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Sample records for power facility sandusky

  1. Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary and Results for the Plum Brook Reactor Facility Sandusky OH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    In 1941, the War Department acquired approximately 9,000 acres of land near Sandusky, Ohio and constructed a munitions plant. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works Plant produced munitions, such as TNT, until the end of World War II. Following the war, the land remained idle until the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (later known as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration or NASA) obtained 500 acres to construct a nuclear research reactor designed to study the effects of radiation on materials used in space flight. The research reactor was put into operation in 1961 and was the first of fifteen test facilities eventually built by NASA at the Plum Brook Station. By 1963, NASA had acquired the remaining land at Plum Brook for these additional test facilities. After successfully completing the objective of landing humans on the Moon and returning them safely to Earth, NASA was faced with budget reductions from Congress in 1973. These budgetary constraints caused NASA to cease operations at several research facilities across the country, including those at Plum Brook Station. The major test facilities at Plum Brook were maintained in a standby mode, capable of being reactivated for future use. The Plum Brook Reactor Facility (PBRF) was shut down January 5, 1973 and all of the nuclear fuel was eventually removed and shipped off site to a U.S. Department of Energy facility in Idaho for disposal or reuse. Decommissioning activities are currently underway at the PBRF (NASA 1999). The objectives of the confirmatory survey activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the licensee's procedures and final status survey (FSS) results

  2. Final-Independent Confirmatory Survey Report For The Reactor Building, Hot Laboratory, Primary Pump House, And Land Areas At The Plum Brook Reactor Facility, Sandusky, Ohio DCN:2036-SR-01-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Erika N.

    2011-01-01

    In 1941, the War Department acquired approximately 9,000 acres of land near Sandusky, Ohio and constructed a munitions plant. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works Plant produced munitions, such as TNT, until the end of World War II. Following the war, the land remained idle until the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics later called the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) obtained 500 acres to construct a nuclear research reactor designed to study the effects of radiation on materials used in space flight. The research reactor was put into operation in 1961 and was the first of fifteen test facilities eventually built by NASA at the Plum Brook Station. By 1963, NASA had acquired the remaining land at Plum Brook for these additional test facilities

  3. Space Power Facility (SPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Power Facility (SPF) houses the world's largest space environment simulation chamber, measuring 100 ft. in diameter by 122 ft. high. In this chamber, large...

  4. Power source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1998-09-29

    The present invention concerns a power plant, in which power is supplied from an ordinary system battery to an ordinary DC bus system when all of the AC power sources should be lost and a generator is driven by a steam turbine. A generator is connected with an ordinary system battery charger by way of a channel. If all of power sources should be lost, the ordinary system battery charger is driven by using emergency steam turbine generator facilities, and reactor steams are supplied thereby enabling to supply power to the ordinary system DC bus system for a long period of time. (N.H.)

  5. Power Systems Development Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the PSDF would be to provide a modular facility which would support the development of advanced, pilot-scale, coal-based power systems and hot gas clean-up components. These pilot-scale components would be designed to be large enough so that the results can be related and projected to commercial systems. The facility would use a modular approach to enhance the flexibility and capability for testing; consequently, overall capital and operating costs when compared with stand-alone facilities would be reduced by sharing resources common to different modules. The facility would identify and resolve technical barrier, as well as-provide a structure for long-term testing and performance assessment. It is also intended that the facility would evaluate the operational and performance characteristics of the advanced power systems with both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Five technology-based experimental modules are proposed for the PSDF: (1) an advanced gasifier module, (2) a fuel cell test module, (3) a PFBC module, (4) a combustion gas turbine module, and (5) a module comprised of five hot gas cleanup particulate control devices. The final module, the PCD, would capture coal-derived ash and particles from both the PFBC and advanced gasifier gas streams to provide for overall particulate emission control, as well as to protect the combustion turbine and the fuel cell

  6. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  7. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-07-01

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC12 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SW) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC12 began on May 16, 2003, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until May 24, 2003, when a scheduled outage occurred to allow maintenance crews to install the fuel cell test unit and modify the gas clean-up system. On June 18, 2003, the test run resumed when operations relit the start-up burner, and testing continued until the scheduled end of the run on July 14, 2003. TC12 had a total of 733 hours using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,850 F at pressures from 130 to 210 psig.

  8. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT4 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT4. GCT4 was planned as a 250-hour test run to continue characterization of the transport reactor using a blend of several Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: Operational Stability--Characterize reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal-feed rate, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids-circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. Secondary objectives included the following: Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. Effects of Reactor Conditions on Synthesis Gas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids-circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, synthesis gas Lower Heating Value (LHV), carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) Testing--Provide syngas in support of the DSRP commissioning. Loop Seal Operations--Optimize loop seal operations and investigate increases to previously achieved maximum solids-circulation rate.

  9. Power Electronics and Electric Machines Facilities | Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research | NREL Facilities Power Electronics and Electric Machines Facilities NREL's power electronics and electric machines thermal management experimentation facilities feature a wide range of four researchers in discussion around a piece of laboratory equipment. Power electronics researchers

  10. Nuclear power generation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Mitsuji.

    1996-01-01

    Main steams are introduced from a moisture separation device for removing moisture content of the main steams to a low pressure turbine passing through a cross-around pipe. A condensate desalter comprising a mixed floor-type desalting tower using granular ion exchange resins is disposed at the downstream of the main condensator by way of condensate pipelines, and a feedwater heater is disposed at the downstream. Structural members of the main condensator are formed by weather proof steels. Low alloy steels are used partially or entirely for the cross-around pipe, gas extraction pipelines, heat draining pipelines, inner structural members other than pipelines in the feedwater heater, and the body and the inner structural members of the moisture separator. Titanium or a titanium alloy is used for the pipelines in the main condensator. With such a constitution, BWR type reactor facilities, in which the concentration of cruds inflown to the condensate cleanup system is reduced to simplify the condensate cleanup device can be obtained. (I.N.)

  11. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Sandusky, MI. Six-Month Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the City of Sandusky, MI facility. The objectives of the project are to evaluate 1) the effectiveness of Siemen...

  12. Decommissioning of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.; Vasil'chenko, V.N.; Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Yashchenko, Ya.V.

    2005-01-01

    This is the first manual in Ukraine giving the complete review of the decommissioning process of the nuclear power facilities including the issues of the planning, design documentation development, advanced technology description. On the base of the international and domestic experience, the issues on the radwaste management, the decontamination methods, the equipment dismantling, the remote technology application, and also the costs estimate at decommissioning are considered. The special attention to the personnel safety provision, population and environment at decommissioning process is paid

  13. Backup power sources for DOE facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This standard establishes fundamental requirements and guidance for backup power sources at DOE facilities. Purpose is to document good engineering practices for installation, testing, and maintenance of these backup power sources, which also covers emergency power sources. Examples are those which supply power to nuclear safety systems, radiation monitors and alarms, fire protection systems, security systems, and emergency lighting.

  14. Gingin High Optical Power Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, C; Blair, D G; Barrigo, P

    2006-01-01

    The Australian Consortium for Gravitational Wave Astronomy (ACIGA) in collaboration with LIGO is developing a high optical power research facility at the AIGO site, Gingin, Western Australia. Research at the facility will provide solutions to the problems that advanced gravitational wave detectors will encounter with extremely high optical power. The problems include thermal lensing and parametric instabilities. This article will present the status of the facility and the plan for the future experiments

  15. Power Burst Facility: power oscillation problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussie, W.G.; Wadkins, R.P.; Wells, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    In late 1973 PBF achieved a power level of 15 MW. During this period of operation fluctuations in reactor power were observed. Many possible causes of these fluctuations were considered and a number of nuclear and non-nuclear tests were conducted. Initial instrumentation installed in the core showed coolant outlet temperature variations of 10 0 F for several fuel cannisters and approximately 10 percent power variations at 15 MW. Power spectral density analysis showed a predominant frequency of 0.05 to 0.06 HZ. The testing program to determine the cause of the power oscillations is described

  16. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains data on power plants, based on the Energy Information Administration's EIA-860 dataset and supplemented with data from EPA's Facility...

  17. Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) facility specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    General requirements for the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS)/Ground Demonstration System (GDS) assembly and test facility are defined. The facility will include provisions for a complete test laboratory for GDS checkout, performance, and endurance testing, and a contamination-controlled area for assembly, fabrication, storage, and storage preparation of GDS components. Specifications, schedules, and drawings are included

  18. Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) facility specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-31

    General requirements for the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS)/Ground Demonstration System (GDS) assembly and test facility are defined. The facility will include provisions for a complete test laboratory for GDS checkout, performance, and endurance testing, and a contamination-controlled area for assembly, fabrication, storage, and storage preparation of GDS components. Specifications, schedules, and drawings are included.

  19. Design of radioisotope power systems facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschenbaum, R.C.; Wiemers, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    Radioisotope power systems currently produced for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Special Applications by the Mound Laboratory at Miamisburg, Ohio, have been used in a variety of configurations by the Department of Defense and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A forecast of fugure radioisotope power systems requirements showed a need for an increased production rate beyond the capability of the existing Mound Laboratory. Westinghouse Hanford Company is modifying the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to install the new Radioisotope Power Systems Facility for assembling future radioisotope power systems. The facility is currently being prepared to assemble the radioisotope thermoelectric generators required by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration missions for Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby in 1995 and Cassini, an investigation of Saturn and its moons, in 1996

  20. ACIGA's high optical power test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, L; Aoun, M; Barriga, P

    2004-01-01

    Advanced laser interferometer detectors utilizing more than 100 W of laser power and with ∼10 6 W circulating laser power present many technological problems. The Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy (ACIGA) is developing a high power research facility in Gingin, north of Perth, Western Australia, which will test techniques for the next generation interferometers. In particular it will test thermal lensing compensation and control strategies for optical cavities in which optical spring effects and parametric instabilities may present major difficulties

  1. 8. High power laser and ignition facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramian, A.J.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.

    2002-01-01

    This document gives a review of the various high power laser projects and ignition facilities in the world: the Mercury laser system and Electra (Usa), the krypton fluoride (KrF) laser and the HALNA (high average power laser for nuclear-fusion application) project (Japan), the Shenguang series, the Xingguang facility and the TIL (technical integration line) facility (China), the Vulcan peta-watt interaction facility (UK), the Megajoule project and its feasibility phase: the LIL (laser integration line) facility (France), the Asterix IV/PALS high power laser facility (Czech Republic), and the Phelix project (Germany). In Japan the 100 TW Petawatt Module Laser, constructed in 1997, is being upgraded to the world biggest peta-watt laser. Experiments have been performed with single-pulse large aperture e-beam-pumped Garpun (Russia) and with high-current-density El-1 KrF laser installation (Russia) to investigate Al-Be foil transmittance and stability to multiple e-beam irradiations. An article is dedicated to a comparison of debris shield impacts for 2 experiments at NIF (national ignition facility). (A.C.)

  2. Power conditioning for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.W.; Anderson, R.; Boyes, J.

    1994-01-01

    A cost-effective, 320-MJ power-conditioning system has been completed for the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The design features include metallized dielectric capacitors, a simple topology, and large (1.6-MJ) module size. Experimental results address the technical risks associated with the design

  3. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, WIlliam O.; Chang, Li, C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007-2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their "t-junctions" connecting the 12 inch supply line to their respective 4 inch branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed "t-junction" connections through non-destructive evaluation testing . Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the "t-junction" connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  4. Capabilities of the Power Burst Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.; Jensen, A.M.; McCardell, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    The unique and diverse test capabilities of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are described in this paper. The PBF test reactor, located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, simulates normal, off-normal, and accident operating conditions of light water reactor fuel rods. An overview description is given, with specific detail on design and operating characteristics of the driver core, experiment test loop, fission product detection system, test train assembly facility, and support equipment which make the testing capability of the PBF so versatile

  5. Power Reactor Thoria Reprocessing Facility (PRTRF), Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhami, P.S; Yadav, J.S; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    Exploitation of the abundant thorium resources to meet sustained energy demand forms the basis of the Indian nuclear energy programme. To gain reprocessing experience in thorium fuel cycle, thoria was irradiated in research reactor CIRUS in early sixties. Later in eighties, thoria bundles were used for initial flux flattening in some of the pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The research reactor irradiated thoria contained small content (∼ 2-3ppm) of "2"3"2U in "2"3"3U product, which did not pose any significant radiological problems during processing in Uranium Thorium Separation Facility (UTSF), Trombay. Thoria irradiated in PHWRs on discharge contained (∼ 0.5-1.5% "2"3"3U with significant "2"3"2U content (100-500 ppm) requiring special radiological attention. Based on the experience from UTSF, a new facility viz. Power Reactor Thoria Reprocessing Facility (PRTRF), Trombay was built which was hot commissioned in the year 2015

  6. Large power supply facilities for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Akira; Yamamoto, Mitsuyoshi.

    1976-01-01

    The authors had opportunities to manufacture and to operate two power supply facilities, that is, 125MVA computer controlled AC generator with a fly wheel for JIPP-T-2 stellerator in Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University and 3MW trial superconductive homopolar DC generator to the Japan Society for Promotion of Machine Industry. The 125MVA fly-wheel generator can feed both 60MW (6kV x 10kA) DC power for toroidal coils and 20MW (0.5kV x 40kA) DC power for helical coils. The characteristic features are possibility of Bung-Bung control based on Pontrjagin's maximum principle, constant current control or constant voltage control for load coils, and cpu control for routine operation. The 3MW (150V-20000A) homopolar generator is the largest in the world as superconductive one, however, this capacity is not enough for nuclear fusion research. The problems of power supply facilities for large Tokamak devices are discussed

  7. Lewis Research Center space station electric power system test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Martin, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center facilities were developed to support testing of the Space Station Electric Power System. The capabilities and plans for these facilities are described. The three facilities which are required in the Phase C/D testing, the Power Systems Facility, the Space Power Facility, and the EPS Simulation Lab, are described in detail. The responsibilities of NASA Lewis and outside groups in conducting tests are also discussed.

  8. No nuclear power. No disposal facility?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinhals, J. [DMT GmbH und Co.KG, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Countries with a nuclear power programme are making strong efforts to guarantee the safe disposal of radioactive waste. The solutions in those countries are large disposal facilities near surface or in deep geological layers depending on the activity and half-life of the nuclides in the waste. But what will happen with the radioactive waste in countries that do not have NPPs but have only low amounts of radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities as well as from research reactors? Countries producing only low amounts of radioactive waste need convincing solutions for the safe and affordable disposal of their radioactive waste. As they do not have a fund by an operator of nuclear power plants, those countries need an appropriate and commensurate solution for the disposal of their waste. In a first overview five solutions seem to be appropriate: (i) the development of multinational disposal facilities by using the existing international knowhow; (ii) common disposal with hazardous waste; (iii) permanent storage; (iv) use of an existing mine or tunnel; (v) extension of the borehole disposal concept for all the categories of radioactive wastes.

  9. Power Systems Integration Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    | NREL Power Systems Integration Laboratory Power Systems Integration Laboratory Research in the Energy System Integration Facility's Power Systems Integration Laboratory focuses on the microgrid applications. Photo of engineers testing an inverter in the Power Systems Integration Laboratory

  10. Nuclear power plant simulation facility evaluation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.M.; Carter, R.J.; Laughery, K.R. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology for evaluation of nuclear power plant simulation facilities with regard to their acceptability for use in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) operator licensing exam is described. The evaluation is based primarily on simulator fidelity, but incorporates some aspects of direct operator/trainee performance measurement. The panel presentation and paper discuss data requirements, data collection, data analysis and criteria for conclusions regarding the fidelity evaluation, and summarize the proposed use of direct performance measurment. While field testing and refinement of the methodology are recommended, this initial effort provides a firm basis for NRC to fully develop the necessary methodology

  11. 76 FR 55564 - Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, Cedar Point, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, Cedar Point, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard... Erie during the Revolution 3 Triathlon. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect participants..., between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  12. 75 FR 55477 - Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie & Sandusky Bay, Cedar Point, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie & Sandusky Bay, Cedar Point, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard... portions of the Lake Erie during the Revolution 3 Cedar Point Triathlon. The temporary safety zone is... 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have...

  13. Replacement Power Facility site selection report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wike, L.D.; Toole, G.L.; Specht, W.L.

    1992-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of a Replacement Power Facility (RPF) for supplementing and replacing existing sources of steam and possibly electricity at the Savannah River Site (SRS). DOE is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for this project As part of the impact analysis of the proposed action, the EIS will include a detailed description of the environment where the RPF will be constructed. This description must be specific to the recommended site at SRS, which contains more than 300 square miles of land including streams, lakes, impoundments, wetlands, and upland areas. A formal site-selection process was designed and implemented to identify the preferred RPF site.

  14. New facility for testing LHC HTS power leads

    CERN Document Server

    Rabehl, Roger Jon; Fehér, S; Huang, Y; Orris, D; Pischalnikov, Y; Sylvester, C D; Tartaglia, M

    2005-01-01

    A new facility for testing HTS power leads at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has been designed and operated. The facility has successfully tested 19 pairs of HTS power leads, which are to be integrated into the Large Hadron Collider Interaction Region cryogenic feed boxes. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. HTS power lead test results from the commissioning phase of the project are also presented.

  15. Water intaking facility of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kazuhito; Iwata, Nobukatsu; Ochiai, Kanehiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a water intaking facility of a nuclear power plant, a dam is disposed at a position near a sea shore for preventing sea water introduced in open conduit from flowing to the outer sea upon ebbing of tsunamis. The upper end of the dam is set lower than the lower end of a water-intake pipe of a sea water pump of an ordinary system. A water-intake pipe is disposed to such a length that a sea water pump of an emergency system continues to suck the sea water when the water level of the introduced sea water is lowered than the upper end of the dam during the ebb tide. In addition, a means for stopping the operation of the sea water pump of the ordinary system upon starting of the ebb is disposed. Upon reactor scram for occurrence of earthquakes and the like, either the sea water pump in the ordinary system or the seawater pump in the emergency system operates to ensure required amount of sea water for cooling the reactor. In addition, even if the level of the sea water is lowered than the upper end of the dam, since the sea water pump in the emergency system continues to suck sea water, unnecessary suction for sea water by the ordinary sea water pumps can be eliminated. (N.H.)

  16. Governments' role in decommissioning nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guindon, S.; Wendling, R.D.; Gordelier, S.; Soederberg, O.; Averous, J.; Orlando, D.

    2005-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants will reach the end of their operating lives over the next 20 years; some may be life-extended, others may not. This development will precipitate enhanced industrial and regulatory activities in the area of decommissioning. We are also witnessing in many countries a significant shift in the role of government itself: new pressures on governments, such as enhanced attention on environmental impact/mitigation and strategies to implement market-oriented approaches in a variety of sectors, including the energy sector are driving the public policy agenda. The paper will examine the range of policy issues, drawing from recent NEA studies on decommissioning policies and the recent NEA study on Government and Nuclear Energy and, strategies and costs, and other current trends and developments in the nuclear industry and in the nuclear policy fields. The paper will reflect on issues to be addressed during the conference and draw conclusions on the appropriate role of government in this area. Decommissioning policy is very specific and focused: it is not a high level policy/political issue in most instances and rarely gets the same attention as the issue surrounding the future of nuclear energy itself and public concerns regarding safety, waste and economics. One reason why decommissioning does not get the same attention as for example disposal of spent nuclear fuel might be the fact that technology is available for decommissioning, while technology for disposal of spent nuclear fuel is under development. High profile or not, it will remain an important issue for governments and industry alike particularly because of the cost and long lead times involved. In some instances, governments are the owners of the facilities to be decommissioned. In addition, decommissioning factors into issues surrounding the economics of nuclear energy and the sustainability of the nuclear option. Based on results of the Tarragona Seminar (Spain, September 2-4, 2003) and

  17. Meson facility. Powerful new research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobashev, V.M.; Tavkhelidze, A.N.

    A meson facility is being built at the Institute of Nuclear Research, USSR Academy of Sciences, in Troitsk, where the Scientific Center, USSR Academy of Sciences is located. The facility will include a linear accelerator for protons and negative hydrogen ions with 600 MeV energy and 0.5-1 mA beam current. Some fundamental studies that can be studied at a meson facility are described in the areas of elementary particles, neutron physics, solid state physics, and applied research. The characteristics of the linear accelerator are given and the meson facility's experimental complex is described

  18. Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Power Systems Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, Cindy H.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides a detailed description of the Johnson Space Center's Power Systems Facility located in the Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Facilities and the resources used to support power and battery systems testing are also shown. The contents include: 1) Power Testing; 2) Power Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 3) Source/Load; 4) Battery Facilities; 5) Battery Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 6) Battery Testing; 7) Performance Test Equipment; 8) Battery Test Environments; 9) Battery Abuse Chambers; 10) Battery Abuse Capabilities; and 11) Battery Test Area Resources.

  19. Outline of electric power facility plan in fiscal year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    As to the electric power facility plan in fiscal year 1988, 15 designated electric power enterprises made the notification to the Minister of International Trade and Industry in March, 1988. This outline of the facility plan summarized the plans of 66 enterprises in total, including the plans of municipally operated, joint thermal power and other enterprises in addition to the above 15. In order to ensure the stable supply of electric power, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry considers that it is indispensable to purposefully develop electric power sources and the facilities for distribution along this facility plan. The forecast for fiscal year 1997 is : total electric power demand 778.2 billion kWh, maximum power demand 151.21 million kW, and yearly load factor 56.9 %. This is equivalent to the yearly growth of 2.4 %. In fiscal year 1988, it is planned to present 29 plants of 2760 MW to the Power Source Development Coordination Council. The breakdown is : hydroelectricity 140 MW, thermal power 2010 MW, and nuclear power 610 MW. The Ministry guides electric power enterprises so as to realize the diversification of electric power sources. Also the increase of transmission and transformation facilities, the plan of equipment investment and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Power supply design for Hadron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karady, G.; Kansog, J.; Thiessen, H.A.; Schneider, E.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, a study investigated the feasibility of building a large 60 GeV, kaon factory accelerator. This paper presents the conceptual design of the magnet power supplies and energy storage system. In this study the following three systems were investigated: (a) power supply using storage generator; (b) power supply using inductive storage device; and (c) resonant power supplies. These systems were analyzed from both technical and economical points of view. It was found that all three systems are feasible and can be built using commercially available components. From a technical point of view, the system using inductive storage is the most advantageous. The resonant power supply is the most economical solution

  1. Prospects for high-power radioactive beam facilities worldwide

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, Jerry A

    2003-01-01

    Advances in accelerators, targets, ion sources, and experimental instrumentation are making possible ever more powerful facilities for basic and applied research with short-lived radioactive isotopes. There are several current generation facilities, based on a variety of technologies, operating worldwide. These include, for example, those based on the in-flight method such as the recently upgraded National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, the facility at RIKEN in Japan, GANIL in Caen, France, and GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. Present facilities based on the Isotope-Separator On-Line method include, for example, the ISOLDE laboratory at CERN, HRIBF at Oak Ridge, and the new high-power facility ISAC at TRIUMF in Vancouver. Next-generation facilities include the Radioactive-Ion Factory upgrade of RIKEN to higher energy and intensity and the upgrade of ISAC to a higher energy secondary beam; both of these projects are in progress. A new project, LINAG, to upgrade the capabilities at...

  2. Micro-Combined Heat and Power Device Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has developed a test facility for micro-combined heat and power (micro-CHP) devices to measure their performance over a range of different operating strategies...

  3. The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2014-01-30

    This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

  4. Power Consumption Analysis of Electrical Installations at Healthcare Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Guillen-Garcia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology for power consumption estimation considering harmonic and interharmonic content and then it is compared to the power consumption estimation commonly done by commercial equipment based on the fundamental frequency, and how they can underestimate the power consumption considering power quality disturbances (PQD. For this purpose, data of electrical activity at the electrical distribution boards in a healthcare facility is acquired for a long time period with proprietary equipment. An analysis in the acquired current and voltage signals is done, in order to compare the power consumption centered in the fundamental frequency with the generalized definition of power consumption. The results obtained from the comparison in the power consumption estimation show differences between 4% and 10% of underestimated power consumption. Thus, it is demonstrated that the presence of harmonic and interharmonic content provokes a significant underestimation of power consumption using only the power consumption centered at the fundamental frequency.

  5. Feasibility Investigation for a Solar Power Generation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Lakshmi

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 states that by fiscal year 2013, at least 7.5% of the energy consumed by the government must be renewable energy. In an effort to help meet this goal, Johnson Space Center (JSC) is considering installing a solar power generation facility. The purpose of this project is to conduct a feasibility investigation for such a facility. Because Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a solar power generation facility, the first step in this investigation is to learn about KSC's facility and obtain information on how it was constructed. After collecting this information, the following must be determined: the amount of power desired, the size of the facility, potential locations for it, and estimated construction and maintenance costs. Contacts with JSC's energy provider must also be established to determine if a partnership would be agreeable to both parties. Lastly, all of this data must be analyzed to decide whether or not JSC should construct the facility. The results from analyzing the data collected indicate that a 200 kW facility would provide enough energy to meet 1% of JSC's energy demand. This facility would require less than 1 acre of land. In the map below, potential locations are shown in green. The solar power facility is projected to cost $2 M. So far, the information collected indicates that such a facility could be constructed. The next steps in this investigation include contacting JSC's energy provider, CenterPoint Energy, to discuss entering a partnership; developing a life cycle cost analysis to determine payback time; developing more detailed plans; and securing funding.

  6. Economic benefits of power factor correction at a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boger, R.M.; Dalos, W.; Juguilon, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    The economic benefits of correcting poor power factor at an operating nuclear facility are shown. A project approach for achieving rapid return of investment without disrupting plant availability is described. Examples of technical problems associated with using capacitors for power factor correction are presented

  7. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yoon W; Campisi, Isidoro E; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark; Davis, Kirk; Drury, Michael A; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; McCarthy, Michael P; Powers, Tom; Shajedul Hasan, S M; Stirbet, Mircea; Stout, Daniel; Tang, Johnny Y; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V; Wezensky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavitites have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducti...

  8. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

  9. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV CO interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads

  10. ACIGA's high optical power test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, L [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Aoun, M [Computer and Information Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth (Australia); Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)] [and others

    2004-03-07

    Advanced laser interferometer detectors utilizing more than 100 W of laser power and with {approx}10{sup 6} W circulating laser power present many technological problems. The Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy (ACIGA) is developing a high power research facility in Gingin, north of Perth, Western Australia, which will test techniques for the next generation interferometers. In particular it will test thermal lensing compensation and control strategies for optical cavities in which optical spring effects and parametric instabilities may present major difficulties.

  11. Optimum operation of a small power production facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capehart, B.L.; Mahoney, J.F.; Sivazlian, B.D.

    1983-09-01

    To help reduce the U.S.A.'s dependence on imported oil for electrical power generation, the 1978 National Energy Act established regulations to promote construction and operation of cogeneration and small power production facilities. Many of these facilities are presently under construction, with a great number planned. This paper examines the operation of a small power production facility with on-site generation and storage, on-site use, and connection to an electric utility grid system for the purpose of both selling excess power and buying power. It is assumed that the buying and selling price of electricity varies frequently during the day and that the relevant price and demand data may be accurately projected into the near future. With this system description, a mathematical model is formulated and solved by linear programming to obtain a series of periodic buy and sell decisions so as to maximize the profit from operating the small power production facility. Results are presented to illustrate the methodology for determining potential profits.

  12. Base isolation for nuclear power and nuclear material facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidinger, J.M.; Kircher, C.A.; Vaidya, N.; Constantinou, M.; Kelly, J.M.; Seidensticker, R.; Tajirian, F.F.; Ovadia, D.

    1989-01-01

    This report serves to document the status of the practice for the use of base isolation systems in the design and construction of nuclear power and nuclear material facilities. The report first describes past and current (1989) applications of base isolation in nuclear facilities. The report then provides a brief discussion of non-nuclear applications. Finally, the report summarizes the status of known base-isolation codes and standards

  13. Cooling facility of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Nagasaki, Hideo.

    1992-01-01

    In a cooling device of a nuclear power plant, an exhaust pipe for an incondensible gas is branched. One of the branched exhaust pipes is opened in a pressure suppression pool water in a suppression chamber containing pool water and the other is opened at a lower portion of a dry well incorporating a pressure vessel. In a state where the pressure in the dry well is higher than that in the suppression chamber, an off-gas is exhausted effectively by way of the exhaustion pipe in communication with the suppression chamber. In a state where there is no difference between the pressures and the opening end of the exhaustion pipe in communication with the suppression chamber is sealed with water, off-gas is exhausted by way of the exhaustion pipe in communication with the lower portion of the dry well. Then, since the incondensible gas in a heat transfer pipe is not accumulated, after-heat can be removed efficiently. Satisfactory cooling is maintained even after the coincidence of the pressures in the dry well with that in the suppression chamber, to decrease a pressure in a reactor container. (N.H.)

  14. Development of the power ramping facility at JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hirokatsu; Sezaki, Katsuji; Nakazaki, Chosaburo; Ishii, Tadahiko; Ito, Haruhiko; Abe, Hiroshi

    1985-03-01

    The LWR fuel power ramping facility have been being developed at JMTR since 1978. This report, following previous reports, JAERI-M 8533 and 9343, summarizes the results of performance test performed in 1981 on the 3 He power controlled boiling water capsule, which is a basic part of the facility. Various measurements were carried out during reactor operation on each part of the capsule, i.e. capsule itself, capsule control unit and 3 He power control unit, after a long-time cold run test of the units. Through the test, it was confirmed that the capsule satisfies the specifications which stated that LWR fuel pin should be power-ramped under BWR conditions up to 50 kW/m with a change factor of more than 2, and that the control units operate in a good condition. (author)

  15. Emergency response facility technical data system of Taiwan Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, E.; Liang, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company (Taipower) has developed its emergency response facility program since 1981. This program is integrated with the following activities to enhance the emergency response capability of nuclear power plants: (1) survey of the plant instrumentation based on the requirements of R.G. 1.97; (2) improvement of plant specific emergency operating procedures based on the emergency response guidelines developed by the Owners group; (3) implementation of the detailed control room design review with the consideration of human engineering and task analysis; and (4) organization, staff and communication of emergency planning of nuclear power plant. The emergency response facility programs of Taipower are implemented in Chinshan (GE BWR4/MARK I), Kuosheng (GE BWR6/MARK III) and Maanshan (W PWR). The major items included in each program are: (1) to establish new buildings for On-Site Technical Support Center, Near-Site Emergency Operation Facility; (2) to establish an Emergency Executive Center at Taipower headquarters; (3) to establish the communication network between control room and emergency response facilities; and (4) to install a dedicated Emergency Response Facility Technical Data System (ERFTDS) for each plant. The ERFTDS provides the functions of data acquisition, data processing, data storage and display in meeting with the requirements of NUREG 0696. The ERFTDS is designed with plant specific requirements. These specific requirements are expected to be useful not only for the emergency condition but also for normal operation conditions

  16. Data acquisition system for medium power neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.R. Jr.; Francis, J.E. Jr.; Hammons, C.E.; Dagenhart, W.K.

    1978-06-01

    The Medium Power Neutral Beam Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was constructed in order to develop, test, and condition powerful neutral beam lines for the Princeton Large Torus experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The data acquisition system for the test stand monitors source performance, beam characteristics, and power deposition profiles to determine if the beam line is operating up to its design specifications. The speed of the computer system is utilized to provide near-real-time analysis of experimental data. Analysis of the data is presented as numerical tabulation and graphic display

  17. Optimised deployment of hydro-power generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werlen, K.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how the opening-up of the European electricity market has led to the creation of more room for manoeuvre in the deployment of the generation capacity of dam and pumped-storage-based hydropower facilities and low-head power stations. Software tools for the optimisation of the operation of power generation facilities that can take care of complex hydraulic interdependencies are described. The use of the software for the assessment of new installations being planned or of older installations being extended is examined. The influence of climatic conditions, market prices for power, the general requirements placed on the system and other influences on financial gain are looked at. The article makes recommendations on those factors influencing the design of the software and for its optimal use in practice

  18. On-site electric power source facility for Japanese nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oohara, T. [Incident/Failure Analysis and Evaluation Office, Nuclear Power Safety Information Research Centre, Nuclear Power Engineering Test Centre, 2nd Floor, Shuwa-Kamiyacho Bldg., 3-13, 4-Chome, Toranomon Minato-ku, Tokyo 105 (Japan)

    1986-02-15

    Trends of construction of nuclear power plants in Japan, occurrence rate of incidents/failures of electric facilities, major example of incidents/failures, their countermeasure to prevent recurrence are introduced. Furthermore, safety administration system of the Government, electric utilities and manufacturers, and various countermeasures to prevent incident/ failure of electrical facilities from the hardware and software sides are discussed. (author)

  19. On-site electric power source facility for Japanese nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohara, T.

    1986-01-01

    Trends of construction of nuclear power plants in Japan, occurrence rate of incidents/failures of electric facilities, major example of incidents/failures, their countermeasure to prevent recurrence are introduced. Furthermore, safety administration system of the Government, electric utilities and manufacturers, and various countermeasures to prevent incident/ failure of electrical facilities from the hardware and software sides are discussed. (author)

  20. Power Systems Development Facility. Quarterly report, July--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a fimction of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and hot gas cleanup units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDS) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of the process structural steel is nearing completion. Nearly all equipment are set in its place and the FW equipment and the PCDs are being set in the structure.

  1. Safety issues relating to the design of fusion power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasko, R.R.; Wong, K.Y.; Russell, S.B.

    1986-06-01

    In order to make fusion power a viable future source of energy, it will be necessary to ensure that the cost of power for fusion electric generation is competitive with advanced fission concepts. In addition, fusion power will have to live up to its original promise of being a more radiologically benign technology than fission, and be able to demonstrate excellent operational safety performance. These two requirements are interrelated, since the selection of an appropriate safety philosophy early in the design phase could greatly reduce or eliminate the capital costs of elaborate safety related and protective sytems. This paper will briefly overview a few of the key safety issues presently recognized as critical to the ultimate achievement of licensable, environmentally safe and socially acceptable fusion power facilities. 12 refs

  2. Power facility plan and power supply plan of Japan in 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Shoji; Makino, Masao

    1988-06-01

    The power facility plan and the power supply plan for 1988 are described. The demand by non-industrial use will grow at an average of 3.8% for the 1986-97 period due to changes in the life style, construction and extension of buildings and increasing use of OA equipment although the power conservation is promoted. The industrial consumption will increase at only 1.2% a year due to the slowed growth and energy saving. As a result, the total demand will be 778,200 million kWh in 1997 with annual growth of 2.4%. The maximum demand will be 151,210 kW in 1997 with annual growth of 2.9%. The annual load rate will decrease to 56.9%, showing a continuously worsening utilization efficiency of power facilities. The development of 29 power units with total capacity of 2,760 MW is planned in 1988 for a stable power supply with a sufficient margin regarding maximum demand. The plan requires the investment of 3,700 billion yen, including the power transmission systems and substations. The power supply plan in 1988 is aimed at the effective operation of facilities and cost reduction by regional management under proper recognition of local characteristics of each power source, while maintaining a stable power supply with specified margins. (1 fig, 11 tabs)

  3. Development of the Ukrainian power sector taking into account the environmental impact of power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyakova, E.; Krymskaya, L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the following problems: Evaluation of total environmental impacts from all kinds of power plants on the whole territory of Ukraine; evaluation of environmental impacts in selected regions due to uneven power facilities distribution. Analysis of the environmental situation in Ukraine was conducted using the IMPACTS module of the ENPEP package with account to the Ukrainian energy requirements in perspective. Some recommendations concerning the development of power facilities and reduction of air emissions are also given. (author). 7 figs, 5 tabs

  4. Development of the Ukrainian power sector taking into account the environmental impact of power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyakova, E; Krymskaya, L [Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Science, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-09-01

    This paper concentrates on the following problems: Evaluation of total environmental impacts from all kinds of power plants on the whole territory of Ukraine; evaluation of environmental impacts in selected regions due to uneven power facilities distribution. Analysis of the environmental situation in Ukraine was conducted using the IMPACTS module of the ENPEP package with account to the Ukrainian energy requirements in perspective. Some recommendations concerning the development of power facilities and reduction of air emissions are also given. (author). 7 figs, 5 tabs.

  5. Radiological design criteria for fusion power test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    The quest for fusion power and understanding of plasma physics has resulted in planning, design, and construction of several major fusion power test facilities, based largely on magnetic and inertial confinement concepts. We have considered radiological design aspects of the Joint European Torus (JET), Livermore Mirror and Inertial Fusion projects, and Princeton Tokamak. Our analyses on radiological design criteria cover acceptable exposure levels at the site boundary, man-rem doses for plant personnel and population at large, based upon experience gained for the fission reactors, and on considerations of cost-benefit analyses

  6. Nuclear space power safety and facility guidelines study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlman, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    This report addresses safety guidelines for space nuclear reactor power missions and was prepared by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) under a Department of Energy grant, DE-FG01-94NE32180 dated 27 September 1994. This grant was based on a proposal submitted by the JHU/APL in response to an open-quotes Invitation for Proposals Designed to Support Federal Agencies and Commercial Interests in Meeting Special Power and Propulsion Needs for Future Space Missionsclose quotes. The United States has not launched a nuclear reactor since SNAP 10A in April 1965 although many Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) have been launched. An RTG powered system is planned for launch as part of the Cassini mission to Saturn in 1997. Recently the Ballistic Missile Defense Office (BMDO) sponsored the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) which was to demonstrate and evaluate the Russian-built TOPAZ II nuclear reactor as a power source in space. As of late 1993 the flight portion of this program was canceled but work to investigate the attributes of the reactor were continued but at a reduced level. While the future of space nuclear power systems is uncertain there are potential space missions which would require space nuclear power systems. The differences between space nuclear power systems and RTG devices are sufficient that safety and facility requirements warrant a review in the context of the unique features of a space nuclear reactor power system

  7. Technology standards for structure, etc. concerning nuclear power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Based on the Ordinance for the Technology Standards concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities, the technology standards are established for the vessels of class 1 to 4 (including reactor pressure vessels, reactor containment vessels, etc.), the pipes of class 1 to 3, safety valves, pressure test and monitoring test specimens. Those specified are materials, nondestructive tests, structures, shapes, shells, flanges, etc. for the vessels and the pipes, and so on. (Mori, K.)

  8. Summarisation of construction and commissioning experience for nuclear power integrated test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zejun; Jia Dounan; Jiang Xulun; Chen Bingde

    2003-01-01

    Since the foundation of Nuclear Power Institute of China, it has successively designed various engineering experimental facilities, and constructed nuclear power experimental research base, and accumulated rich construction experiences of nuclear power integrated test facility. The author presents experience on design, construction and commissioning of nuclear power integrated test facility

  9. Mortality monitoring design for utility-scale solar power facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huso, Manuela; Dietsch, Thomas; Nicolai, Chris

    2016-05-27

    IntroductionSolar power represents an important and rapidly expanding component of the renewable energy portfolio of the United States (Lovich and Ennen, 2011; Hernandez and others, 2014). Understanding the impacts of renewable energy development on wildlife is a priority for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) in compliance with Department of Interior Order No. 3285 (U.S. Department of the Interior, 2009) to “develop best management practices for renewable energy and transmission projects on the public lands to ensure the most environmentally responsible development and delivery of renewable energy.” Recent studies examining effects of renewable energy development on mortality of migratory birds have primarily focused on wind energy (California Energy Commission and California Department of Fish and Game, 2007), and in 2012 the FWS published guidance for addressing wildlife conservation concerns at all stages of land-based wind energy development (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2012). As yet, no similar guidelines exist for solar development, and no published studies have directly addressed the methodology needed to accurately estimate mortality of birds and bats at solar facilities. In the absence of such guidelines, ad hoc methodologies applied to solar energy projects may lead to estimates of wildlife mortality rates that are insufficiently accurate and precise to meaningfully inform conversations regarding unintended consequences of this energy source and management decisions to mitigate impacts. Although significant advances in monitoring protocols for wind facilities have been made in recent years, there remains a need to provide consistent guidance and study design to quantify mortality of bats, and resident and migrating birds at solar power facilities (Walston and others, 2015).In this document, we suggest methods for mortality monitoring at solar facilities that are based on current methods used at wind power facilities but adapted for the

  10. Nitrogen cycling in Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie: oscillations between strong and weak export and implications for harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Kateri R.; Bullerjahn, George S.; McKay, Robert Michael L.; Chaffin, Justin D.; Ostrom, Nathaniel E.

    2018-05-01

    Recent global water quality crises point to an urgent need for greater understanding of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cHABs) and their drivers. Nearshore areas of Lake Erie such as Sandusky Bay may become seasonally limited by nitrogen (N) and are characterized by distinct cHAB compositions (i.e., Planktothrix over Microcystis). This study investigated phytoplankton N uptake pathways, determined drivers of N depletion, and characterized the N budget in Sandusky Bay. Nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) uptake, N fixation, and N removal processes were quantified by stable isotopic approaches. Dissimilatory N reduction was a relatively modest N sink, with denitrification, anammox, and N2O production accounting for 84, 14, and 2 % of sediment N removal, respectively. Phytoplankton assimilation was the dominant N uptake mechanism, and NO3- uptake rates were higher than NH4+ uptake rates. Riverine N loading was sometimes insufficient to meet assimilatory and dissimilatory demands, but N fixation alleviated this deficit. N fixation made up 23.7-85.4 % of total phytoplankton N acquisition and indirectly supports Planktothrix blooms. However, N fixation rates were surprisingly uncorrelated with NO3- or NH4+ concentrations. Owing to temporal separation in sources and sinks of N to Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay oscillates between a conduit and a filter of downstream N loading to Lake Erie, delivering extensively recycled forms of N during periods of low export. Drowned river mouths such as Sandusky Bay are mediators of downstream N loading, but climate-change-induced increases in precipitation and N loading will likely intensify N export from these systems.

  11. Smart Power Supply Systems for Mission Critical Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Keiichi; Babasaki, Tadatoshi

    To develop the advanced and rich life, and the also economy and social activity continuously, various types of energy are necessary. At the same time, to protect the global environment and to prevent the depletion of natural resources, the effective and moreover efficient use of energy is becoming important. Electric power is one of the most important forms of energy for our life and society. This paper describes topics and survey results of technical trends regarding the electric power supply systems which are playing a core role as the important infrastructure to support the emergence of information-oriented society. Specifically, the power supply systems that enhance high power quality and reliability (PQR) are important for the steady growth of information and communication services. The direct current (DC) power, which has been used for telecommunications power systems and information and communications technologies (ICT), enables existing utilities' grid and distributed energy resources to keep a balance between supply and demand of small-scaled power systems or microgirds. These techniques are expected to be part of smartgrid technologies and facilitate the installation of distributed generators in mission critical facilities.

  12. Training of nuclear power facility personnel. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The proceedings of the conference entitled ''Training of Nuclear Power Facility Personnel'' and held in Tale, Czechoslovakia, on 24 - 27 April 1989, contain full texts of 58 contributions, 57 of which fall in the INIS subject scope. The aim of the conference was to summarize experience gained during the training and education of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants operating personnel, to put forth new suggestions for increasing the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants, and to establish the needs and new trends in the training and education of nuclear power plants personnel. The topics treated at the conference can be divided into three basic groups as follows: 1. professional qualification of nuclear power plant staff members; 2. development of technical means for the nuclear power plants personnel training; and 3. training of maintenance personnel, the system and organization of this training and education. The proceedings are published in two volumes. Part 1 contains the texts of 25 papers falling in the INIS subject scope. (Z.M.)

  13. Management of the high-level nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Marin

    2003-05-01

    This thesis approaches current issues in the management of the high power nuclear facilities and as such it appears to be important particularly for nuclear power plant operation topics. Of special interest are the failure events entailing possible catastrophic situations. The contents is structured onto ten chapters. The first chapter describes the operation regimes of the nuclear high power facilities. Highlighted here are the thesis scope and the original features of the work. The second chapter deals with operational policies developed in order to ensure the preventive maintenance of the nuclear installations. Also managing structures are described devoted to practical warranting the equipment safety function of non-classical power stations. In the third chapter cases of nuclear accidents are analyzed especially stressing the probabilistic risk and the operation regimes having in view the elimination of catastrophic events. In the fourth and fifth chapters the control of nuclear radiation emission is treated focusing the quality issue of nuclear installations required to avoid hazardous effects at level of nuclear reactor operation stage. At the same time set of operational measures is given here for preventing risks, catastrophes and chaotic situations. The chapter five presents both theoretical and practical approaches of the nuclear reactor core management concerning particularly the fuel testing, the water primary system and the quality of the involved equipment. In the sixth and seventh chapters issues of risk-quality correlations are approached as well as the structure of expert systems for monitoring the operational regimes of nuclear facilities. The efficiency of the power systems with nuclear injection is discussed and some original ideas developed in this work are evidenced in the eighth and ninth chapters. Presented are here both the operational principles and models of raising the efficiency of the interconnected nuclear stations and prices' policy

  14. Integrated biofuel facility, with carbon dioxide consumption and power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, E.E.; Hill, G.A. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This presentation provided details of an economical design for a large-scale integrated biofuel facility for coupled production of bioethanol and biodiesel, with carbon dioxide capture and power generation. Several designs were suggested for both batch and continuous culture operations, taking into account all costs and revenues associated with the complete plant integration. The microalgae species Chlorella vulgaris was cultivated in a novel photobioreactor (PBR) in order to consume industrial carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This photosynthetic culture can also act as a biocathode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC), which when coupled to a typical yeast anodic half cell, results in a complete biological MFC. The photosynthetic MFC produces electricity as well as valuable biomass and by-products. The use of this novel photosynthetic microalgae cathodic half cell in an integrated biofuel facility was discussed. A series of novel PBRs for continuous operation can be integrated into a large-scale bioethanol facility, where the PBRs serve as cathodic half cells and are coupled to the existing yeast fermentation tanks which act as anodic half cells. These coupled MFCs generate electricity for use within the biofuel facility. The microalgae growth provides oil for biodiesel production, in addition to the bioethanol from the yeast fermentation. The photosynthetic cultivation in the cathodic PBR also requires carbon dioxide, resulting in consumption of carbon dioxide from bioethanol production. The paper also discussed the effect of plant design on net present worth and internal rate of return. tabs., figs.

