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Sample records for potential mechanism-based inactivation

  1. Design and mechanism of tetrahydrothiophene-based γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase inactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hoang V; Hawker, Dustin D; Wu, Rui; Doud, Emma; Widom, Julia; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Liu, Dali; Kelleher, Neil L; Silverman, Richard B

    2015-04-08

    Low levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of two major neurotransmitters that regulate brain neuronal activity, are associated with many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and cocaine addiction. One of the main methods to raise the GABA level in human brain is to use small molecules that cross the blood-brain barrier and inhibit the activity of γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), the enzyme that degrades GABA. We have designed a series of conformationally restricted tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA analogues with a properly positioned leaving group that could facilitate a ring-opening mechanism, leading to inactivation of GABA-AT. One compound in the series is 8 times more efficient an inactivator of GABA-AT than vigabatrin, the only FDA-approved inactivator of GABA-AT. Our mechanistic studies show that the compound inactivates GABA-AT by a new mechanism. The metabolite resulting from inactivation does not covalently bind to amino acid residues of GABA-AT but stays in the active site via H-bonding interactions with Arg-192, a π-π interaction with Phe-189, and a weak nonbonded S···O═C interaction with Glu-270, thereby inactivating the enzyme.

  2. Design and Mechanism of Tetrahydrothiophene-Based γ-Aminobutyric Acid Aminotransferase Inactivators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Hoang V. [Departments; Hawker, Dustin D. [Departments; Wu, Rui [Department; Doud, Emma [Departments; Widom, Julia [Departments; Sanishvili, Ruslan [X-ray; Liu, Dali [Department; Kelleher, Neil L. [Departments; Silverman, Richard B. [Departments

    2015-03-25

    Low levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of two major neurotransmitters that regulate brain neuronal activity, are associated with many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease, Huntingtons disease, and cocaine addiction. One of the main methods to raise the GABA level in human brain is to use small molecules that cross the bloodbrain barrier and inhibit the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), the enzyme that degrades GABA. We have designed a series of conformationally restricted tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA analogues with a properly positioned leaving group that could facilitate a ring-opening mechanism, leading to inactivation of GABA-AT. One compound in the series is 8 times more efficient an inactivator of GABA-AT than vigabatrin, the only FDA-approved inactivator of GABA-AT. Our mechanistic studies show that the compound inactivates GABA-AT by a new mechanism. The metabolite resulting from inactivation does not covalently bind to amino acid residues of GABA-AT but stays in the active site via H-bonding interactions with Arg-192, a pi-pi interaction with Phe-189, and a weak nonbonded (SO)-O-...=C interaction with Glu-270, thereby inactivating the enzyme.

  3. Mechanism-based Enzyme Inactivators of Phytosterol Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. David Nes

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Current progress on the mechanism and substrate recognition by sterol methyl transferase (SMT, the role of mechanism-based inactivators, other inhibitors of SMT action to probe catalysis and phytosterol synthesis is reported. SMT is a membrane-bound enzyme which catalyzes the coupled C-methylation-deprotonation reaction of sterol acceptor molecules generating the 24-alkyl sterol side chains of fungal ergosterol and plant sitosterol. This C-methylation step can be rate-limiting in the post-lanosterol (fungal or post-cycloartenol (plant pathways. A series of sterol analogs designed to impair SMT activity irreversibly have provided deep insight into the C-methylation reaction and topography of the SMT active site and as reviewed provide leads for the development of antifungal agents.

  4. Mechanism of bacterial inactivation by (+-limonene and its potential use in food preservation combined processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Espina

    Full Text Available This work explores the bactericidal effect of (+-limonene, the major constituent of citrus fruits' essential oils, against E. coli. The degree of E. coli BJ4 inactivation achieved by (+-limonene was influenced by the pH of the treatment medium, being more bactericidal at pH 4.0 than at pH 7.0. Deletion of rpoS and exposure to a sub-lethal heat or an acid shock did not modify E. coli BJ4 resistance to (+-limonene. However, exposure to a sub-lethal cold shock decreased its resistance to (+-limonene. Although no sub-lethal injury was detected in the cell envelopes after exposure to (+-limonene by the selective-plating technique, the uptake of propidium iodide by inactivated E. coli BJ4 cells pointed out these structures as important targets in the mechanism of action. Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared Microspectroscopy (ATR-IRMS allowed identification of altered E. coli BJ4 structures after (+-limonene treatments as a function of the treatment pH: β-sheet proteins at pH 4.0 and phosphodiester bonds at pH 7.0. The increased sensitivity to (+-limonene observed at pH 4.0 in an E. coli MC4100 lptD4213 mutant with an increased outer membrane permeability along with the identification of altered β-sheet proteins by ATR-IRMS indicated the importance of this structure in the mechanism of action of (+-limonene. The study of mechanism of inactivation by (+-limonene led to the design of a synergistic combined process with heat for the inactivation of the pathogen E. coli O157:H7 in fruit juices. These results show the potential of (+-limonene in food preservation, either acting alone or in combination with lethal heat treatments.

  5. Mechanism of Bacterial Inactivation by (+)-Limonene and Its Potential Use in Food Preservation Combined Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espina, Laura; Gelaw, Tilahun K.; de Lamo-Castellví, Sílvia; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the bactericidal effect of (+)-limonene, the major constituent of citrus fruits' essential oils, against E. coli. The degree of E. coli BJ4 inactivation achieved by (+)-limonene was influenced by the pH of the treatment medium, being more bactericidal at pH 4.0 than at pH 7.0. Deletion of rpoS and exposure to a sub-lethal heat or an acid shock did not modify E. coli BJ4 resistance to (+)-limonene. However, exposure to a sub-lethal cold shock decreased its resistance to (+)-limonene. Although no sub-lethal injury was detected in the cell envelopes after exposure to (+)-limonene by the selective-plating technique, the uptake of propidium iodide by inactivated E. coli BJ4 cells pointed out these structures as important targets in the mechanism of action. Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared Microspectroscopy (ATR-IRMS) allowed identification of altered E. coli BJ4 structures after (+)-limonene treatments as a function of the treatment pH: β-sheet proteins at pH 4.0 and phosphodiester bonds at pH 7.0. The increased sensitivity to (+)-limonene observed at pH 4.0 in an E. coli MC4100 lptD4213 mutant with an increased outer membrane permeability along with the identification of altered β-sheet proteins by ATR-IRMS indicated the importance of this structure in the mechanism of action of (+)-limonene. The study of mechanism of inactivation by (+)-limonene led to the design of a synergistic combined process with heat for the inactivation of the pathogen E. coli O157:H7 in fruit juices. These results show the potential of (+)-limonene in food preservation, either acting alone or in combination with lethal heat treatments. PMID:23424676

  6. Use of isotope effects to characterize intermediates in mechanism-based inactivation of dopamine beta-monooxygenase by beta-chlorophenethylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossard, M.J.; Klinman, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    A mechanism for beta-chlorophenethylamine inhibition of dopamine beta-monooxygenase has been postulated in which bound alpha-aminoacetophenone is generated followed by an intramolecular redox reaction to yield a ketone-derived radical cation as the inhibitory species. Based on the assumption that the ketone radical is the inhibitory intermediate, an analogous system was predicted and verified. In the present study, the role of alpha-aminoacetophenone as the proposed intermediate in the inactivation by beta-chlorophenethylamine was examined in greater detail. From the interdependence of tyramine and alpha-aminoacetophenone concentrations, ketone inactivation is concluded to occur at the substrate site as opposed to potential binding at the reductant-binding site. Using beta-[2-1H]- and beta-[2-2H]chlorophenethylamine, the magnitude of the deuterium isotope effect on inactivation under second-order conditions has been found to be identical to that observed under catalytic turnover, D(kappa inact/Ki) = D(kappa cat/Km) = 6-7. By contrast, the isotope effect on inactivation under conditions of substrate and oxygen saturation, D kappa inact = 2, is 3-fold smaller than that seen on catalytic turnover, D kappa cat = 6. This reduced isotope effect for inactivation is attributed to a normal isotope effect on substrate hydroxylation followed by an inverse isotope effect on the partitioning of the enol of alpha-aminoacetophenone between oxidation to a radical cation versus protonation to regenerate ketone. These findings are unusual in that two isotopically sensitive steps are present in the inactivation pathway whereas only one is observable in turnover

  7. Mechanism of inactivation of γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase by (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylene-1-cyclopentanoic acid (CPP-115).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunbeom; Doud, Emma H; Wu, Rui; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Juncosa, Jose I; Liu, Dali; Kelleher, Neil L; Silverman, Richard B

    2015-02-25

    γ-Aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that degrades GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian cells. When the concentration of GABA falls below a threshold level, convulsions can occur. Inhibition of GABA-AT raises GABA levels in the brain, which can terminate seizures as well as have potential therapeutic applications in treating other neurological disorders, including drug addiction. Among the analogues that we previously developed, (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylene-1-cyclopentanoic acid (CPP-115) showed 187 times greater potency than that of vigabatrin, a known inactivator of GABA-AT and approved drug (Sabril) for the treatment of infantile spasms and refractory adult epilepsy. Recently, CPP-115 was shown to have no adverse effects in a Phase I clinical trial. Here we report a novel inactivation mechanism for CPP-115, a mechanism-based inactivator that undergoes GABA-AT-catalyzed hydrolysis of the difluoromethylene group to a carboxylic acid with concomitant loss of two fluoride ions and coenzyme conversion to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP). The partition ratio for CPP-115 with GABA-AT is about 2000, releasing cyclopentanone-2,4-dicarboxylate (22) and two other precursors of this compound (20 and 21). Time-dependent inactivation occurs by a conformational change induced by the formation of the aldimine of 4-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid and PMP (20), which disrupts an electrostatic interaction between Glu270 and Arg445 to form an electrostatic interaction between Arg445 and the newly formed carboxylate produced by hydrolysis of the difluoromethylene group in CPP-115, resulting in a noncovalent, tightly bound complex. This represents a novel mechanism for inactivation of GABA-AT and a new approach for the design of mechanism-based inactivators in general.

  8. Nanoscale Structural and Mechanical Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Spores Inactivated with Rapid Dry Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, Daniel L.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2014-01-01

    Effective killing of Bacillus anthracis spores is of paramount importance to antibioterrorism, food safety, environmental protection, and the medical device industry. Thus, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of spore resistance and inactivation is highly desired for developing new strategies or improving the known methods for spore destruction. Previous studies have shown that spore inactivation mechanisms differ considerably depending upon the killing agents, such as heat (wet heat, dry heat), UV, ionizing radiation, and chemicals. It is believed that wet heat kills spores by inactivating critical enzymes, while dry heat kills spores by damaging their DNA. Many studies have focused on the biochemical aspects of spore inactivation by dry heat; few have investigated structural damages and changes in spore mechanical properties. In this study, we have inactivated Bacillus anthracis spores with rapid dry heating and performed nanoscale topographical and mechanical analysis of inactivated spores using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in spore morphology and nanomechanical properties after heat inactivation. In addition, we also found that these changes were different under different heating conditions that produced similar inactivation probabilities (high temperature for short exposure time versus low temperature for long exposure time). We attributed the differences to the differential thermal and mechanical stresses in the spore. The buildup of internal thermal and mechanical stresses may become prominent only in ultrafast, high-temperature heat inactivation when the experimental timescale is too short for heat-generated vapor to efficiently escape from the spore. Our results thus provide direct, visual evidences of the importance of thermal stresses and heat and mass transfer to spore inactivation by very rapid dry heating. PMID:24375142

  9. Mechanism-based inactivation of benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase by aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, L.S.; Lu, J.Y.L.; Alworth, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins have been examined as substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxgenases in liver microsomes from 5,6-benzoflavone or phenobarbital pretreated rats. 1-Ethynylpyrene, 3-ethynylperylene, 2-ethynylfluorene, methyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene, cis- and trans-1-(2-bromovinyl)pyrene, and 1-allylpyrene serve as mechanism-based irreversible inactivators (suicide inhibitors) of benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, while 1-vinylpyrene and phenyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene do not cause a detectable suicide inhibition of benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase. The mechanism-based loss of benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase caused by the aryl acetylenes is not accompanied by a corresponding loss of the P-450 content of the microsomes (suicide destruction). The suicide inhibition by these aryl acetylenes therefore does not involve covalent binding to the heme moiety of the monooxygenase. Nevertheless, in the presence of NADPH, 3 H-labeled 1-ethynylpyrene becomes covalently attached to the cytochrome P-450 protein; the measured stoichiometry of binding is one 1-ethynylpyrene per P-450 heme unit. The authors conclude that the inhibition of benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase produced by 1-ethynylpyrene may be related to the mechanism of suicide inhibition of P-450 activity by chloramphenicol rather than the mechanism of suicide destruction of P-450 previously described for acetylene and propyne

  10. Enteric virus removal inactivation by coal-based media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.; Chaudhuri, M. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-02-01

    Four coal-based media, viz. alum-pretreated or ferric hydroxide-impregnated Giridih bituminous coal and lignite (alum-GBC, Fe-GBC; alum-lignite and Fe-Lignite) were laboratory tested to assess their potential in removing/inactivating enteric viruses in water. Batch-sorption screening tests, employing a poliovirus-spiked canal water, indicated high poliovirus sorption by Fe-GBC and alum-GBC in a short contact time of 5 min. Based on the results of further batch-sorption tests, using silver incorporated media (alum/Ag-GBC, alum-GBC-Ag and Fe-GBC-Ag), as well as aesthetic water quality consideration and previous findings on removal of coliforms and turbidity, alum/Ag-GBC, alum-GBC and alum-GBC-AG were included in downflow column studies employing poliovirus-spiked canal water. All three media showed potential in removing/inactivating enteric viruses. In a separate column study employing a joint challenge of poliovirus and rotavirus, alum/Ag-GBC removed 59.3-86.5% of the viruses along with more than 99% reduction in indigenous heterotrophic bacteria. Alum/silver-pretreated bituminous coal medium appears promising for use in household water filters in rural areas of the developing world. However, improved medium preparation to further enhance its efficiency is needed; also, its efficacy in removing/inactivating indigenous enteric bacteria, viruses and protozoa has to be ensured and practicalities or economics of application need to be considered.

  11. Basolateral amygdala inactivation impairs learning-induced long-term potentiation in the cerebellar cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhu

    Full Text Available Learning to fear dangerous situations requires the participation of basolateral amygdala (BLA. In the present study, we provide evidence that BLA is necessary for the synaptic strengthening occurring during memory formation in the cerebellum in rats. In the cerebellar vermis the parallel fibers (PF to Purkinje cell (PC synapse is potentiated one day following fear learning. Pretraining BLA inactivation impaired such a learning-induced long-term potentiation (LTP. Similarly, cerebellar LTP is affected when BLA is blocked shortly, but not 6 h, after training. The latter result shows that the effects of BLA inactivation on cerebellar plasticity, when present, are specifically related to memory processes and not due to an interference with sensory or motor functions. These data indicate that fear memory induces cerebellar LTP provided that a heterosynaptic input coming from BLA sets the proper local conditions. Therefore, in the cerebellum, learning-induced plasticity is a heterosynaptic phenomenon that requires inputs from other regions. Studies employing the electrically-induced LTP in order to clarify the cellular mechanisms of memory should therefore take into account the inputs arriving from other brain sites, considering them as integrative units. Based on previous and the present findings, we proposed that BLA enables learning-related plasticity to be formed in the cerebellum in order to respond appropriately to new stimuli or situations.

  12. Impaired Inactivation of L-Type Ca2+ Current as a Potential Mechanism for Variable Arrhythmogenic Liability of HERG K+ Channel Blocking Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Gon Kim

    Full Text Available The proarrhythmic effects of new drugs have been assessed by measuring rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K+ current (IKr antagonist potency. However, recent data suggest that even drugs thought to be highly specific IKr blockers can be arrhythmogenic via a separate, time-dependent pathway such as late Na+ current augmentation. Here, we report a mechanism for a quinolone antibiotic, sparfloxacin-induced action potential duration (APD prolongation that involves increase in late L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL caused by a decrease in Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI. Acute exposure to sparfloxacin, an IKr blocker with prolongation of QT interval and torsades de pointes (TdP produced a significant APD prolongation in rat ventricular myocytes, which lack IKr due to E4031 pretreatment. Sparfloxacin reduced peak ICaL but increased late ICaL by slowing its inactivation. In contrast, ketoconazole, an IKr blocker without prolongation of QT interval and TdP produced reduction of both peak and late ICaL, suggesting the role of increased late ICaL in arrhythmogenic effect. Further analysis showed that sparfloxacin reduced CDI. Consistently, replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Ba2+ abolished the sparfloxacin effects on ICaL. In addition, sparfloxacin modulated ICaL in a use-dependent manner. Cardiomyocytes from adult mouse, which is lack of native IKr, demonstrated similar increase in late ICaL and afterdepolarizations. The present findings show that sparfloxacin can prolong APD by augmenting late ICaL. Thus, drugs that cause delayed ICaL inactivation and IKr blockage may have more adverse effects than those that selectively block IKr. This mechanism may explain the reason for discrepancies between clinically reported proarrhythmic effects and IKr antagonist potencies.

  13. [Mechanism of action of neurotoxins acting on the inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, E

    1998-01-01

    This review focuses on the mechanism(s) of action of neurotoxins acting on the inactivation of voltage-gated Na channels. Na channels are transmembrane proteins which are fundamental for cellular communication. These proteins form pores in the plasma membrane allowing passive ionic movements to occur. Their opening and closing are controlled by gating systems which depend on both membrane potential and time. Na channels have three functional properties, mainly studied using electrophysiological and biochemical techniques, to ensure their role in the generation and propagation of action potentials: 1) a highly selectivity for Na ions, 2) a rapid opening ("activation"), responsible for the depolarizing phase of the action potential, and 3) a late closing ("inactivation") involved in the repolarizing phase of the action potential. As an essential protein for membrane excitability, the Na channel is the specific target of a number of vegetal and animal toxins which, by binding to the channel, alter its activity by affecting one or more of its properties. At least six toxin receptor sites have been identified on the neuronal Na channel on the basis of binding studies. However, only toxins interacting with four of these sites (sites 2, 3, 5 et 6) produce alterations of channel inactivation. The maximal percentage of Na channels modified by the binding of neurotoxins to sites 2 (batrachotoxin and some alkaloids), 3 (alpha-scorpion and sea anemone toxins), 5 (brevetoxins and ciguatoxins) et 6 (delta-conotoxins) is different according to the site considered. However, in all cases, these channels do not inactivate. Moreover, Na channels modified by toxins which bind to sites 2, 5 and 6 activate at membrane potentials more negative than do unmodified channels. The physiological consequences of Na channel modifications, induced by the binding of neurotoxins to sites 2, 3, 5 and 6, are (i) an inhibition of cellular excitability due to an important membrane depolarization (site

  14. Mechanism of Inactivation of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Aminotransferase by (1 S ,3 S )-3-Amino-4-difluoromethylene-1-cyclopentanoic Acid (CPP-115)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunbeom [Department; Doud, Emma H. [Department; Department; Wu, Rui [Department; Sanishvili, Ruslan [X-ray; Juncosa, Jose I. [Department; Liu, Dali [Department; Kelleher, Neil L. [Department; Department; Silverman, Richard B. [Department; Department

    2015-02-10

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that degrades GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian cells. When the concentration of GABA falls below a threshold level, convulsions can occur. Inhibition of GABA-AT raises GABA levels in the brain, which can terminate seizures as well as have potential therapeutic applications in treating other neurological disorders, including drug addiction. Among the analogues that we previously developed, (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylene-1-cyclopentanoic acid (CPP-115) showed 187 times greater potency than that of vigabatrin, a known inactivator of GABA-AT and approved drug (Sabril) for the treatment of infantile spasms and refractory adult epilepsy. Recently, CPP-115 was shown to have no adverse effects in a Phase I clinical trial. Here we report a novel inactivation mechanism for CPP-115, a mechanism-based inactivator that undergoes GABA-AT-catalyzed hydrolysis of the difluoromethylene group to a carboxylic acid with concomitant loss of two fluoride ions and coenzyme conversion to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP). The partition ratio for CPP-115 with GABA-AT is about 2000, releasing cyclopentanone-2,4-dicarboxylate (22) and two other precursors of this compound (20 and 21). Time-dependent inactivation occurs by a conformational change induced by the formation of the aldimine of 4-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid and PMP (20), which disrupts an electrostatic interaction between Glu270 and Arg445 to form an electrostatic interaction between Arg445 and the newly formed carboxylate produced by hydrolysis of the difluoromethylene group in CPP-115, resulting in a noncovalent, tightly bound complex. This represents a novel mechanism for inactivation of GABA-AT and a new approach for the design of mechanism-based inactivators in general.

  15. Microbial electrolytic disinfection process for highly efficient Escherichia coli inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Shaofeng; Huang, Shaobin; Li, Xiaohu

    2018-01-01

    extensively studied for recalcitrant organics removal, its application potential towards water disinfection (e.g., inactivation of pathogens) is still unknown. This study investigated the inactivation of Escherichia coli in a microbial electrolysis cell based bio-electro-Fenton system (renamed as microbial......Water quality deterioration caused by a wide variety of recalcitrant organics and pathogenic microorganisms has become a serious concern worldwide. Bio-electro-Fenton systems have been considered as cost-effective and highly efficient water treatment platform technology. While it has been......]OH was identified as one potential mechanism for disinfection. This study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of bio-electro-Fenton process for pathogens inactivation, which offers insight for the future development of sustainable, efficient, and cost-effective biological water treatment technology....

  16. Mycobacteria inactivation using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; McDevitt, James; Gao, Ya; Branco, Alan; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Lemos, Bernardo; Nardell, Edward; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Airborne transmitted pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) cause serious, often fatal infectious disease with enormous global health implications. Due to their unique cell wall and slow growth, mycobacteria are among the most resilient microbial forms. Herein we evaluate the ability of an emerging, chemical-free, nanotechnology-based method to inactivate M. parafortuitum (Mtb surrogate). This method is based on the transformation of atmospheric water vapor into engineered water nano-structures (EWNS) via electrospray. We demonstrate that the EWNS can interact with and inactivate airborne mycobacteria, reducing their concentration levels significantly. Additionally, EWNS can inactivate M. parafortuitum on surfaces eight times faster than the control. The mechanism of mycobacteria inactivation was also investigated in this study. It was demonstrated that the EWNS effectively deliver the reactive oxygen species, encapsulated during the electrospray process, to the bacteria oxidizing their cell membrane resulting into inactivation. Overall, this is a method with the potential to become an effective intervention technology in the battle against airborne infections. This study demonstrates the feasibility of mycobacterium inactivation in airborne form or on contact surfaces using electrospray activated water nano-structures. Given that the method is free of toxic chemicals, this might become an important tool in the prevention of mycobacterial infections, which are notoriously hard to treat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Theoretical studies on the inactivation mechanism of γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, A T; Gökcan, H; Konuklar, F A S

    2011-07-21

    The inactivation mechanism of γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) in the presence of γ-vinyl-aminobutyric acid, an anti-epilepsy drug, has been studied by means of theoretical calculations. Density functional theory methods have been applied to compare the three experimentally proposed inactivation mechanisms (Silverman et al., J. Biol. Chem., 2004, 279, 363). All the calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Single point solvent calculations were carried out in water, by means of an integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEFPCM) at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. The present calculations provide an insight into the mechanistic preferences of the inactivation reaction of GABA-AT. The results also allow us to elucidate the key factors behind the mechanistic preferences. The computations also confirm the importance of explicit water molecules around the reacting center in the proton transfer steps.

  18. Imprinted X chromosome inactivation: evolution of mechanisms in distantly related mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafagh A. Waters

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI ensures transcriptional silencing of one of the two Xs (either in a random or imprinted fashion in somatic cells. Comparing this silencing between species has offered insight into different mechanisms of X inactivation, providing clues into the evolution of this epigenetic process in mammals. Long-noncoding RNAs have emerged as a common theme in XCI of therian mammals (eutherian and marsupial. Eutherian X inactivation is regulated by the noncoding RNA product of XIST, within a cis-acting master control region called the X inactivation center (XIC. Marsupials XCI is XIST independent. Instead, XCI is controlled by the long-noncoding RNA Rsx, which appears to be a functional analog of the eutherian XIST gene, insofar that its transcript coats the inactive X and represses activity of genes in cis. In this review we discuss XCI in eutherians, and contrast imprinted X inactivation in mouse and marsupials. We provide particular focus on the evolution of genomic elements that confer the unique epigenetic features that characterize the inactive X chromosome.

  19. Mechanism-based inactivation of CYP2C8 by gemfibrozil occurs rapidly in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkalammi, J; Niemi, M; Neuvonen, P J; Backman, J T

    2011-04-01

    To study the time to onset of mechanism-based inactivation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8 by gemfibrozil in vivo, we conducted a randomized five-phase crossover study in 10 healthy volunteers. In one phase the volunteers ingested 0.25 mg of repaglinide alone (control), and in the other phases they received 600 mg of gemfibrozil 0-6 h prior to the repaglinide dose. When gemfibrozil was taken 0, 1, 3, or 6 h before repaglinide, the geometric mean ratio relative to control (90% confidence interval (CI)) of repaglinide area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-∞)) was 5.0-fold (4.3-5.7-fold), 6.3-fold (5.4-7.5-fold), 6.6-fold (5.6-7.7-fold), and 5.4-fold (4.8-6.1-fold), respectively (P gemfibrozil dosing, has implications in clinical practice and in studies with gemfibrozil as a CYP2C8 model inhibitor.

  20. Biophysical mechanism of cell inactivation by ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokajicek, M.

    1986-12-01

    In radiobiological mechanism it is possible to distinguish the sequence of three different phases which can be denoted as physical, physico-chemical and biological. Mathematical models of the individual phases and their mutual interrelations are discussed. A special accent is given to the relation between the models of two non-biological phases and that of the biological one. Some detailed characteristics concerning DSB formation and repair and inactivation mechanisms in cells are analyzed with the help of the considered model chain. (author). 39 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  1. Electron beam inactivation of Tulane virus on fresh produce, and mechanism of inactivation of human norovirus surrogates by electron beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predmore, Ashley; Sanglay, Gabriel C; DiCaprio, Erin; Li, Jianrong; Uribe, R M; Lee, Ken

    2015-04-02

    Ionizing radiation, whether by electron beams or gamma rays, is a non-thermal processing technique used to improve the microbial safety and shelf-life of many different food products. This technology is highly effective against bacterial pathogens, but data on its effect against foodborne viruses is limited. A mechanism of viral inactivation has been proposed with gamma irradiation, but no published study discloses a mechanism for electron beam (e-beam). This study had three distinct goals: 1) evaluate the sensitivity of a human norovirus surrogate, Tulane virus (TV), to e-beam irradiation in foods, 2) compare the difference in sensitivity of TV and murine norovirus (MNV-1) to e-beam irradiation, and 3) determine the mechanism of inactivation of these two viruses by e-beam irradiation. TV was reduced from 7 log10 units to undetectable levels at target doses of 16 kGy or higher in two food matrices (strawberries and lettuce). MNV-1 was more resistant to e-beam treatment than TV. At target doses of 4 kGy, e-beam provided a 1.6 and 1.2 log reduction of MNV-1 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), compared to a 1.5 and 1.8 log reduction of TV in PBS and Opti-MEM, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that increased e-beam doses negatively affected the structure of both viruses. Analysis of viral proteins by SDS-PAGE found that irradiation also degraded viral proteins. Using RT-PCR, irradiation was shown to degrade viral genomic RNA. This suggests that the mechanism of inactivation of e-beam was likely the same as gamma irradiation as the damage to viral constituents led to inactivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanism of Cd2+-coordination during Slow Inactivation in Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, H.; Cordero-Morales, Julio F.; Jogini, Vishwanath; Pan, Albert C.; Kollewe, Astrid; Roux, Benoît; Perozo, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Summary In K+ channels, rearrangements of the pore outer-vestibule have been associated with C-type inactivation gating. Paradoxically, the crystal structure of Open/C-type inactivated KcsA suggest these movements to be modest in magnitude. Here, we show that under physiological conditions, the KcsA outer-vestibule undergoes relatively large dynamic rearrangements upon inactivation. External Cd2+ enhances the rate of C-type inactivation in an outer-vestibule cysteine mutant (Y82C) via metal-bridge formation. This effect is not present in a non-inactivating mutant (E71A/Y82C). Tandem dimer and tandem tetramer constructs of equivalent cysteine mutants in KcsA and Shaker K+ channels demonstrate that these Cd2+ metal bridges are formed only between adjacent subunits. This is well supported by molecular dynamics simulations. Based on the crystal structure of Cd2+-bound Y82C-KcsA in the closed state, together with EPR distance measurements in the KcsA outer-vestibule, we suggest that subunits must dynamically come in close proximity as the channels undergo inactivation. PMID:22771214

  3. A molecular switch driving inactivation in the cardiac K+ channel HERG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Köpfer

    Full Text Available K(+ channels control transmembrane action potentials by gating open or closed in response to external stimuli. Inactivation gating, involving a conformational change at the K(+ selectivity filter, has recently been recognized as a major K(+ channel regulatory mechanism. In the K(+ channel hERG, inactivation controls the length of the human cardiac action potential. Mutations impairing hERG inactivation cause life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia, which also occur as undesired side effects of drugs. In this paper, we report atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, complemented by mutational and electrophysiological studies, which suggest that the selectivity filter adopts a collapsed conformation in the inactivated state of hERG. The selectivity filter is gated by an intricate hydrogen bond network around residues S620 and N629. Mutations of this hydrogen bond network are shown to cause inactivation deficiency in electrophysiological measurements. In addition, drug-related conformational changes around the central cavity and pore helix provide a functional mechanism for newly discovered hERG activators.

  4. Revealing mechanisms of selective, concentration-dependent potentials of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal to induce apoptosis in cancer cells through inactivation of membrane-associated catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling by the expression of membrane-associated catalase. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a versatile second messenger generated during lipid peroxidation, has been shown to induce apoptosis selectively in malignant cells. The findings described in this paper reveal the strong, concentration-dependent potential of 4-HNE to specifically inactivate extracellular catalase of tumor cells both indirectly and directly and to consequently trigger apoptosis in malignant cells through superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Namely, 4-HNE caused apoptosis selectively in NOX1-expressing tumor cells through inactivation of their membrane-associated catalase, thus reactivating subsequent intercellular signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and HOCl pathways, followed by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Concentrations of 4-HNE of 1.2 µM and higher directly inactivated membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells, whereas at lower concentrations, 4-HNE triggered a complex amplificatory pathway based on initial singlet oxygen formation through H2O2 and peroxynitrite interaction. Singlet-oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8 increased superoxide anion generation by NOX1 and amplification of singlet oxygen generation, which allowed singlet-oxygen-dependent inactivation of catalase. 4-HNE and singlet oxygen cooperate in complex autoamplificatory loops during this process. The finding of these novel anticancer pathways may be useful for understanding the role of 4-HNE in the control of malignant cells and for the optimization of ROS-dependent therapeutic approaches including antioxidant treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential mechanism of Escherichia coli Inactivation by (+)-limonene as a function of cell physiological state and drug's concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    (+)-limonene is a lipophilic antimicrobial compound, extracted from citrus fruits' essential oils, that is used as a flavouring agent and organic solvent by the food industry. A recent study has proposed a common and controversial mechanism of cell death for bactericidal antibiotics, in which hydroxyl radicals ultimately inactivated cells. Our objective was to determine whether the mechanism of Escherichia coli MG1655 inactivation by (+)-limonene follows that of bactericidal antibiotics. A treatment with 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene inactivated 4 log10 cycles of exponentially growing E. coli cells in 3 hours. On one hand, an increase of cell survival in the ΔacnB mutant (deficient in a TCA cycle enzyme), or in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl (inhibitor of Fenton reaction by iron chelation), thiourea, or cysteamine (hydroxyl radical scavengers) was observed. Moreover, the ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) was more sensitive to (+)-limonene. Thus, this indirect evidence indicates that the mechanism of exponentially growing E. coli cells inactivation by 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene is due to the TCA cycle and Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical formation that caused oxidative DNA damage, as observed for bactericidal drugs. However, several differences have been observed between the proposed mechanism for bactericidal drugs and for (+)-limonene. In this regard, our results demonstrated that E. coli inactivation was influenced by its physiological state and the drug's concentration: experiments with stationary-phase cells or 4,000 μL/L (+)-limonene uncovered a different mechanism of cell death, likely unrelated to hydroxyl radicals. Our research has also shown that drug's concentration is an important factor influencing the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by antibiotics, such as kanamycin. These results might help in improving and spreading the use of (+)-limonene as an antimicrobial compound, and in clarifying the controversy about

  6. Neutralization of Aerosolized Bio-Agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Bio -agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation Mechanisms Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...of Cincinnati Project Title: Neutralization of Aerosolized Bio -agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation...fire ball, where they will not effectively interact with any viable bio -aerosol. 1.1.4. Conclusions Cryo-milling is necessary to achieve a

  7. Mechanism-based inactivation of cytochrome P-450 dependent benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase activity by acetylenic and olefinic polycyclic arylhydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    A series of aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins have been examined as substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenases in liver microsomes from 5,6-benzoflavone or phenobarbital pretreated rats. 1-Ethynylpyrene (EP), 3-ethynylperylene (EPL), cis- and trans-1-(2-bromo-vinyl)pyrene (c-BVP and t-BVP), and 1-allylpyrene (AP) serve as mechanism-based irreversible inactivators (suicide inhibitors) of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) hydroxylase, while 1-vinyl-pyrene (VP) and phenyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene (PPA) do not cause a detectable suicide inhibition of the BP hydroxylase. The mechanism-based loss of BP hydroxylase activity caused by the aryl acetylenes is not accompanied by a corresponding loss of the P-450 content of the microsomes. In the presence of NADPH, 3 H-labeled EP covalently attached to P-450 isozymes with a measured stoichiometry of one mole of EP per mole of the P-450 heme. The results of the effects of these aryl derivatives in the mammalian cell-mediated mutagenesis assay and toxicity assay show that none of the compounds examined nor any of the their metabolites produced in the incubation system are cytotoxic to V79 cells

  8. Inactivation of Mechanically Activated Piezo1 Ion Channels Is Determined by the C-Terminal Extracellular Domain and the Inner Pore Helix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezo proteins form mechanically activated ion channels that are responsible for our sense of light touch, proprioception, and vascular blood flow. Upon activation by mechanical stimuli, Piezo channels rapidly inactivate in a voltage-dependent manner through an unknown mechanism. Inactivation of Piezo channels is physiologically important, as it modulates overall mechanical sensitivity, gives rise to frequency filtering of repetitive mechanical stimuli, and is itself the target of numerous human disease-related channelopathies that are not well understood mechanistically. Here, we identify the globular C-terminal extracellular domain as a structure that is sufficient to confer the time course of inactivation and a single positively charged lysine residue at the adjacent inner pore helix as being required for its voltage dependence. Our results are consistent with a mechanism for inactivation that is mediated through voltage-dependent conformations of the inner pore helix and allosteric coupling with the C-terminal extracellular domain.

  9. A New Treatment Strategy for Inactivating Algae in Ballast Water Based on Multi-Trial Injections of Chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinyang; Wang, Junsheng; Pan, Xinxiang; Yuan, Haichao

    2015-06-09

    Ships' ballast water can carry aquatic organisms into foreign ecosystems. In our previous studies, a concept using ion exchange membrane electrolysis to treat ballast water has been proven. In addition to other substantial approaches, a new strategy for inactivating algae is proposed based on the developed ballast water treatment system. In the new strategy, the means of multi-trial injection with small doses of electrolytic products is applied for inactivating algae. To demonstrate the performance of the new strategy, contrast experiments between new strategies and routine processes were conducted. Four algae species including Chlorella vulgaris, Platymonas subcordiformis, Prorocentrum micans and Karenia mikimotoi were chosen as samples. The different experimental parameters are studied including the injection times and doses of electrolytic products. Compared with the conventional one trial injection method, mortality rate time (MRT) and available chlorine concentration can be saved up to about 84% and 40%, respectively, under the application of the new strategy. The proposed new approach has great potential in practical ballast water treatment. Furthermore, the strategy is also helpful for deep insight of mechanism of algal tolerance.

  10. Nitroxide radicals as research tools: Elucidating the kinetics and mechanisms of catalase-like and "suicide inactivation" of metmyoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuni, Uri; Czapski, Gideon; Goldstein, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Metmyoglobin (MbFe(III)) reaction with H(2)O(2) has been a subject of study over many years. H(2)O(2) alone promotes heme destruction frequently denoted "suicide inactivation," yet the mechanism underlying H(2)O(2) dismutation associated with MbFe(III) inactivation remains obscure. MbFe(III) reaction with excess H(2)O(2) in the absence and presence of the nitroxide was studied at pH 5.3-8.1 and 25°C by direct determination of reaction rate constants using rapid-mixing stopped-flow technique, by following H(2)O(2) depletion, O(2) evolution, spectral changes of the heme protein, and the fate of the nitroxide by EPR spectroscopy. The rates of both H(2)O(2) dismutation and heme inactivation processes depend on [MbFe(III)], [H(2)O(2)] and pH. Yet the inactivation stoichiometry is independent of these variables and each MbFe(III) molecule catalyzes the dismutation of 50±10 H(2)O(2) molecules until it is inactivated. The nitroxide catalytically enhances the catalase-like activity of MbFe(III) while protecting the heme against inactivation. The rate-determining step in the absence and presence of the nitroxide is the reduction of MbFe(IV)O by H(2)O(2) and by nitroxide, respectively. The nitroxide effects on H(2)O(2) dismutation catalyzed by MbFe(III) demonstrate that MbFe(IV)O reduction by H(2)O(2) is the rate-determining step of this process. The proposed mechanism, which adequately fits the pro-catalytic and protective effects of the nitroxide, implies the intermediacy of a compound I-H(2)O(2) adduct, which decomposes to a MbFe(IV)O and an inactivated heme at a ratio of 25:1. The effects of nitroxides are instrumental in elucidating the mechanism underlying the catalysis and inactivation routes of heme proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanistic study of the visible-light-driven photocatalytic inactivation of bacteria by graphene oxide–zinc oxide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dan; An, Taicheng; Li, Guiying; Wang, Wei; Cai, Yuncheng; Yip, Ho Yin; Zhao, Huijun; Wong, Po Keung

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The GO–ZnO composites exhibited efficient VLD bacterial inactivation performance. • Strong interfacial interaction existed between GO and ZnO. • GO served as a photosensitizer in the inactivation process. • Excellent antibacterial activity by GO–ZnO composite was shown under sunlight. • An inactivation mechanism based on the GO photosensitizer induction was proposed. - Abstract: The visible-light-driven (VLD) photocatalytic activity of graphene oxide–zinc oxide (GO–ZnO) composite prepared by a simple hydrothermal method was evaluated toward the inactivation of Escherichia coli K-12. The results showed that GO–ZnO composite had excellent VLD photocatalytic bacterial inactivation activity, comparing with those of ZnO and GO, which was attributed to the strong interaction between ZnO and GO in the composite. Accordingly, an interaction induced VLD photocatalytic inactivation mechanism of the strong interaction of GO with ZnO within the GO–ZnO composite was proposed. GO served as a photosensitizer and facilitated the charge separation and transfer, thus boosted the massive production of reactive oxygen species such as ·OH bulk , which was identified as the major reactive species from conduction band of ZnO, and resulted in a remarkable enhancement of bacterial inactivation efficiency. Moreover, GO–ZnO composite showed obviously superior photocatalytic bacterial inactivation within 10 min under natural solar light irradiation, indicating that GO–ZnO composite has great potential in wastewater treatment and environmental protection.

  12. Radiobiological inactivation of Epstein-Barr virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, E.; Heston, L.; Grogan, E.; Miller, G.

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocyte transforming properties of B95-8 strain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are very sensitive to inactivation by either uv or x irradiation. No dose of irradiation increases the transforming capacity of EBV. The x-ray dose needed for inactivation of EBV transformation (dose that results in 37% survival, 60,000 rads) is similar to the dose required for inactivation of plaque formation by herpes simplex virus type 1 (Fischer strain). Although herpes simplex virus is more sensitive than EBV to uv irradiation, this difference is most likely due to differences in the kinetics or mechanisms of repair of uv damage to the two viruses. The results lead to the hypothesis that a large part, or perhaps all, of the EBV genome is in some way needed to initiate transformation. The abilities of EBV to stimulate host cell DNA synthesis, to induce nuclear antigen, and to immortalize are inactivated in parallel. All clones of marmoset cells transformed by irradiated virus produce extracellular transforming virus. These findings suggest that the abilities of the virus to transform and to replicate complete progeny are inactivated together. The amounts of uv and x irradiation that inactivate transformation by B95-8 virus are less than the dose needed to inactivate early antigen induction by the nontransforming P 3 HR-1 strain of EBV. Based on radiobiological inactivation, 10 to 50% of the genome is needed for early antigen induction

  13. Inactivation as a new regulatory mechanism for neuronal Kv7 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2007-01-01

    neuronal channels and are important for controlling excitability. Kv7.1 channels have been considered the only Kv7 channels to undergo inactivation upon depolarization. However, here we demonstrate that inactivation is also an intrinsic property of Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 channels, which inactivate to a larger...

  14. Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis spore inactivation by and resistance to supercritical CO2 plus peracetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, B; Korza, G; Blatt, K M S; Fey, J P; Setlow, P

    2016-01-01

    Determine how supercritical CO2 (scCO2 ) plus peracetic acid (PAA) inactivates Bacillus subtilis spores, factors important in spore resistance to scCO2 -PAA, and if spores inactivated by scCO2 -PAA are truly dead. Spores of wild-type B. subtilis and isogenic mutants lacking spore protective proteins were treated with scCO2 -PAA in liquid or dry at 35°C. Wild-type wet spores (aqueous suspension) were more susceptible than dry spores. Treated spores were examined for viability (and were truly dead), dipicolinic acid (DPA), mutations, permeability to nucleic acid stains, germination under different conditions, energy metabolism and outgrowth. ScCO2 -PAA-inactivated spores retained DPA, and survivors had no notable DNA damage. However, DPA was released from inactivated spores at a normally innocuous temperature (85°C), and colony formation from treated spores was salt sensitive. The inactivated spores germinated but did not outgrow, and these germinated spores had altered plasma membrane permeability and defective energy metabolism. Wet or dry coat-defective spores had increased scCO2 -PAA sensitivity, and dry spores but not wet spores lacking DNA protective proteins were more scCO2 -PAA sensitive. These findings suggest that scCO2 -PAA inactivates spores by damaging spores' inner membrane. The spore coat provided scCO2 -PAA resistance for both wet and dry spores. DNA protective proteins provided scCO2 -PAA resistance only for dry spores. These results provide information on mechanisms of spore inactivation of and resistance to scCO2 -PAA, an agent with increasing use in sterilization applications. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis by a direct-current, cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma microjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Sun, Peng; Wu, Haiyan; Bai, Na; Wang, Ruixue; Zhu, Weidong; Zhang, Jue; Liu, Fuxiang

    2010-07-01

    A direct-current, cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma microjet (PMJ) was performed to inactivate Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) in air. The process of sterilization and morphology of bacteria was observed. We wish to know the possible inactivation mechanisms of PMJ and explore a potential application in dental and other temperature sensitive treatment. In this study, we employed a direct current, atmospheric pressure, cold air PMJ to inactivate bacterias. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to evaluate the morphology of S. aureus and showed rupture of cell walls after the plasma treatment and Optical emission spectrum (OES) were used to understand the possible inactivation mechanisms of PMJ. The inactivation rates could reach 100% in 5 min. When the distance between the exit nozzle of the PMJ device and Petri dish was extended from 1 cm to 3 cm, effective inactivation was also observed with a similar inactivation curve. The inactivation of bacteria is attributed to the abundant reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, as well as ultroviolet radiation in the plasma. Different life spans and defensibilities of these killing agents may hold the key to understanding the different inactivation curves at different treatment distances.

