whatever use might be determined. During the 1960s and 1970s, the construction of nuclear power plants was widespread across the entire world. It was the baby boom of nuclear energy and now, forty or fifty years later, we are seeing the arrival of the end of the service lifetime of these plants and are faced with the corresponding general process of dismantling these installations. The dismantling of nuclear power plants has ceased to be an emerging issue and is now consolidated as a regular activity in the nuclear industry, albeit an activity that lacks adequate financing or specific regulation in certain countries. Fortunately this is not the case in Spain, since economic provisions have been planned and the regulatory framework developed. In view of the above, the dismantling of the nuclear power plants is an industrial activity involving specific technologies that implies new professional and business opportunities that should be absorbed and seized by society. In Spain the path followed in this direction has been a long one, as is underlined by the experiences of dismantling the Argos (Barcelona, 1998- 2004) and Arbi (Bilbao, 2002-2005) research reactors, the Andujar Uranium Mill (Jaen, 1991-1995), the Vandellos I nuclear power plant

  19. The autumn when 27 gas power plants disappeared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braaten, Jan

    2003-01-01

    In the autumn of 2002 the influx of water to the hydropower plants in the Nordic countries was only half the normal value. The probability of such an extreme failure is less than 0.5 per cent. Prices rose during the autumn, which led to import to the hydropower system and start-up of stand by production capacity and consumption cut. The market and trade essentially worked well and the high prices were the prime mover. Hydropower is an unstable resource and one therefore needs trade possibilities and flexibility in consumption and production to handle variation of the influx. Also, perhaps, one should stimulate the reservoir owners to retain some more water in the reservoirs. A weak energy balance increases the risk of dry year crises. An active grip on this is necessary to reduce vulnerability in the future. While there was plenty of water in the first part of 2002, the influx to the power plants failed fatally during autumn; from week number 31 to the rest of the year only the equivalent of 35 TWh, which is half that of a normal year. This is a historic all-time low. Early next year the influx of water was less than normal. The energy shortage due to hydropower failure during the last 20 weeks of 2002 was greater than it would have been if instead all the Swedish nuclear power had failed. If an energy failure this size should have been covered by means of gas power, 24 gas power works of 400 MW each would be required. At the same time, the import from the Continent was restricted by problems with two cables corresponding to a loss of tree more gas power plants. Thus, the power crisis of the autumn of 2002 corresponds to 27 gas power plants. Gas power plants is a controversial issue in the energy policy debate in Norway, but there are plans for a 400 MW plant. This is food for thought for all those politicians who are worried about the possible environmental impact of gas power plants.

  20. Standardization of nuclear power plants in the United States: recent regulatory developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, B.Z.; Tourtellotte, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    On April 18, 1989, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended the regulations governing the process for licensing nuclear power plants in the United States to provide for issuance of early site permits, standard design certifications and combined construction permits and operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. The new regulations are designed to achieve early resolution of licensing issues and facilitate standardization of nuclear power plants in the United States. The program for design standardization is central to efforts mounted by the U.S. government and industry to ensure that there will be a next generation of nuclear power facilities in the U.S. The most significant changes are provisions for certification of standard designs and for issuance prior to start of construction of combined licenses which incorporate a construction permit and an operating license with conditions. Such certifications and combined licenses must contain tests, inspections and analyses, and acceptance criteria, which are necessary and sufficient to provide reasonable assurance that the facility has been constructed and will operate in accordance with the combined license. A number of significant implementation issues have arisen. In addition a major court case brought by several anti-nuclear groups is pending, challenging NRC authority to issue combined licenses. It is the goal of the U.S. nuclear industry to have the first of the next generation of standardized nuclear power plants ordered, licensed, constructed and on-line by the year 2000. (author)

  1. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs

  2. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  3. Report on assessment of electrical equipment aging for nuclear power plant (AEA), FY2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minakawa, T.