  15. Dry spent fuel storage facility at Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goehring, R.; Stoev, M.; Davis, N.; Thomas, E.

    2004-01-01

    The Dry Spent Fuel Storage Facility (DSF) is financed by the Kozloduy International Decommissioning Support Fund (KIDSF) which is managed by European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). On behalf of the Employer, the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant, a Project Management Unit (KPMU) under lead of British Nuclear Group is managing the contract with a Joint Venture Consortium under lead of RWE NUKEM mbH. The scope of the contract includes design, manufacturing and construction, testing and commissioning of the new storage facility for 2800 VVER-440 spent fuel assemblies at the KNPP site (turn-key contract). The storage technology will be cask storage of CONSTOR type, a steel-concrete-steel container. The licensing process complies with the national Bulgarian regulations and international rules. (authors)

  16. Power conditioning development for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, M.A.; Larson, D.W.; Wilson, J.M.; Harjes, H.C.; Savage, M.E.; Anderson, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high energy glass laser system and target chamber that will be used for research in inertial confinement fusion. The 192 beams of the NIF laser system are pumped by over 8600 Xenon flashlamps. The power conditioning system for NIF must deliver nearly 300 MJ of energy to the flashlamps in a cost effective and reliable manner. The present system design has over 200 capacitive energy storage modules that store approximately 1.7 MJ each and deliver that energy through a single switch assembly to 20 parallel sets of two series flashlamps. Although there are many possible system designs, few will meet the aggressive cost goals necessary to make the system affordable. Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing the system and component technologies that will be required to build the power conditioning system for the National Ignition Facility. This paper will describe the ongoing development activities for the NIF power conditioning system

  17. Ministry of ordinance determining the technical standard concerning atomic energy facilities for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The ministerial ordinance provides for the technical standards for the power generation of nuclear facilities; i.e., electric power facilities generating electricity with nuclear energy for motive power, according to the Electricity Enterprises Act. The contents are as follows: protection against fires, aseismatic design, radiation protective barriers, structural protection for sitings, reactor installation, safety measures, materials and structures, safety valves, pressure resistance tests, reactor core, radiation shields, reactor cooling, emergency core cooling system, facility equipment, alarm system, reactor control system, reactor control room, fuel storage facility, fuel handling facility, ventilation equipment, radioactive contamination prevention, radioactive waste management facility, reactor containment facility, and so on. (Kubozono, M.)

  18. Study on system integration of robots operated in nuclear fusion facility and nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    A present robot is required to apply to many fields such as amusement, welfare and protection against disasters. The are however only limited numbers of the robots, which can work under the actual conditions as a robot system. It is caused by the following reasons: (1) the robot system cannot be realized by the only collection of the elemental technologies, (2) the performance of the robot is determined by that of the integrated system composed of the complicated elements with many functions, and (3) the respective elements have to be optimized in the integrated robot system with a well balance among them, through their examination, adjustment and improvement. Therefore, the system integration of the robot composed of a large number of elements is the most critical issue to realize the robot system for actual use. In the present paper, I describe the necessary approaches and elemental technologies to solve the issues on the system integration of the typical robot systems for maintenance in the nuclear fusion facility and rescue in the accident of the nuclear power plant facilities. These robots work under the intense radiation condition and restricted space in place of human. In particular, I propose a new approach to realize the system integration of the robot for actual use from the viewpoints of not only the environment and working conditions but also the restructure and optimization of the required elemental technologies with a well balance in the robot system. Based on the above approach, I have a contribution to realize the robot systems working under the actual conditions for maintenance in the nuclear fusion facility and rescue in the accident of the nuclear power plant facilities. (author)

  19. Development of 3He-BOCA power ramping facility, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hirokatsu; Ishii, Tadahiko; Itoh, Haruhiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Nakazaki, Chozaburo

    1979-11-01

    Development of a He-3 power controlled boiling water capsule, 3 He-BOCS, for LWR fuels power ramping test in JMTR has been carried out since 1978 on a five-year program; in the reactor, irradiation tests of various fuels and structual materials have been made since 1969. Using stagnant-pressurized water as a thermal medium, the capsule provides pressure and temperature conditions similar to those in LWRs. Heat generation of a fuel pin can be controlled by a He-3 gas screen surrounding the capsule. The facility is capable of testing numbers of both fresh and irradiated fuel pins under LWR operating conditions for power ramping and cycling. After explaining the operating priciples of 3 He-BOCA and the development program, the following are described: the results of preliminary out-of-pile test on heat conductive characteristics of the capsule and a conceptual design of the 3 He-BOCA for power ramping of a short fuel pin from 250 W/cm to 500 W/cm under BWR conditions. (author)

  20. The enforcement order for the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This rule is established under the provisions of the law for the redevelopment of the surrounding areas of power generating facilities. Persons who install power generating facilities under the law include general electric power enterprises and wholesale electric power enterprises defined under the electric enterprises act and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The scale of these facilities defined under the law is 350,000 kilo-watts output for atomic and thermal power generating facilities, 10,000 kilo-watts output for the facilities utilizing geothermal energy, 100,000 kilo-watts output for facilities whose main fuel is coal, and 1,000 kilo-watts output for hydraulic power generating facilities, etc. The facilities closely related to atomic power generation include the reprocessing and examination facilities of fuel materials spent in atomic power reactors, the reactors installed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute for studying on the safety of atomic power reactors, the experimental fast reactors and the uranium enrichment facilities established by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The public facilities in this rule are those for communication, sport and recreation, environment hygiene, education and culture, medicine, social welfare, fire fighting, etc. Governors of prefectures who intend to get approval under the law shall file redevelopment plans to the competent minister through the Minister of the International Trade and Industry. (Okada, K.)

  1. Managing risks during the construction of a power generation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loulakis, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    The construction of a power generation facility is a substantial undertaking that involves considerable risks to all parties involved. While contractors are accustomed to dealing with risks, construction owners are typically more naive about not only the risks they are assuming in the construction of a project, but also about the role they play on the project itself. Owners and developers of power facilities must understand at the outset that their role during the construction of a project is as integral to the success of the project as that of the designer and contractor. In addition, owners should also understand that there are virtually no risks on a construction project that cannot be shifted among the contracting parties as part of the business deal. Consequently, an owner may contractually be assuming the risks of (1) unusually severe weather, (2) unexpected subsurface conditions, (3) strikes at the turbine supplier's plant or (4) changes in law - as well as the increases in price and delays to project completion associated with such risks. In light of this, a prudent owner will evaluate more than just whether there is sufficient financing to complete the construction of a contemplated project. Prudent owners will conduct a risk management review of the project structure and the contracting terms, with the primary focus being (1) the identification and analysis of the most significant risks faced, (2) a determination of how such risks can be either mitigated or eliminated, and (3) the assessment of the financial exposure to the owner should the potential risk become a reality. This paper will present the framework that owners and developers of power generation projects can use in undertaking such a risk management review

  2. Effective use of electric power facilities and promotion of energy conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumitsu, Iwao

    1999-01-01

    The capacity of Japan's commercial electric power facilities has been increased to more than 200 million kw. In order to provide a stable supply of electric power to meet constantly fluctuaring electric power demands, Japan's power plants generate electricity using an optimal combination of facilities, with nuclear power and coal-fired thermoelectric power providing the base load supply. In the use of electric power, moreover, measures are being implemented to reduce generation costs, conserve energy, and cut carbon dioxide emissions by reducing maximum output and equalizing the load. This report presents information concerning measures for improving the efficiency of electric power facilities operation, equalizing the load and promoting energy conservation. (author)

  3. Multimegawatt space nuclear power open-cycle MHD-facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavshuk, V.A.; Panchenko, V.P.

    2008-01-01

    Paper presents the results of the efforts to calculate the characteristics, the layout and the engineering design of the open cycle space power propulsion on the basis of the high-temperature nuclear reactor for a nuclear rocket engine and the Faraday 20 MW capacity MHD-generator. The IVG-1 heterogeneous channel-vessel reactor ensuring in the course of the experiments hydrogen heating up to 3100 K, up to 5 MPa pressure at the reactor core outlet, up to 5 kg/s flowsheet, up to 220 MW thermal power served as a reactor is considered. One determined the MHD-generator basic parameters, namely: the portion of Cs dope was equal to 20%, the outlet stagnation pressure - 2 MPa, the electric conductivity - ≅30 S/m, the Mach number - ≅0.7, the magnetic field induction - 6 T, the capacity - 20 MW, the specific power removal - ∼4 MJ/kg. Paper describes the design of the MHD-facility with the working fluid momentless discharge and its basic characteristics [ru

  4. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2005-08-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details Test Campaign TC18 of the PSDF gasification process. Test campaign TC18 began on June 23, 2005, and ended on August 22, 2005, with the gasifier train accumulating 1,342 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Some of the testing conducted included commissioning of a new recycle syngas compressor for gasifier aeration, evaluation of PCD filter elements and failsafes, testing of gas cleanup technologies, and further evaluation of solids handling equipment. At the conclusion of TC18, the PSDF gasification process had been operated for more than 7,750 hours.

  5. Laser peening applications for next generation of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, J.; Truong, C.; Walter, M.; Chen, H.-L.; Hackel, L.

    2008-01-01

    Generation of electricity by nuclear power can assist in achieving goals of reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Increased safety and reliability are necessary attributes of any new nuclear power plants. High pressure, hot water and radiation contribute to operating environments where Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement can lead to potential component failures. Desire for improved steam conversion efficiency pushes the fatigue stress limits of turbine blades and other rotating equipment. For nuclear reactor facilities now being designed and built and for the next generations of designs, laser peening could be incorporated to provide significant performance life to critical subsystems and components making them less susceptible to fatigue, SCC and radiation induced embrittlement. These types of components include steam turbine blades, hubs and bearings as well as reactor components including cladding material, housings, welded assemblies, fittings, pipes, flanges, vessel penetrations, nuclear waste storage canisters. Laser peening has proven to be a commercial success in aerospace applications and has recently been put into use for gas and steam turbine generators and light water reactors. An expanded role for this technology for the broader nuclear power industry would be a beneficial extension. (author)

  6. Distributed Supply Coordination for Power-to-Gas Facilities Embedded in Energy Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkano, Desti; Scherpen, Jacquelien M. A.

    This paper considers hydrogen and renewable electricity from power-to-gas (PtG) facilities supplied to a gas grid, a mobility sector, and a power grid. The PtG facilities are equipped with hydrogen buffers and fuel cells. The goal is to maximize the expected profit of PtG facilities without

  7. Treatment of measurement uncertainties at the power burst facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    The treatment of measurement uncertainty at the Power Burst Facility provides a means of improving data integrity as well as meeting standard practice reporting requirements. This is accomplished by performing the uncertainty analysis in two parts, test independent uncertainty analysis and test dependent uncertainty analysis. The test independent uncertainty analysis is performed on instrumentation used repeatedly from one test to the next, and does not have to be repeated for each test except for improved or new types of instruments. A test dependent uncertainty analysis is performed on each test based on the test independent uncertainties modified as required by test specifications, experiment fixture design, and historical performance of instruments on similar tests. The methodology for performing uncertainty analysis based on the National Bureau of Standards method is reviewed with examples applied to nuclear instrumentation

  8. Reliability centred maintenance of nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Zoltan; Novakova, Helena; Hlavac, Pavol; Janicek, Frantisek

    2011-01-01

    A method for the optimization of preventive maintenance nuclear power plant equipment, i.e. reliability centred maintenance, is described. The method enables procedures and procedure schedules to be defined such as allow the maintenance cost to be minimized without compromising operational safety or reliability. Also, combinations of facilities which remain available and ensure reliable operation of the reactor unit during the maintenance of other pieces of equipment are identified. The condition-based maintenance concept is used in this process, thereby preventing unnecessary operator interventions into the equipment, which are often associated with human errors. Where probabilistic safety assessment is available, the most important structures, systems and components with the highest maintenance priority can be identified. (orig.)

  9. Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage test series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, B.J.; Osetek, D.J.; Ploger, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) tests planned for the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are described. Bundles containing 32 zircaloy-clad, PWR-type fuel rods will be subjected to severe overheating transients in a high-pressure, superheated-steam environment. Cladding temperatures are expected to reach 2400 0 K, resulting in cladding ballooning and rupture, severe cladding oxidation, cladding melting, fuel dissolution, fuel rod fragmentation, and possibly, rubble bed formation. An experiment effluent collection system is being installed and the PBF fission product monitoring system is being upgraded to meet the special requirements of the SFD tests. Scoping calculations were performed to evaluate performance of the SFD test design and to establish operational requirements for the PBF loop

  10. Ground Shock Resistant of Buried Nuclear Power Plant Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornai, D.; Adar, A.; Gal, E.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) might be subjected to hostile attacks such as Earth Penetrating Weapons (EPW) that carry explosive charges. Explosions of these weapons near buried NPP facility might cause collapse, breaching, spalling, deflection, shear, rigid body motion (depending upon the foundations), and in-structure shock. The occupants and the equipment in the buried facilities are exposed to the in-structure motions, and if they are greater than their fragility values than occupants might be wounded or killed and the equipment might be damaged, unless protective measures will be applied. NPP critical equipment such as pumps are vital for the normal safe operation since it requires constant water circulation between the nuclear reactor and the cooling system, including in case of an immediate shut down. This paper presents analytical- semi empirical formulation and analysis of the explosion of a penetrating weapon with a warhead of 100kgs TNT (Trinitrotoluene) that creates ground shock effect on underground NPP structure containing equipment, such as a typical pump. If the in-structure spectral shock is greater than the pump fragility values than protective measures are required, otherwise a real danger to the NPP safety might occur

  11. Cooling and heating facility for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Atsuro

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a cooling and heating facility for a nuclear power plant. Namely, a cooling water supply system supplies cooling water prepared by a refrigerator for cooling the inside of the plant. A warm water supply system supplies warm water having its temperature elevated by using an exhausted heat from a reactor water cleanup system. The facility comprises a heat pump-type refrigerator disposed in a cold water supply system for producing cold water and warm water, and warm water pipelines for connecting the refrigerator and the warm water supply system. With such a constitution, when the exhaust heat from the reactor water cleanup system can not be used, warm water prepared by the heat pump type refrigerator is supplied to the warm water supply system by way of the warm water pipelines. Accordingly, when the exhaust heat from the reactor water cleanup system can not be used such as upon inspection of the plant, a portion of the refrigerators in a not-operated state can be used for heating. Supply of boiler steams in the plant is no more necessary or extremely reduced. (I.S.)

  12. A multi-tank storage facility to effect power control in the PBMR power cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matimba, T.A.D.; Krueger, D.L.W.; Mathews, E.H.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the concept of a storage facility used to effect power control in South Africa's PBMR power cycle. The concept features a multiple number of storage vessels whose purpose is to contain the working medium, helium, as it is withdrawn from the PBMR's closed loop power cycle, at low energy demand. This helium is appropriately replenished to the power cycle as the energy demand increases. Helium mass transfer between the power cycle and the storage facility, henceforth known as the inventory control system (ICS), is carried out by way of the pressure differential that exists between these two systems. In presenting the ICS concept, emphasis is placed on storage effectiveness; hence the discussion in this paper is centred on those features which accentuate storage effectiveness, namely:- Storage vessel multiplicity; - Unique initial pressures for each vessel arranged in a cascaded manner; and - A heat sink placed in each vessel to provide thermal inertia. Having presented the concept, the objective is to qualitatively justify the presence of each of the above-mentioned features using thermodynamics as a basis

  13. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-09-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC09 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC09 in air- and oxygen-blown modes. Test Run TC09 was started on September 3, 2002, and completed on September 26, 2002. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run, with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen was smooth. The gasifier temperature varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 125 to 270 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC09, 414 hours of solid circulation and over 300 hours of coal feed were attained with almost 80 hours of pure oxygen feed.

  14. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2003-04-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

  15. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2008-12-01

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC25, the second test campaign using a high moisture lignite coal from the Red Hills mine in Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC25 was conducted from July 4, 2008, through August 12, 2008. During TC25, the PSDF gasification process operated for 742 hours in air-blown gasification mode. Operation with the Mississippi lignite was significantly improved in TC25 compared to the previous test (TC22) with this fuel due to the addition of a fluid bed coal dryer. The new dryer was installed to dry coals with very high moisture contents for reliable coal feeding. The TC25 test campaign demonstrated steady operation with high carbon conversion and optimized performance of the coal handling and gasifier systems. Operation during TC25 provided the opportunity for further testing of instrumentation enhancements, hot gas filter materials, and advanced syngas cleanup technologies. The PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane with syngas from the Transport Gasifier.

  16. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2008-03-30

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC24, the first test campaign using a bituminous coal as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC24 was conducted from February 16, 2008, through March 19, 2008. The PSDF gasification process operated for about 230 hours in air-blown gasification mode with about 225 tons of Utah bituminous coal feed. Operational challenges in gasifier operation were related to particle agglomeration, a large percentage of oversize coal particles, low overall gasifier solids collection efficiency, and refractory degradation in the gasifier solids collection unit. The carbon conversion and syngas heating values varied widely, with low values obtained during periods of low gasifier operating temperature. Despite the operating difficulties, several periods of steady state operation were achieved, which provided useful data for future testing. TC24 operation afforded the opportunity for testing of various types of technologies, including dry coal feeding with a developmental feeder, the Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) feeder; evaluating a new hot gas filter element media configuration; and enhancing syngas cleanup with water-gas shift catalysts. During TC24, the PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane.

  17. Proceeding of the 7. Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Jujuratisbela, Uju; Aziz, Ferhat; Su'ud, Zaki; Suprawhardana, M. Salman

    2002-02-01

    The seventh proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities, held by National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about safety and nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of technology; high temperature reactor and application for national development sustain able and high technology. This seminar level all aspects technology, Power Reactor research reactor, high temperature reactor and nuclear facilities. The article is separated by index

  18. Fuel Cells for Backup Power in Telecommunications Facilities (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-04-01

    Telecommunications providers rely on backup power to maintain a constant power supply, to prevent power outages, and to ensure the operability of cell towers, equipment, and networks. The backup power supply that best meets these objectives is fuel cell technology.

  19. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-04-05

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC07 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC07. Prior to TC07, the Transport Reactor was modified to allow operations as an oxygen-blown gasifier. Test Run TC07 was started on December 11, 2001, and the sand circulation tests (TC07A) were completed on December 14, 2001. The coal-feed tests (TC07B-D) were started on January 17, 2002 and completed on April 5, 2002. Due to operational difficulties with the reactor, the unit was taken offline several times. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,700 and 1,780 F at pressures from 200 to 240 psig. In TC07, 679 hours of solid circulation and 442 hours of coal feed, 398 hours with PRB coal and 44 hours with coal from the Calumet mine, and 33 hours of coke breeze feed were attained. Reactor operations were problematic due to instrumentation problems in the LMZ resulting in much higher than desired operating temperatures in the reactor. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable and the modifications to the lower part of the gasifier performed well while testing the gasifier with PRB coal feed.

  20. Results of gap conductance tests in the power burst facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, R.W.; Sparks, D.T.

    1977-01-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) fuel rod behavior studies are being conducted by the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc. These studies are being performed under contract to the Energy Research and Development Adminstration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), as part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Water Reactor Safety Research Fuel Behavior Program. Experimental data for verification of analytical models developed to predict light water nuclear fuel rod behavior under normal and postulated accident conditions are being obtained from a variety of in-reactor and out-of-reactor experiments. This paper summarizes the results of tests performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to obtain data from which the thermal response, gap conductance, and stored energy of LWR fuel rods can be determined. Primary objectives of the PBF gap conductance test program are (a) to obtain data on a variety of pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rod designs, under a wide range of operating conditions, from which gap conductance values can be determined and (b) to evaluate experimentally the power oscillation method for measuring the gap conductance and thermal response of a fresh or burned LWR fuel rod. Tests have been performed with both irradiated and unirradiated PWR-type fuel and with fresh BWR-type fuel rods. Some PWR rod test results are described, and the thermal response data from BWR rod tests are discussed in greater detail. Comparisons are made of gap conductance values determined by the tests with analytically calculated values using the Fuel Rod Analysis Program-Transient (FRAP-T) computer code. These comparisons provide insight into both the experimental measurements methods and the validity of the gap conductance models

  1. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-06-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC08 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier in air- and oxygen-blown modes during TC08. Test Run TC08 was started on June 9, 2002 and completed on June 29. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen blown was smooth. The gasifier temperature was varied between 1,710 and 1,770 F at pressures from 125 to 240 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC08, 476 hours of solid circulation and 364 hours of coal feed were attained with 153 hours of pure oxygen feed. The gasifier and PCD operations were stable in both enriched air and 100 percent oxygen blown modes. The oxygen concentration was slowly increased during the first transition to full oxygen-blown operations. Subsequent transitions from air to oxygen blown could be completed in less than 15 minutes. Oxygen-blown operations produced the highest synthesis gas heating value to date, with a projected synthesis gas heating value averaging 175 Btu/scf. Carbon conversions averaged 93 percent, slightly lower than carbon conversions achieved during air-blown gasification.

  2. High efficiency combined heat and power facilities - benefits and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.

    2001-01-01

    There are important linkages between the economy, energy production, the environment and our health. Where thermal energy is needed, distributed Combined Heat and Power facilities, using gas turbines, reciprocating engines and future fuel cells can provide significant improvements to our long term mix of energy production. Local generation can also have benefits in security of energy supply and economic savings. This paper is intended to discuss the relevant air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from modem CHP plants, the emission prevention and reduction methods available, and their operating experience and cost-effectiveness. Mention is made of recently constructed industrial and commercial plants, and institutional barriers to further development. Solutions described for these barriers include the need for more awareness of opportunities, improved access to the electricity grid, the proper design balance between thermal and electric for CHP systems rather than large combined cycles, improved corporate taxation incentives, and the assessment of all environmental and economic benefits when considering such cleaner sources in a restructured energy market. (author)

  3. The enforcement order for the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Order is based on the prescriptions of the Law for the Arrangement of Surrounding Areas of Power Generating Facilities. Those establishing power generating facilities are general and wholesale electric enterprisers provided for by the Electricity Enterprises Act as well as the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The generating capacity is specified as 350,000 kilowatts for nuclear and steam power generating facilities, 150,000 kilowatts for those set up by the Corporation, 100,000 kilowatts for those using coal as main fuel, and 10,000 kilowatts for water power generation and geothermal plants. The facilities closely connected to nuclear power generation include the reprocessing facilities and test and examination facilities for nuclear fuel materials used for power-generating nuclear reactors, reactors used for the research on the safety of power generating reactors, and experimental reactors for fast breeder reactors. The public facilities consist of communication facilities, and the facilities for sports and recreations, environmental hygiene, education and culture, medicine, social welfare, fire fighting, etc. Prefectural governors ought to file the arrangement plans to the competent minister through the Minister of International Trade and Industry to get the permission prescribed by the Law. The subsidy is not granted to the expenses of the enterprises undertaken by the nation or those enterprises, a part of the expenses of which is borne or subsidized by the nation. (Okada, K.)

  4. Microscale air quality impacts of distributed power generation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaguer, Eduardo P; Knipping, Eladio; Shaw, Stephanie; Ravindran, Satish

    2016-08-01

    The electric system is experiencing rapid growth in the adoption of a mix of distributed renewable and fossil fuel sources, along with increasing amounts of off-grid generation. New operational regimes may have unforeseen consequences for air quality. A three-dimensional microscale chemical transport model (CTM) driven by an urban wind model was used to assess gaseous air pollutant and particulate matter (PM) impacts within ~10 km of fossil-fueled distributed power generation (DG) facilities during the early afternoon of a typical summer day in Houston, TX. Three types of DG scenarios were considered in the presence of motor vehicle emissions and a realistic urban canopy: (1) a 25-MW natural gas turbine operating at steady state in either simple cycle or combined heating and power (CHP) mode; (2) a 25-MW simple cycle gas turbine undergoing a cold startup with either moderate or enhanced formaldehyde emissions; and (3) a data center generating 10 MW of emergency power with either diesel or natural gas-fired backup generators (BUGs) without pollution controls. Simulations of criteria pollutants (NO2, CO, O3, PM) and the toxic pollutant, formaldehyde (HCHO), were conducted assuming a 2-hr operational time period. In all cases, NOx titration dominated ozone production near the source. The turbine scenarios did not result in ambient concentration enhancements significantly exceeding 1 ppbv for gaseous pollutants or over 1 µg/m(3) for PM after 2 hr of emission, assuming realistic plume rise. In the case of the datacenter with diesel BUGs, ambient NO2 concentrations were enhanced by 10-50 ppbv within 2 km downwind of the source, while maximum PM impacts in the immediate vicinity of the datacenter were less than 5 µg/m(3). Plausible scenarios of distributed fossil generation consistent with the electricity grid's transformation to a more flexible and modernized system suggest that a substantial amount of deployment would be required to significantly affect air quality on

  5. 76 FR 51961 - Brown Bear Power, LLC, Topsham Hydroelectric Generating Facility Trust No. 1, Topsham Hydro...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... On August 3, 2011, Brown Bear Power, LLC, Topsham Hydroelectric Generating Facility (Trust No. 1... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 4784-082] Brown Bear Power, LLC, Topsham Hydroelectric Generating Facility Trust No. 1, Topsham Hydro Partners Limited Partnership...

  6. 75 FR 76055 - Nebraska Public Power District Cooper Nuclear Station; Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Docket No. 50-298; NRC-2008-0617] Nebraska Public Power District Cooper Nuclear Station; Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility Operating License No. DPR-46 for an... Power District (NPPD), the operator of the Cooper Nuclear Station (CNS). Renewed facility operating...

  7. 47 CFR 74.795 - Digital low power TV and TV translator transmission system facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Digital low power TV and TV translator... DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.795 Digital low power TV and TV translator transmission system facilities. (a) A digital low power TV or TV translator station shall operate...

  8. Maximization of revenues for power sales from a solid waste resources recovery facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The report discusses the actual implementation of the best alternative in selling electrical power generated by an existing waste-to-energy facility, the Metro-Dade County Resources Recovery Plant. After the plant processes and extracts various products out of the municipal solid waste, it burns it to produce electrical power. The price for buying power to satisfy the internal needs of our Resources Recovery Facility (RRF) is substantially higher than the power price for selling electricity to any other entity. Therefore, without any further analysis, it was decided to first satisfy those internal needs and then export the excess power. Various alternatives were thoroughly explored as to what to do with the excess power. Selling power to the power utilities or utilizing the power in other facilities were the primary options.

  9. Development of the ultra high efficiency thermal power generation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Toshihiro

    2010-09-15

    In order to prevent global warming, attention is focused on nuclear power generation and renewable energy such as wind and solar power generation. The electric power suppliers of Japan are aiming to increase the amount of nuclear and non-fossil fuel power generation over 50% of the total power generation by 2020. But this means that the remaining half will still be of thermal power generation using fossil fuel and will still play an important role. Under such circumstances, further efficiency improvement of the thermal power generation and its aggressive implementation is ongoing in Japan.

  10. The regulation for delivery of subsidies for measures of promoting power source location for nuclear power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Regulation is based on the prescriptions of the Enforcement Order for the Law for Arrangement of Surrounding Areas of Power Generating Facilities, the Law for Proper Budget Enforcement Concerning Subsidies and its Enforcement Order. These rules apply to the subsidies concerning nuclear power generating facilities, reprocessing facilities and test and examination facilities for nuclear fuel materials used for power generating reactors, reactors used for research on the safety of power generating reactors, and experimental reactors for fast breeder reactors. The limits of subsidies are specified respectively for the cases that a unit of power generating facility or two and more units of such facilities are set up in a local municipality. The subsidies are delivered for the expenses occurred in the period, beginning from the fiscal year when construction of the generating facility concerned starts or the arrangement plan of the concerned project is approved, and ending in the fiscal year when such construction comes to an end. The subsidies are given as evenly as possible in each fiscal year. The applicants of the subsidies file the applications attached with the explanations of the projects to the chief of the competent ministry (Director General of the Science and Technology Agency or the Minister of International Trade and Industry). Terms of delivery, reports submitted by the receivers of the subsidies and other related matters are specified. (Okada, K.)

  11. The enforcement order for the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The order is defined under the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities. Establishers of power generating facilities shall be hereunder general electric enterprisers, wholesale electric enterprisers and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The scale of power generating facilities provided by the order is 350,000 kilo-watts for atomic and steam power generation and 5,000 kilo-watts for hydroelectric power. Equipment closely related to atomic power generation shall include facilities for reprocessing and examination of nuclear fuel materials spent for power generating reactors, reactors used for research of the safety of power generating reactors, experimental fast breeding reactors and experimental uranium enrichment facilities. Requisites for the extent of industrial accumulation are that the area belongs to those self-governing bodies whose industrial accumulation is more than the 8th degree. Public facilities specified are those for communication, sports or recreation, environmental hygiene, education and culture, medicine, social welfare, fire fighting and heat supplying, etc. Governors of the prefectures shall file arrangement programs to the Minister in charge through the Minister of International Trade and Industry to get the permission stipulated by the law. Subsidies shall not be paid to those enterprises which are executed by the government or a part of the expenses is born or supported by it. (Okada, K.)

  12. Yearly program of safety research in nuclear power facilities from fiscal 1981 to 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear safety research plans for nuclear power facilities and others from fiscal 1981 to 1985 are presented for the following areas: the safety of LWR fuel, loss-of-coolant accidents, the structural safety of LWR installations, the reduction of radioactive material release from nuclear power facilities, the stochastic safety evaluation of nuclear power facilities, the aseismicity of nuclear power facilities, the safety of nuclear fuel facilities, and the safety of nuclear fuel transport vessels. In the respective areas, the needs for research and the outline of research works are summarized. Then, about the major research works in each area, the purpose, contents, term and responsible institution of the research are given. (Mori, K.)

  13. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Facility Registry Service (FRS) Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This GIS dataset contains data on wastewater treatment plants, based on EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) and NPDES, along with Clean Watersheds Needs Survey...

  14. The enforcement order for the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The enforcement order provides for grants concerning the arrangement of various public facilities in the areas surrounding a power generating facility; the public facilities in the arrangement for which the grants are given include communication, recreation activities, environmental sanitation, culture, medicine, etc. The prefectural governor concerned submits his plan for the arrangement to the Government, which then decides on the grants. Then, the grants are given to local governments concerned. The sums of the grants are determined on the basis of the output, construction cost of the nuclear power facility. (Mori, K.)

  15. The December 7, 1988 Armenia earthquake effects on selected power, industrial and commercial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.D.; Griffin, M.J.; Bragagnolo, L.J.; Yanev, P.I.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed overview of the Armenia earthquake (occurred on December 7, 1988) effects on selected power, industrial and commercial facilities is presented in this paper. It involves geologic and seismology study of the region; description of the design building standards; detailed description of the damaged nuclear and other power plants as well as other industrial facilities. Extensive damage was sustained by the industrial facilities in the epicentral area, the majority due to poor design and construction. The effects on power facilities were much less severe. response time to restore power to the transmission was 2 to 3 days following the earthquake. Power plant equipment without rigorous seismic design performed well. Mechanical equipment, pumps, valves, compressors, and piping all performed with minimal damage, Electrical control equipment if properly anchored performed well without exception

  16. The concept of electro-nuclear facility for useful power generation and minor actinides transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergelson, B.R.; Balyuk, S.A. [ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-10-01

    The possibility is shown to design in principle the double-purpose liquid fuel electro nuclear facility for useful power generation and minor actinides transmutation in U-Pu fuel cycle conditions. D{sub 2}O and a melt of fluorine salts are considered as a working media for liquid fuel. Such facility replenished with depicted or natural uranium only makes it possible to generate power of 900 MW (c) for external consumers and serve 20 WWER-1000 reactors for transmutation of MA. The facility could be thought as an alternative to fast reactors since appr. 30% of the total power confined in uranium is utilized in it.

  17. Facility for protection of technological, especially power assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichon, S.; Hahn, J.; Malatek, K.; Randak, O.; Vitovec, P.; Zidek, M.

    1987-01-01

    The facility consists of sensors producing analog signals, used as input information for the evaluation of process conditions or equipment failures. The sensors are fitted to partial functional parts of technological assemblies, such as nuclear reactors. The individual sensors are connected via unification converters to the respective protection units. The facility is resistant to breakdowns of the analog sensors and other components including the computer; it features the possibility of in-service failure detection and the capability of immediate regeneration following a failure. This capability prevents, with high probability, the production of non-accident failures of the technological assembly. The block diagram is described of the facility and its operation in the event of an emergency. (J.B.). 1 fig

  18. Conference on the research facilities for future nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangel'skij, N.V.

    1996-01-01

    The activity of the European nuclear society Conference (Belgium, June, 1996) is described. The main topics of 60 presented reports are the following ones: necessity of developing new experimental facilities and their parameters; financing prospects and international cooperation in this field

  19. Synthetic methods for beam to beam power balancing capability of large laser facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guangyu; Zhang Xiaomin; Zhao Runchang; Zheng Wanguo; Yang Xiaoyu; You Yong; Wang Chengcheng; Shao Yunfei

    2011-01-01

    To account for output power balancing capability of large laser facilities, a synthetic method with beam to beam root-mean-square is presented. Firstly, a conversion process for the facilities from original data of beam powers to regular data is given. The regular data contribute to the normal distribution approximately, and then a corresponding simple method of root-mean-square for beam to beam power balancing capability is given.Secondly, based on theory of total control charts and cause-selecting control charts, control charts with root-mean-square are established which show short-term variety of power balancing capability of the facilities. Mean rate of failure occurrence is also defined and used to describe long-term trend of global balancing capabilities of the facilities. Finally, advantages of the intuitive and efficient diagnosis for synthetic methods are illustrated by analysis of experimental data. (authors)

  20. Detailed description of an SSAC at the facility level for on-load refueled power reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.J.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of a system for the accounting for and control of nuclear material in an on-load refueled power reactor facility which can be used by a facility operator to establish his own system to comply with a national system for nuclear material accounting and control and to facilitate application of IAEA safeguards. The scope of this document is limited to descriptions of the following SSAC elements: (1) Nuclear Material Measurements; (2) Measurement Quality; (3) Records and Reports; (4) Physical Inventory Taking; (5) Material Balance Closing

  1. Thermal and Hydraulic Conditions Supporting the Recruitment of Asian Carp in Seiche Affected Rivers of Lake Erie Basin - A Case Study of the Lower Sandusky River in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, D. T.; Santacruz, S.; Jones, L.; Garcia, T.; Kočovský, P. M.; Embke, H.

    2017-12-01

    Grass Carp Ctenopharyngodon idella (Cyprinidae) is an invasive fish species that spawns in rivers during high-flow events. In their native range, it is believed eggs must hatch within the riverine environment in order to eventually result in production of adult fish. The lower Sandusky River is approximately 26 km long extending from its confluence with Sandusky Bay upstream to the Ballville Dam, which is impassible for Grass Carp. Grass Carp are known to have spawned in the Sandusky River, a tributary to Lake Erie, in 2011, 2013, 2015, and 2017. This study characterizes the thermal and hydraulic conditions under which these eggs could hatch in the lower Sandusky River, a relatively short river reach for egg hatching. Grass Carp eggs collected in 2015 were previously analyzed for hatching locations using a one-dimensional steady-state HEC-RAS hydraulic model. In this study we refine estimates of hatching locations by incorporating the influence of fluctuating water levels downstream due to seiches in Lake Erie and overland and tributary inflows using an unsteady 1D/2D HEC-RAS hydraulic model. Additionally, conditions conducive to successful hatching, which occurs when eggs reach the hatching stage within the river, were analyzed from nine high-flow events between 2011 and 2015. Simulated hydraulic and water temperature data were used as inputs to the Fluvial Egg Drift Simulator (FluEgg) model, which was used to analyze the transport and dispersal of Grass carp eggs until hatching. We will describe the differences in steady- and unsteady-state hydraulic modeling in predicting hatching locations of Grass Carp eggs for the 2015 spawning events. Results will also include hydraulic and temperature variables that contribute to the successful/unsuccessful in-river hatching for the nine flow events simulated.

  2. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208 Section... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. (a) A hydroelectric small power production facility that impounds or diverts the water of a natural watercourse by...

  3. Overview of power plant and industrial facility performance in earthquakes in 1985 through 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstman, N.G.; Yanev, P.I.; McCormick, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper briefly documents the performance of power and industrial facilities during five destructive earthquakes in 1985 and 1986. These earthquakes represent varying levels of intensity, duration, frequency content, epicentral distance and construction practice. All of the earthquakes reinforce the findings of earlier earthquake investigations. Damage to equipment in power and industrial facilities is rare, as long as the equipment is adequately anchored. The ceramic components of switchyard equipment and the actuation of electro-mechanical relays remain concerns in the design of facilities which must remain operational during and following strong motion earthquakes. (orig.)

  4. Power supply control system for experimental physical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelepukin, S.A.; Osipov, Eh.V.; Petrov, V.S.; Sergeev, V.A.; Uglekov, V.Ya.

    1979-01-01

    A multichannel (to 1024 channels) system for control of power supply voltage is descrited. The system consists of an analog commulator, a digital voltmeter and a special controller. The controller serves at the same time as an interface for connecting the system as a ''unit'' of the VECTOR and SUMMA unified electronic systems. The system has been realized for control of the photomultiplier power supply voltage of the MARK multipurpose experimental device (256 channels, the measurement accuracy is 0.2%, the measuring time is 500 ms per point). Software devised for the HP-2100 computer permits automatical comparison of photomultiplier power supply voltages with sample ones in the mode of continuous control of a single voltage or in the mode of programmed selection of voltages to provide the control in arbitrary order or automatic scanning

  5. Outlook for gas turbine plant utilization in htgr power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beknev, V.S.; Leont'ev, A.I.; Shmidt, K.L.; Surovtsev, I.G.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear reactor power plants that have found greatest favor in the nuclear power industry worldwide are pressurized water reactors, boiling-water reactors, and uranium-graphite channel reactors with saturated-steam steam turbine units (PTU). The efficiency of power generating stations built around reactors such as these does not exceed 30 to 32%, and furthermore they are ''tied down'' to water reservoirs, with the entailed severe thermal effects on the environmental surroundings. The low efficiency range cited is evidence of inefficacious utilization of the nuclear fuel, reserves of which have their limits just as there are limits to available reserves of fossil fuels. Forecasts are being floated of a possible uranium crisis (profitable mining of uranium) in the mid-1990's, even with the expected development of breeder reactors to bridge the gap

  6. Syrinx - a research program for the pulsed power radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etlicher, B.; Chuvatin, A.S.; Choi, P.

    1996-01-01

    Syrinx is a targeted research program with the objective to study, through practical examples, the fundamentals necessary to define the details of all parts which will be required for a new powerful plasma radiation source. The current level of activities of Syrinx is in the design and construction of a multi-megajoule class IES based pulsed power driver which will use long conduction Plasma Opening Switch technology. The present paper reviews mainly the basic experimental research of the POS a nd Z-pinch accomplished in the framework of Syrinx project. This work has a unique international level of participation, from conceptual designs to particular investigations. (author). 9 figs., 17 refs

  7. Issues of improving quality of training personnel for nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacko, J.

    1987-01-01

    The basic stages are characterized of the development of a standard system of personnel training for the start-up, operation and maintenance of nuclear power facilities. The experience is analyzed gained by the Branch Training Centre of the Nuclear Power Plant Research Institute. Suggestions are submitted for improving the quality of personnel training based on Czechoslovak and foreign experiences. (author). 3 refs

  8. Low-power critical facilities: their role in the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didsbury, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of low power critical facilities and their role in the nuclear renaissance. It outline the role of human capital in some detail. sufficient conditions for the renaissance are that nuclear power is safe, sustainable, economical and proliferation resistant.

  9. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Barton, M [California Institute of Technology, LIGO Project, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Blair, D G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)] [and others

    2005-05-21

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with {approx}200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented.

  10. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga, P; Barton, M; Blair, D G

    2005-01-01

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with ∼200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented

  11. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-micros risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001

  12. Automatization of welding for nuclear power equipments and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Yasumasa; Matsumoto, Teruo; Koyama, Takaichi

    1980-01-01

    For the requirement of high reliability in the construction of nuclear power plants and the reduction of radiation exposure in the modefying works of existing plants, the automation and remote operation of welding have increased their necessity. In this paper, the present state of the automation of welding for making machines, equipments and pipings for nuclear power plants in Hitachi Ltd. is described, and the aim of developing the automation, the features of the equipments and the state of application to actual plants are introduced, centering around the automation of welding for large structures such as reactor containment vessels and the remote type automatic welding system for pipings. By these automations, the large outcomes were obtained in the improvement of welding quality required for the machines and equipments for atomic energy. Moreover, the conspicuous results were also obtained in case of the peculiar works to nuclear power plants, in which the reduction of the radiation exposure related to human bodies and the welding of high quality are demanded. The present state of the automation of welding for nuclear installations in Hitachi Ltd., the development of automatic welding equipments and the present state of application to actual plants, and the development and application of the automatic pipe working machine for reducing radiation exposure are explained. (Kako, I.)

  13. An overview of the transportation of radioactive waste at Ontario Power Generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Material Transportation Department (RMT) ensures regulatory compliance in radioactive material shipping within Ontario Power Generation (OPG). OPG provides a radioactive shipping program, high quality carrier service, stringent packaging maintenance, and quality assurance oversight to the corporation's nuclear facilities and its customers. This paper will speak to the transport of radioactive waste in Ontario Power Generation. It will also mention non-waste shipments and the quality assurance programme used at Ontario Power Generation to ensure a high quality transportation system. (author)

  14. A new digital pulse power supply in heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongkun; Chen, Youxin; Huang, Yuzhen; Gao, Daqing; Zhou, Zhongzu; Yan, Huaihai; Zhao, Jiang; Shi, Chunfeng; Wu, Fengjun; Yan, Hongbin; Xia, Jiawen; Yuan, Youjin

    2013-11-01

    To meet the increasing requirements of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR), a new digital pulse power supply, which employs multi-level converter, was designed. This power supply was applied with a multi H-bridge converters series-parallel connection topology. A new control model named digital power supply regulator system (DPSRS) was proposed, and a pulse power supply prototype based on DPSRS has been built and tested. The experimental results indicate that tracking error and ripple current meet the requirements of this design. The achievement of prototype provides a perfect model for HIRFL-CSR power supply system.

  15. Radioactive waste from nuclear power stations and other nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek-Fink, P.

    1976-01-01

    After estimating the amounts of liquid and solid radioactive wastes that will be produced in nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants, by the fuel cycle industry, and in the nuclear research centers in the FRG until 1990, it is reported on the state of technology and on the tendencies in the development of processing radioactive waste. The paper also describes, how waste disposal is managed by those producing radioactive waste (see above), and discusses the future development of the complex of waste disposal from the industry's point of view. (HR/LN) [de

  16. A neutron tomography facility at a low power research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Körner, S; Von Tobel, P; Rauch, H

    2001-01-01

    Neutron radiography (NR) provides a very efficient tool in the field of non-destructive testing as well as for many applications in fundamental research. A neutron beam penetrating a specimen is attenuated by the sample material and detected by a two-dimensional (2D) imaging device. The image contains information about materials and structure inside the sample because neutrons are attenuated according to the basic law of radiation attenuation. Contrary to X-rays, neutrons can be attenuated by some light materials, as for example, hydrogen and boron, but penetrate many heavy materials. Therefore, NR can yield important information not obtainable by more traditional methods. Nevertheless, there are many aspects of structure, both quantitative and qualitative, that are not accessible from 2D transmission images. Hence, there is an interest in three-dimensional neutron imaging. At the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Austria a neutron tomography facility has been installed. The neutron flux at ...

  17. Financing power facilities in the competitive bidding environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hills, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    In 1988 the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (open-quote FERC close-quote) issued proposed rules and guidelines for the use of competitive bidding by state utility commissions to chose new power supplies. Since then, more than 20 states have implemented bidding programs to determine the price and sources of incremental generating capacity. This presentation discusses the impact of the use of competitive bidding on how landers and equity investors perceive the risks of project-supported financing arrangements and describes the actions that project developers have taken to adapt the project financing process to win bidding contests and as importantly, successfully obtain project financing in spite of the open-quotes credit crunchclose quotes market environment

  18. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year

  19. Strategies for the co-operation between power generation facilities and power sales organisations in the European electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bammert, U.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how the public utilities in Hannover, Germany, have developed a strategy for the operation of their power generation facilities and power distribution network as independent yet co-operating units. Three models that were examined are described: 'free-sailing', where generation and distribution were kept completely independent, the 'wedding' model, where they were closely tied together and 'Enercity', a mixture of both models. The various rules necessary and the degrees of freedom needed to implement the 'Enercity' model are discussed, as are the advantages it offers to both the power generation and the sales units

  20. Detailed description of an SSAC at the facility level for light water moderated (off-load refueled) power reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.J.