  16. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  17. Inactivation of γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase by γ-ethynyl- and γ-vinyl GABA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, R.B.; Burke, J.R.; Nanavati, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    γ-Ethynyl- and γ-vinyl GABA (vigabatrin) are anticonvulsant agents that have been shown to be mechanism-based inactivators of γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-T). The inactivation mechanisms of these compounds have been investigated. Inactivation of GABA-T by [ 3 H]γ-ethynyl GABA led to the incorporation of 1.0 equiv of 3 H into the enzyme which is not released by enzyme denaturation. Inactivation by γ-ethynyl GABA of GABA-T reconstituted with [ 3 H]PLP followed by denaturation resulted in release of 3 H as PLP. Eight different possible adducts are consistent with that result. Experiments have been carried out to differentiate these possibilities. Similar studies have been carried out with γ-vinyl GABA. Inactivation by [ 14 C]γ-vinyl GABA resulted in the incorporation of 1.0 equiv of 14 C per active site. Unlike the case with γ-ethynyl GABA, γ-vinyl GABA inactivation of GABA-T reconstituted with [ 3 H]PLP followed by denaturation resulted in release of 3 H as PMP

  18. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, M C

    2012-01-31

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development.

  19. Mechanisms of poliovirus inactivation by the direct and indirect effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the effects of ionizing radiation on poliovirus particles when given under conditions where either direct (in broth) or indirect (in water) effects were predominant. Under direct conditions, inactivation of poliovirus was found to be due primarily to RNA damage, although capsid damage could account for about one-third of the viral inactivation. RNA damage did not appear to be due to strand breakage and therefore was probably caused primarily by base damage or crosslink formation. Capsid damage under direct irradiation conditions did not result in significant alterations of either the sedimentation coefficients or the isoelectric points of the poliovirus particles or detectable modification of the sizes of the viral proteins. It did, however, cause loss of availability to bind to host cells. Under indirect conditions no more than 25% of viral inactivation appeared to be due to RNA damage. However, the sedimentation coefficients and isoelectric points of the viral particles were greatly altered, and their abilities to bind to cells were lost at about three-fourths the rate of loss of infectivity. Capsid damage in this case did result in changes in the sizes of capsid proteins. Therefore, the majority of the radiation inactivation under indirect conditions appeared to be due to protein damage

  20. Inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis by a direct-current, cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma microjet☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Sun, Peng; Wu, Haiyan; Bai, Na; Wang, Ruixue; Zhu, Weidong; Zhang, Jue; Liu, Fuxiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective A direct-current, cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma microjet (PMJ) was performed to inactivate Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) in air. The process of sterilization and morphology of bacteria was observed. We wish to know the possible inactivation mechanisms of PMJ and explore a potential application in dental and other temperature sensitive treatment. Methods In this study, we employed a direct current, atmospheric pressure, cold air PMJ to inactivate bacterias. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to evaluate the morphology of S. aureus and showed rupture of cell walls after the plasma treatment and Optical emission spectrum (OES) were used to understand the possible inactivation mechanisms of PMJ. Results The inactivation rates could reach 100% in 5 min. When the distance between the exit nozzle of the PMJ device and Petri dish was extended from 1 cm to 3 cm, effective inactivation was also observed with a similar inactivation curve. Conclusion The inactivation of bacteria is attributed to the abundant reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, as well as ultroviolet radiation in the plasma. Different life spans and defensibilities of these killing agents may hold the key to understanding the different inactivation curves at different treatment distances. PMID:23554639

  1. High pressure processing's potential to inactivate norovirus and other fooodborne viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    High pressure processing (HPP) can inactivate human norovirus. However, all viruses are not equally susceptible to HPP. Pressure treatment parameters such as required pressure levels, initial pressurization temperatures, and pressurization times substantially affect inactivation. How food matrix ...

  2. Therapeutic activity of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based probiotic and inactivated whole yeast on vaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Ballet, Nathalie; Sabbatini, Samuele; Roselletti, Elena; Cayzeele Decherf, Amélie; Pélerin, Fanny; Luciano, Eugenio; Perito, Stefano; Jüsten, Peter; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2017-01-02

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the most prevalent vaginal infection worldwide and Candida albicans is its major agent. Vulvovaginal candidiasis is characterized by disruption of the vaginal microbiota composition, as happens following large spectrum antibiotic usage. Recent studies support the effectiveness of oral and local probiotic treatment for prevention of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a safe yeast used as, or for, the production of ingredients for human nutrition and health. Here, we demonstrate that vaginal administration of probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae live yeast (GI) and, in part, inactivated whole yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (IY), used as post-challenge therapeutics, was able to positively influence the course of vaginal candidiasis by accelerating the clearance of the fungus. This effect was likely due to multiple interactions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Candida albicans. Both live and inactivated yeasts induced coaggregation of Candida and consequently inhibited its adherence to epithelial cells. However, only the probiotic yeast was able to suppress some major virulence factors of Candida albicans such as the ability to switch from yeast to mycelial form and the capacity to express several aspartyl proteases. The effectiveness of live yeast was higher than that of inactivated whole yeast suggesting that the synergy between mechanical effects and biological effects were dominant over purely mechanical effects. The protection of epithelial cells to Candida-induced damage was also observed. Overall, our data show for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based ingredients, particularly the living cells, can exert beneficial therapeutic effects on a widespread vaginal mucosal infection.

  3. Inactivation of Heterosigma akashiwo in ballast water by circular orifice plate-generated hydrodynamic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Daolun; Zhao, Jie; Liu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The discharge of alien ballast water is a well-known, major reason for marine species invasion. Here, circular orifice plate-generated hydrodynamic cavitation was used to inactivate Heterosigma akashiwo in ballast water. In comparison with single- and multihole orifice plates, the conical-hole orifice plate yielded the highest inactivation percentage, 51.12%, and consumed only 6.84% energy (based on a 50% inactivation percentage). Repeating treatment, either using double series-connection or circling inactivation, elevated the inactivation percentage, yet consumed much more energy. The results indicate that conical-hole-generated hydrodynamic cavitation shows great potential as a pre-inactivation method for ballast water treatment.

  4. Inactivation of Bacillus cereus by Na-chlorophyllin-based photosensitization on the surface of packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksiene, Z; Buchovec, I; Paskeviciute, E

    2010-11-01

    This study was focused on the possibility to inactivate food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus by Na-chlorophyllin (Na-Chl)-based photosensitization in vitro and after attachment to the surface of packaging material. Bacillus cereus in vitro or attached to the packaging was incubated with Na-Chl (7·5×10(-8) to 7·5×10(-5) mol l(-1) ) for 2-60min in phosphate buffer saline. Photosensitization was performed by illuminating cells under a light with a λ of 400nm and an energy density of 20mW cm(-2) . The illumination time varied 0-5min and subsequently the total energy dose was 0-6J cm(-2) . The results show that B. cereus vegetative cells in vitro or attached to the surface of packaging after incubation with 7·5×10(-7) mol l(-1) Na-Chl and following illumination were inactivated by 7log. The photoinactivation of B. cereus spores in vitro by 4log required higher (7·5×10(-6) mol l(-1) ) Na-Chl concentration. Decontamination of packaging material from attached spores by photosensitization reached 5log at 7·5×10(-5) mol l(-1) Na-Chl concentration. Comparative analysis of different packaging decontamination treatments indicates that washing with water can diminish pathogen population on the surface by packaging material. Spores are more resistant than vegetative cells to photosensitization-based inactivation. Comparison of different surface decontamination treatments indicates that Na-Chl-based photosensitization is much more effective antibacterial tool than washing with water or 200ppm Na-hypochlorite. Our data support the idea that Na-Chl-based photosensitization has great potential for future application as an environment-friendly, nonthermal surface decontamination technique. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Key tumor suppressor genes inactivated by "greater promoter" methylation and somatic mutations in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Michailidi, Christina; Marchionni, Luigi; Pickering, Curtis R.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Hadar, Tal; Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Zizkova, Veronika; Fertig, Elana; Agrawal, Nishant; Westra, William; Koch, Wayne; Califano, Joseph; Velculescu, Victor E.; Sidransky, David

    Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are commonly inactivated by somatic mutation and/or promoter methylation; yet, recent high-throughput genomic studies have not identified key TSGs inactivated by both mechanisms. We pursued an integrated molecular analysis based on methylation binding domain sequencing

  6. Reactive radical-driven bacterial inactivation by hydrogen-peroxide-enhanced plasma-activated-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songjie; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    The combined effects of plasma activated water (PAW) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), PAW/HP, in sterilization were investigated in this study. To assess the synergistic effects of PAW/HP, S. aureus was selected as the test microorganism to determine the inactivation efficacy. Also, the DNA/RNA and proteins released by the bacterial suspensions under different conditions were examined to confirm membrane integrity. Additionally, the intracellular pH (pHi) of S. aureus was measured in our study. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was employed to identify the presence of radicals. Finally, the oxidation reduction potential (ORP), conductivity and pH were measured. Our results revealed that the inactivation efficacy of PAW/HP is much greater than that of PAW, while increased H2O2 concentration result in higher inactivation potential. More importantly, as compared with PAW, the much stronger intensity ESR signals and higher ORP in PAW/HP suggests that the inactivation mechanism of the synergistic effects of PAW/HP: more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), especially OH and NO radicals, are generated in PAW combined with H2O2 resulting in more deaths of the bacteria.

  7. Molecular dynamics of CYP2D6 polymorphisms in the absence and presence of a mechanism-based inactivator reveals changes in local flexibility and dominant substrate access channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker W de Waal

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs represent an important enzyme superfamily involved in metabolism of many endogenous and exogenous small molecules. CYP2D6 is responsible for ∼ 15% of CYP-mediated drug metabolism and exhibits large phenotypic diversity within CYPs with over 100 different allelic variants. Many of these variants lead to functional changes in enzyme activity and substrate selectivity. Herein, a molecular dynamics comparative analysis of four different variants of CYP2D6 was performed. The comparative analysis included simulations with and without SCH 66712, a ligand that is also a mechanism-based inactivator, in order to investigate the possible structural basis of CYP2D6 inactivation. Analysis of protein stability highlighted significantly altered flexibility in both proximal and distal residues from the variant residues. In the absence of SCH 66712, *34, *17-2, and *17-3 displayed more flexibility than *1, and *53 displayed more rigidity. SCH 66712 binding reversed flexibility in *17-2 and *17-3, through *53 remained largely rigid. Throughout simulations with docked SCH 66712, ligand orientation within the heme-binding pocket was consistent with previously identified sites of metabolism and measured binding energies. Subsequent tunnel analysis of substrate access, egress, and solvent channels displayed varied bottle-neck radii. Taken together, our results indicate that SCH 66712 should inactivate these allelic variants, although varied flexibility and substrate binding-pocket accessibility may alter its interaction abilities.

  8. Structure of suicide-inactivated β-hydroxydecanoyl-thioester dehydrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwab, J.M.; Ho, C.K.; Li, W.B.; Townsend, C.A.; Salituro, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    β-Hydroxydecanoylthioester dehydrase, the key enzyme in biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids under anaerobic conditions, equilibrates thioesters of (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid, E-2-decenoic acid, and Z-3-decenoic acid. Dehydrase is irreversibly inactivated by the N-acetylcysteamine thioester of 3-decynoic acid (3-decynoyl-NAC), via dehydrase-catalyzed isomerization to 2,3-decadienoyl-NAC. To probe the relationship between normal catalysis and suicide inactivation, the structure of the inactivated enzyme has been studied. 3-[2- 13 C]Decynoyl-NAC was synthesized and incubated with dehydrase. 13 C NMR showed that attack of 2,3-decadienoyl-NAC by the active site histidine gives 3-histidinyl-3-decenoyl-NAC, which slowly rearranges to the more stable Δ 2 isomer. Model histidine-allene adducts have been made and characterized. Analysis of NMR data show that the C=C configuration of the decenoyl moiety of enzyme-bound inactivator is E. The suggestion that the mechanism of dehydrase inactivation parallels its normal mechanism of action is supported these findings

  9. Single-hit mechanism of tumour cell killing by radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J D

    2003-02-01

    To review the relative importance of the single-hit mechanism of radiation killing for tumour response to 1.8-2.0 Gy day(-1) fractions and to low dose-rate brachytherapy. Tumour cell killing by ionizing radiation is well described by the linear-quadratic equation that contains two independent components distinguished by dose kinetics. Analyses of tumour cell survival curves that contain six or more dose points usually provide good estimates of the alpha- and beta-inactivation coefficients. Superior estimates of tumour cell intrinsic radiosensitivity are obtained when synchronized populations are employed. The characteristics of single-hit inactivation of tumour cells are reviewed and compared with the characteristics of beta-inactivation. Potential molecular targets associated with single-hit inactivation are discussed along with strategies for potentiating cell killing by this mechanism. The single-hit mechanism of tumour cell killing shows no dependence on dose-rate and, consequently, no evidence of sublethal damage repair. It is uniquely potentiated by high linear-energy-transfer radiation, exhibits a smaller oxygen enhancement ratio and exhibits a larger indirect effect by hydroxyl radicals than the beta-mechanism. alpha-inactivation coefficients vary slightly throughout interphase but mitotic cells exhibit extremely high alpha-coefficients in the range of those observed for lymphocytes and some repair-deficient cells. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that chromatin in compacted form could be a radiation-hypersensitive target associated with single-hit radiation killing. Analyses of tumour cell survival curves demonstrate that it is the single-hit mechanism (alpha) that determines the majority of cell killing after doses of 2Gy and that this mechanism is highly variable between tumour cell lines. The characteristics of single-hit inactivation are qualitatively and quantitatively distinct from those of beta-inactivation. Compacted chromatin in tumour cells

  10. Potassium iodide potentiates antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by Rose Bengal: in vitro and in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaoshen; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; ElHussien, Ahmed; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sarna, Tadeusz; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2018-02-01

    Rose Bengal (RB) is a halogenated xanthene dye that has been used to mediate antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation. While highly active against Gram-positive bacteria, RB is largely inactive in killing Gram-negative bacteria. We have discovered that addition of the non-toxic salt potassium iodide (100mM) potentiates green light (540nm)-mediated killing by up to six extra logs with Gramnegative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa,Gram-positive methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and fungal yeast Candida albicans. The mechanism is proposed to be singlet oxygen addition to iodide anion to form peroxyiodide, which decomposes into radicals, finally forms hydrogen peroxide and molecular iodine. The effects of these different bactericidal species can be teased apart by comparing killing in three different scenarios: (1) cells+RB+KI are mixed together then illuminated with green light; (2) cells+RB are centrifuged then KI added then green light; (3) RB+KI+green light then cells added after light. We showed that KI could potentiate RBPDT in a mouse model of skin abrasions infected with bioluminescent P.aeruginosa.

  11. An Alternative Inactivant for Rift Valley Fever Virus using Cobra Venom-derived L-Amino Oxidase, which is Related to its Immune Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtesam M Al-Olayan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Vaccine improvement depends on the formulation, adjuvant type and inactivant used. The type of formulation may interfere with immunogenicity. The present work aimed to evaluate the inactivation activity and related immune potential of the Cobra venom-derived LAO enzyme compared to the currently used inactivants (BPL and formalin for both animal and human vaccines. The RVF virus was completely inactivated within 6 hrs, 4 hrs and 2 hrs after treatment with Formalin, LAO and BPL, respectively. The vaccine potency [ED50] was arranged in a descending order from formalin (0.016 to BPL (0.005 and LAO (0.002. The total IgG levels, Neutralizing Index (NI and Interferon levels were significantly increased compared to those detected after immunization with the BPL- and Formalin-inactivated vaccine candidates.

  12. ALTERNATIVE EQUATIONS FOR DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF IONIC CHANNEL ACTIVATION AND INACTIVATION GATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut ÖZER

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, alternative equations for dynamics of ionic channel activation and inactivation gates are proposed based on the path probability method. Dynamic behavior of a voltage-gated ionic channel is modeled by the conventional Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H mathematical formalism. In that model, conductance of the channel is defined in terms of activation and inactivation gates. Dynamics of the activation and inactivation gates is modeled by first-order differential equations dependent on the gate variable and the membrane potential. In the new approach proposed in this study, dynamic behavior of activation and inactivation gates is modeled by a firstorder differential equation dependent on internal energy and membrane potential by using the path probability method which is widely used in statistical physics. The new model doesn't require the time constant and steadystate values which are used explicitly in the H-H model. The numerical results show validity of the proposed method.

  13. Efficient Bacteria Inactivation by Ultrasound in Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Ernesto Amabilis-Sosa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The reuse of treated wastewaters could contribute to reducing water stress. In this research, ultrasound application on bacterial inactivation in municipal wastewater (MWW was evaluated. Total and fecal coliforms were used as standard fecal indicators; volatile suspended solids (VSS were analyzed too. Samples were taken from the effluent of secondary clarifiers. In addition, inactivation tests were carried out on pure cultures of E. coli (EC and B. subtilis (BS. Sonication was performed at 20 kHz, 35% amplitude and 600 W/L for 15, 30 and 45 min. After 15 min of sonication, bacterial density was reduced by 1.85 Log10 MPN/100 mL for EC and 3.16 Log10 CFU/mL for BS. After 30 min, no CFU/mL of BS were observed in MWW and, after 45 min, the reduction of total and fecal coliforms was practically 6.45 Log10 MPN/100mL. Inactivation mechanism was made by cavitation, which causes irreversible damage to the cell wall. Although high bacterial densities were employed, percentages of inactivation >99% were reached at 45 min. This research contributes to the implementation of ultrasound as a disinfection technique with high potential due to its high efficiency without producing byproducts. In fact, the water meets the guidelines for reuse in direct human contact services.

  14. Inactivation of nuclear factor κB by MIP-based drug combinations augments cell death of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam M

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Menaga Subramaniam,1 Su Ki Liew,1 Lionel LA In,2 Khalijah Awang,3,4 Niyaz Ahmed,5 Noor Hasima Nagoor1,6 1Institute of Biological Science (Genetics & Molecular Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, UCSI University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Centre for Natural Product Research and Drug Discovery (CENAR, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 5Pathogen Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India; 6Centre for Research in Biotechnology for Agriculture (CEBAR, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Drug combination therapy to treat cancer is a strategic approach to increase successful treatment rate. Optimizing combination regimens is vital to increase therapeutic efficacy with minimal side effects. Materials and methods: In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro cytotoxicity of double and triple combinations consisting of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA, Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP and cisplatin (CDDP against 14 various human cancer cell lines to address the need for more effective therapy. Our data show synergistic effects in MCF-7 cells treated with MIP:ACA, MIP:CDDP and MIP:ACA:CDDP combinations. The type of interaction between MIP, ACA and CDDP was evaluated based on combination index being <0.8 for synergistic effect. Identifying the mechanism of cell death based on previous studies involved intrinsic apoptosis and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and tested in Western blot analysis. Inactivation of NF-κB was confirmed by p65 and IκBα, while intrinsic apoptosis pathway activation was confirmed by caspase-9 and Apaf-1 expression Results: All combinations confirmed intrinsic apoptosis activation and NF-κB inactivation. Conclusion: Double and triple

  15. Structure of 6-diazo-5-oxo-norleucine-bound human gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase 1, a novel mechanism of inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzyan, Simon S; Cook, Paul F; Heroux, Annie; Hanigan, Marie H

    2017-06-01

    Intense efforts are underway to identify inhibitors of the enzyme gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase 1 (GGT1) which cleaves extracellular gamma-glutamyl compounds and contributes to the pathology of asthma, reperfusion injury and cancer. The glutamate analog, 6-diazo-5-oxo-norleucine (DON), inhibits GGT1. DON also inhibits many essential glutamine metabolizing enzymes rendering it too toxic for use in the clinic as a GGT1 inhibitor. We investigated the molecular mechanism of human GGT1 (hGGT1) inhibition by DON to determine possible strategies for increasing its specificity for hGGT1. DON is an irreversible inhibitor of hGGT1. The second order rate constant of inactivation was 0.052 mM -1 min -1 and the K i was 2.7 ± 0.7 mM. The crystal structure of DON-inactivated hGGT1 contained a molecule of DON without the diazo-nitrogen atoms in the active site. The overall structure of the hGGT1-DON complex resembled the structure of the apo-enzyme; however, shifts were detected in the loop forming the oxyanion hole and elements of the main chain that form the entrance to the active site. The structure of hGGT1-DON complex revealed two covalent bonds between the enzyme and inhibitor which were part of a six membered ring. The ring included the OG atom of Thr381, the reactive nucleophile of hGGT1 and the α-amine of Thr381. The structure of DON-bound hGGT1 has led to the discovery of a new mechanism of inactivation by DON that differs from its inactivation of other glutamine metabolizing enzymes, and insight into the activation of the catalytic nucleophile that initiates the hGGT1 reaction. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  16. Reaction of uridine diphosphate galactose 4-epimerase with a suicide inactivator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flentke, G.R.; Frey, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    UDPgalactose 4-epimerase from Escherichia coli is rapidly inactivated by the compounds uridine 5'-diphosphate chloroacetol (UDC) and uridine 5'-diphosphate bromoacetol (UCB). Both UDC and UDB inactivate the enzyme in neutral solution concomitant with the appearance of chromophores absorbing maximally at 325 and 328 nm, respectively. The reaction of UDC with the enzyme follows saturation kinetics characterized by a K D of 0.110 mM and k inact of 0.84 min -1 at pH 8.5 and ionic strength 0.2 M. The inactivation by UDC is competitively inhibited by competitive inhibitors of UDPgalactose 4-epimerase, and it is accompanied by the tight but noncovalent binding of UDC to the enzyme in a stoichiometry of 1 mol of UDC/mol of enzyme dimer, corresponding to 1 mol of UDC/mol of enzyme-bound NAD + . The inactivation of epimerase by uridine 5'-diphosphate [ 2 H 2 ]chloroacetol proceeds with a primary kinetic isotope effect (k H /k D ) of 1.4. The inactivation mechanism is proposed to involve a minimum of three steps: (a) reversible binding of UDC to the active site of UDPgalactose 4-epimerase; (b) enolization of the chloroacetol moiety of enzyme-bound UDC, catalyzed by an enzymic general base at the active site; (c) alkylation of the nicotinamide ring of NAD + at the active site by the chloroacetol enolate. The resulting adduct between UDC and NAD + is proposed to be the chromophore with λ max at 325 nm. The enzymic general base required to facilitate proton transfer in redox catalysis by this enzyme may be the general base that facilitates enolization of the chloroacetol moiety of UDC in the inactivation reaction

  17. The inactivation of human CYP2E1 by phenethyl isothiocyanate, a naturally occurring chemopreventive agent, and its oxidative bioactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshigae, Yasushi; Sridar, Chitra; Kent, Ute M; Hollenberg, Paul F

    2013-04-01

    Phenethylisothiocyanate (PEITC), a naturally occurring isothiocyanate and potent cancer chemopreventive agent, works by multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, such as CYP2E1, that are involved in the bioactivation of carcinogens. PEITC has been reported to be a mechanism-based inactivator of some P450s. We describe here the possible mechanism for the inactivation of human CYP2E1 by PEITC, as well as the putative intermediate that might be involved in the bioactivation of PEITC. PEITC inactivated recombinant CYP2E1 with a partition ratio of 12, and the inactivation was not inhibited in the presence of glutathione (GSH) and not fully recovered by dialysis. The inactivation of CYP2E1 by PEITC is due to both heme destruction and protein modification, with the latter being the major pathway for inactivation. GSH-adducts of phenethyl isocyanate (PIC) and phenethylamine were detected during the metabolism by CYP2E1, indicating formation of PIC as a reactive intermediate following P450-catalyzed desulfurization of PEITC. Surprisingly, PIC bound covalently to CYP2E1 to form protein adducts but did not inactivate the enzyme. Liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy analysis of the inactivated CYP2E1 apo-protein suggests that a reactive sulfur atom generated during desulfurization of PEITC is involved in the inactivation of CYP2E1. Our data suggest that the metabolism of PEITC by CYP2E1 that results in the inactivation of CYP2E1 may occur by a mechanism similar to that observed with other sulfur-containing compounds, such as parathion. Digestion of the inactivated enzyme and analysis by SEQUEST showed that Cys 268 may be the residue modified by PIC.

  18. Gemfibrozil is a strong inactivator of CYP2C8 in very small multiple doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkalammi, J; Niemi, M; Neuvonen, P J; Backman, J T

    2012-05-01

    Therapeutic doses of gemfibrozil cause mechanism-based inactivation of CYP2C8 via formation of gemfibrozil 1-O-β-glucuronide. We investigated the extent of CYP2C8 inactivation caused by three different doses of gemfibrozil twice dailyfor 5 days, using repaglinide as a probe drug, in 10 healthy volunteers. At the end of this 5-day regimen, there were dose-dependent increases in the area under the plasma concentration–time curve from 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞) of repaglinide by3.4-, 5.5-, and 7.0-fold corresponding to 30, 100, and 600 mg of gemfibrozil, respectively, as compared with the control phase (P gemfibrozil 1-O-β-glucuronide, a gemfibrozil dose of 30 mg twice daily was estimated to inhibit CYP2C8 by >70% and 100 mg twice daily was estimated to inhibit it by >90%. Hence, gemfibrozil is a strong inactivator of CYP2C8 even in very small, subtherapeutic, multiple doses. Administration of small gemfibrozil doses may be useful in optimizing the pharmacokinetics of CYP2C8 substrate drugs and in reducing the formation of their potentially toxic metabolites via CYP2C8.

  19. Preserved immunogenicity of an inactivated vaccine based on foot-and-mouth disease virus particles with improved stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, Flavia; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Borrego, Belén; McCullough, Kenneth; Summerfield, Artur; Sobrino, Francisco; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2017-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the etiological agent of a highly contagious disease that affects important livestock species. Vaccines based on inactivated FMDV virions provide a useful tool for the control of this pathogen. However, long term storage at 4°C (the temperature for vaccine storage) or ruptures of the cold chain, provoke the dissociation of virions, reducing the immunogenicity of the vaccine. An FMDV mutant carrying amino acid replacements VP1 N17D and VP2 H145Y isolated previously rendered virions with increased resistance to dissociation at 4°C. We have evaluated the immunogenicity in swine (a natural FMDV host) of a chemically inactivated vaccine based on this mutant. The presence of these amino acid substitutions did not compromise the immunological potential, including its ability to elicit neutralizing antibodies. These results support the feasibility of this kind of mutants with increased capsid stability as suitable viruses for producing improved FMDV vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanism of inactivation of human leukocyte elastase by a chloromethyl ketone: kinetic and solvent isotope effect studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, R.L.; Trainor, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of inactivation of human leukocyte elastase (HLE) by the chloromethyl ketone MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-CH 2 Cl was investigated. The dependence of the first-order rate constant for inactivation on concentration of chloromethyl ketone is hyperbolic and suggests formation of a reversible Michaelis complex prior to covalent interaction between the enzyme and inhibitor. However, the observed Ki value is 10 microM, at least 10-fold lower than dissociation constants for complexes formed from interaction of HLE with structurally related substrates or reversible inhibitors, and suggests that Ki is a complex kinetic constant, reflecting the formation and accumulation of both the Michaelis complex and a second complex. It is proposed that this second complex is a hemiketal formed from attack of the active site serine on the carbonyl carbon of the inhibitor. The accumulation of this intermediate may be a general feature of reactions of serine proteases and chloromethyl ketones derived from specific peptides and accounts for the very low Ki values observed for these reactions. The solvent deuterium isotope effect (SIE) on the inactivation step (ki) is 1.58 +/- 0.07 and is consistent with rate-limiting, general-catalyzed attack of the active site His on the methylene carbon of the inhibitor with displacement of chloride anion. The general catalyst is thought to be the active site Asp. In contrast, the SIE on the second-order rate constant for HLE inactivation, ki/Ki, is inverse and equals 0.64 +/- 0.05

  1. Inactivation of Laccase by the Attack of As (III) Reaction in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinyuan; Lu, Kun; Dong, Shipeng; Huang, Qingguo; Mao, Liang

    2018-03-06

    Laccase is a multicopper oxidase containing four coppers as reaction sites, including one type 1, one type 2, and two type 3. We here provide the first experimental data showing that As (III) can be effectively removed from water and transformed to As (V) through reactions mediated by laccase with the presence of oxygen. To this end, the As (III) removal, As (V) yields, total protein, active laccase, and copper concentrations in the aqueous phase were determined, respectively. Additionally, electron paramagnetic resonance spectra and UV-vis spectra were applied to probe possible structural changes of the laccase during the reaction. The data offer the first evidence that laccase can be inactivated by As (III) attack thus leading to the release of type 2 copper. The released copper has no reactivity with the As (III). These findings provide new ideas into a significant pathway likely to master the environmental transformation of arsenite, and advance the understanding of laccase inactivation mechanisms, thus providing a foundation for optimization of enzyme-based processes and potential development for removal and remediation of arsenite contamination in the environment.

  2. Thermal inactivation kinetics of β-galactosidase during bread baking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.; Chen, Xiao Dong; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, β-galactosidase was utilized as a model enzyme to investigate the mechanism of enzyme inactivation during bread baking. Thermal inactivation of β-galactosidase was investigated in a wheat flour/water system at varying temperature-moisture content combinations, and in bread during

  3. Ultraviolet-C irradiation for inactivation of viruses in foetal bovine serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Vivek; Dhere, Rajeev; Agnihotri, Snehal; Muley, Ravindra; Patil, Sanjay; Pawar, Amit

    2018-07-05

    Foetal Bovine Serum (FBS) and porcine trypsin are one of the essential raw materials used in the manufacturing of cell culture based viral vaccines. Being from animal origin, these raw materials can potentially contaminate the final product by known or unknown adventitious agents. The issue is more serious in case of live attenuated viral vaccines, where there is no inactivation step which can take care of such adventitious agents. It is essential to design production processes which can offer maximum viral clearance potential for animal origin products. Ultraviolet-C irradiation is known to inactivate various adventitious viral agents; however there are limited studies on ultraviolet inactivation of viruses in liquid media. We obtained a recently developed UVivatec ultraviolet-C (UV-C) irradiation based viral clearance system for evaluating its efficacy to inactivate selected model viruses. This system has a unique design with spiral path of liquid allowing maximum exposure to UV-C light of a short wavelength of 254 nm. Five live attenuated vaccine viruses and four other model viruses were spiked in tissue culture media and exposed to UV-C irradiation. The pre and post UV-C irradiation samples were analyzed for virus content to find out the extent of inactivation of various viruses. These experiments showed substantial log reduction for the majority of the viruses with few exceptions based on the characteristics of these viruses. Having known the effect of UV irradiation on protein structure, we also evaluated the post irradiation samples of culture media for growth promoting properties using one of the most fastidious human diploid cells (MRC-5). UV-C exposure did not show any notable impact on the nutritional properties of culture media. The use of an UV-C irradiation based system is considered to be promising approach to mitigate the risk of adventitious agents in cell culture media arising through animal derived products. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Radiation inactivation of T7 phage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.; Redpath, J.L.; Grossweiner, L.I.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation inactivation of T7 phage by 25-MeV electron pulses has been measured in various media containing a wide concentration range of radical scavenging solutes and in the presence of protective and sensitizing agents. The dependence of sensitivity on pulse dose, from 1 mrad to 3.6 krad, is attributed to radical depletion via bimolecular processes. The survival data are analyzed by extending target theory to include diffusive reactions of primary and secondary radicals generated in the medium. It is concluded that OH radicals are the principal primary inactivating species and that secondary radicals from Br - , CNS - , uracil, glucose, ribose, sucrose, tyrosine, and histidine are lethal to some extent. In nutrient broth or 100 mM histidine, psoralen derivatives, Actinomycin D, and Mitomycin C are anoxic sensitizers. It is proposed that the psoralens promote the formation of non-strand break lesions as the sensitization mechanism. The target theory based on diffusional kinetics is applicable to other systems including single cells

  5. Cationic antimicrobial peptides inactivate Shiga toxin-encoding bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cogliano, Manuel E.; Hollmann, Axel; Martinez, Melina; Semorile, Liliana; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Maffía, Paulo C.; Bentancor, Leticia V.

    2017-12-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs) are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: 1) direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, 2) cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and 3) inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure) specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  6. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Inactivate Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Del Cogliano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non-alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: (1 direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, (2 cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and (3 inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  7. Thermal inactivation kinetics of β-galactosidase during bread baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiao Dong; Boom, Remko M; Schutyser, Maarten A I

    2017-06-15

    In this study, β-galactosidase was utilized as a model enzyme to investigate the mechanism of enzyme inactivation during bread baking. Thermal inactivation of β-galactosidase was investigated in a wheat flour/water system at varying temperature-moisture content combinations, and in bread during baking at 175 or 205°C. In the wheat flour/water system, the thermostability of β-galactosidase increased with decreased moisture content, and a kinetic model was accurately fitted to the corresponding inactivation data (R 2 =0.99). Interestingly, the residual enzyme activity in the bread crust (about 30%) was hundredfold higher than that in the crumb (about 0.3%) after baking, despite the higher temperature in the crust throughout baking. This result suggested that the reduced moisture content in the crust increased the thermostability of the enzyme. Subsequently, the kinetic model reasonably predicted the enzyme inactivation in the crumb using the same parameters derived from the wheat flour/water system. However, the model predicted a lower residual enzyme activity in the crust compared with the experimental result, which indicated that the structure of the crust may influence the enzyme inactivation mechanism during baking. The results reported can provide a quantitative understanding of the thermal inactivation kinetics of enzyme during baking, which is essential to better retain enzymatic activity in bakery products supplemented with heat-sensitive enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biochemical mechanism of action of a diketopiperazine inactivator of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einholm, Anja P; Pedersen, Katrine E; Wind, Troels

    2003-01-01

    -inactivated PAI-1 is inert to reaction with its target proteases and has a decreased susceptibility to non-target proteases, in spite of a generally increased proteolytic susceptibility of specific peptide bonds elsewhere in PAI-1. The properties of XR5118-inactivated PAI-1 were different from those of the so...

  9. Domain IV voltage-sensor movement is both sufficient and rate limiting for fast inactivation in sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capes, Deborah L; Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel P; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Bezanilla, Francisco; Chanda, Baron

    2013-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical for the generation and propagation of electrical signals in most excitable cells. Activation of Na(+) channels initiates an action potential, and fast inactivation facilitates repolarization of the membrane by the outward K(+) current. Fast inactivation is also the main determinant of the refractory period between successive electrical impulses. Although the voltage sensor of domain IV (DIV) has been implicated in fast inactivation, it remains unclear whether the activation of DIV alone is sufficient for fast inactivation to occur. Here, we functionally neutralize each specific voltage sensor by mutating several critical arginines in the S4 segment to glutamines. We assess the individual role of each voltage-sensing domain in the voltage dependence and kinetics of fast inactivation upon its specific inhibition. We show that movement of the DIV voltage sensor is the rate-limiting step for both development and recovery from fast inactivation. Our data suggest that activation of the DIV voltage sensor alone is sufficient for fast inactivation to occur, and that activation of DIV before channel opening is the molecular mechanism for closed-state inactivation. We propose a kinetic model of sodium channel gating that can account for our major findings over a wide voltage range by postulating that DIV movement is both necessary and sufficient for fast inactivation.

  10. Mechanistic and kinetic aspects of microbial inactivation in food irradiation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukenmez, I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A proper reaction mechanism was searched by analyzing the inactivation processes of microorganisms during food irradiation by ionizing radiation. By employing transition-state theory, it was assumed that the overall inactivation process involves a reversible sub-lethal stress and repair reactions to form reversibly injured cell or sensitized cell, which then undergoes irreversible injury leading to dead cell. A shoulder in low dose range in survival kinetics was associated with the repair process. Depending on the postulated mechanism, kinetic model equations were derived. The kinetics of cell inactivation by irradiation was expressed as depending on irradiation dose. By using experimental data in the developed model the inactivation parameters including threshold dose, radiation yield, decimal reduction dose and minimum sterilization dose were evaluated and microbial inactivation by irradiation was simulated by using the numerical values of the parameters. Developed model and model parameters may be used for the process control and the assessment of product quality in radiation preservation of food

  11. Inactivation of Caliciviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Nims

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Caliciviridae family of viruses contains clinically important human and animal pathogens, as well as vesivirus 2117, a known contaminant of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes employing Chinese hamster cells. An extensive literature exists for inactivation of various animal caliciviruses, especially feline calicivirus and murine norovirus. The caliciviruses are susceptible to wet heat inactivation at temperatures in excess of 60 °C with contact times of 30 min or greater, to UV-C inactivation at fluence ≥30 mJ/cm2, to high pressure processing >200 MPa for >5 min at 4 °C, and to certain photodynamic inactivation approaches. The enteric caliciviruses (e.g.; noroviruses display resistance to inactivation by low pH, while the non-enteric species (e.g.; feline calicivirus are much more susceptible. The caliciviruses are inactivated by a variety of chemicals, including alcohols, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, and β-propiolactone. As with inactivation of viruses in general, inactivation of caliciviruses by the various approaches may be matrix-, temperature-, and/or contact time-dependent. The susceptibilities of the caliciviruses to the various physical and chemical inactivation approaches are generally similar to those displayed by other small, non-enveloped viruses, with the exception that the parvoviruses and circoviruses may require higher temperatures for inactivation, while these families appear to be more susceptible to UV-C inactivation than are the caliciviruses.

  12. Development of Singlet Oxygen Luminescence Kinetics during the Photodynamic Inactivation of Green Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bornhütter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show the feasibility of photodynamic inactivation of green algae as a vital step towards an effective photodynamic suppression of biofilms by using functionalized surfaces. The investigation of the intrinsic mechanisms of photodynamic inactivation in green algae represents the next step in order to determine optimization parameters. The observation of singlet oxygen luminescence kinetics proved to be a very effective approach towards understanding mechanisms on a cellular level. In this study, the first two-dimensional measurement of singlet oxygen kinetics in phototrophic microorganisms on surfaces during photodynamic inactivation is presented. We established a system of reproducible algae samples on surfaces, incubated with two different cationic, antimicrobial potent photosensitizers. Fluorescence microscopy images indicate that one photosensitizer localizes inside the green algae while the other accumulates along the outer algae cell wall. A newly developed setup allows for the measurement of singlet oxygen luminescence on the green algae sample surfaces over several days. The kinetics of the singlet oxygen luminescence of both photosensitizers show different developments and a distinct change over time, corresponding with the differences in their localization as well as their photosensitization potential. While the complexity of the signal reveals a challenge for the future, this study incontrovertibly marks a crucial, inevitable step in the investigation of photodynamic inactivation of biofilms: it shows the feasibility of using the singlet oxygen luminescence kinetics to investigate photodynamic effects on surfaces and thus opens a field for numerous investigations.

  13. Anti-leukemic potential of methyl-cobalamin inactivation by nitrous oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Abels; A.C.M. Kroes (Aloys C.M.); A.A.M. Ermens (Anton); J. van Kapel (Jan); M. Schoester (Martijn); L.J.M. Spijkers (L. J M); J. Lindemans (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractMyelo‐cytotoxicity of extended nitrous oxide (N2O) inhalation was described almost forty years ago and then incidentally applied already with temporary success for suppressing leukemia. In 1948 the accompanying megaloblastic maturation arrest was explained by inactivation of the

  14. Pivotal role of water in terminating enzymatic function: a density functional theory study of the mechanism-based inactivation of cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Hajime; Cheong, Zhi Hao; Wang, Xiaoqing

    2012-07-12

    The importance of the mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of enzymes, which has a variety of physiological effects and therapeutic implications, has been garnering appreciation. Density functional theory calculations were undertaken to gain a clear understanding of the MBI of a cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP2B4) by tert-butylphenylacetylene (tBPA). The results of calculations suggest that, in accordance with previous proposals, the reaction proceeds via a ketene-type metabolic intermediate. Once an oxoiron(IV) porphyryn π-cation radical intermediate (compound I) of P450 is generated at the heme reaction site, ketene formation is facile, as the terminal acetylene of tBPA can form a C-O bond with the oxo unit of compound I with a relatively low reaction barrier (14.1 kcal/mol). Unexpectedly, it was found that the ketene-type intermediate was not very reactive. Its reaction with the hydroxyl group of a threonine (Thr302) to form an ester bond required a substantial barrier (38.2 kcal/mol). The high barrier disfavored the mechanism by which these species react directly. However, the introduction of a water molecule in the reaction center led to its active participation in the reaction. The water was capable of donating its proton to the tBPA molecule, while accepting the proton of threonine. This water-mediated mechanism lowered the reaction barrier for the formation of an ester bond by about 20 kcal/mol. Therefore, our study suggests that a water molecule, which can easily gain access to the threonine residue through the proton-relay channel, plays a critical role in enhancing the covalent modification of threonine by terminal acetylene compounds. Another type of MBI by acetylenes, N-alkylation of the heme prosthetic group, was less favorable than the threonine modification pathway.

  15. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  16. Inactivation of high-risk human papillomaviruses by Holder pasteurization: implications for donor human milk banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donalisio, Manuela; Cagno, Valeria; Vallino, Marta; Moro, Guido E; Arslanoglu, Sertac; Tonetto, Paola; Bertino, Enrico; Lembo, David

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have recently reported the detection of oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) in human milk of a minority of lactating mothers. These findings raised safety concerns in the context of human donor milk banking given the potential risk of HPV transmission to recipient infants. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the Holder pasteurization, a procedure currently in use in human donor milk banks for milk pasteurization, completely inactivates high-risk and low-risk HPV. HPV pseudoviruses (PsV) were generated, spiked into cell culture medium or donor human milk and subjected to thermal inactivation. HPV PsV infectivity and morphological integrity was analyzed by cell-based assay and by electron microscopy, respectively. The Holder pasteurization completely inactivated the infectivity of high-risk (types 16 and 18) and low-risk (type 6) HPV both in cell culture medium and in human milk causing PsV particle disassembly. The results presented here indicate that the Holder pasteurization is an efficient procedure to inactivate high-risk and low-risk HPV thus preventing the potential risk of their transmission through human donor milk.

  17. Drosophila QVR/SSS modulates the activation and C-type inactivation kinetics of Shaker K+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Terry; Xu, Rong; Joiner, William; Sehgal, Amita; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2011-01-01

    The quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene encodes a small, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that plays a critical role in the regulation of sleep in Drosophila. Loss-of-function mutations in qvr/sss severely suppress sleep and effect multiple changes in in situ Shaker K+ currents, including decreased magnitude, slower time-to-peak, and cumulative inactivation. Recently, we demonstrated that SLEEPLESS (SSS) protein modulates Shaker channel activity, possibly through a direct interaction at the plasma membrane. We show here that SSS accelerates the activation of heterologously expressed Shaker channels with no effect on deactivation or fast N-type inactivation. Furthermore, this SSS-induced acceleration is sensitive to the pharmacological disruption of lipid rafts and sufficiently accounts for the slower time-to-peak of in situ Shaker currents seen in qvr/sss mutants. We also find that SSS decreases the rate of C-type inactivation of heterologously expressed Shaker channels, providing a potential mechanism for the cumulative inactivation phenotype induced by qvr/sss loss of function mutations. Kinetic modeling based on the in vitro results suggests that the SSS-dependent regulation of channel kinetics accounts for nearly 40% of the decrease in Shaker current magnitude in flies lacking SSS. Sleep duration in qvr/sss null mutants is restored to normal by a qvr/sss transgene that fully rescues the Shaker kinetic phenotypes but only partially rescues the decrease in current magnitude. Together, these results suggest that the role of SSS in the regulation of sleep in Drosophila correlates more strongly with the effects of SSS on Shaker kinetics than current magnitude. PMID:21813698

  18. Drosophila QVR/SSS modulates the activation and C-type inactivation kinetics of Shaker K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Terry; Xu, Rong; Joiner, William; Sehgal, Amita; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2011-08-03

    The quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene encodes a small, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that plays a critical role in the regulation of sleep in Drosophila. Loss-of-function mutations in qvr/sss severely suppress sleep and effect multiple changes in in situ Shaker K(+) currents, including decreased magnitude, slower time-to-peak, and cumulative inactivation. Recently, we demonstrated that SLEEPLESS (SSS) protein modulates Shaker channel activity, possibly through a direct interaction at the plasma membrane. We show here that SSS accelerates the activation of heterologously expressed Shaker channels with no effect on deactivation or fast N-type inactivation. Furthermore, this SSS-induced acceleration is sensitive to the pharmacological disruption of lipid rafts and sufficiently accounts for the slower time-to-peak of in situ Shaker currents seen in qvr/sss mutants. We also find that SSS decreases the rate of C-type inactivation of heterologously expressed Shaker channels, providing a potential mechanism for the cumulative inactivation phenotype induced by qvr/sss loss-of-function mutations. Kinetic modeling based on the in vitro results suggests that the SSS-dependent regulation of channel kinetics accounts for nearly 40% of the decrease in Shaker current magnitude in flies lacking SSS. Sleep duration in qvr/sss-null mutants is restored to normal by a qvr/sss transgene that fully rescues the Shaker kinetic phenotypes but only partially rescues the decrease in current magnitude. Together, these results suggest that the role of SSS in the regulation of sleep in Drosophila correlates more strongly with the effects of SSS on Shaker kinetics than current magnitude.