    2012-11-01

    Electrical components with safety function used in nuclear power plants, such as cables, medium voltage motors, low voltage motors, electrical penetration of reactor containment vessel, motor operated valve, pressure transmitter, temperature detector, etc, are required to be operational under the environment of design basis event (DBE) to shut down a reactor safely and to prevent radioactive materials from being leaked to outside. Polymer materials used as parts of these equipments are gradually degraded by thermal and radiation environment in the normal operation. In addition, the degradation is thought to progress rapidly when they are exposed to the DBE environment and a decrease in performance of the equipment may be caused. From these reason, electrical components with safety function are tested for long-term integrity in accordance with IEEE standard. However, conventional method of accelerated aging which assumes thermal and radiation aging during normal operation is said to have uncertainty in simulating the degradation given in actual operating environment. To address this issue, the project of 'Assessment of Cable Aging for Nuclear Power Plants' (ACA, 2002-2008) was carried out and 'Guide for Cable Environmental Qualification Test for Nuclear Power Plant' was developed. The need for developing an aging evaluation method for other electrical and I and C components was pointed out in the 'Strategy maps 2007', prepared by the cooperation among government, industry and academia. Under the circumstance, the project of 'Assessment of Electrical Equipment Aging for Nuclear Power Plants' (AEA) was initiated in FY2008. In this study, parts of electrical and I and C component with safety function used in nuclear power plant whose aging needs to be considered are employed as specimens, and their aging characteristics under the thermal environment and the combined radiation and thermal environment are obtained (herein after referred to as 'critical part test

  4. Estimation of environmental external costs between coal fired power plant and nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, G. H.; Kim, S. S.

    2000-01-01

    First of all, this study evaluated the impacts on the health and the environment of air pollutants emitted from coal power plant and nuclear power pant, two major electric power generating options in Korea. Then, the environmental external costs of those two options were estimated by transforming the health and environment impact into monetary values. To do this, AIRPACTS and Impacts of Atmospheric Release model developed by IAEA were used. The environmental external cost of Samcheonpo coal power plant was estimated about 25 times as much as that of Younggwang nuclear power plant. This result implies that nuclear power plant is a clean technology compared with coal power plant. This study suggests that the external cost should be reflected in the electric system expansion plan in order to allocate energy resources efficiently and to reduce economic impact stemming from the environmental regulation emerged recently on a global level

  5. Aging effects in PWR power plants components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Diogo da S.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: tony@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a contribution to the study of aging process of components in commercial plants of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The analysis is made through application of the Fault Trees Method, Monte Carlo Method and Fussell-Vesely Importance Measure. The approach of the study of aging in nuclear power plants, besides giving attention to the economic factors involved directly with the extent of their operational life, also provide significant data on security issues. The latest case involving process of life extension of a PWR could be seen in Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant through investing of $27 million for the installation of a new reactor lid. The corrective action has generated an estimated operating life extension of Angra I in twenty years, offering great economy compared with building cost of a new plant and anterior decommissioning, if it had reached the time operating limit of forty years. The Extension of the operating life of a nuclear power plant must be accompanied by a special attention to the components of the systems and their aging process. After the application of the methodology (aging analysis of the injection system of the containment spray) proposed in this work, it can be seen that 'the increase in the rate of component failure, due the aging process, generates the increase in the general unavailability of the system that containing these basic components'. The final results obtained were as expected and may contribute to the maintenance policy, preventing premature aging process in Nuclear Plant Systems. (author)

  6. Organization patterns of PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leicman, J.

    1980-01-01

    Organization patterns are shown for the St. Lucia 1, North Anna, Sequoyah, and Beaver Valley nuclear power plants, for a typical PWR power plant in the USA, for the Biblis/RWE-KWU nuclear power plants and for a four-unit nuclear power plant operated by Electricite de France as well as for the Loviisa power plant. Organization patterns are also shown for relatively independent and non-independent nuclear power plants according to IAEA recommendations. (J.P.)

  7. Nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkiewicz, M.; Navratil, J.

    The construction of a nuclear power plant is conditioned on territorial requirements and is accompanied by the disturbance of the environment, land occupation, population migration, the emission of radioactive wastes, thermal pollution, etc. On the other hand, a nuclear power plant makes possible the introduction of district heating and increases the economic and civilization activity of the population. Due to the construction of a nuclear power plant the set limits of negative impacts must not be exceeded. The locality should be selected such as to reduce the unfavourable effects of the plant and to fully use its benefits. The decision on the siting of the nuclear power plant is preceded by the processing of a number of surveys and a wide range of documentation to which the given criteria are strictly applied. (B.H.)