    1985-03-01

    This report is intended to provide the technical details of an effective State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC) which Member States may use, if they wish, to establish and maintain their SSACs. It is expected that systems designed along the lines described would be effective in meeting the objectives of both national and international systems for nuclear material accounting and control. This document accordingly provides a detailed description of a system for the accounting for and control of nuclear material in an off-load refueled light water moderated power reactor facility which can be used by a facility operator to establish his own system to comply with a national system for nuclear material accounting and control and to facilitate application of IAEA safeguards. The scope of this document is limited to descriptions of the following elements: (1) Nuclear Material Measurements; (2) Measurement Quality; (3) Records and Reports; (4) Physical Inventory Taking; (5) Material Balance Closing

  1. Design and Testing of a Breadboard Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluid Combustion Facility Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.

    1999-01-01

    The Fluid Combustion Facility (FCF) Project and the Power Technology Division at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) at Lewis Field in Cleveland, OH along with the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL are jointly developing an Electrical Power Converter Unit (EPCU) for the Fluid Combustion Facility to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The FCF facility experiment contains three racks: A core rack, a combustion rack, and a fluids rack. The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS 120V(sub dc) power distribution system by each FCF experiment rack which requires 28V(sub dc). The EPCU is a modular design which contains three 120V(sub dc)-to-28V(sub dc) full-bridge, power converters rated at 1 kW(sub e) each bus transferring input relays and solid-state, current-limiting input switches, 48 current-limiting, solid-state, output switches; and control and telemetry hardware. The EPCU has all controls required to autonomously share load demand between the power feeds and--if absolutely necessary--shed loads. The EPCU, which maximizes the usage of allocated ISS power and minimizes loss of power to loads, can be paralleled with other EPCUs. This paper overviews the electrical design and operating characteristics of the EPCU and presents test data from the breadboard design.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD, is summarized. Main elements of the design, systems, and plant facilities are illustrated. System design descriptions are included for closed cycle cooling water, industrial gas systems, fuel oil, boiler flue gas, coal management, seed management, slag management, plant industrial waste, fire service water, oxidant supply, MHD power ventilating

  3. Report of third regular inspection of Tokai reprocessing facilities, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The reprocessing facilities passed the inspection before use on December 25, 1980, and started the full operation. Since then, this is the third regular inspection. It was begun on April 1, 1986, and finished on August 18, 1986, with the inspection of the rate of recovery of products. The reprocessing facilities which became the object of inspection were the facilities for accepting and storing spent fuel, the reprocessing facilities proper (the facilities of shearing, dissolution, separation, refining, denitration and recovery of acid and solvent), the facilities for storing products, measurement and control system, radioactive waste facilities, radiation control facilities and attached facilities (power, water, steam and testing). The main works carried out during the period of this regular inspection were the repair of an enriched uranium dissolution tank by welding, the renewal of a piping for a low activity waste liquid storing tank, and the removal of a washing tank. The total exposure dose in the first half of fiscal year 1986 was about 30.81 man-rem. (Kako, I.)

  4. Post 9-11 Security Issues for Non-Power Reactor Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaffuts, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the legal and practical issues arising out of the design and implementation of a security-enhancement program for non power reactor nuclear facilities. The security enhancements discussed are derived from the commercial nuclear power industry's approach to security. The nuclear power industry's long and successful experience with protecting highly sensitive assets provides a wealth of information and lessons that should be examined by other industries contemplating security improvements, including, but not limited to facilities using or disposing of nuclear materials. This paper describes the nuclear industry's approach to security, the advantages and disadvantages of its constituent elements, and the legal issues that facilities will need to address when adopting some or all of these elements in the absence of statutory or regulatory requirements to do so

  5. Post 9-11 Security Issues for Non-Power Reactor Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaffuts, P. J.

    2003-02-25

    This paper addresses the legal and practical issues arising out of the design and implementation of a security-enhancement program for non power reactor nuclear facilities. The security enhancements discussed are derived from the commercial nuclear power industry's approach to security. The nuclear power industry's long and successful experience with protecting highly sensitive assets provides a wealth of information and lessons that should be examined by other industries contemplating security improvements, including, but not limited to facilities using or disposing of nuclear materials. This paper describes the nuclear industry's approach to security, the advantages and disadvantages of its constituent elements, and the legal issues that facilities will need to address when adopting some or all of these elements in the absence of statutory or regulatory requirements to do so.

  6. Spare parts management for nuclear power generation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Natalie Michele

    With deregulation, utilities in the power sector face a much more urgent imperative to emphasize cost efficiencies as compared to the days of regulation. One major opportunity for cost savings is through reductions in spare parts inventories. Most utilities are accustomed to carrying large volumes of expensive, relatively slow-moving parts because of a high degree of risk-averseness. This attitude towards risk is rooted in the days of regulation. Under regulation, companies recovered capital inventory costs by incorporating them into the base rate charged to their customers. In a deregulated environment, cost recovery is no longer guaranteed. Companies must therefore reexamine their risk profile and develop policies for spare parts inventory that are appropriate for a competitive business environment. This research studies the spare parts inventory management problem in the context of electric utilities, with a focus on nuclear power. It addresses three issues related to this problem: criticality, risk, and policy. With respect to criticality and risk, a methodology is presented that incorporates the use of influence diagrams and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). A new method is developed for group aggregation in the AHP when Saaty and Vargas' (2007) dispersion test fails and decision makers are unwilling or unable to revise their judgments. With respect to policy, a quantitative model that ranks the importance of keeping a part in inventory and recommends a corresponding stocking policy through the use of numerical simulation is developed. This methodology and its corresponding models will enable utilities that have transitioned from a regulated to a deregulated environment become more competitive in their operations while maintaining safety and reliability standards. Furthermore, the methodology developed is general enough so that other utility plants, especially those in the nuclear sector, will be able to use this approach. In addition to regulated

  7. Regulation for delivery of subsidies for urgent safety measures for atomic power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This rule is established under the provisions of the law for the proper enforcement of subsidy budgets and the ordinance for the execution of this law and to practice these provisions. It is applied to the delivery of subsidies for the expenses of the measures taken beforehand for the security of inhabitants in the surrounding areas of atomic power generating facilities in the emergency time of hazard or the danger of the occurrence of hazard by such facilities. Basic terms are defined, such as atomic power generating facilities and others, prefecture concerned, cities, towns and villages concerned, emergency communication network arrangement business, emergency medical facility arrangement business, business of holding hazard prevention course and expected date of beginning operation. Directors of ministries and agencies concerned deliver, if necessary, to prefectures concerned subsidies for all or a part of the expenses needed for the businesses of emergency communication network arrangement, emergency medical facility arrangement and holding hazard prevention course. The terms of delivery and the amounts of subsidies vary according to the kinds of businesses. Prefectures which intend to apply for the delivery of subsidies shall file to the director of the ministry or agency concerned the specified application attaching the operation plans of businesses and the general explanation of atomic power generating facilities, etc. The decision and conditions of delivery, reports on the situations and results of businesses and other related matters are defined, respectively. (Okada, K.)

  8. Introduction to structural failure modes for nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.W.; Gurbuz, O.

    1993-01-01

    This introduction provides a background of the evaluation methods for earthquakes larger than design basis. Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) and seismic margin assessment (SMA) methods are introduced to the reader. The basic parameters used to define seismic capacity for each method are explained. The objectives of both evaluation methods and how they can be used to evaluate the adequacy of a seismic design are discussed. General issues related to computing seismic capacity are reviewed relative to SPRA and SMA. Four companion papers presented in the journal following this introduction discuss the types of information (i.e., dynamic tests, earthquake experience, and analytical data) that are used to determine the real capacity of structures and equipment in nuclear power plants to resist earthquakes. The motivation for discussing these three types of information is presented as an introduction to these papers that following in this journal edition. The purpose of the present paper is to lay the groundwork and provide motivation for these papers

  9. Compensator design for corrector magnet power supply of TPS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Y.-S.; Chen, J.-F.; Liu, K.-B.; Liu, C.-Y.; Wang, B.-S.

    2017-01-01

    From 2012 to 2015, Taiwan government has a most important technology project is Taiwan Photon Source (TPS), the total budget of TPS fund to over US300 million. It set up a synchrotron storage ring (electron energy of 3.3 GeV, circumference of 518 m, and low emittance) that provides one of the world's brightest synchrotron sources of x-rays. This study presents a compensator design for corrector magnet power supply to avoid limitations in stabilizing the frequency when the machine output current load is valid. A lead-lag compensator had been built in a full-bridge converter to improve the system bandwidth. Lead-lag compensators influence various disciplines, such as robotics, satellite control, automobile diagnostics, and laser frequency stabilization. These components are important building blocks in analog control systems and can also be used in digital control. A 50V output voltage and 10A output current prototype converter is fabricated in the laboratory. From the experimental results, the effectiveness of the control loop design can be verified from the gain margin and phase margin.

  10. Compensator design for corrector magnet power supply of TPS facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y.-S.; Chen, J.-F.; Liu, K.-B.; Liu, C.-Y.; Wang, B.-S.

    2017-10-01

    From 2012 to 2015, Taiwan government has a most important technology project is Taiwan Photon Source (TPS), the total budget of TPS fund to over US300 million. It set up a synchrotron storage ring (electron energy of 3.3 GeV, circumference of 518 m, and low emittance) that provides one of the world's brightest synchrotron sources of x-rays. This study presents a compensator design for corrector magnet power supply to avoid limitations in stabilizing the frequency when the machine output current load is valid. A lead-lag compensator had been built in a full-bridge converter to improve the system bandwidth. Lead-lag compensators influence various disciplines, such as robotics, satellite control, automobile diagnostics, and laser frequency stabilization. These components are important building blocks in analog control systems and can also be used in digital control. A 50V output voltage and 10A output current prototype converter is fabricated in the laboratory. From the experimental results, the effectiveness of the control loop design can be verified from the gain margin and phase margin.

  11. Deployment of Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility with the Introduction of Nuclear Power Plants in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadrack, Antoony; Kim, Changlak [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Uljin (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear power program will inevitably generate radioactive wastes including low-and intermediate radioactive waste and spent fuel. These wastes are hazardous to human health and the environment and therefore, a reliable radioactive waste disposal facility becomes a necessity. This paper describes Kenya's basic plans for the disposal of radioactive wastes expected from the nuclear program. This plan is important as an initial implementation of a national Low to intermediate level wastes storage facility in Kenya. In Kenya, radioactive waste is generated from the use of radioactive materials in medicine, industry, education and research and development. Future radioactive waste is expected to arise from nuclear reactors, oil exploration, radioisotope and fuel production, and research reactors as shown in table 1. The best strategy is to store the LILW and spent fuel temporarily within reactor sites pending construction of a centralized interim storage facility or final disposal facility. The best philosophy is to introduce both repository and nuclear power programs concurrently. Research and development on volume reduction technology and conceptual design of disposal facility of LILW should be pursued. Safe management of radioactive waste is a national responsibility for sustainable generation of nuclear power. The republic of Kenya is set to become the second African nuclear power generation country after South Africa.

  12. Human engineering considerations in the design of New Virginia Power Radwaste facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankley, A.V.; Morris, L.L.; Lippard, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Human engineering principles were considered by Virginia Power in the recent design of new radwaste facilities (NRFs) for both the Surry and North Anna power stations. Virginia Power recognized that the rigorous application of human engineering principles to the NRF design was essential to the ultimate success or failure of the facilities. Success of the NRF should not only be measured in the volume of radwaste processed but also by other factors such as (a) availability and maintainability of preferred equipment, (b) as-low-as-reasonably-achievable considerations, (c) actual release rates versus achievable release rates, and (d) flexibility to deal with varying circumstances. Each of these success criteria would suffer as the result of operator/human inefficiencies or error. Therefore, human engineering should be applied to the maximum practical extent to minimize such inefficiencies or errors. No method is ever going to ensure a perfectly human-engineered facility design. Virginia Power believes, however, that significant strides have been made in efforts to design and construct a successful radwaste processing facility, a facility where operating success rests with the ability of the human operators to perform their jobs in an efficient and reliable fashion

  13. Power Systems Development Facility. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes the work completed during the third quarter of a project entitled Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion. The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phase expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  14. Lawrence Berkeley laboratory neutral-beam engineering test facility power-supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, I.C.; Arthur, C.A.; deVries, G.J.; Owren, H.M.

    1981-10-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is upgrading the neutral beam source test facility (NBSTF) into a neutral beam engineering test facility (NBETF) with increased capabilities for the development of neutral beam systems. The NBETF will have an accel power supply capable of 170 kV, 70 A, 30 sec pulse length, 10% duty cycle; and the auxiliary power supplies required for the sources. This paper describes the major components, their ratings and capabilities, and the flexibility designed to accomodate the needs of source development

  15. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... the Federal Power Act, at which non-Federal hydroelectric development is permissible; or (2) An...

  16. Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design

  17. Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design.

  18. Locations and attributes of utility-scale solar power facilities in Colorado and New Mexico, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignizio, Drew A.; Carr, Natasha B.

    2012-01-01

    The data series consists of polygonal boundaries for utility-scale solar power facilities (both photovoltaic and concentrating solar power) located within Colorado and New Mexico as of December 2011. Attributes captured for each facility include the following: facility name, size/production capacity (in MW), type of solar technology employed, location, state, operational status, year the facility came online, and source identification information. Facility locations and perimeters were derived from 1-meter true-color aerial photographs (2011) produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP); the photographs have a positional accuracy of about ±5 meters (accessed from the NAIP GIS service: http://gis.apfo.usda.gov/arcgis/services). Solar facility perimeters represent the full extent of each solar facility site, unless otherwise noted. When visible, linear features such as fences or road lines were used to delineate the full extent of the solar facility. All related equipment including buildings, power substations, and other associated infrastructure were included within the solar facility. If solar infrastructure was indistinguishable from adjacent infrastructure, or if solar panels were installed on existing building tops, only the solar collecting equipment was digitized. The "Polygon" field indicates whether the "equipment footprint" or the full "site outline" was digitized. The spatial accuracy of features that represent site perimeters or an equipment footprint is estimated at +/- 10 meters. Facilities under construction or not fully visible in the NAIP imagery at the time of digitization (December 2011) are represented by an approximate site outline based on the best available information and documenting materials. The spatial accuracy of these facilities cannot be estimated without more up-to-date imagery – users are advised to consult more recent imagery as it becomes available. The "Status" field provides information about the operational

  19. Proceedings of the 9. National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Aziz, Ferhat; Untoro, Pudji; Su'ud, Zaki; Zarkasi, Amin Santoso; Lasman, As Natio

    2003-08-01

    The ninth proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities held by National Nuclear Energy Agency and PLN-JTK. The aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about Safety and Nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of Technology High Temperature Reactor and Application for National Development Sustainable and High Technology. This seminar cover all aspects Technology, Power Reactor, Research Reactor High Temperature Reactor and Nuclear Facilities. There are 20 articles have separated index

  20. Visibility and Visual Characteristics of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System Power Tower Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Robert [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Abplanalp, Jennifer M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to document the visibility and visual characteristics of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS), a utility-scale solar power tower facility located on land administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management in southern California. Study activities consisted of field observations of the ISEGS facility and comparison of the observations made in the field with the visual contrast assessments and visual simulations in the ISEGS Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) and supporting documents created prior to ISEGS construction. Field observations of ISEGS were made from 19 locations within 35 mi (56 km) of the facility in the course of one week in September 2014. The study results established that reflected sunlight from the receivers was the primary source of visual contrast from the operating ISEGS facility. The ISEGS facility was found to be a major source of visual contrast for all observations up to 20 mi (32 km), and was easily visible at 35 mi. Glare from individual heliostats was frequently visible, and often brighter than the reflected light from the receivers. Heliostat glare caused discomfort for one or more viewers at distances up to 20 mi. The ISEGS power blocks were brightly lit at night, and were conspicuous at the observation distance of approximately 6 mi (10 km). The facility is substantially brighter and is seen more clearly in the field than in photographs of the facility or in the prepared simulations, which were based on photographs. The simulations of the ISEGS facility in the Final EIS, which were evaluated as part of this study, sometimes lacked spatial accuracy and realism. The evaluated simulations generally under-represented the actual visual contrast from the project, and some of the contrast ratings in the Final EIS predicted substantially lower levels of visual contrast than were actually observed for the operating facility.

  1. Adequacy of power-to-volume scaling philosophy to simulate natural circulation in Integral Test Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.; Venkat Raj, V.; Aritomi, Masanori

    1998-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations were carried out to study the adequacy of power-to-volume scaling philosophy for the simulation of natural circulation and to establish the scaling philosophy applicable for the design of the Integral Test Facility (ITF-AHWR) for the Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). The results indicate that a reduction in the flow channel diameter of the scaled facility as required by the power-to-volume scaling philosophy may affect the simulation of natural circulation behaviour of the prototype plants. This is caused by the distortions due to the inability to simulate the frictional resistance of the scaled facility. Hence, it is recommended that the flow channel diameter of the scaled facility should be as close as possible to the prototype. This was verified by comparing the natural circulation behaviour of a prototype 220 MWe Indian PHWR and its scaled facility (FISBE-1) designed based on power-to-volume scaling philosophy. It is suggested from examinations using a mathematical model and a computer code that the FISBE-1 simulates the steady state and the general trend of transient natural circulation behaviour of the prototype reactor adequately. Finally the proposed scaling method was applied for the design of the ITF-AHWR. (author)

  2. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: (1) Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. (2) Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. (3) Combustion Gas Turbine. (4) Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  3. The regulation for delivery of subsidies for measures of promoting power source location for nuclear power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    According to the law for the arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities, the regulations concern the allocation of subsidies to promote the most efficient way of siting nuclear power facilities. The contents consist of the following: limits on the subsidies, terms of subsidy allocations, the sum of subsidies for each respective year, applications for subsidies, determination of subsidy allocations, withdrawal of applications, the conditions attached to the allocations, a report on the work proceedings, a report on the results, confirmation on the sum of the subsidies, withdrawal of the decision for subsidies, limitations for disposal of the properties, payment of subsidies, accounting of the subsidy operations, a record of the subsidies, and the chief in the governmental office concerned. (Mori, K.)

  4. Situation of the radioactive waste management and the employee radiation exposure in commercial power generation reactor facilities in fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    (1) Situation of the radioactive waste management in commercial power generating reactor facilities: The owners of power generation reactor facilities are obligated not to exceed the target dose around the sites by law in the radioactive waste management. The release of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes and the storage of radioactive solid wastes in respective reactor facilities in fiscal 1980 are presented in tables (for the former, the data since 1971 are also given). The release control values were satisfied in all the facilities. (2) Situation of employe radiation exposure in commercial power generating reactor facilities: The owners of power generation reactor facilities are obligated not to exceed the permissible exposure doses by law. The Employe exposure doses in respective reactor facilities in fiscal 1980 are given in tables. All exposure doses were below the permissible levels. (J.P.N.)

  5. Administrative limits for tritium concentrations found in non-potable groundwater at nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, R.; Hart, D.; WIllert, C.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is a regulatory limit available for tritium in drinking water, but no such limit for non-potable groundwater. Voluntary administrative limits for site groundwater may be established at nuclear power facilities to ensure minimal risk to human health and the environment, and provide guidance for investigation or other actions intended to prevent exceedances of future regulatory or guideline limits. This work presents a streamlined approach for nuclear power facilities to develop three tiers of administrative limits for tritium in groundwater so that facilities can identify abnormal/uncontrolled releases of tritium at an early stage, and take appropriate actions to investigate, control, and protect groundwater. Tier 1 represents an upper limit of background, Tier 2 represents a level between background and Tier 3, and Tier 3 represents a risk-based concentration protective of down-gradient receptors. (author)

  6. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1991. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1991 annual reports submitted by about 436 licensees indicated that approximately 206,732 individuals were monitored, 182,334 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.15 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.31 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 96,231 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 436 covered licensees during 1991. Some 68,115 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 7,763 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.52 rem (cSv)

  7. Defense waste processing facility at Savannah River Plant. Instrument and power jumpers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckendorm, F.M. II.

    1983-06-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for waste vitrification at the Savannah River Plant is in the final design stage. Development of equipment interconnecting devices or jumpers for use within the remotely operated processing canyon is now complete. These devices provide for the specialized instrument and electrical requirements of the DWPF process for low-voltage, high-frequency, and high-power interconnections

  8. International inventory of training facilities in nuclear power and its fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Because the development of trained manpower is important for full use of nuclear power, the International Atomic Energy Agency has compiled this first inventory of training facilities and programs. It is based on information submitted by Member States and received up to 31 January 1977. The inventory is arranged by country, type of training organization, and by subject

  9. State-of-the-art WEB -technologies and ecological safety of nuclear power engineering facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batij, V.G.; Batij, E.V.; Rud'ko, V.M.; Kotlyarov, V.T.

    2004-01-01

    Prospects of web-technologies using in the field of improvement radiation safety level of nuclear power engineering facilities is seen. It is shown that application of such technologies will enable entirely using the data of all information systems of radiation control

  10. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC 1 licensees during the years 1969 through 1989. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC 1 licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1989 annual reports submitted by about 448 licensees indicated that approximately 216,294 individuals were monitored 111,000 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual does of 0.18 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of 0.36 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 113,535 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 448 covered licensees during 1989. Some 76,561 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 10, 344 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.64 rem (cSv)

  11. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1988. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1988 annual reports submitted by about 429 licensees indicated that approximately 220,048 individuals were monitored, 113,00 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.20 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of 0.41 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 113,072 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 429 covered licensees during 1988. Some 80,211 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 8,760 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.27 rem (cSv). 17 refs., 11 figs., 29 tabs

  12. Facilities for treatment of radioactive contaminated water in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The standard applies to processes applied in facilities for treatment of radioactive contaminated water in nuclear power plants with LWR- and HTR-type reactors. It does not apply to the treatment of concentrates obtained in the decontamination of water. (orig.) [de

  13. Qualification and actuation of the independent technical supervision organisms in nuclear power plants and others facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    This norm presents the following objectives: establishment of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission requirements for qualifying an institution as independent technical supervision organization, in a specific area of activity related to nuclear power plants and others nuclear or radioactive facilities as appropriated; regulation of the independent technical supervision and others complementary activities to be executed by an independent technical supervision organism

  14. Analysis of Opportunity to Create Self-Regulating Reactor Facility of Extra-Low Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazansky, Y.A.; Levtchenko, V.A.; Yuriev, Y.S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with fundamental possibilities (economy, safety, self-regulation) of creating an extra-low power reactor facility for heat supply. It contains the results of calculations for thermal and fast neutron reactors. The concept of this type of a reactor had been developed by the contributors earlier

  15. The regulation for delivery of subsidies for measures of promoting power source location for nuclear power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The regulation is defined under the law for arrangement of surrounding areas of power generating facilities and the law concerning subsidies and others. Limits of the subsidies are stipulated respectively for establishment of a unit and simultaneous construction of more than 2 units of power generating facilities in the area of self-governing bodies concerned. Limits of the subsidies for an arrangement business out of the area of self-governing bodies where the facilities are set up shall be equal to those of the subsidies for such bodies. The Director General of Science and Technology Agency and the Minister of International Trade and Industry may make the amounts otherwise determined the limits of the subsidies, when considered necessary successfully to build the facilities. The term of delivery is from a fiscal year in which a later one of either the day of beginning of the construction concerned or the day of acknowledgment of the arrangement program of the business is included, through a fiscal year when the work finishes. An application for subsidies shall be filed to the head of the authorities concerned with gists of the business according to the forms attached. Receiving the application, the head of the authorities shall examine it and notify to the applicant without delay in writing the decision of delivery and its conditions, when such settlement is made. (Okada, K.)

  16. Annual monitoring and surveillance report for Piqua Nuclear Power Facility, Piqua, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosho, G.D.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the decommissioned Piqua Nuclear Power Facility which is located in Piqua, Ohio near the Greater Miami River. The Facility was built by the US Atomic Energy Commission (now U. S. Department of Energy) and was operated from 1963 to 1966. The reactor was retired prior to 1970 and the facility was leased to the city of Piqua for use as offices and equipment storage. In December 1991, a radiological survey was done of the facility to document its radiological condition. The data show that all radiological parameters measured were essentially the same as that found in the natural environment. The only exception was that low levels of radioactive contamination were detected in one drain on the 56.5 ft elevation, but the radiation exposure rate in that area was also typical of natural background

  17. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Status report. Humboldt Bay Power Plant Unit 3, SAFSTOR decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, B.L.; Haffner, D.R.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-06-01

    This document explains the purpose of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program and summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 facility. Preparations to put this facility into a custodial safe storage (SAFSTOR) mode are currently scheduled for completion by June 30, 1986. This report gives the status of activities as of June 1985. A final summary report will be issued after completion of this SAFSTOR decommissioning activity. Information included in this status report has been collected from the facility decommissioning plan, environmental report, and other sources made available by the licensee. This data has been placed in a computerized data base system which permits data manipulation and summarization. A description of the computer reports that can be generated by the decommissioning data system (DDS) for Humboldt Bay and samples of those reports are included in this document

  18. Acoustic assessment report for Toronto Hydro Energy Services Inc. Ashbridge's Bay power generation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, F.; Shinbin, N.

    2010-04-01

    This acoustic assessment report was conducted to determine the potential noise impacts of a biogas cogeneration plant that will be located on a street in a primarily industrial area of Toronto, Ontario. The facility will be comprised of seven 1.416 MW biogas-fired reciprocating engine generators and a single flare. The report presented results obtained from noise level calculations and noise modelling studies of the on-site equipment at the planned facility. The cogeneration plant will utilize biogas produced in existing digesters to generate electricity and hot water. The biogas will be produced by anaerobic digestion from municipal sewage waste at an adjacent facility. It is expected that the facility will generate 9.912 MW of electricity from the generators. Heat resulting from the biogas combustion process is recovered from engine and exhaust flue gases by heat exchangers. The facility will operate continuously. Significant noise sources at the facility include generator exhaust gas stacks; air intake points; building ventilation fans; and roof-top heat dump radiators. Sound power levels determined for each of the noise sources were based upon worst-case operating scenarios. Results of the assessment indicated that the facility is in compliance with all Ministry of the Environment (MOE) requirements. 5 refs., 10 tabs., 4 figs.

  19. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, July 1 through September 30, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; Combustion Gas Turbine; and Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility.

  20. Economic impacts of zebra mussels on drinking water treatment and electric power generation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Nancy A; O'Neill, Charles R; Knuth, Barbara A; Brown, Tommy L

    2007-07-01

    Invasions of nonnative species such as zebra mussels can have both ecological and economic consequences. The economic impacts of zebra mussels have not been examined in detail since the mid-1990s. The purpose of this study was to quantify the annual and cumulative economic impact of zebra mussels on surface water-dependent drinking water treatment and electric power generation facilities (where previous research indicated the greatest impacts). The study time frame was from the first full year after discovery in North America (Lake St. Clair, 1989) to the present (2004); the study area was throughout the mussels' North American range. A mail survey resulted in a response rate of 31% for electric power companies and 41% for drinking water treatment plants. Telephone interviews with a sample of nonrespondents assessed nonresponse bias; only one difference was found and adjusted for. Over one-third (37%) of surveyed facilities reported finding zebra mussels in the facility and almost half (45%) have initiated preventive measures to prevent zebra mussels from entering the facility operations. Almost all surveyed facilities (91%) with zebra mussels have used control or mitigation alternatives to remove or control zebra mussels. We estimated that 36% of surveyed facilities experienced an economic impact. Expanding the sample to the population of the study area, we estimated 267 million dollars (BCa 95% CI = 161 million dollars - 467 million dollars) in total economic costs for electric generation and water treatment facilities through late 2004, since 1989. Annual costs were greater (44,000 dollars/facility) during the early years of zebra mussel infestation than in recent years (30,000 dollars). As a result of this and other factors, early predictions of the ultimate costs of the zebra mussel invasion may have been excessive.

  1. Outline of construction and facility features of Onagawa nuclear power station Unit No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umimura, Yoshiharu; Tsunoda, Ryohei; Watanabe, Kazunori

    1996-01-01

    Tohoku Electric Power Company promotes development of various power sources to provide a stable supply of electricity in the future, and nuclear power takes a leading part. In August 1989, construction of Onagawa nuclear power plant Unit No. 2 (825MW) was started, following Unit No. 1 (524MW) which went on line in 1984 as Tohoku Electric's first nuclear power plant unit. Unit No. 2 began commercial operation in July 1995 through satisfactory construction work such as RPV hydraulic test in March 1994, fuel loading in October 1994, and various startup tests in each power stage. The design and construction of Unit No. 2 reflect construction and operation experience gained from Unit No. 1, and the latest technology, including that of the LWR Improvement and Standardization Program, was adopted to enhance facility reliability, improve operation and maintenance performance, and reduce worker dosage. Features of the facility, construction techniques, and a description of preoperation of Onagawa nuclear power plant Unit No. 2 are described in this paper. (author)

  2. Proposed power upgrade of the hot fuel examination facility's neutron radiography reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both non-destructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the non-destructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography. When the NRAD facility was designed and constructed, an operating power level of 250 kw was considered to be adequate for obtaining radiographs of the type of specimens envisaged at that time. Since that time, several things have occurred that have tended to increase radiography exposure times to as much as 90 minutes each. In order to decrease exposure times, the reactor power level is to be increased from 250 kW to 1 MW. This increase in power will necessitate several engineering and design changes. The proposed upgrade of the NRAD facility will increase the neutron flux available in the beam tubes appreciably. The increased flux will enable NRAD to continue to meet its operational commitments in a timely manner and to develop state-of-the-art techniques in the future as it has in the past

  3. Temporary storage facility for spent nuclear fuels at the Atucha I nuclear power station (CNA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasinger, K.

    1983-01-01

    According to plans of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), the spent nuclear fuel elements of the Atucha I Nuclear Power Station are to be stored temporarily pending a decision about the ultimate disposal concept. The holding capacity of the first fuel storage facility built by the German KWU together with the whole power plant had been expanded in 1978 to a level good until mid-1982. In 1977, KWU drafted the concept of another fuel storage facility. Like the first one, it was designed as a wet storage system attached to the power plant installations and had a holding capacity of 6944 fuel elements, which corresponds to some 1100 te of uranium. This extends the storage capacity up until 1996. In 1978, KWU was commissioned by CNEA to plan the whole facility and deliver the mechanical and electrical equipment. CNEA themselves assumed responsibility for the construction work. The second fuel storage facility was commissioned three years after the start of construction. (orig.) [de

  4. Testing of the Engineering Model Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluids and Combustion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.; Fox, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (GRC) in Cleveland, OH and the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL have designed and developed an Engineering Model (EM) Electrical Power Control Unit (EPCU) for the Fluids Combustion Facility, (FCF) experiments to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS power distribution system for the FCF's space experiments'test and telemetry hardware. Furthermore. it is proposed to be the common power interface for all experiments. The EPCU is a three kilowatt 12OVdc-to-28Vdc converter utilizing three independent Power Converter Units (PCUs), each rated at 1kWe (36Adc @ 28Vdc) which are paralleled and synchronized. Each converter may be fed from one of two ISS power channels. The 28Vdc loads are connected to the EPCU output via 48 solid-state and current-limiting switches, rated at 4Adc each. These switches may be paralleled to supply any given load up to the 108Adc normal operational limit of the paralleled converters. The EPCU was designed in this manner to maximize allocated-power utilization. to shed loads autonomously, to provide fault tolerance. and to provide a flexible power converter and control module to meet various ISS load demands. Tests of the EPCU in the Power Systems Facility testbed at GRC reveal that the overall converted-power efficiency, is approximately 89% with a nominal-input voltage of 12OVdc and a total load in the range of 4O% to 110% rated 28Vdc load. (The PCUs alone have an efficiency of approximately 94.5%). Furthermore, the EM unit passed all flight-qualification level (and beyond) vibration tests, passed ISS EMI (conducted, radiated. and susceptibility) requirements. successfully operated for extended periods in a thermal/vacuum chamber, was integrated with a proto-flight experiment and passed all stability and functional requirements.

  5. Considerations in the development and implementation of a maintenance robot for nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrabacher, A.; Carlton, R.; Gelhaus, F.

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Division of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) began its automated nuclear plant maintenance research (research project 2232) in 1982 with surveys of domestic and Japanese ongoing and potential uses of robotic systems in nuclear power facilities. After studying these potential research areas, EPRI initiated a three-pronged effort. All surveys concluded that a mobile system for general environmental, visual, and auto surveillance would be beneficial, and EPRI contracted for the development and evaluation of the Surveyor robot. Work also began to catalog existing systems and to quantify the methodology that a utility could use to optimally complete the plant-mission, robot-system selection process. The conceptualizing phase of the effort defined the necessary physical attributes for the machine to perform a variety of maintenance tasks. Characteristics such as mobility, strength, conditions of service, materials of construction, tool functional requirements, facility interfaces, and operator interface were defined to the extent practical. Substantial versatility is required for the variability of the targeted maintenance tasks and for the variability of facility layouts and designs found throughout the nuclear industry. A key contribution to this development effort comes from the project's Utility Advisors Group. The contract's host utility provides membership to lead this group, and that company will train in the use of the machine for 6 months prior to utilizing it in their power plant for 2 yr

  6. S-band 45 MW peak power test facility at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanmode, A. Yashwant; Reddy, Sivananda; Mulchandani, J.; Mohania, Praveen; Shrivastava, B. Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    RRCAT is engaged in the design and development of high energy electron LINAC as future injectors for the Booster Synchrotron for Indus-1 and Indus-2 SRS. The high energy LINAC will need microwave power over 30 MW depending on the number of structures to be energized. In order to have advance preparations for this development a 45 MW S-Band test facility has been designed and developed at RRCAT. The test stand is built around a 45 MW peak power S-band pulsed klystron, A conventional pulse forming network based modulator for klystron has been designed and developed. The WR-284 waveguide transmission system consisting of dual directional couplers, SF 6 gas pressurization unit, high power waveguide load and arc sensor has been developed and interfaced with the klystron. The klystron has been successfully tested up to 30 MW peak power at 2856 MHz on SF 6 pressurized waveguide line. A solid state S Band driver amplifier up to 1 kW output power was designed developed for driving the klystron. This paper describes the results of 30 MW peak power test of this facility. (author)

  7. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 284-E and 284-W power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, D.R.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP- 0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years. The 284-E and 284-W Power Plants are coal-fired plants used to generate steam. Electricity is not generated at these facilities. The maximum production of steam is approximately 159 t (175 tons)/h at 101 kg (225 lb)/in 2 . Steam generated at these facilities is used in other process facilities (i. e., the B Plant, Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant, 242-A Evaporator) for heating and process operations. The functions or processes associated with these facilities do not have the potential to generate radioactive airborne effluents or radioactive liquid effluents, therefore, radiation monitoring equipment is not used on the discharge of these streams. The functions or processes associated with the production of steam result in the use, storage, management and disposal of hazardous materials

  8. Culture-based Identification Of Microcystin-Degrading Bacteria In the Sandusky Bay and Maumee Bay of Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiston, A.; Mou, X.

    2012-12-01

    Harmful cyanobacteria blooms (cyanoHABs) are a serious issue that affects wildlife, human health, recreation and local economics worldwide. CyanoHABs produce cyanotoxins, such as microcystins (MCs) that lead to skin irritation, illness and liver tumors. Bacterially mediated degradation of MCs plays a key role to transform these toxic substrates to less harmful metabolites in natural environments. However, only a few Sphingomonos species have been isolated for degradation of MCs and many of which are from other habitats such as water plants. This project aims to isolate and identify bacteria that can degrade MC-LR and MC-RR, two major forms of MCs found during cyanoHABs in Lake Erie. Water samples were collected from the surface of Sandusky Bay and Maumee Bay of Lake Erie and immediately filtered through 3.0 -μm-pore-size membrane filters to obtain bacterioplankton fraction. The filtrates were amended with excessive inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus compounds and incubated in the dark for a week to purposely establish a carbon-limited condition. Afterwards, enrichment microcosms were established in flasks filled with pre-incubated bacterioplankton and single MC compounds (final concentration 10 μM). Once cell growth was confirmed by flow cytometry-based cell counting, bacterial cells in enriched microcosms were transferred onto solid surfaces, i.e., GFF filter and noble agar for colony isolation. Obtained single colonies were inoculated in defined liquid media with MCs as single carbon source. DNA was extracted from each purified isolate and analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP). A total of 18 different RFLP banding patterns were found, indicating MC-degrading bacteria may be heterogeneous in studied water samples. 16S rRNA genes of selected bacterial isolates were PCR amplified and sequenced for taxonomic identification. Our results demonstrated that MCs can be degraded by multiple bacterial species in Lake Erie. Future directions

  9. An environmental testing facility for Space Station Freedom power management and distribution hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackola, Arthur S.; Hartjen, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    The plans for a new test facility, including new environmental test systems, which are presently under construction, and the major environmental Test Support Equipment (TSE) used therein are addressed. This all-new Rocketdyne facility will perform space simulation environmental tests on Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) hardware to Space Station Freedom (SSF) at the Engineering Model, Qualification Model, and Flight Model levels of fidelity. Testing will include Random Vibration in three axes - Thermal Vacuum, Thermal Cycling and Thermal Burn-in - as well as numerous electrical functional tests. The facility is designed to support a relatively high throughput of hardware under test, while maintaining the high standards required for a man-rated space program.

  10. Operation and utilization of low power research reactor critical facility for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, S.K.; Karhadkar, C.G.

    2017-01-01

    An Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been designed and developed for maximum power generation from thorium considering large reserves of thorium. The design envisages using 54 pin MOX cluster with different enrichment of "2"3"3U and Pu in Thoria fuel pins. Theoretical models developed to neutron transport and the geometrical details of the reactor including all reactivity devices involve approximations in modelling, resulting in uncertainties. With a view to minimize these uncertainties, a low power research reactor Critical Facility was built in which cold clean fuel can be arranged in a desired and precise geometry. Different experiments conducted in this facility greatly contribute to understand and validate the physics design parameters

  11. IAEA Director General visits purification facility at Polish thermal power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    On the occasion of his first visit to Poland, the Director General of the IAEA visited an industrial scale Electron Beam Demonstration facility constructed with IAEA assistance at the Pomorzany Electric Power Station near Szczecin. The facility uses an electron beam device to purify gas effluents from coal burning. By the addition of ammonia, the process permits the production of fertilizer as a by-product. This is an excellent example of how nuclear techniques can be used to reduce the emissions from conventional power plants. Experience gained will help to demonstrate the environmental effectiveness and economic competitiveness of this technology and serve to illustrate how the IAEA in cooperation with Member States can provide advanced nuclear technique to industrial companies

  12. Study on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma for the ICP test facility at HUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Haikun [School of Electronic Information and Communications, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Dong; Wang, Chenre; Li, Xiaofei; Chen, Dezhi; Liu, Kaifeng; Zhou, Chi; Pan, Ruimin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-10-15

    An Radio-Frequency (RF) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) ion source test facility has been successfully developed at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). As part of a study on hydrogen plasma, the influence of three main operation parameters on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma was investigated. At 6 Pa, the RF power necessary to ignite plasma influenced little by the filament heating current from 5 A to 9 A. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma increased rapidly with the operation pressure decreasing from 8 Pa to 4 Pa. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma decreased with the number of coil turns from 6 to 10. During the experiments, plasma was produced with the electron density of the order of 10{sup 16}m{sup -3} and the electron temperature of around 4 eV. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Operation reliability analysis of independent power plants of gas-transmission system distant production facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Maksim V.; Voytkov, Ivan S.; Vysokomornaya, Olga V.; Vysokomorny, Vladimir S.

    2015-01-01

    The new approach was developed to analyze the failure causes in operation of linear facilities independent power supply sources (mini-CHP-plants) of gas-transmission system in Eastern part of Russia. Triggering conditions of ceiling operation substance temperature at condenser output were determined with mathematical simulation use of unsteady heat and mass transfer processes in condenser of mini-CHP-plants. Under these conditions the failure probability in operation of independent power supply sources is increased. Influence of environmental factors (in particular, ambient temperature) as well as output electric capability values of power plant on mini-CHP-plant operation reliability was analyzed. Values of mean time to failure and power plant failure density during operation in different regions of Eastern Siberia and Far East of Russia were received with use of numerical simulation results of heat and mass transfer processes at operation substance condensation.

  14. Experiences in the development of an emergency response facility (ERF) system for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seisdedos, A.; Sanchez-Fornie, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident gave rise to a series of new requirements with which Nuclear Power Plants must comply and amongst which the implementation of emergency response facilities, particularly the SPDS, has received special attention. This paper covers the experience and problems encountered in the developing of the engineering necessary for the detailed definition of the ERF in a Nuclear Power Plant in the commercial operation phase. Also, a real example is provided for the case of a plant in the last phase of construction and installation. This will serve to illustrate each of the topics covered. (author)

  15. Reliability analysis for power supply system in a reprocessing facility based on GO methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Renze

    2014-01-01

    GO methodology was applied to analyze the reliability of power supply system in a typical reprocessing facility. Based on the fact that tie breakers are set in the system, tie breaker operator was defined. Then GO methodology modeling and quantitative analysis were performed sequently, minimal cut sets and average unavailability of the system were obtained. Parallel analysis between GO methodology and fault tree methodology was also performed. The results showed that setup of tie breakers was rational and necessary and that the modeling was much easier and the chart was much more succinct for GO methodology parallel with fault tree methodology to analyze the reliability of the power supply system. (author)

  16. Upgrade of DC power supply system in ITER CS model coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimono, Mitsugu; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Keita; Kawano, Katsumi; Isono, Takaaki

    2014-03-01

    Objective of the ITER CS Model Coil Test Facility is to evaluate a large scale superconducting conductor for fusion using the Central Solenoid (CS) Model Coil, which can generate a 13T magnetic field in the inner bore with a 1.5 m diameter. The facility is composed of a helium refrigerator / liquefier system, a DC power supply system, a vacuum system and a data acquisition system. The DC power supply system supplies currents to two superconducting coils, the CS Model Coil and an insert coil. A 50-kA DC power supply is installed for the CS Model Coil and two 30 kA DC power supplies are installed for an insert coil. In order to evaluate superconducting performance of a conductor used for ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coils whose operating current is 68 kA, the line for an insert coil is upgraded. A 10 kA DC power supply was added, DC circuit breakers were upgraded, bus bars and current measuring instrument were replaced. In accordance to the upgrade, operation manual was revised. (author)

  17. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Design Requirements Document (DRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, H. S.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Bents, D. J.; Hatch, A. M.

    1981-01-01

    A description and the design requirements for the 200 MWe (nominal) net output MHD Engineering Test Facility (ETF) Conceptual Design, are presented. Performance requirements for the plant are identified and process conditions are indicated at interface stations between the major systems comprising the plant. Also included are the description, functions, interfaces and requirements for each of these major systems. The lastest information (1980-1981) from the MHD technology program are integrated with elements of a conventional steam electric power generating plant.

  18. Low power microwave tests on RF gun prototype of the Iranian Light Source Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sadeghipanah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce RF electron gun of Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF pre-injection system. Design, fabrication and low-power microwave tests results of the prototype RF electron gun have been described in detail. This paper also explains the tuning procedure of the prototype RF electron gun to the desired resonant frequency. The outcomes of this project brighten the path to the fabrication of the RF electron gun by the local industries  

  19. Advanced Education Facilities for Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Lungeanu, Marian; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    A new approach for the project- and problem-based learning method is achieved at Aalborg University. Two new laboratories called Flexible Drives System Laboratory (FDSL) and Green Power Laboratory (GPL) have been developed. A common feature is that these facilities are using entirely Simulink for...... for programming, a very user-friendly block-oriented tool for designing control and different setups have been realized for practical implementation. Both the hardware and the course content is described in this paper....

  20. Emergency and backup power supplies at Department of Energy facilities: Augmented Evaluation Team -- Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This report documents the results of the Defense Programs (DP) Augmented Evaluation Team (AET) review of emergency and backup power supplies (i.e., generator, uninterruptible power supply, and battery systems) at DP facilities. The review was conducted in response to concerns expressed by former Secretary of Energy James D. Watkins over the number of incidents where backup power sources failed to provide electrical power during tests or actual demands. The AET conducted a series of on-site reviews for the purpose of understanding the design, operation, maintenance, and safety significance of emergency and backup power (E&BP) supplies. The AET found that the quality of programs related to maintenance of backup power systems varies greatly among the sites visited, and often among facilities at the same site. No major safety issues were identified. However, there are areas where the AET believes the reliability of emergency and backup power systems can and should be improved. Recommendations for improving the performance of E&BP systems are provided in this report. The report also discusses progress made by Management and Operating (M&O) contractors to improve the reliability of backup sources used in safety significant applications. One area that requires further attention is the analysis and understanding of the safety implications of backup power equipment. This understanding is needed for proper graded-approach implementation of Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, and to help ensure that equipment important to the safety of DOE workers, the public, and the environment is identified, classified, recognized, and treated as such by designers, users, and maintainers. Another area considered important for improving E&BP system performance is the assignment of overall ownership responsibility and authority for ensuring that E&BP equipment performs adequately and that reliability and availability are maintained at acceptable levels.

  1. The performance of the Armenia Nuclear Power Plant and power facilities in the 1988 Armenia earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, P.I.

    1989-01-01

    The speaker presents the geology, seismology, and effects of the Armenian earthquake which occured on December 7,1988. This is a highly industrialized area with numerous power plants, including one nuclear power plant in addition to several conventional plants. The response of the nuclear plant to the earthquake is described in detail, and the speaker concludes with an outline of suggestions which could help with earthquake preparedness in the United States, particularly in Puget Sound, Washington; along the New Madrid in Missouri and Tennessee;in the Charleston ,South Carolina area; and in the Salt Lake City region of Utah. All of these areas have similar earthquake potential, building types, absence of earthquake preparedness programs, the possibility of an earthquake of comparable proportions as Armenia

  2. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada's acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  3. Proceedings of the 8. National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y.; Aziz, Ferhat; Untoro, Pudji; Su'ud, Zaki; Zarkasi, Amin Santosa; Umar, Faraz H.; Teguh Bambang; Hafnan, M.; Mustafa, Bustani; Rosfian, H.