  19. Inactivation of a putative efflux pump (LmrB) in Streptococcus mutans results in altered biofilm structure and increased exopolysaccharide synthesis: implications for biofilm resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Zhang, Jianying; Guo, Lihong; Zhao, Wei; Hu, Xiaoli; Wei, Xi

    2017-07-01

    Efflux pumps are a mechanism associated with biofilm formation and resistance. There is limited information regarding efflux pumps in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in dental caries. The aim of this study was to investigate potential roles of a putative efflux pump (LmrB) in S. mutans biofilm formation and susceptibility. Upon lmrB inactivation and antimicrobial exposure, the biofilm structure and expression of other efflux pumps were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and qRT-PCR. lmrB inactivation resulted in biofilm structural changes, increased EPS formation and EPS-related gene transcription (p < 0.05), but no improvement in susceptibility was observed. The expression of most efflux pump genes increased upon lmrB inactivation when exposed to antimicrobials (p < 0.05), suggesting a feedback mechanism that activated the transcription of other efflux pumps to compensate for the loss of lmrB. These observations imply that sole inactivation of lmrB is not an effective solution to control biofilms.

  20. Difunctional bacteriophage conjugated with photosensitizers for Candida albicans-targeting photodynamic inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuai; Shi, Hongxi; Zhang, Xintong; Chen, Xi; Cao, Donghui; Mao, Chuanbin; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

    2018-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal pathogen of the human microbiota, causing infections ranging from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Due to the increasing occurrence of antibiotic-resistant C. albicans strains, new approaches to control this pathogen are needed. Photodynamic inactivation is an emerging alternative to treat infections based on the interactions between visible light and photosensitisers, in which pheophorbide a (PPA) is a chlorophyll-based photosensitizer that could induce cell death after light irradiation. Due to PPA's phototoxicity and low efficiency, the main challenge is to implement photosensitizer cell targeting and attacking. In this study, PPA was conjugated with JM-phage by EDC/NHS crosslinking. UV-Vis spectra was used to determine the optimum conjugation percentages of PPA and JM-phage complex for photodynamic inactivation. After photodynamic inactivation, the efficacy of PPA-JM-phage was assessed by performing in vitro experiments, such as MTS assay, scanning electron microscopy, measurement of dysfunctional mitochondria, ROS accumulation, S cell arrest and apoptotic pathway. A single-chain variable-fragment phage (JM) with high affinity to MP65 was screened from human single-fold single-chain variable-fragment libraries and designed as a binding target for C. albicans cells. Subsequently, PPa was integrated into JM phage to generate a combined nanoscale material, which was called PPA-JM-phage. After photodynamic inactivation, the growth of C. albicans was inhibited by PPA-JM-phage and apoptosis was observed. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed shrinking and rupturing of C. albicans . We also found that depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were elevated significantly in C. albicans inhibited by PPA-JM-phage. Additionally, PPA-JM-phage also lead to S-phase arrest, and metacaspase activation

  1. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highsmith, R.F.; Gallaher, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive 125 I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface

  2. Systems biology modeling reveals a possible mechanism of the tumor cell death upon oncogene inactivation in EGFR addicted cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ping Zhou

    Full Text Available Despite many evidences supporting the concept of "oncogene addiction" and many hypotheses rationalizing it, there is still a lack of detailed understanding to the precise molecular mechanism underlying oncogene addiction. In this account, we developed a mathematic model of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR associated signaling network, which involves EGFR-driving proliferation/pro-survival signaling pathways Ras/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K/AKT, and pro-apoptotic signaling pathway apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1/p38. In the setting of sustained EGFR activation, the simulation results show a persistent high level of proliferation/pro-survival effectors phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT, and a basal level of pro-apoptotic effector phospho-p38. The potential of p38 activation (apoptotic potential due to the elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS is largely suppressed by the negative crosstalk between PI3K/AKT and ASK1/p38 pathways. Upon acute EGFR inactivation, the survival signals decay rapidly, followed by a fast increase of the apoptotic signal due to the release of apoptotic potential. Overall, our systems biology modeling together with experimental validations reveals that inhibition of survival signals and concomitant release of apoptotic potential jointly contribute to the tumor cell death following the inhibition of addicted oncogene in EGFR addicted cancers.

  3. Hyperglycemia Augments the Adipogenic Transdifferentiation Potential of Tenocytes and Is Alleviated by Cyclic Mechanical Stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Fu; Huang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Hsing-Kuo; Yao, Chung-Chen Jane; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chao, Yuan-Hung

    2017-12-28

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with damage to tendons, which may result from cellular dysfunction in response to a hyperglycemic environment. Tenocytes express diminished levels of tendon-associated genes under hyperglycemic conditions. In contrast, mechanical stretch enhances tenogenic differentiation. However, whether hyperglycemia increases the non-tenogenic differentiation potential of tenocytes and whether this can be mitigated by mechanical stretch remains elusive. We explored the in vitro effects of high glucose and mechanical stretch on rat primary tenocytes. Specifically, non-tenogenic gene expression, adipogenic potential, cell migration rate, filamentous actin expression, and the activation of signaling pathways were analyzed in tenocytes treated with high glucose, followed by the presence or absence of mechanical stretch. We analyzed tenocyte phenotype in vivo by immunohistochemistry using an STZ (streptozotocin)-induced long-term diabetic mouse model. High glucose-treated tenocytes expressed higher levels of the adipogenic transcription factors PPAR γ and C/EBPs. PPARγ was also highly expressed in diabetic tendons. In addition, increased adipogenic differentiation and decreased cell migration induced by high glucose implicated a fibroblast-to-adipocyte phenotypic change. By applying mechanical stretch to tenocytes in high-glucose conditions, adipogenic differentiation was repressed, while cell motility was enhanced, and fibroblastic morphology and gene expression profiles were strengthened. In part, these effects resulted from a stretch-induced activation of ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinases) and a concomitant inactivation of Akt. Our results show that mechanical stretch alleviates the augmented adipogenic transdifferentiation potential of high glucose-treated tenocytes and helps maintain their fibroblastic characteristics. The alterations induced by high glucose highlight possible pathological mechanisms for diabetic tendinopathy

  4. Andrographolide sodium bisulphite-induced inactivation of urease: inhibitory potency, kinetics and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Zhi-Zhun; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Zhang, Xie; Su, Ji-Yan; Chen, Hai-Ming; Liu, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Zhen-Biao; Xie, Jian-Hui; Su, Zi-Ren

    2015-07-16

    The inhibitory effect of andrographolide sodium bisulphite (ASB) on jack bean urease (JBU) and Helicobacter pylori urease (HPU) was performed to elucidate the inhibitory potency, kinetics and mechanism of inhibition in 20 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, 2 mM EDTA, 25 °C. The ammonia formations, indicator of urease activity, were examined using modified spectrophotometric Berthelot (phenol-hypochlorite) method. The inhibitory effect of ASB was characterized with IC50 values. Lineweaver-Burk and Dixon plots for JBU inhibition of ASB was constructed from the kinetic data. SH-blocking reagents and competitive active site Ni2+ binding inhibitors were employed for mechanism study. Molecular docking technique was used to provide some information on binding conformations as well as confirm the inhibition mode. The IC50 of ASB against JBU and HPU was 3.28±0.13 mM and 3.17±0.34 mM, respectively. The inhibition proved to be competitive and concentration- dependent in a slow-binding progress. The rapid formation of initial ASB-JBU complex with an inhibition constant of Ki=2.86×10(-3) mM was followed by a slow isomerization into the final complex with an overall inhibition constant of Ki*=1.33×10(-4) mM. The protective experiment proved that the urease active site is involved in the binding of ASB. Thiol reagents (L-cysteine and dithiothreithol) strongly protect the enzyme from the loss of enzymatic activity, while boric acid and fluoride show weaker protection, indicating that the active-site sulfhydryl group of JBU was potentially involved in the blocking process. Moreover, inhibition of ASB proved to be reversible since ASB-inactivated JBU could be reactivated by dithiothreitol application. Molecular docking assay suggested that ASB made contacts with the important sulfhydryl group Cys-592 residue and restricted the mobility of the active-site flap. ASB was a competitive inhibitor targeting thiol groups of urease in a slow-binding manner both reversibly and concentration

  5. The assessment of efficacy of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus inactivated vaccine based on the viral quantity and inactivation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Byeongchun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been many efforts to develop efficient vaccines for the control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV. Although inactivated PRRSV vaccines are preferred for their safety, they are weak at inducing humoral immune responses and controlling field PRRSV infection, especially when heterologous viruses are involved. Results In all groups, the sample to positive (S/P ratio of IDEXX ELISA and the virus neutralization (VN titer remained negative until challenge. While viremia did not reduce in the vaccinated groups, the IDEXX-ELISA-specific immunoglobulin G increased more rapidly and to significantly greater levels 7 days after the challenge in all the vaccinated groups compared to the non-vaccinated groups (p 6 PFU/mL PRRSV vaccine-inoculated and binary ethylenimine (BEI-inactivated groups 22 days after challenge (p Conclusions The inactivated vaccine failed to show the humoral immunity, but it showed different immune response after the challenge compared to mock group. Although the 106 PFU/mL-vaccinated and BEI-inactivated groups showed significantly greater VN titers 22 days after challenge, all the groups were already negative for viremia.

  6. Mechanism of high-temperature resistant water-base mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, P

    1981-01-01

    Based on experiments, the causes and laws governing the changes in the performance of water-base mud under high temperature are analyzed, and the requisites and mechanism of treating agents resisting high temperature are discussed. Ways and means are sought for inhibiting, delaying and making use of the effect of high temperature on the performance of mud, while new ideas and systematic views have been expressed on the preparation of treating agents and set-up of a high temperature resistant water-base mud system. High temperature dispersion and high temperature surface inactivation of clay in the mud, as well as their effect and method of utilization are reviewed. Subjects also touched upon include degradation and cross-linking of the high-temperature resistant treating agents, their use and effect. Based on the above, the preparation of a water-base and system capable of resisting 180 to 250/sup 0/C is recommended.

  7. Wastewater disinfection by peracetic acid: assessment of models for tracking residual measurements and inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Domenico; Gehr, Ronald; Bartrand, Timothy A; Liberti, Lorenzo; Notarnicola, Michele; Dell'Erba, Adele; Falsanisi, Dario; Haas, Charles N

    2007-07-01

    With its potential for low (if any) disinfection byproduct formation and easy retrofit for chlorine contactors, peracetic acid (PAA) or use of PAA in combination with other disinfectant technologies may be an attractive alternative to chlorine-based disinfection. Examples of systems that might benefit from use of PAA are water reuse schemes or plants discharging to sensitive receiving water bodies. Though PAA is in use in numerous wastewater treatment plants in Europe, its chemical kinetics, microbial inactivation rates, and mode of action against microorganisms are not thoroughly understood. This paper presents results from experimental studies of PAA demand, PAA decay, and microbial inactivation, with a complementary modeling analysis. Model results are used to evaluate techniques for measurement of PAA concentration and to develop hypotheses regarding the mode of action of PAA in bacterial inactivation. Kinetic and microbial inactivation rate data were collected for typical wastewaters and may be useful for engineers in evaluating whether to convert from chlorine to PAA disinfection.

  8. Mechanism of photodynamic inactivation of hepatocarcinoma cells with sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Yu; Dong, Rong-Chun; Chen, Ji-Yao; Cai, Huai-Xin

    1993-03-01

    The mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlSPC) studied with the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line in culture is reported herein. Photofrin II (PII) was chosen as the control photosensitizer of AlSPC. Deuterium oxide (D2O), an enhancer of singlet oxygen (1O2); 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF), a quencher of 1O2: glycerol, a quencher of OH radical (OH(DOT)); superoxide dismutase (SOD), a quencher of O2- radical (O2-(DOT)); diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC), an inhibitor of SOD and glutathione peroxidase; were introduced into both the processes of photodynamic inactivation of human liver cancer cells in culture with AlSPC (AlSPC-PDT) and with PII (PII-PDT). The results suggest that: 1O2 is dominantly involved in both PII-PDT and AlSPC-PDT; O2-(DOT) is involved in AlSPC-PDT in a lower degree than 1O2, while almost not involved in PII-PDT; OH(DOT) is involved in PII-PDT in a lower degree than 1O2, while almost not involved in AlSPC-PDT.

  9. Pharmacology of the Nav1.1 domain IV voltage sensor reveals coupling between inactivation gating processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Jeremiah D; Sampson, Kevin; Iyer, Vivek; Julius, David; Bosmans, Frank

    2017-06-27

    The Na v 1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel is a critical contributor to excitability in the brain, where pathological loss of function leads to such disorders as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and autism. This voltage-gated sodium (Na v ) channel subtype also plays an important role in mechanical pain signaling by primary afferent somatosensory neurons. Therefore, pharmacologic modulation of Na v 1.1 represents a potential strategy for treating excitability disorders of the brain and periphery. Inactivation is a complex aspect of Na v channel gating and consists of fast and slow components, each of which may involve a contribution from one or more voltage-sensing domains. Here, we exploit the Hm1a spider toxin, a Na v 1.1-selective modulator, to better understand the relationship between these temporally distinct modes of inactivation and ask whether they can be distinguished pharmacologically. We show that Hm1a inhibits the gating movement of the domain IV voltage sensor (VSDIV), hindering both fast and slow inactivation and leading to an increase in Na v 1.1 availability during high-frequency stimulation. In contrast, ICA-121431, a small-molecule Na v 1.1 inhibitor, accelerates a subsequent VSDIV gating transition to accelerate entry into the slow inactivated state, resulting in use-dependent block. Further evidence for functional coupling between fast and slow inactivation is provided by a Na v 1.1 mutant in which fast inactivation removal has complex effects on slow inactivation. Taken together, our data substantiate the key role of VSDIV in Na v channel fast and slow inactivation and demonstrate that these gating processes are sequential and coupled through VSDIV. These findings provide insight into a pharmacophore on VSDIV through which modulation of inactivation gating can inhibit or facilitate Na v 1.1 function.

  10. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadden, Shawn C; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here, we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport.

  11. Thermal inactivation of enzymes and pathogens in biosamples for MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnoff, Martin; Cazares, Lisa H; Sköld, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Protein denaturation is the common basis for enzyme inactivation and inactivation of pathogens, necessary for preservation and safe handling of biosamples for downstream analysis. While heat-stabilization technology has been used in proteomic and peptidomic research since its introduction in 2009, the advantages of using the technique for simultaneous pathogen inactivation have only recently been addressed. The time required for enzyme inactivation by heat (≈1 min) is short compared with chemical treatments, and inactivation is irreversible in contrast to freezing. Heat stabilization thus facilitates mass spectrometric studies of biomolecules with a fast conversion rate, and expands the chemical space of potential biomarkers to include more short-lived entities, such as phosphorylated proteins, in tissue samples as well as whole-blood (dried blood sample) samples.

  12. Pathogen inactivation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J P R; Transue, S; Snyder, E L

    2006-01-01

    of investigation. Clearly, regulatory agencies have a major role to play in the evaluation of these new technologies. This chapter will cover the several types of pathogen-reduction systems, mechanisms of action, the inactivation efficacy for specific types of pathogens, toxicology of the various systems and the published research and clinical trial data supporting their potential usefulness. Due to the nature of the field, pathogen reduction is a work in progress and this review should be considered as a snapshot in time rather than a clear picture of what the future will bring.

  13. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highsmith, R.F.; Gallaher, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive /sup 125/I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface.

  14. Hda inactivation of DnaA is the predominant mechanism preventing hyperinitiation of Escherichia coli DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Johanna E; Breier, Adam M; Brendler, Therese; Austin, Stuart; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R; Crooke, Elliott

    2005-08-01

    Initiation of DNA replication from the Escherichia coli chromosomal origin is highly regulated, assuring that replication occurs precisely once per cell cycle. Three mechanisms for regulation of replication initiation have been proposed: titration of free DnaA initiator protein by the datA locus, sequestration of newly replicated origins by SeqA protein and regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA), in which active ATP-DnaA is converted to the inactive ADP-bound form. DNA microarray analyses showed that the level of initiation in rapidly growing cells that lack datA was indistinguishable from that in wild-type cells, and that the absence of SeqA protein caused only a modest increase in initiation, in agreement with flow-cytometry data. In contrast, cells lacking Hda overinitiated replication twofold, implicating RIDA as the predominant mechanism preventing extra initiation events in a cell cycle.

  15. Photodynamic inactivation of foodborne bacteria by eosin Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, E; Dos Santos, A R; Fiori da Silva, A; Ribeiro, L H; Favero, M E; Campanerut-Sá, P A Z; de Freitas, C F; Caetano, W; Hioka, N; Mikcha, J M G

    2018-03-25

    The aim of this study was evaluate the effect of photodynamic inactivation mediated by eosin Y in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ATCC 14028, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778. Bacteria (10 7 CFU per ml) were incubated with eosin Y at concentrations ranging from 0·1 to 10 μmol l -1 , irradiated by green LED (λ max 490-570 nm) for 5, 10 and 15 min and the cellular viability was determined. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was completely inactivated when treated with 10 μmol l -1 eosin Y for 10 min. Treatments reduced B. cereus and Salm. Typhimurium counts to 2·7 log CFU per ml and 1·7 log CFU per ml, respectively. Escherichia coli counts were slightly reduced. Staphylococcus aureus presented the highest sensitivity, being completely inactivated by eosin Y at 5 μmol l -1 and 5 min of illumination. The reduction of cellular viability of photoinactivated Staph. aureus was also demonstrated by flow cytometry and morphological changes were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Eosin Y in combination with LED produced bacterial inactivation, being a potential candidate for photodynamic inactivation. This study evidenced the efficacy of photodynamic inactivation as a novel and promising alternative to bacterial control. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Modeling of human factor Va inactivation by activated protein C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo Maria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because understanding of the inventory, connectivity and dynamics of the components characterizing the process of coagulation is relatively mature, it has become an attractive target for physiochemical modeling. Such models can potentially improve the design of therapeutics. The prothrombinase complex (composed of the protease factor (FXa and its cofactor FVa plays a central role in this network as the main producer of thrombin, which catalyses both the activation of platelets and the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, the main substances of a clot. A key negative feedback loop that prevents clot propagation beyond the site of injury is the thrombin-dependent generation of activated protein C (APC, an enzyme that inactivates FVa, thus neutralizing the prothrombinase complex. APC inactivation of FVa is complex, involving the production of partially active intermediates and “protection” of FVa from APC by both FXa and prothrombin. An empirically validated mathematical model of this process would be useful in advancing the predictive capacity of comprehensive models of coagulation. Results A model of human APC inactivation of prothrombinase was constructed in a stepwise fashion by analyzing time courses of FVa inactivation in empirical reaction systems with increasing number of interacting components and generating corresponding model constructs of each reaction system. Reaction mechanisms, rate constants and equilibrium constants informing these model constructs were initially derived from various research groups reporting on APC inactivation of FVa in isolation, or in the presence of FXa or prothrombin. Model predictions were assessed against empirical data measuring the appearance and disappearance of multiple FVa degradation intermediates as well as prothrombinase activity changes, with plasma proteins derived from multiple preparations. Our work integrates previously published findings and through the cooperative

  17. Fullerene C60 and graphene photosensibiles for photodynamic virus inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, I.; Hvorostovsky, A.; Kiselev, V.; Zarubaev, V.; Kiselev, O.; Piotrovsky, L.; Anfimov, P.; Krisko, T.; Muraviova, T.; Rylkov, V.; Starodubzev, A.; Sirotkin, A.; Grishkanich, A.; Kudashev, I.; Kancer, A.; Kustikova, M.; Bykovskaya, E.; Mayurova, A.; Stupnikov, A.; Ruzankina, J.; Afanasyev, M.; Lukyanov, N.; Redka, D.; Paklinov, N.

    2018-02-01

    A solid-phase photosensitizer based on aggregated C60 fullerene and graphene oxide for photodynamic inactivation of pathogens in biological fluids was studied. The most promising technologies of inactivation include the photodynamic effect, which consists in the inactivation of infectious agents by active oxygen forms (including singlet oxygen), formed when light is activated by the photosensitizer introduced into the plasma. Research shows features of solid-phase systems based on graphene and fullerene C60 oxide, which is a combination of an effective inactivating pathogens (for example, influenza viruses) reactive oxygen species formed upon irradiation of the photosensitizer in aqueous and biological fluids, a high photostability fullerene coatings and the possibility of full recovery photosensitizer from the biological environment after the photodynamic action.

  18. High pressure inactivation of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Sanelle; Silva, Filipa V M

    2017-05-01

    Brettanomyces bruxellensis ("Brett") is a major spoilage concern for the wine industry worldwide, leading to undesirable sensory properties. Sulphur dioxide, is currently the preferred method for wine preservation. However, due to its negative effects on consumers, the use of new alternative non-thermal technologies are increasingly being investigated. The aim of this study was to determine and model the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) conditions and yeast strain on the inactivation of "Brett" in Cabernet Sauvignon wine. Processing at 200 MPa for 3 min resulted in 5.8 log reductions. However higher pressure is recommended to achieve high throughput in the wine industry, for example >6.0 log reductions were achieved after 400 MPa for 5 s. The inactivation of B. bruxellensis is pressure and time dependent, with increased treatment time and pressure leading to increased yeast inactivation. It was also found that yeast strain had a significant effect on HPP inactivation, with AWRI 1499 being the most resistant strain. The Weibull model successfully described the HPP "Brett" inactivation. HPP is a viable alternative for the inactivation of B. bruxellensis in wine, with the potential to reduce the industry's reliance on sulphur dioxide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inactivation Data.xlsx

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data set is a spreadsheet that contains results of inactivation experiments that were conducted to to determine the effectiveness of chlorine in inactivating B....

  20. Redox-sensitive GFP fusions for monitoring the catalytic mechanism and inactivation of peroxiredoxins in living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Staudacher

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein 2 (roGFP2 is a valuable tool for redox measurements in living cells. Here, we demonstrate that roGFP2 can also be used to gain mechanistic insights into redox catalysis in vivo. In vitro enzyme properties such as the rate-limiting reduction of wild type and mutant forms of the model peroxiredoxin PfAOP are shown to correlate with the ratiometrically measured degree of oxidation of corresponding roGFP2 fusion proteins. Furthermore, stopped-flow kinetic measurements of the oxidative half-reaction of PfAOP support the interpretation that changes in the roGFP2 signal can be used to map hyperoxidation-based inactivation of the attached peroxidase. Potential future applications of our system include the improvement of redox sensors, the estimation of absolute intracellular peroxide concentrations and the in vivo assessment of protein structure-function relationships that cannot easily be addressed with recombinant enzymes, for example, the effect of post-translational protein modifications on enzyme catalysis. Keywords: Peroxiredoxin, Redox sensor, roGFP2, H2O2, Plasmodium falciparum

  1. The inactivation of papain by high LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisby, R.H.; Cundall, R.B.; Sims, H.E.; Burns, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of varying LET over a wide range (0.2-1570 eV/nm) on the radiation-induced inactivation of the enzyme papain in dilute aqueous solution has been investigated. Measurements of total, reparable and non-reparable inactivation G values in oxygen, nitrous oxide and argon saturated solutions have allowed the contributions to inactivation from radicals and hydrogen peroxide to be evaluated. At high LET the results demonstrate an increasing component due to reaction of the superoxide radical, formed from oxygen produced in the track as a primary radiolysis product. This effect was not observed in our previous study with ribonuclease due to the insensitivity of ribonuclease to inactivation by superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. The results obtained with papain clearly demonstrate a maximum in G(H 2 O 2 ) at an LET of equivalent to 140 eV/nm. Generation of O 2 within the track as a primary radiolysis product at high LET now appears to be confirmed as an important mechanism leading to reduction in the oxygen enhancement ratio for cellular systems exposed to high LET radiations (Baverstock and Burns 1981). (author)

  2. Inactivation of pathogenic bacteria in food matrices: high pressure processing, photodynamic inactivation and pressure-assisted photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, A.; Couceiro, J.; Bonifácio, D.; Martins, C.; Almeida, A.; Neves, M. G. P. M. S.; Faustino, M. A. F.; Saraiva, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Traditional food processing methods frequently depend on the application of high temperature. However, heat may cause undesirable changes in food properties and often has a negative impact on nutritional value and organoleptic characteristics. Therefore, reducing the microbial load without compromising the desirable properties of food products is still a technological challenge. High-pressure processing (HPP) can be classified as a cold pasteurization technique, since it is a non-thermal food preservation method that uses hydrostatic pressure to inactivate spoilage microorganisms. At the same time, it increases shelf life and retains the original features of food. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is also regarded as promising approach for the decontamination of food matrices. In this case, the inactivation of bacterial cells is achieved by the cytotoxic effects of reactive oxygens species (ROS) produced from the combined interaction of a photosensitizer molecule, light and oxygen. This short review examines some recent developments on the application of HPP and PDI with food-grade photosensitizers for the inactivation of listeriae, taken as a food pathogen model. The results of a proof-of-concept trial of the use of high-pressure as a coadjutant to increase the efficiency of photodynamic inactivation of bacterial endospores is also addressed.

  3. Membrane permeabilization in relation to inactivation kinetics of Lactobacillus species due to pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, P C; Bos, A P; Ueckert, J

    2001-07-01

    Membrane permeabilization due to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment of gram-positive Lactobacillus cells was investigated by using propidium iodide uptake and single-cell analysis with flow cytometry. Electric field strength, energy input, treatment time, and growth phase affected membrane permeabilization of Lactobacillus plantarum during PEF treatment. A correlation between PEF inactivation and membrane permeabilization of L. plantarum cells was demonstrated, whereas no relationship was observed between membrane permeabilization and heat inactivation. The same results were obtained with a Lactobacillus fermentum strain, but the latter organism was more PEF resistant and exhibited less membrane permeabilization, indicating that various bacteria have different responses to PEF treatment. While membrane permeabilization was the main factor involved in the mechanism of inactivation, the growth phase and the acidity of the environment also influenced inactivation. By using flow cytometry it was possible to sort cells in the L. plantarum population based on different cell sizes and shapes, and the results were confirmed by image analysis. An apparent effect of morphology on membrane permeabilization was observed, and larger cells were more easily permeabilized than smaller cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the ability of PEF treatment to cause membrane permeabilization is an important factor in determining inactivation. This finding should have an effect on the final choice of the processing parameters used so that all microorganisms can be inactivated and, consequently, on the use of PEF treatment as an alternative method for preserving food products.

  4. Membrane Permeabilization in Relation to Inactivation Kinetics of Lactobacillus Species due to Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Patrick C.; Bos, Ad P.; Ueckert, Joerg

    2001-01-01

    Membrane permeabilization due to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment of gram-positive Lactobacillus cells was investigated by using propidium iodide uptake and single-cell analysis with flow cytometry. Electric field strength, energy input, treatment time, and growth phase affected membrane permeabilization of Lactobacillus plantarum during PEF treatment. A correlation between PEF inactivation and membrane permeabilization of L. plantarum cells was demonstrated, whereas no relationship was observed between membrane permeabilization and heat inactivation. The same results were obtained with a Lactobacillus fermentum strain, but the latter organism was more PEF resistant and exhibited less membrane permeabilization, indicating that various bacteria have different responses to PEF treatment. While membrane permeabilization was the main factor involved in the mechanism of inactivation, the growth phase and the acidity of the environment also influenced inactivation. By using flow cytometry it was possible to sort cells in the L. plantarum population based on different cell sizes and shapes, and the results were confirmed by image analysis. An apparent effect of morphology on membrane permeabilization was observed, and larger cells were more easily permeabilized than smaller cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the ability of PEF treatment to cause membrane permeabilization is an important factor in determining inactivation. This finding should have an effect on the final choice of the processing parameters used so that all microorganisms can be inactivated and, consequently, on the use of PEF treatment as an alternative method for preserving food products. PMID:11425727

  5. Development of an inactivated candidate vaccine against Chandipura virus (Rhabdoviridae: Vesiculovirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadi, R S; Sudeep, A B; Barde, P V; Arankalle, V A; Mishra, A C

    2011-06-20

    A Vero cell based vaccine candidate against Chandipura (CHP) virus (Rhabdoviridae: Vesiculovirus), was developed and evaluated for immunogenicity in mice. Virus was purified by ultracentrifugation on 30% glycerol cushion followed by differential centrifugation on 10-60% sucrose gradient and inactivated with β-propio lactone at a concentration of 1:3500. The inactivated product was blended with aluminium phosphate (3%) and immunized 4-week-old Swiss albino mice. Neutralizing antibodies in the range of 1:10 to 160 and 1:80 to 1:320 was detected with 85% and 100% sero-conversion after 2nd and 3rd dose, respectively. All the immunized mice with antibody titer above 1:20 survived live virus challenge. The vaccine candidate has potential to be an efficient vaccine against CHP virus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inactivation of biological substances by local heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Masahiro [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1982-09-01

    Mechanism of inactivation of biological substances caused by local heating was investigated. The effect of hot-zone formation by local heating on reaction of radicals was previously evaluated. The thermal increase in a hot zone due to low energy LET x-rays had little effect on reactibility of the radicals, but, in a hot zone caused by high energy LET x-rays, formed radicals seemed immediately react to active biological molecules to inactivate them. Direct thermal effect on biological molecules was analysed. Thermal increase in a hot zone may induce degenaration of biological molecules which seems to occur in a short time judged from the extension of a hot zone and the duration of high temperature.

  7. Activity of the anticonvulsant lacosamide in experimental and human epilepsy via selective effects on slow Na+ channel inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Dominik; Opitz, Thoralf; Niespodziany, Isabelle; Wolff, Christian; Beck, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    In human epilepsy, pharmacoresistance to antiepileptic drug therapy is a major problem affecting ~30% of patients with epilepsy. Many classical antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated sodium channels, and their potent activity in inhibiting high-frequency firing has been attributed to their strong use-dependent blocking action. In chronic epilepsy, a loss of use-dependent block has emerged as a potential cellular mechanism of pharmacoresistance for anticonvulsants acting on voltage-gated sodium channels. The anticonvulsant drug lacosamide (LCM) also targets sodium channels, but has been shown to preferentially affect sodium channel slow inactivation processes, in contrast to most other anticonvulsants. We used whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in acutely isolated cells to investigate the effects of LCM on transient Na + currents. Furthermore, we used whole-cell current clamp recordings to assess effects on repetitive action potential firing in hippocampal slices. We show here that LCM exerts its effects primarily via shifting the slow inactivation voltage dependence to more hyperpolarized potentials in hippocampal dentate granule cells from control and epileptic rats, and from patients with epilepsy. It is important to note that this activity of LCM was maintained in chronic experimental and human epilepsy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficacy of LCM in inhibiting high-frequency firing is undiminished in chronic experimental and human epilepsy. Taken together, these results show that LCM exhibits maintained efficacy in chronic epilepsy, in contrast to conventional use-dependent sodium channel blockers such as carbamazepine. They also establish that targeting slow inactivation may be a promising strategy for overcoming target mechanisms of pharmacoresistance. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Potentiation by potassium iodide using TPPS4 for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liyi; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2018-02-01

    Potassium iodide can potentiate antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (aPDI) of a broad-spectrum of microorganisms, producing many extra logs of killing. We compared two charged porphyrins, TPPS4 (thought to be anionic and not able to bind to Gram-negative bacteria) and TMPyP4 (considered cationic and well able to bind to bacteria). As expected TPPS4 + light did not kill Gram-negative Escherichia coli, but surprisingly when 100 mM KI was added, it was highly effective at mediating aPDI (eradication at 200 nM + 10 J/cm2 of 415 nm light). TPPS4 was more effective than TMPyP4 in eradicating the Gram-positive bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the fungal yeast Candida albicans (regardless of KI). TPPS4 was also highly active against E. coli after a centrifugation step when KI was added, suggesting that the supposedly anionic porphyrin bound to bacteria and Candida. We conclude that TPPS4 behaves as if it has some cationic character in the presence of bacteria, which may be related to its supply from vendors in the form of a dihydrochloride salt.

  9. Regional inactivations of primate ventral prefrontal cortex reveal two distinct mechanisms underlying negative bias in decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Hannah F; Horst, Nicole K; Roberts, Angela C

    2015-03-31

    Dysregulation of the orbitofrontal and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices is implicated in anxiety and mood disorders, but the specific contributions of each region are unknown, including how they gate the impact of threat on decision making. To address this, the effects of GABAergic inactivation of these regions were studied in marmoset monkeys performing an instrumental approach-avoidance decision-making task that is sensitive to changes in anxiety. Inactivation of either region induced a negative bias away from punishment that could be ameliorated with anxiolytic treatment. However, whereas the effects of ventrolateral prefrontal cortex inactivation on punishment avoidance were seen immediately, those of orbitofrontal cortex inactivation were delayed and their expression was dependent upon an amygdala-anterior hippocampal circuit. We propose that these negative biases result from deficits in attentional control and punishment prediction, respectively, and that they provide the basis for understanding how distinct regional prefrontal dysregulation contributes to the heterogeneity of anxiety disorders with implications for cognitive-behavioral treatment strategies.

  10. Inactivated Orf virus (Parapoxvirus ovis) elicits antifibrotic activity in models of liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowatzky, Janina; Knorr, Andreas; Hirth-Dietrich, Claudia; Siegling, Angela; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Limmer, Andreas; Knolle, Percy; Weber, Olaf

    2013-05-01

    Inactivated Orf virus (ORFV, Parapoxvirus ovis) demonstrates strong antiviral activity in animal models including a human hepatitis B virus (HBV)-transgenic mouse. In addition, expression of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin-10 (IL-10) was induced after administration of inactivated ORFV in these mice. IFN-γ and IL-10 are known to elicit antifibrotic activity. We therefore aimed to study antifibrotic activity of inactivated ORFV in models of liver fibrosis. We characterized ORFV-induced hepatic cytokine expression in rats. We then studied ORFV in two models of liver fibrosis in rats, pig serum-induced liver fibrosis and carbon tetrachloride (CCL4 )-induced liver fibrosis. ORFV induced hepatic expression of IFN-γ and IL-10 in rats. ORFV mediated antifibrotic activity when administrated concomitantly with the fibrosis-inducing agents in both models of liver fibrosis. Importantly, when CCL4 -induced liver fibrosis was already established, ORFV application still showed significant antifibrotic activity. In addition, we were able to demonstrate a direct antifibrotic effect of ORFV on stellate cells. These results establish a potential novel antifibrotic therapeutic approach that not only prevents but also resolves established liver fibrosis. Further studies are required to unravel the details of the mechanisms involved. © 2012 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  11. Carvacrol suppresses high pressure high temperature inactivation of Bacillus cereus spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu-Thi, Hue; Corthouts, Jorinde; Passaris, Ioannis; Grauwet, Tara; Aertsen, Abram; Hendrickx, Marc; Michiels, Chris W

    2015-03-16

    The inactivation of bacterial spores generally proceeds faster and at lower temperatures when heat treatments are conducted under high pressure, and high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing is, therefore, receiving an increased interest from food processors. However, the mechanisms of spore inactivation by HPHT treatment are poorly understood, particularly at moderately elevated temperature. In the current work, we studied inactivation of the spores of Bacillus cereus F4430/73 by HPHT treatment for 5 min at 600MPa in the temperature range of 50-100°C, using temperature increments of 5°C. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the natural antimicrobial carvacrol on spore germination and inactivation under these conditions. Spore inactivation by HPHT was less than about 1 log unit at 50 to 70°C, but gradually increased at higher temperatures up to about 5 log units at 100°C. DPA release and loss of spore refractility in the spore population were higher at moderate (≤65°C) than at high (≥70°C) treatment temperatures, and we propose that moderate conditions induced the normal physiological pathway of spore germination resulting in fully hydrated spores, while at higher temperatures this pathway was suppressed and replaced by another mechanism of pressure-induced dipicolinic acid (DPA) release that results only in partial spore rehydration, probably because spore cortex hydrolysis is inhibited. Carvacrol strongly suppressed DPA release and spore rehydration during HPHT treatment at ≤65°C and also partly inhibited DPA release at ≥65°C. Concomitantly, HPHT spore inactivation was reduced by carvacrol at 65-90°C but unaffected at 95-100°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of a non-denaturing detergent and a guanidinium-based inactivation agent on the viability of Ebola virus in mock clinical serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J E; Easterbrook, L; Pitman, J; Anderson, D; Roddy, S; Bailey, D; Vipond, R; Bruce, C B; Roberts, A D

    2017-12-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa required the rapid testing of clinical material for the presence of potentially high titre Ebola virus (EBOV). Safe, fast and effective methods for the inactivation of such clinical samples are required so that rapid diagnostic tests including downstream analysis by RT-qPCR or nucleotide sequencing can be carried out. One of the most commonly used guanidinium - based denaturing agents, AVL (Qiagen) has been shown to fully inactivate EBOV once ethanol is added, however this is not compatible with the use of automated nucleic acid extraction systems. Additional inactivation agents need to be identified that can be used in automated systems. A candidate inactivation agent is Triton X-100, a non-denaturing detergent that is frequently used in clinical nucleic acid extraction procedures and has previously been used for inactivation of EBOV. In this study the effect of 0.1% and 1.0% Triton X-100 (final concentration 0.08% and 0.8% respectively) alone and in combination with AVL on the viability of EBOV (10 6 TCID 50 /ml) spiked into commercially available pooled negative human serum was tested. The presence of viable EBOV in the treated samples was assessed by carrying out three serial passages of the samples in Vero E6 cells (37°C, 5% CO 2 , 1 week for each passage). At the end of each passage the cells were observed for evidence of cytopathic effect and samples were taken for rRT-PCR analysis for the presence of EBOV RNA. Before cell culture cytotoxic components of AVL and Triton X-100 were removed from the samples using size exclusion spin column technology or a hydrophobic adsorbent resin. The results of this study showed that EBOV spiked into human serum was not fully inactivated when treated with either 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100 for 10 mins or 1.0% (v/v) Triton X-100 for 20 mins (final concentrations 0.08% and 0.8% Triton X-100 respectively). AVL alone also did not consistently provide complete inactivation. Samples treated

  13. Elective Inactivation of Total Artificial Heart Technology in Non-Futile Situations: Inpatients, Outpatients and Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramstedt, Katrina A.

    2004-01-01

    Total artificial heart technology as a potential clinical therapy raises the issue of elective device inactivation in both futile and non-futile situations. This article explores elective device inactivation in non-futile situations. In reply to such requests for inactivation, the medical team should reflect on the individual's decision-making…

  14. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Human norovirus (NoV) causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV) as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA) or glutaraldehyde (GDA) for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v)] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v)] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA) on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes). Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces. PMID:19583832

  15. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmann Jörg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human norovirus (NoV causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA or glutaraldehyde (GDA for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes. Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces.

  16. Intranasal Immunization with Pressure Inactivated Avian Influenza Elicits Cellular and Humoral Responses in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana P C Barroso

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses pose a serious global health threat, particularly in light of newly emerging strains, such as the avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 viruses. Vaccination remains the primary method for preventing acquiring influenza or for avoiding developing serious complications related to the disease. Vaccinations based on inactivated split virus vaccines or on chemically inactivated whole virus have some important drawbacks, including changes in the immunogenic properties of the virus. To induce a greater mucosal immune response, intranasally administered vaccines are highly desired as they not only prevent disease but can also block the infection at its primary site. To avoid these drawbacks, hydrostatic pressure has been used as a potential method for viral inactivation and vaccine production. In this study, we show that hydrostatic pressure inactivates the avian influenza A H3N8 virus, while still maintaining hemagglutinin and neuraminidase functionalities. Challenged vaccinated animals showed no disease signs (ruffled fur, lethargy, weight loss, and huddling. Similarly, these animals showed less Evans Blue dye leakage and lower cell counts in their bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with the challenged non-vaccinated group. We found that the whole inactivated particles were capable of generating a neutralizing antibody response in serum, and IgA was also found in nasal mucosa and feces. After the vaccination and challenge we observed Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion with a prevalence of IFN-γ. Our data indicate that the animals present a satisfactory immune response after vaccination and are protected against infection. Our results may pave the way for the development of a novel pressure-based vaccine against influenza virus.

  17. Radiation inactivation of multimeric enzymes: application to subunit interactions of adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkman, A.S.; Skorecki, K.L.; Ausiello, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation inactivation has been applied extensively to determine the molecular weight of soluble enzyme and receptor systems from the slope of a linear ln (activity) vs. dose curve. Complex nonlinear inactivation curves are predicted for multimeric enzyme systems, composed of distinct subunits in equilibrium with multimeric complexes. For the system A1 + A2----A1A2, with an active A1A2 complex (associative model), the ln (activity) vs. dose curve is linear for high dissociation constant, K. If a monomer, A1, has all the enzyme activity (dissociative model), the ln (activity) vs. dose curve has an activation hump at low radiation dose if the inactive subunit, A2, has a higher molecular weight than A1 and has upward concavity when A2 is smaller than A1. In general, a radiation inactivation model for a multistep mechanism for enzyme activation fulfills the characteristics of an associative or dissociative model if the reaction step forming active enzyme is an associative or dissociative reaction. Target theory gives the molecular weight of the active enzyme subunit or complex from the limiting slope of the ln (activity) vs. dose curve at high radiation dose. If energy transfer occurs among subunits in the multimer, the ln (activity) vs. dose curve is linear for a single active component and is concave upward for two or more active components. The use of radiation inactivation as a method to determine enzyme size and multimeric subunit assembly is discussed with specific application to the hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase system. It is shown that the complex inactivation curves presented in the accompanying paper can be used select the best mechanism out of a series of seven proposed mechanisms for the activation of adenylate cyclase by hormone

  18. The Wnt Transcriptional Switch: TLE Removal or Inactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Aravinda-Bharathi; Sinha, Abhishek; Fan, Vinson B; Cadigan, Ken M

    2018-02-01

    Many targets of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway are regulated by TCF transcription factors, which play important roles in animal development, stem cell biology, and oncogenesis. TCFs can regulate Wnt targets through a "transcriptional switch," repressing gene expression in unstimulated cells and promoting transcription upon Wnt signaling. However, it is not clear whether this switch mechanism is a general feature of Wnt gene regulation or limited to a subset of Wnt targets. Co-repressors of the TLE family are known to contribute to the repression of Wnt targets in the absence of signaling, but how they are inactivated or displaced by Wnt signaling is poorly understood. In this mini-review, we discuss several recent reports that address the prevalence and molecular mechanisms of the Wnt transcription switch, including the finding of Wnt-dependent ubiquitination/inactivation of TLEs. Together, these findings highlight the growing complexity of the regulation of gene expression by the Wnt pathway. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shionoiri, Nozomi; Nogariya, Osamu; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tsuyo@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Feline calicivirus was inactivated electrochemically by a factor of >5 log. • The electrochemical treatment was performed at 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 15 min. • Electrochemical treatment caused oxidation of viral proteins. • Oxidation of viral proteins can lead to loss of viral structural integrity. - Abstract: Pathogenic viral infections are an international public health concern, and viral disinfection has received increasing attention. Electrochemical treatment has been used for treatment of water contaminated by bacteria for several decades, and although in recent years several reports have investigated viral inactivation kinetics, the mode of action of viral inactivation by electrochemical treatment remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated the inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for human noroviruses, by electrochemical treatment in a developed flow-cell equipped with a screen-printed electrode. The viral infectivity titer was reduced by over 5 orders of magnitude after 15 min of treatment at 0.9 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Proteomic study of electrochemically inactivated virus revealed oxidation of peptides located in the viral particles; oxidation was not observed in the non-treated sample. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed that viral particles in the treated sample had irregular structures. These results suggest that electrochemical treatment inactivates FCV via oxidation of peptides in the structural region, causing structural deformation of virus particles. This first report of viral protein damage through electrochemical treatment will contribute to broadening the understanding of viral inactivation mechanisms.