  8. Mercury controls for coal-fired power plants - status and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offen, G.; Shick, N.; Chang, R.; Chu, P.; Dene, C.; Rhudy, R. [EPRI, Palo Alto (US)

    2005-05-01

    Although the US Environmental Protection Agency has issued its mercury rule, setting limits for emissions from new power plants and placing an eventual cap on emissions from all plants, mercury control technologies offering sustainable performance and known applicability, impact, and cost are still in the future. Co-operative funding for long-term, full-scale tests of technologies in advanced stages of development, and support for emerging ones, promises to close the gap. The goal is to learn how to tailor control technologies to flue gas environments at individual power plants. In this paper the authors describe the current performance of mercury control technologies and outline the research needed to demonstrate their easiness for commercial deployment. 4 figs.

  9. Human reliability analysis for probabilistic safety assessments - review of methods and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, G.; Guptan, Rajee; Malhotra, P.K.; Ghadge, S.G.; Chandra, Umesh

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the two major events in World Nuclear Power Plant Operating history, namely the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, were Human failure events. Subsequent to these two events, several significant changes have been incorporated in Plant Design, Control Room Design and Operator Training to reduce the possibility of Human errors during plant transients. Still, human error contribution to Risk in Nuclear Power Plant operations has been a topic of continued attention for research, development and analysis. Probabilistic Safety Assessments attempt to capture all potential human errors with a scientifically computed failure probability, through Human Reliability Analysis. Several methods are followed by different countries to quantify the Human error probability. This paper reviews the various popular methods being followed, critically examines them with reference to their criticisms and brings out issues for future research. (author)

  10. Preparation of environmental reports and impact statements for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.H.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable first-hand experience has accumulated during the past decade in the United States regarding the preparation of environmental reports (ER) and environmental impact statements (EIS) for nuclear power plants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), which is responsible for regulating the construction and operation of nuclear power plants, is required under the National Environmental Policy Act to prepare an EIS for each plant. To obtain information essential to the EIS, the USNRC requires that each power company submit an ER. This paper focuses on the interrelationships of the two environmental documents and discusses the environmental review process and the environmental laws and regulations related to the licensing of nuclear power plants. It also describes the format and content, environmental issues, data requirements, and impact assessment methodologies for preparation of the ER and EIS. Problems associated with preparing the EIS are presented, with particular emphasis on the problems and methodologies associated with evaluating environmental costs and benefits

  11. Degradation of aged plants by corrosion: 'Long cell action' in unresolved corrosion issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Genn

    2009-01-01

    In a series of previously published papers the author has identified that 'long cell action' corrosion plays a pivotal role in practically all unresolved corrosion issues for all types of nuclear power plants (e.g. PWR/VVER, BWR/RBMK and CANDU). Some of these unresolved issues are IGSCC, PWSCC, AOA and FAC (erosion-corrosion). In conventional corrosion science it is well established that 'long cell action' can seriously accelerate or suppress the local cell corrosion activities. Although long cell action is another fundamental mechanism of corrosion, especially in a 'soil corrosion' arena, potential involvement of this corrosion process has never been studied in nuclear and fossil power plants as far as the author has been able to establish. The author believes that the omission of this basic corrosion mechanism is the root cause of practically all un-resolved corrosion issues. In this paper, the author further elaborated on his assessment to other key corrosion issues, e.g. steam generator and turbine corrosion issues, while briefly summarizing previous discussions for completeness purposes, as well as introducing additional experimental and theoretical evidence of this basic corrosion mechanism. Due to the importance of this potential mechanism the author is calling for institutional review activities and further verification experiments in the form of a joint international project.

  12. Feasibility study for the partial conversion of a hydropower plant into a pumped-storage power plant: a case study of hydroelectric power plant La Barca (Asturias, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Antuña Yudego

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy sources have reported an unpr