    2002-10-01

    The eight proceeding of National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plant and Nuclear Facilities held by National Atomic Energy Agency and University of Trisakti. The aims of Seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about safety and nuclear Power Plant Temperature Reactor and Application for National Development sustain able and High Technology. This Seminar covers all aspect Technology, Power Reactor : Research Reactor; High Temperature Reactor and Nuclear Facilities. There are 33 articles have separated index

  4. A flexible testing facility for high-power targets T-MIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusco, Y.; Samec, K.; Behzad, M.; Kadi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A dedicated material test irradiation facility is being proposed. The testing station will allow critical issues concerning materials under irradiation to be addressed, such as the impact of proton beam irradiation, neutron irradiation, liquid metal corrosion and temperature. The material samples to be investigated in such a facility will be subjected to tensile stress, either constant or cyclical. The facility may also be used for sensor development under irradiation and isotope production. The goal of the current work is to propose a facility that is sufficiently versatile and compact so that it may be transported and used in different laboratories. The power is limited to 100 kW. The general aspect of the proposed irradiation facility is a cube, 2 metres deep and comprising within it all the necessary systems. The interface to the laboratory is limited to the coolant connections, the secondary circuit, the electric energy supply and the signals from the instrumentation. The liquid metal target placed in the centre of the facility contains the samples which are subjected to a proton beam, creating irradiation damage directly through protons or indirectly through neutrons created by spallation of the surrounding liquid metal by the incoming protons. The design of the target is based upon the EURISOL target. The same beam window design is used, albeit stretched horizontally to adopt an elliptical section which is compatible with the shape of the beam used to irradiate the samples. The liquid metal in the target is re-circulated by an electromagnetic pump that drives the liquid metal through a heat exchanger located at the top of the facility, the position of which was chosen to encourage natural circulation. The heat exchanger is made up of two separate parts which allow the primary and secondary circuit to separate cleanly

  5. Development of high power CW and pulsed RF test facility based on 1 MW, 352.2 MHz klystron amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badapanda, M.K.; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Upadhyay, Rinki; Rao, J.N.; Tiwari, Ashish; Jain, Akhilesh; Lad, M.R.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    A high power 1 MW, 352.2 MHz RF Test facility having CW and Pulse capability is being developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore for performance evaluation of various RF components, accelerating structures and related subsystems. Thales make 1 MW, 352.2 MHz klystron amplifier (TH 2089) will be employed in this high power test facility, which is thoroughly tested for its performance parameters at rated operating conditions. Auxiliary power supplies like filament, electromagnet, ion pump and mod anode power supply as well as 200 W solid state driver amplifier necessary for this high power test facility have been developed. A high voltage floating platform is created for floating filament and mod anode power supplies. Interconnection of various power supplies and other subsystems of this test facility are being carried out. A high voltage 100 kV, 25 Amp DC crowbar less power supply and low conductivity water (LCW) plant required for this klystron amplifier are in advanced stage of development. NI make cRIO 9081 real time (RT) controller based control and interlock system has been developed to realize proper sequence of operation of various power supplies and to monitor the status of crucial parameters in this test facility. This RF test facility will provide confidence for development of RF System of future accelerators like SNS and ADSS. (author)

  6. Test facility for investigation of heat transfer of promising coolants for the nuclear power industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, I. A.; Sviridov, V. G.; Batenin, V. M.; Biryukov, D. A.; Nikitina, I. S.; Manchkha, S. P.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    The results are presented of experimental investigations into liquid metal heat transfer performed by the joint research group consisting of specialist in heat transfer and hydrodynamics from NIU MPEI and JIHT RAS. The program of experiments has been prepared considering the concept of development of the nuclear power industry in Russia. This concept calls for, in addition to extensive application of water-cooled, water-moderated (VVER-type) power reactors and BN-type sodium cooled fast reactors, development of the new generation of BREST-type reactors, fusion power reactors, and thermonuclear neutron sources. The basic coolants for these nuclear power installations will be heavy liquid metals, such as lead and lithium-lead alloy. The team of specialists from NRU MPEI and JIHT RAS commissioned a new RK-3 mercury MHD-test facility. The major components of this test facility are a unique electrical magnet constructed at Budker Nuclear Physics Institute and a pressurized liquid metal circuit. The test facility is designed for investigating upward and downward liquid metal flows in channels of various cross-sections in a transverse magnetic field. A probe procedure will be used for experimental investigation into heat transfer and hydrodynamics as well as for measuring temperature, velocity, and flow parameter fluctuations. It is generally adopted that liquid metals are the best coolants for the Tokamak reactors. However, alternative coolants should be sought for. As an alternative to liquid metal coolants, molten salts, such as fluorides of lithium and beryllium (so-called FLiBes) or fluorides of alkali metals (so-called FLiNaK) doped with uranium fluoride, can be used. That is why the team of specialists from NRU MPEI and JIHT RAS, in parallel with development of a mercury MHD test facility, is designing a test facility for simulating molten salt heat transfer and hydrodynamics. Since development of this test facility requires numerical predictions and verification

  7. A distributed process monitoring system for nuclear powered electrical generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweney, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    Duke Power Company is one of the largest investor owned utilities in the United States, with a service area of 20,000 square miles extending across North and South Carolina. Oconee Nuclear Station, one of Duke Power's three nuclear generating facilities, is a three unit pressurized water reactor site and has, over the course of its 15-year operating lifetime, effectively run out of plant processing capability. From a severely overcrowded cable spread room to an aging overtaxed Operator Aid Computer, the problems with trying to add additional process variables to the present centralized Operator Aid Computer are almost insurmountable obstacles. This paper reports that for this reason, and to realize the inherent benefits of a distributed process monitoring and control system, Oconee has embarked on a project to demonstrate the ability of a distributed system to perform in the nuclear power plant environment

  8. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-12-30

    The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at the Power Systems Development Facility supports the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of promoting the United States’ energy security through reliable, clean, and affordable energy produced from coal. Work at the NCCC supports the development of new power technologies and the continued operation of conventional power plants under CO2 emission constraints. The NCCC includes adaptable slipstreams that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity and accelerate their development path to commercialization. During its first contract period, from October 1, 2008, through December 30, 2014, the NCCC designed, constructed, and began operation of the Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Center (PC4). Testing of CO2 capture technologies commenced in 2011, and through the end of the contract period, more than 25,000 hours of testing had been achieved, supporting a variety of technology developers. Technologies tested included advanced solvents, enzymes, membranes, sorbents, and associated systems. The NCCC continued operation of the existing gasification facilities, which have been in operation since 1996, to support the advancement of technologies for next-generation gasification processes and pre-combustion CO2 capture. The gasification process operated for 13 test runs, supporting over 30,000 hours combined of both gasification and pre-combustion technology developer testing. Throughout the contract period, the NCCC incorporated numerous modifications to the facilities to accommodate technology developers and increase test capabilities. Preparations for further testing were ongoing to continue advancement of the most promising technologies for

  9. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  10. Helium turbomachinery operating experience from gas turbine power plants and test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Colin F.

    2012-01-01

    The closed-cycle gas turbine, pioneered and deployed in Europe, is not well known in the USA. Since nuclear power plant studies currently being conducted in several countries involve the coupling of a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a helium closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system, the experience gained from operated helium turbomachinery is the focus of this paper. A study done as early as 1945 foresaw the use of a helium closed-cycle gas turbine coupled with a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor, and some two decades later this was investigated but not implemented because of lack of technology readiness. However, the first practical use of helium as a gas turbine working fluid was recognized for cryogenic processes, and the first two small fossil-fired helium gas turbines to operate were in the USA for air liquefaction and nitrogen production facilities. In the 1970's a larger helium gas turbine plant and helium test facilities were built and operated in Germany to establish technology bases for a projected future high efficiency large nuclear gas turbine power plant concept. This review paper covers the experience gained, and the lessons learned from the operation of helium gas turbine plants and related test facilities, and puts these into perspective since over three decades have passed since they were deployed. An understanding of the many unexpected events encountered, and how the problems, some of them serious, were resolved is important to avoid them being replicated in future helium turbomachines. The valuable lessons learned in the past, in many cases the hard way, particularly from the operation in Germany of the Oberhausen II 50 MWe helium gas turbine plant, and the technical know-how gained from the formidable HHV helium turbine test facility, are viewed as being germane in the context of current helium turbomachine design work being done for future high efficiency nuclear gas turbine plant concepts. - Highlights:

  11. Electromagnetic Fields Associated with Commercial Solar Photovoltaic Electric Power Generating Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, R A; Hooper, H C; Sias, G G; Mezei, G; Hung, P; Kavet, R

    2015-01-01

    The southwest region of the United States is expected to experience an expansion of commercial solar photovoltaic generation facilities over the next 25 years. A solar facility converts direct current generated by the solar panels to three-phase 60-Hz power that is fed to the grid. This conversion involves sequential processing of the direct current through an inverter that produces low-voltage three-phase power, which is stepped up to distribution voltage (∼12 kV) through a transformer. This study characterized magnetic and electric fields between the frequencies of 0 Hz and 3 GHz at two facilities operated by the Southern California Edison Company in Porterville, CA and San Bernardino, CA. Static magnetic fields were very small compared to exposure limits established by IEEE and ICNIRP. The highest 60-Hz magnetic fields were measured adjacent to transformers and inverters, and radiofrequency fields from 5-100 kHz were associated with the inverters. The fields measured complied in every case with IEEE controlled and ICNIRP occupational exposure limits. In all cases, electric fields were negligible compared to IEEE and ICNIRP limits across the spectrum measured and when compared to the FCC limits (≥0.3 MHz).

  12. Feasibility Assessment of Using Power Plant Waste Heat in Large Scale Horticulture Facility Energy Supply Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Gyung Yu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Korean government has been carrying out projects to construct several large scale horticulture facilities. However, it is difficult for an energy supply to operate stably and economically with only a conventional fossil fuel boiler system. For this reason, several unused energy sources have become attractive and it was found that power plant waste heat has the greatest potential for application in this scenario. In this study, we performed a feasibility assessment of power plant waste heat as an energy source for horticulture facilities. As a result, it was confirmed that there was a sufficient amount of energy potential for the use of waste heat to supply energy to the assumed area. In Dangjin, an horticultural area of 500 ha could be constructed by utilizing 20% of the energy reserves. In Hadong, a horticulture facility can be set up to be 260 ha with 7.4% of the energy reserves. In Youngdong, an assumed area of 65 ha could be built utilizing about 19% of the energy reserves. Furthermore, the payback period was calculated in order to evaluate the economic feasibility compared with a conventional system. The initial investment costs can be recovered by the approximately 83% reduction in the annual operating costs.

  13. Present state of inspection robot technology in nuclear power facilities. Case of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, Kuniaki

    1995-01-01

    In the maintenance works in nuclear power facilities such as checkup, inspection and repair, for the main purpose of radiation protection, remote operation technology was introduced since relatively early stage, and at present, the robots that carry out the inspection works for confirming the soundness of main equipment have been developed and put to practical use. At the time of introducing these technologies, in addition to the research and development of robots proper, the coordination with the design of plant machinery and equipment facilities as the premise of introducing robots is an important requirement. In this report, the present state of the development of remote inspection technology for fast breeder reactors is introduced, and the matters to which attention is paid in the plant design for introducing robots are explained. First, fast breeder reactors are described. The needs of robotizing and adopting remote operation in nuclear power facilities are explained, using the examples of the inspection system for a reactor vessel and the inspection system for steam generator heat transfer tubes. (K.I.)

  14. Design and construction of solidification and dewatering facility at Alabama Power Company's Farley Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, P.

    1988-01-01

    The approximate total cost of the structure and supporting piping systems is estimated to be 4.1 million dollars. Total dose savings per year could be as high as 70 man Rem for resin processing alone. The ability to store refueling equipment, process contaminated oils, load and unload trucks and containers regardless of weather conditions and support repair work on equipment greatly enhances the cost effectiveness of the project. It will take at least one year of operation of the facility to accurately assess the true cost savings to Alabama Power Company. The morale factor for the Waste and Decon Group has escalated measurably due to the dose reduction to our personnel. Plant and company management are well pleased due to the possibility of a spill or release to the environment has been eliminated which was on intangible cost. Facility construction has been completed as of this date and resin transfer anticipated within the next few days. Some of the problems encountered in planning and constructing this solidification and dewatering facility are presented. A safety evaluation for the facility is included in the appendix

  15. Facilities and medical care for on-site nuclear power plant radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The operation of a nuclear power plant introduces risks of injury or accidents that could also result in the exposure of personnel to radiation or radioactive materials. It is important in such an event to have adequate first aid and medical facilities, supplies, equipment, transportation capabilities and trained personnel available to provide necessary care. This standard provides guidance for first aid during an emergency and for initial medical care of those overexposed to penetrating radiation or contaminated with radioactive material or radionuclides. Recommendations cover facilities, supplies, equipment and the extent of care on-site, where first aid and initial care may be provided, and off-site at a local hospital, where further medical and surgical care may be provided. Additional recommendations are also provided for the transportation of patients and the training of personnel. A brief discussion of specialized care is provided in an appendix

  16. Soft x-ray power diagnostic improvements at the Omega Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorce, C.; Schein, J.; Weber, F.; Widmann, K.; Campbell, K.; Dewald, E.; Turner, R.; Landen, O.; Jacoby, K.; Torres, P.; Pellinen, D.

    2006-01-01

    Soft x-ray power diagnostics are essential for evaluating high temperature laser plasma experiments. The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer, a core diagnostic for radiation flux and temperature measurements of Hohlraums, installed on the Omega Laser Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics has recently undergone a series of upgrades. Work performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the development of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Dante spectrometer enables the Omega Dante to offer a total of 18 absolutely calibrated channels in the energy range from 50 eV to 20 keV. This feature provides Dante with the capability to measure higher, NIF relevant, radiation temperatures with increased accuracy including a differentiation of higher energy radiation such as the Au M and L bands. Diagnostic monitoring using experimental data from directly driven Au spherical shots is discussed

  17. Seismic experience in power and industrial facilities as it relates to small magnitude earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swan, S.W.; Horstman, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    The data base on the performance of power and industrial facilities in small magnitude earthquakes (M = 4.0 - 5.5) is potentially very large. In California alone many earthquakes in this magnitude range occur every year, often near industrial areas. In 1986 for example, in northern California alone, there were 76 earthquakes between Richter magnitude 4.0 and 5.5. Experience has shown that the effects of small magnitude earthquakes are seldom significant to well-engineered facilities. (The term well-engineered is here defined to include most modern industrial installations, as well as power plants and substations.) Therefore detailed investigations of small magnitude earthquakes are normally not considered worthwhile. The purpose of this paper is to review the tendency toward seismic damage of equipment installations representative of nuclear power plant safety systems. Estimates are made of the thresholds of seismic damage to certain types of equipment in terms of conventional means of measuring the damage potential of an earthquake. The objective is to define thresholds of damage that can be correlated with Richter magnitude. In this manner an earthquake magnitude might be chosen below which damage to nuclear plant safety systems is not considered credible

  18. Differential infrared thermography applied to power generation facilities -- A case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, H.; Zayicek, P.

    1995-01-01

    The controlled and systematic application of differential thermal imaging (DIT) can be a highly promising tool for condition monitoring and predictive maintenance of electronic, electrical and mechanical elements and can dramatically improve the reliability, maintainability and operational life of certain types of elements in the power generation and distribution community. The expanded applicability of this technique has been brought about by improvements in commercial IR thermal imaging equipment and advances in the related data and image processing capacities. This paper summarizes the advantages and limitations of DIT and describes several variations of the technique. It goes on to provide an update of progress on a program initiated by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center to apply DIT to operating elements within a power generating station environment (Wolf Creek Nuclear Facility). It traces the selection of candidate elements at some of EPRI's member facilities, the implementation of exploratory measurements on selected candidates using available on-site infrared imaging equipment and the analysis of significant findings on one specific critical element. Finally, a projection for the potential future applicability of the DIT technique is provided

  19. Siting locally-unwanted facilities: What can be learnt from the location of Italian power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrone, Paola; Groppi, Angelamaria

    2012-01-01

    The reaction of communities to the development of energy facilities is based on the environmental impact of the investment, but it also reflects the ex-ante propensity of residents to engage in collective actions. In this work we have examined the requests of authorization of Italian power producers for new thermal plants with the purpose of testing the efficiency of market-based siting policies. The classical location factors, e.g., infrastructure availability, have been confirmed to play a role, and there is a weak evidence that authorization demands have targeted communities that suffer less environmental damage. However our findings have also revealed that power producers are likely to avoid potentially suitable sites if they host a highly activistic community. The paper also discusses some modifications concerning siting policies that could improve the alignment between community responses and the environmental costs of new energy facilities. - Highlights: ► We model location choices for polluting power plants by Italian producers in 1999–2006. ► The efficiency of market-based siting policies is tested (i.e., plants located where environmental damage is lower). ► More than environmental costs, voice factors prevailed on the location choices. ► We conclude that market-based siting policies does not ensure an efficient outcome. ► Developers and communities relationship may suffer from relevant transaction costs

  20. Aseismatic design and safety of nuclear power generation facilities. Research in Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In order to contribute to the aseismatic design of nuclear power generation facilities, this Research Institute has carried out the observation on the site of buildings in Matsushiro earthquake, the experiment on a large vibration table, the vibration experiment on actual buildings and so on, thus made clear the method of evaluating the dynamic model of buildings and foundation grounds. Also it cooperated in the determination of input earthquake motion which is important for aseismatic design by carrying out the evaluation of the activity of faults the observation of strong earthquakes, and the elucidation and evaluation of the characteristics of earthquake motion. It has made the standard for evaluating the fault activity and the stability in earthquakes of the foundation and surrounding grounds of power stations. The development of new underground location technology, the location on Quaternary grounds and the location on the sea, and the research on developing the aseismatic construction of FBRs are in progress. The survey and evaluation of fault activities, the evaluation of earthquake input, the limit state design of important outdoor structures, the new location technology for nuclear power stations, and the development of the buckling and base isolation design of FBRs are reported. (K.I.)

  1. Design Basis Provisions for New and Existing Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    India has 3-Stage Nuclear Power Program. • Various facilities under design, construction or operation. • Design Basis Knowledge Management (DBKM) is an important and challenging task. • Design Basis Knowledge contributes towards: - Safe operation of running plants; - Design and construction of new facilities; - Addresses issues related to future decommissioning activities

  2. RF power source for the compact linear collider test facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, G; Brown, Peter; Carron, G; Hanni, R; Mourier, J; Rossat, G; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L; Thorndahl, L

    2004-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility will test and demonstrate many vital components of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider). This paper describes the pulsed RF power source at 2998.55 MHz for the drive-beam accelerator (DBA), which produces a beam with an energy of 150 MeV and a current of 3.5 Amps. Where possible, existing equipment from the LEP preinjector, especially the modulators and klystrons, is being used and upgraded to achieve this goal. A high power RF pulse compression system is used at the output of each klystron, which requires sophisticated RF phase programming on the low level side to achieve the required RF pulse. In addition to the 3 GHz system two pulsed RF sources operating at 1.5 GHz are being built. The first is a wide-band, low power, travelling wave tube (TWT) for the subharmonic buncher (SHB) system that produces a train of "phase coded" subpulses as part of the injector scheme. The second is a high power narrow band system to produce 20 MW RF power to the 1.5 GHz RF deflectors in the delay loop situate...

  3. Operational results for the raster scanning power supply system constructed at the Bevalac Biomedical Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, G.; Halliwell, J.; Nyman, M.; Dwinell, R.

    1989-03-01

    A raster scanning power supply for controlling an 8.0 Tesla-meter relativistic heavy-ion beam at the Biomedical Facility has been recently completed and is undergoing electrical testing before on- line operation in 1989. The scanner system will provide tightly controlled beam uniformity and off-axis treatment profiles with large aspect ratios and unusual dimensions. This article will discuss original specifications, agreement with measured results and special device performance (i.e. GTOs, FET actuator assembly, etc.). 5 refs., 4 figs

  4. Investigation on Transmission and Substation Facilities of Sichuan Power Grid in Wenchuan Earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yongqing; Li Guangfan; Li Peng; Zhu Quanjun; Yuan Dalu; Wang Chengyu; Li Jinzhong; Huang Huang; Li Lixin; Zhang Xinghai; Liu Jingmin

    2009-01-01

    @@ On May 12,2008,an earthquake of Ms 8.0 hit the area around Wenchuan County,Sichuan Province,China.It has been one of the most destructive earthquakes since the founding of P.R.China in 1949.The quake caused not only tremendous loss of life and wealth,but also severe damage to transmission and substation facilities.After the disaster,an expert group from China Electric Power Research Institute (CEPRI)was sent for on-site investigation.This paper is a summary of the investigation,in which suggestions for electric equipment to resist earthquake disasters are also proponed.

  5. Regulation for delivery of subsidies for urgent safety measures for atomic power generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The regulations provide for subsidies for the emergency measures taken by the prefecture concerned in preparation for a major accident in a nuclear power generating, etc. facility. These activities include an emergency communication network, emergency medical care, personnel education, and outfitting of emergency personnel. The contents are as follows: terms of subsidy allocations, the sum of a subsidy allocation, applications for subsidies, determination of subsidy allocations, withdrawal of applications the conditions attached to the allocations, a report on the work proceedings, a report on the results, confirmation on the sum of the subsidies, withdrawal of the decision for subsidies, limitations for the disposal of the properties, etc. (Mori, K.)

  6. MELCOR modeling of the PBF [Power Burst Facility] Severe Fuel Damage Test 1-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madni, I.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a MELCOR Version 1.8 simulation of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1--4. The input data for the analysis were obtained from the Test Results Report and from SCDAP/RELAP5 input. Results are presented for the transient liquid level in the test bundle, clad temperatures, shroud temperatures, clad oxidation and hydrogen generation, bundle geometry changes, fission product release, and heat transfer to the bypass flow. Comparisons are made with experimental data and with SCDAP/RELAP5 calculations. 10 refs., 7 figs

  7. Active seismic response control systems for nuclear power plant equipment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobori, Takuji; Kanayama, Hiroo; Kamagata, Shuichi

    1989-01-01

    To sustain severe earthquake ground motion, a new type of anti-seismic structure is proposed, called a Dynamic Intelligent Building (DIB) system, which is positioned as an active seismic response controlled the structure. The structural concept starts from a new recognition of earthquake ground motion, and the structural natural frequency is actively adjusted to avoid resonant vibration, and similarly the external counter-force cancels the resonant force which comes from the dynamic structural motion energy. These concepts are verified using an analytical simulator program. The advanced application of the DIB system, is the Active Supporting system and the Active Stabilizer system for nuclear power plant equipment facilities. (orig.)

  8. Design and development of microcontroller based programmable ramp generator for AC-DC converter for simulating decay power transient in experimental facility for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Gaurava Deep; Kulkarni, R.D.

    2015-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, fuel is subjected to a wide range of power and temperature transients during normal and abnormal conditions. The reactor setback and step-back power pattern, fast temperature profile occurred during Loss of Coolant Accident and decay power followed by shutdown of power plant are the typical transients in nuclear power plant. For a variety of reactor engineering and reactor safety related study, one needs to simulate these transients in experimental facility. In experimental facilities, high response AC-DC converters are used to handle these power and temperature transients safely in a controlled manner for generating a database which is utilized for design of thermal hydraulic system, development of computer codes, study of reliability of reactor safety system, etc. for nuclear power plants. The paper presents the methodology developed for simulating the typical reactor decay power transient in an experimental facility. The design and simulation of AC-DC power electronic converter of 3 MW capacity is also presented. The microcontroller based programmable ramp generator is designed and hardware implemented for feeding reference voltage to the closed loop control system of AC-DC converter for obtaining the decay power profile at the converter output. The typical decay power transient of the nuclear power plant is divided into several small power ramps for simulating the transient. The signal corresponding to each power ramp is generated by programmable ramp generator and fed to the comparator for generating control signal for the converter. The actual decay power transient obtained from the converter is compared with the theoretical decay power transient. (author)

  9. Decommissioning and decontamination of licensed reactor facilities and demonstration nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, G.; Erickson, P.B.

    1975-01-01

    Decommissioning of licensed reactors and demonstration nuclear power plants has been accomplished by mothballing (protective storage), entombment, and dismantling or a combination of these three. The alternative selected by a licensee seems to be primarily based on cost. A licensee must, however, show that the decommissioning process provides adequate protection of the health and safety of the public and no adverse impact on the environment. To date the NRC has approved each of the alternatives in the decommissioning of different facilities. The decommissioning of small research reactors has been accomplished primarily by dismantling. Licensed nuclear power plants, however, have been decommissioned primarily by being placed in a mothballed state in which they continue to retain a reactor license and the associated licensee responsibilities

  10. A flexible testing facility for high-power targets (Tiara FP7 program)

    CERN Document Server

    Fusco, Y.; Samec, K.; Kadi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Building on recent experience in the field of applied physics, TIARA Work package n° 9 focuses on target applications for accelerators in Europe. A roadmap for target development has been derived from major achievements in the EU-FP6 and EU-FP7 programs such as the MEGAPIE and EURISOL experiments. The TIARA management board concluded that a worthwhile continuation of such projects would be in the development of a flexible material irradiation facility easily transportable and which could be installed in different laboratories. The power is limited to 100 kW in a very compact arrangement so as to obtain the best neutron economy from a moderate beam power which is more likely to be found in laboratories across Europe. The challenges posed by such a compact design and accompanying calculations are presented in the current work.

  11. High-power light-emitting diode based facility for plant cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamulaitis, G [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Duchovskis, P [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Bliznikas, Z [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Breive, K [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Ulinskaite, R [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Brazaityte, A [Lithuanian Institute of Horticulture, Babtai, LT-54333 Kaunas District (Lithuania); Novickovas, A [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Zukauskas, A [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2005-09-07

    Based on perspectives of the development of semiconductor materials systems for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs), an illumination facility for greenhouse plant cultivation was designed with the dominating 640 nm photosynthetically active component delivered by AlGaInP LEDs and supplementary components from AlGaN (photothropic action, 455 nm) and AlGaAs (photosynthetic 660 nm and photomorphogenetic 735 nm) LEDs. Photosynthesis intensity, photosynthetic productivity and growth morphology as well as chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations were investigated in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under the LED-based illuminators and under high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps with an equivalent photon flux density. Advantages of the high-power LED-based illuminators over conventional HPS lamps, applicability of AlGaInP LEDs for photosynthesis and control of plant growth by circadian manipulation of a relatively weak far-red component were demonstrated.

  12. High-power light-emitting diode based facility for plant cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamulaitis, G; Duchovskis, P; Bliznikas, Z; Breive, K; Ulinskaite, R; Brazaityte, A; Novickovas, A; Zukauskas, A

    2005-01-01

    Based on perspectives of the development of semiconductor materials systems for high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs), an illumination facility for greenhouse plant cultivation was designed with the dominating 640 nm photosynthetically active component delivered by AlGaInP LEDs and supplementary components from AlGaN (photothropic action, 455 nm) and AlGaAs (photosynthetic 660 nm and photomorphogenetic 735 nm) LEDs. Photosynthesis intensity, photosynthetic productivity and growth morphology as well as chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations were investigated in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under the LED-based illuminators and under high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps with an equivalent photon flux density. Advantages of the high-power LED-based illuminators over conventional HPS lamps, applicability of AlGaInP LEDs for photosynthesis and control of plant growth by circadian manipulation of a relatively weak far-red component were demonstrated

  13. Conditioning and handling of tritiated wastes at Canadian nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krochmalnek, L.S.; Krasznai, J.P.; Carney, M.

    1987-04-01

    Ontario Hydro operates a 10,000 MW capacity nuclear power system utilizing the CANDU pressurized heavy water reactor design. The use of D 2 O as moderator and coolant results in the production of about 2400 Ci of tritium per MWe-yr. As a result, there is significant Canadian experience in the treatment, handling, transport and storage of tritiated wastes. Ontario Hydro operates its own reactor waste storage site which includes systems for volume reduction, immobilization and packaging of wastes. In addition, a facility to remove tritium from heavy water is presently being commissioned at the Darlington nuclear site. This facility will generate tritiated liquid and solid waste that will have to be properly conditioned prior to storage or disposal. The nature of these various wastes and the processes/packaging required to meet storage/disposal criteria are judged to have relevance to investigations in fusion facility waste arisings. Experience to date, planned operational procedures and ongoing R and D in this area are described

  14. The International Remote Monitoring Project: Results of the Swedish Nuclear Power Facility field trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.S.; af Ekenstam, G.; Sallstrom, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored work on a Remote Monitoring System (RMS) that was installed in August 1994 at the Barseback Works north of Malmo, Sweden. The RMS was designed to test the front end detection concept that would be used for unattended remote monitoring activities. Front end detection reduces the number of video images recorded and provides additional sensor verification of facility operations. The function of any safeguards Containment and Surveillance (C/S) system is to collect information which primarily is images that verify the operations at a nuclear facility. Barseback is ideal to test the concept of front end detection since most activities of safeguards interest is movement of spent fuel which occurs once a year. The RMS at Barseback uses a network of nodes to collect data from microwave motion detectors placed to detect the entrance and exit of spent fuel casks through a hatch. A video system using digital compression collects digital images and stores them on a hard drive and a digital optical disk. Data and images from the storage area are remotely monitored via telephone from Stockholm, Sweden and Albuquerque, NM, USA. These remote monitoring stations operated by SKI and SNL respectively, can retrieve data and images from the RMS computer at the Barseback Facility. The data and images are encrypted before transmission. This paper presents details of the RMS and test results of this approach to front end detection of safeguard activities

  15. Facilities for the treatment of radioactively contaminated water in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The regulation is to be applied to design, construction and operation of facilities for the treatment of contaminated water in stationary nuclear power plants with LWR and HTR. The facilities are to be designed, constructed and operated in such manner that (a) imcontrolled discharge of contaminated water is avoided (Paragraph 46 section 1, no. 1 Radiation Protection Regulation) (b) the activity discharged with water is as low as possible ( paragraph 46, section 2, no. 2 Radiation Protection Regulation) (c)contaminated water will not get into the ground, unless this is permitted by a license (paragraph 46 section 6 Radiation Protection Regulation) (d) the radiation exposure resulting from direct radiation, contamination and inhalation of the personnel working with the facility is as low as possible and, at the most, corresponds to the values fixed in the regulation (paragraph 28 section 1 Radiation Protection Regulation) or the values given in the discharge permit. The regulation is not to be applied to installations for reactor coolant or fuel pit clean-up. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Intervention in independent spent fuel storage facility license application proceedings for storage on the power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, J.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the intervention in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process for currently operating Independent Spent fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) projects at Carolina Power and Light's Company's H.B. Robinson, Duke Power Company's Oconee, and Virginia Power Company's Surry. In addition, intervention at dry storage facilities that are currently under development are also described. The utilities and reactors include Baltimore Gas and Electric Company's Calvert Cliffs, Public Service Company of Colorado's Fort St. Vrain plant, Northern States Power Company's Prairie Island, Wisconsin Electric Power Company's Point Beach, and Consumers Power Company's Palisades

  17. Radioactivity measuring and control method and the system for facility of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu.

    1996-01-01

    In measurement and control for radioactivity in an inspection operation in radiation circumstance for nuclear power plant facilities, radioactive materials in air are sometimes suspended together with ordinary dusts. Then, when a radiation level is low, light is applied to the suspended dusts to measure the quantity and the number of the dusts thereby estimating the radiation level based on the amount of the dusts. Then, the level of the equipments is informed to an operator based on the estimated value, and an operation time is determined. Since the optical dust monitor is inexpensive, a number of dust monitors can be brought into an operation chamber. In addition, they are reduced in the size and the weight, an operator can carry and bring them into the operation chamber. A distribution of dusts can be determined by measuring the concentration of dusts using a plurality of dust monitors thereby enabling to improve safety and economical property of periodical inspection for nuclear power plant facilities. (T.M.)

  18. Radioactivity measuring and control method and the system for facility of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Megumu

    1996-12-03

    In measurement and control for radioactivity in an inspection operation in radiation circumstance for nuclear power plant facilities, radioactive materials in air are sometimes suspended together with ordinary dusts. Then, when a radiation level is low, light is applied to the suspended dusts to measure the quantity and the number of the dusts thereby estimating the radiation level based on the amount of the dusts. Then, the level of the equipments is informed to an operator based on the estimated value, and an operation time is determined. Since the optical dust monitor is inexpensive, a number of dust monitors can be brought into an operation chamber. In addition, they are reduced in the size and the weight, an operator can carry and bring them into the operation chamber. A distribution of dusts can be determined by measuring the concentration of dusts using a plurality of dust monitors thereby enabling to improve safety and economical property of periodical inspection for nuclear power plant facilities. (T.M.)

  19. Intellectual decision-making system in the context of potentially dangerous nuclear power facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilov Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with intelligent operation decision support system under condition of potentially hazardous nuclear facilities. The proposed system is referred to the class of advising systems and does not make final decisions in case of deviations of parameters to be analyzed, but generates general ways to solve an encountered problem and issues a set of recommendations for the plant personnel. In the article a fuzzy logic tool is used as mathematic tool. Lessons learnt from operation of nuclear facilities demonstrate that existing critical components (parts, areas, welding joints are subject to increased failure under conditions of high operational loads, including beyond design loads and negative environmental impact. Usually in that situation there is probability of equipment integrity failure, when the unit is at power, with severe defect downing. For instance, the coolant leak and potential development of initial penetration defect to critical dimensions. In other words, in fact, the final observable result is always one – formation and development of operational crack which jeopardizes design integrity of the component and, accordingly, seriously compromises the nuclear power unit operation. The proposed situational model is linked with real knowledge data base where generated situational pairs are stored. The expert system is used for knowledge data base formation. Actually the proposed system consists of two independent fuzzy systems. From mathematical tool point of view, the advantage of such systems combination is lack of defuzzification unit in the first system and fuzzification unit in the second one.

  20. Power Burst Reactor Facility as an epithermal neutron source for brain cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactor is considered for modification to provide an intense, clean source of intermediate-energy (epithermal) neutrons desirable for clinical studies of neutron capture therapy (NCT) for malignant tumors. The modifications include partial replacement of the reflector, installation of a neutron-moderating, shifting region, additional shielding, and penetration of the present concrete shield with a collimating (and optionally) filtering region. The studies have indicated that the reactor, after these modifications, will be safely operable at full power (28 MW) within the acceptable limits of the plant protection systems. The neutron beam exiting from the collimator port is predicted to be of sufficient intensity (approx.10 10 neutrons/cm 2 -s) to provide therapeutic doses in very short irradiation times. The beam would be relatively free of undesirable fast neutrons, thermal neutrons and gamma rays. The calculated neutron energy spectrum and associated gamma rays in the beam were provided as input in simulation studies that used a computer model of a patient with a brain tumor to determine predicted dose rates to the tumor and healthy tissue. The results of this conceptual study indicate an intense, clean beam of epithermal neutrons for NCT clinical trials is attainable in the PBF facility with properly engineered design modifications. 9 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Initial high-power testing of the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] ECH [electron cyclotron heating] system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a moderate aspect ratio torsatron that will utilize 53.2 GHz 200 kW Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) to produce nearly current-free target plasmas suitable for subsequent heating by strong neutral beam injection. The initial configuration of the ECH system from the gyrotron to ATF consists of an optical arc detector, three bellows, a waveguide mode analyzer, two TiO 2 mode absorbers, two 90 0 miter bends, two waveguide pumpouts, an insulating break, a gate valve, and miscellaneous straight waveguide sections feeding a launcher radiating in the TE 02 mode. Later, a focusing Vlasov launcher will be added to beam the ECH power to the saddle point in ATF magnetic geometry for optimum power deposition. The ECH system has several unique features; namely, the entire ECH system is evacuated, the ECH system is broadband, forward power is monitored by a newly developed waveguide mode analyzer, phase correcting miter bends will be employed, and the ECH system will be capable of operating short pulse to cw. Initial high-power tests show that the overall system efficiency is 87%. The waveguide mode analyzer shows that the gyrotron mode output consists of 13% TE 01 , 82.6% TE 02 , 2.5% TE 03 , and 1.9% TE 04 . 4 refs

  2. Preliminary reactor physics calculations for Exxon LWR fuel testing in the power burst facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, W.O.; Nigg, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    The PFB reactor is being considered as an irradiation facility to test LWR fuel rods for Exxon Nuclear Company. Requested test conditions are 18 kW/ft axial peak steady state power in 2.5% initial enrichment, 20,000 MWd/Tu exposed rods. Multigroup transport theory calculations (S/sub n/ and Monte Carlo) showed that this was unattainable in the standard PBF test loop. Thus, a flux multiplier was developed in the form of a Zr-2-clad 0.15-inch thick cylindrical shell of 35% enriched, 88% T.D. UO 2 replacing the flow divider, surrounding the rod within the in-pile tube in PFB. With this flux multiplier installed and assuming an average water density of 0.86 g/cm 3 within the test loop, a Figure of Merit (FOM) for a single-rod test assembly of 0.86 kW/ft-MW +- 5% (at 95% confidence level) was calculated. This FOM is the axial peak linear test rod power per megawatt of reactor power. A reactor power of about 21 megawatts will therefore be required to supply the requested linear test rod axial peak heating rate of 18 kW/ft

  3. Theoretical assessment of the maximum power point tracking efficiency of photovoltaic facilities with different converter topologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enrique, J.M.; Duran, E.; Andujar, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, de Sistemas Informaticos y Automatica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Sidrach-de-Cardona, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, II, Universidad de Malaga (Spain)

    2007-01-15

    The operating point of a photovoltaic generator that is connected to a load is determined by the intersection point of its characteristic curves. In general, this point is not the same as the generator's maximum power point. This difference means losses in the system performance. DC/DC converters together with maximum power point tracking systems (MPPT) are used to avoid these losses. Different algorithms have been proposed for maximum power point tracking. Nevertheless, the choice of the configuration of the right converter has not been studied so widely, although this choice, as demonstrated in this work, has an important influence in the optimum performance of the photovoltaic system. In this article, we conduct a study of the three basic topologies of DC/DC converters with resistive load connected to photovoltaic modules. This article demonstrates that there is a limitation in the system's performance according to the type of converter used. Two fundamental conclusions are derived from this study: (1) the buck-boost DC/DC converter topology is the only one which allows the follow-up of the PV module maximum power point regardless of temperature, irradiance and connected load and (2) the connection of a buck-boost DC/DC converter in a photovoltaic facility to the panel output could be a good practice to improve performance. (author)

  4. Aseismatic design and safety of nuclear power generation facilities. On aseismatic capability of commercial nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Muneaki

    1995-01-01

    In view of the great Hanshin earthquake, the aseismatic safety of the important facilities in nuclear power stations is ensured by the location direct on base rocks, the design with the earthquake force at least three times as large as that in the building standard, and the consideration of the earthquakes due to active faults as design earthquake. The basic policy of the aseismatic design of nuclear power stations is described. The determination of the earthquake motions due to strongest earthquake and utmost limit earthquake for design, the survey of the geological features and ground of the sites and so on are explained. In the aseismatic design of buildings and structures, structural planning, the modeling for the aseismatic analysis of buildings, the analysis of time historical response and so on are carried out. In the aseismatic design of equipment and piping systems, the planning of aseismatic support structures, the aseismatic design and the analysis of time historical response, the spectral modal analysis for other systems such as multiple material point system and so on are described. The tests and researches related to the aseismatic design are reported. (K.I.)

  5. Simulation of power maneuvering experiment of MASLWR test facility by MARS-KS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Yeop [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In the present study, KINS simulation result by the MARS-KS code (KS-002 version) for the SP-3 experiment is presented in detail and conclusion on MARS-KS code performance drawn through this simulation is described. Performance of the MARS-KS code is evaluated through the simulation of the power maneuvering experiment of the MASLWR test facility. Steady run shows the helical coil specific heat transfer model of the code is reasonable. However, identified discrepancy of the primary mass flowrate at transient run shows code performance for pressure drop needs to be improved considering sensitivity of the flowrate to the pressure drop at natural circulation. Since 2009, IAEA has conducted a research program entitled as ICSP (International Collaborative Standard Problem) on integral PWR design to evaluate current the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic code in simulating natural circulation flow within integral type reactor. In this ICSP, experimental data obtained from MASLWR (Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor) test facility located at Oregon state university in the US have been simulated by various thermal-hydraulic codes of each participant of the ICSP and compared among others. MASLWR test facility is a mock-up of a passive integral type reactor equipped with helical coil steam generator. Since SMART reactor which is currently being developed in Korea also adopts a helical coil steam generator, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) has joined this ICSP to assess the applicability of a domestic regulatory audit thermal-hydraulic code (i. e. MARS-KS code) for the SMART reactor including wall-to-fluid heat transfer model modification based on independent international experiment data. In the ICSP, two types of transient experiments have been focused and they are loss of feedwater transient with subsequent ADS operation and long term cooling (SP-2) and normal operating conditions at different power levels (SP-3)

  6. Simulation of power maneuvering experiment of MASLWR test facility by MARS-KS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Yeop [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this ICSP, experimental data obtained from MASLWR (Mulit-Application Small Light Water Reactor) test facility located at Oregon state university in the US have been simulated by various thermal-hydraulic codes of each participant of the ICSP and compared among others. MASLWR test facility is a mock-up of a passive integral type reactor equipped with helical coil steam generator. Since SMART reactor which is currently being developed in Korea also adopts a helical coil steam generator, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) has joined this ICSP to assess the applicability of a domestic regulatory audit thermal-hydraulic code (i. e. MARS-KS code) for the SMART reactor including wall-to-fluid heat transfer model modification based on independent international experiment data. In the ICSP, two types of transient experiments have been focused and they are 1) loss of feedwater transient with subsequent ADS operation and long term cooling (SP-2) and normal operating conditions at different power levels. In the present study, KINS simulation result by the MARS-KS code (KS-002 version) for the SP-3 experiment is presented in detail and conclusion on MARS-KS code performance drawn through this simulation is described. Performance of the MARS-KS code is evaluated through the simulation of the power maneuvering experiment of the MASLWR test facility. Steady run shows the helical coil specific heat transfer model of the code is reasonable. However, identified discrepancy of the primary mass flowrate at transient run shows code performance for pressure drop needs to be improved considering sensitivity of the flowrate to the pressure drop at natural circulation.

  7. Consideration of external events in the design of nuclear facilities other than nuclear power plants, with emphasis on earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The design of nuclear facilities other than nuclear power plants in relation to external events is not a well harmonized practice around the world. Traditionally, the design of these facilities has either been left to the provisions collected in national building codes and other industrial codes not specifically intended for nuclear facilities, or it has been the subject of complex analyses of the type usually performed for nuclear power plants. The IAEA has recently started a programme of development of safety standards for such facilities. The need to define the appropriate safety requirements for nuclear installations prompted a generic review of siting and design approaches for these facilities in relation to external events. Therefore the assessment methods for siting and design were reviewed by the engineering community to provide the overall design of such facilities with the necessary reliability level. This report aims to provide guidelines for the assessment of the safety of nuclear facilities other than nuclear power plants in relation to external events through the application of simplified methods and procedures for their siting and design. The approach adopted is both simplified and conservative compared with that used for power reactors. It seeks to provide a rational balance for a suitable combination of sustainable effort in site investigations and refinement in design procedures, compatible with the assigned safety objectives. This publication is related to IAEA-TECDOC-348 'Earthquake Resistant Design of Nuclear Facilities with Limited Radioactive Inventory' (1985) which focused on the seismic design of nuclear facilities with limited radioactive inventory. After some 17 years, parts of IAEA-TECDOC-348 needed modification, as new operational data have become available from many facilities. In addition, sophisticated design methodologies are now more easily obtainable, and experts felt that the trade-off between sustainable investment in the

  8. Current status of personnel exposure at nuclear power plants and other medical, industrial and educational facilities in JAPAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Fumiaki

    1991-01-01

    The state of radiation exposure of the workers engaging in radiation works in Japanese nuclear power stations, the factors of the radiation exposure of the workers engaging in radiation works, the countermeasures for reducing exposure in nuclear power stations, the state of radiation exposure of doctors, the workers engaging in radiation works, researchers and others in medical, industrial, research and educational and other facilities in Japan, the factors of their radiation exposure and the countermeasures for reducing the exposure, and the comparison of the exposure in nuclear power stations with that in medical, industrial, research and educational facilities are reported. (K.I.)

  9. The state of radioactive waste management and of personnel radiation exposure in nuclear power generating facilities in fiscal 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    (1) The state of radioactive waste management in nuclear power generating facilities: In the nuclear power stations, the released quantities of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes are all below the control objective levels. For the respective nuclear power stations, the released quantities of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes in fiscal 1983 and the objective levels are given in table. And, the quantities of solid wastes taken into storage and the cumulative amounts are given. For reference, the results each year since fiscal 1974 are shown. (2) The state of personnel radiation exposure in nuclear power generating facilities: In the nuclear power stations, the personnel radiation exposures are all below the permissible levels. The dose distribution etc. in the respective nuclear power stations are given in table. For reference, the results each year since fiscal 1974 are shown. (Mori, K.)