  20. High Pressure Inactivation of HAV within Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to be inactivated within Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by high pressure processing was evaluated. HAV was bioaccumulated within mussels to approximately 6-log10 PFU by exposure of mussels to HAV-contamina...

  1. The mechanism of photosystem-II inactivation during sulphur deprivation-induced H2 production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Valéria; Vidal-Meireles, André; Podmaniczki, Anna; Szentmihályi, Klára; Rákhely, Gábor; Zsigmond, Laura; Kovács, László; Tóth, Szilvia Z

    2018-05-01

    Sulphur limitation may restrain cell growth and viability. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, sulphur limitation may induce H 2 production lasting for several days, which can be exploited as a renewable energy source. Sulphur limitation causes a large number of physiological changes, including the inactivation of photosystem II (PSII), leading to the establishment of hypoxia, essential for the increase in hydrogenase expression and activity. The inactivation of PSII has long been assumed to be caused by the sulphur-limited turnover of its reaction center protein PsbA. Here we reinvestigated this issue in detail and show that: (i) upon transferring Chlamydomonas cells to sulphur-free media, the cellular sulphur content decreases only by about 25%; (ii) as demonstrated by lincomycin treatments, PsbA has a significant turnover, and other photosynthetic subunits, namely RbcL and CP43, are degraded more rapidly than PsbA. On the other hand, sulphur limitation imposes oxidative stress early on, most probably involving the formation of singlet oxygen in PSII, which leads to an increase in the expression of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase, playing an essential role in ascorbate biosynthesis. When accumulated to the millimolar concentration range, ascorbate may inactivate the oxygen-evolving complex and provide electrons to PSII, albeit at a low rate. In the absence of a functional donor side and sufficient electron transport, PSII reaction centers are inactivated and degraded. We therefore demonstrate that the inactivation of PSII is a complex and multistep process, which may serve to mitigate the damaging effects of sulphur limitation. © 2018 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Pulsed dielectric barrier discharge for Bacillus subtilis inactivation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Arias, A. N.; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G.; López-Callejas, R.; Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Muñoz-Castro, A. E.; de la Piedad Beneitez, A.

    2012-06-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus subtilis bacteria in water has been experimentally studied by means of a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (PDBD) in a coaxial reactor endowed with an alumina dielectric. The plasma source is capable of operating at atmospheric pressure with gas, water or hybrid gas-liquid media at adjustable 25 kV pulses, 30 μs long and at a 500 Hz frequency. In order to evaluate the inactivation efficiency of the system, a set of experiments were designed on the basis of oxygen flow control. The initial data have showed a significant bacterial rate reduction of 103-107 CFU/mL. Additional results proved that applying an oxygen flow for a few seconds during the PDBD treatment inactivates the Bacillus subtilis population with 99.99% effectiveness. As a reference, without gas flow but with the same exposure times, this percentage is reduced to ~90%. The analysis of the relationship between inactivation rate and chemical species in the discharge has been carried out using optical emission spectroscopy as to identifying the main reactive species. Reactive oxygen species such as atomic oxygen and ozone tuned out to be the dominant germicidal species. Some proposed inactivation mechanisms of this technique are discussed.

  3. Pulsed dielectric barrier discharge for Bacillus subtilis inactivation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández-Arias, A N; López-Callejas, R; De la Piedad Beneitez, A; Rodríguez-Méndez, B G; Valencia-Alvarado, R; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Peña-Eguiluz, R; Barocio, S R; Muñoz-Castro, A E

    2012-01-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus subtilis bacteria in water has been experimentally studied by means of a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (PDBD) in a coaxial reactor endowed with an alumina dielectric. The plasma source is capable of operating at atmospheric pressure with gas, water or hybrid gas-liquid media at adjustable 25 kV pulses, 30 μs long and at a 500 Hz frequency. In order to evaluate the inactivation efficiency of the system, a set of experiments were designed on the basis of oxygen flow control. The initial data have showed a significant bacterial rate reduction of 10 3 -10 7 CFU/mL. Additional results proved that applying an oxygen flow for a few seconds during the PDBD treatment inactivates the Bacillus subtilis population with 99.99% effectiveness. As a reference, without gas flow but with the same exposure times, this percentage is reduced to ∼90%. The analysis of the relationship between inactivation rate and chemical species in the discharge has been carried out using optical emission spectroscopy as to identifying the main reactive species. Reactive oxygen species such as atomic oxygen and ozone tuned out to be the dominant germicidal species. Some proposed inactivation mechanisms of this technique are discussed.

  4. A mechanical wave system to show waveforms similar to quantum mechanical wavefunctions in a potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faletič, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Interviews with students suggest that even though they understand the formalism and the formal nature of quantum theory, they still often desire a mental picture of what the equations describe and some tangible experience with the wavefunctions. Here we discuss a mechanical wave system capable of reproducing correctly a mechanical equivalent of a quantum system in a potential, and the resulting waveforms in principle of any form. We have successfully reproduced the finite potential well, the potential barrier and the parabolic potential. We believe that these mechanical waveforms can provide a valuable experience base for introductory students to start from. We aim to show that mechanical systems that are described with the same mathematics as quantum mechanical, indeed behave in the same way. We believe that even if treated purely as a wave phenomenon, the system provides much insight into wave mechanics. This can be especially useful for physics teachers and others who often need to resort to concepts and experience rather than mathematics when explaining physical phenomena. (paper)

  5. Changes in H(+)-ATP Synthase Activity, Proton Electrochemical Gradient, and pH in Pea Chloroplast Can Be Connected with Variation Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Surova, Lyubov; Morozova, Ekaterina; Sherstneva, Oksana; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Local stimulation induces generation and propagation of electrical signals, including the variation potential (VP) and action potential, in plants. Burning-induced VP changes the physiological state of plants; specifically, it inactivates photosynthesis. However, the mechanisms that decrease photosynthesis are poorly understood. We investigated these mechanisms by measuring VP-connected systemic changes in CO2 assimilation, parameters of light reactions of photosynthesis, electrochromic pigment absorbance shifts, and light scattering. We reveal that inactivation of photosynthesis in the pea, including inactivation of dark and light reactions, was connected with the VP. Inactivation of dark reactions decreased the rate constant of the fast relaxation of the electrochromic pigment absorbance shift, which reflected a decrease in the H(+)-ATP synthase activity. This decrease likely contributed to the acidification of the chloroplast lumen, which developed after VP induction. However, VP-connected decrease of the proton motive force across the thylakoid membrane, possibly, reflected a decreased pH in the stroma. This decrease may be another mechanism of chloroplast lumen acidification. Overall, stroma acidification can decrease electron flow through photosystem I, and lumen acidification induces growth of fluorescence non-photochemical quenching and decreases electron flow through photosystem II, i.e., pH decreases in the stroma and lumen, possibly, contribute to the VP-induced inactivation of light reactions of photosynthesis.

  6. Mechanism of reactivation of the UV-inactivated cells of Escherichia coli by cell extracts of propionic acid bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'eva, L.I.; Khodzhaev, E.Y.; Ponomareva, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    Two mechanisms of reactivation of UV-inactivated Escherichia coli cells - photoreactivation (PhR) and reactivation by the dialyzate of cell extract of propionic acid bacteria - are shown to be different but not completely additive. PhR displays an insignificant negative effect on the reactivaton by active substances (peptides) of the dialyzate, whereas reactivation by dialyzate inhibits PhR. The maximal reactivation can be attained under complete PhR followed by the protective action of dialyzate. The dialyzate protects UV-irradiated E. coli cells with PolA, UvrA, and RecA mutations and Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 (UvrB) cells, and also exerts an antimutagenic effect on S. typhimurium TA 100. Protection by dialyzate is suggested to be due to restoration of the cell division mechanism damaged by UV irradiation. 14 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Inactivation of thiol-dependent enzymes by hypothiocyanous acid: role of sulfenyl thiocyanate and sulfenic acid intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Tessa J.; Pattison, David I.; Leonard, Stephen E.; Carroll, Kate S.; Davies, Michael J.; Hawkins, Clare L.

    2012-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) forms reactive oxidants including hypochlorous and hypothiocyanous acids (HOCl and HOSCN) under inflammatory conditions. HOCl causes extensive tissue damage and plays a role in the progression of many inflammatory-based diseases. Although HOSCN is a major MPO oxidant, particularly in smokers, who have elevated plasma thiocyanate, the role of this oxidant in disease is poorly characterized. HOSCN induces cellular damage by targeting thiols. However, the specific targets and mechanisms involved in this process are not well defined. We show that exposure of macrophages to HOSCN results in the inactivation of intracellular enzymes, including creatine kinase (CK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In each case, the active-site thiol residue is particularly sensitive to oxidation, with evidence for reversible inactivation and the formation of sulfenyl thiocyanate and sulfenic acid intermediates, on treatment with HOSCN (less than fivefold molar excess). Experiments with DAz-2, a cell-permeable chemical trap for sulfenic acids, demonstrate that these intermediates are formed on many cellular proteins, including GAPDH and CK, in macrophages exposed to HOSCN. This is the first direct evidence for the formation of protein sulfenic acids in HOSCN-treated cells and highlights the potential of this oxidant to perturb redox signaling processes. PMID:22248862

  8. Preparation of mucosal nanoparticles and polymer-based inactivated vaccine for Newcastle disease and H9N2 AI viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba M. El Naggar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To develop a mucosal inactivated vaccines for Newcastle disease (ND and H9N2 viruses to protect against these viruses at sites of infections through mucosal immunity. Materials and Methods: In this study, we prepared two new formulations for mucosal bivalent inactivated vaccine formulations for Newcastle and Avian Influenza (H9N2 based on the use of nanoparticles and polymer adjuvants. The prepared vaccines were delivered via intranasal and spray routes of administration in specific pathogen-free chickens. Cell-mediated and humoral immune response was measured as well as challenge trial was carried out. In addition, ISA71 water in oil was also evaluated. Results: Our results showed that the use of spray route as vaccination delivery method of polymer and nanoparticles MontanideTM adjuvants revealed that it enhanced the cell mediated immune response as indicated by phagocytic activity, gamma interferon and interleukin 6 responses and induced protection against challenge with Newcastle and Avian Influenza (H9N2 viruses. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate the potentiality of polymer compared to nanoparticles adjuvantes when used via spray route. Mass application of such vaccines will add value to improve the vaccination strategies against ND virus and Avian influenza viruses.

  9. Inactivated yellow fever 17D vaccine: development and nonclinical safety, immunogenicity and protective activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, Thomas P; Lee, Cynthia K; Julander, Justin G; Brown, Alicja; Beasley, David W; Watts, Douglas M; Hayman, Edward; Guertin, Patrick; Makowiecki, Joseph; Crowell, Joseph; Levesque, Philip; Bowick, Gavin C; Morin, Merribeth; Fowler, Elizabeth; Trent, Dennis W

    2010-05-14

    In the last 10 years new concerns have arisen about safety of the live, attenuated yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine, in particular viscerotropic adverse events, which have a case-fatality rate of 64%. A non-replicating cell culture-based vaccine would not cause these adverse events, and potentially could be used in persons with precautions or contraindications to use of the live vaccine, including age 60 years, egg allergy, immune suppression, and pregnancy. We developed a whole virion vaccine from the 17D strain inactivated with beta-propiolactone, and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide. The inactivated vaccine was highly immunogenic in mice, hamsters, and cynomolgus macaques. After a single dose in hamsters and macaques, neutralizing antibody titers were similar to those elicited by the live 17D vaccine (YF-VAX, Sanofi Pasteur). After two doses of inactivated vaccine, neutralizing antibody titers in hamsters were significantly higher than after a single dose of YF-VAX [geometric mean titer (GMT) 20,480 vs. 1940, respectively (Pvaccine or a single dose of YF-VAX were fully protected against hepatitis, viremia, weight loss and death after challenge with YF virus (Jimenez strain). A clinical trial of the inactivated vaccine (XRX-001) has been initiated. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Active-site-directed inactivation of Aspergillus oryzae beta-galactosidase with beta-D-galactopyranosylmethyl-p-nitrophenyltriazene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, T; Nishijima, T; Ikenaka, T

    1990-04-01

    beta-D-Galactopyranosylmethyl-p-nitrophenyltriazene (beta-GalMNT), a specific inhibitor of beta-galactosidase, was isolated as crystals by HPLC and its chemical and physicochemical characteristics were examined. Aspergillus oryzae beta-galactosidase was inactivated by the compound. We studied the inhibition mechanism in detail. The inhibitor was hydrolyzed by the enzyme to p-nitroaniline and an active intermediate (beta-galactopyranosylmethyl carbonium or beta-galactopyranosylmethyldiazonium), which inactivated the enzyme. The efficiency of inactivation of the enzyme (the ratio of moles of inactivated enzyme to moles of beta-GalMNT hydrolyzed by the enzyme) was 3%; the efficiency of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase was 49%. In spite of the low efficiency, the rate of inactivation of A. oryzae enzyme was not very different from that of the E. coli enzyme, because the former hydrolyzed beta-GalMNT faster than the latter did. A. oryzae beta-galactosidase was also inactivated by p-chlorophenyl, p-tolyl, and m-nitrophenyl derivatives of beta-galactopyranosylmethyltriazene. However, E. coli beta-galactosidase was not inactivated by these triazene derivatives. The results showed that the inactivation of A. oryzae and E. coli beta-galactosidases by beta-GalMNT was an enzyme-activated and active-site-directed irreversible inactivation. The possibility of inactivation by intermediates produced nonenzymatically was ruled out for E. coli, but not for the A. oryzae enzyme.

  11. Difunctional bacteriophage conjugated with photosensitizers for Candida albicans-targeting photodynamic inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong S

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Shuai Dong,1,2 Hongxi Shi,1 Xintong Zhang,1,2 Xi Chen,1 Donghui Cao,2 Chuanbin Mao,3,4 Xiang Gao,1 Li Wang1 1Key Laboratory of Molecular Epigenetics of Ministry of Education, Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Northeast Normal University, 2First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, 3School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China; 4Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Stephenson Life Science Research Center, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA Background: Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal pathogen of the human microbiota, causing infections ranging from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Due to the increasing occurrence of antibiotic-resistant C. albicans strains, new approaches to control this pathogen are needed. Photodynamic inactivation is an emerging alternative to treat infections based on the interactions between visible light and photosensitisers, in which pheophorbide a (PPA is a chlorophyll-based photosensitizer that could induce cell death after light irradiation. Due to PPA’s phototoxicity and low efficiency, the main challenge is to implement photosensitizer cell targeting and attacking. Methods: In this study, PPA was conjugated with JM-phage by EDC/NHS crosslinking. UV-Vis spectra was used to determine the optimum conjugation percentages of PPA and JM-phage complex for photodynamic inactivation. After photodynamic inactivation, the efficacy of PPA-JM-phage was assessed by performing in vitro experiments, such as MTS assay, scanning electron microscopy, measurement of dysfunctional mitochondria, ROS accumulation, S cell arrest and apoptotic pathway.Results: A single-chain variable-fragment phage (JM with high affinity to MP65 was screened from human single-fold single-chain variable-fragment libraries and designed as a binding target for C. albicans cells. Subsequently, PPa was integrated into JM phage to generate

  12. High pressure processing inactivates human norovirus within oysters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumption of raw bivalve mollusks can result in norovirus infection. One potential intervention for virus-contaminated shellfish is high pressure processing (HPP). Currently HPP is known to inactivate Vibrio bacteria, hepatitis A virus, and murine norovirus within oysters. To evaluate the potentia...

  13. Antigen sparing with adjuvanted inactivated polio vaccine based on Sabin strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westdijk, Janny; Koedam, Patrick; Barro, Mario; Steil, Benjamin P; Collin, Nicolas; Vedvick, Thomas S; Bakker, Wilfried A M; van der Ley, Peter; Kersten, Gideon

    2013-02-18

    Six different adjuvants, each in combination with inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) produced with attenuated Sabin strains (sIPV), were evaluated for their ability to enhance virus neutralizing antibody titres (VNTs) in the rat potency model. The increase of VNTs was on average 3-, 15-, 24-fold with adjuvants after one immunization (serotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Also after a boost immunization the VNTs of adjuvanted sIPV were on average another 7-20-27 times higher than after two inoculations of sIPV without adjuvant. The results indicate that it is feasible to increase the potency of inactivated polio vaccines by using adjuvants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell wall as a target for bacteria inactivation by pulsed electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Flavien; Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Baaziz, Houda; Dague, Etienne; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The integrity and morphology of bacteria is sustained by the cell wall, the target of the main microbial inactivation processes. One promising approach to inactivation is based on the use of pulsed electric fields (PEF). The current dogma is that irreversible cell membrane electro-permeabilisation causes the death of the bacteria. However, the actual effect on the cell-wall architecture has been poorly explored. Here we combine atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy to study the cell-wall organization of living Bacillus pumilus bacteria at the nanoscale. For vegetative bacteria, exposure to PEF led to structural disorganization correlated with morphological and mechanical alterations of the cell wall. For spores, PEF exposure led to the partial destruction of coat protein nanostructures, associated with internal alterations of cortex and core. Our findings reveal for the first time that the cell wall and coat architecture are directly involved in the electro-eradication of bacteria. PMID:26830154

  15. Fluorescence-based methods for the detection of pressure-induced spore germination and inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Daniel; Reineke, Kai; Doehner, Isabel; Mathys, Alexander; Knorr, Dietrich

    2011-03-01

    The application of high pressure (HP) provides an opportunity for the non-thermal preservation of high-quality foods, whereas highly resistant bacterial endospores play an important role. It is known that the germination of spores can be initiated by the application of HP. Moreover, the resistance properties of spores are highly dependent on their physiological states, which are passed through during the germination. To distinguish between different physiological states and to detect the amount of germinated spores after HP treatments, two fluorescence-based methods were applied. A flow cytometric method using a double staining with SYTO 16 as an indicator for germination and propidium iodide as an indicator for membrane damage was used to detect different physiological states of the spores. During the first step of germination, the spore-specific dipicolinic acid (DPA) is released [P. Setlow, Spore germination, Curr. Opin. Microbiol. 6 (2003), pp. 550-556]. DPA reacts with added terbium to form a distinctive fluorescent complex. After measuring the fluorescence intensity at 270 nm excitation wavelength in a fluorescence spectrophotometer, the amount of germinated spores can be determined. Spores of Bacillus subtilis were treated at pressures from 150 to 600 MPa and temperatures from 37 °C to 60 °C in 0.05 M ACES buffer solution (pH 7) for dwell times of up to 2 h. During the HP treatments, inactivation up to 2log 10 cycles and thermal sensitive populations up to 4log 10 cycles could be detected by plate counts. With an increasing number of thermal sensitive spores, an increased proportion of spores in germinated states was detected by flow cytometry. Also the released amount of DPA increased during the dwell times. Moreover, a clear pressure-temperature-time-dependency was shown by screening different conditions. The fluorescence-based measurement of the released DPA can provide the opportunity of an online monitoring of the germination of spores under HP inside

  16. Nitric Oxide Inactivation Mechanisms in the Brain: Role in Bioenergetics and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo M. Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades nitric oxide (•NO has emerged as a critical physiological signaling molecule in mammalian tissues, notably in the brain. •NO may modify the activity of regulatory proteins via direct reaction with the heme moiety, or indirectly, via S-nitrosylation of thiol groups or nitration of tyrosine residues. However, a conceptual understanding of how •NO bioactivity is carried out in biological systems is hampered by the lack of knowledge on its dynamics in vivo. Key questions still lacking concrete and definitive answers include those related with quantitative issues of its concentration dynamics and diffusion, summarized in the how much, how long, and how far trilogy. For instance, a major problem is the lack of knowledge of what constitutes a physiological •NO concentration and what constitutes a pathological one and how is •NO concentration regulated. The ambient •NO concentration reflects the balance between the rate of synthesis and the rate of breakdown. Much has been learnt about the mechanism of •NO synthesis, but the inactivation pathways of •NO has been almost completely ignored. We have recently addressed these issues in vivo on basis of microelectrode technology that allows a fine-tuned spatial and temporal measurement •NO concentration dynamics in the brain.

  17. Skewed X-inactivation in cloned mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Sho; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Ohgane, Jun; Hattori, Naka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Shiota, Kunio

    2004-01-01

    In female mammals, dosage compensation for X-linked genes is accomplished by inactivation of one of two X chromosomes. The X-inactivation ratio (a percentage of the cells with inactivated maternal X chromosomes in the whole cells) is skewed as a consequence of various genetic mutations, and has been observed in a number of X-linked disorders. We previously reported that phenotypically normal full-term cloned mouse fetuses had loci with inappropriate DNA methylation. Thus, cloned mice are excellent models to study abnormal epigenetic events in mammalian development. In the present study, we analyzed X-inactivation ratios in adult female cloned mice (B6C3F1). Kidneys of eight naturally produced controls and 11 cloned mice were analyzed. Although variations in X-inactivation ratio among the mice were observed in both groups, the distributions were significantly different (Ansary-Bradley test, P < 0.01). In particular, 2 of 11 cloned mice showed skewed X-inactivation ratios (19.2% and 86.8%). Similarly, in intestine, 1 of 10 cloned mice had a skewed ratio (75.7%). Skewed X-inactivation was observed to various degrees in different tissues of different individuals, suggesting that skewed X-inactivation in cloned mice is the result of secondary cell selection in combination with stochastic distortion of primary choice. The present study is the first demonstration that skewed X-inactivation occurs in cloned animals. This finding is important for understanding both nuclear transfer technology and etiology of X-linked disorders

  18. Free radical inactivation of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudina, Ivana; Jovanovic, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of free radical oxidants, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and Cl 3 COO radical and a reductant, CO2-anion radical, with trypsin and reactive protein components were determined by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions at pH 7, 20 0 C. Highly reactive free radicals, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical, react with trypsin at diffusion controlled rates. Moderately reactive trichloroperoxy radical, k(Cl 3 COO radical + trypsin) preferentially oxidizes histidine residues. The efficiency of inactivation of trypsin by free radicals is inversely proportional to their reactivity. The yields of inactivation of trypsin by radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical are low, G(inactivation) = 0.6-0.8, which corresponds to ∼ 10% of the initially produced radicals. In contrast, Cl 3 COO radical inactivates trypsin with ∼ 50% efficiency, i.e. G(inactivation) = 3.2. (author)

  19. Characterization of X chromosome inactivation using integrated analysis of whole-exome and mRNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Szelinger

    Full Text Available In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI is an epigenetic, gene dosage compensatory mechanism by inactivation of one copy of X in cells. Random XCI of one of the parental chromosomes results in an approximately equal proportion of cells expressing alleles from either the maternally or paternally inherited active X, and is defined by the XCI ratio. Skewed XCI ratio is suggestive of non-random inactivation, which can play an important role in X-linked genetic conditions. Current methods rely on indirect, semi-quantitative DNA methylation-based assay to estimate XCI ratio. Here we report a direct approach to estimate XCI ratio by integrated, family-trio based whole-exome and mRNA sequencing using phase-by-transmission of alleles coupled with allele-specific expression analysis. We applied this method to in silico data and to a clinical patient with mild cognitive impairment but no clear diagnosis or understanding molecular mechanism underlying the phenotype. Simulation showed that phased and unphased heterozygous allele expression can be used to estimate XCI ratio. Segregation analysis of the patient's exome uncovered a de novo, interstitial, 1.7 Mb deletion on Xp22.31 that originated on the paternally inherited X and previously been associated with heterogeneous, neurological phenotype. Phased, allelic expression data suggested an 83∶20 moderately skewed XCI that favored the expression of the maternally inherited, cytogenetically normal X and suggested that the deleterious affect of the de novo event on the paternal copy may be offset by skewed XCI that favors expression of the wild-type X. This study shows the utility of integrated sequencing approach in XCI ratio estimation.

  20. Properties of an intermediate-duration inactivation process of the voltage-gated sodium conductance in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Christopher R; Zeng, Zhen; Williams, David A; Hill-Yardin, Elisa L; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-02-01

    Rapid transmembrane flow of sodium ions produces the depolarizing phase of action potentials (APs) in most excitable tissue through voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV). Macroscopic currents display rapid activation followed by fast inactivation (IF) within milliseconds. Slow inactivation (IS) has been subsequently observed in several preparations including neuronal tissues. IS serves important physiological functions, but the kinetic properties are incompletely characterized, especially the operative timescales. Here we present evidence for an "intermediate inactivation" (II) process in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons with time constants of the order of 100 ms. The half-inactivation potentials (V0.5) of steady-state inactivation curves were hyperpolarized by increasing conditioning pulse duration from 50 to 500 ms and could be described by a sum of Boltzmann relations. II state transitions were observed after opening as well as subthreshold potentials. Entry into II after opening was relatively insensitive to membrane potential, and recovery of II became more rapid at hyperpolarized potentials. Removal of fast inactivation with cytoplasmic papaine revealed time constants of INa decay corresponding to II and IS with long depolarizations. Dynamic clamp revealed attenuation of trains of APs over the 10(2)-ms timescale, suggesting a functional role of II in repetitive firing accommodation. These experimental findings could be reproduced with a five-state Markov model. It is likely that II affects important aspects of hippocampal neuron response and may provide a drug target for sodium channel modulation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Plant extracts, spices, and essential oils inactivate E. coli O157:H7 pathogens and reduce formation of potentially carcinogenic heterocyclic amines in grilled beef patties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meats need to be sufficiently heated to inactivate foodborne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. High-temperature heat treatment used to prepare well-done meats could, however, increase the formation of potentially carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs). The objective of this study was to ...

  2. Atmospheric-pressure air microplasma jets in aqueous media for the inactivation of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Si-ze [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Liu, Dongping [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Song, Ying [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Yue [School of Physics, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2013-05-15

    The hollow fiber-based cold air microplasma jet array running at atmospheric pressure has been designed to inactivate Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) cells in vitro in aqueous media. The influences of electrode configurations, air flow rate, and applied voltage on the discharge characteristics of the single microplasma jet operating in aqueous media are presented, and the bactericidal efficiency of the hollow fibers-based and large-volume microplasma jet array is reported. Optical emission spectroscopy is utilized to identify excited species during the antibacterial testing of plasma in solutions. These well-aligned and rather stable air microplasma jets containing a variety of short-lived species, such as OH and O radicals and charged particles, are in direct contact with aqueous media and are very effective in killing P. fluorescens cells in aqueous media. This design shows its potential application for atmospheric pressure air plasma inactivation of bacteria cells in aqueous media.

  3. Inactivation of acetylcholinesterase by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lun-Yi; Misra, Hara P

    2003-12-01

    The neurotoxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) has been shown to reversibly inhibit the activity of acetylcholinesterase. The inactivation of the enzyme was detected by monitoring the accumulation of yellow color produced from the reaction between thiocholine and dithiobisnitrobenzoate ion. The kinetic parameter, Km for the substrate (acetylthiocholine), was found to be 0.216 mM and Ki for MPTP inactivation of acetylcholinesterase was found to be 2.14 mM. The inactivation of enzyme by MPTP was found to be dose-dependent. It was found that MPTP is neither a substrate of AChE nor the time-dependent inactivator. The studies of reaction kinetics indicate the inactivation of AChE to be a linear mixed-type inhibition. The dilution assays indicate that MPTP is a reversible inhibitor for AChE. These data suggest that once MPTP enters the basal ganglia of the brain, it can inactivate the acetylcholinesterase enzyme and thereby increase the acetylcholine level in the basal ganglia of brain, leading to potential cell dysfunction. It appears that the nigrostriatal toxicity by MPTP leading to Parkinson's disease-like syndrome may, in part, be mediated via the acetylcholinesterase inactivation.

  4. Molecular mechanism of DNA replication-coupled inactivation of the initiator protein in Escherichia coli: interaction of DnaA with the sliding clamp-loaded DNA and the sliding clamp-Hda complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'etsugu, Masayuki; Takata, Makoto; Kubota, Toshio; Matsuda, Yusaku; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2004-06-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-DnaA protein initiates chromosomal replication. After the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme is loaded on to DNA, DnaA-bound ATP is hydrolysed in a manner depending on Hda protein and the DNA-loaded form of the DNA polymerase III sliding clamp subunit, which yields ADP-DnaA, an inactivated form for initiation. This regulatory DnaA-inactivation represses extra initiation events. In this study, in vitro replication intermediates and structured DNA mimicking replicational intermediates were first used to identify structural prerequisites in the process of DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Unlike duplex DNA loaded with sliding clamps, primer RNA-DNA heteroduplexes loaded with clamps were not associated with DnaA-ATP hydrolysis, and duplex DNA provided in trans did not rescue this defect. At least 40-bp duplex DNA is competent for the DnaA-ATP hydrolysis when a single clamp was loaded. The DnaA-ATP hydrolysis was inhibited when ATP-DnaA was tightly bound to a DnaA box-bearing oligonucleotide. These results imply that the DnaA-ATP hydrolysis involves the direct interaction of ATP-DnaA with duplex DNA flanking the sliding clamp. Furthermore, Hda protein formed a stable complex with the sliding clamp. Based on these, we suggest a mechanical basis in the DnaA-inactivation that ATP-DnaA interacts with the Hda-clamp complex with the aid of DNA binding. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Limited

  5. Influences of physicochemical stresses on injury and inactivation behaviour of Listeria innocua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima A. Miller

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many minimally processed foods depend on a combination of inhibitory factors to reduce the hazard of foodborne illness. Therefore, inactivation of Listeria innocua was studied according to a 24 factorial experiment designed to draw conclusions about temperature (52.5 °C and 65.0 °C, pH (4.5 and 7.5, water activity (aw=0.95 and 0.99 and solute type (NaCl and glycerol effects. Three different recovery media were used to assess injured cells. Survival data were fitted with a Gompertz-based model and kinetic parameters (shoulder, maximum inactivation rate – kmax, and tail were estimated. Results showed that shoulder was affected by temperature, pH and combined effects; kmax was influenced by all factors and their combinations; and tail was affected by aw, temperature and aw/pH combination. Results demonstrated the potential occurrence of microbial cross-protection survival techniques between the various stresses, e.g. heat and osmolarity. Indeed, this work clearly established that, to avoid hazards, Listeria inactivation must be evaluated with a maximum of environmental factors that undergo alterations. Only thus, appropriate food preservation treatments can be developed and consequently, the safety of food products can be assured.

  6. Inactivation of carotenoid-producing and albino strains of Neurospora crassa by visible light, blacklight, and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, P.L.; Tuveson, R.W.; Sargent, M.L.

    1976-01-01

    Suspensions of Neurospora crassa conidia were inactivated by blacklight (BL) radiation (300 to 425 nm) in the absence of exogenous photosensitizing compounds. Carotenoid-containing wild-type conidia were less sensitive to BL radiation than albino conidia, showing a dose enhancement factor (DEF) of 1.2 for dose levels resulting in less than 10 percent survival. The same strains were about equally sensitive to shortwave ultraviolet (uv) inactivation. The kinetics of BL inactivation are similar to those of photodynamic inactivation by visible light in the presence of a photosensitizing dye (methylene blue). Only limited inactivation by visible light in the absence of exogenous photosensitizers was observed. BL and UV inactivations are probably caused by different mechanisms since wild-type conidia are only slightly more resistant to BL radiation (DEF = 1.2 at 1.0 percent survival) than are conidia from a uv-sensitive strain (upr-1, uvs-3). The BL-induced lethal lesions are probably not cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers since BL-inactivated Haemophilus influenzae transforming deoxyribonucleic acid is not photoreactivated by N. crassa wild-type enzyme extracts, whereas uv-inactivated transforming deoxyribonucleic acid is photoreactivable with this treatment

  7. Substrate-induced inactivation of the OXA2 beta-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledent, P; Frère, J M

    1993-01-01

    The hydrolysis time courses of 22 beta-lactam antibiotics by the class D OXA2 beta-lactamase were studied. Among these, only three appeared to correspond to the integrated Henri-Michaelis equation. 'Burst' kinetics, implying branched pathways, were observed with most penicillins, cephalosporins and with flomoxef and imipenem. Kinetic parameters characteristic of the different phases of the hydrolysis were determined for some substrates. Mechanisms generally accepted to explain such reversible partial inactivations involving branches at either the free enzyme or the acyl-enzyme were inadequate to explain the enzyme behaviour. The hydrolysis of imipenem was characterized by the occurrence of two 'bursts', and that of nitrocefin by a partial substrate-induced inactivation complicated by a competitive inhibition by the hydrolysis product. PMID:8240304

  8. Detailed analysis of the cell-inactivation mechanism by accelerated protons and light ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, - (2006), s. 1185-1199 ISSN 0031-9155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : biological effects of ionizing particles * cell inactivation * modelling * protons * light ions * hadron radiotherapy Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 2.873, year: 2006

  9. Genetic characterization in symptomatic female DMD carriers: lack of relationship between X-inactivation, transcriptional DMD allele balancing and phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brioschi Simona

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, X-linked recessive myopathies, predominantly affect males, a clinically significant proportion of females manifesting symptoms have also been reported. They represent an heterogeneous group characterized by variable degrees of muscle weakness and/or cardiac involvement. Though preferential inactivation of the normal X chromosome has long been considered the principal mechanism behind disease manifestation in these females, supporting evidence is controversial. Methods Eighteen females showing a mosaic pattern of dystrophin expression on muscle biopsy were recruited and classified as symptomatic (7 or asymptomatic (11, based on the presence or absence of muscle weakness. The causative DMD gene mutations were identified in all cases, and the X-inactivation pattern was assessed in muscle DNA. Transcriptional analysis in muscles was performed in all females, and relative quantification of wild-type and mutated transcripts was also performed in 9 carriers. Dystrophin protein was quantified by immunoblotting in 2 females. Results The study highlighted a lack of relationship between dystrophic phenotype and X-inactivation pattern in females; skewed X-inactivation was found in 2 out of 6 symptomatic carriers and in 5 out of 11 asymptomatic carriers. All females were characterized by biallelic transcription, but no association was found between X-inactivation pattern and allele transcriptional balancing. Either a prevalence of wild-type transcript or equal proportions of wild-type and mutated RNAs was observed in both symptomatic and asymptomatic females. Moreover, very similar levels of total and wild-type transcripts were identified in the two groups of carriers. Conclusions This is the first study deeply exploring the DMD transcriptional behaviour in a cohort of female carriers. Notably, no relationship between X-inactivation pattern and transcriptional behaviour of DMD gene was

  10. Acute Vhl gene inactivation induces cardiac HIF-dependent erythropoietin gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Miró-Murillo

    Full Text Available Von Hippel Lindau (Vhl gene inactivation results in embryonic lethality. The consequences of its inactivation in adult mice, and of the ensuing activation of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs, have been explored mainly in a tissue-specific manner. This mid-gestation lethality can be also circumvented by using a floxed Vhl allele in combination with an ubiquitous tamoxifen-inducible recombinase Cre-ER(T2. Here, we characterize a widespread reduction in Vhl gene expression in Vhl(floxed-UBC-Cre-ER(T2 adult mice after dietary tamoxifen administration, a convenient route of administration that has yet to be fully characterized for global gene inactivation. Vhl gene inactivation rapidly resulted in a marked splenomegaly and skin erythema, accompanied by renal and hepatic induction of the erythropoietin (Epo gene, indicative of the in vivo activation of the oxygen sensing HIF pathway. We show that acute Vhl gene inactivation also induced Epo gene expression in the heart, revealing cardiac tissue to be an extra-renal source of EPO. Indeed, primary cardiomyocytes and HL-1 cardiac cells both induce Epo gene expression when exposed to low O(2 tension in a HIF-dependent manner. Thus, as well as demonstrating the potential of dietary tamoxifen administration for gene inactivation studies in UBC-Cre-ER(T2 mouse lines, this data provides evidence of a cardiac oxygen-sensing VHL/HIF/EPO pathway in adult mice.

  11. Inactivation of dairy manure-borne pathogens by anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Anaerobic digestion of animal manure has the potential to inactivate enteric pathogens, thereby reducing exposures to livestock and humans when the products of digestion are disposed by land-spreading or irrigation or returned to livestock uses such as bedding. Data on digester effectiv...

  12. Chlorine inactivation of Tubifex tubifex in drinking water and the synergistic effect of sequential inactivation with UV irradiation and chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiao-Bao; Li, Zhi-Hong; Long, Yuan-Nan; He, Pan-Pan; Xu, Chao

    2017-06-01

    The inactivation of Tubifex tubifex is important to prevent contamination of drinking water. Chlorine is a widely-used disinfectant and the key factor in the inactivation of T. tubifex. This study investigated the inactivation kinetics of chlorine on T. tubifex and the synergistic effect of the sequential use of chlorine and UV irradiation. The experimental results indicated that the Ct (concentration × time reaction ) concept could be used to evaluate the inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex with chlorine, thus allowing for the use of a simpler Ct approach for the assessment of T. tubifex chlorine inactivation requirements. The inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be well-fitted to a delayed pseudo first-order Chick-Watson expression. Sequential experiments revealed that UV irradiation and chlorine worked synergistically to effectively inactivate T. tubifex as a result of the decreased activation energy, E a , induced by primary UV irradiation. Furthermore, the inactivation effectiveness of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be affected by several drinking water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand with potassium permanganate (COD Mn ) concentration. High pH exhibited pronounced inactivation effectiveness and the decrease in turbidity and COD Mn concentrations contributed to the inactivation of T. tubifex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  14. Inactivation of urease by catechol: Kinetics and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Luca; Cianci, Michele; Musiani, Francesco; Lente, Gábor; Palombo, Marta; Ciurli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Urease is a Ni(II)-containing enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to yield ammonia and carbamate at a rate 10 15 times higher than the uncatalyzed reaction. Urease is a virulence factor of several human pathogens, in addition to decreasing the efficiency of soil organic nitrogen fertilization. Therefore, efficient urease inhibitors are actively sought. In this study, we describe a molecular characterization of the interaction between urease from Sporosarcina pasteurii (SPU) and Canavalia ensiformis (jack bean, JBU) with catechol, a model polyphenol. In particular, catechol irreversibly inactivates both SPU and JBU with a complex radical-based autocatalytic multistep mechanism. The crystal structure of the SPU-catechol complex, determined at 1.50Å resolution, reveals the structural details of the enzyme inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores – kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Andreas Lenz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C. botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores.We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near isothermal HPT treatments at 300 – 1200 MPa at 30 – 75 °C for 1 s – 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone, large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed 1st order kinetics. DPA release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced germination at ≤ 450 MPa/≤ 45 °C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60 – 70 °C.Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores than spores from other C. botulinum types, could allow for the implementation of milder processes without

  16. Pulsed Electric Field inactivation of microbial cells: the use of ceramic layers to increase the efficiency of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on bacteria and plant or animal cells has been investigated since the early 1960s. High electric fields pulses (20-70 kV/cm, 1-10 μs) are reported to cause rupture of the cellular lipid membrane, through the mechanism of irreversible electroporation. Quantitative description of cell inactivation kinetics is based on the analysis of stability of lipid bilayers under electric fields and the thermal fluctuations associated with the production of pores. PEF has been successfully applied to inactivation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in many sorts of liquids, such as milk, fruit juices and liquid eggs. In all these media, the level of inactivation could reach the 5 Logs for an approximate range of pulses of 100-200, and an energy consumption of ∼ 10-100 kJ/kg. The advantages of PEF are the superior maintenance of functional and nutritional levels (if compared to traditional thermal treatment), continuous treatment and short processing times, while the current high costs of this technique make it more suitable for treatment of expensive media. We present a solution to the problem of volumes in PEF treatment through the use of high permittivity ceramics, while retaining the same inactivation efficiency and improving the duration of the electrodes.

  17. Pulsed Electric Field inactivation of microbial cells: the use of ceramic layers to increase the efficiency of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on bacteria and plant or animal cells has been investigated since the early 1960s. High electric fields pulses (20-70 kV/cm, 1-10 μs) are reported to cause rupture of the cellular lipid membrane, through the mechanism of irreversible electroporation. Quantitative description of cell inactivation kinetics is based on the analysis of stability of lipid bilayers under electric fields and the thermal fluctuations associated with the production of pores. PEF has been successfully applied to inactivation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in many sorts of liquids, such as milk, fruit juices and liquid eggs. In all these media, the level of inactivation could reach the 5 Logs for an approximate range of pulses of 100-200, and an energy consumption of ˜ 10-100 kJ/kg. The advantages of PEF are the superior maintenance of functional and nutritional levels (if compared to traditional thermal treatment), continuous treatment and short processing times, while the current high costs of this technique make it more suitable for treatment of expensive media. We present a solution to the problem of volumes in PEF treatment through the use of high permittivity ceramics, while retaining the same inactivation efficiency and improving the duration of the electrodes.

  18. Pulsed Electric Field inactivation of microbial cells: the use of ceramic layers to increase the efficiency of treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzichemi, M. [Physics Department, University of Milano - Bicocca (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The impact of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on bacteria and plant or animal cells has been investigated since the early 1960s. High electric fields pulses (20-70 kV/cm, 1-10 mus) are reported to cause rupture of the cellular lipid membrane, through the mechanism of irreversible electroporation. Quantitative description of cell inactivation kinetics is based on the analysis of stability of lipid bilayers under electric fields and the thermal fluctuations associated with the production of pores. PEF has been successfully applied to inactivation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in many sorts of liquids, such as milk, fruit juices and liquid eggs. In all these media, the level of inactivation could reach the 5 Logs for an approximate range of pulses of 100-200, and an energy consumption of approx 10-100 kJ/kg. The advantages of PEF are the superior maintenance of functional and nutritional levels (if compared to traditional thermal treatment), continuous treatment and short processing times, while the current high costs of this technique make it more suitable for treatment of expensive media. We present a solution to the problem of volumes in PEF treatment through the use of high permittivity ceramics, while retaining the same inactivation efficiency and improving the duration of the electrodes.

  19. Comparative study on the mechanisms of rotavirus inactivation by sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.L. (Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes a comparative study on the effects of the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate and the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate on purified rotavirus SA-11 particles. Both chemicals readily inactivated rotavirus at quite low concentrations and under very mild conditions. In addition, both agents modified the viral capsid and prevented the adsorption of inactivated virions to cells. Capsid damage by ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused a shift in the densities of rotavirions from about l.35 to about 1.37 g/ml and a reduction in their sedimentation coefficients. Sodium dodcyl sulfate, on the other hand, did not detectably alter either of these physical properties of rotavirions. Both agents caused some alteration of the isoelectric points of the virions. Finally, analysis of rotavirus proteins showed that ethylenediaminetetraacetate caused the loss of two protein peaks from the electrophoretic pattern of virions but sodium dodecyl sulfate caused the loss of only one of these same protein peaks.

  20. Distinct molecular sites of anaesthetic action: pentobarbital block of human brain sodium channels is alleviated by removal of fast inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wartenberg, H. C.; Urban, B. W.; Duch, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    Fast inactivation of sodium channel function is modified by anaesthetics. Its quantitative contribution to the overall anaesthetic effect is assessed by removing the fast inactivation mechanism enzymatically. Sodium channels from human brain cortex were incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. After

  1. Regulation of Na+ channel inactivation by the DIII and DIV voltage-sensing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eric J; Zhu, Wandi; Schubert, Angela R; Voelker, Taylor; Varga, Zoltan; Silva, Jonathan R

    2017-03-06

    Functional eukaryotic voltage-gated Na + (Na V ) channels comprise four domains (DI-DIV), each containing six membrane-spanning segments (S1-S6). Voltage sensing is accomplished by the first four membrane-spanning segments (S1-S4), which together form a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). A critical Na V channel gating process, inactivation, has previously been linked to activation of the VSDs in DIII and DIV. Here, we probe this interaction by using voltage-clamp fluorometry to observe VSD kinetics in the presence of mutations at locations that have been shown to impair Na V channel inactivation. These locations include the DIII-DIV linker, the DIII S4-S5 linker, and the DIV S4-S5 linker. Our results show that, within the 10-ms timeframe of fast inactivation, the DIV-VSD is the primary regulator of inactivation. However, after longer 100-ms pulses, the DIII-DIV linker slows DIII-VSD deactivation, and the rate of DIII deactivation correlates strongly with the rate of recovery from inactivation. Our results imply that, over the course of an action potential, DIV-VSDs regulate the onset of fast inactivation while DIII-VSDs determine its recovery. © 2017 Hsu et al.