  10. A personal computer code for seismic evaluations of nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Graves, H.

    1990-01-01

    A wide range of computer programs and modeling approaches are often used to justify the safety of nuclear power plants. It is often difficult to assess the validity and accuracy of the results submitted by various utilities without developing comparable computer solutions. Taken this into consideration, CARES is designed as an integrated computational system which can perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and examine capability of nuclear power plant facilities, thus CARES may be used by the NRC to determine the validity and accuracy of analysis methodologies employed for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. CARES has been designed to: operate on a PC, have user friendly input/output interface, and have quick turnaround. The CARES program is structured in a modular format. Each module performs a specific type of analysis. The basic modules of the system are associated with capabilities for static, seismic and nonlinear analyses. This paper describes the various features which have been implemented into the Seismic Module of CARES version 1.0. In Section 2 a description of the Seismic Module is provided. The methodologies and computational procedures thus far implemented into the Seismic Module are described in Section 3. Finally, a complete demonstration of the computational capability of CARES in a typical soil-structure interaction analysis is given in Section 4 and conclusions are presented in Section 5. 5 refs., 4 figs

  11. ARC: A compact, high-field, disassemblable fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Palmer, Timothy; Mangiarotti, Franco; Sierchio, Jennifer; Bonoli, Paul; Kasten, Cale; Sutherland, Derek; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Goh, Jon; Sung, Choongki; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable, Robust, Compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils with joints to allow disassembly, allowing for removal and replacement of the vacuum vessel as a single component. Inboard-launched current drive of 25 MW LHRF power and 13.6 MW ICRF power is used to provide a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing Fluorine Lithium Beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket acts as a working fluid, coolant, and tritium breeder, and minimizes the solid material that can become activated. The large temperature range over which FLiBe is liquid permits blanket operation at 800-900 K with single phase fluid cooling and allows use of a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity production in the secondary coolant loop.

  12. Proceedings of the first international seminar on seismic base isolation for nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First International Seminar on Seismic Base Isolation of Nuclear Power Facilities was organized by the authors of this paper. It was held in San Francisco, California, USA, on August 21--22, 1989, in conjunction with the tenth International Conference on Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology (SMiRT-10). The purpose of the seminar was to provide an international forum for discussion on the application of base isolation to nuclear power plants and of its effectiveness in reducing seismic loads and permitting standard plant designs. It also provided an opportunity for technical interchange between base isolation system designers, structural engineers, and nuclear power plant engineers. Seismic isolation is certainly one of the most significant earthquake engineering developments in recent years. This was clearly demonstrated by the very large attendance at this seminar and the various papers presented. Isolation system act as filters that reduce the seismic forces and increase the ability of isolated structures and their contents to withstand the damaging effects of earthquake motions. Each individual paper has been cataloged separately

  13. Alteration in reactor installations (Unit 1 and 2 reactor facilities) in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station of The Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A report by the Nuclear Safety Commission to the Ministry of International Trade and Industry concerning the alteration in Unit 1 and 2 reactor facilities in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., was presented. The technical capabilities for the alteration of reactor facilities in Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., were confirmed to be adequate. The safety of the reactor facilities after the alteration was confirmed to be adequate. The items of examination made for the confirmation of the safety are as follows: reactor core design (nuclear design, mechanical design, mixed reactor core), the analysis of abnormal transients in operation, the analysis of various accidents, the analysis of credible accidents for site evaluation. (Mori, K.)

  14. The state of improvement of security management setup in the Japan Atomic Power Company and improvement of facilities in its Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In connection with the series of accidents in the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station of the Japan Atomic Power Company, the state of security management in JAPC and the safety of facilities in the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station, which have resulted from improvement efforts, are described on the following items: security management setup - communication and reporting in emergency, the management of inspection and maintenance records, work control and supervision in repair, improvement, etc., functional authority and responsibility in maintenance management, operation management, radiation control, personnel education; improvement of facilities - feed water heaters, laundry waste-water filter room, radioactive waste treatment facility, general drainage, concentrated waste liquid storage tanks in newly-built waste treatment building, etc. (Mori, K.)

  15. Integration of distributed plant process computer systems to nuclear power generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogard, T.; Finlay, K.

    1996-01-01

    Many operating nuclear power generation facilities are replacing their plant process computer. Such replacement projects are driven by equipment obsolescence issues and associated objectives to improve plant operability, increase plant information access, improve man machine interface characteristics, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. This paper describes a few recently completed and on-going replacement projects with emphasis upon the application integrated distributed plant process computer systems. By presenting a few recent projects, the variations of distributed systems design show how various configurations can address needs for flexibility, open architecture, and integration of technological advancements in instrumentation and control technology. Architectural considerations for optimal integration of the plant process computer and plant process instrumentation ampersand control are evident from variations of design features

  16. Thermohydraulic investigations of nuclear power facilities (to the 60-th anniversary of the First NPP start)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachkov, V.I.; Efanov, A.D.; Zhukov, A.V.; Kalyakin, S.G.; Sorokin, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    The investigations conducting in SSC RF - IPPE are aimed to develop theory and create calculational programs which allow to obtain the detailed description of coolant velocity fields and temperatures in any channels and equipment units of nuclear power facilities. Specially developed sensors for measuring various parameters are used in the experiments. Mathematical models and numerical methods are generalized for description and numerical solution of compressible fluids, multiphase and multifluid systems. The programs which allow to determine hydrodynamic and thermotechnical characteristics with account for melting, solidification, boiling processes are established. The obtained data is the base for creating the two-phase media flow theory. The study of the processes of impurity formation, transport and precipitation in liquid metal coolants has been allowed to develop the methods of impurity mass transfer simulation in circuits. For solving the fast reactor safety problem the series of investigations on liquid metals physics, boiling and condensation have been carried out [ru

  17. The Idaho Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, R.V. III; Griebenow, M.L.; Ackermann, A.L.; Miller, L.G.; Miller, D.L.; Wheeler, F.J.; Bradshaw, K.M.; Wessol, D.E.; Harker, Y.D.; Nigg, D.W.; Randolph, P.D.; Bauer, W.F.; Gavin, P.R.; Richards, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program has been funded since 1988 to evaluate brain tumor treatment using Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH (borocaptate sodium or BSH) and epithermal neutrons. The PBF/BNCT Program pursues this goal as a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, multiorganizational endeavor applying modern program management techniques. The initial focus was to: (1) establish a representative large animal model and (2) develop the generic analytical and measurement capabilities require to control treatment repeatability and determine critical treatment parameters independent of tumor type and body location. This paper will identify the PBF/BNCT Program elements and summarize the status of some of the developed capabilities

  18. CONCERT A high power proton accelerator driven multi-application facility concept

    CERN Document Server

    Laclare, J L

    2000-01-01

    A new generation of High Power Proton Accelerator (HPPA) is being made available. It opens new avenues to a long series of scientific applications in fundamental and applied research, which can make use of the boosted flux of secondary particles. Presently, in Europe, several disciplines are preparing their project of dedicated facility, based on the upgraded performances of HPPAs. Given the potential synergies between these different projects, for reasons of cost effectiveness, it was considered appropriate to look into the possibility to group a certain number of these applications around a single HPPA: CONCERT project left bracket 1 right bracket . The ensuing 2-year feasibility study organized in collaboration between the European Spallation Source and the CEA just started. EURISOL left bracket 2 right bracket project and CERN participate in the steering committee.

  19. Community attitudes toward a proposed nuclear power generating facility as a function of expected outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundstrom, E.; Lounsbury, J.W.; Schuller, C.R.; Fowler, J.R.; Mattingly, T.J. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between attitudes toward a proposed nuclear power generating facility and the outcomes expected to accompany it are examined. In a survey of 350 residents of a small rural community, approximately 2/3 expressed favorable attitudes toward the proposed nuclear plant. A principal components factor analysis of the anticipated likelihoods of outcomes of the plant revealed five factors: hazards, economic growth, lower costs, social disruption, and community visibility. Using these factors as predictors, a simple multiple regression equation accounted for 52% of the variation in attitudes toward the plant. The strongest predictor was the perceived likelihood of hazards. These findings are discussed in terms of the relationship between attitudes and expectations, and in relation to decisions regarding public policy

  20. Nuclear EMP induced chaos. [Effect of nuclear explosion on power and communication facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dance, B

    1983-04-01

    It is anticipated that a single nuclear explosion, of adequate size, on the outside of the atmosphere would generate a pulse of sufficient intensity to damage communications equipment (including telephones, radio transmitters and receivers), and to disrupt main power supplies. This damage could be done by a very intense, short duration electro-magnetic pulse (EMP). The article discusses the generation and history of EMP, the test facilities that are needed for EMP test, and techniques that can be used to harden equipment against EMP. It is also important to protect extensive systems against EMP. The article points out that fibre-optics are very useful, because they are EMP resistant and a single fibre can also carry a very high data rate.

  1. The national carbon capture center at the power systems development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-09-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Three reporting period, efforts at the NCCC/PSDF focused on testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; commissioning and initial testing at the post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  2. THE NATIONAL CARBON CAPTURE CENTER AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-05-11

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Two reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on new technology assessment and test planning; designing and constructing post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  3. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility: Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-03-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The newly established NCCC will include multiple, adaptable test skids that will allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period One reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on developing a screening process for testing consideration of new technologies; designing and constructing pre- and post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; developing sampling and analytical methods; expanding fuel flexibility of the Transport Gasification process; and operating the gasification process for technology research and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  4. Indicators System Creation For The Energy Efficiency Benchmarking Of Municipal Power System Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydenko L.V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The issues of the dataware of the comparative analysis procedure (benchmarking for municipal power system facilities energy efficiency level estimation with a view of the hierarchical structure of the heat supply system are considered. The aim of the paper is the system of indicators formation for characterizing the efficiency of energy usage as on objects on lowest so on highest levels of power systems, proceeding from features of their functioning. Benchmarking methodology allows carrying out the estimation of energy efficiency level on the base of a plurality of parameters without their generalization in one indicator, but requires ensuring their comparability. Using the methodology of available statistical information that did not require deep specification and additional inspection structuring objectives and tasks of energy efficiency estimation problem has been proposed for ensuring the opportunity of benchmarking procedure implementation. This makes it possible to form the subset of indicators that ensure enough specification of the object of study, taking into account the degree of abstraction for every hierarchical level or sub problem. For a comparative analysis of energy using efficiency in municipal power systems at the highest levels of the hierarchy a plurality of indicators of the energy efficiency has been formed. Indicators have been determined with consideration of the structural elements of heat supply systems, but allowing taking into account the efficiency of the initial state of the objects, their functioning, and the questions of energy resources accounting organization. Usage of the proposed indicators provides implementation of energy using efficiency monitoring in the municipal power system and allows getting complete overview of the problem.

  5. A personal computer code for seismic evaluations of nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Graves, H.

    1991-01-01

    In the process of review and evaluation of licensing issues related to nuclear power plants, it is essential to understand the behavior of seismic loading, foundation and structural properties and their impact on the overall structural response. In most cases, such knowledge could be obtained by using simplified engineering models which, when properly implemented, can capture the essential parameters describing the physics of the problem. Such models do not require execution on large computer systems and could be implemented through a personal computer (PC) based capability. Recognizing the need for a PC software package that can perform structural response computations required for typical licensing reviews, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored the development of a PC operated computer software package CARES (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) system. This development was undertaken by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during FY's 1988 and 1989. A wide range of computer programs and modeling approaches are often used to justify the safety of nuclear power plants. It is often difficult to assess the validity and accuracy of the results submitted by various utilities without developing comparable computer solutions. Taken this into consideration, CARES is designed as an integrated computational system which can perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and examine capability of nuclear power plant facilities, thus CARES may be used by the NRC to determine the validity and accuracy of analysis methodologies employed for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. CARES has been designed to operate on a PC, have user friendly input/output interface, and have quick turnaround. This paper describes the various features which have been implemented into the seismic module of CARES version 1.0

  6. Coordination Between Wind Power, Hydro Storage Facility and Conventional Generating Units According to the Annual Growth Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh Shojaeean

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the growing trend of the consumption of the electric power and the global tendency to substitute new renewable sources of energy, this paper proposes a Monte Carlo based method to determine an optimal level of this change. Considering the limitation of the wind farms in continuous supply of electric power, hydrostatic power storage facilities are used beside wind farms so that the electric power could be stored and fed in a continuous flow into power systems. Due to the gradual exclusion of conventional generators and 5 percent annual load increments, LOLE index was used in order to calculate the amount of the wind power and the capacity of the necessary power storage facility. To this end, LOLE index was calculated for the first year as the reference index for the estimation of the amount of wind power and the capacity of the storage facility in consequent years. For the upcoming years, calculations have been made to account for the gradual exclusion of conventional generators in proportion to load increments. The proposed method has been implemented and simulated on IEEE-RTS test system.

  7. Development of protection system for power supply facilities in JT-60U P-NBI for long pulse operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Katsumi; Okano, Fuminori; Honda, Atsushi; Shinozaki, Shin-ichi; Usui, Katsutomi; Noto, Katsuya; Kawai, Mikito; Ikeda, Yoshitaka

    2007-06-01

    In the positive ion based NBI (P-NBI) system, we have developed a protection system to protect the power supply facilities from over load during long pulse operation. The protection system monitors the voltage (V) and current (I) in the power supply facilities, and calculates the parameters of V2t and I2t in real-time, where T is the pulse duration. It turns off the power supply facilities when V2t and I2t are beyond the critical values. After two development stages, we have completed the protection system using a package typed PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) which has a high expandability of multi-unit operation. Moreover, we have constructed a user-friendly system by using a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system. (author)

  8. Design considerations and analysis of potential applications of a high power ultraviolet FEL at the TESLA test facility at DESY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, C.; Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    A possibility of constructing a high power ultraviolet free electron laser at the TESLA test facility at DESY is discussed. The proposed facility consists of a tunable master oscillator (P av ∼10 mW, P peak ∼10 kW, λ≅200-350 nm) and an FEL amplifier with a tapered undulator. The average and peak radiation power at the exit of the FEL amplifier is about 7 kW and 220 GW, respectively. Installation of such a facility can significantly extend scientific potential of the TESLA test facility. The UV free electron laser can be used to construct a polarized, monochromatic gamma-source with the ultimate yield up to 10 12 gamma-quanta per second and the maximal energy of about 100 MeV. An intensive gamma-source can also form the base for constructing the test facility for the TESLA positron generation system. Another accelerator application of the proposed facility is verification of the main technical solutions for the laser and the optical system to be used in the gamma-gamma option of the TESLA collider. A high average power UV laser is also promising for industrial applications

  9. Current summary of international extreme load design requirements for nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The development of extreme load design criteria both as to rate and depth within any national jurisdiction as applied to nuclear power plant design is a function of several factors. The prime factor is the number of nuclear power plant facilities which are operating, under construction or planned in a given country. The second most important factor seems to be the degree of development of a domestic independent nuclear steam system supplier, NSSS vendor. Finally, countries whose domestic NSSS firms are active in the export market appear to have more active criteria development programs or at least they appear more visible to the foreign observer. For the purposes of this paper, extreme loads are defined as those loads having probability of occurence less than 10 -1 /yr and whose occurence could result in radiological consequences in excess of those permitted by national health standards. The specific loads considered include earthquake, extreme wind (tornado), airplane crash, detonation, and high energy system rupture. The paper identifies five national centers for extreme load criteria development; Canada, Great Britian, USA, USSR, and West Germany with both France and Japan also about to appear as independent centers of criteria development. Criteria under development by each national center are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  10. Operational Performance and Improvements to the RF Power Sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses ...

  11. Research and design of pulsed switching power supply for deep tumor therapy facility with heavy ions accelerator in Lanzhou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chunfeng; Zhao Jiang; Yan Hongbin; Wu Fengjun; Gao Daqing

    2012-01-01

    The pulsed switching power supply was developed for deep tumor therapy facility with heavy ions in cooler-storage-ring of the heavy ions research facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR). The control principle of the dual closed-loop scheme was described and the open-loop Bode diagrams were given. The results of simulation and prototype experiment show that the current error gets much smaller than that of the single closed-loop pulsed switching power supply. Moreover, the simulation and test results were analyzed, and the circuit configuration and dual closed-loop strategy selected are practicable. (authors)

  12. Operational Performance and Improvements to the RF Power Sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses in the injector and a narrow band high power L-Band klystron powering the transverse 1.5GHz RF deflector in the Delay Loop immediately after the DBA. This paper describes these different systems and discusses their operational performance.

  13. Operational performance and improvements to the rf power sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses in the injector and a narrow band high power L-Band klystron powering the transverse 1.5 GHz RF deflector in the Delay Loop immediately after the DBA. This paper describes these different systems and discusses their operational performance.

  14. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosser, Morgan [Southern Company Services, Inc., Wilsonville, AL (United States)

    2012-12-31

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of high efficiency coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to promote new technologies for CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity and accelerate their development path to commercialization. During the calendar year 2012 portion of the Budget Period Four reporting period, efforts at the NCCC focused on testing of pre- and post-combustion CO2 capture processes and gasification support technologies. Preparations for future testing were on-going as well, and involved facility upgrades and collaboration with numerous technology developers. In the area of pre-combustion, testing was conducted on a new water-gas shift catalyst, a CO2 solvent, and gas separation membranes from four different technology developers, including two membrane systems incorporating major scale-ups. Post-combustion tests involved advanced solvents from three major developers, a gas separation membrane, and two different enzyme technologies. An advanced sensor for gasification operation was evaluated, operation with biomass co-feeding with coal under oxygen-blown conditions was achieved, and progress continued on refining several gasification support technologies.

  15. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-07-14

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of high efficiency coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to promote new technologies for CO2 capture from coal-derived flue gas and syngas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived flue gas and syngas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity and accelerate their development paths to commercialization. During the calendar year 2013 portion of the Budget Period Four reporting period, efforts at the NCCC focused on post-combustion CO2 capture, gasification, and pre-combustion CO2 capture technology testing. Preparations for future testing were on-going as well, and involved facility upgrades and collaboration with numerous technology developers. In the area of post-combustion, testing was conducted on an enzyme-based technology, advanced solvents from two major developers, and a gas separation membrane. During the year, the gasification process was operated for three test runs, supporting development of water-gas shift and COS hydrolysis catalysts, a mercury sorbent, and several gasification support technologies. Syngas produced during gasification operation was also used for pre-combustion capture technologies, including gas separation membranes from three different technology developers, a CO2 sorbent, and CO2 solvents.

  16. Small scale wind power harnessing in Colombian oil industry facilities: Wind resource and technology issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo, Mauricio; Nieto, Cesar; Escudero, Ana C.; Cobos, Juan C.; Delgado, Fernando

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Looking to improve its national and international standing, Colombia's national oil company, Ecopetrol, has set its goal on becoming involved on the production of energy from multiple sources, most importantly, on having an important percentage of its installed capacity from renewable sources. Part of this effort entices the evaluation of wind power potential on its facilities, including production, transportation and administrative, as well as identifying those technologies most suitable for the specific conditions of an equatorial country such as Colombia. Due to the lack of adequate site information, the first step consisted in superimposing national data to the facilities map of the company; this allowed for the selection of the first set of potential sites. From this set, the terminal at Covenas-Sucre was selected taking into account not only wind resource, but ease of access and power needs, as well as having a more or less representative wind potential in comparison to the rest of the country. A weather station was then installed to monitor wind variables. Measurements taken showed high variations in wind direction, and relatively low velocity profiles, making most commercially available wind turbines difficult to implement. In light of the above, a series of iterative steps were taken, first considering a range of individual Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT), given their capacity to adapt to changing wind directions. However, wind speed variations proved to be a challenge for individual VAWT's, i.e. Darriues turbines do not work well with low wind speeds, and Savonius turbines are not efficient of high wind speeds. As a result, a combined Darrieus- Savonius VAWT was selected given the capacity to adapt to both wind regimes, while at the same time modifying the size and shape of the blades in order to adapt to the lower average wind speeds present at the site. The resulting prototype is currently under construction and is scheduled to

  17. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1990: Twenty-third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1990. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1990 annual reports submitted by about 443 licensees indicated that approximately 214,568 individuals were monitored, 110,204 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.19 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.36 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 113,361 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 443 covered licensees during 1990. Some 77,633 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 11,083 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.67 rem (cSv)

  18. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992. Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv)

  19. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1993. Volume 15, Twenty-six annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1995-01-01

    This report the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1993. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1993 annual reports submitted by about 360 licensees indicated that approximately 189,711 individuals were monitored, 169,872 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measured dose of about 0.31 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 99,749 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 360 covered licensees during 1993. Some 91,000 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 12,685 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.49 rem (cSv)

  20. Blowdown mass flow measurements during the Power Burst Facility LOC-11C test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broughton, J.M.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    An interpretation and evaluation of the two-phase coolant mass flow measurements obtained during Test LOC-11C performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. Although a density gradient existed within the pipe between 1 and 6 s, the homogeneous flow model used to calculate the coolant mass flow from the measured mixture density, momentum flux, and volumetric flow was found to be generally satisfactory. A cross-sectional average density was determined by fitting a linear density gradient through the upper and lower chordal densities obtained from a three-beam gamma densitometer and then combining the result with the middle beam density. The integrated measured coolant mass flow was subsequently found to be within 5% if the initial mass inventory of the PBF loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) system. The posttest calculations using the RELAP4/MOD6 computer code to determine coolant mass flow for Test LOC-11C also agreed well with the measured data

  1. Design and development of embedded control system for high power RF test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nageswara Rao, J.; Badapanda, M.K.; Upadhyay, Rinki; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Design and development of an embedded control system for the control, interlock and operation of 1MW, 352.2 MHz TH2089 klystron based RF test facility. The key components of the control system are NI compact Re configurable Input Output (cRIO) system and Windows based PC. The cRIO system's rugged hardware architecture includes a 1.06 GHz Dual-Core embedded controller with Real Time (RT) Operating System, a reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chassis for custom I/O timing, control and processing; and I/O modules. Windows based Graphical User Interface (GUI) has been developed to guide the user through start-up procedure, to set the operating parameters and also to display the status information of all the signals. The application software for data logging and publishing of the acquired data namely set, read back and status signals of auxiliary power supplies and machine safety interlocks has been developed in LabVIEW RT module and is running on embedded controller. Machine safety interlock logic has been implemented in FPGA to meet the time criticality. (author)

  2. Characteristics of SUS-MI cables and it's application to wiring in nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Michio; Sato, Toshio; Handa, Katsue; Ohya, Shingo; Ioroi, Masaya

    1984-01-01

    SUS-MI cables are the inorganic insulation cables using austenitic stainless steel SUS 321 as the sheath, oxygen-free copper as the conductor and high purity magnesium oxide as the insulatingmaterial. Because of the excellent characteristics of the composing materials, the properties withstanding radiation, fire and heat, and sodium of the cables are superior. In the nuclear power facilities being developed such as fast breeder reactors and nuclear fusion reactors, there is the environment the cables with organic materials as the components cannot meet. As the cables to be applied to such places, the SUS-MI cables are most suitable. In this report, the electric properties and the mechanical strength of the cables and the examples of practical use are described. The highest temperature of using the SUS-MI cables is 800 deg C. The form and the composing materials of the SUS-MI cables, the characteristics and the cable laying are reported. Ceramic connectors and heat-resistant wall penetration parts were developed. The characteristics of the cables for the preheaters of fast breeder reactors are compared. (Kako, I.)

  3. Proceeding of 26th domestic symposium on present and future of integrity monitoring technology in nuclear power generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    As the 26th domestic symposium of Atomic Energy Research Committee, the Japan Welding Engineering Society, the symposium was held titled as 'Current status and future of integrity monitoring techniques in nuclear power facilities'. Six speakers gave lectures titled as 'Maintenance and integrity monitoring in nuclear power plants', 'Present status of fatigue and creep-fatigue monitoring techniques in the US', 'Fatigue monitoring system in Tsuruga-1 nuclear power station', 'Vibration monitoring technique of rotational machine', 'SCC monitoring with electrochemical noise analysis' and Monitoring technique for corrosive environments and crack shape'. (T. Tanaka)

  4. Research and design of scanning power supply for deep tumor therapy facility with heavy ions accelerator in Lanzhou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yuzhen; Liu Yuntao; Chen Youxin; Gao Daqing; Zhang Shu; Gao Yalin

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the technique targets and operation principle of the scanning power supply for the deep tumor therapy facility with heavy ions in Cooler-Storage-Ring of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR). To ensure the specified accuracy of the current, the hysteresis loop control strategy was adopted, and tracking error was constrained in the specified tolerance. One prototype was designed and installed. And the simulation results and test results were listed in the paper. The results show that all the targets can meet the design requirements, and that the circuit configuration and hysteresis loop control strategy selected are practicable. (authors)

  5. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 284-E and 284-W power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.; Herman, D.R.

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  6. Use of the Power Burst Facility for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Griebenow, M.L.; Leatham, J.

    1990-01-01

    A program is under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that involves using the Power Burst Facility (PBF) for research into boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). BNCT utilizes the ionizing energy from boron-neutron capture to stop reproduction of or destroy cells in cancerous tissue in a two-step process. The first step is to selectively concentrate a boron isotope within the tumor cell, that when activated by neutron capture emits highly ionizing, short range particles. The second step involves activation of the isotope only in the vicinity of the tumor with a narrow neutron beam. The ( 10 B[n, 4 He] 7 Li) reaction with thermal neutrons produces fission products with track lengths approximately equal to a cell diameter. The INEL program includes the modification of the PBF by the addition of a filter and treatment area. The filter will down-scatter high energy neutrons into the epithermal range and remove thermal neutrons and excessively damaging gamma components. The intense source of epithermal neutrons from PBF is considered necessary to achieve optimum therapy for deep-seated tumors with minimum damage to surface tissue. THe neutron filter conceptualized for PBF utilizes aluminum and heavy water to down-scatter neutrons into the proper energy range. Bismuth will be used for gamma shielding and cadmium will remove the thermal neutron contaminant from the beam. The INEL program leads to human clinical trials at PBF which are intended to prove that brain tumors can be successfully treated through noninvasive techniques. Further research into BNCT at PBF for other cancer types is also anticipated

  7. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Wildlife Detection and Observation Technologies at a Solar Power Tower Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H; Valdez, Ernest W; Preston, Todd M; Wellik, Michael J; Cryan, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light ("solar flux") in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world's largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance) could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  8. Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife detection and observation technologies at a solar power tower facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H.; Valdez, Ernest W.; Preston, Todd M.; Wellik, Mike J.; Cryan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light (“solar flux”) in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world’s largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance) could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  9. Fall diets of red-breasted merganser (Mergus serrator) and walleye (Sander vitreus) in Sandusky Bay and adjacent waters of western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bur, M.T.; Stapanian, M.A.; Bernhardt, G.; Turner, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    Although published studies indicate the contrary, there is concern among many sport anglers that migrating red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator) and other waterbirds pose a competitive threat to sport fish species such as walleye (Sander vitreus) in Lake Erie. We quantified the diet of autumn-migrant mergansers and walleye during 1998-2000 in Sandusky Bay and adjacent waters of western Lake Erie. We hypothesized that the diets of both predators would be similar in species composition, but because of different foraging ecologies their diets would differ markedly in size of prey consumed. In addition to predator samples, we used trawl data from the same general area as an index of prey availability. We found that mergansers fed almost exclusively on fish (nine species). Gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), emerald shiner (Notropis atherinoides) and round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) were consumed in the greatest numbers, most frequently and comprised the greatest biomass. Walleye fed exclusively on fish: gizzard shad, alewife (Alosa psuedoharengus) and emerald shiner were consumed in the greatest numbers, most frequently and comprised the greatest biomass. Diet overlap between mergansers and walleye was 67% by weight and 66% by species frequency. Mean total lengths of gizzard shad, emerald shiner and round goby found in walleye stomachs exceeded those captured in trawls by 47%, on average. Mean total lengths of gizzard shad, emerald shiner and round goby were greater in walleye stomachs than in merganser stomachs. Mean total lengths of emerald shiner and round goby were less in merganser stomachs than in trawls. Our results suggest that although the diets of walleye and mergansers overlapped considerably, mergansers generally consumed smaller fish than walleye. Given the abundance and diversity of prey species available, and the transient nature of mergansers on Lake Erie during migration, we conclude that competition for food between these species is minimal.

  10. Final environmental assessment for a refinement of the power delivery component of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Treatment and Transmission Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    The Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) is designing and constructing a system of regional water supply facilities to meet current and projected water demands and increase system reliability. The existing Southern Nevada Water system is being upgraded with a number of improvements to increase the capacity of the system. However, even the expanded system is expected to be unable to meet projected peak daily water demands by the year 1999. As a result, new facilities are being designed and constructed to operate in conjunction with the upgraded Southern Nevada Water system. These new facilities, known as the Southern Nevada Water Authority Treatment and Transmission Facility (SNWA-TTF), include four primary components: a new raw water intake; new transmission facilities including below ground pipelines, tunnels, and above ground pumping stations; a water treatment facility; and new power supply facilities. Because existing power supplies would not be adequate for the new water treatment facilities, new power facilities, consisting of two new 230 kV-69 kV substations and new 69 and 230 kV power lines, are being constructed. This environmental assessment is specifically on the new power facilities

  11. Environmental safety aspects of the new solid radioactive waste management and storage facility at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragaisis, Valdas; Poskas, Povilas; Simonis, Vytautas; Adomaitis, Jonas Erdvilas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania). Nuclear Engineering Lab.

    2011-11-15

    New solid radioactive waste management and interim storage facilities will be constructed for the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant to support ongoing decommissioning activities, including removal and treatment of operational waste from the existing storage buildings. The paper presents approach and methods that have been used to assess radiological impacts to the general public potentially arising under normal operation and accident conditions and to demonstrate compliance with regulations in force. The assessment of impacts from normal operation includes evaluation of exposure arising from release of airborne radioactive material and from facilities and packages containing radioactive material. In addition, radiological impacts from other nearby operating and planned nuclear facilities are taken into consideration. The assessment of impacts under accident conditions includes evaluation of exposure arising from the selected design and beyond design basis accidents. (orig.)

  12. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them was reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates are presented, and the engineering issues that should be reexamined are identified. The latest (1980-1981) information from the MHD technology program is integrated with the elements of a conventional steam power electric generating plant.

  13. The Texts of the Instruments Concerning the Agency's Assistance to Mexico in Establishing a Nuclear Power Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The texts of the Supply Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Mexico and the United States of America, and of the Project Agreement between the Agency and the Government of Mexico concerning the Agency's assistance to that Government in establishing a nuclear power facility, are reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreements entered into force on 12 February 1974, pursuant to Articles VIII and IX respectively.

  14. The Texts of the Instruments Concerning the Agency's Assistance to Mexico in Establishing a Nuclear Power Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-04-05

    The texts of the Supply Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Mexico and the United States of America, and of the Project Agreement between the Agency and the Government of Mexico concerning the Agency's assistance to that Government in establishing a nuclear power facility, are reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreements entered into force on 12 February 1974, pursuant to Articles VIII and IX respectively.

  15. Catalogue and classification of technical safety standards, rules and regulations for nuclear power reactors and nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichtner, N.; Becker, K.; Bashir, M.

    1977-01-01

    The present report is an up-dated version of the report 'Catalogue and Classification of Technical Safety Rules for Light-water Reactors and Reprocessing Plants' edited under code No EUR 5362e, August 1975. Like the first version of the report, it constitutes a catalogue and classification of standards, rules and regulations on land-based nuclear power reactors and fuel cycle facilities. The reasons for the classification system used are given and discussed

  16. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  17. Utilisation of real-scale renewable energy test facility for validation of generic wind turbine and wind power plant controller models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeni, Lorenzo; Gevorgian, Vahan; Wallen, Robb

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an example of application of a modern test facility conceived for experiments regarding the integration of renewable energy in the power system. The capabilities of the test facility are used to validate dynamic simulation models of wind power plants and their controllers....... The models are based on standard and generic blocks. The successful validation of events related to the control of active power (control phenomena in...

  18. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    A fixed-price procurement contract for $24.9 million was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, CA, for the design, manufacture, installation, and acceptance testing of the sustaining neutral beam power supply system (SNBPSS). This system is scheduled for completion in early 1981 and will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each of the 24 power supply sets will provide the accel potential of 80 kV at 88 A, the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module

  19. CALCULATION OF OPERATING PARAMETERS OF HIGH-VOLTAGE POWER TAKE-OFF SYSTEM FOR THE PHOTOVOLTAIC FACILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Zaitsev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To ensure maximum production of electric power by photovoltaic vacilities, in addition to using highly efficient photovoltaic modules equipped with solar radiation concentrators must use a highly effective power take-off system. This paper is inscribed to solving the problem of a highly efficient and economic power take-off system development. Methodology. To solving the problem, we implemented three stages. On the first stage examines the dependence of electrical power from the intensity of the incident solar radiation. Based on this, the second stage is calculated the DC-DC converter resonant circuit and its working parameters, and developed circuit diagram of DC-DC converter. On the third stage, we carry out an analysis of power take-off system with step up DC-DC converter working. Results. In this paper, we carry out the analysis of working efficiency for photovoltaic facility power take-off system with step-up boost converter. The result of such analysis show that the efficiency of such system in a wide range of photovoltaic energy module illumination power is at 0.92, whereas the efficiency of classic power take-off systems does not exceed 0.70. Achieved results allow designing a circuit scheme of a controlled bridge resonant step-up converter with digital control. Proposed scheme will ensure reliable operation, fast and accurate location point of maximum power and conversion efficiency up to 0.96. Originality. Novelty of proposed power take-off system solution constitute in implementation of circuit with DC-DC converters, which as it shown by results of carrying out modeling is the most effective. Practical value. Practical implementation of proposed power take-off system design will allow reducing losses in connective wires and increasing the efficiency of such a system up to 92.5% in wide range of photovoltaic energy modules illumination.

  20. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, A.L. (ed.); Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-09-01

    This monthly bulletin describes activities in the following project areas during this reporting period: supporting technology development, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support, and PBF operations. (FI)

  1. Policies to deal with reactionary factors in the location of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Soo

    2000-01-01

    Energy is very important for daily life. But the prevailing fossil fuels are almost running out and moore over, the global warming caused by fossil fuel threatens all lives on the earth. Yet in reality, there are almost no choices to take the place fossil fuels beside nuclear energy. Nuclear energy is the only practical new energy resource that can be produced in Korea, which possesses nearly no energy resources and imports 98% do its energy supplies annually. Fortunately the rate of self-reliance of Korean nuclear technology is up to 95%, which is almost at top level in the world. However, many people think that nuclear energy is dangerous and uneconomical, thus social tension and dispute often a rises regarding nuclear energy, To minimize these discords, those in charge of the facility should provide an acceptable strategy to the publics, especially concerning the location of the facility. The strategy should include the followings: (1) The publics should participate in the planning stage of the nuclear facility, not only symbolically but also practically, and all information should be opened to publics so that cost-effectiveness and safety of the facility can be evaluated. (2) For the people who lose their land, home and work, an appropriate compensation should be considered from the planning stage. (3) The person in charge of the facility has to show that people in neighborhood of the facility enjoy better life than before and should help people to recognize it. (4) Continuous campaign enhancing public understanding of the need and safety for nuclear facility must be implemented. (5) South Korea's nuclear facilities could be set up in North Korea as the relationships between two Koreas improve. (author)

  2. Research on adoption of graphic processing system into electric power facilities operation management. Denryoku setsubi kanri gyomu ni okeru zukei shori system no tekiyo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitsubuchi, Yoshiyasu; Uryu, Kenji; Terasaki, Naoaki (Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc., Fukuoka (Japan))

    1989-03-30

    In the technical department of electric power companies, there are innumerable single line diagram, machinery arrangement plan and other facilities drawings. Based on those drawings, facilities planning, work design, construction plan, maintenance and management data, etc. are made, for which making heightening is desired in efficiency of drawing filing management. Therefore, research was made on the adoption of CAD technology through modeling power transmission line, and power generating and transforming station operation management. First for the application of power transmission facilities, the power transmission line plan and facilities information were planned to be unified in management. Ie., the power transmission line plan and profile being shown on the display, symbols of steel towers, cable lines, etc. were further picked by mouth to easily substantiate the facilities. While image input and CAD of drawing were made in combined treatment. Then for the application to the power generating and transforming facilities, the single line diagram and facilities information were unified in management, together with demonstration of data interchangeability among different kinds of CAD system. 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Safety at basic nuclear facilities other than nuclear power plants. Lessons learned from significant events reported in 2011 and 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The third report on the safety of basic nuclear installations in France other than power reactors presents an IRSN's analysis of significant events reported to the Nuclear Safety Authority in the years 2011 and 2012. It covers plants, laboratories, research reactors and facilities for the treatment, storage or disposal of waste. This report aims to contribute to a better understanding by stakeholders and more widely by the public of the safety and radiation protection issues associated with the operation of nuclear facilities, the progress made in terms of safety as well as the identified deficiencies. The main trend shows, once again, the significant role of organizational and human factors in the significant events that occurred in 2011 and 2012, of which the vast majority are without noteworthy consequences. Aging mechanisms are another major cause of equipment failure and require special attention. The report also provides IRSN's analysis of specific events that are particularly instructive for facility safety and a synthesis of assessments performed by IRSN on topics that are important for safety and radiation protection. IRSN also includes an overview of its analysis of measures proposed by licensees for increasing the safety of their facilities after the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, which consist of providing a 'hardened safety core' to confront extreme situations (earthquake, flooding, etc.) that are unlikely but plausible and can bring about levels of hazards higher than those taken into account in the design of the facilities

  4. Nuclear power-related facilities and neighboring land price: a case study on the Mutsu-Ogawara region, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Fumihiro; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Asano, Kota

    2011-12-01

    From the perspective of risk, nuclear-power-related facilities (NPRFs) are often regarded as locally undesirable land use. However, construction of NPRFs contributes to social infrastructural improvement and job creation in the host communities. This raises a question: How large are these positive and negative effects? To approach this question from an economic viewpoint, we estimated the hedonic land price function for the Mutsu-Ogawara region of Japan from 1976 to 2004 and analyzed year-by-year fluctuations in land prices around the NPRFs located there. Land prices increased gradually in the neighborhood of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities (NFCFs) in Rokkasho Village, except for some falling (i) from 1982 to 1983 (the first official announcement of the project of construction came in 1983), (ii) from 1987 to 1988 (in 1988, the construction began and opposition movements against the project reached their peak), and (iii) from 1998 to 1999 (the pilot carry-in of spent fuels into the reprocessing plant began in 1998). Land prices around the Higashidori Nuclear Power Plant decreased during the period 1981-1982, when the Tohoku Electric Power Corp. and Tokyo Electric Power Corp. announced their joint construction plan. On the other hand, we obtained some results, even though not significant, indicating that land prices around Ohminato and Sekinehama harbors changed with the arrival and departure of the nuclear ship Mutsu, which suffered a radiation leak in 1974. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  5. The Cost-Optimal Distribution of Wind and Solar Generation Facilities in a Simplified Highly Renewable European Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kies, Alexander; von Bremen, Lüder; Schyska, Bruno; Chattopadhyay, Kabitri; Lorenz, Elke; Heinemann, Detlev

    2016-04-01

    The transition of the European power system from fossil generation towards renewable sources is driven by different reasons like decarbonisation and sustainability. Renewable power sources like wind and solar have, due to their weather dependency, fluctuating feed-in profiles, which make their system integration a difficult task. To overcome this issue, several solutions have been investigated in the past like the optimal mix of wind and PV [1], the extension of the transmission grid or storages [2]. In this work, the optimal distribution of wind turbines and solar modules in Europe is investigated. For this purpose, feed-in data with an hourly temporal resolution and a spatial resolution of 7 km covering Europe for the renewable sources wind, photovoltaics and hydro was used. Together with historical load data and a transmission model , a simplified pan-European power power system was simulated. Under cost assumptions of [3] the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for this simplified system consisting of generation, consumption, transmission and backup units is calculated. With respect to the LCOE, the optimal distribution of generation facilities in Europe is derived. It is shown, that by optimal placement of renewable generation facilities the LCOE can be reduced by more than 10% compared to a meta study scenario [4] and a self-sufficient scenario (every country produces on average as much from renewable sources as it consumes). This is mainly caused by a shift of generation facilities towards highly suitable locations, reduced backup and increased transmission need. The results of the optimization will be shown and implications for the extension of renewable shares in the European power mix will be discussed. The work is part of the RESTORE 2050 project (Wuppertal Institute, Next Energy, University of Oldenburg), that is financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF, Fkz. 03SFF0439A). [1] Kies, A. et al.: Kies, Alexander, et al

  6. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA [Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator] II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards

  7. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  8. Simulation based assembly and alignment process ability analysis for line replaceable units of the high power solid state laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Lu, Cong; Li, Shiqi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Discrete event simulation is applied to analyze the assembly and alignment process ability of LRUs in SG-III facility. • The overall assembly and alignment process of LRUs with specific characteristics is described. • An extended-directed graph is proposed to express the assembly and alignment process of LRUs. • Different scenarios have been simulated to evaluate assembling process ability of LRUs and decision making is supported to ensure the construction millstone. - Abstract: Line replaceable units (LRUs) are important components of the very large high power solid state laser facilities. The assembly and alignment process ability of LRUs will impact the construction milestone of facilities. This paper describes the use of discrete event simulation method for assembly and alignment process analysis of LRUs in such facilities. The overall assembly and alignment process for LRUs is presented based on the layout of the optics assembly laboratory and the process characteristics are analyzed. An extended-directed graph is proposed to express the assembly and alignment process of LRUs. Taking the LRUs of disk amplifier system in Shen Guang-III (SG-III) facility as the example, some process simulation models are built based on the Quest simulation platform. The constraints, such as duration, equipment, technician and part supply, are considered in the simulation models. Different simulation scenarios have been carried out to evaluate the assembling process ability of LRUs. The simulation method can provide a valuable decision making and process optimization tool for the optics assembly laboratory layout and the process working out of such facilities.

  9. Simulation based assembly and alignment process ability analysis for line replaceable units of the high power solid state laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junfeng; Lu, Cong; Li, Shiqi, E-mail: sqli@hust.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Discrete event simulation is applied to analyze the assembly and alignment process ability of LRUs in SG-III facility. • The overall assembly and alignment process of LRUs with specific characteristics is described. • An extended-directed graph is proposed to express the assembly and alignment process of LRUs. • Different scenarios have been simulated to evaluate assembling process ability of LRUs and decision making is supported to ensure the construction millstone. - Abstract: Line replaceable units (LRUs) are important components of the very large high power solid state laser facilities. The assembly and alignment process ability of LRUs will impact the construction milestone of facilities. This paper describes the use of discrete event simulation method for assembly and alignment process analysis of LRUs in such facilities. The overall assembly and alignment process for LRUs is presented based on the layout of the optics assembly laboratory and the process characteristics are analyzed. An extended-directed graph is proposed to express the assembly and alignment process of LRUs. Taking the LRUs of disk amplifier system in Shen Guang-III (SG-III) facility as the example, some process simulation models are built based on the Quest simulation platform. The constraints, such as duration, equipment, technician and part supply, are considered in the simulation models. Different simulation scenarios have been carried out to evaluate the assembling process ability of LRUs. The simulation method can provide a valuable decision making and process optimization tool for the optics assembly laboratory layout and the process working out of such facilities.

  10. Consideration for a tritium removal facility at the Cernavoda Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A pre-feasibility study considering process options for a Tritium Removal Facility at the Cernavoda Nuclear Power Station has been completed by ICIT and AECL. Three different process options were considered. These three options differ in the front-end process used to transfer tritium from heavy water to deuterium gas. All three options use cryogenic distillation (CD) as a back end process to extract tritium from the deuterium gas stream and concentrate it into a small volume stream of pure DT or T 2 that can be immobilized on a titanium sponge. The first option for the front-end process is Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE). The LPCE column is used to transfer the tritium from the heavy water to a recirculating stream of deuterium gas. The separation of hydrogen isotopes takes place in the cryogenic distillation column. Tritium-depleted deuterium gas from the CD system is fed back to the LPCE column. The cryogenic distillation system concentrates the tritium into a small volume of elemental tritium for storage. Tritiated heavy water that has been purified to remove catalyst poisons is fed to the top of the LPCE column. The heavy water leaving the column is depleted in deuterium. Both existing detritiation plants built to detritiate CANDU reactors (the Darlington TRF in Canada and the Wolsung TRF in Korea) use variations of the LPCE-CD process. The second option uses electrolysis to convert tritiated heavy water into oxygen and tritiated deuterium gas. The deuterium gas is sent to the Cryogenic Distillation system to extract and concentrate the tritium. The tritium depleted deuterium gas is recombined with the electrolytic oxygen to give a tritium-depleted heavy water product. The third option uses a Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) front end. A CECE process concentrates the tritium in the water and, using water electrolysis, converts the concentrated tritium into deuterium gas. An overhead catalytic recombiner converts the

  11. Nuclear safety and radiation protection report of the basic nuclear facilities of the Tricastin nuclear power plant - 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-06-01

    This safety report was established under the article 21 of the French law no. 2006-686 of June 13, 2006 relative to nuclear safety and information transparency. It presents, first, the facilities of the Tricastin nuclear power plant (INB 87 and 88, Saint-Paul-Trois-Chateaux, Drome (FR)). Then, the nuclear safety and radiation protection measures taken regarding the facilities are reviewed: nuclear safety definition, radiation protection of intervening parties, safety and radiation protection improvement paths, crisis management, external and internal controls, technical situation of facilities, administrative procedures in progress. The incidents and accidents which occurred in 2010, are reported as well as the radioactive and non-radioactive (chemical, thermal) effluents discharge in the environment. Finally, The radioactive materials and wastes generated by the facilities are presented and sorted by type of waste, quantities and type of conditioning. Other environmental impacts (noise) are presented with their mitigation measures. Actions in favour of transparency and public information are presented as well. The document concludes with a glossary and a list of recommendations from the Committees for health, safety and working conditions. (J.S.)

  12. 18 CFR 292.204 - Criteria for qualifying small power production facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... shall be measured from the electrical generating equipment of a facility. (3) Waiver. The Commission may... sources. (ii) Any primary energy source which, on the basis of its energy content, is 50 percent or more... adding paragraph (a)(4), effective June 1, 2010. For the convenience of the user, the added and revised...

  13. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 4: Supplementary engineering data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the Magnetohydrodynamic Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates, and identification of engineering issues that should be reexamined are also given. The latest (1980-1981) information from the MHD technology program are integrated with the elements of a conventional steam power electric generating plant. Supplementary Engineering Data (Issues, Background, Performance Assurance Plan, Design Details, System Design Descriptions and Related Drawings) is presented.

  14. A facility for the testing and repair of primary collectors of steam generators at WWER nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Kuna, M.

    1990-01-01

    A facility labelled ZOKPG-1 has been developed for in-service inspection and repair of steam generator collectors in WWER-440 nuclear power plants. The facility makes possible visual, capillary, luminescence and ultrasonic inspection and eddy current testing of the internal surface, base material and welded joints of the collector. The repair modules of the ZOKPG-1 manipulator enable electroerosive elimination of surface defects of the material and local electrochemical decontamination of the internal surfaces. The manipulator can be operated at temperatures up to 40 degC, humidity up to 100%, and in conditions of radiation load up to 15 mGy/h and of surface contamination on the order of 100 Bq/cm 2 . (Z.M.). 16 figs

  15. Concerning results of environmental monitoring around the reprocessing facilities of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Central Evaluation Expert Group for Environmental radiation Monitoring has been engaged in examinations of plants for and results of the environmental radiation monitoring performed by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation around its reprocessing facilities. The present report outlines an examination of the results of monitoring carried out in 1987 (January to December). It is concluded that the methods used for the monitoring and its technical level are satisfactory in meeting the objectives of the monitoring plans. Expept for tritium in seawater, the level of radiations stays within the normal variation determined based on preliminary measurements of the background radiation. The procedure used for the calculation of exposure dose is also satisfactory in meeting the requirements specified in the monitoring plants. It is confirmed that the exposure dose of the residents around the facilities is well below the permissible exposure dose limite specified in law. (Nogami. K.)

  16. Evolution of Technology Laser Scanner. Implications for use in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarti Fernandez, F.; Bonet, J.

    2012-01-01

    The main technical factors affecting these teams their actual implementation in nuclear power plants will be analyzed: data acquisition speed, sensitivity, laser power, autonomy, contamination of equipment, radiation effect, etc. In conclusion, the real difference is displayed in the data collection in function of various technologies, embodied in field time, and costs.

  17. LWR fuel rod testing facilities in high flux reactor (HFT) Petten for investigation of power cycling and ramping behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markgraf, J; Perry, D; Oudaert, J [Commission of the European Communities, Joint Reserach Centre, Petten Establishment, Petten (Netherlands)

    1983-06-01

    LWR fuel rod irradiation experiments are being performed in HFR's Pool Side Facility (PSF) by means of pressurized boiling water capsules (BWFC). For more than 6 years the major application of these devices has been in performing irradiation programs to investigate the power ramp behaviour of PWR and BWR rods which have been pre-irradiated in power reactors. Irradiation devices with various types of monitoring instrumentation are available, e.g. for fuel rod length, fuel stack length, fuel rod internal pressure and fuel rod central temperature measurements. The application scope covers PWR and BWR fuel rods, with burn-up levels up to 45 MWd/kg(U), max. linear heat generation rates up to 700 W/cm and simulation of constant power change rates between 0.05 and 1000 W/cm.min. The paper describes the different designs of LWR fuel rod testing facilities and associated non-destructive testing devices in use at the HFR Petten. It also addresses the new test capabilities that will become available after exchange of the HFR vessel in 1983. Furthermore it shows some typical results. (author)

  18. The Text of the Agreement Between the Agency and Argentina for the Application of Safeguards to the Embalse Power Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Government of the Republic of Argentina for the Application of Safeguards to the Embalse Power Reactor Facility is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members

  19. Problems of development and putting into education process an electronic textbook on special discipline 'General theory and construction of heat-and-power engineering facilities'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karitskaya, S.G.; Ruzanov, K.A.; Davletov, V.S.

    2005-01-01

    The results of work of making the electronic textbook of special discipline ('General theory and construction of heat-and-power engineering facilities' are brought. The principles and requirements, presented towards literature of such type, are outlined. (author)

  20. The Text of the Agreement between the Agency and Argentina for the Application of Safeguards to the Atucha Power Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-01-25

    The text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Government of the Republic of Argentina for the Application of Safeguards to the Atucha Power Reactor Facility is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members.

  1. Site Characterization Report ORGDP Diffusion Facilities Permanent Shutdown K-700 Power House and K-27 Switch Yard/Switch House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas R.J., Blanchard R.D.

    1988-06-13

    The K-700 Power House area, initially built to supply power to the K-25 gaseous diffusion plant was shutdown and disassembled in the 1960s. This shutdown was initiated by TVA supplying economical power to the diffusion plant complex. As a result of world wide over production of enriched, reactor grade U{sup 235}, the K-27 switch yard and switch house area was placed in standby in 1985. Subsequently, as the future production requirements decreased, the cost of production increased and the separation technologies for other processes improved, the facility was permanently shutdown in December, 1987. This Site Characterization Report is a part of the FY-88 engineering Feasibility Study for placing ORGDP Gaseous Diffusion Process facilities in 'Permanent Shutdown'. It is sponsored by the Department of Energy through Virgil Lowery of Headquarters--Enrichment and through Don Cox of ORO--Enrichment Operations. The primary purpose of these building or site characterization reports is to document, quantify, and map the following potential problems: Asbestos; PCB containing fluids; Oils, coolants, and chemicals; and External contamination. With the documented quantification of the concerns (problems) the Engineering Feasibility Study will then proceed with examining the potential solutions. For this study, permanent shutdown is defined as the securing and/or conditioning of each facility to provide 20 years of safe service with minimal expenditures and, where feasible, also serving DOE's needs for long-term warehousing or other such low-risk use. The K-700 power house series of buildings were either masonry construction or a mix of masonry and wood. The power generating equipment was removed and sold as salvage in the mid 1960s but the buildings and auxiliary equipment were left intact. The nine ancillary buildings in the power house area use early in the Manhattan Project for special research projects, were left intact minus the original special equipment

  2. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 2: Engineering. Volume 3: Costs and schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Engineering design details for the principal systems, system operating modes, site facilities, and structures of an engineering test facility (ETF) of a 200 MWE power plant are presented. The ETF resembles a coal-fired steam power plant in many ways. It is analogous to a conventional plant which has had the coal combustor replaced with the MHD power train. Most of the ETF components are conventional. They can, however, be sized or configured differently or perform additional functions from those in a conventional coal power plant. The boiler not only generates steam, but also performs the functions of heating the MHD oxidant, recovering seed, and controlling emissions.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 2: Engineering. Volume 3: Costs and schedules. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Engineering design details for the principal systems, system operating modes, site facilities, and structures of an engineering test facility (ETF) of a 200 MWE power plant are presented. The ETF resembles a coal-fired steam power plant in many ways. It is analogous to a conventional plant which has had the coal combustor replaced with the MHD power train. Most of the ETF components are conventional. They can, however, be sized or configured differently or perform additional functions from those in a conventional coal power plant. The boiler not only generates steam, but also performs the functions of heating the MHD oxidant, recovering seed, and controlling emissions

  4. Ice storage facilities are worthwhile for the operation of power plants. Load management with jet pumps; Eisspeicher zahlen sich fuer Kraftwerksbetrieb aus. Lastmanagement mit Strahlpumpen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhold, Richard

    2012-12-15

    The significantly better alternative to hot water tanks in thermal power plants are ice storage tanks and steam jet refrigeration plants. These facilities form ice, supply district heating and produce heat from the environment. Furthermore, these facilities produce additional peak load electricity nearly daily, so that several large power plants become dispensable. How this is possible in a simple and low-cost manner, is described in the contribution under consideration.

  5. The text of the agreement between the Agency and Argentina for the application of safeguards to Embalse Power Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Agreement between the Republic of Argentina, the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards came into force on 4 March 1994. As a result of the coming into force of the aforesaid Agreement for Argentina, the application of safeguards under the Agreement of 6 December 1974 between the Agency and the Government of the Republic of Argentina for the Application of Safeguards to the Embalse Power Reactor Facility has been suspended

  6. Proceeding of 31st domestic symposium on failure events and integrity evaluation of nuclear power generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    As the 31st domestic symposium of Atomic Energy Research Committee, the Japan Welding Engineering Society, the symposium was held titled as 'Damage events and integrity evaluations of nuclear power facilities'. Six speakers gave lectures titled as 'Damages of structural materials in the LWR plants and their measures', 'Inspection and integrity evaluation method of SCC in the BWR plants', 'Measures with chloride SCC of piping', 'High cycle fatigue damage events of small diameter pipes and their measures', 'Management of SCC in in-core instrumentation thimbles' and 'Japanese lost ten years and American and other leaps'. (T. Tanaka)

  7. Regulations on the allocating of subsidies to promote the development of radiation exposure reduction technology for nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The regulations provide for subsidies for the research and development of radiation exposure reduction technology for nuclear power facilities and evaluation of the results. The subsidies are for purchase of equipment, materials, etc. and other expendures approved. The contents are as follows: applications for subsidies, determination of subsidy allocations, withdrawal of applications, a report on the work proceedings, a report on the results, confirmation on the sum of the subsidies, payment of subsidies, approval of alterations in the plans, withdrawal of the decision for subsidies, patent rights, payment of the earnings, management of the properties, etc. (Mori, K.)

  8. Regulations on allocating the sums of money regarding of development of radiation exposure reduction technology for nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The regulations provide for the sums of money regarding research and development of radiation exposure reduction technology for nuclear power facilities and evaluation of the results. Expenses cover the purchase of equipment, personnel expenditures, travelling expenses, communication, etc. The contents are as follows: the application for subsidy allocations, determination of subsidy allocations, withdrawal of applications, a report on the work proceedings, a report on the results, approval of alterations in the plans, withdrawal of the decision for a subsidy allocation, patent rights, utilization etc. of the results, management of the properties, etc. (Mori, K.)

  9. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the last quarter of the Second Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1994, entitled {open_quotes}Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.{close_quotes} The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particulate control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size.

  10. Pre-feasibility analysis of powering a remote research facility under arid conditions in Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagimbayev Sagi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the feasibility of using photovoltaic solar cells and solar water heating in a remote off-grid research facility for scientists in the steppe of Kazakhstan. The objective of the facility is to observe wildlife in this region, especially saiga antelope, whose population has been drastically reduced in recent years. The analysis is conducted using RETScreen software and includes energy, cost, emissions, and financial assessment. The proposed energy model is compared with a traditional base case scenario (based on a diesel boiler and reciprocating engine. Despite the challenges and constraints, the project pays off within its lifespan. It eliminates greenhouse gas emissions and reduces human interference with local wildlife.

  11. Conceptual design of a laser fusion power plant. Part I. An integrated facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    This study is a new preliminary conceptual design and economic analysis of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plant performed by Bechtel under the direction of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The purpose of a new conceptual design is to examine alternatives to the LLNL HYLIFE power plant and to incorporate information from the recent liquid metal cooled power plant conceptual design study (CDS) into the reactor system and balance of plant design. A key issue in the design of a laser fusion power plant is the degree of symmetry in the illumination of the target that will be required for a proper burn. Because this matter is expected to remain unresolved for some time, another purpose of this study is to determine the effect of symmetry requirements on the total plant size, layout, and cost

  12. Highest manageable level of radioactivity in the waste storage facilities of power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkert, J.; Lennartsson, R.

    1991-01-01

    This project presents and discusses an investigation of the highest level of radioactivity possible to handle in the waste storage facilities. The amount of radioactivity, about 0.1% of the fuel inventory, is the same in both of the cases but the amount of water is very different. The hypothetical accident was supposed to be damage of the reactor fuel caused by loss of coolant. (K.A.E.)

  13. Applicability of Long Duration Exposure Facility environmental effects data to the design of Space Station Freedom electrical power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Robert J.; Lu, Cheng-Yi; Aronoff, Irene

    1992-01-01

    Data defining space environmental effects on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) are examined in terms of the design of the electrical power system (EPS) of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The significant effects of long-term exposure to space are identified with respect to the performance of the LDEF's materials, components, and systems. A total of 57 experiments were conducted on the LDEF yielding information regarding coatings, thermal systems, electronics, optics, and power systems. The resulting database is analyzed in terms of the specifications of the SSF EPS materials and subsystems and is found to be valuable in the design of control and protection features. Specific applications are listed for findings regarding the thermal environment, atomic oxygen, UV and ionizing radiation, debris, and contamination. The LDEF data are shown to have a considerable number of applications to the design and planning of the SSF and its EPS.

  14. Study of electrical power facilities and measures for planned outages in Japanese hemodialysis clinics after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kai; Sawa, Manami; Fujiwara, Kousaku; Hirose, Minoru; Tsuruta, Harukazu; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2013-02-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 caused major damage in northeastern Japan. The Kanto region experienced a massive electrical power shortage in the summer of 2011. A questionnaire was submitted to 354 hemodialysis clinics in Kanagawa prefecture and the Tokyo metropolitan area, excluding isolated islands, and 176 responses were analyzed (49.7%). The questions included evaluation of the availability of a private electricity generator, countermeasures in case of a planned outage, awareness of saving electricity, and improvement of safety of medical devices or electrical facilities after the earthquake. Only 12% of the clinics had private electricity generators and many clinics had no plans to introduce this facility. However, 96% of the clinics had established countermeasures to deal with a planned outage. Many clinics planned to provide dialysis on a different day or at a different time. All clinics had tried hard to establish procedures to save electricity in the summer of 2011, and 84% of the clinics had reconsidered and improved the safety of medical devices or electricity facilities after the earthquake. These results show that the awareness of crisis management was greatly improved in the wake of the earthquake. © 2012 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2012 International Society for Apheresis.

  15. Environmental risks of power generation from fossil fuels and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probert, D.; Tarrant, C.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear power industry, when considered via statistical arguments, is far less dangerous than the average 'man in the street' in the UK perceives it to be. To support this assertion, an elementary analysis of the risk factors associated with commonplace hazards (e.g. road accidents and smoking) is presented. The radiological risks resulting from the Chernobyl nuclear power station accident, even in the most badly affected areas of the UK and at the times of highest intensity, were much less than those due to natural background radiation. Radioactive elements occur naturally in coal and are released as a result of combustion into the UK environment via flue gases and ash in significantly greater amounts than those from nuclear power stations. (author)

  16. Preliminary benefit-cost analysis of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) power addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaway, J.M.; Lezberg, A.J.; Scott, M.J.; Tawil, J.J.

    1984-07-01

    The primary objective of this report is to conduct a preliminary benefit-cost study for the proposed power addition to FFTF to determine whether the project is cost-effective. If the project is authorized, construction will begin in 1986 and end in 1991. Full power operation is scheduled to begin in 1991 and a project life of 20 years is assumed. The undiscounted cost during the construction period of the FFTF power addition is estimated to be approximately $117 million over the construction period (1984 dollars). An additional $3 million is estimated as the opportunity cost - or value of these resources in their most favorable alternative use - of surplus FFTF equipment and unused CRBR equipment, including materials for steam generator fabrication. The annual operating and maintenance cost of the project is estimated to be about $2.1 million in 1984 dollars. 20 references

  17. Radiation control aspects of the civil construction for a high power free electron laser (FEL) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, T.; Neil, G.; Stapleton, G.

    1996-01-01

    The paper discusses some of the assumptions and methods employed for the control of ionizing radiation in the specifications for the civil construction of a planned free electron laser facility based on a 200 MeV, 5 mA superconducting recirculation electron accelerator. Consideration is given firstly to the way in which the underlying building configuration and siting aspects were optimized on the basis of the early assumptions of beam loss and radiation goals. The various design requirements for radiation protection are then considered, and how they were folded into an aesthetically pleasing and functional building

  18. Certificate-Based Approach to Marketing Green Power and Constructing New Wind Energy Facilities: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, E.; Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

    2002-05-01

    The availability of wind energy certificates in Pennsylvania's retail electricity market has made a critical difference in the economic feasibility of developing 140 MW of new wind energy projects in the region. Certificates offer important benefits to both green power suppliers and buyers by reducing transaction barriers and thus lowering the cost of renewable energy. Buyers also benefit through the increased flexibility offered by certificate products. The experience described in this paper offers important insights for selling green power certificates and achieving new wind energy development in other areas of the country.

  19. A certificate-based approach to marketing green power and constructing new wind energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, Eric; Bird, Lori; Swezey, Blair

    2003-01-01

    The availability of wind energy certificates in Pennsylvania's retail electricity market has made a critical difference in the economic feasibility of developing 140 MW of new wind energy projects in the region. Certificates offer important benefits to both green power suppliers and buyers by reducing transaction barriers. They thus lower the cost of renewable energy. Buyers also benefit through the increased flexibility offered by certificate products. The experience described in this paper offers important insights for selling green power certificates and achieving new wind energy development in other areas of the country. (Author)

  20. Socioeconomic impacts of nuclear power plants: a paired comparison of operating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, M.A.; Cowan, J.T.; Bjornstad, D.J.

    1979-07-01

    This study compares the social, economic, and political effects of constructing and operating two nuclear power plants in the rural Southeast: Brunswick 1 and 2 in Brunswick County, North Carolina, and Hatch 1 and 2 in Appling County, Georgia. It is a comparative, post-licensing case study designed to analyze variations in the range and magnitude of impacts experienced by the areas in which the plants were constructed. The study is intended to assist the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the preparation of socioeconomic impact sections of environmental impact statements for proposed nuclear power stations

  1. SUPER-CAPACITOR APPLICATION IN ELECTRICAL POWER CABLE TESTING FACILITIES IN THERMAL ENDURANCE AND MECHANICAL BRACING TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Oleksyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current-carrying cores of the electrical power cables should be resistant to effects of short-circuit currents whose values depend on the material of the core, its cross-sectional area, cable insulation properties, environment temperature, and the duration of the short-circuit current flow (1 and 3–4 sec. when tested for thermal endurance and mechanical bracing. The facilities for testing the 10 kV aluminum core cables with short-circuit current shall provide mechanical-bracing current 56,82 kA and thermal endurance current 11,16 kA. Although capacitors provide such values of the testing currents to the best advantage, utilizing conventional capacitor-units will involve large expenditures for erecting and  running a separate building. It is expedient to apply super-capacitors qua the electric power supply for testing facilities, as they are capacitors with double-electrical layer and involve the current values of tens of kilo-amperes.The insulation voltage during short-circuit current testing being not-standardized, it is not banned to apply voltages less than 10 kV when performing short-circuit thermal endurance and mechanical bracing tests for electrical power cables of 10 kV. The super-capacitor voltage variation-in-time graph consists of two regions: capacitive and resistive. The capacitive part corresponds to the voltage change consequent on the energy change in the super-capacitors. The resistive part shows the voltage variation due to the active resistance presence in the super-capacitor.The author offers the algorithm determining the number of super capacitors requisite for testing 10 kV-electrical power cables with short-circuit currents for thermal endurance and mechanical bracing. The paper shows that installation of super-capacitors in the facilities testing the cables with short-circuit currents reduces the area needed for the super-capacitors in comparison with conventional capacitors more than by one order of magnitude.

  2. Control and data processing systems in UK nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, J.A.; Wall, D.N.

    1997-01-01

    This note identifies some of the data processing and control systems in UK nuclear power plant, with emphasis on direct digital control systems and sequence control. A brief indication is also given of some of the associated research activities on control systems and software. (author). 2 figs

  3. Summary of international extreme load design requirements for nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt is made to trace the development of extreme load criteria as it applies to earthquakes, extreme wind, high energy system rupture (LOCA), floods and other manmade and natural external hazards, from 1965 until the present, in the leading nuclear power nations throughout the world. (Author)

  4. A simulated test of physical starting and reactor physics on zero power facility of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zewu; Ji Huaxiang; Chen Zhicheng; Yao Zhiquan; Chen Chen; Li Yuwen

    1995-01-01

    The core neutron economics has been verified through experiments conducted at a zero power reactor with baffles of various thickness. A simulated test of physical starting of Qinshan PWR has been introduced. The feasibility and safety of the programme are verified. The research provides a valuable foundation for developing physical starting programme

  5. Control and data processing systems in UK nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, J A; Wall, D N [AEA Technology, Winfrith, Dorchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    This note identifies some of the data processing and control systems in UK nuclear power plant, with emphasis on direct digital control systems and sequence control. A brief indication is also given of some of the associated research activities on control systems and software. (author). 2 figs.

  6. BASEMAP, SANDUSKY COUNTY, OHIO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  7. Results of special security inspection on improvement of security management setup in Head Office and Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station of the Japan Atomic Power Company and improvement of facilities in Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In connection with the series of accidents in the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station, the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy had instructed JAPC to make comprehensive inspection on the security management setup and to take improvement measures in the nuclear power station. The results of the subsequent inspection by ANRE confirmed that the improvements made by JAPC are adequate, and the following items are described: improvement of security management setup - communication and reporting in emergency, the management of inspection and maintenance records, work control and supervision in repair, improvement, etc., functional authority and responsibility in maintenance management, operation management, radiation control, personnel education; improvement of facilities - feed water heaters, laundry waste-water filter room, radioactive waste treatment facility, general drainage, concentrated waste liquid storage tanks in newly-built waste treatment building, etc. (J.P.N.)

  8. The design study of an ultra-high power EB/X-ray conversion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zi-Feng, E-mail: hezifeng@sinap.ac.cn; Li, Deming; Huang, Jian-Ming; Yang, Yong-Jin; Zhu, Xi-Kai; Zhang, Yu-Tian

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We describe a 100 kW electron beam to X-rays conversion system. • We give an idea to improve the conversion efficiency and lifetime of the target. • We describe the design and thermal characteristics of the X-ray converter. - Abstract: X-ray conversion is a frequent need for irradiating the products that cannot be processed by electron beams, duo to their limited penetration capacity in materials, in radiation sterilization of disposable healthcare products and food irradiation. In this paper, we report the design of a conversion facility with a 5-MeV/120-kW electron accelerator, regarding the considerations on selection of the target materials and target structure, design of the electron beam transport line and approaches to improve the conversion efficiency and lifetime.

  9. Material-related issues at high-power and high-energy ion beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, M.; Tomut, M.; Trautmann, C.

    2015-01-01

    When solids are exposed to energetic ions (MeV-GeV), their physical and chemical structure can be severely modified. The change is governed by ultrafast dynamical processes starting from the deposition of large energy densities, electronic excitation and ionization processes, and finally damage creation in the atomic lattice system. In many materials, each projectile creates a cylindrical track with a few nanometers in diameter and up to many μm in length. To study and monitor the creation of damage, the GSI irradiation facility dedicated to materials science provides different in-situ and on-line techniques such as high resolution microscopy, X-ray diffraction, optical absorption spectroscopy, thermal imaging and residual gas analysis. The irradiation experiments can be performed under various gas atmospheres and under cryogenic or elevated temperature.

  10. Revision of 'JASS 5N reinforced concrete work for nuclear power facilities'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yoshihiro; Kitagawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    'JASS 5N, Reinforced Concrete Work at Nuclear Power Plants,' is part of the 'Japanese Architectural Standard Specification and Its Interpretation' established by the Architectural Institute of Japan. It is the stipulation to establish the standards for the implementation of reinforced concrete work and quality control for the major buildings of nuclear power plants, and to ensure the safety related to the construction work. The original specification was established in 1985, and its third revised edition was published in February 2013. This 2013 edition is composed of 15 sections and four items of appendices. This paper introduces the major revisions of each section, and explains the newly added section 'Section 14: Small-scale Reinforced Concrete Work.' In addition, this paper describes the newly added 'Appendix: Quality Standards for Heavy Mortal (tentative draft),' and the minor change that part of the appendix related to reinforced concrete was taken into the interpretation of 'Section 10: Reinforced Concrete Work.' (O.A.)

  11. Dynamic interaction of components, structure, and foundation of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajuhesh, J.; Hadjian, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    A solution is formulated for the dynamic analysis of structures and components with different stiffness and damping characteristics, including the consideration of soil-structure interaction effects. Composite structures are often analysed approximately, in particular with regards to damping. For example, the reactor and other equipment in nuclear power plant structures are often analysed by assuming them uncoupled from the supporting structures. To achieve a better accuracy, the coupled system is hereby analysed as a composite component-structure-soil system. To demonstrate the assembly technique, two examples are considered: (a) a steel structure sitting on a concrete stem and linked by a steel bridge to another concrete structure, and (b) an actual model of a nuclear power plant containment structure. (Auth.)

  12. Zero-discharge wastewater treatment facility for a 900-MWe GCC power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosain, R.M.; Dalan, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    Florida Power and Light desires to examine the prospect of achieving zero liquid discharge from the gasification area of their proposed 900-MW coal gasification-combined cycle (GCC) power plant expansion at the Martin station. This report provides information about the technologies available, cost, and process selection methods, and recommends a preferred system for achieving zero liquid discharge from the gasification block. The recommended system consists of primary clarification and vapor compression evaporation, followed by carbon adsorption post-treatment of the evaporator distillate. Dry solids are produced from the evaporator concentrate with a crystallizer/centrifuge combination. The system recovers 99 percent of the wastewater as pure distillate vater. The predicted capital cost for the 265-gpm system is $12.5 million; the predicted operating costs are $18.60/1000 gallons. Both costs are in 1990 dollars. Promising treatment technologies to examine for future designs are cooling tower treatment and freeze crystallization

  13. Data support system for controlling decentralised nuclear power industry facilities through uninterruptible condition monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povarov Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the automated uninterruptible multi-parameter system for monitoring operational vulnerability of critical NPP components, which differs from existing ones by being universally applicable for analysing mechanical damage of nuclear power unit components. The system allows for performing routine assessment of metal structures. The assessment of strained condition of a deteriorating component is based on three-dimensional finite element simulation with calculations adjusted with reference to in-situ measurements. A program for calculation and experimental analysis of maximum load and durability of critical area forms the core of uninterruptible monitoring system. The knowledge base on performance of the monitored components in different operating conditions and the corresponding comprehensive analysis of strained condition and deterioration rates compose the basis of control system data support, both for operating nuclear power units and robotic maintenance and repair systems.

  14. Introduction to structural and mechanical failure modes for nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The three papers presented in this section discuss the types of information (i.e., dynamic tests, earthquake experience and analytical data) which are used in predicting the capacity of structures and equipment in nuclear power plants to resist earthquakes. The background and motivation for discussing these three types of information is presented in this paper as an introduction to the papers which follow in this section

  15. International inventory of training facilities in nuclear power and its fuel cycle 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The revised inventory is arranged according to the following subject areas: nuclear power plant (NPP) engineering, nuclear safety, quality assurance, NPP operation and maintenance, NPP instrumentation and control, nuclear fuel management, nuclear materials control. Training in each subject area is classified into five groups depending on the type of organization offering the training courses. Each course is briefly described by its name or purpose, institution and location, duration, frequency, language, and content

  16. High power plasma heating experiments on the Proto-MPEX facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, T. S.; Beers, C. J.; Biewer, T. M.; Caneses, J. F.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Diem, S. J.; Goulding, R. H.; Green, D. L.; Kafle, N.; Rapp, J.; Showers, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    Work is underway to maximize the power delivered to the plasma that is available from heating sources installed on the Prototype Materials Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) at ORNL. Proto-MPEX is a linear device that has a >100 kW, 13.56 MHz helicon plasma generator available and is intended for material sample exposure to plasmas. Additional plasma heating systems include a 10 kW 18 GHz electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system, a 25 kW 8 MHz ion cyclotron heating ICH system, and a 200 kW 28 GHz electron Bernstein wave (EBW) and ECH system. Most of the heating systems have relatively good power transmission efficiency, however, the 28 GHz EBW system has a lower efficiency owing to stringent requirements on the microwave launch characteristics for EBW coupling combined with the lower output mode purity of the early-model gyrotron in use and its compact mode converter system. A goal for the Proto-MPEX is to have a combined heating power of 200 kW injected into the plasma. Infrared emission diagnostics of the target plate combined with Thomson Scattering, Langmuir probe, and energy analyzer measurements near the target are utilized to characterize the plasmas and coupling efficiency of the heating systems. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  17. Early site reviews for nuclear power facilities: procedures and possible technical review options. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    The document provides guidance for utility companies, State and other governmental agencies, and others who may request or may wish to participate in an early review of site suitability issues related to a site proposed for a nuclear power or test reactor. Although the emphasis of this document is on a nuclear electric generating station, the guidance provided can be used for a test reactor or other kinds of reactors. The procedures to be followed by applicants for construction permits and by others are described and the possible significant areas of technical review are delineated

  18. A Study on the technology of the Protective Device Application for the power Telecommunication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.K.; Lee, S.J.; Choi, H.Y. [Korea Electric Power Research Insitute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B.H.; Jeon, D.K.; Lee, K.O.; Ahn, C.H.; Kim, S.O.; Kim, J.S. [Electrical Engineering and Science Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    In order to protect the power telecommunication system from surge by lightning or switching and ground potential rise, characteristics of surge are analyzed when surge strikes communication system. Surge generator which meets international standard was made and test of protective devices was carried out by using it. Counter measures against surge is established through the analysis of ground potential which varies with transient ground impedance. Also specification for installing protective devices was recommended, which is proper to apply to the field system. (author). 186 refs., 203 figs., 21 tabs.

  19. Facility for processing the condensates from nuclear power plants (BWR and PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucker, Georges.

    1975-01-01

    A plant for the processing of the condensates from boiling water or pressurized water nuclear power plants is presented. A series of couples of units for the processing of the condensates through mixed beds of ion exchange resins simultaneously ensures the filtration and demineralization of the condensates. When the resins are saturated, each mixed bed is transferred into a unit of regeneration of said resins. Each processing unit is a sphere made of a stainless material, and provided with a plurality of air and water pipes allowing the admission and evacuation of the various elements to be successively controlled [fr

  20. Feasibility Study on The Modulization of Structure and System Facility for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    This final report is a results of Study on applicable to SC(Steel Concrete) structure for NPPS and experimentation of SC wall-Support joint carried out by KEPRI from 2001.7.1 to 2000.3.27. The major objectives is to study on application of SC structure and behavior of SC wall-support joint. This result is applicable to plan a main project for ''Development of Modular Construction System in the Nuclear Power Plant''. (author). 45 refs., 19 figs., 23 tabs.

  1. Quadruped locomotion system of prototype advanced robot for nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Sakae

    1991-01-01

    The development of the robots for the works in nuclear power stations has been promoted. The demonstration machine developed comprises subsystems so that the design, manufacture, operation, maintenance and so on of the robots are simplified and made convenient, that is, the command for all actions, visual information processing subsystem, manipulation subsystem and movement subsystem. In this report, the elementary technology of movement and the movement subsystem are described. Quadruped walking, intelligent type motion control, and the target specification, movement subsystem and test of the demonstration machine are explained. (K.I.)

  2. A personal computer code for seismic evaluations of nuclear power plants facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Graves, H.

    1990-01-01

    The program CARES (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) is an integrated computational system being developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It is specifically designed to be a personal computer (PC) operated package which may be used to determine the validity and accuracy of analysis methodologies used for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. CARES is structured in a modular format. Each module performs a specific type of analysis i.e., static or dynamic, linear or nonlinear, etc. This paper describes the various features which have been implemented into the Seismic Module of CARES

  3. The Atlas pulsed power facility for high energy density physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, R B; Barr, G W; Bowman, D W; Cochrane, J C; Davis, H A; Elizondo, J M; Gribble, R F; Griego, J R; Hicks, R D; Hinckley, W B; Hosack, K W; Nielsen, K E; Parker, J V; Parsons, M O; Rickets, R L; Salazar, H R; Sánchez, P G; Scudder, D W; Shapiro, C; Thompson, M C; Trainor, R J; Valdez, G A; Vigil, B N; Watt, R G; Wysocki, F J; Kirbie, H C

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. Here, the authors describe how the primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently- removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the Marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-ys risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line compo...

  4. Guide to the safety design examination about light water reactor facilities for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This guide was compiled to evaluate the validity of the design policy when the safety design is examined at the time of the application for approval of the installation of nuclear reactors. About 7 years has elapsed since the existing guide was established, and the more appropriate guide to evaluate the safety should be made on the basis of the knowledge and experience accumulated thereafter. The range of application of this guide is limited to the above described evaluation, and it is not intended as the general standard for the design of nuclear reactors. First, the definition of the words used in this guide is given. Then, the guide to the safety examination is described about the general matters of reactor facilities, nuclear reactors and the measuring and controlling system, reactor-stopping system, reactivity-controlling system and safety protection system, reactor-cooling system, reactor containment vessels, fuel handling and waste treatment system. Several matters which require attention in the application of this guide or the clarification of the significance and interpretation of the guide itself were found, therefore the explanation about them was added at the end of this guide. (Kako, I.)

  5. Evaluation of Optimal Distribution of Wind Power Facilities in Iowa for 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Factor, T. (Iowa Wind Energy Institute); Milligan, M. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    1999-08-05

    By the end of June 1999, about 250 megawatts of wind generation will have been dedicated in the state of Iowa. This represents the beginning of what is likely to be significant wind capacity development during the next 20 years in the state, as a result of possible public and governmental mandates and consumers' desire for sustainable sources of energy. As the utility industry in the United States moves towards a new structure, renewable energy sources continue to be an important part of new resource development. In this paper, we consider the predicted trends in load growth in Iowa. After accounting for the retirement of nuclear and older fossil fuel facilities over the next 15 years, we estimate Iowa's potential renewable generating capacity through the year 2015 and anticipate the contribution of wind energy to Iowa's portfolio. The Iowa Wind Energy Institute (IWEI) has been monitoring the wind resource in Iowa since June 1994 to obtain wind speed averages at 10, 33 and 50 meters above ground at fourteen geographically dispersed potential wind farm sites. Winds in the Midwest are primarily generated by fronts moving through the region. The Northwest Buffalo Ridge area of Iowa typically has wind speed averages of 7-8 m/s. Central Iowa may have typical winds slightly below this mean value. However, as a front passes through the state, there will be times when a wind farm in Central Iowa will produce more energy than one on Buffalo Ridge.

  6. Accidents and failures related to nuclear fuel facilities and nuclear power stations in fiscal 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In the chemical preparation room of the reprocessing plant in the Tokai Establishment, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., the nasal contamination of small amount (3.6 pCi at maximum) was detected on two workers in June, 1982, but abnormality was not observed in the Lung-monitor of the workers themselves. There was not the effect to the surrounding environment. The failures reported by electric power companies to the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy in accordance with the laws related to atomic energy were 26 cases. The main causes were 5 cases due to improper design management, 2 cases due to improper manufacture management, 4 cases due to improper construction management, 11 cases due to improper maintenance management and 4 other cases. Among those 26 cases, 17 cases occurred in operation, and 9 cases occurred or were detected during shutdown such as regular inspection. Among the 17 cases, 7 cases were the automatic stop by reactor protection system, and 10 cases were the finding by regular in-operation inspection. Among the 9 cases, 5 cases were the breaking of steam generator tubes, 2 cases the breaking of bumper plates at feed heater entrance, and 2 cases other troubles. Moreover, there were 41 minor troubles. (Kako, I.)

  7. A basis for standardized seismic design (SSD) for nuclear power plants/critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P.; Bellini, F.X.

    1991-01-01

    US Nuclear Power Plants (NPP's) are designed, engineered and constructed to stringent standards. Their seismic adequacy is assured by compliance with regulatory standards and demonstrated by both probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) and seismic margin studies. However, present seismic siting criteria requires improvement. Proposed changes to siting criteria discussed here will provide a predictable licensing process and a stable regulatory environment. Two recent state-of-the-art studies evaluate the seismic design for all eastern US (EUS) NPP'S: a Lawrence Livermore National Labs study (LLNL, 1989) funded by the NRC and similar research by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI, 1989) supported by the utilities. Both confirm that Appendix A 10CFR Part 100 has not provided consistent seismic design levels for all sites. Standardized Seismic Design (SSD) uses a probabilistic framework to accommodate alternative deterministic interpretations. It uses seismic hazard input from EPRI or LLNL to produce consistent bases for future seismic design. SSD combines deterministic and probabilistic insights to provide a comprehensive approach for determining a future site's acceptable seismic design basis

  8. Interactive simulation of nuclear power systems using a dedicated minicomputer - computer graphics facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tye, C.; Sezgen, A.O.

    1980-01-01

    The design of control systems and operational procedures for large scale nuclear power plant poses a difficult optimization problem requiring a lot of computational effort. Plant dynamic simulation using digital minicomputers offers the prospect of relatively low cost computing and when combined with graphical input/output provides a powerful tool for studying such problems. The paper discusses the results obtained from a simulation study carried out at the Computer Graphics Unit of the University of Manchester using a typical station control model for an Advanced Gas Cooled reactor. Particular reference is placed on the use of computer graphics for information display, parameter and control system optimization and techniques for using graphical input for defining and/or modifying the control system topology. Experience gained from this study has shown that a relatively modest minicomputer system can be used for simulating large scale dynamic systems and that highly interactive computer graphics can be used to advantage to relieve the designer of many of the tedious aspects of simulation leaving him free to concentrate on the more creative aspects of his work. (author)

  9. Electrical supervisory control and data acquisition system for Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Facility (PREFRE-II) at Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V.K.; Kaushik, S.; Haneef, K.K.M.

    2014-01-01

    Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Facility (PREFRE II) is a radio-chemical plant located at Tarapur. The electric power supply to PREFRE-II plant has been provided from a 33 KV Sub-station located in PREFRE-II complex to meet the O and M requirement of plant. The major equipment of the substation includes HT switch board, dry type transformer, LT switch board, Diesel Generator (DG) set and Un-interrupted Power Supply (UPS) System. The power supply to the plant is provided at 415 V voltage level with the help of Power Distribution Boards (PDBs) and Motor Control Centres (MCCs) located at different floors of the plant. The parameters of the electrical equipment of substation and plant are recorded in each shift in the log-book, manually by the operator. To maintain the log-book, the operator needs to go closer to the individual equipment in radioactive area of the plant to read the parameters. The log-book method of monitoring is a cumbersome method and does not include fault event records, trends and diagnostic behavior of the equipment. Electrical Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (E-SCADA) system has been increasingly used in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) for control and monitoring of electrical parameters of plant and switchyard equipment. E-SCADA system has been designed, developed and implemented for PREFRE-II plant for remote monitoring of parameters of electrical equipment. E-SCADA system provides monitoring of electrical equipment and renders complete guidance and information with the help of Graphical User Interface (GUI) to the operator to take necessary action during normal and abnormal conditions. E-SCADA with intelligent communication features helps in reducing cabling from field equipment which enhances the fire safety of plant. As a result engineering, operation and maintenance efforts for monitoring are reduced considerably in terms of requirement of skilled man power and accurate data logging of electrical parameters. This system also helps to

  10. Versatile 0.5 TW electron beam facility for power conditioning studies of large rare-gas/halide lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rare-gas/halide lasers which are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion will require large area, low impedance electron beam drivers. A wide range of electron beam parameters are being considered for future systems in an effort to optimize the overall system design. A number of power conditioning issues must be investigated in order to obtain a better understanding of the various trade-offs involved in making such optimizations. The RAYITO electron beam accelerator is being designed and built at Sandia National Laboratories and will be used for such investigations. It will be capable of operating in either a 2 or 4 ohm configuration at 1 MV, 50 ns or 0.8 MV, 200 ns. Design details for RAYITO are presented in this paper. Experiments planned for this facility are also discussed

  11. Assessment of Potential Capacity Increases at Combined Heat and Power Facilities Based on Available Corn Stover and Forest Logging Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald L. Grebner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Combined Heat and Power (CHP production using renewable energy sources is gaining importance because of its flexibility and high-energy efficiency. Biomass materials, such as corn stover and forestry residues, are potential sources for renewable energy for CHP production. In Mississippi, approximately 4.0 MT dry tons of woody biomass is available annually for energy production. In this study, we collected and analyzed 10 years of corn stover data (2001–2010 and three years of forest logging residue data (1995, 1999, and 2002 in each county in Mississippi to determine the potential of these feed stocks for sustainable CHP energy production. We identified six counties, namely Amite, Copiah, Clarke, Wayne, Wilkinson and Rankin, that have forest logging residue feedstocks to sustain a CHP facility with a range of capacity between 8.0 and 9.8 MW. Using corn stover alone, Yazoo and Washington counties can produce 13.4 MW and 13.5 MW of energy, respectively. Considering both feedstocks and based on a conservative amount of 30% available forest logging residue and 33% corn stover, we found that 20 counties have adequate supply for a CHP facility with a capacity of 8.3 MW to 19.6 MW.

  12. Checking the special professional qualification of selected personnel of Czechoslovak nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, P.; Bahnova, V.

    1990-01-01

    The system of examinations of selected staff members of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants for their special professional quanlification is described in detail. This selected personnel includes secondary circuit operators, primary circuit operators, graduate shift leaders as well as reactor unit managers. Attention is paid to the structure, methodology, contents and criteria of evaluation of the written, oral and practical parts of the examination, which is sat for before the State Examination Commission. Based on the results of the examinations, the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission grants, prolongs or cancels licenses for the particular functions. Over the period from 1985 to March 1989, 394 new licenses were issued, 93 licenses were prolonged and 4 were withdrawn. (Z.M.). 7 figs., 3 tabs., 3 refs

  13. Structural health monitoring and lifecycle-management for civil engineering constructions in power plants and industrial facilities; Zustandsueberwachung und Lebensdauermanagement von baulichen Einrichtungen in Kraftwerken und Industrieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnen, Dieter; Demmer, Martin; Pfister, Tobias [ZERNA Planen und Pruefen GmbH, Bochum (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    In contrast to other fields of engineering, structural health monitoring and lifecycle management for civil engineering constructions in power plants and industrial facilities have to be developed yet. The necessity of this development immediately arises from the building regulations law with its extensive set of regulations as well as from economic constraints. Approaches and methods of structural health monitoring and lifecycle management for civil engineering constructions in power plants and industrial facilities could be improved intensively during recent years. The paper focuses on practical examples that show the necessity of comprehensive and strategic structural health monitoring in conjunction with lifecycle management for civil engineering constructions in power plants and industrial facilities unambiguously und clear. (orig.)