  2. Prospects for a novel ultrashort pulsed laser technology for pathogen inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsen Shaw-Wei D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The threat of emerging pathogens and microbial drug resistance has spurred tremendous efforts to develop new and more effective antimicrobial strategies. Recently, a novel ultrashort pulsed (USP laser technology has been developed that enables efficient and chemical-free inactivation of a wide spectrum of viral and bacterial pathogens. Such a technology circumvents the need to introduce potentially toxic chemicals and could permit safe and environmentally friendly pathogen reduction, with a multitude of possible applications including the sterilization of pharmaceuticals and blood products, and the generation of attenuated or inactivated vaccines.

  3. Inactivated recombinant plant virus protects dogs from a lethal challenge with canine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeveld, J P; Brennan, F R; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, J L; Jones, T D; Boshuizen, R S; Vela, C; Casal, J I; Kamstrup, S; Dalsgaard, K; Meloen, R H; Bendig, M M; Hamilton, W D

    2001-06-14

    A vaccine based upon a recombinant plant virus (CPMV-PARVO1), displaying a peptide derived from the VP2 capsid protein of canine parvovirus (CPV), has previously been described. To date, studies with the vaccine have utilized viable plant chimaeric particles (CVPs). In this study, CPMV-PARVO1 was inactivated by UV treatment to remove the possibility of replication of the recombinant plant virus in a plant host after manufacture of the vaccine. We show that the inactivated CVP is able to protect dogs from a lethal challenge with CPV following parenteral immunization with the vaccine. Dogs immunized with the inactivated CPMV-PARVO1 in adjuvant displayed no clinical signs of disease and shedding of CPV in faeces was limited following CPV challenge. All immunized dogs elicited high titres of peptide-specific antibody, which neutralized CPV in vitro. Levels of protection, virus shedding and VP2-specific antibody were comparable to those seen in dogs immunized with the same VP2- peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Since plant virus-derived vaccines have the potential for cost-effective manufacture and are not known to replicate in mammalian cells, they represent a viable alternative to current replicating vaccine vectors for development of both human and veterinary vaccines.

  4. A Chimeric LysK-Lysostaphin Fusion Enzyme Lysing Staphylococcus aureus Cells: a Study of Both Kinetics of Inactivation and Specifics of Interaction with Anionic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Lyubov Y; Donovan, David M; Ishnazarova, Nadiya T; Foster-Frey, Juli A; Becker, Stephen C; Pugachev, Vladimir G; Balabushevich, Nadezda G; Dmitrieva, Natalia F; Klyachko, Natalia L

    2016-10-01

    A staphylolytic fusion protein (chimeric enzyme K-L) was created, harboring three unique lytic activities composed of the LysK CHAP endopeptidase, and amidase domains, and the lysostaphin glycyl-glycine endopeptidase domain. To assess the potential of possible therapeutic applications, the kinetic behavior of chimeric enzyme K-L was investigated. As a protein antimicrobial, with potential antigenic properties, the biophysical effect of including chimeric enzyme K-L in anionic polymer matrices that might help reduce the immunogenicity of the enzyme was tested. Chimeric enzyme K-L reveals a high lytic activity under the following optimal ( opt ) conditions: pH opt 6.0-10.0, t opt 20-30 °C, NaCl opt 400-800 mM. At the working temperature of 37 °C, chimeric enzyme K-L is inactivated by a monomolecular mechanism and possesses a high half-inactivation time of 12.7 ± 3.0 h. At storage temperatures of 22 and 4 °C, a complex mechanism (combination of monomolecular and bimolecular mechanisms) is involved in the chimeric enzyme K-L inactivation. The optimal storage conditions under which the enzyme retains 100 % activity after 140 days of incubation (4 °C, the enzyme concentration of 0.8 mg/mL, pH 6.0 or 7.5) were established. Chimeric enzyme K-L is included in complexes with block-copolymers of poly-L-glutamic acid and polyethylene glycol, while the enzyme activity and stability are retained, thus suggesting methods to improve the application of this fusion as an effective antimicrobial agent.

  5. Optimising the inactivation of grape juice spoilage organisms by pulse electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsellés-Fontanet, A Robert; Puig, Anna; Olmos, Paola; Mínguez-Sanz, Santiago; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2009-04-15

    The effect of some pulsed electric field (PEF) processing parameters (electric field strength, pulse frequency and treatment time), on a mixture of microorganisms (Kloeckera apiculata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus hilgardii and Gluconobacter oxydans) typically present in grape juice and wine were evaluated. An experimental design based on response surface methodology (RSM) was used and results were also compared with those of a factorially designed experiment. The relationship between the levels of inactivation of microorganisms and the energy applied to the grape juice was analysed. Yeast and bacteria were inactivated by the PEF treatments, with reductions that ranged from 2.24 to 3.94 log units. All PEF parameters affected microbial inactivation. Optimal inactivation of the mixture of spoilage microorganisms was predicted by the RSM models at 35.0 kV cm(-1) with 303 Hz pulse width for 1 ms. Inactivation was greater for yeasts than for bacteria, as was predicted by the RSM. The maximum efficacy of the PEF treatment for inactivation of microorganisms in grape juice was observed around 1500 MJ L(-1) for all the microorganisms investigated. The RSM could be used in the fruit juice industry to optimise the inactivation of spoilage microorganisms by PEF.

  6. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds. © The

  7. Evaluation of Chlorine Treatment Levels for Inactivation of Human Norovirus and MS2 Bacteriophage during Sewage Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, David H; Fay, Johnna P; Calci, Kevin; Pouillot, Régis; Woods, Jacquelina; Chen, Haiqiang; Niemira, Brendan A; Van Doren, Jane M

    2017-12-01

    This study examined the inactivation of human norovirus (HuNoV) GI.1 and GII.4 by chlorine under conditions mimicking sewage treatment. Using a porcine gastric mucin-magnetic bead (PGM-MB) assay, no statistically significant loss in HuNoV binding (inactivation) was observed for secondary effluent treatments of ≤25 ppm total chlorine; for both strains, 50 and 100 ppm treatments resulted in ≤0.8-log 10 unit and ≥3.9-log 10 unit reductions, respectively. Treatments of 10, 25, 50, and 100 ppm chlorine inactivated 0.31, 1.35, >5, and >5 log 10 units, respectively, of the norovirus indicator MS2 bacteriophage. Evaluation of treatment time indicated that the vast majority of MS2 and HuNoV inactivation occurred in the first 5 min for 0.2-μm-filtered, prechlorinated secondary effluent. Free chlorine measurements of secondary effluent seeded with MS2 and HuNoV demonstrated substantial oxidative burdens. With 25, 50, and 100 ppm treatments, free chlorine levels after 5 min of exposure ranged from 0.21 to 0.58 ppm, from 0.28 to 16.7 ppm, and from 11.6 to 53 ppm, respectively. At chlorine treatment levels of >50 ppm, statistically significant differences were observed between reductions for PGM-MB-bound HuNoV (potentially infectious) particles and those for unbound (noninfectious) HuNoV particles or total norovirus particles. While results suggested that MS2 and HuNoV (measured as PGM-MB binding) behave similarly, although not identically, both have limited susceptibility to chlorine treatments of ≤25 ppm total chlorine. Since sewage treatment is performed at ≤25 ppm total chlorine, targeting free chlorine levels of 0.5 to 1.0 ppm, these results suggest that traditional chlorine-based sewage treatment does not inactivate HuNoV efficiently. IMPORTANCE HuNoV is ubiquitous in sewage. A receptor binding assay was used to assess inactivation of HuNoV by chlorine-based sewage treatment, given that the virus cannot be routinely propagated in vitro Results reported here

  8. Non-thermal plasma-activated water inactivation of food-borne pathogen on fresh produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruonan; Wang, Guomin; Tian, Ying; Wang, Kaile [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue, E-mail: zhangjue@pku.edu.cn [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • We propose a new approach to treat S. aureus inoculated on strawberries by PAW. • PAW could inactivate S. aureus on strawberries via the Log Reduction results, further confirmed by CLSM and SEM. • The short-lived ROS in PAW are considered the most important agents in inactivation process. • No significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. - Abstract: Non-thermal plasma has been widely considered to be an effective method for decontamination of foods. Recently, numerous studies report that plasma-activated water (PAW) also has outstanding antibacterial ability. This study presents the first report on the potential of PAW for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inoculated on strawberries. PAW treatments achieved a reduction of S. aureus ranging from 1.6 to 2.3 log at day-0 storage, while 1.7 to 3.4 log at day-4 storage. The inactivation efficiency depended on the plasma-activated time for PAW generation and PAW-treated time of strawberries inoculated with S. aureus. LIVE/DEAD staining and scanning electron microscopy results confirm that PAW could damage the bacterial cell wall. Moreover, optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrate the inactivation is mainly attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. In addition, no significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. Thus, PAW can be a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry.

  9. Non-thermal plasma-activated water inactivation of food-borne pathogen on fresh produce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ruonan; Wang, Guomin; Tian, Ying; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a new approach to treat S. aureus inoculated on strawberries by PAW. • PAW could inactivate S. aureus on strawberries via the Log Reduction results, further confirmed by CLSM and SEM. • The short-lived ROS in PAW are considered the most important agents in inactivation process. • No significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. - Abstract: Non-thermal plasma has been widely considered to be an effective method for decontamination of foods. Recently, numerous studies report that plasma-activated water (PAW) also has outstanding antibacterial ability. This study presents the first report on the potential of PAW for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inoculated on strawberries. PAW treatments achieved a reduction of S. aureus ranging from 1.6 to 2.3 log at day-0 storage, while 1.7 to 3.4 log at day-4 storage. The inactivation efficiency depended on the plasma-activated time for PAW generation and PAW-treated time of strawberries inoculated with S. aureus. LIVE/DEAD staining and scanning electron microscopy results confirm that PAW could damage the bacterial cell wall. Moreover, optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrate the inactivation is mainly attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. In addition, no significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. Thus, PAW can be a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry.

  10. Predicting Bacillus coagulans spores inactivation in tomato pulp under nonisothermal heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Morgana; Longhi, Daniel A; Schaffner, Donald W; Aragão, Gláucia M F

    2014-05-01

    The knowledge and understanding of Bacillus coagulans inactivation during a thermal treatment in tomato pulp, as well as the influence of temperature variation during thermal processes are essential for design, calculation, and optimization of the process. The aims of this work were to predict B. coagulans spores inactivation in tomato pulp under varying time-temperature profiles with Gompertz-inspired inactivation model and to validate the model's predictions by comparing the predicted values with experimental data. B. coagulans spores in pH 4.3 tomato pulp at 4 °Brix were sealed in capillary glass tubes and heated in thermostatically controlled circulating oil baths. Seven different nonisothermal profiles in the range from 95 to 105 °C were studied. Predicted inactivation kinetics showed similar behavior to experimentally observed inactivation curves when the samples were exposed to temperatures in the upper range of this study (99 to 105 °C). Profiles that resulted in less accurate predictions were those where the range of temperatures analyzed were comparatively lower (inactivation profiles starting at 95 °C). The link between fail prediction and both lower starting temperature and magnitude of the temperature shift suggests some chemical or biological mechanism at work. Statistical analysis showed that overall model predictions were acceptable, with bias factors from 0.781 to 1.012, and accuracy factors from 1.049 to 1.351, and confirm that the models used were adequate to estimate B. coagulans spores inactivation under fluctuating temperature conditions in the range from 95 to 105 °C. How can we estimate Bacillus coagulans inactivation during sudden temperature shifts in heat processing? This article provides a validated model that can be used to predict B. coagulans under changing temperature conditions. B. coagulans is a spore-forming bacillus that spoils acidified food products. The mathematical model developed here can be used to predict the spoilage

  11. Complicated biallelic inactivation of Pten in radiation-induced mouse thymic lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Yu [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Yayoicho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Experimental Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Group, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Takabatake, Takashi; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Yamauchi, Kazumi; Shang, Yi [Experimental Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Group, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Miyoshi-Imamura, Tomoko [Experimental Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Group, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Genetic Counseling Program, Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Otsuka, Bunkyou-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Nogawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Yayoicho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yoshiro [Department of Biomolecular Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, Miyama 2-2-1, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Shimada, Yoshiya, E-mail: y_shimad@nirsgo.jp [Experimental Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Group, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-04-01

    Inactivation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog gene (Pten) occurs via multiple tissue-dependent mechanisms including epigenetic silencing, point mutations, insertions, and deletions. Although frequent loss of heterozygosity around the Pten locus and plausible involvement of epigenetic silencing have been reported in radiation-induced thymic lymphomas, the proportion of lymphomas with inactivated Pten and the spectrum of causal aberrations have not been extensively characterized. Here, we assessed the mode of Pten inactivation by comprehensive analysis of the expression and alteration of Pten in 23 radiation-induced thymic lymphomas developed in B6C3F1 mice. We found no evidence for methylation-associated silencing of Pten; rather, complex structural abnormalities comprised of missense and nonsense mutations, 1- and 3-bp insertions, and focal deletions were identified in 8 of 23 lymphomas (35%). Sequencing of deletion breakpoints suggested that aberrant V(D)J recombination and microhomology-mediated rearrangement were responsible for the focal deletions. Seven of the 8 lymphomas had biallelic alterations, and 4 of them did not express Pten protein. These Pten aberrations coincided with downstream Akt phosphorylation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Pten inactivation is frequently biallelic and is caused by a variety of structural abnormalities (rather than by epigenetic silencing) and is involved in radiation-induced lymphomagenesis.

  12. Evidence for catabolite degradation in the glucose-dependent inactivation of yeast cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neeff, J.; Haegele, E.; Nauhaus, J.; Heer, U.; Mecke, D.

    1978-01-01

    The cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was radioactively labeled during its synthesis on a glucose-free derepression medium. After purification a sensitive radioimmunoassay for this enzyme could be developed. The assay showed that after the physiological, glucose-dependent 'catabolite inactivation' of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase an inactive enzyme protein is immunologically not detectable. Together with the irreversibility of this reaction in vivo this finding strongly suggests a proteolytic mechanism of enzyme inactivation. For this process the term 'catabolite degradation' is used. (orig.) [de

  13. Role of dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size on microbial inactivation of Cu-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Manoranjan; Wu Bing; Zhu Liying; Jacobson, Craig; Wang Weining; Jones, Kristen; Goyal, Yogesh; Tang, Yinjie J; Biswas, Pratim, E-mail: pbiswas@wustl.edu [Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2011-10-14

    The properties of Cu-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) were independently controlled in a flame aerosol reactor by varying the molar feed ratios of the precursors, and by optimizing temperature and time history in the flame. The effect of the physico-chemical properties (dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size) of Cu-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on inactivation of Mycobacterium smegmatis (a model pathogenic bacterium) was investigated under three light conditions (complete dark, fluorescent light and UV light). The survival rate of M. smegmatis (in a minimal salt medium for 2 h) exposed to the NPs varied depending on the light irradiation conditions as well as the dopant concentrations. In dark conditions, pristine TiO{sub 2} showed insignificant microbial inactivation, but inactivation increased with increasing dopant concentration. Under fluorescent light illumination, no significant effect was observed for TiO{sub 2}. However, when TiO{sub 2} was doped with copper, inactivation increased with dopant concentration, reaching more than 90% (>3 wt% dopant). Enhanced microbial inactivation by TiO{sub 2} NPs was observed only under UV light. When TiO{sub 2} NPs were doped with copper, their inactivation potential was promoted and the UV-resistant cells were reduced by over 99%. In addition, the microbial inactivation potential of NPs was also crystal-phase-and size-dependent under all three light conditions. A lower ratio of anatase phase and smaller sizes of Cu-doped TiO{sub 2} NPs resulted in decreased bacterial survival. The increased inactivation potential of doped TiO{sub 2} NPs is possibly due to both enhanced photocatalytic reactions and leached copper ions.

  14. Solvable potentials derived from supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levai, G.

    1994-01-01

    The introduction of supersymmetric quantum mechanics has generated renewed interest in solvable problems of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. This approach offers an elegant way to describe different, but isospectral potentials by interpreting the degeneracy of their energy levels in terms of supersymmetry. The original ideas of supersymmetric quantum mechanics have been developed further in many respects in the past ten years, and have been applied to a large variety of physical problems. The purpose of this contribution is to give a survey of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and its applications to solvable quantum mechanical potentials. Its relation to other models describing isospectral potentials is also discussed here briefly, as well as some of its practical applications in various branches of physics. (orig.)

  15. Microbial inactivation kinetics and mechanisms of carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} (C-TiO{sub 2}) under visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Jaehong [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-752 (Korea, Republic of); School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0817 (United States); Seo, Young-Seok; Oh, Byung-Taek [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min, E-mail: cho317@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Carbon modified TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts prepared by sol–gel methods. • C-TiO{sub 2} was highly effective in the inactivation of L. monocytogenes. • C-TiO{sub 2} was shown to be more synergistic inactivation effect under visible light. • C-TiO{sub 2} be useful in the development of alternative disinfectants for environmental application. - Abstract: In this study, titanium dioxide nanoparticles doped with carbon (C-TiO{sub 2}) were synthesized by means of sol–gel methods, and the synthesis was verified by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The nanoparticles’ photocatalytic disinfection activity of Listeria monocytogenes was tested under UV and visible light. The observed inactivation levels for 150 min of visible light exposure with and without UV cutoff filters were 2.10 and 2.45 log, respectively. We also found that traditional reactive oxygen species had insignificant actions on C-TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts and that L. monocytogenes inactivation in the C-TiO{sub 2} system under visible light was induced in large part by the midgap states (h{sub mid}{sup +}) that was produced photochemically from the visible light response. C-TiO{sub 2} was found to accelerate bacterial inactivation (of L. monocytogenes) in the presence of visible light. Our data suggests that the C-TiO{sub 2} may be useful in the development of alternative disinfectants for environmental applications.

  16. Functional size analysis of bioactive materials by radiation inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    1994-01-01

    When the research on various proteins including enzymes is carried out, first molecular weight is measured. The physical chemical methods used for measuring molecular weight cannot measure it in the state of actually acting in living bodies. Radiation inactivation method is the unique method which can measure the molecular weight of the active substances in living bodies. Paying attention to this point, recently it is attempted to measure the activity unit of enzymes, receptors and others, and to apply to the elucidation of their functions. In this report, the concept of the method of measuring molecular size based on radiation inactivation, the detailed experimental method and the points to which attention must be paid are described. Also its application to the elucidation of living body functions according to the example of the studies by the author is reported. The concept of the measurement of molecular weight by radiation inactivation is based on target theory. The preparation of samples, the effect of oxygen, radiation sources, dosimetry, irradiation temperature, internal standard process and so on are reported. The trend of the research is shown. (K.I.)

  17. Turnover-dependent inactivation of the nitrogenase MoFe-protein at high pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun-Yun; Haynes, Chad A; Spatzal, Thomas; Rees, Douglas C; Howard, James B

    2014-01-21

    Proton uptake accompanies the reduction of all known substrates by nitrogenase. As a consequence, a higher pH should limit the availability of protons as a substrate essential for turnover, thereby increasing the proportion of more highly reduced forms of the enzyme for further study. The utility of the high-pH approach would appear to be problematic in view of the observation reported by Pham and Burgess [(1993) Biochemistry 32, 13725-13731] that the MoFe-protein undergoes irreversible protein denaturation above pH 8.65. In contrast, we found by both enzyme activity and crystallographic analyses that the MoFe-protein is stable when incubated at pH 9.5. We did observe, however, that at higher pHs and under turnover conditions, the MoFe-protein is slowly inactivated. While a normal, albeit low, level of substrate reduction occurs under these conditions, the MoFe-protein undergoes a complex transformation; initially, the enzyme is reversibly inhibited for substrate reduction at pH 9.5, yet in a second, slower process, the MoFe-protein becomes irreversibly inactivated as measured by substrate reduction activity at the optimal pH of 7.8. The final inactivated MoFe-protein has an increased hydrodynamic radius compared to that of the native MoFe-protein, yet it has a full complement of iron and molybdenum. Significantly, the modified MoFe-protein retains the ability to specifically interact with its nitrogenase partner, the Fe-protein, as judged by the support of ATP hydrolysis and by formation of a tight complex with the Fe-protein in the presence of ATP and aluminum fluoride. The turnover-dependent inactivation coupled to conformational change suggests a mechanism-based transformation that may provide a new probe of nitrogenase catalysis.

  18. Underlying mechanism of drug-drug interaction between pioglitazone and gemfibrozil: Gemfibrozil acyl-glucuronide is a mechanism-based inhibitor of CYP2C8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Motoi; Sakamoto, Masaya; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2015-08-01

    While co-administered gemfibrozil can increase the area under the concentration/time curve (AUC) of pioglitazone more than 3-fold, the underlying mechanism of the drug-drug interaction between gemfibrozil and pioglitazone has not been fully understood. In the present study, gemfibrozil preincubation time-dependently inhibited the metabolism of pioglitazone in the cytochrome P450 (CYP)- and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-activated human liver microsomes. We estimated the kinact and K'app values, which are the maximum inactivation rate constant and the apparent dissociation constant, of gemfibrozil to be 0.071 min(-1) and 57.3 μM, respectively. In this study, the kobs, in vivo value was defined as a parameter that indicates the potency of the mechanism-based inhibitory effect at the blood drug concentration in vivo. The kobs, in vivo values of potent mechanism-based inhibitors, clarithromycin and erythromycin, were estimated to be 0.0096 min(-1) and 0.0051 min(-1), respectively. The kobs, in vivo value of gemfibrozil was 0.0060 min(-1), which was comparable to those of clarithromycin and erythromycin, suggesting that gemfibrozil could be a mechanism-based inhibitor as potent as clarithromycin and erythromycin in vivo. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors potentiate bradykinin's inotropic effects independently of blocking its inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, R D; Erdös, E G; Vogel, S M

    1997-08-04

    The positive inotropic effects of bradykinin (BK) and 2 analogs resistant to angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) were potentiated on isolated guinea pig atrial preparations by enalaprilat. The stable BK analogs, dextran-BK and [Hyp3-Tyr(Me)8]-BK, were as active as BK. Pretreatment for 5 min with enalaprilat augmented the maximal positive inotropic effect of [Hyp3-Tyr(Me)8]-BK 2.8-fold, from 19% to 53% and that of BK from 28% to 42% over baseline; inotropic responses to dextran-BK (1 microM) were similarly increased. The activity of atrial ACE, a zinc-requiring enzyme, was completely inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (QSA, 10 mM), which raised the maximal inotropic effect of BK to 39% above baseline. This value rose to 67% when in addition to QSA, 1 microM enalaprilat was added; enalaprilat thus, potentiated the effects of BK independently of enzyme inhibition. The positive inotropic effects to BK and its analogs decline with time in the presence of these agonists. After 10 min of exposure, the response to 1 microM [Hyp3-Tyr(Me)8]-BK decreased to about half, and after 20 min, to 0. Enalaprilat, when present in the tissue bath, prevented the decline in inotropy; even after tachyphylaxis occurred, it reversed this decrease in activity when added. The effects of 1 microM [Hyp3-Tyr(Me)8]-BK, in the absence or presence of enalaprilat, were abolished by the BK B2 receptor antagonist icatibant (0.75 microM). The results indicate that ACE inhibitors, by potentiating the BK effects and blocking BK B2-receptor desensitization, may contribute to the beneficial cardiac effects of BK independently of blocking its inactivation.

  20. Gaultherin Production From Gandapura Gaultheria Fragantissima By Enzymatic Inactivation Of Gaultherase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Yuniastuti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gaultherin is the active form of salicylate from plants Gandapura. Gaultherin has some characterictics which make it potential to become a natural aspirin anti-cancer antiinflamatory dan cardiopulmonary. Currently aspirin acetylsalicylic acid is a medicine which is used by most of the people in this world because of its function as antipiretic antiinflamatory and analgesic. Approximately the need of pharmacy industry towards gaultherin will be increased in the following year. However at the time being there is still no any effective methods to produce gaultherin from gandapura. This difficulty in the process of taking gaultherin is based on the process of its extraction where the tissue is broken so gaultherin will be hydrolyzed change to be its individual components like methyl salicylate and disaccharides. The hydrolysis process is believed to be catalyzed by the enzyme gaultherase inside. This research is aimed to analyze the production of gaultherin form gandapura using the gaultherase enzyme inactivation process through extraction with alcoholic solvent and determine the correct condition to get the highest production of gaultherin. The result of the calculation shows that the bioextraction process variables of gaultherase enzyme inactivation which is mostly influential are pH and alcohol concentration. The more pH extraction will increase the outcome of gaultherin active compounds The optimum condition of bioextraction enzyme inactivation is in pH 8 with 1446 gaultherin active compounds and regression equation in . The bigger solvent concentration the more gaultherin be extracted. The production of gaultherin will optimally reached in the 90 concentration of ethanol with the result of 1310 active compounds

  1. Cell inactivation by heavy charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, E A [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Cell and Molecular Biology Div.

    1992-06-01

    The inactivation of cells resulting in lethal or aberrant effects by charged particles is of growing interest. Charged particles at extremely high LET are capable of completely eliminating cell-type and cell-line differences in repair capacity. It is still not clear however whether the repair systems are inactivated, or merely that heavy-ion lesions are less repairable. Studies correlating the particle inactivation dose of radioresistant cells with intact DNA analyzed with pulse field gel electrophoresis and other techniques may be useful, but more experiments are also needed to assess the fidelity of repair. For particle irradiations between 40-100 keV/{mu}m there is however evidence for particle-induced activation of specific genes in mammalian cells, and certain repair processes in bacteria. New data are available on the inactivation of developmental processes in several systems including seeds, and cells of the nematode C. elegans. Future experimental and theoretical modeling research emphasis should focus on exploring particle-induced inactivation of endpoints assessing functionality and not just lethality, and on analyzing molecular damage and genetic effects arising in damage but non-inactivated survivors. The discrete nature of selective types of particle damage as a function of radiation quality indicates the value of accelerated ions as probes of normal and aberrant biological processes. Information obtained from molecular analyses of damage and repair must however be integrated into the context of cellular and tissue functions of the organism. (orig.).

  2. Effective inactivation of a wide range of viruses by pasteurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröner, Albrecht; Broumis, Connie; Fang, Randel; Nowak, Thomas; Popp, Birgit; Schäfer, Wolfram; Roth, Nathan J

    2018-01-01

    Careful selection and testing of plasma reduces the risk of blood-borne viruses in the starting material for plasma-derived products. Furthermore, effective measures such as pasteurization at 60°C for 10 hours have been implemented in the manufacturing process of therapeutic plasma proteins such as human albumin, coagulation factors, immunoglobulins, and enzyme inhibitors to inactivate blood-borne viruses of concern. A comprehensive compilation of the virus reduction capacity of pasteurization is presented including the effect of stabilizers used to protect the therapeutic protein from modifications during heat treatment. The virus inactivation kinetics of pasteurization for a broad range of viruses were evaluated in the relevant intermediates from more than 15 different plasma manufacturing processes. Studies were carried out under the routine manufacturing target variables, such as temperature and product-specific stabilizer composition. Additional studies were also performed under robustness conditions, that is, outside production specifications. The data demonstrate that pasteurization inactivates a wide range of enveloped and nonenveloped viruses of diverse physicochemical characteristics. After a maximum of 6 hours' incubation, no residual infectivity could be detected for the majority of enveloped viruses. Effective inactivation of a range of nonenveloped viruses, with the exception of nonhuman parvoviruses, was documented. Pasteurization is a very robust and reliable virus inactivation method with a broad effectiveness against known blood-borne pathogens and emerging or potentially emerging viruses. Pasteurization has proven itself to be a highly effective step, in combination with other complementary safety measures, toward assuring the virus safety of final product. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  3. Complete inactivation of HIV-1 using photo-labeled non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Adan; Quesada, Jorge; Anderson, Dallas; Goldstein, Allan; Fossum, Theresa; Colby-Germinario, Susan; Wainberg, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that a photo-labeled derivative of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine termed DAPY, when used together with exposure to ultraviolet light, was able to completely and irreversibly inactivate both HIV-1 RT activity as well as infectiousness in each of a T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Control experiments using various concentrations of DAPY revealed that a combination of exposure to ultraviolet light together with use of the specific, high affinity photo-labeled compound was necessary for complete inactivation to occur. This method of HIV RT inactivation may have applicability toward preservation of an intact viral structure and warrants further investigation in regard to the potential of this approach to elicit a durable, broad protective immune response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Light-driven photosensitizer uptake increases Candida albicans photodynamic inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Renan A; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Silva, Ana P da; Kurachi, Cristina; Guimarães, Francisco E G

    2017-11-01

    Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) is based on the use of a photosensitizer (PS) and light that results mainly in the production of reactive oxygen species, aiming to produce microorganism cell death. PS incubation time and light dose are key protocol parameters that influence PDI response; the correct choice of them can increase the efficiency of inactivation. The results of this study show that a minor change in the PDI protocol, namely light-driven incubation leads to a higher photosensitizer and more uniform cell uptake inside the irradiated zone. Furthermore, as the uptake increases, the damage caused by PDI also increases. The proposed light-driven incubation prior to the inactivation illumination dose has advantages when compared to the traditional PDI treatments since it can be more selective and effective. Using a violet light as pre-illumination (light-driven incubation) source and a red-light system as PDI source, it was possible to demonstrate that when compared to the traditional protocol of dark incubation, the pre-illuminated cell culture showed an inactivation increase of 7 log units. These in vitro results performed in Candida albicans cells may result in the introduction of a new protocol for PDI. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Pathogen inactivation of Dengue virus in red blood cells using amustaline and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, Maite; Laughhunn, Andrew; Santa Maria, Felicia; Lanteri, Marion C; Stassinopoulos, Adonis; Musso, Didier

    2017-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an arbovirus primarily transmitted through mosquito bite; however, DENV transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) have been reported and asymptomatic DENV RNA-positive blood donors have been identified in endemic countries. DENV is considered a high-risk pathogen for blood safety. One of the mitigation strategies to prevent arbovirus TTIs is pathogen inactivation. In this study we demonstrate that the amustaline and glutathione (S-303/GSH) treatment previously found effective against Zika virus in red blood cells (RBCs) is also effective in inactivating DENV. Red blood cells were spiked with high levels of DENV. Viral RNA loads and infectious titers were measured in the untreated control and before and after pathogen inactivation treatment of RBC samples. DENV infectivity was also assessed over five successive cell culture passages to detect any potential residual replicative virus. The mean ± SD DENV titer in RBCs before inactivation was 6.61 ± 0.19 log 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID 50 )/mL and the mean viral RNA load was 8.42 log genome equivalents/mL. No replicative DENV was detected either immediately after completion of treatment using S-303/GSH or after cell culture passages. Treatment using S-303/GSH inactivated high levels of DENV in RBCs to the limit of detection. In combination with previous studies showing the effective inactivation of DENV in plasma and platelets using the licensed amotosalen/UVA system, this study demonstrates that high levels of DENV can be inactivated in all blood components. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  6. Estimating the size of the potential market for the Kyoto flexibility mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.X.

    2000-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol incorporates three flexibility mechanisms to help Annex I countries to meet their Kyoto targets at a lower overall cost. This paper aims to estimate the size of the potential market for all three mechanisms over the first commitment period. Based on the national communications

  7. Ultraviolet inactivation of papain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugher, J.F.; Grossweiner, L.I.

    1975-01-01

    Flash photolysis transient spectra (lambda > 250 nm) of aqueous papain showed that the initial products are the neutral tryptophan radical Trp (lambdasub(max) 510 nm), the tryptophan triplet state 3 Trp (lambdasub(max) 460 nm), the disulfide bridge electron adduct -SS - - (lambdasub(max) 420 nm) and the hydrated electron esub(aq) - . The -SS - - yield was not altered by nitrous oxide or air, indicating that the formation of this product does not involve electrons in the external medium. The original papain preparation was activated by irradiating under nitrogen. The action spectrum supports previous work attributing the low initial activity to blocking of cysteinyl site 25 with a mixed disulfide. Flask lamp irradiation in nitrogen led to activation at low starting activities and inactivation at higher starting activities, while only inactivation at the same quantum yield was observed with air saturation. The results are consistent with photoionization of an essential tryptophyl residue as the key inactivating step. (author)

  8. Evaluation of eco-friendly zwitterionic detergents for enveloped virus inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Lynn; Tao, Yinying; Henry, Alexis; Koepf, Edward; Cecchini, Douglas; Pieracci, John; Ghose, Sanchayita

    2017-04-01

    Inclusion of a detergent in protein biotherapeutic purification processes is a simple and very robust method for inactivating enveloped viruses. The detergent Triton X-100 has been used for many years and is part of the production process of several commercial therapeutic proteins. However, recent ecological studies have suggested that Triton X-100 and its break-down products can potentially behave as endocrine disrupters in aquatic organisms, raising concerns from an environmental impact perspective. As such, discharge of Triton X-100 into the waste water treatment plants is regulated in some jurisdictions, and alternative detergents for viral inactivation are required. In this work, we report on the identification and evaluation of more eco-friendly detergents as viable replacements for Triton X-100. Five detergent candidates with low to moderate environmental impact were initially identified and evaluated with respect to protein stability, followed by proof-of-concept virus inactivation studies using a model enveloped virus. From the set of candidates lauryldimethylamine N-oxide (LDAO) was identified as the most promising detergent due to its low ecotoxicity, robust anti-viral activity (LRV >4 at validation set-point conditions with X-MuLX), and absence of any negative impact on protein function. This detergent exhibited effective and robust virus inactivation in a broad range of protein concentrations, solution conductivities, pHs, and in several different cell culture fluid matrices. The only process parameter which correlated with reduced virus inactivation potency was LDAO concentration, and then only when the concentration was reduced to below the detergent's critical micelle concentration (CMC). Additionally, this work also demonstrated that LDAO was cleared to below detectable levels after Protein A affinity chromatography, making it suitable for use in a platform process that utilizes this chromatographic mode for protein capture. All these findings

  9. Covalent Allosteric Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) by an Inhibitor-Electrophile Conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punthasee, Puminan; Laciak, Adrian R; Cummings, Andrea H; Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Lewis, Sarah M; Hillebrand, Roman; Singh, Harkewal; Tanner, John J; Gates, Kent S

    2017-04-11

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a validated drug target, but it has proven difficult to develop medicinally useful, reversible inhibitors of this enzyme. Here we explored covalent strategies for the inactivation of PTP1B using a conjugate composed of an active site-directed 5-aryl-1,2,5-thiadiazolidin-3-one 1,1-dioxide inhibitor connected via a short linker to an electrophilic α-bromoacetamide moiety. Inhibitor-electrophile conjugate 5a caused time-dependent loss of PTP1B activity consistent with a covalent inactivation mechanism. The inactivation occurred with a second-order rate constant of (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10 2 M -1 min -1 . Mass spectrometric analysis of the inactivated enzyme indicated that the primary site of modification was C121, a residue distant from the active site. Previous work provided evidence that covalent modification of the allosteric residue C121 can cause inactivation of PTP1B [Hansen, S. K., Cancilla, M. T., Shiau, T. P., Kung, J., Chen, T., and Erlanson, D. A. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 7704-7712]. Overall, our results are consistent with an unusual enzyme inactivation process in which noncovalent binding of the inhibitor-electrophile conjugate to the active site of PTP1B protects the nucleophilic catalytic C215 residue from covalent modification, thus allowing inactivation of the enzyme via selective modification of allosteric residue C121.

  10. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics and new potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drigo Filho, E.

    1988-01-01

    Using the supersymmetric quantum mechanics the following potential are generalized. The particle in the box, Poeschl-Teller and Rosen-Morse. The new potentials are evaluated and their eigenfunctions and spectra are indicated. (author) [pt

  11. [Inactivated poliovirus vaccines: an inevitable choice for eliminating poliomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidor, J D; Jean-Denis, Shu

    2016-12-06

    The inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is a very old tool in the fight against poliomyelitis. Though supplanted by oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) in the 1960s and 1970s, the IPV has now become an inevitable choice because of the increasingly recognized risks associated with continuous use of OPVs. Following the pioneering work of Jonas Salk, who established key principles for the IPV, considerable experience has accumulated over the years. This work has led to modern Salk IPV-containing vaccines, based on the use of inactivated wildtype polioviruses, which have been deployed for routine use in many countries. Very good protection against paralysis is achieved with IPV through the presence of circulating antibodies able to neutralize virus infectivity toward motor neurons. In addition, with IPV, a variable degree of protection against mucosal infection (and therefore transmission) through mucosal antibodies and immune cells is achieved, depending on previous exposure of subjects to wildtype or vaccine polioviruses. The use of an IPV-followed-by-OPV sequential immunization schedule has the potential advantage of eliminating the vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) risk, while limiting the risks of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPVs). Sabin strain-derived IPVs are new tools, only recently beginning to be deployed, and data are being generated to document their performance. IPVs will play an irreplaceable role in global eradication of polio.

  12. Biphasic voltage-dependent inactivation of human NaV 1.3, 1.6 and 1.7 Na+ channels expressed in rodent insulin-secreting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godazgar, Mahdieh; Zhang, Quan; Chibalina, Margarita V; Rorsman, Patrik

    2018-05-01

    Na + current inactivation is biphasic in insulin-secreting cells, proceeding with two voltage dependences that are half-maximal at ∼-100 mV and -60 mV. Inactivation of voltage-gated Na + (Na V ) channels occurs at ∼30 mV more negative voltages in insulin-secreting Ins1 and primary β-cells than in HEK, CHO or glucagon-secreting αTC1-6 cells. The difference in inactivation between Ins1 and non-β-cells persists in the inside-out patch configuration, discounting an involvement of a diffusible factor. In Ins1 cells and primary β-cells, but not in HEK cells, inactivation of a single Na V subtype is biphasic and follows two voltage dependences separated by 30-40 mV. We propose that Na V channels adopt different inactivation behaviours depending on the local membrane environment. Pancreatic β-cells are equipped with voltage-gated Na + channels that undergo biphasic voltage-dependent steady-state inactivation. A small Na + current component (10-15%) inactivates over physiological membrane potentials and contributes to action potential firing. However, the major Na + channel component is completely inactivated at -90 to -80 mV and is therefore inactive in the β-cell. It has been proposed that the biphasic inactivation reflects the contribution of different Na V α-subunits. We tested this possibility by expression of TTX-resistant variants of the Na V subunits found in β-cells (Na V 1.3, Na V 1.6 and Na V 1.7) in insulin-secreting Ins1 cells and in non-β-cells (including HEK and CHO cells). We found that all Na V subunits inactivated at 20-30 mV more negative membrane potentials in Ins1 cells than in HEK or CHO cells. The more negative inactivation in Ins1 cells does not involve a diffusible intracellular factor because the difference between Ins1 and CHO persisted after excision of the membrane. Na V 1.7 inactivated at 15--20 mV more negative membrane potentials than Na V 1.3 and Na V 1.6 in Ins1 cells but this small difference is insufficient to solely

  13. Modification of sodium and potassium channel kinetics by diethyl ether and studies on sodium channel inactivation in the crayfish giant axon membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, Bruce Palmer [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The effects of ether and halothane on membrane currents in the voltage clamped crayfish giant axon membrane were investigated. Concentrations of ether up to 300 mM and of halothane up to 32 mM had no effect on resting potential or leakage conductance. Ether and halothane reduced the size of sodium currents without changing the voltage dependence of the peak currents or their reversal potential. Ether and halothane also produced a reversible, dose-dependent speeding of sodium current decay at all membrane potentials. Ether reduced the time constants for inactivation, and also shifted the midpoint of the steady-state inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction. Potassium currents were smaller with ether present, with no change in the voltage dependence of steady-state currents. The activation of potassium channels was faster with ether present. There was no apparent change in the capacitance of the crayfish giant axon membrane with ether concentrations of up to 100 mM. Experiments on sodium channel inactivation kinetics were performed using 4-aminopyridine to block potassium currents. Sodium currents decayed with a time course generally fit well by a single exponential. The time constant of decay was a steep function of voltage, especially in the negative resistance region of the peak current vs voltage relation.The time course of inactivation was very similar to that of the decay of the current at the same potential. The measurement of steady-state inactivation curves with different test pulses showed no shifts along the voltage asix. The voltage-dependence of the integral of sodium conductance was measured to test models of sodium channel inactivation in which channels must open before inactivating; the results appear inconsistent with some of the simplest cases of such models.

  14. Effective Thermal Inactivation of the Spores of Bacillus cereus Biofilms Using Microwave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyong Seok; Yang, Jungwoo; Choi, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2017-07-28

    Microwave sterilization was performed to inactivate the spores of biofilms of Bacillus cereus involved in foodborne illness. The sterilization conditions, such as the amount of water and the operating temperature and treatment time, were optimized using statistical analysis based on 15 runs of experimental results designed by the Box-Behnken method. Statistical analysis showed that the optimal conditions for the inactivation of B. cereus biofilms were 14 ml of water, 108°C of temperature, and 15 min of treatment time. Interestingly, response surface plots showed that the amount of water is the most important factor for microwave sterilization under the present conditions. Complete inactivation by microwaves was achieved in 5 min, and the inactivation efficiency by microwave was obviously higher than that by conventional steam autoclave. Finally, confocal laser scanning microscopy images showed that the principal effect of microwave treatment was cell membrane disruption. Thus, this study can contribute to the development of a process to control food-associated pathogens.

  15. Microbial inactivation and cytotoxicity evaluation of UV irradiated coconut water in a novel continuous flow spiral reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Manreet Singh; Patras, Ankit; Kilanzo-Nthenge, Agnes; Pokharel, Bharat; Yannam, Sudheer Kumar; Rakariyatham, Kanyasiri; Pan, Che; Xiao, Hang; Sasges, Michael

    2018-01-01

    A continuous-flow UV reactor operating at 254nm wave-length was used to investigate inactivation of microorganisms including bacteriophage in coconut water, a highly opaque liquid food. UV-C inactivation kinetics of two surrogate viruses (MS2, T1UV) and three bacteria (E. coli ATCC 25922, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 13311, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115) in buffer and coconut water were investigated (D 10 values ranging from 2.82 to 4.54mJ·cm -2 ). A series of known UV-C doses were delivered to the samples. Inactivation levels of all organisms were linearly proportional to UV-C dose (r 2 >0.97). At the highest dose of 30mJ·cm -2 , the three pathogenic organisms were inactivated by >5 log 10 (pUV-C irradiation effectively inactivated bacteriophage and pathogenic microbes in coconut water. The inactivation kinetics of microorganisms were best described by log linear model with a low root mean square error (RMSE) and high coefficient of determination (r 2 >0.97). Models for predicting log reduction as a function of UV-C irradiation dose were found to be significant (pUV-C treatment did not generate cytotoxic compounds in the coconut water. This study clearly demonstrated that high levels of inactivation of pathogens can be achieved in coconut water, and suggested potential method for UV-C treatment of other liquid foods. This research paper provides scientific evidence of the potential benefits of UV-C irradiation in inactivating bacterial and viral surrogates at commercially relevant doses of 0-120mJ·cm -2 . The irradiated coconut water showed no cytotoxic effects on normal intestinal and healthy mice liver cells. UV-C irradiation is an attractive food preservation technology and offers opportunities for horticultural and food processing industries to meet the growing demand from consumers for healthier and safe food products. This study would provide technical support for commercialization of UV-C treatment of beverages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. Synergistic inactivation of anaerobic wastewater biofilm by free nitrous acid and hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Guangming; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► H 2 O 2 greatly enhances the inactivation of microorganisms in biofilms by FNA. ► About 2-log of inactivation of biofilm microbes was achieved by FNA + H 2 O 2 . ► FNA + H 2 O 2 reduced sulfide production and detached biofilm in reactors. -- Abstract: Free nitrous acid (FNA) was recently revealed to be a strong biocide for microbes in anaerobic biofilm, achieving approximately 1-log (90%) inactivation at a concentration of 0.2–0.3 mgHNO 2 -N/L with an exposure time longer than 6 h. The combined biocidal effects of FNA and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) on anaerobic wastewater biofilm are investigated in this study. H 2 O 2 greatly enhances the inactivation of microorganisms by FNA. About 2-log (99%) of microbial inactivation was achieved when biofilms were exposed to FNA at 0.2 mgN/L or above and H 2 O 2 at 30 mg/L or above for 6 h or longer. It was found, through response surface methodology and ridge analysis, that FNA is the primary inactivation agent and H 2 O 2 enhances its efficiency. The loss and the subsequent slow recovery of biological activity in biofilm reactors subjected to FNA and H 2 O 2 dosing confirmed that the chemical combination could achieve higher microbial inactivation than with FNA alone. Reaction simulation shows that intermediates of reactions between FNA and H 2 O 2 , like peroxynitrite and nitrogen dioxide, would be produced at elevated levels and are likely responsible for the synergism between FNA and H 2 O 2 . The combination of FNA and H 2 O 2 could potentially provide an effective solution to sewer biofilm control

  17. Synergistic inactivation of anaerobic wastewater biofilm by free nitrous acid and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Guangming, E-mail: gjiang@awmc.uq.edu.au [Advanced Water Management Centre, Gehrmann Building, Research Road, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Yuan, Zhiguo, E-mail: zhiguo@awmc.uq.edu.au [Advanced Water Management Centre, Gehrmann Building, Research Road, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► H{sub 2}O{sub 2} greatly enhances the inactivation of microorganisms in biofilms by FNA. ► About 2-log of inactivation of biofilm microbes was achieved by FNA + H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. ► FNA + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduced sulfide production and detached biofilm in reactors. -- Abstract: Free nitrous acid (FNA) was recently revealed to be a strong biocide for microbes in anaerobic biofilm, achieving approximately 1-log (90%) inactivation at a concentration of 0.2–0.3 mgHNO{sub 2}-N/L with an exposure time longer than 6 h. The combined biocidal effects of FNA and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on anaerobic wastewater biofilm are investigated in this study. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} greatly enhances the inactivation of microorganisms by FNA. About 2-log (99%) of microbial inactivation was achieved when biofilms were exposed to FNA at 0.2 mgN/L or above and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 30 mg/L or above for 6 h or longer. It was found, through response surface methodology and ridge analysis, that FNA is the primary inactivation agent and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances its efficiency. The loss and the subsequent slow recovery of biological activity in biofilm reactors subjected to FNA and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosing confirmed that the chemical combination could achieve higher microbial inactivation than with FNA alone. Reaction simulation shows that intermediates of reactions between FNA and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, like peroxynitrite and nitrogen dioxide, would be produced at elevated levels and are likely responsible for the synergism between FNA and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The combination of FNA and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} could potentially provide an effective solution to sewer biofilm control.