  14. Conceptual study of nuclear power generation facilities life-cycle support versatile engineering database. Procedure of development and consideration of fundamental functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Hidetoshi

    2009-05-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) stands out the activity of the knowledge management of nuclear safety and the movement to introduce the idea of the life cycle management into the quality control of maintenance of the nuclear power generation facilities to assure the knowledge preservation and to succeed the technology of facilities. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) also has such activities as the knowledge preservation of research and development, and related information. The facilities' performance reliability can be easily checked with the technology of data processing in the general industry and the results of the knowledge repository, transmitting technology and knowledge management by referring to the information and knowledge if the information and knowledge at each step of the life-cycle of facilities can be built. This report shows the strategy of the construction of the engineering database to support the life cycle of facilities and the basic function of the management system. (author)

  15. Development of stand-alone risk assessment software for optimized maintenance planning of power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Sung; Song, Gee Wook; Kim, Bum Shin; Chang, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang Min

    2015-01-01

    Risk-Risk-based inspection (RBI) has been developed in order to identify risky equipment that can cause major accidents or damages in large-scale plants. This assessment evaluates the equipment's risk, categorizes their priorities based on risk level, and then determines the urgency of their maintenance or allocates maintenance resources. An earlier version of the risk-based assessment software is already installed within the equipment management system; however, the assessment is based on examination by an inspector, and the results can be influenced by his subjective judgment, rather than assessment being based on failure probability. Moreover, the system is housed within a server, which limits the inspector's work space and time, and such a system can be used only on site. In this paper, the development of independent risk-based assessment software is introduced; this software calculates the failure probability by an analytical method, and analyzes the field inspection results, as well as inspection effectiveness. It can also operate on site, since it can be installed on an independent platform, and has the ability to generate an I/O function for the field inspection results regarding the period for an optimum maintenance cycle. This program will provide useful information not only to the field users who are participating in maintenance, but also to the engineers who need to decide whether to extend the life cycle of the power machinery or replace only specific components

  16. Severe weather data near nuclear power station and reprocessing fuel facility in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Tadahisa

    2017-01-01

    The main weather data are updated at any time. The strong wind and tornado (strong wind/tornado) data are opened until March 2016 in Japan. The main weather and the strong wind/tornado data near the nuclear power station (NPS) were investigated. The earthquake, Tunami and volcano were not mentioned on this report. The main weather data might not be severe. The maximum temperature had not been considered in the safety analysis of NPS. The weather data of some small observation posts near NPSs had not been considered. The unusual high temperature and the local severe rain near NPS by the global warming may be considered in future. The maximum intensities of the strong wind/tornado in Japan and near NPS were Fujita-scale 3 and 2, respectively. The maximum intensities of almost half NPSs were Fujita-scale 1. The intensity and the number of the strong winds/tornados differed depending on NPS. The Japanese main weather and strong wind/tornado might not be severe compared with other country. (author)

  17. Cooling water intake and discharge facilities for Ikata Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hisashi; Iwabe, Masakazu

    1977-01-01

    Igata Nuclear Power Station is located at the root of Sadamisaki peninsula in the western part of Ehime Prefecture, Japan, and faces the Iyonada sea area in Seto Inland Sea. The most part of the shoreline forms the cliffs, and the bottom of the sea is rather steep, reaching 60 m depth at 300 m offshore. Considering warm water discharge measures in addition to the natural conditions of tide and current, temperature of sea water, water quality and wave data, it was decided that the deep layer intake system using bottom laid intake pipes and the submerged discharge system with caisson penetrable dike would be adopted for cooling water. The latter was first employed in Japan, and the submerged discharge system with caisson penetrable dike had been developed. The intake was designed to take sea water of about 38 m 3 per sec for each condenser unit at the depth of approximately 17 m with 4.8 m diameter and 116 m length pipes and its calculation details and construction are described. The discharge system was designed to provide a horseshoe-shaped discharge pond with inner diameter of approximately 50 m, surrounded by 17 concrete caissons, and to spout warm water discharge from eight openings of 1.58 m diameter, at the location of approximately 300 m eastward of the intake. Its hydraulic studies and model experiments and its construction are reported. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Seismic evaluation of existing nuclear power plants and other facilities V. 1. Proceedings of the technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this Tcm are: to review the IAEA Safety Report on Seismic Evaluation of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in order to achieve a consensus among Member States on this matter and to discuss the outlines of an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on specific topics related to this subject. Today the nuclear industry relies much more on existing facilities than on the design of new ones. Nevertheless it appears that safety evaluation against external hazards is not a decreasing activity. The reason being that maintaining an acceptable level of nuclear safety requires periodic re-assessments of facilities, either because of modifications of the environment due to human activity or because of new data or new approaches in the assessment of natural hazards. In this regard, seismic re-evaluation has increasingly become a key issue for several existing nuclear facilities, including not only nuclear power plants but also other plants of the fuel cycle, as well as research reactors or laboratories. The IAEA has already supported development of engineering practices in this field by managing a Co-ordinated Research Programme, launched in 1992, on a Benchmark Study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER 1000 type NPPs. It is now proposed to investigate other aspects of this issue. Many of these facilities were built according to older standards which did not take into account seismic hazard. Consequently, the seismic re-evaluation of existing facilities is a real challenge for earthquake engineers. In most of the cases, it is impossible to re-evaluate according to the up to date standards because entering these standards implies that some design rules are met, what is generally not the case for older facilities. In the best cases some rules exist for non nuclear buildings. In order to achieve a consensus on this matter, the IAEA intends to edit a Safety Report on 'Seismic Evaluation of existing NPPs'. The TCM will offer the opportunity to review the draft of

  19. Behavior of four PWR rods subjected to a simulated loss-of-coolant accient in the power burst facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, T.F.; Hagrman, D.L.; Sepold, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    Cladding deformation characteristics resulting from the first nuclear blowdown tests (LOC-11) conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are emphasized in this paper. The objective of the LOC-11 tests was to obtain data on the thermal, mechanical, and materials behavior of pressurized and unpressurized fuel rods when exposed to a blowdown similiar to that expected in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) during a hypothesized double-ended cold-leg break. The test hardware consisted of four separately shrouded fresh fuel rods of PWR 15 x 15 design. Initial plenum pressures ranged from atmospheric to 4.8 MPa (representative of end-of-life). During LOC-11C, the four fuel rods were subjected to 6.5 hours of nuclear operation at approximately 67 kW/m average rod power to cause decay heat build-up. Just before the start of blowdown, cladding surface temperatures were about 620 K and fuel centerline temperatures were in the 2500 to 2600 K range. During the 30-second blowdown transient, CHF occurred 2 seconds after initiation. Fuel centerline temperature dropped continuously, while cladding surface temperatures increased. Maximum cladding temperatures of 1030 to 1050 K occurred 15 seconds into the transient. Posttest destructive examination revealed cladding microstructures and oxide thicknesses consistent with the measured cladding temperatures. The cladding surface thermocouples did not appreciably affect cladding temperature distributuion (fin cooling effect) in the vicinity of the thermocouples

  20. A UV pre-ionized dual-wavelength short-pulse high-power CO{sub 2} laser facility for laser particle acceleration research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahim, N A; Mouris, J F; Davis, R W

    1994-12-01

    In this report we describe the Chalk River dual-wavelength, short-pulse, single-mode, high-power CO{sub 2} laser facility for research in laser particle acceleration and CANDU materials modifications. The facility is designed and built around UV-preionized transversely-excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) Lumonics CO{sub 2} laser discharge modules. Peak focussed power densities of up to 2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in 500 ps pulses have been obtained. (author). 10 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. McGowin; M. DiFilippo; L. Weintraub

    2006-06-30

    Tree ring studies indicate that, for the greater part of the last three decades, New Mexico has been relatively 'wet' compared to the long-term historical norm. However, during the last several years, New Mexico has experienced a severe drought. Some researchers are predicting a return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters to supplement current fresh water supplies for power plant operation and cooling and other uses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. These were (1) an assessment of using water produced with oil and gas as a supplemental supply for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS); (2) a field evaluation of the wet-surface air cooling (WSAC) system at SJGS; and (3) the development of a ZeroNet systems analysis module and an application of the Watershed Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to evaluate a range of water shortage management plans. The study of the possible use of produced water at SJGS showed that produce water must be treated to justify its use in any reasonable quantity at SJGS. The study identified produced water volume and quality, the infrastructure needed to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements, and delivery and treatment economics. A number of produced water treatment alternatives that use off-the-shelf technology were evaluated along with the equipment needed for water treatment at SJGS. Wet surface air-cooling (WSAC) technology was tested at the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) to determine its capacity to cool power plant circulating water using degraded water. WSAC is a commercial cooling technology and has been used for many years to cool and/or condense process fluids. The purpose of the pilot test was to

  2. Dynamic interactions of components, structure, and foundation of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajuhesh, J.; Hadjian, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    A solution is formulated for the dynamic analysis of structures and components with different stiffness and damping characteristics, including the consideration of soil-structure interaction effects. Composite structures are often analysed approximately, in particular with regards to damping. For example, the reactor and other equipment in nuclear power plant structures are often analysed by assuming them uncoupled from the supporting structures. To achieve a better accuracy, the coupled system is hereby analysed as a composite component-structure-soil system. Although derivation of mass and stiffness matrices for the component-structure-soil system is a simple problem, the determination of the damping characteristics of such a system is more complex. This emphasis on the proper evaluation of system damping is warranted on the grounds that, when resonance conditions occur, the response amplitude is governed to a significant degree by the system damping. The damping information is usually available for each sub-structure separately with its based fixed or devoid of rigid-body modes of motion. The rigid-body motions are often free of damping resistance but sometimes, such as in the case of soil-structure interaction, or in the case of aerodynamic resistance, are uniquely defined. The composite damping matrix for the complete structure is hereby derived from the above-mentioned information. Thus, the damping matrix is first obtained for the free-free model of each sub-structure (the model containing the structural degrees of freedom together with rigid-body modes of motion), and then the submatrices for the free-free models are assembled to form the composite damping matrix in acccordance with an assembly technique relating the sub-structure coordinates to the global coordinates of the composite structure

  3. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.; Hagemeyer, D.

    1989-08-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was extracted from the 1986 annual statistical reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR section 20.407. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. These six categories of licensees also submit personal identification and exposure information for terminating employees pursuant to 10 CFR section 20.408, and some analysis of this ''termination'' data is also presented in this report. Annual report for 1986 were received from a total of 482 NRC licensees, 101 of whom were licensed nuclear power reactors. Compilations of the 482 reports indicated that some 227,652 individuals were monitored, 116,241 of whom received a measurable dose (Table 3.1). The collective dose incurred by these individuals was calculated to be 46,366 person-rems (person-cSv) which represents a decrease of 23% from the 1985 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose increased while the collective dose decreased slightly, causing the average measurable dose to decrease from 0.43 rem (cSv) to 0.40 rem (cSv). About 13% of the monitored individuals were found to have received doses greater than 0.50 rem (cSv), which is about the same as the value for 1985. 16 refs., 11 figs., 26 tabs

  4. EPRI/NRC-RES fire PRA guide for nuclear power facilities. Volume 1, summary and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report documents state-of-the-art methods, tools, and data for the conduct of a fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) application. The methods have been developed under the Fire Risk Re-quantification Study. This study was conducted as a joint activity between EPRI and the U. S. NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) under the terms of an EPRI/RES Memorandum of Understanding (RS.1) and an accompanying Fire Research Addendum (RS.2). Industry participants supported demonstration analyses and provided peer review of this methodology. The documented methods are intended to support future applications of Fire PRA, including risk-informed regulatory applications. The documented method reflects state-of-the-art fire risk analysis approaches. The primary objective of the Fire Risk Study was to consolidate recent research and development activities into a single state-of-the-art fire PRA analysis methodology. Methodological issues raised in past fire risk analyses, including the Individual Plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) fire analyses, have been addressed to the extent allowed by the current state-of-the-art and the overall project scope. Methodological debates were resolved through a consensus process between experts representing both EPRI and RES. The consensus process included a provision whereby each major party (EPRI and RES) could maintain differing technical positions if consensus could not be reached. No cases were encountered where this provision was invoked. While the primary objective of the project was to consolidate existing state-of-the-art methods, in many areas, the newly documented methods represent a significant advancement over previously documented methods. In several areas, this project has, in fact, developed new methods and approaches. Such advances typically relate to areas of past methodological debate.

  5. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorbom, B.N., E-mail: bsorbom@mit.edu; Ball, J.; Palmer, T.R.; Mangiarotti, F.J.; Sierchio, J.M.; Bonoli, P.; Kasten, C.; Sutherland, D.A.; Barnard, H.S.; Haakonsen, C.B.; Goh, J.; Sung, C.; Whyte, D.G.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • ARC reactor designed to have 500 MW fusion power at 3.3 m major radius. • Compact, simplified design allowed by high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • ARC has innovative plasma physics solutions such as inboardside RF launch. • High temperature superconductors allow high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • Liquid immersion blanket and jointed magnets greatly simplify tokamak reactor design. - Abstract: The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor is the product of a conceptual design study aimed at reducing the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a ∼200–250 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q{sub p} ≈ 13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ∼63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ∼23 T peak field on coil achievable with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External current drive is provided by two innovative inboard RF launchers using 25 MW of lower hybrid and 13.6 MW of ion cyclotron fast wave power. The resulting efficient current drive provides a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing fluorine lithium beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket is low-risk technology and provides effective neutron moderation and shielding, excellent

  6. Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratory's Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007). Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is operated under a contract with the University of Chicago. Fundamental and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences are conducted at ANL-E and the laboratory serves as a major center of energy research and development. Building 315, which was completed in 1962, contained two cells, Cells 5 and 4, for holding Zero Power Reactor (ZPR)-6 and ZPR-9, respectively. These reactors were built to increase the knowledge and understanding of fast reactor technology. ZPR-6 was also referred to as the Fast Critical Facility and focused on fast reactor studies for civilian power production. ZPR-9 was used for nuclear rocket and fast reactor studies. In 1967, the reactors were converted for plutonium use. The reactors operated from the mid-1960's until 1982 when they were both shut down. Low levels of radioactivity were expected to be present due to the operating power levels of the ZPR's being restricted to well below 1,000 watts. To evaluate the presence of radiological contamination, DOE characterized the ZPRs in 2001. Currently, the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) and Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) Experiments are being conducted in Cell 4 where the ZPR-9 is located (ANL 2002 and 2006). ANL has performed final

  7. Historical records of the electric power and cooling water systems for the experimental facilities in the I.P.P. (1964-1983)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Miyoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty years have passed, since experimental studies began in the IPP. This is a status report on the electric power and cooling water systems in this Institute. Historical records on consumption of the electric power and cooling water for experimental facilities are summarized, also. Valuable stories obtained through operation, control and periodic inspection of these systems are described, which will be helpful for construction of new systems in future. Finally problems on safety, reliability, and economy are commented. (author)

  8. Alteration of installation of reactors (alteration of No.1 and No.2 reactor facilities) in Oi Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission reported to the Minister of International Trade and Industry on October 27, 1983, that the technical capability was recognized to be adequate, and the safety after the alteration of the installation of reactors was judged to be ensured. At the time of deliberation, the guidelines for examining the safety design and safety evaluation of LWR facilities for power generation were used. Regarding the change of the degree of enrichment of replacement fuel from 3.2 to 3.4 wt.%, the limiting conditions are satisfied in the replacement core, and the nuclear design is appropriate. Eight test fuel assemblies using UO 2 pellets containing gadolinia are charged in the core of No.2 reactor, and the irradiation of two cycles is carried out. As the result of the safety examination regarding this test, the propriety of the nuclear design and mechanical design of the test fuel assemblies was confirmed. This alteration does not exert influence on the result of safety analysis made so far. This report was decided by the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety based on the conclusion of No.26 subcommittee. (Kako, I.)

  9. The Texts of the Instruments Concerning the Agency's assistance to Mexico in Establishing a Nuclear Power Facility. A Second Supply Agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-10-31

    As a sequel to the assistance which the Agency provided to the Government of Mexico in establishing a nuclear power facility, a Second Supply Agreement has been concluded between the Agency and that Government. The Agreement entered into force on 14 June 1974, pursuant to Article IX, and the text thereof is reproduced herein for the information of all Members.

  10. The Texts of the Instruments Concerning the Agency's assistance to Mexico in Establishing a Nuclear Power Facility. A Second Supply Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    As a sequel to the assistance which the Agency provided to the Government of Mexico in establishing a nuclear power facility, a Second Supply Agreement has been concluded between the Agency and that Government. The Agreement entered into force on 14 June 1974, pursuant to Article IX, and the text thereof is reproduced herein for the information of all Members.

  11. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Adli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter regime of CLIC.

  12. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dubrovskiy, A; Syratchev, I; Ruber, R; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter reg...

  13. Application of low bitrate image coding to surveillance of electric power facilities. Part 1. Proposal of low bitrate coding for surveillance of electric power facilities and examination of facilities region extraction method; Denryoku setsubi kanshi eno tei rate fugoka hoshiki no tekiyo. 1. Setsubi kanshiyo fugoka hoshiki no teian to setsubi ryoiki chushutsuho no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, H.; Ishino, R. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Current status of low bitrate image coding has been investigated, and a low bitrate coding suitable for the surveillance of electric power facilities has been proposed, to extract its problems to be solved. For the conventional image coding, the waveform coding has been used by which the images are processed as signals. While, for the MPEG-4, a coding method with considering the image information has been proposed. For these coding methods, however, image information lacks details primarily, when lowering the bitrate. Accordingly, these methods can not be applied when the details in the images are important, such as in the case of surveillance of facilities. Then, the coding method has been proposed by expanding the partially detailed coding, and by separating constituent images of facilities, such as power cables and steel towers, designated by operators. It is the special feature of this method that the method can easily respond to the low bitrate and the detailed information can be conserved by using the structure extraction coding for the designated partial image which is generally processed by the low bitrate waveform coding. 29 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Epithermal neutron beam design for neutron capture therapy at the Power Burst Facility and the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.; Parsons, D.K.; Rushton, B.L.; Nigg, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear design studies have been performed for two reactor-based epithermal neutron beams for cancer treatment by neutron capture therapy (NCT). An intermediate-intensity epithermal beam has been designed and implemented at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Measurements show that the BMRR design predictions for the principal characteristics of this beam are accurate. A canine program for research into the biological effects of NCT is now under way at BMRR. The design for a high-intensity epithermal beam with minimal contamination from undesirable radiation components has been finalized for the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This design will be implemented when it is determined that human NCT trials are advisable. The PBF beam will exhibit approximately an order of magnitude improvement in absolute epithermal flux intensity over that available in the BMRR, and its angular distribution and spectral characteristics will be more advantageous for NCT. The combined effects of beam intensity, angular distribution, spectrum, and contaminant level allow the desired tumor radiation dose to be delivered in much shorter times than are possible with the currently available BMRR beam, with a significant reduction (factor of 3 to 5) in collateral dose due to beam contaminants

  15. American National Standard: for facilities and medical care for on-site nuclear-power-plant radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This standard provides guidance for first aid during an emergency and for initial medical care of those persons on-site who are overexposed to penetrating radiation (irradiated). It also provides guidance for medical care of persons contaminated with radioactive material or radionuclides who may also be irradiated or injured as a result of an accident at a nuclear power plant. It provides recommendations for facilities, supplies, equipment, and the extent of care both on-site where first aid and initial care may be provided and off-site at a local hospital where further medical and surgical care may be provided. This initial care continues until either the patient is released or admitted, or referred to another, possibly distant, medical center for definitive care. Recommendations are also provided for the transportation of patients and the training of personnel. Recommendations for specialized care are considered to be beyond the scope of this standard on emergency medical care; however, since emergency and specialized care are related, a brief discussion of specialized care is provided in the Appendix

  16. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M. [Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Girardin, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  17. Recalculating the steady state conditions of the V-1000 zero-power facility at Kurchatov Institute using Monte Carlo and nodal diffusion codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahlberg, Ville [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, VTT (Finland)

    2017-09-15

    Continuous-energy Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent 2 was used to model the critical steady state conditions measured in V-1000 zero-power critical facility at Kurchatov Institute (KI), Moscow in 1990-1992. The Serpent 2 results were compared to measurements and Serpent 2 was used to generate group constants for reactor dynamics code HEXTRAN. The results of a HEXTRAN calculation of the steady state were compared to Serpent 2. The relative power density distribution of the SERPENT2 calculations compared with the measurements was within the statistical accuracy. The comparison of HEXTRAN and Serpent 2 node-wise relative power density distributions showed an accuracy of ±10%.

  18. Change in plan for installation of nuclear reactor in Genkai Nuclear Power Plant of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. (change in plan for No.3 and No.4 nuclear reactor facilities) (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report, compiled by the Nuclear Safety Commission to be submitted to the Minister of International Trade and Industry, deals with studies on a proposed change in the plan for the installation of nuclear reactors in the Genkai Nuclear Power Plant of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. (change in the plan for the No.3 and No.4 nuclear reactor facilities). The conclusions of and principles for the examination and evaluation are described first. The studies carried out are focused on the safety of the facilities, and it is concluded that part of the proposed change is appropriate with respect to the required technical capability and that part of the change will not have adverse effects on the safety design of the facilities. The examination of the safety design of the reactor facilities cover the reactivity control, new material for the steam generator, design of chemical and volume control systems, design of liquid waste treatment facilities, integration of all confinement vessel spray rings, and design of the diesel power generator. It is confirmed that all of them can meet the safety requirements. Studies and analyses are also made of the emission of radiations to the surrounding environment, abnormal transient changes during operations, and possible accidents. (Nogami, K.)

  19. Prevention of significant deterioration permit application for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    This New Source Review'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (PO Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 173-403-050 and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing A Prevention Of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies for use in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

  20. Supplemental information for a notice of construction for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    This ''Notice of Construction'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (P.O. Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 402-80-070, for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State (Figure 1). The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS) the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA) will be located in one facility, the Fuels and materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post- irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies to be used in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, to the extent possible, these systems will be dealt with separately. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

  1. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume III. Resources and fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    The ability of uranium supply and the rest of the nuclear fuel cycle to meet the demand for nuclear power is an important consideration in future domestic and international planning. Accordingly, the purpose of this assessment is to evaluate the adequacy of potential supply for various nuclear resources and fuel cycle facilities in the United States and in the world outside centrally planned economy areas (WOCA). Although major emphasis was placed on uranium supply and demand, material resources (thorium and heavy water) and facility resources (separative work, spent fuel storage, and reprocessing) were also considered

  2. Industrial complex for solid radwaste management (ICSRM) at Chernobyl nuclear power plant pre-commissioning of the facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietsch, Thomas [NUKEM Technologies GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); NUKEM Technologies GmbH, Slavutich (Ukraine)

    2009-07-01

    NUKEM was awarded to build the industrial complex for solid radwaste management (ICSRM) at the NPP Chernobyl. ICSRM consists of four facilities: SLWS (solid low waste storage), solid waste retrieval facility, solid waste processing plant, repository for the disposal of short-lived waste. The contribution describes the approach for testing and pre-commissioning the following systems: sorting, compaction, incineration, transport systems, monitoring, tracking and retrieval. Start-up of the facilities is planned for 2009.

  3. Industrial complex for solid radwaste management (ICSRM) at Chernobyl nuclear power plant pre-commissioning of the facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    NUKEM was awarded to build the industrial complex for solid radwaste management (ICSRM) at the NPP Chernobyl. ICSRM consists of four facilities: SLWS (solid low waste storage), solid waste retrieval facility, solid waste processing plant, repository for the disposal of short-lived waste. The contribution describes the approach for testing and pre-commissioning the following systems: sorting, compaction, incineration, transport systems, monitoring, tracking and retrieval. Start-up of the facilities is planned for 2009.

  4. Decree of the Czech Labor Safety Office No. 263/1991 amending the Decree No. 76/1989 on ensuring safety of technical facilities in the nuclear power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Some provisions of the Decree of the Czech Labor Safety Office No. 76/1989 on ensuring safety of technical facilities in the nuclear power sector are amended, particularly in the field of construction activities, assembling, reconstruction and repair of nuclear power facilities. The Decree entered into force on 28 June 1991. (J.B.)

  5. Administrative procedures linked with power production facilities that use renewable energy sources. Report made in application of article 6 of directive 2001/77/CE from October 27, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the legislative and regulatory framework relative to power generation facilities that use renewable energy sources. It presents also the actions that have been carried out to reduce the obstacles to the development of these facilities (access to the power distribution and transportation grid). (J.S.)

  6. Communication grounding facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gye Seong

    1998-06-01

    It is about communication grounding facility, which is made up twelve chapters. It includes general grounding with purpose, materials thermal insulating material, construction of grounding, super strength grounding method, grounding facility with grounding way and building of insulating, switched grounding with No. 1A and LCR, grounding facility of transmission line, wireless facility grounding, grounding facility in wireless base station, grounding of power facility, grounding low-tenton interior power wire, communication facility of railroad, install of arrester in apartment and house, install of arrester on introduction and earth conductivity and measurement with introduction and grounding resistance.

  7. A Comprehensive Investigation of Facility Effects on the Testing of High-Power Monolithic and Clustered Hall Thruster Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallimore, Alec D; Walker, Mitchell M; Beal, Brian E; Smith, Timothy B

    2006-01-01

    .... It is difficult for researchers to make adequate comparisons between data sets because of both differences in instrumentation and back pressures due to the wide range of facilities used in Hall thruster testing...

  8. Nanofluidic crystal: a facile, high-efficiency and high-power-density scaling up scheme for energy harvesting based on nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Wei; Wang Wei; Zhang Haixia; Wu Wengang; Li Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    The great advances in nanotechnology call for advances in miniaturized power sources for micro/nano-scale systems. Nanofluidic channels have received great attention as promising high-power-density substitutes for ion exchange membranes for use in energy harvesting from ambient ionic concentration gradient, namely reverse electrodialysis. This paper proposes the nanofluidic crystal (NFC), of packed nanoparticles in micro-meter-sized confined space, as a facile, high-efficiency and high-power-density scaling-up scheme for energy harvesting by nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis (NRED). Obtained from the self-assembly of nanoparticles in a micropore, the NFC forms an ion-selective network with enormous nanochannels due to electrical double-layer overlap in the nanoparticle interstices. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, a maximum efficiency of 42.3 ± 1.84%, a maximum power density of 2.82 ± 0.22 W m −2 , and a maximum output power of 1.17 ± 0.09 nW/unit (nearly three orders of magnitude of amplification compared to other NREDs) were achieved in our prototype cell, which was prepared within 30 min. The current NFC-based prototype cell can be parallelized and cascaded to achieve the desired output power and open circuit voltage. This NFC-based scaling-up scheme for energy harvesting based on NRED is promising for the building of self-powered micro/nano-scale systems. (paper)

  9. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  10. Catalytic Fuel Conversion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility enables unique catalysis research related to power and energy applications using military jet fuels and alternative fuels. It is equipped with research...

  11. Research and development of power reactor technology supporting work, 3; Development of utility facility operation management technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Demands on utility facilities for nuclear technology development are increasingly sophisticated and diversified. It is important to meet requirements of securing the reliability of utility supply and ensuring the safety of facility operation and maintenance by means of technical supporting, data supply and quick contingency responses. A New computer system to make practicable man-machine interface, real-time data acquisition and operation data centralization has been developed based on the knowledge. Obtained from data base information and operation experience for the purpose of operation efficiency and labor saving. (author).

  12. 75 FR 7628 - Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    ...; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility Operating License, Proposed No Significant Hazards Consideration Determination, and Opportunity for a Hearing The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission... involves no significant hazards consideration. Under the Commission's regulations in Title 10 of the Code...

  13. Current situation with the centralized storage facilities for non-power radioactive wastes in Latin American countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Juan C.; Salgado, Mercedes; Idoyaga Navarro, Maria L.; Escobar, Carolina; Mallaupoma, Mario; Sbriz, Luciano; Moreno, Sandra; Gozalez, Olga; Gomez, Patricia; Mora, Patricia; Miranda, Alberto; Aguilar, Lola; Zarate, Norma; Rodriguez, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Several Latin American (LA) countries have been firmly committed to the peaceful applications of ionizing radiations in medicine, industry, agriculture and research in order to achieve socioeconomic development in diverse sectors. Consequently the use of radioactive materials and radiation sources as well as the production of radioisotopes and labeled compounds may always produce radioactive wastes which require adequate management and, in the end, disposal. However, there are countries in the Latin American region whose radioactive waste volumes do not easily justify a national repository. Moreover, such facilities are extremely expensive to develop. It is unlikely that such an option will become available in the foreseeable future for most of these countries, which do not have nuclear industries. Storage has long been incorporated as a step in the management of radioactive wastes. In the recent years, there have been developments that have led some countries to consider whether the roles of storage might be expanded to provide longer-term care of long-live radioactive wastes The aim of this paper is to discuss the current situation with the storage facilities/conditions for the radioactive wastes and disused sealed radioactive sources in Latin-American countries. In some cases a brief description of the existing facilities for certain countries are provided. In other cases, when no centralized facility exists, general information on the radioactive inventories and disused sealed sources is given. (author)

  14. 10 CFR Appendix R to Part 50 - Fire Protection Program for Nuclear Power Facilities Operating Prior to January 1, 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... service-water/fire-water uses the minimum volume for fire uses shall be ensured by means of dedicated... knowledge of his or her role in the fire fighting strategy for the area assumed to contain the fire... LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. R Appendix R to Part 50—Fire Protection...

  15. The effect of nuclear facilities operation on fish populations and the Dukovany-Dalesice power complex under construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penaz, M.

    1979-01-01

    The scope and the main results are described of the hydrobiological and ichthyological research into the Jihlava river in the neighbourhood of the Dukovany - Dalesice power plant complex. The effect of the power plant complex on the ecosystem of the affected river stretch is predicted, mainly on the fish community. (author)

  16. On present situation of radioactive waste management and exposure of workers in nuclear reactor facilities for commercial power generation in fiscal 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The article summarizes the contents of some reports including the Report on Radiation Management in 1988 that were submitted by the operators of nuclear reactor facilities for commercial power generation according to the requirements specified in the Law Concerning Regulation on Nuclear Material, Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Reactor. According to these reports, the annual radiation release in all nuclear power generation plants was well below the radiation release limits set up in the report 'On Guidelines for Target Dose in Areas around Light Water Reactor Facilities for Power Generation'. Data submitted also show that there are no significant problems with the management of radioactive solid waste. In all nuclear generation plants, the personal exposure of workers is below the permissible exposure dose specified in law. The Agency of Natural Resources and Energy is planned to further promote the development of advanced techniques for automatization and remote control of light water reactors and to provide effective guidance to electrical contractors for positive radiation management. (N.K.)

  17. Analysis of results from a loss-of-offsite-power-initiated ATWS experiment in the LOFT Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J.; Giri, A.M.; Koizumi, Y.; Koske, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    An anticipated transient without scram (ATWS), initiated by loss-of-offsite power, was experimentally simulated in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) pressurized water reactor (PWR). Primary system pressure was controlled using a scaled safety relief valve (SRV) representative of those in a commercial PWR, while reactor power was reduced by moderator reactivity feedback in a natural circulation mode. The experiment showed that reactor power decreases more rapidly when the primary pumps are tripped in a loss-of-offsite-power ATWS than in a loss-of-feedwater induced ATWS when the primary pumps are left on. During the experiment, the SRV had sufficient relief capacity to control primary system pressure. Natural circulation was effective in removing core heat at high temperature, pressure, and core power. The system transient response predicted using the RELAPS/MOD1 computer code showed good agreement with the experimental data

  18. Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Claus Westergård; Fogsgaard, Morten

    2016-01-01

    and creativity suggests that when managers give people the opportunity to gain power and explicate that there is reason to be more creative, people will show a boost in creative behaviour. Moreover, this process works best in unstable power hierarchies, which implies that power is treated as a negotiable....... It is thus a central point that power is not necessarily something that breaks down and represses. On the contrary, an explicit focus on the dynamics of power in relation to creativity can be productive for the organisation. Our main focus is to elaborate the implications of this for practice and theory...

  19. Detection of fatigue damage of high and medium pressure rotor by X-ray diffraction method. Survey and research of nondestructive examination of thermal power generation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Suesada, Yasuhiko; Nishioka, Noriaki; Goto, Toru; Ito, Hitomi; Kadoya, Yoshikuni

    1987-03-25

    In recent years, the existing thermal power generation facilities have been required to be operated in securing dependability from the standpoints of the operating conditions which have been getting severer and the demands to use them for longer periods, accordingly it is hoped to establish the diagnostic technology of aged deterioration by the non-destructive examination method for the facilities. In the beginning of 1959 the Kansai Electric Power Co. surveyed the current situation of this technology at various thermal power generation turbine facilities and discovered that concerning the diagnostic technology of aged deterioration by the non-destructive examination method, there remained many matters untouched in the basic research field. The company consequently started a survey and research jointly with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries in the first half of 1959. This report summarizes the research on the detection of aged deterioration due to thermal fatigue of Cr-Mo-V rotor material by the X-ray diffraction method which was conducted during the full fiscal year of 1984 and the first half of FY 1985 as a part of the above joint research. With respect to the conditions for the detection method of thermal fatigue damages of dummy grooves of the high and medium pressure rotor by the application of the X-ray diffraction method, it is preferred to measure a diffraction strength curve of the diffraction surface by using a Co tube as X-ray tube and it is also desirable to use a position sensitive proportional counter tube for X-ray detector. (5 figs, 6 refs)

  20. Results from study of potential early commercial MHD power plants and from recent ETF design work. [Engineering Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hals, F.; Kessler, R.; Swallom, D.; Westra, L.; Zar, J.; Morgan, W.; Bozzuto, C.

    1980-01-01

    The study deals with different 'moderate technology' entry-level commercial MHD power plants. Two of the reference plants are based on combustion of coal with air preheated in a high-temperature regenerative air heater separately fired with a low-BTU gas produced in a gasifier integrated with the power plant. The third reference plant design is based on the use of oxygen enriched combustion air. Performance calculations show that an overall power plant efficiency of the order of 44% can be reached with the use of oxygen enrichment.

  1. The text of the agreement between the Agency and Argentina for the application of safeguards to the Atucha power reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Agreement between the Republic of Argentina, the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards came into force on 4 March 1994. As a result of the coming into force of the aforesaid Agreement for Argentina, the application of safeguards under the Agreement of 3 October 1972 between Argentina and the IAEA for the application of safeguards to the Atucha Power Reactor Facility has been suspended

  2. A Logistic Life Cycle Cost-Benefit Analysis of Power Quality Management in the Avionics Repair Facility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kennedy, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    .... The implementation of power quality management can result in wide scale logistical support changes in regards to the life cycle costs of maintaining the DoD's current inventory of sensitive electronic equipment...

  3. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Genard Gilles; Portal Romain; Bouchat Virginie; Vanderperre Serge

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF) for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assump...

  4. Assessment of the Impacts of Green Mountain Power Corporation's Wind Power Facility on Breeding and Migrating Birds in Searsburg, Vermont: July 1996--July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerlinger, P.

    2002-03-01

    A 6-megawatt, 11 turbine wind power development was constructed by Green Mountain Power Corporation in Searsburg, southern Vermont, in 1996. To determine whether birds were impacted, a series of modified BA (Before, After) studies was conducted before construction (1993-1996), during (1996), and after (1997) construction on the project site. The studies were designed to monitor changes in breeding bird community (species composition and abundance) on the site, examine the behavior and numbers of songbirds migrating at night over the site and hawks migrating over the site in daylight, and search for carcasses of birds that might have collided with the turbines.

  5. State of radioactive waste management is power reactor facilities and state of radiation exposure of workers who engaged in radiation works in fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report is the summary of the reports on radiation control and others submitted by those who installed practical power reactor facilities based on the relevant law in fiscal 1993. The amounts of release of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes were sufficiently smaller than the target value of the yearly release control for attaining the target value of dose that the public around the facilities receive. As to the state of control of radioactive solid waste, the amount of drum generation tended to decrease year by year, and the cumulative amount to be preserved tended to level off. The dose equivalent that the individuals who engaged in radiation works received was smaller than the limit value in all nuclear power stations. The total dose equivalent for those workers in fiscal 1993 was 86.65 man Sv. Hereafter, the automation and remote operation of works, the water quality control for reducing crud and so on will be promoted to reduce radiation exposure. The reference data on the state of control of gaseous, liquid and solid wastes, and the state of control of radiation exposure of workers are attached. (K.I.)

  6. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Power Burst Facility (PER-620) Final End State and PBF Vessel Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. C. Culp

    2007-05-01

    Preparation of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, (DOE and EPA 1995) which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time critical removal action process as an approach for decommissioning. The scope of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is to evaluate alternatives and recommend a preferred alternative for the final end state of the PBF and the final disposal location for the PBF vessel.

  7. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genard, Gilles; Portal, Romain; Bouchat, Virginie; Vanderperre, Serge

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF) for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assumptions on the source terms and on the source geometry as well as the way the shielding is determined and the results of the sizing are presented.

  8. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genard Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assumptions on the source terms and on the source geometry as well as the way the shielding is determined and the results of the sizing are presented.

  9. Calculations of high-power production target and beamdump for the GSI future Super-FRS for a fast extraction scheme at the FAIR Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N A; Weick, H; Iwase, H

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting fragment separator (Super-FRS) is being designed for the production and separation of radioactive isotopes at the future FAIR (Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research) facility at Darmstadt. This paper discusses various aspects and requirements for the high-power production target that will be used in the Super-FRS experiments. The production target must survive over an extended period of time as it will be used during the course of many experiments. The specific power deposited by the high intensity beam that will be generated at the future FAIR facility will be high enough to destroy the target in most of the cases as a result of a single shot from the new heavy ion synchrotrons SIS100/300. By using an appropriate beam intensity and focal spot parameters, the target would survive after being irradiated once. However, the heat should be dissipated efficiently before the same target area is irradiated again. We have considered a wheel shaped solid carbon target that rotates around its axis so that different areas of the target are irradiated successively. This allows for cooling of the beam heated region by thermal conduction before the same part of the target is irradiated a second time. Another attractive option is to use a liquid jet target at the Super-FRS. First calculations of a possible liquid lithium target are also presented in this paper. One of the advantages of using lithium as a target is that it will survive even if one uses a smaller focal spot, which has half the area of that used for a solid carbon target. This will significantly improve the isotope resolution. A similar problem associated with these experiments will be safe deposition of the beam energy in a beamdump after its interaction with the production target. We also present calculations to study the suitability of a proposed beamdump

  10. Autonomous electric small power supply facilities with a regenerative power feed and hydrogen storage path; Autarke elektrische Kleinenergieversorgungsanlagen mit regenerativer Einspeisung und Wasserstoff-Speicherpfad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, Maike

    2012-11-01

    Due to the worldwide increase in the energy consumption, the increasing scarcity of fossil fuels and the phasing out of nuclear power in Germany, the significance of the renewable energy in the energy mix will increase. This development is accompanied by an increasing number of decentralized, autonomous energy systems. The author of the book under consideration reports on the design and operation of such small autonomous power systems. An integrated approach for an advisory system is presented which supports the developer of these systems from the selection of suitable system components through dimensioning to the design of a obvious operating strategy. Different knowledge-based and meta-heuristic methods are used. Furthermore, the author examines the impact of waviness in the electric current of PEM fuel cells in detail. In this case the author describes systematically conducted measurements and developed a simulation model for the PEM fuel cell.

  11. PBF [Power Burst Facility] severe fuel damage test 1-1: Volume 2, Test results report, Appendices A through I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, Z.R.; Petti, D.A.; Cook, B.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report provides information on: fuel rod characteristics; instrumentation identification, location, and performance; effluent sampling and monitoring system; bundle power; test SFD 1-1 data qualification, uncertainties, and data plots; postirradiation examinations; chemical kinetics predictions; SCDAP analysis model; and coolant level measurements

  12. An optimization-based approach for facility energy management with uncertainties, and, Power portfolio optimization in deregulated electricity markets with risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun

    Topic 1. An Optimization-Based Approach for Facility Energy Management with Uncertainties. Effective energy management for facilities is becoming increasingly important in view of the rising energy costs, the government mandate on the reduction of energy consumption, and the human comfort requirements. This part of dissertation presents a daily energy management formulation and the corresponding solution methodology for HVAC systems. The problem is to minimize the energy and demand costs through the control of HVAC units while satisfying human comfort, system dynamics, load limit constraints, and other requirements. The problem is difficult in view of the fact that the system is nonlinear, time-varying, building-dependent, and uncertain; and that the direct control of a large number of HVAC components is difficult. In this work, HVAC setpoints are the control variables developed on top of a Direct Digital Control (DDC) system. A method that combines Lagrangian relaxation, neural networks, stochastic dynamic programming, and heuristics is developed to predict the system dynamics and uncontrollable load, and to optimize the setpoints. Numerical testing and prototype implementation results show that our method can effectively reduce total costs, manage uncertainties, and shed the load, is computationally efficient. Furthermore, it is significantly better than existing methods. Topic 2. Power Portfolio Optimization in Deregulated Electricity Markets with Risk Management. In a deregulated electric power system, multiple markets of different time scales exist with various power supply instruments. A load serving entity (LSE) has multiple choices from these instruments to meet its load obligations. In view of the large amount of power involved, the complex market structure, risks in such volatile markets, stringent constraints to be satisfied, and the long time horizon, a power portfolio optimization problem is of critical importance but difficulty for an LSE to serve the

  13. Energy Systems Integration Facility Videos | Energy Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility | NREL Energy Systems Integration Facility Videos Energy Systems Integration Facility Integration Facility NREL + SolarCity: Maximizing Solar Power on Electrical Grids Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration Robot-Powered Reliability Testing at NREL's ESIF Microgrid

  14. Facility for remote filling and discharging of containers and tanks in nuclear power plants with radioactive concentrates and sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucharik, D.

    1987-01-01

    The facility consists of a remote controlled filling and discharge head pressed with a pneumatic cylinder to the container adapters. The head is provided with hoses for the feeding and/or withdrawal of the concentrate and for container ventilation. It is suspended on the pneumatic cylinder which is mounted on a revolving arm. On the pin of the revolving arm there is a drip tray which captures drops of the concentrate when the container has been filled and the head unsealed. The ball valves in the container adapters are electromagnetically controlled. The machine serves to mechanize certain manual operations, improves work safety and reduces contact of personnel with radioactive concentrates. (J.B.). 1 fig

  15. Magnetohydrodynamics MHD Engineering Test Facility ETF 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report CDER. Volume 3: Costs and schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The estimated plant capital cost for a coal fired 200 MWE electric generating plant with open cycle magnetohydrodynamics is divided into principal accounts based on Federal Energy Regulatory Commision account structure. Each principal account is defined and its estimated cost subdivided into identifiable and major equipment systems. The cost data sources for compiling the estimates, cost parameters, allotments, assumptions, and contingencies, are discussed. Uncertainties associated with developing the costs are quantified to show the confidence level acquired. Guidelines established in preparing the estimated costs are included. Based on an overall milestone schedule related to conventional power plant scheduling experience and starting procurement of MHD components during the preliminary design phase there is a 6 1/2-year construction period. The duration of the project from start to commercial operation is 79 months. The engineering phase of the project is 4 1/2 years; the construction duration following the start of the man power block is 37 months.

  16. A raster scanning power supply system for controlling relativistic heavy ion beams at the Bevalac Biomedical Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, G.; Nyman, M.; Halliwell, J.; Lutz, I.; Dwinell, R.

    1987-03-01

    A power supply system is currently being designed and constructed to sweep an 8.0 Tesla-meter relativistic heavy ion beam in a raster scanning mode for radiotherapy use. Two colinear dipole magnets with orthogonally oriented magnetic fields are driven by the system to produce a rectangular field (40 x 40 cm max.) with a uniform dose (+-2.5%) to a target volume 6 meters away. The ''fast'' horizontal scanning magnet is driven by a single power supply which in conjunction with a triac bridge network and a current regulated linear actuator will produce a 1200 cm/sec max. sweep rate. The ''slow'' (40 cm/sec) vertical scanning magnet will be controlled by dual current regulated linear actuators in a push-pull configuration. The scanner system can provide off-axis treatment profiles with large aspect ratios and unusual dimensions

  17. Alteration of installation of nuclear reactors (alteration of No. 1 and No. 2 reactor facilities) in Shimane Nuclear Power Station, Chugoku Electric Power Co. , Inc. (report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-07-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission reported to the Minister of International Trade and Industry after prudent deliberation on this alteration problem which had been inquired on August 28, 1986. It was recognized that the technical capability of the applicant is appropriate, as the result of deliberation. It was judged that the safety after this alteration of the installation of the reactor facilities can be ensured. As the result of examining new type 8 x 8 zirconium liner fuel, there was no problem in its mechanical design, the analysis of dynamical characteristics, and the analysis of abnormal transient change and accident in operation. As to the change of the average degree of enrichment of replacement fuel, the thermonuclear design of the reactor core was adequate. In the incineration of spent resin and filter sludge, the effect of radioactive substances to the environment was negligible. The safety after abolishing the auxiliary protection function against exhaust radioactivity is ensured with a rare gas holdup equipment. The soundness of fuel and the soundness of reactor coolant pressure boundary are maintained in abnormal transient change and accident. (Kako, I.).

  18. Alteration of installation of nuclear reactors (alteration of No.1 and No.2 reactor facilities) in Shimane Nuclear Power Station, Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission reported to the Minister of International Trade and Industry after prudent deliberation on this alteration problem which had been inquired on August 28, 1986. It was recognized that the technical capability of the applicant is appropriate, as the result of deliberation. It was judged that the safety after this alteration of the installation of the reactor facilities can be ensured. As the result of examining new type 8 x 8 zirconium liner fuel, there was no problem in its mechanical design, the analysis of dynamical characteristics, and the analysis of abnormal transient change and accident in operation. As to the change of the average degree of enrichment of replacement fuel, the thermonuclear design of the reactor core was adequate. In the incineration of spent resin and filter sludge, the effect of radioactive substances to the environment was negligible. The safety after abolishing the auxiliary protection function against exhaust radioactivity is ensured with a rare gas holdup equipment. The soundness of fuel and the soundness of reactor coolant pressure boundary are maintained in abnormal transient change and accident. (Kako, I.)

  19. Ensuring radiation safety during construction of the facility ''Ukrytie'' and restoration of unit 3 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belovodsky, L.F.; Panfilov, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    On April 26, 1986, an accident at the fourth power unit of the Chernobyl NPS (ChNPS) destroyed the reactor core and part of the power unit building, whereby sizeable amounts of radioactive materials, stored in reactor at operation, were released into the environment, and there were also highly active fragments of fuel elements and pieces of graphite from reactor spread on ChNPS site near to safety block. Information on the accident at ChNPS, including its cause and consequences, was considered at special meeting, conducted by IAEA on August 25-29, 1986, in Vienna. In final report of International Advisory Group for Nuclear Safety (IAGNS), prepared by results of meeting activities, the main stages of the accident effects elimination (AEE) immediately on the station site according to the data, received before August 1, 1986, were discussed. In 1987-1990 the published materials on the later period of AEE, completed by building ''Ukrytie'' installation at the fourth power unit of ChNPS

  20. Works of shifting discharge facilities in construction for adding No.3 and No.4 plants to Oi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Gen-ichi; Yoshida, Atsumu.

    1989-01-01

    At present in Oi Power Station, No.1 and No.2 plants of 1175 MWe output each are in operation, but in order to stabilize electric power supply for a long period, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. earnestly advances the construction works for adding No.3 and No.4 plants of each 1180 MWe output PWR. No.3 plant is expected to begin the operation in October, 1991, and No.4 plant in August, 1992. The works for creating the site were started in July, 1985, and the flat land of about 60,000 m 2 and the reclaimed land of about 80,000 m 2 were prepared. Subsequently, the main construction works were started in May, 1987, and the rate of general progress was 21 % in No.3 plant and 2 % in No.4 plant as of the end of October, 1988. Due to the addition of No.3 and No.4 plants, the quantity of condenser cooling water discharge increases to 318 m 3 /s from 150 m 3 /s at present, therefore, the bank having discharge holes is shifted from the present position about 100 m toward sea. As to the problems, the shifting works in flowing water, the method of shifting, the examination on lifting caissons and culverts, the trial construction of chemical anchors and so on were investigated. The execution of the shifting works is reported. (K.I.)

  1. A bulk tungsten tile for JET: Heat flux tests in the MARION facility on the power-handling performance and validation of the thermal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, Ph.; Altmann, H.; Chaumet, P.; Joffrin, E.; Knaup, M.; Matthews, G.F.; Neubauer, O.; Nicolai, D.; Riccardo, V.; Tanchuk, V.; Thompson, V.; Uhlemann, R.; Samm, U.