  18. Integrated oxide graphene based device for laser inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishkanich, Alexsandr; Ruzankina, Julia; Afanasyev, Mikhail; Paklinov, Nikita; Hafizov, Nail

    2018-02-01

    We develop device for virus disinfection of pathogenic microorganisms. Viral decontamination can be carried out due to hard ultraviolet irradiation and singlet oxygen destroying the genetic material of a virus capsid. UV rays can destroy DNA, leading to the formation of dimers of nucleic acids. This practically does not occur in tissues, tk. UV rays penetrate badly through them, however, the viral particles are small and UV can destroy their genetic material, RNA / DNA and the virus can not replicate. It is with the construction of the ultraviolet laser water disinfection system (UFLOV) based on the continuous and periodic pulsed ultraviolet laser sources (pump) binds to solve sterility and depyrogenation of water. It has been established that small doses of UV irradiation stimulate reproduction, and large doses cause the death of pathogenic microorganisms. The effect of a dose of ultraviolet is the result of photochemical action on the substance of a living bacterial cell or virion. Also complex photodynamic laser inactivation on graphene oxide is realized.

  19. Photodynamic inactivation of pathogens causing infectious keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carole; Wolf, G.; Walther, M.; Winkler, K.; Finke, M.; Hüttenberger, D.; Bischoff, Markus; Seitz, B.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance requires new approaches also for the treatment of infectious keratitis. Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) using the photosensitizer (PS) Chlorin e6 (Ce6) was investigated as an alternative to antibiotic treatment. An in-vitro cornea model was established using porcine eyes. The uptake of Ce6 by bacteria and the diffusion of the PS in the individual layers of corneal tissue were investigated by fluorescence. After removal of the cornea's epithelium Ce6-concentrations tested in liquid culture against different concentrations of Ce6 (1 - 512 μM) using 10 minutes irradiation (E = 18 J/cm2 ). This demonstrated that a complete inactivation of the pathogen strains were feasible whereby SA was slightly more susceptible than PA. 3909 mutants of the Keio collection of Escherichia coli (E.coli) were screened for potential resistance factors. The sensitive mutants can be grouped into three categories: transport mutants, mutants in lipopolysaccharide synthesis and mutants in the bacterial SOS-response. In conclusion PDI is seen as a promising therapy concept for infectious keratitis.

  20. Infectious Causes of Cholesteatoma and Treatment of Infected Ossicles prior to Reimplantation by Hydrostatic High-Pressure Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation, which is caused by recurrent infections, is one of the factors contributing to the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma. If reimplantation of autologous ossicles after a surgical intervention is intended, inactivation of planktonic bacteria and biofilms is desirable. High hydrostatic pressure treatment is a procedure, which has been used to inactivate cholesteatoma cells on ossicles. Here we discuss the potential inactivating effect of high hydrostatic pressure on microbial pathogens including biofilms. Recent experimental data suggest an incomplete inactivation at a pressure level, which is tolerable for the bone substance of ossicles and results at least in a considerable reduction of pathogen load. Further studies are necessary to access how far this quantitative reduction of pathogens is sufficient to prevent ongoing chronic infections, for example, due to forming of biofilms. PMID:25705686

  1. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yucheng; Dai, Tianhong; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: With the increasing emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains, there is a pressing need for the development of alternative treatment for infections. Antimicrobial blue light (aBL) has provided a simple and effective approach. Methods: We first investigated the effectiveness of aBL (415 nm) inactivation of USA300 LAClux (a communityacquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain) both in the planktonic and biofilm forms. The survival of the bacteria in suspensions was determined by serial dilution and that of the biofilm-embedded bacteria was determined by bioluminescence quantification. Using a mouse model of thermal burn infected with USA300 LAClux, we further assessed the effectiveness of aBL for treating localized infections. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time bacterial viability in vivo. Results: In vitro study showed that, for the planktonic counterpart of the bacteria or the 24-h-old biofilms, an irradiance of 55 mW/cm2 for 60 min resulted in a 4.61 log10 or 2.56 log10 inactivation, respectively. In vivo study using infected mouse burns demonstrated that a 2.56-log10 inactivation was achieved after 100-mW/cm2 irradiation for 62 min. Conclusions: aBL is a potential alternative approach for treating Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  2. “Redundancy” of Endocannabinoid Inactivation: New Challenges and Opportunities for Pain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Redundancy of metabolic pathways and molecular targets is a typical feature of all lipid mediators, and endocannabinoids, which were originally defined as endogenous agonists at cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, are no exception. In particular, the two most studied endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, are inactivated through alternative biochemical routes, including hydrolysis and oxidation, and more than one enzyme might be used even for the same type of inactivating reaction. These enzymes also recognize as substrates other concurrent lipid mediators, whereas, in turn, endocannabinoids might interact with noncannabinoid receptors with subcellular distribution and ultimate biological actions either similar to or completely different from those of cannabinoid receptors. Even splicing variants of endocannabinoid hydrolyzing enzymes, such as FAAH-1, might play distinct roles in endocannabinoid inactivation. Finally, the products of endocannabinoid catabolism may have their own targets, with biological roles different from those of cannabinoid receptors. These peculiarities of endocannabinoid signaling have complicated the use of inhibitors of its inactivation mechanisms as a safer and more efficacious alternative to the direct targeting of cannabinoid receptors for the treatment of several pathological conditions, including pain. However, new strategies, including the rediscovery of “dirty drugs”, and the use of certain natural products (including non-THC cannabis constituents), are emerging that might allow us to make a virtue of necessity and exploit endocannabinoid redundancy to develop new analgesics. PMID:22860203

  3. Real time, in situ observation of the photocatalytic inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingtao [School of Food and Bioengineering, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Xiaoxin [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Qi, E-mail: qili@imr.ac.cn [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Shang, Jian Ku [Environment Functional Materials Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    An in situ microscopy technique was developed to observe in real time the photocatalytic inactivation process of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) cells by palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxide (TiON/PdO) under visible light illumination. The technique was based on building a photocatalytic micro-reactor on the sample stage of a fluorescence/phase contrast microscopy capable of simultaneously providing the optical excitation to activate the photocatalyst in the micro-reactor and the illumination to acquire phase contrast images of the cells undergoing the photocatalytic inactivation process. Using TiON/PdO as an example, the technique revealed for the first time the vacuolar activities inside S. cerevisiae cells subjected to a visible light photocatalytic inactivation. The vacuoles responded to the photocatalytic attack by the first expansion of the vacuolar volume and then contraction, before the vacuole disappeared and the cell structure collapsed. Consistent with the aggregate behavior observed from the cell culture experiments, the transition in the vacuolar volume provided clear evidence that photocatalytic disinfection of S. cerevisiae cells started with an initiation period in which cells struggled to offset the photocatalytic damage and moved rapidly after the photocatalytic damage overwhelmed the defense mechanisms of the cells against oxidative attack. - Highlights: • Palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxidephotocatalyst (TiON/PdO) • Effective visible-light photocatalytic disinfection of yeast cells by TiON/PdO • Real time, in situ observation technique was developed for photocatalytic disinfection. • The fluorescence/phase contrast microscope with a photocatalytic micro-reactor • Yeast cell disinfection happened before the cell structure collapsed.

  4. Inactivation of enteroviruses in sewage with ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, O.E.; Bogdanov, M.V.; Kazantseva, V.A.; Gabrilevskaia, L.N.; Kodkind, G.K.H.

    The study of ozone inactivation of enteroviruses in sewage showed the presence in sewage of suspensions of organic origin and bacterial flora to influence the rate of inactivation. The inactivation rate of poliomyelitis virus in sewage free from organic suspension and bacterial flora was significantly higher than that in sewage containing such suspension and bacterial flora. The inactivation rate of enteroviruses was found not to depend upon the protein and salt composition and pH of sewage or strain appurtenance of viruses. The inactivation rate of enteroviruses directly depended upon the dose of ozone and time of contact with it. Differences in the resistance of different types of poliomyelitis virus, ECHO and Coxsackie viruses to the effect of ozone are likely exist. These differences are manifested within the range of relatively small doses of ozone. E. coli is more resistant to ozone than entero-viruses. The results of laboratory studies were used to choose the regimen of sanitation of urban sewage to be used in technological cycles of industrial enterprises.

  5. THE CYTOKINES SYNTHESIS IN VITRO IN THE TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS INFECTED CELLS AND IN THE PRESENCE OF INACTIVATED VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Mesentseva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE is severe neuroinfectious disease with involvement of immune mechanisms in pathogenesis. Comparative analysis of synthesis of key cytokines had been performed for the TBE virus (TBEV infected cells and in the presence of inactivated vaccine against TBE in vitro. Persistent TBEV infection of immortal tissue culture of human larynx cancer cells caused transcription activation of interferons IFNα, IFNγ, IFNλ1, interleukins IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumour necrosis factor TNFα as well as one of apoptosis factors Fas. Comparison of transcription and production of cytokines revealed that the TBEV infection resulted in posttranscription Th1 shift of cytokine response. In the presence of inactivated vaccine against TBE based on the same strain Sofjin of the TBEV activation of transcription of cytokines IFNα, IFNλ1, IL-4, IL-10 was also observed as after the TBEV infection that together with an additional stimulation of GM-CSF production might serve as an evidence of Th2 response. Involvement of IFNIII type (IFNλ1 both during persistent infection and after addition of inactivated vaccines was found in the first time. Differences in dynamics of cytokines IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, TNFα response during the TBEV infection and in the presence of inactivated vaccine are described.

  6. Inactivation kinetics of spores of Bacillus cereus strains treated by a peracetic acid-based disinfectant at different concentrations and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhaus, Nadine; Pina-Pérez, Maria Consuelo; Martínez, Antonio; Klein, Günter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a commercial peracetic acid-based disinfectant against spores of Bacillus cereus, to identify the most influential factor for the final number of microorganisms after different disinfection procedures, and to evaluate the nature of the inactivation kinetics. The spores of four different strains of B. cereus (DSM 318, 4312, 4313, and 4384) were treated with five different disinfectant concentrations (0.25%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% [w/v]) at three different temperatures (10°C, 15°C, and 20°C) with or without protein load. A higher temperature and PES 15/23 concentration resulted in a higher inactivation. Inactivation of B. cereus strain 4312 was around 2 log₁₀ cycles at 10°C and around 7 log₁₀ at 20°C (conc=1% [w/v] PAA; t=60 min; without protein). The protein load at higher concentrations did not significantly reduce the efficacy of the disinfectant (p>0.05). This article indicates the applicability of the Weibull model to fit the B. cereus disinfectant survival curves. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to carry out a sensitivity analysis, which revealed the most influential factors affecting the final number of microorganisms after the disinfection process.

  7. Dual mechanism of integrin αIIbβ3 closure in procoagulant platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheij, Nadine J A; Gilio, Karen; van Kruchten, Roger; Jobe, Shawn M; Wieschhaus, Adam J; Chishti, Athar H; Collins, Peter; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Cosemans, Judith M E M

    2013-05-10

    Inactivation of integrin αIIbβ3 reverses platelet aggregate formation upon coagulation. Platelets from patient (Scott) and mouse (Capn1(-/-) and Ppif(-/-)) blood reveal a dual mechanism of αIIbβ3 inactivation: by calpain-2 cleavage of integrin-associated proteins and by cyclophilin D/TMEM16F-dependent phospholipid scrambling. These data provide novel insight into the switch mechanisms from aggregating to procoagulant platelets. Aggregation of platelets via activated integrin αIIbβ3 is a prerequisite for thrombus formation. Phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets with a key role in the coagulation process disconnect from a thrombus by integrin inactivation via an unknown mechanism. Here we show that αIIbβ3 inactivation in procoagulant platelets relies on a sustained high intracellular Ca(2+), stimulating intracellular cleavage of the β3 chain, talin, and Src kinase. Inhibition of calpain activity abolished protein cleavage, but only partly suppressed αIIbβ3 inactivation. Integrin αIIbβ3 inactivation was unchanged in platelets from Capn1(-/-) mice, suggesting a role of the calpain-2 isoform. Scott syndrome platelets, lacking the transmembrane protein TMEM16F and having low phosphatidylserine exposure, displayed reduced αIIbβ3 inactivation with the remaining activity fully dependent on calpain. In platelets from Ppif(-/-) mice, lacking mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) formation, agonist-induced phosphatidylserine exposure and αIIbβ3 inactivation were reduced. Treatment of human platelets with cyclosporin A gave a similar phenotype. Together, these data point to a dual mechanism of αIIbβ3 inactivation via calpain(-2) cleavage of integrin-associated proteins and via TMEM16F-dependent phospholipid scrambling with an assistant role of mPTP formation.

  8. Modelling the Ozone-Based Treatments for Inactivation of Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Joanna Brodowska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the development of a model for ozone treatment in a dynamic bed of different microorganisms (Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, B. pumilus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Aspergillus niger, Eupenicillium cinnamopurpureum on a heterogeneous matrix (juniper berries, cardamom seeds initially treated with numerous ozone doses during various contact times was studied. Taking into account various microorganism susceptibility to ozone, it was of great importance to develop a sufficiently effective ozone dose to preserve food products using different strains based on the microbial model. For this purpose, we have chosen the Weibull model to describe the survival curves of different microorganisms. Based on the results of microorganism survival modelling after ozone treatment and considering the least susceptible strains to ozone, we selected the critical ones. Among tested strains, those from genus Bacillus were recognized as the most critical strains. In particular, B. subtilis and B. pumilus possessed the highest resistance to ozone treatment because the time needed to achieve the lowest level of its survival was the longest (up to 17.04 min and 16.89 min for B. pumilus reduction on juniper berry and cardamom seed matrix, respectively. Ozone treatment allow inactivate microorganisms to achieving lower survival rates by ozone dose (20.0 g O3/m3 O2, with a flow rate of 0.4 L/min and contact time (up to 20 min. The results demonstrated that a linear correlation between parameters p and k in Weibull distribution, providing an opportunity to calculate a fitted equation of the process.

  9. Modelling the Ozone-Based Treatments for Inactivation of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodowska, Agnieszka Joanna; Nowak, Agnieszka; Kondratiuk-Janyska, Alina; Piątkowski, Marcin; Śmigielski, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the development of a model for ozone treatment in a dynamic bed of different microorganisms (Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, B. pumilus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Aspergillus niger, Eupenicillium cinnamopurpureum) on a heterogeneous matrix (juniper berries, cardamom seeds) initially treated with numerous ozone doses during various contact times was studied. Taking into account various microorganism susceptibility to ozone, it was of great importance to develop a sufficiently effective ozone dose to preserve food products using different strains based on the microbial model. For this purpose, we have chosen the Weibull model to describe the survival curves of different microorganisms. Based on the results of microorganism survival modelling after ozone treatment and considering the least susceptible strains to ozone, we selected the critical ones. Among tested strains, those from genus Bacillus were recognized as the most critical strains. In particular, B. subtilis and B. pumilus possessed the highest resistance to ozone treatment because the time needed to achieve the lowest level of its survival was the longest (up to 17.04 min and 16.89 min for B. pumilus reduction on juniper berry and cardamom seed matrix, respectively). Ozone treatment allow inactivate microorganisms to achieving lower survival rates by ozone dose (20.0 g O3/m3 O2, with a flow rate of 0.4 L/min) and contact time (up to 20 min). The results demonstrated that a linear correlation between parameters p and k in Weibull distribution, providing an opportunity to calculate a fitted equation of the process. PMID:28991199

  10. Bimodal voltage dependence of TRPA1: mutations of a key pore helix residue reveal strong intrinsic voltage-dependent inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xia; Lu, Yungang; Chen, Xueqin; Xiong, Jian; Zhou, Yuanda; Li, Ping; Xia, Bingqing; Li, Min; Zhu, Michael X; Gao, Zhaobing

    2014-07-01

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is implicated in somatosensory processing and pathological pain sensation. Although not strictly voltage-gated, ionic currents of TRPA1 typically rectify outwardly, indicating channel activation at depolarized membrane potentials. However, some reports also showed TRPA1 inactivation at high positive potentials, implicating voltage-dependent inactivation. Here we report a conserved leucine residue, L906, in the putative pore helix, which strongly impacts the voltage dependency of TRPA1. Mutation of the leucine to cysteine (L906C) converted the channel from outward to inward rectification independent of divalent cations and irrespective to stimulation by allyl isothiocyanate. The mutant, but not the wild-type channel, displayed exclusively voltage-dependent inactivation at positive potentials. The L906C mutation also exhibited reduced sensitivity to inhibition by TRPA1 blockers, HC030031 and ruthenium red. Further mutagenesis of the leucine to all natural amino acids individually revealed that most substitutions at L906 (15/19) resulted in inward rectification, with exceptions of three amino acids that dramatically reduced channel activity and one, methionine, which mimicked the wild-type channel. Our data are plausibly explained by a bimodal gating model involving both voltage-dependent activation and inactivation of TRPA1. We propose that the key pore helix residue, L906, plays an essential role in responding to the voltage-dependent gating.

  11. Immunological tolerance to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in neonatally infected virus carrier mice: evidence supporting a clonal inactivation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cihak, J.; Lehmann-Grube, F.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments are described aimed at analysing the mechanism responsible for the absence of cell-mediated immunity against LCM virus-infected cells in neonatally established LCM virus carrier mice. Virus-specific cell-mediated immunity was assessed by 51 Cr release and target cell reduction assays. Attempts to demonstrate cells in spleens of CBA/J carrier mice able to suppress in syngeneic recipients the induction or the effector phase of the cytotoxic T-cell response against LCM virus-infected cells were unsuccessful. Also, no factors were detected in CBA/J and C57BL/6J carrier mice, either spleen cell-associated or free in the circulation, which would block the activity of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes against LCM virus-infected syngeneic target cells. The results indicate that inability of LCM virus carrier mice to act immunologically against virus-infected target cells is due to deletion or irreversible inactivation of T lymphocytes carrying receptors for virally altered cell membrane antigens. (author)

  12. Inactivation of microorganisms for high pressures in the wine industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montana B, Jaime Nelson; Ortegon T, Sandra Patricia

    2000-01-01

    In order to evaluate experimentally the capacity of N 2 and CO 2 under pressure to inactivate wild yeasts, which remain in the Puntalarga vineyard grape, musts were exposed to hyperbaric treatment with these gases. At the end of the pascalization (after 2 hours), CO 2 at 15 degrades Celsius under pressures from 1 to 5 MPa, reached high inactivation percentages of yeast cells (> 90%). Contrary to CO 2 treatment the use of N 2 at 15 degrades Celsius at 4 and 10 MPa failed to exert microbicide effect in a same treatment time. While CO 2 gas with high solubility in water has the potential to reduce microbial loads in musts, N 2 gas with low solubility in water have not effect on the survival of the pathogenic microorganisms in these juices

  13. The Potential of the Market for the Kyoto Mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.X.

    2000-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol is the first international environmental agreement to set legally binding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions targets and timetables for Annex I countries. It incorporates emissions trading and two project-based flexibility mechanisms, namely joint implementation (JI) and the clean development mechanism (CDM) to help Annex I countries to meet their Kyoto targets at a lower overall cost. The extent to which their compliance cost can be lowered depends on the size of the market for all three flexibility mechanisms under the Protocol. This article estimates the size of such a market and demonstrates that restrictions on the use of flexibility mechanisms not only reduce potential of the Annex I countries' efficiency gains, but are furthermore not beneficial to developing countries since they restrict the total financial flows to developing countries under the CDM. Thus, from the perspective of husbanding the world's limited resources, the fewer the restrictions on the use of flexibility mechanisms, the greater are the gains from their use

  14. Pulsed-light inactivation of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria on cheese surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, J; Hsu, L C; Miller, B M; Sullivan, G; Paradis, K; Moraru, C I

    2015-09-01

    Cheese products are susceptible to postprocessing cross-contamination by bacterial surface contamination during slicing, handling, or packaging, which can lead to food safety issues and significant losses due to spoilage. This study examined the effectiveness of pulsed-light (PL) treatment on the inactivation of the spoilage microorganism Pseudomonas fluorescens, the nonenterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (nonpathogenic surrogate of Escherichia coli O157:H7), and Listeria innocua (nonpathogenic surrogate of Listeria monocytogenes) on cheese surface. The effects of inoculum level and cheese surface topography and the presence of clear polyethylene packaging were evaluated in a full factorial experimental design. The challenge microorganisms were grown to early stationary phase and subsequently diluted to reach initial inoculum levels of either 5 or 7 log cfu/slice. White Cheddar and process cheeses were cut into 2.5×5 cm slices, which were spot-inoculated with 100 µL of bacterial suspension. Inoculated cheese samples were exposed to PL doses of 1.02 to 12.29 J/cm(2). Recovered survivors were enumerated by standard plate counting or the most probable number technique, as appropriate. The PL treatments were performed in triplicate and data were analyzed using a general linear model. Listeria innocua was the least sensitive to PL treatment, with a maximum inactivation level of 3.37±0.2 log, followed by P. fluorescens, with a maximum inactivation of 3.74±0.8 log. Escherichia coli was the most sensitive to PL, with a maximum reduction of 5.41±0.1 log. All PL inactivation curves were nonlinear, and inactivation reached a plateau after 3 pulses (3.07 J/cm(2)). The PL treatments through UV-transparent packaging and without packaging consistently resulted in similar inactivation levels. This study demonstrates that PL has strong potential for decontamination of the cheese surface. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc

  15. Inactivation kinetics and efficiencies of UV-LEDs against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and surrogate microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanakul, Surapong; Oguma, Kumiko

    2018-03-01

    To demonstrate the effectiveness of UV light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) to disinfect water, UV-LEDs at peak emission wavelengths of 265, 280, and 300 nm were adopted to inactivate pathogenic species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella pneumophila, and surrogate species, including Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis spores, and bacteriophage Qβ in water, compared to conventional low-pressure UV lamp emitting at 254 nm. The inactivation profiles of each species showed either a linear or sigmoidal survival curve, which both fit well with the Geeraerd's model. Based on the inactivation rate constant, the 265-nm UV-LED showed most effective fluence, except for with E. coli which showed similar inactivation rates at 265 and 254 nm. Electrical energy consumption required for 3-log 10 inactivation (E E,3 ) was lowest for the 280-nm UV-LED for all microbial species tested. Taken together, the findings of this study determined the inactivation profiles and kinetics of both pathogenic bacteria and surrogate species under UV-LED exposure at different wavelengths. We also demonstrated that not only inactivation rate constants, but also energy efficiency should be considered when selecting an emission wavelength for UV-LEDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Singular potentials in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera-Navarro, V.C.; Koo, E. Ley

    1995-10-01

    This paper is a review of some mathematical methods as recently developed and applied to deal with singular potentials in Quantum Mechanics. Regular and singular perturbative methods as well as variational treatments are considered. (author). 25 refs

  17. Membrane potential correlates of sensory perception in mouse barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachidhanandam, Shankar; Sreenivasan, Varun; Kyriakatos, Alexandros; Kremer, Yves; Petersen, Carl C H

    2013-11-01

    Neocortical activity can evoke sensory percepts, but the cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We trained mice to detect single brief whisker stimuli and report perceived stimuli by licking to obtain a reward. Pharmacological inactivation and optogenetic stimulation demonstrated a causal role for the primary somatosensory barrel cortex. Whole-cell recordings from barrel cortex neurons revealed membrane potential correlates of sensory perception. Sensory responses depended strongly on prestimulus cortical state, but both slow-wave and desynchronized cortical states were compatible with task performance. Whisker deflection evoked an early (sensory response that was encoded through cell-specific reversal potentials. A secondary late (50-400 ms) depolarization was enhanced on hit trials compared to misses. Optogenetic inactivation revealed a causal role for late excitation. Our data reveal dynamic processing in the sensory cortex during task performance, with an early sensory response reliably encoding the stimulus and later secondary activity contributing to driving the subjective percept.

  18. [Kinetics of catalase inactivation induced by ultrasonic cavitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapovich, M V; Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic patterns of sonication-induced inactivation of bovine liver catalase (CAT) were studied in buffer solutions (pH 4-11) within the temperature range from 36 to 55 degrees C. Solutions of CAT were exposed to low-frequency (20.8 kHz) ultrasound (specific power, 48-62 W/cm2). The kinetics of CAT inactivation was characterized by effective first-order rate constants (s-1) of total inactivation (kin), thermal inactivation (*kin), and ultrasonic inactivation (kin(us)). In all cases, the following inequality was valid: kin > *kin. The value of kin(us) increased with the ultrasound power (range, 48-62 W/cm2) and exhibited a strong dependence on pH of the medium. On increasing the initial concentration of CAT (0.4-4.0 nM), kin(us) decreased. The three rate constants were minimum within the range of pH 6.5-8; their values increased considerably at pH 9. At 36-55 degrees C, temperature dependence of kin(us) was characterized by an activation energy (Eact) of 19.7 kcal/mol, whereas the value of Eact for CAT thermoinactivation was equal to 44.2 kcal/mol. Bovine serum and human serum albumins (BSA and HSA, respectively) inhibited sonication-induced CAT inactivation; complete prevention was observed at concentrations above 2.5 micrograms/ml. Dimethyl formamide (DMFA), a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals (HO.), prevented sonication-induced CAT inactivation at 10% (kin and *kin increased with the content of DMFA at concentrations in excess of 3%). The results obtained indicate that free radicals generated in the field of ultrasonic cavitation play a decisive role in the inactivation of CAT, which takes place when its solutions are exposed to low-frequency ultrasound. However, the efficiency of CAT inactivation by the radicals is determined by (1) the degree of association between the enzyme molecules in the reaction medium and (2) the composition thereof.

  19. Defense through sensory inactivation: sea hare ink reduces sensory and motor responses of spiny lobsters to food odors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love-Chezem, Tiffany; Aggio, Juan F; Derby, Charles D

    2013-04-15

    Antipredator defenses are ubiquitous and diverse. Ink secretion of sea hares (Aplysia) is an antipredator defense acting through the chemical senses of predators by different mechanisms. The most common mechanism is ink acting as an unpalatable repellent. Less common is ink secretion acting as a decoy (phagomimic) that misdirects predators' attacks. In this study, we tested another possible mechanism--sensory inactivation--in which ink inactivates the predator's reception of food odors associated with would-be prey. We tested this hypothesis using spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, as model predators. Ink secretion is composed of two glandular products, one being opaline, a viscous substance containing concentrations of hundreds of millimolar of total free amino acids. Opaline sticks to antennules, mouthparts and other chemosensory appendages of lobsters, physically blocking access of food odors to the predator's chemosensors, or over-stimulating (short term) and adapting (long term) the chemosensors. We tested the sensory inactivation hypotheses by treating the antennules with opaline and mimics of its physical and/or chemical properties. We compared the effects of these treatments on responses to a food odor for chemoreceptor neurons in isolated antennules, as a measure of effect on chemosensory input, and for antennular motor responses of intact lobsters, as a measure of effect on chemically driven motor behavior. Our results indicate that opaline reduces the output of chemosensors by physically blocking reception of and response to food odors, and this has an impact on motor responses of lobsters. This is the first experimental demonstration of inactivation of peripheral sensors as an antipredatory defense.

  20. Somatic INK4a-ARF locus mutations: a significant mechanism of gene inactivation in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poi, M J; Yen, T; Li, J; Song, H; Lang, J C; Schuller, D E; Pearl, D K; Casto, B C; Tsai, M D; Weghorst, C M

    2001-01-01

    The INK4a-ARF locus is located on human chromosome 9p21 and is known to encode two functionally distinct tumor-suppressor genes. The p16(INK4a) (p16) tumor-suppressor gene product is a negative regulator of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, which in turn positively regulate progression of mammalian cells through the cell cycle. The p14(ARF) tumor-suppressor gene product specifically interacts with human double minute 2, leading to the subsequent stabilization of p53 and G(1) arrest. Previous investigations analyzing the p16 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHNs) have suggested the predominate inactivating events to be homozygous gene deletions and hypermethylation of the p16 promoter. Somatic mutational inactivation of p16 has been reported to be low (0-10%, with a combined incidence of 25 of 279, or 9%) and to play only a minor role in the development of SCCHN. The present study examined whether this particular mechanism of INK4a/ARF inactivation, specifically somatic mutation, has been underestimated in SCCHN by determining the mutational status of the p16 and p14(ARF) genes in 100 primary SCCHNs with the use of polymerase chain reaction technology and a highly sensitive, nonradioactive modification of single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis termed "cold" SSCP. Exons 1alpha, 1beta, and 2 of INK4a/ARF were amplified using intron-based primers or a combination of intron- and exon-based primers. A total of 27 SCCHNs (27%) exhibited sequence alterations in this locus, 22 (22%) of which were somatic sequence alterations and five (5%) of which were a single polymorphism in codon 148. Of the 22 somatic alterations, 20 (91%) directly or indirectly involved exon 2, and two (9%) were located within exon 1alpha. No mutations were found in exon 1beta. All 22 somatic mutations would be expected to yield altered p16 proteins, but only 15 of them should affect p14(ARF) proteins. Specific somatic alterations included microdeletions or

  1. New Potentials for Old: The Darboux Transformation in Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian Wesley; Celius, Tevye C.

    2008-01-01

    The Darboux transformation in quantum mechanics is reviewed at a basic level. Examples of how this transformation leads to exactly solvable potentials related to the "particle in a box" and the harmonic oscillator are shown in detail. The connection between the Darboux transformation and some modern operator based approaches to quantum mechanics…

  2. Synthetic protocells interact with viral nanomachinery and inactivate pathogenic human virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Porotto

    Full Text Available We present a new antiviral strategy and research tool that could be applied to a wide range of enveloped viruses that infect human beings via membrane fusion. We test this strategy on two emerging zoonotic henipaviruses that cause fatal encephalitis in humans, Nipah (NiV and Hendra (HeV viruses. In the new approach, artificial cell-like particles (protocells presenting membrane receptors in a biomimetic manner were developed and found to attract and inactivate henipavirus envelope glycoprotein pseudovirus particles, preventing infection. The protocells do not accumulate virus during the inactivation process. The use of protocells that interact with, but do not accumulate, viruses may provide significant advantages over current antiviral drugs, and this general approach may have wide potential for antiviral development.

  3. Modelling and application of the inactivation of microorganism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oğuzhan, P.; Yangılar, F.

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of consuming contaminated food with toxic microorganisms causing infections and consideration of food protection and new microbial inactivation methods are obligatory situations. Food microbiology is mainly related with unwanted microorganisms spoiling foods during processing and transporting stages and causing diseases. Determination of pathogen microorganisms is important for human health to define and prevent dangers and elongate shelf life. Inactivation of pathogen microorganisms can provide food security and reduce nutrient losses. Microbial inactivation which is using methods of food protection such as food safety and fresh. With this aim, various methods are used such as classical thermal processes (pasteurisation, sterilisation), pressured electrical field (PEF), ionised radiation, high pressure, ultrasonic waves and plasma sterilisation. Microbial inactivation modelling is a secure and effective method in food production. A new microbiological application can give useful results for risk assessment in food, inactivation of microorganisms and improvement of shelf life. Application and control methods should be developed and supported by scientific research and industrial applications

  4. Non-linear pressure/temperature-dependence of high pressure thermal inactivation of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum type B in foods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian B Maier

    Full Text Available The effect of high pressure thermal (HPT processing on the inactivation of spores of proteolytic type B Clostridium botulinum TMW 2.357 in four differently composed low-acid foods (green peas with ham, steamed sole, vegetable soup, braised veal was studied in an industrially feasible pressure range and temperatures between 100 and 120°C. Inactivation curves exhibited rapid inactivation during compression and decompression followed by strong tailing effects. The highest inactivation (approx. 6-log cycle reduction was obtained in braised veal at 600 MPa and 110°C after 300 s pressure-holding time. In general, inactivation curves exhibited similar negative exponential shapes, but maximum achievable inactivation levels were lower in foods with higher fat contents. At high treatment temperatures, spore inactivation was more effective at lower pressure levels (300 vs. 600 MPa, which indicates a non-linear pressure/temperature-dependence of the HPT spore inactivation efficiency. A comparison of spore inactivation levels achievable using HPT treatments versus a conventional heat sterilization treatment (121.1°C, 3 min illustrates the potential of combining high pressures and temperatures to replace conventional retorting with the possibility to reduce the process temperature or shorten the processing time. Finally, experiments using varying spore inoculation levels suggested the presence of a resistant fraction comprising approximately 0.01% of a spore population as reason for the pronounced tailing effects in survivor curves. The loss of the high resistance properties upon cultivation indicates that those differences develop during sporulation and are not linked to permanent modifications at the genetic level.

  5. Acute toxicity and inactivation tests of CO2 on invertebrates in drinking water treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wen-Chao; Zhang, Jin-Song; Liu, Li-Jun; Zhao, Jian-Shu; Li, Tuo

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the esthetic problem caused by invertebrates, researchers are recently starting to be more aware of their potential importance in terms of public health. However, the inactivation methods of invertebrates which could proliferate in drinking water treatment systems are not well developed. The objective of this study is to assess the acute toxicity and inactivation effects of CO2 on familiar invertebrates in water treatment processes. The results of this study revealed that CO2 has a definite toxicity to familiar invertebrates. The values of 24-h LC50 (median lethal concentration) were calculated for each test with six groups of invertebrates. The toxicity of CO2 was higher with increasing concentrations in solution but was lower with the increase in size of the invertebrates. Above the concentration of 1,000 mg/L for the CO2 solution, the 100% inactivation time of all the invertebrates was less than 5 s, and in 15 min, the inactivation ratio showed a gradient descent with a decline in concentration. As seen for Mesocyclops thermocyclopoides, by dosing with a sodium bicarbonate solution first and adding a dilute hydrochloric acid solution 5 min later, it is possible to obtain a satisfactory inactivation effect in the GAC (granular activated carbon) filters.

  6. Susceptibility of glucokinase-MODY mutants to inactivation by oxidative stress in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kirsty S; Matschinsky, Franz M; Agius, Loranne; Arden, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    The posttranslational regulation of glucokinase (GK) differs in hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells. We tested the hypothesis that GK mutants that cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (GK-MODY) show compromised activity and posttranslational regulation in β-cells. Activity and protein expression of GK-MODY and persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) mutants were studied in β-cell (MIN6) and non-β-cell (H4IIE) models. Binding of GK to phosphofructo-2-kinase, fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (PFK2/FBPase2) was studied by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in cell-based models. Nine of 11 GK-MODY mutants that have minimal effect on enzyme kinetics in vitro showed decreased specific activity relative to wild type when expressed in β-cells. A subset of these were stable in non-β-cells but showed increased inactivation in conditions of oxidative stress and partial reversal of inactivation by dithiothreitol. Unlike the GK-MODY mutants, four of five GK-PHHI mutants had similar specific activity to wild type and Y214C had higher activity than wild type. The GK-binding protein PFK2/FBPase2 protected wild-type GK from oxidative inactivation and the decreased stability of GK-MODY mutants correlated with decreased interaction with PFK2/FBPase2. Several GK-MODY mutants show posttranslational defects in β-cells characterized by increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and/or protein instability. Regulation of GK activity through modulation of thiol status may be a physiological regulatory mechanism for the control of GK activity in β-cells.

  7. Non-coding RNAs and epigenome: de novo DNA methylation, allelic exclusion and X-inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Halytskiy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs are widespread class of cell RNAs. They participate in many important processes in cells – signaling, posttranscriptional silencing, protein biosynthesis, splicing, maintenance of genome stability, telomere lengthening, X-inactivation. Nevertheless, activity of these RNAs is not restricted to posttranscriptional sphere, but cover also processes that change or maintain the epigenetic information. Non-coding RNAs can directly bind to the DNA targets and cause their repression through recruitment of DNA methyltransferases as well as chromatin modifying enzymes. Such events constitute molecular mechanism of the RNA-dependent DNA methylation. It is possible, that the RNA-DNA interaction is universal mechanism triggering DNA methylation de novo. Allelic exclusion can be also based on described mechanism. This phenomenon takes place, when non-coding RNA, which precursor is transcribed from one allele, triggers DNA methylation in all other alleles present in the cell. Note, that miRNA-mediated transcriptional silencing resembles allelic exclusion, because both miRNA gene and genes, which can be targeted by this miRNA, contain elements with the same sequences. It can be assumed that RNA-dependent DNA methylation and allelic exclusion originated with the purpose of counteracting the activity of mobile genetic elements. Probably, thinning and deregulation of the cellular non-coding RNA pattern allows reactivation of silent mobile genetic elements resulting in genome instability that leads to ageing and carcinogenesis. In the course of X-inactivation, DNA methylation and subsequent hete­rochromatinization of X chromosome can be triggered by direct hybridization of 5′-end of large non-coding RNA Xist with DNA targets in remote regions of the X chromosome.

  8. Procaine rapidly inactivates acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo and competes with agonist for inhibition sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, S.A.; Miller, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the high-affinity procaine channel inhibition site and the agonist self-inhibition site on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) from Torpedo electroplaque was investigated by using rapid 86 Rb + quenched-flux assays at 4 degree C in native AChR-rich vesicles on which 50-60% of ACh activation sites were blocked with α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX). In the presence of channel-activating acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations alone, AChR undergoes one phase of inactivation in under a second. Addition of procaine produces two-phase inactivation similar to that seen with self-inhibiting ACh concentrations rapid inactivation complete in 30-75 ms is followed by fast desensitization at the same k d observed without procaine. The dependence of k r on [procaine] is consistent with a bimolecular association between procaine and its AChR site. Inhibition of AChR function by mixtures of procaine plus self-inhibiting concentrations of ACh or suberyldicholine was studied by reducing the level of α-BTX block in vesicles. The data support a mechanism where procaine binds preferentially to the open-channel AChR state, since no procaine-induced inactivation is observed without agonist and k r 's dependence on [ACh] in channel-activating range closely parallels that of 86 Rb + flux response to ACh

  9. Inactivation of Template-Directed Misfolding of Infectious Prion Protein by Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Price, Luke M.; Braithwaite, Shannon L.; Balachandran, Aru; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2012-01-01

    Misfolded prions (PrPSc) are well known for their resistance to conventional decontamination processes. The potential risk of contamination of the water environment, as a result of disposal of specified risk materials (SRM), has raised public concerns. Ozone is commonly utilized in the water industry for inactivation of microbial contaminants and was tested in this study for its ability to inactivate prions (263K hamster scrapie = PrPSc). Treatment variables included initial ozone dose (7.6 to 25.7 mg/liter), contact time (5 s and 5 min), temperature (4°C and 20°C), and pH (pH 4.4, 6.0, and 8.0). Exposure of dilute suspensions of the infected 263K hamster brain homogenates (IBH) (0.01%) to ozone resulted in the in vitro destruction of the templating properties of PrPSc, as measured by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay. The highest levels of prion inactivation (≥4 log10) were observed with ozone doses of 13.0 mg/liter, at pH 4.4 and 20°C, resulting in a CT (the product of residual ozone concentration and contact time) value as low as 0.59 mg · liter−1 min. A comparison of ozone CT requirements among various pathogens suggests that prions are more susceptible to ozone degradation than some model bacteria and protozoa and that ozone treatment may be an effective solution for inactivating prions in water and wastewater. PMID:22138993

  10. Use of laser-UV for inactivation of virus in blood products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodouz, K.N.; Fratantoni, J.C.; Boone, E.J.; Bonner, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    Inactivation of virus by UV radiation was examined as a potential method for sterilization of blood products. Samples of attenuated poliovirus, platelets and plasma were uniformly irradiated with a XeCl excimer laser that delivered 40 nsec pulses of UV at 308 nm (UVB308). Intensities and exposure does were varied from 0.11 to 1.40 MW/cm2 and 0.51 to 56.0 J/cm2, respectively. In studies conducted with low intensity UVB308 (less than or equal to 0.17 MW/cm2), using exposure doses greater than or equal to 10.8 J/cm2, it was possible to inactivate poliovirus by 4 to 6 log10. Platelets irradiated with doses less than or equal to 21.5 J/cm2 exhibited minimal damage as assessed by aggregation activity and spontaneous release of serotonin. Examination of the coagulation activity of irradiated plasma indicated that exposure doses less than or equal to 21.5 J/cm2 resulted in less than 20% increase in prothrombin and partial thromboplastin times. The use of UVB308 at a higher intensity (1.4 MW/cm2) over a similar range of exposure doses did not enhance viral inactivation but did result in increased damage to platelet and plasma proteins. These results demonstrate that at 308 nm there exists a window of efficacy for exposure doses between 10.8 and 21.5 J/cm2 and peak intensities less than or equal to 0.17 MW/cm2 in which a hardy virus is significantly inactivated and platelets and plasma proteins are, by functional criteria, minimally affected. Increased viral inactivation cannot be accomplished with higher UV intensities and will require additional or alternate measures

  11. Chemical Changes in Nonthermal Plasma-Treated N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) Solution and Their Contribution to Bacterial Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Utku K; Smith, Josh; Ji, Hai-Feng; Brooks, Ari D; Joshi, Suresh G

    2016-02-02

    In continuation of our previous reports on the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of atmospheric non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma treated N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) solution against planktonic and biofilm forms of different multidrug resistant microorganisms, we present here the chemical changes that mediate inactivation of Escherichia coli. In this study, the mechanism and products of the chemical reactions in plasma-treated NAC solution are shown. UV-visible spectrometry, FT-IR, NMR, and colorimetric assays were utilized for chemical characterization of plasma treated NAC solution. The characterization results were correlated with the antimicrobial assays using determined chemical species in solution in order to confirm the major species that are responsible for antimicrobial inactivation. Our results have revealed that plasma treatment of NAC solution creates predominantly reactive nitrogen species versus reactive oxygen species, and the generated peroxynitrite is responsible for significant bacterial inactivation.

  12. Removal of detergents from SDS-inactivated dextransucrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husman, D.W.; Mayer, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dextransucrase, which is rapidly inactivated by SDS, can be reactivated upon the addition of Triton X-100. Purification of the enzyme, in good yield and homogeneity, has been achieved by chromatography in the presence of SDS. The purified enzyme can be reactivated with Triton, but has large amounts of detergents. It was important to develop procedures for their removal. Density gradient centrifugation of SDS-inactivated or Triton-reactivated enzyme, treatment with Extracti-Gel D (Pierce) or chromatography on hydroxyl apatite (HA), have been examined for their effectiveness in providing detergent-free enzyme in good yield. Ultracentrifugation of SDS-inactivated protein provided limited recovery of active enzyme, but suggested that reactivation could be achieved by the simple removal of the detergent. While similar behavior was observed when the enzyme was eluted from Extracti-Gel, it was also shown that the limited recovery was a result of irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. Recovery could be improved if the enzyme was collected in solutions containing Triton, which has been reported to be a stabilizer. Chromatography of SDS-inactivated enzyme on HA also yielded active enzyme. Good recovery was obtained when Triton-reactivated enzyme was employed in these studies. The degree of detergent removal was determined by utilizing radiolabelled SDS and Triton X-100

  13. β1 subunit stabilises sodium channel Nav1.7 against mechanical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Jannis; Meents, Jannis; Machtens, Jan-Philipp; Lampert, Angelika

    2018-06-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 is a key player in neuronal excitability and pain signalling. In addition to voltage sensing, the channel is also modulated by mechanical stress. Using whole-cell patch-clamp experiments, we discovered that the sodium channel subunit β1 is able to prevent the impact of mechanical stress on Nav1.7. An intramolecular disulfide bond of β1 was identified to be essential for stabilisation of inactivation, but not activation, against mechanical stress using molecular dynamics simulations, homology modelling and site-directed mutagenesis. Our results highlight the role of segment 6 of domain IV in fast inactivation. We present a candidate mechanism for sodium channel stabilisation against mechanical stress, ensuring reliable channel functionality in living systems. Voltage-gated sodium channels are key players in neuronal excitability and pain signalling. Precise gating of these channels is crucial as even small functional alterations can lead to pathological phenotypes such as pain or heart failure. Mechanical stress has been shown to affect sodium channel activation and inactivation. This suggests that stabilising components are necessary to ensure precise channel gating in living organisms. Here, we show that mechanical shear stress affects voltage dependence of activation and fast inactivation of the Nav1.7 channel. Co-expression of the β1 subunit, however, protects both gating modes of Nav1.7 against mechanical shear stress. Using molecular dynamics simulation, homology modelling and site-directed mutagenesis, we identify an intramolecular disulfide bond of β1 (Cys21-Cys43) which is partially involved in this process: the β1-C43A mutant prevents mechanical modulation of voltage dependence of activation, but not of fast inactivation. Our data emphasise the unique role of segment 6 of domain IV for sodium channel fast inactivation and confirm previous reports that the intracellular process of fast inactivation can be

  14. Luciferase inactivation in the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, C A; Baldwin, T O

    1981-06-01

    Luciferase was rapidly inactivated in stationary-phase cultures of the wild type of the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, but was stable in stationary-phase cultures of mutants of V. harveyi that are nonluminous without exogenous aldehyde, termed the aldehyde-deficient mutants. The inactivation in the wild type was halted by cell lysis and was slowed or stopped by O2 deprivation or by addition of KCN and NaF or of chloramphenicol. If KCN and NaF or chloramphenicol were added to a culture before the onset of luciferase inactivation, then luciferase inactivation did not occur. However, if these inhibitors were added after the onset of luciferase inactivation, then luciferase inactivation continued for about 2 to 3 h before the inactivation process stopped. The onset of luciferase inactivation in early stationary-phase cultures of wild-type cell coincided with a slight drop in the intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) level from a relatively constant log-phase value of 20 pmol of ATP per microgram of soluble cell protein. Addition of KCN and NaF to a culture shortly after this drop in ATP caused a rapid decrease in the ATP level to about 4 pmol of ATP per microgram whereas chloramphenicol added at this same time caused a transient increase in ATP level to about 25 pmol/microgram. The aldehyde-deficient mutant (M17) showed a relatively constant log-phase ATP level identical with that of the wild-type cells, but rather than decreasing in early stationary phase, the ATP level increased to a value twice that in log-phase cells. We suggest that the inactivation of luciferase is dependent on the synthesis of some factor which is produced during stationary phase and is itself unstable, and whose synthesis is blocked by chloramphenicol or cyanide plus fluoride.

  15. Comparison of two different methods for inactivation of viruses in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preuss, T.; Kamstrup, Søren; Kyvsgaard, N.C.

    1997-01-01

    enterovirus (PEV) was inactivated within 3 h, The inactivation with electron-beam irradiation resulted in almost linear curves in a semilogarithmic plot of virus titer versus irradiation dose, reflecting a first-order inactivation, The rate of inactivation was almost twice as fast in the liquid samples...

  16. Abnormal X : autosome ratio, but normal X chromosome inactivation in human triploid cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norwood Thomas H

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X chromosome inactivation (XCI is that aspect of mammalian dosage compensation that brings about equivalence of X-linked gene expression between females and males by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes (Xi in normal female cells, leaving them with a single active X (Xa as in male cells. In cells with more than two X's, but a diploid autosomal complement, all X's but one, Xa, are inactivated. This phenomenon is commonly thought to suggest 1 that normal development requires a ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set, and 2 that an early event in XCI is the marking of one X to be active, with remaining X's becoming inactivated by default. Results Triploids provide a test of these ideas because the ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set cannot be achieved, yet this abnormal ratio should not necessarily affect the one-Xa choice mechanism for XCI. Previous studies of XCI patterns in murine triploids support the single-Xa model, but human triploids mostly have two-Xa cells, whether they are XXX or XXY. The XCI patterns we observe in fibroblast cultures from different XXX human triploids suggest that the two-Xa pattern of XCI is selected for, and may have resulted from rare segregation errors or Xi reactivation. Conclusion The initial X inactivation pattern in human triploids, therefore, is likely to resemble the pattern that predominates in murine triploids, i.e., a single Xa, with the remaining X's inactive. Furthermore, our studies of XIST RNA accumulation and promoter methylation suggest that the basic features of XCI are normal in triploids despite the abnormal X:autosome ratio.

  17. Monitoring ultraviolet (UV) radiation inactivation of Cronobacter sakazakii in dry infant formula using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Lu, Xiaonan; Swanson, Barry G; Rasco, Barbara A; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen associated with dry infant formula presenting a high risk to low birth weight neonates. The inactivation of C. sakazakii in dry infant formula by ultraviolet (UV) radiation alone and combined with hot water treatment at temperatures of 55, 60, and 65 °C were applied in this study. UV radiation with doses in a range from 12.1 ± 0.30 kJ/m² to 72.8 ± 1.83 kJ/m² at room temperature demonstrated significant inactivation of C. sakazakii in dry infant formula (P radiation combining 60 °C hot water treatment increased inactivation of C. sakazakii cells significantly (P radiation on C. sakazakii inactivation kinetics (D value) were not observed in infant formula reconstituted in 55 and 65 °C water (P > 0.05). The inactivation mechanism was investigated using vibrational spectroscopy. Infrared spectroscopy detected significant stretching mode changes of macromolecules on the basis of spectral features, such as DNA, proteins, and lipids. Minor changes on cell membrane composition of C. sakazakii under UV radiation could be accurately and correctly monitored by infrared spectroscopy coupled with 2nd derivative transformation and principal component analysis. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii of dehydrated infant formula by gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Oh, Sang-Hee; Byun, Eui-Baek; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Jang-Ho; Woon, Jae-Ho; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2007-01-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii has been implicated as a causal organism in a severe form of neonatal meningitis, with reported mortality rates of 20%. The population at greatest risk is immunocompromised infants of any age. Dried infant formula has been identified as a potential source of the organism in both outbreaks and sporadic cases. The objective of this study was to investigate theirradiation effect of the inactivation on E. sakazakii (ATCC 29544) of a dehydrated infant formula. The D 10 -values were 0.22-0.27 and 0.76 kGy for broth and dehydrated infant formula, respectively. The irradiation at 5.0 kGy was able to completely eliminate the E. sakazakii inoculated at 8.0 to 9.0 log CFU g -1 onto a dehydrated infant formula. There was no regrowth for all samples during the time they were stored at 10 deg. C for 6 h after rehydration. The present results indicated that a gamma-irradiation could potentially be used to inactivate E. sakazakii in a dehydrated powdered infant formula

  19. Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii of dehydrated infant formula by gamma-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Oh, Sang-Hee [Radiation Application Research Division, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580 185 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Eui-Baek [Radiation Application Research Division, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580 185 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biotechnology, Korea University, Yeongi 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Jang-Ho [Radiation Application Research Division, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580 185 (Korea, Republic of); Woon, Jae-Ho [Livestock Products standard Division, National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service, Anyang 430-824 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Myung-Woo [Radiation Application Research Division, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580 185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mwbyun@kaeri.re.kr

    2007-11-15

    Enterobacter sakazakii has been implicated as a causal organism in a severe form of neonatal meningitis, with reported mortality rates of 20%. The population at greatest risk is immunocompromised infants of any age. Dried infant formula has been identified as a potential source of the organism in both outbreaks and sporadic cases. The objective of this study was to investigate theirradiation effect of the inactivation on E. sakazakii (ATCC 29544) of a dehydrated infant formula. The D{sub 10}-values were 0.22-0.27 and 0.76 kGy for broth and dehydrated infant formula, respectively. The irradiation at 5.0 kGy was able to completely eliminate the E. sakazakii inoculated at 8.0 to 9.0 log CFU g{sup -1} onto a dehydrated infant formula. There was no regrowth for all samples during the time they were stored at 10 deg. C for 6 h after rehydration. The present results indicated that a gamma-irradiation could potentially be used to inactivate E. sakazakii in a dehydrated powdered infant formula.

  20. Inactivation of Enterobacter sakazakii of dehydrated infant formula by gamma-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Oh, Sang-Hee; Byun, Eui-Baek; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Jang-Ho; Woon, Jae-Ho; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2007-11-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii has been implicated as a causal organism in a severe form of neonatal meningitis, with reported mortality rates of 20%. The population at greatest risk is immunocompromised infants of any age. Dried infant formula has been identified as a potential source of the organism in both outbreaks and sporadic cases. The objective of this study was to investigate theirradiation effect of the inactivation on E. sakazakii (ATCC 29544) of a dehydrated infant formula. The D10-values were 0.22-0.27 and 0.76 kGy for broth and dehydrated infant formula, respectively. The irradiation at 5.0 kGy was able to completely eliminate the E. sakazakii inoculated at 8.0 to 9.0 log CFU g -1 onto a dehydrated infant formula. There was no regrowth for all samples during the time they were stored at 10 °C for 6 h after rehydration. The present results indicated that a gamma-irradiation could potentially be used to inactivate E. sakazakii in a dehydrated powdered infant formula.

  1. Weed seed inactivation in soil mesocosms via biosolarization with mature compost and tomato processing waste amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achmon, Yigal; Fernández-Bayo, Jesús D; Hernandez, Katie; McCurry, Dlinka G; Harrold, Duff R; Su, Joey; Dahlquist-Willard, Ruth M; Stapleton, James J; VanderGheynst, Jean S; Simmons, Christopher W

    2017-05-01

    Biosolarization is a fumigation alternative that combines passive solar heating with amendment-driven soil microbial activity to temporarily create antagonistic soil conditions, such as elevated temperature and acidity, that can inactivate weed seeds and other pest propagules. The aim of this study was to use a mesocosm-based field trial to assess soil heating, pH, volatile fatty acid accumulation and weed seed inactivation during biosolarization. Biosolarization for 8 days using 2% mature green waste compost and 2 or 5% tomato processing residues in the soil resulted in accumulation of volatile fatty acids in the soil, particularly acetic acid, and >95% inactivation of Brassica nigra and Solanum nigrum seeds. Inactivation kinetics data showed that near complete weed seed inactivation in soil was achieved within the first 5 days of biosolarization. This was significantly greater than the inactivation achieved in control soils that were solar heated without amendment or were amended but not solar heated. The composition and concentration of organic matter amendments in soil significantly affected volatile fatty acid accumulation at various soil depths during biosolarization. Combining solar heating with organic matter amendment resulted in accelerated weed seed inactivation compared with either approach alone. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with 60 CO gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of 60 CO radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. The authors found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents

  3. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with 60 Co gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of 60 Co radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. We found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents

  4. Endotoxin inactivation via steam-heat treatment in dilute simethicone emulsions used in biopharmaceutical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Keith A; Galvin, Jeffrey; Gammell, Patrick; Nti-Gyabaah, Joseph; Boras, George; Kolwyck, David; Ramirez, José G; Presente, Esther; Naugle, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Simethicone emulsion is used to regulate foaming in cell culture operations in biopharmaceutical processes. It is also a potential source of endotoxin contamination. The inactivation of endotoxins in dilute simethicone emulsions was assessed as a function of time at different steam temperatures using a Limulus amebocyte lysate kinetic chromogenic technique. Endotoxin inactivation from steam-heat treatment was fit to a four-parameter double exponential decay model, which indicated that endotoxin inactivation was biphasic, consisting of fast and slow regimes. In the fast regime, temperature-related effects were dominant. Transitioning into the slow regime, the observed temperature dependence diminished, and concentration-related effects became increasingly significant. The change in the Gibbs free energy moving through the transition state indicated that a large energy barrier must be overcome for endotoxin inactivation to occur. The corresponding Arrhenius pre-exponential factor was >10(12) s(-1) suggesting that endotoxins in aqueous solution exist as aggregates. The disorder associated with the endotoxin inactivation reaction pathway was assessed via the change in entropy moving through the transition state. This quantity was positive indicating that endotoxin inactivation may result from hydrolysis of individual endotoxin molecules, which perturbs the conformation of endotoxin aggregates, thereby modulating the biological activity observed. Steam-heat treatment decreased endotoxin levels by 1-2 logarithm (log) reduction (LRV), which may be practically relevant depending on incoming raw material endotoxin levels. Antifoam efficiency and cell culture performance were negligibly impacted following steam-heat treatment. The results from this study show that steam-heat treatment is a viable endotoxin control strategy that can be implemented to support large-scale biopharmaceutical manufacturing. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium with free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, Jeanne; Mariñas, Benito J

    2007-07-15

    The inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium with free chlorine was characterized by two stages: an initial phase at a relatively fast rate followed by a slower second stage of pseudo first-order kinetics. The inactivation rate of each stage was approximately the same for all experiments performed at a certain condition of pH and temperature; however, variability was observed for the disinfectant exposure at which the transition between the two stages occurred. This variability was not a function of the initial disinfectant concentration, the initial bacterial density, or the bacterial stock. However, the transition to the second stage varied more significantly at high temperatures (30 degrees C), while lower variability was observed at lower temperatures (5 and 20 degrees C). Experiments conducted at pH values in the range of 6-9 revealed that the inactivation of M. avium was primarily due to hypochlorous acid, with little contribution from hypochlorite ion within this pH range. The inactivation kinetics was represented with a two-population model. The activation energies for the resulting pseudo first-order rate constants for the populations with fast and slow kinetics were 100.3 and 96.5 kJ/mol, respectively. The magnitude of these values suggested that for waters of relatively high pH and low temperatures, little inactivation of M. avium would be achieved within treatment plants, providing a seeding source for distribution systems.

  6. Calcium release-dependent inactivation precedes formation of the tubular system in developing rat cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macková, Katarina; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Hoťka, Matej; Hoffmannová, Barbora; Zahradník, Ivan; Zahradníková, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    Developing cardiac myocytes undergo substantial structural and functional changes transforming the mechanism of excitation-contraction coupling from the embryonic form, based on calcium influx through sarcolemmal DHPR calcium channels, to the adult form, relying on local calcium release through RYR calcium channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum stimulated by calcium influx. We characterized day-by-day the postnatal development of the structure of sarcolemma, using techniques of confocal fluorescence microscopy, and the development of the calcium current, measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp in isolated rat ventricular myocytes. We characterized the appearance and expansion of the t-tubule system and compared it with the appearance and progress of the calcium current inactivation induced by the release of calcium ions from sarcoplasmic reticulum as structural and functional measures of direct DHPR-RYR interaction. The release-dependent inactivation of calcium current preceded the development of the t-tubular system by several days, indicating formation of the first DHPR-RYR couplons at the surface sarcolemma and their later spreading close to contractile myofibrils with the growing t-tubules. Large variability of both of the measured parameters among individual myocytes indicates uneven maturation of myocytes within the growing myocardium.

  7. Mechanical and electromechanical properties of graphene and their potential application in MEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Zulfiqar H; Kermany, Atieh R; Iacopi, Francesca; Öchsner, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Graphene-based micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are very promising candidates for next generation miniaturized, lightweight, and ultra-sensitive devices. In this review, we review the progress to date of the assessment of the mechanical, electromechanical, and thermomechanical properties of graphene for application in graphene-based MEMS. Graphene possesses a plethora of outstanding properties—such as a 1 TPa Young’s modulus, exceptionally high 2D failure strength that stems from its sp 2 hybridization, and strong sigma bonding between carbon atoms. Such exceptional mechanical properties can enable, for example, graphene-based sound sources capable of generating sound beyond the audible range. The recently engineered piezoelectric properties of atomic force microscope tip-pressed graphene membranes or supported graphene on SiO 2 substrates, have paved the way in fabricating graphene-based nano-generators and actuators. On the other hand, graphene’s piezoresistive properties have enabled miniaturized pressure and strain sensors. 2D graphene nano-mechanical resonators can potentially measure ultralow forces, charges and potentially detect single atomic masses. The exceptional tribology of graphene can play a significant role in achieving superlubricity. In addition, the highest reported thermal conductivity of graphene is amenable for use in chips and providing better performing MEMS, as heat is efficiently dissipated. On top of that, graphene membranes could be nano-perforated to realize specialized applications like DNA translocation and desalination. Finally, to ensure stability and reliability of the graphene-based MEMS, adhesion is an important mechanical property that should be considered. In general, graphene could be used as a structural material in resonators, sensors, actuators and nano-generators with better performance and sensitivity than conventional MEMS. (topical review)

  8. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Gu, Ying; Dai, Tianhong

    2018-02-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a human-adapted, gram-negative diplococcus that infects human reproductive tracts and causes gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease, resulting in discharge and inflammation at the urethra, cervix, pharynx, or rectum. Over the years, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance to nearly every drug ever used to treat it, including sulfonamides, penicillin, tetracycline, and fluoroquinolones. Drug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae is now considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an urgent threat. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial blue light (aBL) at 405 and 470 nm for inactivating N. gonorrhoeae and reveal the mechanism of action. Our results showed that an exposure of 45 J/cm2 aBL at 405 nm reduced the bacterial CFU by 7.16-log10. When the aBL exposure was increased to 54 J/cm2, eradication of bacterial CFU was achieved. When the bacteria were exposed to aBL at 470 nm, 3-log10 reduction of CFU was observed at an aBL exposure of higher than 126 J/cm2. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic analyses revealed the presence of endogenous porphyrins and flavins in N. gonorrhoeae cells. The present study indicated that aBL is a potential strategy to control N. gonorrhoeae infections. Endogenous porphyrins play a vital role in the killing effects of aBL. In vivo experiments are ongoing in our laboratory to treat genital tract infections in mice using aBL and explore the potential clinical applications.

  9. Inactivation of viruses in municipal effluent by chlorine.

    OpenAIRE

    Hajenian, H. G.; Butler, M.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of pH and temperature on the efficiency of chlorine inactivation of two unrelated picornaviruses in a typical urban wastewater effluent was examined. Temperature, unlike pH, had relatively little effect on the rate of inactivation. The pH effect was complex and the two viruses differed. The f2 coliphage was more sensitive to chlorine at low pH, but at all values there was a threshold above which additional chlorine resulted in very rapid inactivation. The amount of chlorine requ...

  10. Inactivation of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleotide reductase by 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate: adenosylcobalamin destruction and formation of a nucleotide-based radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Gerfen, Gary J; Stubbe, Joanne

    2010-02-23

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR, 76 kDa) from Lactobacillus leichmannii is a class II RNR that requires adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) as a cofactor. It catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside triphosphates to deoxynucleotides and is 100% inactivated by 1 equiv of 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate (F(2)CTP) in cytidine, characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, indicating the trapped nucleotide had lost both of its fluorides and gained an oxygen. High-field ENDOR studies with [1'-(2)H]F(2)CTP from the reaction quenched at 30 s revealed a radical that is nucleotide-based. The relationship between this radical and the trapped cytidine analogue provides insight into the nonalkylative pathway for RNR inactivation relative to the alkylative pathway.

  11. Inactivation and unfolding of protein tyrosine phosphatase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 during urea and guanidine hydrochloride denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejing Wang

    Full Text Available The effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl on the activity, conformation and unfolding process of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase, a thermostable low molecular weight protein from Thermus thermophilus HB27, have been studied. Enzymatic activity assays showed both urea and GdnHCl resulted in the inactivation of PTPase in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Inactivation kinetics analysis suggested that the inactivation of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl were both monophasic and reversible processes, and the effects of urea and GdnHCl on PTPase were similar to that of mixed-type reversible inhibitors. Far-ultraviolet (UV circular dichroism (CD, Tryptophan and 1-anilinonaphthalene -8-sulfonic acid (ANS fluorescence spectral analyses indicated the existence of a partially active and an inactive molten globule-like intermediate during the unfolding processes induced by urea and GdnHCl, respectively. Based on the sequence alignment and the homolog Tt1001 protein structure, we discussed the possible conformational transitions of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl and compared the conformations of these unfolding intermediates with the transient states in bovine PTPase and its complex structures in detail. Our results may be able to provide some valuable clues to reveal the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity, and the unfolding pathway and mechanism of PTPase.

  12. Physical inactivation and stabilization of sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, D.

    1979-07-01

    High temperature conditioning of sludge is a stabilization process that insures sterilization. Both thermal pasteurization and irradiation are inactivation processes. Viruses and parasites are inactivated at 70-80 0 C. Total bacterial destruction requires higher temperatures and/or detention time. Radio sensitivity of pathogens and pertinent treatment parameters are examined. If sludge is to be land disposed, disinfection requires irradiation doses ranging 500 Krad; if cattle feeding is considered, the required dose is 1 Mrad

  13. CAF01 potentiates immune responses and efficacy of an inactivated influenza vaccine in ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Jean-Marie Martel

    Full Text Available Trivalent inactivated vaccines (TIV against influenza are given to 350 million people every year. Most of these are non-adjuvanted vaccines whose immunogenicity and protective efficacy are considered suboptimal. Commercially available non-adjuvanted TIV are known to elicit mainly a humoral immune response, whereas the induction of cell-mediated immune responses is negligible. Recently, a cationic liposomal adjuvant (dimethyldioctadecylammonium/trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate, CAF01 was developed. CAF01 has proven to enhance both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to a number of different experimental vaccine candidates. In this study, we compared the immune responses in ferrets to a commercially available TIV with the responses to the same vaccine mixed with the CAF01 adjuvant. Two recently circulating H1N1 viruses were used as challenge to test the vaccine efficacy. CAF01 improved the immunogenicity of the vaccine, with increased influenza-specific IgA and IgG levels. Additionally, CAF01 promoted cellular-mediated immunity as indicated by interferon-gamma expressing lymphocytes, measured by flow cytometry. CAF01 also enhanced the protection conferred by the vaccine by reducing the viral load measured in nasal washes by RT-PCR. Finally, CAF01 allowed for dose-reduction and led to higher levels of protection compared to TIV adjuvanted with a squalene emulsion. The data obtained in this human-relevant challenge model supports the potential of CAF01 in future influenza vaccines.

  14. Inactivation of complement by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, H M; Finke, J H; Elgert, K D; Cambell, B J; Barrett, J T

    1979-07-01

    Zymosan depletion of serum complement in guinea pigs rendered them highly resistant to lesion by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom. Guinea pigs deficient in C4 of the complement system are as sensitive to the venom as normal guinea pigs. The injection of 35 micrograms of whole recluse venom intradermally into guinea pigs lowered their complement level by 35.7%. Brown recluse spider venom in concentrations as slight as 0.02 micrograms protein/ml can totally inactivate one CH50 of guinea pig complement in vitro. Bee, scorpion, and other spider venoms had no influence on the hemolytic titer of complement. Fractionation of recluse spider venom by Sephadex G-200 filtration separated the complement-inactivating property of the venom into three major regions which could be distinguished on the basis of heat stability as well as size. None was neutralized by antivenom. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of venom resolved the complement inactivators into five fractions. Complement inactivated by whole venom or the Sephadex fractions could be restored to hemolytic activity by supplements of fresh serum but not by heat-inactivated serum, pure C3, pure C5, or C3 and C5 in combination.

  15. Estrogen-mediated inactivation of FOXO3a by the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zekas, Erin; Prossnitz, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen (17β-estradiol) promotes the survival and proliferation of breast cancer cells and its receptors represent important therapeutic targets. The cellular actions of estrogen are mediated by the nuclear estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ as well as the 7-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). We previously reported that estrogen activates the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3Kinase) pathway via GPER, resulting in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) production within the nucleus of breast cancer cells; however, the mechanisms and consequences of this activity remained unclear. MCF7 breast cancer cells were transfected with GFP-fused Forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) as a reporter to assess localization in response to estrogen stimulation. Inhibitors of PI3Kinases and EGFR were employed to determine the mechanisms of estrogen-mediated FOXO3a inactivation. Receptor knockdown with siRNA and the selective GPER agonist G-1 elucidated the estrogen receptor(s) responsible for estrogen-mediated FOXO3a inactivation. The effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators and downregulators (SERMs and SERDs) on FOXO3a in MCF7 cells were also determined. Cell survival (inhibition of apoptosis) was assessed by caspase activation. In the estrogen-responsive breast cancer cell line MCF7, FOXO3a inactivation occurs on a rapid time scale as a result of GPER, but not ERα, stimulation by estrogen, established by the GPER-selective agonist G-1 and knockdown of GPER and ERα. GPER-mediated inactivation of FOXO3a is effected by the p110α catalytic subunit of PI3Kinase as a result of transactivation of the EGFR. The SERMs tamoxifen and raloxifene, as well as the SERD ICI182,780, were active in mediating FOXO3a inactivation in a GPER-dependent manner. Additionally, estrogen-and G-1-mediated stimulation of MCF7 cells results in a decrease in caspase activation under proapoptotic conditions. Our results suggest that non-genomic signaling by GPER contributes

  16. Randomized Trials Comparing Inactivated Vaccine after Medium- or High-titer Measles Vaccine with Standard Titer Measles Vaccine after Inactivated Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Benn, Christine S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Observational studies have suggested that girls have higher mortality if their most recent immunization is an inactivated vaccine rather than a live vaccine. We therefore reanalyzed 5 randomized trials of early measles vaccine (MV) in which it was possible to compare an inactivated va...

  17. MPLEx: a method for simultaneous pathogen inactivation and extraction of samples for multi-omics profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Casey, Cameron P.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Gonzalez, Juan F.; Habyarimana, Fabien; Negretti, Nicholas M.; Sims, Amy C.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Thackray, Larissa B.; Halfmann, Peter J.; Walters, Kevin B.; Kim, Young-Mo; Zink, Erika M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Weitz, Karl K.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ahmer, Brian; Konkel, Michael E.; Motin, Vladimir; Baric, Ralph S.; Diamond, Michael S.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2017-01-01

    The continued emergence and spread of infectious agents is of increasing concern due to increased population growth and the associated increased livestock production to meet food demands, increased urbanization and land-use changes, and greater travel. A systems biology approach to infectious disease research can significantly advance our understanding of host-pathogen relationships and facilitate the development of new therapies and vaccines. Molecular characterization of infectious samples outside of appropriate biosafety containment can only take place subsequent to pathogen inactivation. Herein, we describe a modified Folch extraction using chloroform/methanol that facilitates the molecular characterization of infectious samples by enabling simultaneous pathogen inactivation and extraction of proteins, metabolites, and lipids for subsequent mass spectrometry-based multi-omics measurements. This metabolite, protein and lipid extraction (MPLEx) method resulted in complete inactivation of bacterial and viral pathogens with exposed lipid membranes, including Yersinia pestis, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Campylobacter jejuni in pure culture, and Yersinia pestis, Campylobacter jejuni, West Nile, MERS-CoV, Ebola, and influenza H7N9 viruses in infection studies. Partial inactivation was observed for pathogens without exposed lipid membranes including 99.99% inactivation of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 99.6% and >99% inactivation of Clostridium difficile spores and vegetative cells, respectively, and 50% inactivation of adenovirus type 5. To demonstrate that MPLEx yields biomaterial of sufficient quality for subsequent multi-omics analyses, we highlight select proteomics, metabolomics and lipidomics data from human epithelial lung cells infected with wild-type and mutant forms of influenza H7N9. We believe that MPLEx will facilitate systems biology studies of infectious samples by enabling simultaneous pathogen inactivation and multi

  18. Germination and Inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris Spores Induced by Moderate Hydrostatic Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowska, Barbara; Skapska, Sylwia; Fonberg-Broczek, Monika; Niezgoda, Jolanta; Porebska, Izabela; Dekowska, Agnieszka; Rzoska, Sylwester J

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of spoilage caused by Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris for the fruit juice industry, the objective of this work was to study the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris spores induced by moderate hydrostatic pressure. Hydrostatic pressure treatment can induce the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris spores. At low pH, spore germination of up to 3.59-3.75 log and inactivation of 1.85-2.04 log was observed in a low pressure window (200-300 MPa) applied at 50 degrees C for 20 min. Neutral pH suppressed inactivation, the number of spores inactivated at pH 7.0 was only 0.24-1.06 log. The pressurization temperature significantly affected spore germination and inactivation. The degree of germination in apple juice after pressurization for 30 min with 200 MPa at 20 degrees C was 2.04 log, with only 0.61 log of spores being inactivated, while at 70 degrees C spore germination was 5.94 log and inactivation 4.72 log. This temperature strongly stimulated germination and inactivation under higher (500 MPa) than lower (200 MPa) pressure. When the oscillatory mode was used, the degree of germination and inactivation was slightly higher than at continuous mode. The degree of germination and inactivation was inversely proportional to the soluble solids content and was lowest in concentrated apple juice.

  19. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  20. Hypothiocyanite produced by human and rat respiratory epithelial cells inactivates extracellular H1N2 influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Aaron; Pang, Lan; Hanson, Jarod; Dlugolenski, Daniel; Streich, Rebecca; Lafontaine, Eric R; Nagy, Tamás; Tripp, Ralph A; Rada, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to study whether an extracellular, oxidative antimicrobial mechanism inherent to tracheal epithelial cells is capable of inactivating influenza H1N2 virus. Epithelial cells were isolated from tracheas of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Both primary human and rat tracheobronchial epithelial cells were differentiated in air-liquid interface cultures. A/swine/Illinois/02860/09 (swH1N2) influenza A virions were added to the apical side of airway cells for 1 h in the presence or absence of lactoperoxidase or thiocyanate. Characterization of rat epithelial cells (morphology, Duox expression) occurred via western blotting, PCR, hydrogen peroxide production measurement and histology. The number of viable virions was determined by plaque assays. Statistical difference of the results was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Our data show that rat tracheobronchial epithelial cells develop a differentiated, polarized monolayer with high transepithelial electrical resistance, mucin production and expression of dual oxidases. Influenza A virions are inactivated by human and rat epithelial cells via a dual oxidase-, lactoperoxidase- and thiocyanate-dependent mechanism. Differentiated air-liquid interface cultures of rat tracheal epithelial cells provide a novel model to study airway epithelium-influenza interactions. The dual oxidase/lactoperoxidase/thiocyanate extracellular oxidative system producing hypothiocyanite is a fast and potent anti-influenza mechanism inactivating H1N2 viruses prior to infection of the epithelium.

  1. Risk scaling factors from inactivation to chromosome aberrations, mutations and oncogenic transformations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkaharam, A.S.; Watt, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    Analyses of bio-effect mechanisms of damage to mammalian cells in terms of the quality parameter 'mean free path for primary ionisation', for heavy charged particles, strongly suggests that there is a common mechanism for the biological endpoints of chromosome aberrations, mutations and oncogenic transformation. The lethal lesions are identified as unrepaired double-strand breaks in the intracellular DNA. As data for the various endpoints studied can be represented in a unified scheme, for any radiation type, it follows that radiation risk factors can be determined on the basis of simple ratios to the inactivation cross sections. There are intrinsic physical reasons why neutrons can never reach the saturation level of heavier particles for equal fluences. The probabilities of risk with respect to inactivation, for chromosome dicentrics, mutation of the HPRT gene and of oncogenic transformation are respectively 0.24, 5.8 x 10 -5 , and 4.1 x 10 -3 . (author)

  2. Mutual inactivation of Notch receptors and ligands facilitates developmental patterning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sprinzak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Developmental patterning requires juxtacrine signaling in order to tightly coordinate the fates of neighboring cells. Recent work has shown that Notch and Delta, the canonical metazoan juxtacrine signaling receptor and ligand, mutually inactivate each other in the same cell. This cis-interaction generates mutually exclusive sending and receiving states in individual cells. It generally remains unclear, however, how this mutual inactivation and the resulting switching behavior can impact developmental patterning circuits. Here we address this question using mathematical modeling in the context of two canonical pattern formation processes: boundary formation and lateral inhibition. For boundary formation, in a model motivated by Drosophila wing vein patterning, we find that mutual inactivation allows sharp boundary formation across a broader range of parameters than models lacking mutual inactivation. This model with mutual inactivation also exhibits robustness to correlated gene expression perturbations. For lateral inhibition, we find that mutual inactivation speeds up patterning dynamics, relieves the need for cooperative regulatory interactions, and expands the range of parameter values that permit pattern formation, compared to canonical models. Furthermore, mutual inactivation enables a simple lateral inhibition circuit architecture which requires only a single downstream regulatory step. Both model systems show how mutual inactivation can facilitate robust fine-grained patterning processes that would be difficult to implement without it, by encoding a difference-promoting feedback within the signaling system itself. Together, these results provide a framework for analysis of more complex Notch-dependent developmental systems.

  3. Inactivation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase by 5'-[p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl]adenosine: protection by the hydrolyzed reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettigrew, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Incubation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase with 5'-[p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl]adenosine (FSO 2 BzAdo) at pH 8.0 and 25 0 C results in the loss of enzyme activity, which is not restored by the addition of β-mercaptoethanol or dithiothreitol. The FSO 2 BzAdo concentration dependence of the inactivation kinetics is described by a mechanism that includes the equilibrium binding of the reagent to the enzyme prior to a first-order inactivation reaction in addition to effects of reagent hydrolysis. The hydrolysis of the reagent has two effects on the observed kinetics. The first effect is deviation from pseudo-first-order kinetic behavior due to depletion of the reagent. The second effect is the novel protection of the enzyme from inactivation due to binding of the sulfonate hydrolysis product. Determinations of the reaction stoichiometry with 3 H-labeled FSO 2 BzAdo show that the inactivation is associated with the covalent incorporation of 1.08 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme subunit. Ligand protection experiments show that ATP, AMP, dAMP, NADH, 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, and the sulfonate hydrolysis product of FSO 2 BzAdo provide protection from inactivation. The protection obtained with ATMP is not dependent on Mg 2+ . The results are consistent with modification by FSO 2 BzAdo of a single adenine nucleotide binding site per enzyme subunit

  4. Targeted Catalytic Inactivation of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jeff C.; Hocharoen, Lalintip; Cowan, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    A series of compounds that target reactive transition metal chelates to somatic Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) have been synthesized. Half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) and rate constants for both inactivation and cleavage of full length sACE-1 have been determined and evaluated in terms of metal-chelate size, charge, reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, and coreactant selectivity. Ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), and tripeptide GGH were linked to the lysine sidechain of lisinopril by EDC/NHS coupling. The resulting amide-linked chelate-lisinopril (EDTA-lisinopril, NTA-lisinopril, DOTA-lisinopril, and GGH-lisinopril) conjugates were used to form coordination complexes with iron, cobalt, nickel and copper, such that lisinopril could mediate localization of the reactive metal chelates to sACE-1. ACE activity was assayed by monitoring cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate Mca-RPPGFSAFK(Dnp)-OH, a derivative of bradykinin, following pre-incubation with metal-chelate-lisinopril compounds. Concentration-dependent inhibition of sACE-1 by metal-chelate-lisinopril complexes revealed IC50 values ranging from 44 nM to 4,500 nM for Ni-NTA-lisinopril and Ni-DOTA-lisinopril, respectively, versus 1.9 nM for lisinopril. Stronger inhibition was correlated with smaller size and lower negative charge of the attached metal chelates. Time-dependent inactivation of sACE-1 by metal-chelate-lisinopril complexes revealed a remarkable range of catalytic activities, with second order rate constants as high as 150,000 M−1min−1 (Cu-GGH-lisinopril), while catalyst-mediated cleavage of sACE-1 typically occurred at much lower rates, indicating that inactivation arose primary from sidechain modification. Optimal inactivation of sACE-1 was observed when the reduction potential for the metal center was poised near 1000 mV, reflecting the difficulty of protein

  5. Targeted catalytic inactivation of angiotensin converting enzyme by lisinopril-coupled transition-metal chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jeff C; Hocharoen, Lalintip; Cowan, J A

    2012-02-22

    A series of compounds that target reactive transition-metal chelates to somatic angiotensin converting enzyme (sACE-1) have been synthesized. Half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) and rate constants for both inactivation and cleavage of full-length sACE-1 have been determined and evaluated in terms of metal chelate size, charge, reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, and coreactant selectivity. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), and tripeptide GGH were linked to the lysine side chain of lisinopril by 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide coupling. The resulting amide-linked chelate-lisinopril (EDTA-lisinopril, NTA-lisinopril, DOTA-lisinopril, and GGH-lisinopril) conjugates were used to form coordination complexes with iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper, such that lisinopril could mediate localization of the reactive metal chelates to sACE-1. ACE activity was assayed by monitoring cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate Mca-RPPGFSAFK(Dnp)-OH, a derivative of bradykinin, following preincubation with metal chelate-lisinopril compounds. Concentration-dependent inhibition of sACE-1 by metal chelate-lisinopril complexes revealed IC(50) values ranging from 44 to 4500 nM for Ni-NTA-lisinopril and Ni-DOTA-lisinopril, respectively, versus 1.9 nM for lisinopril. Stronger inhibition was correlated with smaller size and lower negative charge of the attached metal chelates. Time-dependent inactivation of sACE-1 by metal chelate-lisinopril complexes revealed a remarkable range of catalytic activities, with second-order rate constants as high as 150,000 M(-1) min(-1) (Cu-GGH-lisinopril), while catalyst-mediated cleavage of sACE-1 typically occurred at much lower rates, indicating that inactivation arose primarily from side chain modification. Optimal inactivation of sACE-1 was observed when the reduction potential for the

  6. Effect of ionizing radiation on transmembrane potential of Streptococcus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomenko, B.S.; Akoev, I.G.

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of Streptococcus faecalis with ionizing radiation at doses of 5 to 100 krad is shown to reduce the energy-dependent accumulation of dibenzyldimethylammonium (DDA + ) by the cell. Since transmembrane potential is the moving force of DDA + transport across the membrane, the decrease in DDA + accumulation is suggested to be due to potential reduction. This radiation effect was not due to inactivation of the potential-generating mechanism; thus, the ATPase activity and glycolytic activity of the irradiated cells were higher than in the control. At the same time, the membranes exhibited an increased permeability for K + and protons, which is probably due to structural rearrangements in the membranes after irradiation. It is suggested that the potential reduction results from the increase in proton permeability of membranes

  7. Antioxidant potential of selected Spirulina platensis preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartsch, Peter C

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that Spirulina, a unicellular blue-green alga, may have a variety of health benefits and therapeutic properties and is also capable of acting as an antioxidant and antiinflammatory agent. In this study, a cell-free and a cell-based test assay were used to examine the antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties of four selected Spirulina platensis preparations: (1) Biospirulina, (2) SpiruComplex, a preparation with naturally bound selenium, chromium and zinc, (3) SpiruZink, a preparation with naturally bound zinc, (4) Zinkspirulina + Acerola, a preparation with naturally bound zinc and acerola powder. The cell-free test assay used potassium superoxide as a donor for superoxide radicals, whereas the cell-based test assay used the formation of intracellular superoxide radicals of functional neutrophils upon stimulation by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate as a model to investigate the potential of Spirulina preparations to inactivate superoxide radicals. In accordance with the recommended daily dosage, test concentrations ranging from 50 to 1000 microg/mL were chosen. The results showed a dose-dependent inactivation of free superoxide radicals (antioxidant effect) as well as an antiinflammatory effect characterized by a dose-dependent reduction of the metabolic activity of functional neutrophils and a dose-dependent inactivation of superoxide radicals generated during an oxidative burst. The results demonstrate that the tested Spirulina preparations have a high antioxidant and antiinflammatory potential. Especially SpiruZink and Zinkspirulina + Acerola might be useful as a supportive therapeutic approach for reducing oxidative stress and/or the generation of oxygen radicals in the course of inflammatory processes.

  8. Inactivation of catalase monolayers by irradiation with 100 keV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, M.; Seredynski, J.; Baumeister, W.

    1976-01-01

    A catalase monolayer adsorbed on a layer of arachidic acid deposited on a solid support was irradiated with 100 keV electrons simulating the conditions of electron microscopic imaging. Effective doses were calculated taking into account the angular and energy distribution of backscattered electrons. Enzymatic inactivation was chosen as the criterion for damage and was monitored by a rapid and quantifiable but nevertheless sensitive assay. Dose-response curves revealed that inactivation is a one-hit--multiple-target phenomenon, which is consistent with biochemical evidence for a cooperative function of subunits. The experimentally determined target size coincides fairly well with both calculated cross sections for inelastic interactions based on the atomic composition of catalase and with calculated cross sections for ionizing events based on the chemical bonds involved. This legitimates both types of calculations even for complex biomolecules

  9. Bacterial adhesion and inactivation on Ag decorated TiO2-nanotubes under visible light: Effect of the nanotubes geometry on the photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaji, A; Elabidi, M; Trabelsi, K; Assadi, A A; Bessais, B; Rtimi, S

    2018-06-05

    This study investigates the effect of the diameter of TiO 2 nanotubes and silver decorated nanotubes on optical properties and photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli under visible light. The TiO 2 nanotubes (TiO 2 -NTs) were prepared using the electrochemical method varying the anodization potential starting from 20 V until 70 V. The Ag nanoparticles were carried out using the photoreduction process under the same experimental conditions. The diameter size was determined using the scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). TiO 2 -NTs diameter reached ∼100 nm at 70 V. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) imaging confirmed the TiO 2 -NTs surface decoration by silver nanoparticles. The Ag-NPs average size was found to be equal to 8 nm. The X-Ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirm that all TiO 2 -NTs crystallize in the anatase phases regardless the used anodization potential. The decrease of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of Ag NPs decorated TiO 2 -NTs indicates the decrease of the specific area when the nanotubes diameter increases. The UV-vis absorbance show that the absorption edges was bleu shifted with the increasing of nanotubes diameter, which can be explained by the increase of the crystallites average size. The bacterial adhesion and inactivation tests were carried in the dark and under light. Bacteria were seen to adhere on TiO 2 -NTs in the dark; however, under light the bacteria were killed before they establish a strong contact with the TiO 2 -NTs and Ag/TiO 2 -NTs surfaces. Bacterial inactivation kinetics were faster when the anodizing potential of the NTs-preparation increases. A total bacterial inactivation was obtained on ∼100 nm nanotubes diameter within 90 min. This result was attributed to the enhancement of the TNTs crystallinity leading to reduced surface defects. Redox catalysis was seen to occur under light on the TiO 2 -NTs and Ag/TiO 2 -NTs. the photo-induced antibacterial activity on the AgO/Ag 2 O decorated Ti

  10. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  11. Inactivation of RNA Viruses by Gamma Irradiation: A Study on Mitigating Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Hume

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective inactivation of biosafety level 4 (BSL-4 pathogens is vital in order to study these agents safely. Gamma irradiation is a commonly used method for the inactivation of BSL-4 viruses, which among other advantages, facilitates the study of inactivated yet morphologically intact virions. The reported values for susceptibility of viruses to inactivation by gamma irradiation are sometimes inconsistent, likely due to differences in experimental protocols. We analyzed the effects of common sample attributes on the inactivation of a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein and green fluorescent protein. Using this surrogate virus, we found that sample volume and protein content of the sample modulated viral inactivation by gamma irradiation but that air volume within the sample container and the addition of external disinfectant surrounding the sample did not. These data identify several factors which alter viral susceptibility to inactivation and highlight the usefulness of lower biosafety level surrogate viruses for such studies. Our results underscore the need to validate inactivation protocols of BSL-4 pathogens using “worst-case scenario” procedures to ensure complete sample inactivation.