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of the ITER-like Wall (ILW) for the JET tokamak, a divertor row made of bulk tungsten material has been developed for the position where the outer strike point is located in most of the foreseen plasma configurations. In the absence of active cooling, this represents a formidable challenge when one considers the temperature reached by tungsten (T W,surf > 2000 deg. C) and the vertical gradient ∂T/∂z = 5 x 10 4 K/m. As the development is drawing to an end and most components are in production, actual 1:1 prototypes are exposed to an ion beam with a power density around 7 MW/m 2 on the plasma-facing surface. Advantage is taken of the flexibility of the MARION facility to bombard the tungsten stack under shallow angles of incidence (∼6 o ) with a powerful beam of ions and neutrals (>70 MW/m 2 on axis). The shallow angles are important, with respect to the toroidal wetted surface, for properly simulating the expected performance under actual tokamak conditions. The MARION tests have been used to validate for a few typical cases the thermal calculations that were steadily developed along with the tungsten tile and, at the same time, to gather information on the actual temperatures of individual components. The latter is an important factor to a finer estimation of the power handling capabilities.

  2. Seismic evaluation of existing nuclear power plants and other facilities V. 2. Proceedings of the technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this TCM are: to review the IAEA Safety Report on Seismic Evaluation of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in order to achieve a consensus among Member States on this matter and to discuss the outlines of an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on specific topics related to this subject. This volume includes presentations of the member states describing the practical approach to evaluation of seismic equipment of the existing NPPs, validation of innovative systems for earthquake protection; seismic re-evaluation of the NPPs, seismic regulations and safety standards; and other activities related to seismic safety in Member States

  3. Seismic evaluation of existing nuclear power plants and other facilities V. 2. Proceedings of the technical committee meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this TCM are: to review the IAEA Safety Report on Seismic Evaluation of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in order to achieve a consensus among Member States on this matter and to discuss the outlines of an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on specific topics related to this subject. This volume includes presentations of the member states describing the practical approach to evaluation of seismic equipment of the existing NPPs, validation of innovative systems for earthquake protection; seismic re-evaluation of the NPPs, seismic regulations and safety standards; and other activities related to seismic safety in Member States.

  4. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  5. Validation of temporal and spatial consistency of facility- and speed-specific vehicle-specific power distributions for emission estimation: A case study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhiqiang; Song, Guohua; Lu, Hongyu; He, Weinan; Yu, Lei

    2017-09-01

    Vehicle-specific power (VSP) has been found to be highly correlated with vehicle emissions. It is used in many studies on emission modeling such as the MOVES (Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator) model. The existing studies develop specific VSP distributions (or OpMode distribution in MOVES) for different road types and various average speeds to represent the vehicle operating modes on road. However, it is still not clear if the facility- and speed-specific VSP distributions are consistent temporally and spatially. For instance, is it necessary to update periodically the database of the VSP distributions in the emission model? Are the VSP distributions developed in the city central business district (CBD) area applicable to its suburb area? In this context, this study examined the temporal and spatial consistency of the facility- and speed-specific VSP distributions in Beijing. The VSP distributions in different years and in different areas are developed, based on real-world vehicle activity data. The root mean square error (RMSE) is employed to quantify the difference between the VSP distributions. The maximum differences of the VSP distributions between different years and between different areas are approximately 20% of that between different road types. The analysis of the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emission factor indicates that the temporal and spatial differences of the VSP distributions have no significant impact on vehicle emission estimation, with relative error of less than 3%. The temporal and spatial differences have no significant impact on the development of the facility- and speed-specific VSP distributions for the vehicle emission estimation. The database of the specific VSP distributions in the VSP-based emission models can maintain in terms of time. Thus, it is unnecessary to update the database regularly, and it is reliable to use the history vehicle activity data to forecast the emissions in the future. In one city, the areas with less data can still

  6. Collaborative Russian-US work in nuclear material protection, control and accounting at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering. II. extension to additional facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, V.V.; Pshakin, G.M.; Belov, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    During 1995, collaborative Russian-US nuclear material protection, control and accounting (MPC ampersand A) tasks at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Obninsk, Russia focused on improving the protection of nuclear materials at the BFS Fast Critical Facility. BFS has thousands of fuel disks containing highly enriched uranium and weapons-grade plutonium that are used to simulate the core configurations of experimental reactors in two critical assemblies. Completed tasks culminated in demonstrations of newly implemented equipment and methods that enhanced the MPC ampersand A at BFS through computerized accounting, nondestructive inventory verification measurements, personnel identification and assess control, physical inventory taking, physical protection, and video surveillance. The collaborative work is now being extended. The additional tasks encompass communications and tamper-indicating devices; new storage alternatives; and systemization of the MPC ampersand A elements that are being implemented

  7. United States Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Component Test Facility for 760°C Steam Power Plants ComTest Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hack, Horst [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Purgert, Robert Michael [Energy Industries of Ohio

    2017-12-13

    Following the successful completion of a 15-year effort to develop and test materials that would allow coal-fired power plants to be operated at advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) steam conditions, a United States-based consortium is presently engaged in a project to build an A-USC component test facility (ComTest). A-USC steam cycles have the potential to improve cycle efficiency, reduce fuel costs, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Current development and demonstration efforts are focused on enabling the construction of A-USC plants, operating with steam temperatures as high as 1400°F (760°C) and steam pressures up to 5000 psi (35 MPa), which can potentially increase cycle efficiencies to 47% HHV (higher heating value), or approximately 50% LHV (lower heating value), and reduce CO2 emissions by roughly 25%, compared to today’s U.S. fleet. A-USC technology provides a lower-cost method to reduce CO2 emissions, compared to CO2 capture technologies, while retaining a viable coal option for owners of coal generation assets. Among the goals of the ComTest facility are to validate that components made from advanced nickel-based alloys can operate and perform under A-USC conditions, to accelerate the development of a U.S.-based supply chain for the full complement of A-USC components, and to decrease the uncertainty of cost estimates for future A-USC power plants. The configuration of the ComTest facility would include the key A-USC technology components that were identified for expanded operational testing, including a gas-fired superheater, high-temperature steam piping, steam turbine valve, and cycling header component. Membrane walls in the superheater have been designed to operate at the full temperatures expected in a commercial A-USC boiler, but at a lower (intermediate) operating pressure. This superheater has been designed to increase the temperature of the steam supplied by the host utility boiler up to 1400°F (760

  8. Using sound to modify fish behavior at power-production and water-control facilities: A workshop. Phase 2: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, T.J.; Popper, A.N.

    1997-06-01

    A workshop on ''''Use of Sound for Fish Protection at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities'''' was held in Portland, Oregon on December 12--13, 1995. This workshop convened a 22-member panel of international experts from universities, industry, and government to share knowledge, questions, and ideas about using sound for fish guidance. Discussions involved in a broad range of indigenous migratory and resident fish species and fish-protection issues in river systems, with particular focus on the Columbia River Basin. Because the use of sound behavioral barriers for fish is very much in its infancy, the workshop was designed to address the many questions being asked by fishery managers and researchers about the feasibility and potential benefits of using sound to augment physical barriers for fish protection in the Columbia River system

  9. Using Sound to Modify Fish Behavior at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities: A Workshop December 12-13, 1995. Phase II: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J. [ed.] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Popper, Arthur N. [ed.] [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A workshop on ``Use of Sound for Fish Protection at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities`` was held in Portland, Oregon on December 12--13, 1995. This workshop convened a 22-member panel of international experts from universities, industry, and government to share knowledge, questions, and ideas about using sound for fish guidance. Discussions involved in a broad range of indigenous migratory and resident fish species and fish-protection issues in river systems, with particular focus on the Columbia River Basin. Because the use of sound behavioral barriers for fish is very much in its infancy, the workshop was designed to address the many questions being asked by fishery managers and researchers about the feasibility and potential benefits of using sound to augment physical barriers for fish protection in the Columbia River system.

  10. Development of an evaluation method for seismic isolation systems of nuclear power facilities. Development of crossover piping design method for seismic isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otoyo, Teruyoshi; Otani, Akihito; Otani, Akihito; Fukushima, Shunsuke; Jimbo, Masakazu; Yamamoto, Tomofumi; Sakakida, Takaaki; Onishi, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    In the conceptual design of seismic isolation systems of nuclear power facilities, there exist two types of installation. The first type is to isolate both the reactor and the turbine buildings, the other is to isolate only the reactor building. In the latter type, the crossover piping, which installed between the isolated and the non-isolated buildings, is excited and deformed by the different motions of those buildings. In this study, shaking tests of 1/10 scaled model of the main steam piping and FEM analyses under multiple support excitation conditions have been performed to investigate the vibration behavior of the crossover piping. It was confirmed that modal time-history analyses could be in good agreement with the shaking test results. Also, Numerous combination methods were investigated by comparing response spectrum analyses and modal time-history analyses. In conclusion, response spectrum analyses using SRSS combinations could correspond to time-history analyses. (author)

  11. Current status of ground motions evaluation in seismic design guide for nuclear power facilities. Investigation on IAEA and US.NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Masato; Ito, Hiroshi; Hirata, Kazuta

    2009-01-01

    Recently, IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and US.NRC (US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission) published several standards and technical reports on seismic design and safety evaluation for nuclear power facilities. This report summarizes the current status of the international guidelines on seismic design and safety evaluation for nuclear power facilities in order to explore the future research topics. The main results obtained are as follows: 1 IAEA: (1) In the safety standard series, two levels are defined as seismic design levels, and design earthquake ground motion is determined corresponding to each seismic design level. (2) A new framework on seismic design which consists of conventional deterministic method and risk-based method is discussed in the technical report although the framework is not adopted in the safety guidelines. 2 USA: (1) US.NRC discusses a performance-based seismic design framework which has been originally developed by the private organization (American Society of Civil Engineers). (2) Design earthquakes and earthquake ground motion are mainly evaluated and determined based on probabilistic seismic hazard evaluations. 3 Future works: It should be emphasized that IAEA and US.NRC have investigated the implementation of risk-based concept into seismic design. The implementation of risk-based concept into regulation and seismic design makes it possible to consider various uncertainties and to improve accountability. Therefore, we need to develop the methods for evaluating seismic risk of structures, and to correlate seismic margin and seismic risk quantitatively. Moreover, the probabilistic method of earthquake ground motions, that is required in the risk-based design, should be applied to sites in Japan. (author)

  12. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER) supplement. Magnet system special investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The results of magnet system special investigations listed below are summarized: 4 Tesla Magnet Alternate Design Study; 6 Tesla Magnet Manufacturability Study. The conceptual design for a 4 Tesla superconducting magnet system for use with an alternate (supersonic) ETF power train is described, and estimated schedule and cost are identified. The magnet design is scaled from the ETF 6 T Tesla design. Results of a manufacturability study and a revised schedule and cost estimate for the ETF 6 T magnet are reported. Both investigations are extensions of the conceptual design of a 6 T magnet system performed earlier as a part of the overall MED-ETF conceptual design described in Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER) Vol. V, System Design Description (SDD) 503 dated September, 1981, DOE/NASA/0224-1; NASA CR-165/52.

  13. Does nuclear power-related facility siting always lower the local property Values? Comparative analysis among the sites in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Fumihiro; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Asano, Kota

    2011-01-01

    Yamane et al. (2011) carried out hedonic house rent analyses for several nuclear power plant sites in Japan, compared the result for each plant, and obtained some empirical results indicating that the local residents' marginal willingness-to-pay (MWTP) for living near the plant was not necessarily positive and that the MWTP was correlated with operation years of the plants and some of the host communities' attributes (i.e., population density, financial condition and public service improvement). However, these results may suffer from biases and inefficiency in estimating hedonic functions, caused by spatial dependency: spatial autoregression and spatial autocorrelation. In this paper, we introduce spatial econometric techniques to settle this problem. As a revised result, it is indicated that the local residents' MWTP is correlated with past accidents in the plants, education service improvement in the host communities and so on. (author)

  14. Standard format and content for the physical protection section of a license application (for facilities other than nuclear power plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The document presented has been prepared as an aid to uniformity and completeness in the preparation and review of the physical protection section of license applications. It is applicable to fuel reprocessing plants, fuel manufacturing plants, SNM tranportation, or other special nuclear material operations involving the possession and use of uranium 235 (contained in uranium enriched to 20 percent or more in the U-235 isotope), uranium 233, or plutonium alone or in any combination in a quantity of 5000 grams or more computed by the formula: grams = (grams contained U-235) + 2.5 (grams U-233 + grams plutonium). The document is not intended to be used for nuclear power plants. The information specified is the minimum needed for a license application. Additional information may be required for completion of the staff review of a particular application

  15. FY 1999 report on the results of the joint study - project on the public facility use photovoltaic power generation field test; 1999 nendo kokyo shisetsunadoyo taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo kyodo kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In the field test, solar cell panels were installed on rooftop, and inverters were installed indoors. The electric power generated was connected at high pressure with electric installation of facilities and was also supplied to power equipment, lighting, air conditioning, etc. in facilities. The FY 1999 results were summarized. The installation of photovoltaic power generation facilities at 137 places and the results of the study were summarized in this report including a new university co-op building, Tokyo Metropolitan Advanced Technology Education Center, Suwano Center House of Fukushima prefecture, Environment Center of Saga prefecture, Educational Foundation Utsukushino Kindergarten, Hikarigaoka Park of Yamagata prefecture, Koiwai factory of Koiwai Dairy Products Co., Social Welfare Corporation Kameyama Ayumi Nursery School, etc. (NEDO)

  16. The first phase epidemiological study on the workers engaged in radiation business in facilities for atomic power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Tamiko; Kumatori, Toshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    Recently, the influence of long-lasting exposure to low-dose radiation on human bodies, especially on carcinogenesis have been attracting considerable attentions, however, there are few data available for the estimation of such risks. An epidemiological survey study on the workers for radiation business in atomic power stations was started in 1990 and its first phase study (1990-1994) was finished. This report describes the outlines of the results from the study, which has been made public by the Science and Technology Agency. The correlation between the exposure dose and carcinogenicity was observed only for the cancer in pancreas, but not in other organs. But, the previous studies in other countries and the data from the persons exposed to atomic bomb indicated that there was no significant correlation between the radiation and the incidence of pancreatic cancer. This causal relation found should be coped with carefully. The standardized mortality ratio, SMR for all kinds of death cause in the subjects was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82-0.96), significantly lower than that in all Japanese men. This fact was consistent with the data in other countries, suggesting that the decreased SMR compared with the whole people would be due to so called 'healthy worker's effects'. (M.N.)

  17. A mobile test facility based on a magnetic cumulative generator to study the stability of the power plants under impact of lightning currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurupov, A. V.; Zavalova, V. E., E-mail: zavalova@fites.ru; Kozlov, A. V.; Shurupov, M. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The report presents the results of the development and field testing of a mobile test facility based on a helical magnetic cumulative generator (MCGTF). The system is designed for full-scale modeling of lightning currents to study the safety of power plants of any type, including nuclear power plants. Advanced technologies of high-energy physics for solving both engineering and applied problems underlie this pilot project. The energy from the magnetic cumulative generator (MCG) is transferred to a high-impedance load with high efficiency of more than 50% using pulse transformer coupling. Modeling of the dynamics of the MEG that operates in a circuit with lumped parameters allows one to apply the law of inductance output during operation of the MCG, thus providing the required front of the current pulse in the load without using any switches. The results of field testing of the MCGTF are presented for both the ground loop and the model load. The ground loop generates a load resistance of 2–4 Ω. In the tests, the ohmic resistance of the model load is 10 Ω. It is shown that the current pulse parameters recorded in the resistive-inductive load are close to the calculated values.

  18. Construction and cost experience regarding the 2nd pool house for spent fuel storage facility in the Atucha Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The Atucha I second pool house storage for spent fuel is designed as an extension of the Atucha I power station. The two are linked by civil structure, controlling circuits, electrical and compressed air and water supplies, low level wastes disposal, ventilation under pressure maintenance, and, most important, the ability to transfer spent and new fuel in both directions. Because the second pool house is, by location and design, an extension of the existing installation, and since there is no design departure, regarding storage and transfer of fuel from that of the original installation, the rules and regulations applied for its construction were the same as those valid for the Atucha I construction. The requirement not to exceed a four-year period for construction and commissioning was determined by the need to have storage room for the Atucha I fuel. Argentina will meet the 1982 target by having the installation available during the second half of 1981. The second pool house is a wet storage location with a capacity of 1000 tons metallic uranium. It was designed by the Kraftwerk Union of West Germany along the same lines as the 440-ton storage location originally built with the station. The Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina has managed the construction and participated in project and design stages. As in the original pool, the 6 m long assemblies are stacked in double tiers. The cost figures which are mentioned differ from previously released figures and are not the final ones. With civil construction almost finished and mechanical erection started, the present estimates should not differ by more than 10% from the final figures. The installation has an investment cost of 61 million dollars, (1980), and, depending on the amortization time span considered, a total yearly cost per kg of capacity of metallic uranium, ranging between 5.5 and 9.3 dollars per kg

  19. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.L.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem) 2 which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem)

  20. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, M.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem).

  1. Airborne & Field Sensors Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTTC facilities include an 800' x 60' paved UAV operational area, clearapproach/departure zone, concrete pads furnished with 208VAC, 3 phase,200 amp power, 20,000 sq...

  2. Use of Sound for Fish Protection at Power Facilities : A Historical Perspective of the State of the Art : Phase 1 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    1994-11-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of the knowledge of fish hearing, i.e., what is known about fish response to sound, and provides a starting place for investigation into the use of sonic behavior modification to help solve pressing problems in the maintenance and recovery of anadromous and resident fish stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The challenge for scientists and engineers is to understand (1) how and what fish hear, and (2) how to use this knowledge to influence fish behavior or to factor fish sensory systems and behavior into the design of fish protection devices at power-production and water-control facilities. The sections that follow are a studied response to this challenge. In many respects, the search for effective and economical ways to modify fish behavior without physical intervention is one of the grails of fish management, particularly (although not exclusively), relative to electric power production. Within the Columbia River Basin and elsewhere, water is put to many uses not conducive to the health of indigenous fish. Irrigation, impoundment, and hydropower production frequently modify the riverine environment to the detriment of indigenous stocks while creating productive environments for competing or predatory species. The mechanisms of impact are numerous. Water project managers, when faced with the need to reduce impacts of their operations on fish health, generally attempt to divert fish from high-risk to lower-risk regions or manage the environment in such a way as to increase the survival prospects of impacted species. Almost without exception, risk reduction is accomplished by using physical barriers of one form or another. Unfortunately, physical barriers at water projects have several drawbacks, e.g., reducing available water flow for energy production and incurring high maintenance costs. In addition, recent studies (Sale et al. 1991) have documented that once these barriers are installed, they are rarely evaluated for

  3. Safety in connection with the request for approval of the installation alteration in the fuel reprocessing facilities of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A report to the Prime Minister by the Nuclear Safety Commission was presented concerning the safety in the installation alteration of the fuel reprocessing facilities, as PNC had requested its approval to the Prime Minister. The safety was confirmed. The items of examination on the safety made by the committee on Examination of Nuclear Fuel Safety of NSC were the aseismic design of liquid waste storage, uranium denitration facility, intermediate gate and radioactive solid waste storage; the criticality safety design of the denitration facility; the radiation shielding design of the liquid waste storage, denitration facility and solid waste storage; the function of radioactive material containment of the liquid waste storage and denitration facility; the radiation control in the liquid waste storage, denitration facility and solid waste storage; the waste management in the liquid waste storage and denitration facility; fire and explosion prevention in the liquid waste storage; exposure dose from the liquid waste storage and denitration facility. (Mori, K.)

  4. Concerning safety issue associated with approval of modification of plan for reprocessing facilities of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (reply to inquiry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    In response to an inquiry on the title issue received on Sept. 16, 1988, the Nuclear Safety Commission made an adequate study and submitted the findings to the Prime Minister on Oct. 20. the relevant modifications include the installation of combustion facilities comprising two furnaces to replace the existing facilities, and the addition of uranyl nitrate solution receiving equipment to the existing facilities for plutonium conversion technology development. The study addressed the effect of the modifications on the safety of the facilities and the environment. The combustion facilities, equipment and underground seepage water tank are designed in accordance with the applicable anti-earthquake standards. The facilities will be constructed of incombustible of flame-retardant materials. Equipment in the facilities will be used under negative pressure to prevent counterflow. Adequate measures will be taken for shielding, exposure control, waste disposal, etc. It is concluded that the modifications will not affect the safety of the reprocessing facilities. (Nogami, K.).

  5. Concerning safety issue associated with approval of modification of plan for reprocessing facilities of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (reply to inquiry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In response to an inquiry on the title issue received on Sept. 16, 1988, the Nuclear Safety Commission made an adequate study and submitted the findings to the Prime Minister on Oct. 20. the relevant modifications include the installation of combustion facilities comprising two furnaces to replace the existing facilities, and the addition of uranyl nitrate solution receiving equipment to the existing facilities for plutonium conversion technology development. The study addressed the effect of the modifications on the safety of the facilities and the environment. The combustion facilities, equipment and underground seepage water tank are designed in accordance with the applicable anti-earthquake standards. The facilities will be constructed of incombustible of flame-retardant materials. Equipment in the facilities will be used under negative pressure to prevent counterflow. Adequate measures will be taken for shielding, exposure control, waste disposal, etc. It is concluded that the modifications will not affect the safety of the reprocessing facilities. (Nogami, K.)

  6. Power Service Shops

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — TVA's Power Service Shops provides expert repair and maintenance of power system components and large industrial equipment. With world-class maintenance facilities...

  7. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    During September and October 2001, 15 events were recorded on the first grade and 1 on the second grade of the INES scale. The second grade event is in fact a re-classification of an incident that occurred on the second april 2001 at Dampierre power plant. This event happened during core refueling, a shift in the operation sequence led to the wrong positioning of 113 assemblies. A preliminary study of this event shows that this wrong positioning could have led, in other circumstances, to the ignition of nuclear reactions. Even in that case, the analysis made by EDF shows that the consequences on the staff would have been limited. Nevertheless a further study has shown that the existing measuring instruments could not have detected the power increase announcing the beginning of the chain reaction. The investigation has shown that there were deficiencies in the control of the successive operations involved in refueling. EDF has proposed a series of corrective measures to be implemented in all nuclear power plants. The other 15 events are described in the article. During this period 121 inspections have been made in nuclear facilities. (A.C.)

  8. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O.; Nichols, R.T.

    1994-05-01

    The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report

  9. Thermal analysis of the modified Hallum Nuclear Power Facility cask using experimentally obtained thermal boundary conditions corresponding to an engulfing open pool fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longenbaugh, R.S.; Sanchez, L.C.; Gregory, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    This report presents the two-dimensional heat transfer analysis of an open pool fire surrounding a modified radioactive materials transport cask. The cask is an older cask that was used by the Hallum Nuclear Power Facility (HNPF). The HNPF cask did not have a neutron shielding region but was modified to include one for testing purposes. Analysis of the thermal effects of an engulfing open pool fire was performed with the use of the heat transfer code Q/TRAN, which had previously been used in thermal benchmarking problems for spent nuclear fuel casks. Boundary condition data for the analysis were derived from experimental open pool fire tests of large-scale calorimeter test articles performed at SNL that produced information about cask surface heat flux versus surface temperature relationships. Data analysis was directed toward a determination of the thermal response of the cask, particularly the extent of lead melt since lead is used within the HNPF cask's gamma-shielding region. Parameters, such as surface emissivity and internal heat generation rate, can affect the results of the thermal analysis which control the amount of lead melt. A parameter sensitivity analysis was performed using a one-dimensional model to describe how surface emissivity and internal heat generation rates affect the temperature distribution within the cask. The information from this analysis was used to determine the range of parameters for the two-dimensional thermal analysis. 13 refs., 57 figs., 8 tabs

  10. Research on advancement of method for evaluating aseismatic ability of rock discontinuity plane in ground and surrounding slopes of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunose, Kinichiro; Cho, Akio; Takahashi, Manabu; Kamai, Toshitaka

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to carry out the technical development required for exploring with high accuracy the distribution and shapes of the discontinuity planes in rocks in the ground and surrounding cut-off slopes of nuclear power facilities, and to advance the techniques of interpreting and evaluating quantitatively the stability against earthquakes of the discontinuity planes. This research consists of two themes: the research on the method of investigating the three-dimensional distribution of the crevices in the ground and the research on the method of evaluating the aseismatic ability in the slopes. As for the first theme, one of the techniques for exploring underground structure with elastic waves, tomography, is explained, and the development of the 12 channel receiver and the program for the multi-channel analysis and processing of waveform are reported. As for the second theme, the stability analysis was carried out on three actual cases of landslide. The equation for stability analysis is shown, and the results are reported. The strength at the time of forming separation plane gives the most proper result. (K.I.)

  11. Corrosion and flow resistance of metal filter elements used in the cleanup of syngas from the Transport Gasifier at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Dahlin; E. Carl Landham; Xiaofeng Guan [Southern Research Institute, Wilsonville, AL (United States). Power Systems Development Facility

    2008-07-01

    At the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), a variety of filter elements and failsafes are being tested for the cleanup of coal-generated syngas from the Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR) Transport Gasifier. Thus far, no evidence of corrosion or plugging has been found in the HR-160 failsafes or sinterned metal fiber elements. However, a progressive corrosion and increase in pressure drop has been noted in the iron aluminide elements. The corrosion was first detected as reddish-brown spots of iron oxide after about 2,000 to 3,000 hours of syngas exposure. As the corrosion progressed, the spots of iron oxide merged to form a continuous scale after about 5,000 to 5,500 hours of exposure. With additional exposure, a black scale containing iron sulfide also appeared, and localized areas of sulfidation and plugging were noted in element cross sections. These effects have not resulted in any significant reduction in tensile strength, but a gradual increase in the clean element pressure drop has been noted. Flow test results suggest that there is an interaction between the corroded filter surface and the dustcake that effectively increases the residual cake flow resistance and baseline pressure drop. 10 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report.

  13. The composition of aerosols generated during a severe reactor accident: Experimental results from the Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage Test 1-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, D.A.; Hobbins, R.R.; Hagrman, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental results on fission product and aerosol release during the Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damages (SFD) Test 1-4 are examined to determine the composition of aerosols that would be generated during a severe reactor accident. The SFD 1-4 measured aerosol contained significant quantities of volatile fission products (VFPs) (cesium, iodine, tellurium), control materials (silver and cadmium), and structural materials (tin), indicating that fission product release, vaporization of control material, and release of tin from oxidized Zircaloy were all important aerosol sources. On average the aerosol composition is between one-quarter and one-half VFPs (especially cesium), with the remainder being control material (especially cadmium), and structural material (especially tin). Source term computer codes like CORSOR-M tend to overpredict the release of structural and control rod material relative to fission products by a factor of between 2 and 15 because the models do not account for relocation of molten control, fuel, and structural material during the degradation process, which tends to reduce the aerosol source. The results indicate that the aerosol generation in a severe reactor accident is intimately linked to the core degradation process. They recommend that these results be used to improve the models in source term computer codes

  14. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  15. FY 1998 evaluation/analysis by site of the data collected in the field test project for photovoltaic power generation for public facilities. 4/4; 1998 nendo kokyo shisetsu nadoyo taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo ni okeru shushu data hyoka kaiseki kaku site betsu. 4/4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The data items are horizontal insolation intensity, inclined insolation intensity, effective inclined insolation intensity (each unit: kWh/m{sup 2}), average temperature, array power energy, system power energy, system consumption power, load power energy, system supply load, and back flow power energy (each unit: kWh). Besides, the number of interconnected protective movement, disconnection hour (minute), system operating hour (minute), independent operating load, independent supply load (each unit: kWh), equivalent array operating hour, equivalent system operating hour, array/system output coefficient, system utilization rate/power generation rate, INV effective efficiency, and INV load factor. The objects of field tests are government office (joint office building, etc.), school (college, high school, elementary school, etc.), the Shinkansen Kyoto Station, health/welfare facilities (health facilities for the elderly, welfare center, etc.), hospital, industrial experimental station, training facilities (exhibition training facilities, etc.), broadcasting facilities, etc. (NEDO)

  16. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  17. 18 CFR 1317.410 - Comparable facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparable facilities... facilities. A recipient may provide separate toilet, locker room, and shower facilities on the basis of sex, but such facilities provided for students of one sex shall be comparable to such facilities provided...

  18. Dance Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Dudley, Ed.; Irey, Charlotte, Ed.

    This booklet represents an effort to assist teachers and administrators in the professional planning of dance facilities and equipment. Three chapters present the history of dance facilities, provide recommended dance facilities and equipment, and offer some adaptations of dance facilities and equipment, for elementary, secondary and college level…

  19. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, which requires that existing power plants reduce mercury emissions to meet an emission rate of 1.2 lb/TBtu on a 30-day rolling average and that new plants meet a 0.0002 lb/GWHr emission rate. This translates to mercury removals greater than 90% for existing units and greater than 99% for new units. Current state-of-the-art technology for the control of mercury emissions uses activated carbon injected upstream of a fabric filter, a costly proposition. For example, a fabric filter, if not already available, would require a 200M capital investment for a 700 MW size unit. A lower-cost option involves the injection of activated carbon into an existing cold-side electrostatic precipitator. Both options would incur the cost of activated carbon, upwards of 3M per year. The combination of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors and wet flue gas desulphurization (wet FGD) systems have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce mercury emissions, especially at units that burn coals containing sufficient halogens. Halogens are necessary for transforming elemental mercury to oxidized mercury, which is water-soluble. Plants burning halogen-deficient coals such as Power River Basin (PRB) coals currently have no alternative but to install activated carbon-based approaches to control mercury emissions. This research consisted of investigating calcium bromide addition onto PRB coal as a method of increasing flue gas halogen concentration. The treated coal was combusted in a 700 MW boiler and the subsequent treated flue gas was introduced into a wet FGD. Short-term parametric and an 83-day longer-term tests were completed to determine the ability of calcium bromine to oxidize mercury and to study the removal of the mercury in a wet FGD. The research goal was to show that calcium bromine addition to PRB coal was a viable approach for meeting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule

  20. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

    2012-07-07

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor

  1. Comparison of the cladding deformation measured during the Power Burst Facility loss-of-coolant accident in-pile experiments with recent Oak Ridge National Laboratory out-of-pile results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broughton, J.M.; McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    A series of four large break loss-of-coolant accident fuel behavior experiments have been performed in the Power Burst Facility. The results of these experiments are briefly reviewed and compared with results from the ORNL multirod burst test program. The effect of cladding burst temperature and prior irradiation were investigated. The cladding strain of the previously irradiated test rods was more uniformly distributed around the cladding circumference and larger than for similar unirradiated test rods. The ORNL out-of-pile single rod test results are in good agreement with the Power Burst Facility (PBF) test results with unirradiated test rods, and the ORNL out-of-pile, single-rod test results with heated shrouds and the PBF test results with previously irradiated test rods are comparable

  2. FY 1998 evaluation/analysis of the data collected in the field test project for photovoltaic power generation for public facilities; 1998 nendo kokyo shisetsu nadoyo taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo ni okeru shushu data hyoka kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In the field test project for the photovoltaic power generation for public facilities, operational data were collected/analyzed on facilities at 158 sites installed from FY 1994 to FY 1997. As a result, the following were found out: Average values of the global radiation on an inclined surface, equivalent array operation time, equivalent system operation time, system operation time, inverter performance efficiency, inverter load factor, array power coefficient, and system power coefficient are 3.51 kWh/m{sup 2}/D, 2.72 h/D, 2.47 h/D, 10.3 h/D, 0.91, 0.30, 0.77 and 0.70, respectively. No deterioration with age was recognized in the 4-year operation data. As to the maintenance, the item, 'there are a lot of failures in the photovoltaic power system,' was 2% in rate. As to the inspection, times are mostly once a month. The annual maintenance cost was widely between about 360 yen/kW and about 30,000 yen/kW. Supposing annual expenses to be a total of capital expense, direct expense, and general administrative expense, the power generation cost dropped from approximately 240 yen/kWh in FY 1994 to 100 yen/kWh in FY 1997. (NEDO)

  3. Recommended practice for the design of a computer driven Alarm Display Facility for central control rooms of nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Yaacov, G.

    1984-01-01

    This paper's objective is to explain the process by which design can prevent human errors in nuclear plant operation. Human factor engineering principles, data, and methods used in the design of computer driven alarm display facilities are discussed. A ''generic'', advanced Alarm Display Facility is described. It considers operator capabilities and limitations in decision-making processes, response dynamics, and human memory limitations. Highlighted are considerations of human factor criteria in the designing and layout of alarm displays. Alarm data sources are described, and their use within the Alarm Display Facility are illustrated

  4. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  5. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  6. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  7. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  8. Improvement of irradiation facilities performance in JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Masaru; Sakurai, Susumu; Honma, Kenzo; Sagawa, Hisashi; Nakazaki, Chousaburo

    1999-01-01

    Various kinds of irradiation facilities are installed in the JMTR for the purpose of irradiation tests on fuels and materials and of producing radioisotopes. The irradiation facilities have been improved so far at every opportunity of new irradiation requirements and of renewing them which reached the design lifetime. Of these irradiation facilities, improvements of the power ramping test facility (BOCA/OSF-1 facility) and the hydraulic rabbit No.2 (HR-2 facility) are described here. (author)

  9. Meteosat SEVIRI Fire Radiative Power (FRP) products from the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA SAF) - Part 1: Algorithms, product contents and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, M. J.; Roberts, G.; Freeborn, P. H.; Xu, W.; Govaerts, Y.; Beeby, R.; He, J.; Lattanzio, A.; Mullen, R.

    2015-06-01

    Characterising changes in landscape scale fire activity at very high temporal resolution is best achieved using thermal observations of actively burning fires made from geostationary Earth observation (EO) satellites. Over the last decade or more, a series of research and/or operational "active fire" products have been developed from these types of geostationary observations, often with the aim of supporting the generation of data related to biomass burning fuel consumption and trace gas and aerosol emission fields. The Fire Radiative Power (FRP) products generated by the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA SAF) from data collected by the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) are one such set of products, and are freely available in both near real-time and archived form. Every 15 min, the algorithms used to generate these products identify and map the location of new SEVIRI observations containing actively burning fires, and characterise their individual rates of radiative energy release (fire radiative power; FRP) that is believed proportional to rates of biomass consumption and smoke emission. The FRP-PIXEL product contains the highest spatial resolution FRP dataset, delivered for all of Europe, northern and southern Africa, and part of South America at a spatial resolution of 3 km (decreasing away from the west African sub-satellite point) at the full 15 min temporal resolution. The FRP-GRID product is an hourly summary of the FRP-PIXEL data, produced at a 5° grid cell size and including simple bias adjustments for meteorological cloud cover and for the regional underestimation of FRP caused, primarily, by the non-detection of low FRP fire pixels at SEVIRI's relatively coarse pixel size. Here we describe the enhanced geostationary Fire Thermal Anomaly (FTA) algorithm used to detect the SEVIRI active fire pixels, and detail methods used to deliver atmospherically corrected FRP information

  10. Evaluation of separation distance from the temporary storage facility for decontamination waste to ensure public radiological safety after Fukushima nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Go, A Ra; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The object of this study was to evaluate the separation distance from a temporary storage facility satisfying the dose criteria. The calculation of ambient dose rates took into account cover soil thickness, facility size, and facility type by using MCNPX code. Shielding effects of cover soil were 68.9%, 96.9% and 99.7% at 10 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm respectively. The on-ground type of storage facility had the highest ambient dose rate, followed by the semi-ground type and the underground type. The ambient dose rate did not vary with facility size (except 5 × 5 × 2 m size) due to the self-shielding of decontamination waste in temporary storage. The separation distances without cover soil for a 50 × 50 × 2 m size facility were evaluated as 14 m (minimum radioactivity concentration), 33 m (most probably radioactivity concentration), and 57 m (maximum radioactivity concentration) for on-ground storage type, 9 m, 24 m, and 45 m for semi-underground storage type, and 6 m, 16 m, and 31 m for underground storage type.

  11. Concerning modification of installation plan for reactor (modification of No.3 and No.4 reactor facilities) at Genkai nuclear power plant of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Ltd. (reply to inquiry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In response to an inquiry on the title issue, the Nuclear Safety Commission made an examination and submitted the findings to the Minister of International Trade and Industry. The modifications include the construction of combustion facilities for volume reduction of miscellaneous solid wastes. In the facilities, miscellaneous solid wastes will be combusted for volume reduction, and the combustion residue will be cooled with water and processed into glass-like granules, which will be stored in drums in the solid waste storage facilities. It is confirmed that the release of radioactive substances into the environment will be negligible, that the facilities have been designed to the Class B anti-earthquake standards, and that radiation monitors will be installed. The modifications also include the installation of an improved cement solidification system to replace a conventional-type system and a change in the capacity of the solid waste storage facilities. It is concluded that all proposed modifications should be approved. (Nogami, K.)

  12. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on joint research business (2/2). Photovoltaic power generation field test for public facilities; 1998 nendo kokyo shisetsu nadoyo taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo (2/2). Kyodo kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Photovoltaic power generation systems are experimentally installed at public facilities at various locations, and subjected to field tests in which they experience long-term operation under real loads. Mie Prefectural Iidaka Senior/Junior High School has a 10kW solar cell system installed on the south-side roof of the school house. The system is linked to an in-house transformation station and the power generated by the system is supplied to the lighting and air-conditioning facilities in the building, and surplus if any is transmitted to the Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., system. A field test is being conducted to determine if there are usability and safety in the 10kW system. A number of like systems are undergoing field tests, installed at a comprehensive technological training center of Kyushu Electric Power Safety Association, Kongo Gakuen Senior High School, Sakata Nursery School, Taiyo Daiichi Nursery School, Minami Kindergarten, Neyagawa Ishizu Old People's Home, Co-Op Living Konan, Factory Hishimeki, Tochigi Fuji Industries, Gamo-cho Hirabayashi Public Hall, Fukuoka Prefectural Culture Complex, Yatsusugi Forest Schooling Center, Osaka Prefectural Murano Water Purification Plant, Yamanashi Institute of Environmental Sciences, Utatsu-cho Town Office, Ginga Gakuen Junior High School, etc. (NEDO)

  13. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on joint research business (1/2). Photovoltaic power generation field test for public facilities; 1998 nendo kokyo shisetsu nadoyo taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo (1/2). Kyodo kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Photovoltaic power generation systems are experimentally installed at public facilities at various locations, and subjected to field tests in which they experience long-term operation under real loads. At Livelihood Cooperative Association Co-Op Kanagawa, a photovoltaic cell system is installed on the roof, facing true south, of its Yokohama eastern district joint purchase center, and the power generated by the system is utilized as interconnected with the commercial distribution line connecting to its power facilities. It is called a '10kW Photovoltaic Power Generation Model System,' and is subjected to a verification test, carried over from the previous fiscal year, centering about its usability and safety. Similar systems are also installed at many locations, such as the Kadosawa Bridge district of Ebina City, Kanagawa Prefectural Industrial Technology Research Center, Shiga Prefectural University, Suntory Museum, Fukui Institute of Technology, Saigo Police Station, Higashi-Murayama Water Purification Plant, Kanagawa Prefectural Disaster Prevention Center, Toyosato-cho Health Center, Kyodo Gakusha School, Sakuragi Nursery School, Yagi Junior High School, Shizuoka Prefectural Environmental Radiation Monitoring Center, Tanabe City Health Center. (NEDO)

  14. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on joint research business (2/2). Photovoltaic power generation field test for public facilities; 1998 nendo kokyo shisetsu nadoyo taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo (2/2). Kyodo kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Photovoltaic power generation systems are experimentally installed at public facilities at various locations, and subjected to field tests in which they experience long-term operation under real loads. Mie Prefectural Iidaka Senior/Junior High School has a 10kW solar cell system installed on the south-side roof of the school house. The system is linked to an in-house transformation station and the power generated by the system is supplied to the lighting and air-conditioning facilities in the building, and surplus if any is transmitted to the Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., system. A field test is being conducted to determine if there are usability and safety in the 10kW system. A number of like systems are undergoing field tests, installed at a comprehensive technological training center of Kyushu Electric Power Safety Association, Kongo Gakuen Senior High School, Sakata Nursery School, Taiyo Daiichi Nursery School, Minami Kindergarten, Neyagawa Ishizu Old People's Home, Co-Op Living Konan, Factory Hishimeki, Tochigi Fuji Industries, Gamo-cho Hirabayashi Public Hall, Fukuoka Prefectural Culture Complex, Yatsusugi Forest Schooling Center, Osaka Prefectural Murano Water Purification Plant, Yamanashi Institute of Environmental Sciences, Utatsu-cho Town Office, Ginga Gakuen Junior High School, etc. (NEDO)

  15. Power-law distribution of Sr-90 concentration in soil samples taken in the South part of Sverdlovsk Oblast, contaminated in the result of the Kyshtym accident at the Mayak facility in 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobitsyn, B.; Manzhurov, I.; Sergeev, A.; Subbotina, I. [Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    In September 1957, a chemical explosion occurred in one of the Mayak facility's nuclear waste storage tank, spreading 740 PBq of radiation over a 23,000-km{sup 2} area. To determine a present contamination of the territory of Kamensk region of Sverdlovsk Oblast, soil samples at 315 locations were collected and analyzed in the course of the field campaign of 1993 and 1994. It was found that a distribution of Sr-90 activity in soil samples is a distribution with 'heavy tail'. Analysis of a histogram representing its frequency distribution and plotting this histogram on doubly logarithmic axes allows to conjecture that this distribution follows the power low. Testing of the power-low hypothesis provided objective evidence that the power-low is a reasonable description of the data. In this case a conclusion follows that radioactive contamination levels of the territory are not well characterized by their averages. (author)

  16. DeBeNe Test Facilities for Fast Breeder Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storz, R.

    1980-10-01

    This report gives an overview and a short description of the test facilities constructed and operated within the collaboration for fast breeder development in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands. The facilities are grouped into Sodium Loops (Large Facilities and Laboratory Loops), Special Equipment including Hot Cells and Reprocessing, Test Facilities without Sodium, Zero Power Facilities and In-pile Loops including Irradiation Facilities

  17. Report on design and technical standard planning of vibration controlling structure on the buildings, in the Tokai Reprocessing Facility, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uryu, Mitsuru; Terada, Shuji; Shinohara, Takaharu; Yamazaki, Toshihiko; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Toshinari; Hosoya, Hisashi

    1997-10-01

    The Tokai reprocessing facility buildings are constituted by a lower foundation, vibration controlling layers, and upper structure. At the vibration controlling layer, a laminated rubber aiming support of the building load and extension of the eigenfrequency and a damper aiming absorption of earthquake energy are provided. Of course, the facility buildings are directly supported at the arenaceous shale (Taga Layer) of the Miocene in the Neogene confirmed to the stablest ground, as well the buildings with high vibration resistant importance in Japan. This report shows that when the vibration controlling structure is adopted for the reprocessing facility buildings where such high vibration resistance is required, reduction of input acceleration for equipments and pipings can be achieved and the earthquake resistant safety can also be maintained with sufficient tolerance and reliability. (G.K.)

  18. Animal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Angerman, J.M.; Keenan, W.G.; Linsley, J.G.; Poole, C.M.; Sallese, A.; Simkins, R.C.; Tolle, D.

    1981-01-01

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60 Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60 Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  19. Facilities inventory protection for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The fact that shut-down applications have been filed for nuclear power plants, suggests to have a scrutinizing look at the scopes of assessment and decision available to administrations and courts for the protection of facilities inventories relative to legal and constitutional requirements. The paper outlines the legal bases which need to be observed if purposeful calculation is to be ensured. Based on the different actual conditions and legal consequences, the author distinguishes between 1) the legal situation of facilities licenced already and 2) the legal situation of facilities under planning during the licencing stage. As indicated by the contents and restrictions of the pertinent provisions of the Atomic Energy Act and by the corresponding compensatory regulation, the object of the protection of facilities inventor in the legal position of the facility owner within the purview of the Atomic Energy Act, and the licensing proper. Art. 17 of the Atomic Energy Act indicates the legislators intent that, once issued, the licence will be the pivotal point for regulations aiming at protection and intervention. (orig./HSCH) [de

  20. Analysis of output power and capacity reduction in electrical storage facilities by peak shift control of PV system with bifacial modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Shin’ya; Konno, Daisuke; Utsugi, Yuta; Morel, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Characteristics of a large-scale power plant using bifacial solar cell is described. • Conversion efficiency of bifacial photovoltaics obtained using 3D-CAD modeling. • Power supply of bifacial PV can be matched with demand by adjusting the orientation. - Abstract: Bifacial photovoltaics are widely investigated with the aim of reducing the amount of silicon used and increasing conversion efficiencies. The output power of bifacial photovoltaics depends on the quantity of solar radiation incident on the reverse face. Furthermore, controlling the orientation can distribute the times of peak power output in the morning and afternoon to better match the demand. In this study, the demand patterns of individual houses or the whole Hokkaido region were analyzed assuming the substitution of a conventional large-scale electric power system with one using bifacial photovoltaics. The supply–demand balances and electrical storage capacities were investigated. When comparing a large scale solar power plant (mega-solar power plant) using monofacial photovoltaics or vertical bifacial photovoltaics (in which the orientation could be adjusted), the supply–demand could be better balanced for individual houses in the latter case, thereby allowing the storage capacity to be reduced. A bifacial solar module was modeled by 3D-CAD (three dimensional computer aided design) and thermal fluid analysis. The module temperature distribution of bifacial photovoltaics was calculated with respect to the environmental conditions (wind flow, direct and diffuse solar radiation, etc.) and internal heat generation, as well as the orientation of the solar panels. Furthermore, the output power of bifacial photovoltaics can be easily obtained from the analysis result of modular temperature distribution and the relation between temperature and output power