  12. Trehalose and sorbitol alter the kinetic pattern of inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase during drying in levitated microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Elke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2013-12-01

    A single-droplet acoustic levitator was used to determine the drying rate and the kinetics of inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of added trehalose or sorbitol. The solution was also spray dried under the same process condition of drying gas temperature on a bench-top machine. Both trehalose and sorbitol delay the point of onset of enzyme inactivation which lies after the critical point of drying. Both carbohydrates also reduce the apparent rate constant of inactivation calculated during the subsequent inactivation phase. The carbohydrates stabilise, therefore, the enzyme during droplet drying and particle formation mainly during the falling rate drying period. There is no difference between the stabilising effects of the two carbohydrates when examined as levitated single droplets. This suggests the importance of water replacement as a stabilising mechanism in the levitated droplets/particles. On spray drying, the trehalose stabilises the enzyme better than does the sorbitol at a drying gas (outlet) temperature of 60°C. This suggests glass formation with the trehalose but not the sorbitol during the very rapid drying process of small-atomised droplets in the spray dryer. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  13. Far-UVC light applications: sterilization of MRSA on a surface and inactivation of aerosolized influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, David; Buonanno, Manuela; Shuryak, Igor; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Spotnitz, Henry M.; Brenner, David J.

    2018-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and influenza A virus are two of the major targets for new antimicrobial technologies. In contrast to conventional germicidal lamps emitting primarily at 254 nm, which are both carcinogenic and cataractogenic, recent work has shown the potential of far-UVC technology, mainly between 207 and 222 nm, to be an effective means of sterilization of pathogens without apparent harm to mammalian cells. This is because, due to its strong absorbance in biological materials, far-UVC light cannot penetrate even the outer (non living) layers of human skin or eye; however, because bacteria and viruses are of micrometer or smaller dimensions, far-UVC can penetrate and inactivate them. With this report, we present progress on in vitro tests to inactivate MRSA on a surface using far-UVC light from a laser delivered using an optical diffuser. Qualitative and quantitative results show that this means of far-UVC exposure is adequate to inactivate MRSA with a dose comparable to that which would be required using a conventional germicidal lamp. Also included is a report on progress on inactivation of aerosolized influenza A virus. A custom benchtop aerosol exposure chamber was constructed and used to determine the effectiveness of far- UVC. Results indicate that far-UVC efficiently inactivates airborne aerosolized viruses, with a very low dose of 2 mJ/cm2 of 222-nm light inactivating >95% of aerosolized H1N1 influenza virus. Together these studies help to further establish far-UVC technology as a promising, safe and inexpensive tool for sterilization in many environments.

  14. X inactivation in females with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2012-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common inherited neuropathy, caused by mutations in gap junction beta-1 (GJB1). Males have a uniformly moderately severe phenotype while females have a variable phenotype, suggested to be due to X inactivation. We aimed to assess X inactivation pattern in females with CMT1X and correlate this with phenotype using the CMT examination score to determine whether the X inactivation pattern accounted for the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X. We determined X inactivation pattern in 67 females with CMT1X and 24 controls using the androgen receptor assay. We were able to determine which X chromosome carried the GJB1 mutation in 30 females. There was no difference in X inactivation pattern between patients and controls. In addition, there was no correlation between X inactivation pattern in blood and phenotype. A possible explanation for these findings is that the X inactivation pattern in Schwann cells rather than in blood may explain the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X.

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Shielding Constants from Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Calculations Using Polarizable Embedding: Role of the Embedding Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmann, Casper; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    We present NMR shielding constants obtained through quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) embedding calculations. Contrary to previous reports, we show that a relatively small QM region is sufficient, provided that a high-quality embedding potential is used. The calculated averaged NMR...... shielding constants of both acrolein and acetone solvated in water are based on a number of snapshots extracted from classical molecular dynamics simulations. We focus on the carbonyl chromophore in both molecules, which shows large solvation effects, and we study the convergence of shielding constants...

  16. One pyrimidine dimer inactivates expression of a transfected gene in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protic-Sabljic, M.; Kraemer, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have developed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair utilizing UV-treated plasmid vectors. The assay primarily reflects cellular repair of transcriptional activity of damaged DNA measured indirectly as enzyme activity of the transfected genes. They studied three plasmids (pSV2cat, 5020 base pairs; pSV2catSVgpt, 7268 base pairs; and pRSVcat, 5027 base pairs) with different sizes and promoters carrying the bacterial cat gene (CAT, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) in a construction that permits cat expression in human cells. All human simian virus 40-transformed cells studied expressed high levels of the transfected cat gene. UV treatment of the plasmids prior to transfection resulted in differential decrease in CAT activity in different cell lines. With pSV2catSVgpt, UV inactivation of CAT expression was greater in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and D lines than in the other human cell lines tested. The D 0 of the CAT inactivation curve was 50 J X m-2 for pSV2cat and for pRSVcat in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. The similarity of the D0 data in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells for three plasmids of different size and promoters implies they all have similar UV-inactivation target size. UV-induced pyrimidine dimer formation in the plasmids was quantified by assay of the number of UV-induced T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites. In the most sensitive xeroderma pigmentosum cells, with all three plasmids, one UV-induced pyrimidine dimer inactivates a target of about 2 kilobases, close to the size of the putative CAT mRNA

  17. Inactivation of Src-to-Ezrin Pathway: A Possible Mechanism in the Ouabain-Mediated Inhibition of A549 Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Kyoung Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ouabain, a cardiac glycoside found in plants, is primarily used in the treatment of congestive heart failure and arrhythmia because of its ability to inhibit Na+/K+-ATPase pump. Recently ouabain has been shown to exert anticancer effects but the underlying mechanism is not clear. Here, we explored the molecular mechanism by which ouabain exerts anticancer effects in human lung adenocarcinoma. Employing proteomic techniques, we found 7 proteins downregulated by ouabain in A549 including p-ezrin, a protein associated with pulmonary cancer metastasis in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, when the relative phosphorylation levels of 39 intracellular proteins were compared between control and ouabain-treated A549 cells, p-Src (Y416 was also found to be downregulated by ouabain. Furthermore, western blot revealed the ouabain-mediated downregulation of p-FAK (Y925, p-paxillin (Y118, p130CAS, and Na+/K+-ATPase subunits that have been shown to be involved in the migration of cancer cells. The inhibitory effect of ouabain and Src inhibitor PP2 on the migration of A549 cells was confirmed by Boyden chamber assay. Anticancer effects of ouabain in A549 cells appear to be related to its ability to regulate and inactivate Src-to-ezrin signaling, and proteins involved in focal adhesion such as Src, FAK, and p130CAS axis are proposed here.

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli on blueberries using cold plasma with chemical augmentation inside a partial vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justification: The mechanism by which cold plasma inactivates pathogens is through the production of free reactive chemical species. Unfortunately, the most reactive chemical species have the shortest half-life. In a vacuum their half-life is believed to be prolonged. Additionally, these reactive sp...

  19. Inactivation of viable Ascaris eggs by reagents during enumeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, K L; Darby, J L

    2001-12-01

    Various reagents commonly used to enumerate viable helminth eggs from wastewater and sludge were evaluated for their potential to inactivate Ascaris eggs under typical laboratory conditions. Two methods were used to enumerate indigenous Ascaris eggs from sludge samples. All steps in the methods were the same except that in method I a phase extraction step with acid-alcohol (35% ethanol in 0.1 N H(2)SO(4)) and diethyl ether was used whereas in method II the extraction step was avoided by pouring the sample through a 38-microm-mesh stainless steel sieve that retained the eggs. The concentration of eggs and their viability were lower in the samples processed by method I than in the samples processed by method II by an average of 48 and 70%, respectively. A second set of experiments was performed using pure solutions of Ascaris suum eggs to elucidate the effect of the individual reagents and relevant combination of reagents on the eggs. The percentages of viable eggs in samples treated with acid-alcohol alone and in combination with diethyl ether or ethyl acetate were 52, 27, and 4%, respectively, whereas in the rest of the samples the viability was about 80%. Neither the acid nor the diethyl ether alone caused any decrease in egg viability. Thus, the observed inactivation was attributed primarily to the 35% ethanol content of the acid-alcohol solution. Inactivation of the eggs was prevented by limiting the direct exposure to the extraction reagents to 30 min and diluting the residual concentration of acid-alcohol in the sample by a factor of 100 before incubation. Also, the viability of the eggs was maintained if the acid-alcohol solution was replaced with an acetoacetic buffer. None of the reagents used for the flotation step of the sample cleaning procedure (ZnSO(4), MgSO(4), and NaCl) or during incubation (0.1 N H(2)SO(4) and 0.5% formalin) inactivated the Ascaris eggs under the conditions studied.

  20. Inactivation of Cellobiose Dehydrogenases Modifies the Cellulose Degradation Mechanism of Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangthirasunun, Narumon; Navarro, David; Garajova, Sona; Chevret, Didier; Tong, Laetitia Chan Ho; Gautier, Valérie; Hyde, Kevin D; Silar, Philippe; Berrin, Jean-Guy

    2017-01-15

    Conversion of biomass into high-value products, including biofuels, is of great interest to developing sustainable biorefineries. Fungi are an inexhaustible source of enzymes to degrade plant biomass. Cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs) play an important role in the breakdown through synergistic action with fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). The three CDH genes of the model fungus Podospora anserina were inactivated, resulting in single and multiple CDH mutants. We detected almost no difference in growth and fertility of the mutants on various lignocellulose sources, except on crystalline cellulose, on which a 2-fold decrease in fertility of the mutants lacking P. anserina CDH1 (PaCDH1) and PaCDH2 was observed. A striking difference between wild-type and mutant secretomes was observed. The secretome of the mutant lacking all CDHs contained five beta-glucosidases, whereas the wild type had only one. P. anserina seems to compensate for the lack of CDH with secretion of beta-glucosidases. The addition of P. anserina LPMO to either the wild-type or mutant secretome resulted in improvement of cellulose degradation in both cases, suggesting that other redox partners present in the mutant secretome provided electrons to LPMOs. Overall, the data showed that oxidative degradation of cellulosic biomass relies on different types of mechanisms in fungi. Plant biomass degradation by fungi is a complex process involving dozens of enzymes. The roles of each enzyme or enzyme class are not fully understood, and utilization of a model amenable to genetic analysis should increase the comprehension of how fungi cope with highly recalcitrant biomass. Here, we report that the cellobiose dehydrogenases of the model fungus Podospora anserina enable it to consume crystalline cellulose yet seem to play a minor role on actual substrates, such as wood shavings or miscanthus. Analysis of secreted proteins suggests that Podospora anserina compensates for the lack of cellobiose

  1. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gominet, M. [Ionisos, ZI les Chatinieres, F01120 Dagneux (France); Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France); Darbord, J.C. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France)], E-mail: darbord@pharmacie.univ-paris5.fr

    2007-11-15

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination.

  2. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gominet, M.; Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G.; Darbord, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination

  3. Particle swarm approach based on quantum mechanics and harmonic oscillator potential well for economic load dispatch with valve-point effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Coelho, Leandro dos; Mariani, Viviana Cocco

    2008-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is population-based heuristic global search algorithm inspired by social behavior patterns of organisms that live and interact within large groups. The PSO is based on researches on swarms such as fish schooling and bird flocking. Inspired by the classical PSO method and quantum mechanics theories, this work presents a quantum-inspired version of the PSO (QPSO) using the harmonic oscillator potential well (HQPSO) to solve economic dispatch problems. A 13-units test system with incremental fuel cost function that takes into account the valve-point loading effects is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed HQPSO method compared with the simulation results based on the classical PSO, the QPSO, and other optimization algorithms reported in the literature

  4. Particle swarm approach based on quantum mechanics and harmonic oscillator potential well for economic load dispatch with valve-point effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    dos Santos Coelho, Leandro [Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, PUCPR Industrial and Systems Engineering Graduate Program, PPGEPS, Imaculada Conceicao, 1155, Zip code 80215-901, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Mariani, Viviana Cocco [Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, PUCPR Mechanical Engineering Graduate Program, PPGEM, Imaculada Conceicao, 1155, Zip code 80215-901, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2008-11-15

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is population-based heuristic global search algorithm inspired by social behavior patterns of organisms that live and interact within large groups. The PSO is based on researches on swarms such as fish schooling and bird flocking. Inspired by the classical PSO method and quantum mechanics theories, this work presents a quantum-inspired version of the PSO (QPSO) using the harmonic oscillator potential well (HQPSO) to solve economic dispatch problems. A 13-units test system with incremental fuel cost function that takes into account the valve-point loading effects is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed HQPSO method compared with the simulation results based on the classical PSO, the QPSO, and other optimization algorithms reported in the literature. (author)

  5. Particle swarm approach based on quantum mechanics and harmonic oscillator potential well for economic load dispatch with valve-point effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Coelho, Leandro dos [Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, PUCPR Industrial and Systems Engineering Graduate Program, PPGEPS, Imaculada Conceicao, 1155, Zip code 80215-901, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: leandro.coelho@pucpr.br; Mariani, Viviana Cocco [Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, PUCPR Mechanical Engineering Graduate Program, PPGEM, Imaculada Conceicao, 1155, Zip code 80215-901, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: viviana.mariani@pucpr.br

    2008-11-15

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is population-based heuristic global search algorithm inspired by social behavior patterns of organisms that live and interact within large groups. The PSO is based on researches on swarms such as fish schooling and bird flocking. Inspired by the classical PSO method and quantum mechanics theories, this work presents a quantum-inspired version of the PSO (QPSO) using the harmonic oscillator potential well (HQPSO) to solve economic dispatch problems. A 13-units test system with incremental fuel cost function that takes into account the valve-point loading effects is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed HQPSO method compared with the simulation results based on the classical PSO, the QPSO, and other optimization algorithms reported in the literature.

  6. Thermal and high pressure inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Delon, Antoine; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2017-10-01

    This study for the first time investigated the stability and inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase in model systems (McIlvaine buffer, pH=3.6, the typical pH of blueberry juice) during thermal (40-80°C) and combined high pressure-thermal processing (0.1-690MPa, 30-90°C). At 70-80°C, the thermal inactivation kinetics was best described by a biphasic model with ∼61% labile and ∼39% stable fractions at temperature between 70 and 75°C. High pressure inhibited the inactivation of the enzyme with no inactivation at pressures as high as 690MPa and temperatures less than 50°C. The inactivation kinetics of the enzyme at 60-70°C, and pressures higher than 500MPa was best described by a first order biphasic model with ∼25% labile fraction and 75% stable fraction. The activation energy values at atmospheric pressure were 548.6kJ/mol and 324.5kJ/mol respectively for the stable and the labile fractions. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimation by radiation inactivation of the size of functional units governing Sendai and influenza virus fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundo-Morita, K.; Gibson, S.; Lenard, J.

    1987-01-01

    The target sizes associated with fusion and hemolysis carried out by Sendai virus envelope glycoproteins were determined by radiation inactivation analysis. The target size for influenza virus mediated fusion with erythrocyte ghosts at pH 5.0 was also determined for comparison. Sendai-mediated fusion with erythrocyte ghosts at pH 7.0 was likewise inactivated exponentially with increasing radiation dose, yielding a target size of 60 +/- 6 kDa, a value consistent with the molecular weight of a single F-protein molecule. The inactivation curve for Sendai-mediated fusion with cardiolipin liposomes at pH 7.0, however, was more complex. Assuming a multiple target-single hit model, the target consisted of 2-3 units of ca. 60 kDa each. A similar target was seen if the liposome contained 10% gangliosides or if the reaction was measured at pH 5.0, suggesting that fusion occurred by the same mechanism at high and low pH. A target size of 261 +/- 48 kDa was found for Sendai-induced hemolysis, in contrast with influenza, which had a more complex target size for this activity. Sendai virus fusion thus occurs by different mechanisms depending upon the nature of the target membrane, since it is mediated by different functional units. Hemolysis is mediated by a functional unit different from that associated with erythrocyte ghost fusion or with cardiolipin liposome fusion

  8. Adsorption, sedimentation, and inactivation of E. coli within wastewater treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutilier, L; Jamieson, R; Gordon, R; Lake, C; Hart, W

    2009-09-01

    Bacteria fate and transport within constructed wetlands must be understood if engineered wetlands are to become a reliable form of wastewater treatment. This study investigated the relative importance of microbial treatment mechanisms in constructed wetlands treating both domestic and agricultural wastewater. Escherichia coli (E. coli) inactivation, adsorption, and settling rates were measured in the lab within two types of wastewater (dairy wastewater lagoon effluent and domestic septic tank effluent). In situ E. coli inactivation was also measured within a domestic wastewater treatment wetland and the adsorption of E. coli was also measured within the wetland effluent. Inactivation of E. coli appears to be the most significant contributor to E. coli removal within the wastewaters and wetland environments examined in this study. E. coli survived longer within the dairy wastewater (DW) compared to the domestic wastewater treatment wetland water (WW). First order rate constants for E. coli inactivation within the WW in the lab ranged from 0.09 day(-1) (d(-1)) at 7.6 degrees C to 0.18d(-1) at 22.8 degrees C. The average in situ rate constant observed within the domestic wetland ranged from 0.02 d(-1) to 0.03 d(-1) at an average water temperature of 17 degrees C. First order rate constants for E. coli inactivation within the DW ranged from 0.01 d(-1) at 7.7 degrees C to 0.04 d(-1) at 24.6 degrees C. Calculated distribution coefficients (K(d)) were 19,000 mL g(-1), 324,000 mL g(-1), and 293 mL g(-1) for E. coli with domestic septic tank effluent (STE), treated wetland effluent (WLE), and DW, respectively. Approximately 50%, 20%, and 90% of E. coli were "free floating" or associated with particles 5 microm within both the STE and DW, settling did not appear to contribute to E. coli removal within sedimentation experiments, indicating that the particles the bacteria were associated with had very small settling velocities. The results of this study highlight the

  9. Inactivation of gram-negative bacteria in milk and banana juice by hen egg white and lambda lysozyme under high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakimbugwe, Dorothy; Masschalck, Barbara; Anim, Grace; Michiels, Chris W

    2006-10-15

    The effect of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and bacteriophage lambda lysozyme (LaL) in combination with high pressure (HP) treatment on the inactivation of four gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella flexneri, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella typhimurium), was studied in skim milk (pH 6.8; a(w) 0.997) and in banana juice (pH 3.8; a(w) 0.971). In the absence of lysozymes, S. flexneri was more sensitive to HP in milk than in banana juice, while the opposite was observed for the other three bacteria. In combination with HP treatment, LaL was more effective than HEWL on all bacteria in both milk and banana juice. Depending on the bacteria, inactivation levels in banana juice were increased from 0.4-2.7 log units by HP treatment alone to 3.6-6.5 log units in the presence of 224 U/ml LaL. Bacterial inactivation in milk was also enhanced by LaL but only by 0.5-2.1 log units. Under the experimental conditions used, LaL was more effective in banana juice than in milk, while the effectiveness of HEWL under the same conditions was not significantly affected by the food matrix. This effect could be ascribed to the low pH of the banana juice since LaL was also more effective on E. coli in buffer at pH 3.8 than at pH 6.8. Since neither LaL nor HEWL are enzymatically active at pH 3.8, we analysed bacterial lysis after HP treatment in the presence of these enzymes, and found that inactivation proceeds through a non-lytic mechanism at pH 3.8 and a lytic mechanism at pH 6.8. Based on these results, LaL may offer interesting perspectives for use as an extra hurdle in high pressure food preservation.

  10. Disruption of the IS6-AID linker affects voltage-gated calcium channel inactivation and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Minor, Daniel L

    2009-03-01

    Two processes dominate voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca(V)) inactivation: voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) and calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI). The Ca(V)beta/Ca(V)alpha(1)-I-II loop and Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)/Ca(V)alpha(1)-C-terminal tail complexes have been shown to modulate each, respectively. Nevertheless, how each complex couples to the pore and whether each affects inactivation independently have remained unresolved. Here, we demonstrate that the IS6-alpha-interaction domain (AID) linker provides a rigid connection between the pore and Ca(V)beta/I-II loop complex by showing that IS6-AID linker polyglycine mutations accelerate Ca(V)1.2 (L-type) and Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) VDI. Remarkably, mutations that either break the rigid IS6-AID linker connection or disrupt Ca(V)beta/I-II association sharply decelerate CDI and reduce a second Ca(2+)/CaM/Ca(V)alpha(1)-C-terminal-mediated process known as calcium-dependent facilitation. Collectively, the data strongly suggest that components traditionally associated solely with VDI, Ca(V)beta and the IS6-AID linker, are essential for calcium-dependent modulation, and that both Ca(V)beta-dependent and CaM-dependent components couple to the pore by a common mechanism requiring Ca(V)beta and an intact IS6-AID linker.

  11. Models of intracellular mechanisms of plant bioelectrical potentials caused by combined stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Chernetchenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with bioelectrical potentials of the plants recorded during different types of stimuli and combined stimulus as well. All registrations were observed on the leaves of the corn. We used different stimuli, such as cold, heat, photo- and electrical stimulation, and certain combination of this stimuli. Hardware and software system for automated recording of bioelectrical potentials has been successfully used in this work. We proposed the universal pattern of bioelectrical potentials’ recording which allowed to detect the response of the biological object to different stimuli and various combinations of these stimuli. This pattern can be used for the deeper understanding of biological mechanisms of electrical potentials’ generation in cells and discovering of processes of accommodation of whole organisms to these stimuli. Integrated system of recording and biometrical processing was used for analysis of corn leaves electrical responses to the thermal stimuli. The dynamics of these potentials was studied, with the quantitative analysis of the potential level stabilization.We calculated the ratio of amplitude of response potentials to the first response amplitude. Mathematical models of the plant cell were used for studying of intracellular mechanisms of biopotentials gereration. As a result of modeling, we revealed that electrical response of the cells was based on selectiveconductivity of cell membrane for Н+ and Ca2+ ions. Therefore, we showed the biophysical relation of plant potentials to underlying intracellular biophysical mechanisms during thermal and combined stimulation.

  12. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D.; Ritter, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A-type voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na+ channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  13. Depolarization of the conductance-voltage relationship in the NaV1.5 mutant, E1784K, is due to altered fast inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Alec; Zhu, Wandi; Silva, Jonathan R.; Ruben, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    E1784K is the most common mixed long QT syndrome/Brugada syndrome mutant in the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5. E1784K shifts the midpoint of the channel conductance-voltage relationship to more depolarized membrane potentials and accelerates the rate of channel fast inactivation. The depolarizing shift in the midpoint of the conductance curve in E1784K is exacerbated by low extracellular pH. We tested whether the E1784K mutant shifts the channel conductance curve to more depolarized membrane potentials by affecting the channel voltage-sensors. We measured ionic currents and gating currents at pH 7.4 and pH 6.0 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Contrary to our expectation, the movement of gating charges is shifted to more hyperpolarized membrane potentials by E1784K. Voltage-clamp fluorimetry experiments show that this gating charge shift is due to the movement of the DIVS4 voltage-sensor being shifted to more hyperpolarized membrane potentials. Using a model and experiments on fast inactivation-deficient channels, we show that changes to the rate and voltage-dependence of fast inactivation are sufficient to shift the conductance curve in E1784K. Our results localize the effects of E1784K to DIVS4, and provide novel insight into the role of the DIV-VSD in regulating the voltage-dependencies of activation and fast inactivation. PMID:28898267

  14. Depolarization of the conductance-voltage relationship in the NaV1.5 mutant, E1784K, is due to altered fast inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin H Peters

    Full Text Available E1784K is the most common mixed long QT syndrome/Brugada syndrome mutant in the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5. E1784K shifts the midpoint of the channel conductance-voltage relationship to more depolarized membrane potentials and accelerates the rate of channel fast inactivation. The depolarizing shift in the midpoint of the conductance curve in E1784K is exacerbated by low extracellular pH. We tested whether the E1784K mutant shifts the channel conductance curve to more depolarized membrane potentials by affecting the channel voltage-sensors. We measured ionic currents and gating currents at pH 7.4 and pH 6.0 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Contrary to our expectation, the movement of gating charges is shifted to more hyperpolarized membrane potentials by E1784K. Voltage-clamp fluorimetry experiments show that this gating charge shift is due to the movement of the DIVS4 voltage-sensor being shifted to more hyperpolarized membrane potentials. Using a model and experiments on fast inactivation-deficient channels, we show that changes to the rate and voltage-dependence of fast inactivation are sufficient to shift the conductance curve in E1784K. Our results localize the effects of E1784K to DIVS4, and provide novel insight into the role of the DIV-VSD in regulating the voltage-dependencies of activation and fast inactivation.

  15. Vero cell technology for rapid development of inactivated whole virus vaccines for emerging viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, P Noel; Terpening, Sara J; Snow, Doris; Cobb, Ronald R; Kistner, Otfried

    2017-09-01

    Rapid development and production of vaccines against emerging diseases requires well established, validated, robust technologies to allow industrial scale production and accelerated licensure of products. Areas covered: A versatile Vero cell platform has been developed and utilized to deliver a wide range of candidate and licensed vaccines against emerging viral diseases. This platform builds on the 35 years' experience and safety record with inactivated whole virus vaccines such as polio vaccine. The current platform has been optimized to include a novel double inactivation procedure in order to ensure a highly robust inactivation procedure for novel emerging viruses. The utility of this platform in rapidly developing inactivated whole virus vaccines against pandemic (-like) influenza viruses and other emerging viruses such as West Nile, Chikungunya, Ross River and SARS is reviewed. The potential of the platform for development of vaccines against other emerging viruses such as Zika virus is described. Expert commentary: Use of this platform can substantially accelerate process development and facilitate licensure because of the substantial existing data set available for the cell matrix. However, programs to provide vaccines against emerging diseases must allow alternative clinical development paths to licensure, without the requirement to carry out large scale field efficacy studies.

  16. Inactivation of glutamate racemase (MurI) eliminates virulence in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianying; Liu, Jia; Ling, Junqi; Tong, Zhongchun; Fu, Yun; Liang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of enzymes required for bacterial cell wall synthesis is often lethal or leads to virulence defects. Glutamate racemase (MurI), an essential enzyme in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, has been an attractive target for therapeutic interventions. Streptococcus mutans, one of the many etiological factors of dental caries, possesses a series of virulence factors associated with cariogenicity. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which MurI influences pathogenesis of S. mutans. In this work, a stable mutant of S. mutans deficient in glutamate racemase (S. mutans FW1718) was constructed to investigate the impact of murI inactivation on cariogenic virulence in S. mutans UA159. Microscopy revealed that the murI mutant exhibited an enlarged cell size, longer cell chains, diminished cell⬜cell aggregation, and altered cell surface ultrastructure compared with the wild-type. Characterization of this mutant revealed that murI deficiency weakened acidogenicity, aciduricity, and biofilm formation ability of S. mutans (Pmutans virulence properties, making MurI a potential target for controlling dental caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Selective effects of potassium elevations on glutamate signaling and action potential conduction in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Julian P; Mennerick, Steven

    2004-01-07

    High-frequency synaptic transmission is depressed by moderate rises in the extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o). Previous reports have indicated that depression of action potential signaling may underlie the synaptic depression. Here, we investigated the specific contribution of K+-induced action potential changes to synaptic depression. We found that glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampal area CA1 was significantly depressed by 8-10 mM [K+]o, but that GABAergic transmission remained intact. Riluzole, a drug that slows recovery from inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaChs), interacts with subthreshold [K+]o to depress afferent volleys and EPSCs strongly. Thus, elevated [K+]o likely depresses synapses by slowing NaCh recovery from inactivation. It is unclear from previous studies whether [K+]o-induced action potential depression is caused by changes in initiation, reliability, or waveform. We investigated these possibilities explicitly. [K+]o-induced afferent volley depression was independent of stimulus strength, suggesting that changes in action potential initiation do not explain [K+]o-induced depression. Measurements of action potentials from single axons revealed that 8 mM [K+]o increased conduction failures in a subpopulation of fibers and depressed action potential amplitude in all fibers. Together, these changes quantitatively account for the afferent volley depression. We estimate that conduction failure explains more than half of the synaptic depression observed at 8 mM [K+]o, with the remaining depression likely explained by waveform changes. These mechanisms of selective sensitivity of glutamate release to [K+]o accumulation represent a unique neuromodulatory mechanism and a brake on runaway excitation.

  18. Combination of endolysins and high pressure to inactivate Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nassau, Tomas J; Lenz, Christian A; Scherzinger, Anna S; Vogel, Rudi F

    2017-12-01

    Outbreaks of listeriosis are often related to the consumption of low-processed ready-to-eat food products (e.g. soft cheeses or smoked fish) contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Traditional preservation techniques, such as heat treatment, cannot eliminate Listeria from these products without strongly affecting the quality of the foods. We therefore investigated the use of endolysin (PlyP40, Ply511, or PlyP825) in combination with high hydrostatic pressure processing to kill L. monocytogenes in buffer. The results demonstrated a more than additive effect when both treatments were combined. For example, whereas 0.16 μg/mL PlyP825 or 300 MPa (1 min, 30 °C) applied individually reduced the cell count by 0.2 and 0.3 log cfu, respectively, a combined treatment resulted in a reduction of 5.5 log cfu. Similar results were obtained for the other endolysins combined with high pressure processing. We also showed that the synergistic inactivation of cells by endolysin and HHP is possible at a pressure level of only 200 MPa (2 min, 30 °C). Thus, the application of endolysins did not only substantially increase the bactericidal effect of high pressure, but it also enabled the inactivation of bacterial cells at much lower pressure levels. This shows the potential of using such combined processes for the inactivation of L. monocytogenes and food preservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inactivation of adipose angiotensinogen reduces adipose tissue macrophages and increases metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMieux, Monique J; Ramalingam, Latha; Mynatt, Randall L; Kalupahana, Nishan S; Kim, Jung Han; Moustaïd-Moussa, Naïma

    2016-02-01

    The adipose renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been linked to obesity-induced inflammation, though mechanisms are not completely understood. In this study, adipose-specific angiotensinogen knockout mice (Agt-KO) were generated to determine whether Agt inactivation reduces inflammation and alters the metabolic profile of the Agt-KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. Adipose tissue-specific Agt-KO mice were created using the Cre-LoxP system with both Agt-KO and WT littermates fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet to assess metabolic changes. White adipose tissue was used for gene/protein expression analyses and WAT stromal vascular cells for metabolic extracellular flux assays. No significant differences were observed in body weight or fat mass between both genotypes on either diet. However, improved glucose clearance was observed in Agt-KO compared to WT littermates, consistent with higher expression of genes involved in insulin signaling, glucose transport, and fatty acid metabolism. Furthermore, Agt inactivation reduced total macrophage infiltration in Agt-KO mice fed both diets. Lastly, stroma vascular cells from Agt-KO mice revealed higher metabolic activity compared to WT mice. These findings indicate that adipose-specific Agt inactivation leads to reduced adipose inflammation and increased glucose tolerance mediated in part via increased metabolic activity of adipose cells. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  20. Soft tissue deformation modelling through neural dynamics-based reaction-diffusion mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinao; Zhong, Yongmin; Gu, Chengfan

    2018-05-30

    Soft tissue deformation modelling forms the basis of development of surgical simulation, surgical planning and robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery. This paper presents a new methodology for modelling of soft tissue deformation based on reaction-diffusion mechanics via neural dynamics. The potential energy stored in soft tissues due to a mechanical load to deform tissues away from their rest state is treated as the equivalent transmembrane potential energy, and it is distributed in the tissue masses in the manner of reaction-diffusion propagation of nonlinear electrical waves. The reaction-diffusion propagation of mechanical potential energy and nonrigid mechanics of motion are combined to model soft tissue deformation and its dynamics, both of which are further formulated as the dynamics of cellular neural networks to achieve real-time computational performance. The proposed methodology is implemented with a haptic device for interactive soft tissue deformation with force feedback. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methodology exhibits nonlinear force-displacement relationship for nonlinear soft tissue deformation. Homogeneous, anisotropic and heterogeneous soft tissue material properties can be modelled through the inherent physical properties of mass points. Graphical abstract Soft tissue deformation modelling with haptic feedback via neural dynamics-based reaction-diffusion mechanics.

  1. Generation Mechanism of Alternans in Luo-Rudy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Hiroyuki; Ioka, Eri; Yazawa, Toru

    Electrical alternans is the alternating amplitude from beat to beat in the action potential of the cardiac cell. It has been associated with ventricular arrhythmias in many clinical studies; however, its dynamical mechanisms remain unknown. The reason is that we do not have realistic network models of the heart system. Recently, Yazawa clarified the network structure of the heart and the central nerve system in the crustacean heart. In this study, we construct a simple model of the heart system based on Yazawa’s experimental data. Using this model, we clarify that two parameters (the conductance of sodium ions and free concentration of potassium ions in the extracellular compartment) play the key roles of generating alternans. In particular, we clarify that the inactivation gate of the time-independent potassium channel is the most important parameter. Moreover, interaction between the membrane potential and potassium ionic currents is significant for generating alternate rhythms. This result indicates that if the muscle cell has problems such as channelopathies, there is great risk of generating alternans.

  2. Inactivation and injury of total coliform bacteria after primary disinfection of drinking water by TiO2 photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    In this study the potential application of TiO 2 photocatalysis as primary disinfection system of drinking water was investigated in terms of coliform bacteria inactivation and injury. As model water the effluent of biological denitrification unit for nitrate removal from groundwater, which is characterized by high organic matter and bacteria release, was used. The injury of photocatalysis on coliform bacteria was characterized by means of selective (mEndo) and less selective (mT7) culture media. Different catalyst loadings as well as photolysis and adsorption effects were investigated. Photocatalysis was effective in coliform bacteria inactivation (91-99% after 60 min irradiation time, depending on both catalyst loading and initial density of coliform bacteria detected by mEndo), although no total removal was observed after 60 min irradiation time. The contribution of adsorption mechanism was significant (60-98% after 60 min, depending on catalyst loading) compared to previous investigations probably due to the nature of source water rich in particulate organic matter and biofilm. Photocatalysis process did not result in any irreversible injury (98.8% being the higher injury) under investigated conditions, thus a bacteria regrowth may take place under optimum environment conditions if any final disinfection process (e.g., chlorine or chlorine dioxide) is not used.

  3. Effect of extrusion conditions and lipoxygenase inactivation treatment on the physical and nutritional properties of corn/cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Moguel, Odri; Ruiz-Ruiz, Jorge; Martínez-Ayala, Alma; González, Rolando; Drago, Silvina; Betancur-Ancona, David; Chel-Guerrero, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The influence of lipoxygenase inactivation and extrusion cooking on the physical and nutritional properties of corn/cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) blends was studied. Corn was blended in an 80:15 proportion with cowpea flour treated to inactivate lipoxygenase (CI) or non-inactivated cowpea flour (CNI). Extrusion variables were temperature (150 degrees C, 165 degrees C and 180 degrees C) and moisture (15%, 17% and 19%). Based on their physical properties, the 165 degrees C/15% corn:CNI, and 165 degrees C/15% corn:CI, and 150 degrees C/15% corn:CI blends were chosen for nutritional quality analysis. Extrudate chemical composition indicated high crude protein levels compared with standard corn-based products. With the exception of lysine, essential amino acids content in the three treatments met FAO requirements. Extrusion and lipoxygenase inactivation are promising options for developing corn/cowpea extruded snack products with good physical properties and nutritional quality.

  4. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  5. Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Peng; Georget, Erika S.; Aganovic, Kemal; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) opens up new areas for dynamic high pressure assisted thermal sterilization of liquids. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores are resistant to high isostatic pressure and temperature and were suggested as potential surrogate for high pressure thermal sterilization validation. B. amyloliquefaciens spores suspended in PBS buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0), low fat milk (1.5%, pH 6.7), and whole milk (3.5%, pH 6.7) at initial concentration of ~106 CFU/mL were subjected to UHPH treatments at 200, 300, and 350 MPa with an inlet temperature at ~80°C. Thermal inactivation kinetics of B. amyloliquefaciens spores in PBS and milk were assessed with thin wall glass capillaries and modeled using first-order and Weibull models. The residence time during UHPH treatments was estimated to determine the contribution of temperature to spore inactivation by UHPH. No sublethal injury was detected after UHPH treatments using sodium chloride as selective component in the nutrient agar medium. The inactivation profiles of spores in PBS buffer and milk were compared and fat provided no clear protective effect for spores against treatments. Treatment at 200 MPa with valve temperatures lower than 125°C caused no reduction of spores. A reduction of 3.5 log10CFU/mL of B. amyloliquefaciens spores was achieved by treatment at 350 MPa with a valve temperature higher than 150°C. The modeled thermal inactivation and observed inactivation during UHPH treatments suggest that temperature could be the main lethal effect driving inactivation. PMID:26236296

  6. Inactivation of the lactose permease of Escherichia coli by monochromatic ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, F T; Peak, M J [Rhodes Univ., Grahamstown (South Africa)

    1979-09-01

    The lactose permease of E. coli was inactivated exponetially by seven wavelengths of monochromatic UV light. An action spectrum revealed that the shorter wavelengths (243, 290 and 313 nm) were much more efficient than longer wavelengths. Inactivation at 290 nm was most efficient and was not due to generalized membrane damage. The rate of counterflux of intracellular ..beta..-galactoside in response to externally added ..beta..-galactoside was slowed by 290 nm irradiation, indicating destruction of the facilitated diffusion mechanism. The induction of ..beta..-galactosidase and ..beta..-galactoside permease was co-ordinate both with and without pre-irradiation by 290 nm light. The ..beta.. galactosidase was approximately 26-fold more resistant to 290 nm than the permease. These results are discussed in terms of a greater sensitivity of membrane proteins to 290 nm light, which may be due to the role of aromatic amino acids in conferring stability to the permease in the membrane.

  7. Quantum chromodynamics as the sequential fragmenting with inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botet, R.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the modified leading log approximation of the perturbative QCD and the sequential binary fragmentation process. We will show that in the absence of inactivation, this process is equivalent to the QCD gluodynamics. The inactivation term yields a precise prescription of how to include the hadronization in the QCD equations. (authors)

  8. Thermal inactivation of foot and mouth disease virus in extruded pet food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, S; Forster, J; Clive, S; Schley, D; Zuber, S; Schaaff, J; Corley, D

    2016-12-01

    The risk of importing foot and mouth disease, a highly contagious viral disease of livestock, severely restricts trade and investment opportunities in many developing countries where the virus is present. This study was designed to investigate the inactivation of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) by heat treatments used in extruded commercial pet food manufacture. If extrusion could be shown to reliably inactivate the virus, this could potentially facilitate trade for FMDV-endemic countries. The authors found that there was no detectable virus following: i) treatment of FMDVspiked meat slurry at 68°C for 300 s; ii) treatment of FMDV-spiked slurry and meal mix at 79°C for 10 or 30 s, or iii) treatment of homogenised bovine tongue epithelium, taken from an FMDV-infected animal, at 79°C for 10 s. This corresponds to an estimated 8 log10 reduction in titre (95% credible interval: 6 log10 -13 log10). Furthermore, the authors found that the pH of the slurry and meal mix was sufficient to inactivate FMDV in the absence of heat treatment. This demonstrates that heat treatments used in commercial pet food manufacture are able to substantially reduce the titre of FMDV in infected raw materials. © OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health), 2016.

  9. Treatment alternatives of slaughterhouse wastes, and their effect on the inactivation of different pathogens: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H; Insam, Heribert

    2013-05-01

    Slaughterhouse wastes are a potential reservoir of bacterial, viral, prion and parasitic pathogens, capable of infecting both animals and humans. A quick, cost effective and safe disposal method is thus essential in order to reduce the risk of disease following animal slaughter. Different methods for the disposal of such wastes exist, including composting, anaerobic digestion (AD), alkaline hydrolysis (AH), rendering, incineration and burning. Composting is a disposal method that allows a recycling of the slaughterhouse waste nutrients back into the earth. The high fat and protein content of slaughterhouse wastes mean however, that such wastes are an excellent substrate for AD processes, resulting in both the disposal of wastes, a recycling of nutrients (soil amendment with sludge), and in methane production. Concerns exist as to whether AD and composting processes can inactivate pathogens. In contrast, AH is capable of the inactivation of almost all known microorganisms. This review was conducted in order to compare three different methods of slaughterhouse waste disposal, as regards to their ability to inactivate various microbial pathogens. The intention was to investigate whether AD could be used for waste disposal (either alone, or in combination with another process) such that both energy can be obtained and potentially hazardous materials be disposed of.

  10. Mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase is inactivated upon oxidation and reactivated by thioredoxin-dependent reduction in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke eYoshida

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of mitochondrial metabolism is essential for ensuring cellular growth and maintenance in plants. Based on redox-proteomics analysis, several proteins involved in diverse mitochondrial reactions have been identified as potential redox-regulated proteins. NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, is one such candidate. In this study, we investigated the redox regulation mechanisms of IDH by biochemical procedures. In contrast to mammalian and yeast counterparts reported to date, recombinant IDH in Arabidopsis mitochondria did not show adenylate-dependent changes in enzymatic activity. Instead, IDH was inactivated by oxidation treatment and partially reactivated by subsequent reduction. Functional IDH forms a heterodimer comprising regulatory (IDH-r and catalytic (IDH-c subunits. IDH-r was determined to be the target of oxidative modifications forming an oligomer via intermolecular disulfide bonds. Mass spectrometric analysis combined with tryptic digestion of IDH-r indicated that Cys128 and Cys216 are involved in intermolecular disulfide bond formation. Furthermore, we showed that mitochondria-localized o-type thioredoxin (Trx-o promotes the reduction of oxidized IDH-r. These results suggest that IDH-r is susceptible to oxidative stress, and Trx-o serves to convert oxidized IDH-r to the reduced form that is necessary for active IDH complex.

  11. Scale down of the inactivated polio vaccine production process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Y.E.; Oever, van 't R.; Vinke, C.M.; Spiekstra, A.; Wijffels, R.H.; Pol, van der L.A.; Bakker, W.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The anticipated increase in the demand for inactivated polio vaccines resulting from the success in the polio eradication program requires an increase in production capacity and cost price reduction of the current inactivated polio vaccine production processes. Improvement of existing production

  12. Comparison of the disinfection efficacy of chlorine-based products for inactivation of viral indicators and pathogenic bacteria in produce wash water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaidez, Cristobal; Moreno, Maria; Rubio, Werner; Angulo, Miguel; Valdez, Benigno

    2003-09-01

    Outbreaks of pathogenic bacteria infections associated with the consumption of fresh produce has occurred with increased frequency in recent years. This study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of three commonly used disinfectants in packing-houses of Culiacan, Mexico (sodium hypochlorite [NaOCl], trichlor-s-triazinetrione [TST] and thrichlormelamine [TCM]) for inactivation of viral indicators and pathogenic bacteria inoculated onto produce wash water. Each microbial challenge consisted of 2 L of water containing approximately 8 log10 bacterial CFU ml(-1), and 8 log10 viral PFU ml(-1) treated with 100 and 300 mg l(-1) of total chlorine with modified turbidity. Water samples were taken after 2 min of contact with chlorine-based products and assayed for the particular microorganisms. TST and NaOCl were found to effectively reduce for bacterial pathogens and viral indicators 8 log10 and 7 log10, respectively (alpha=0.05). The highest inactivation rate was observed when the turbidity was low and the disinfectant was applied at 300 mg l(-1). TCM did not show effective results when compared with the TST and NaOCl (Pturbidity created by the organic and inorganic material present in the water tanks carried by the fresh produce may affect the efficacy of the chlorine-based products.

  13. Transient optogenetic inactivation of the medial entorhinal cortex biases the active population of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueckemann, Jon W; DiMauro, Audrey J; Rangel, Lara M; Han, Xue; Boyden, Edward S; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms that enable the hippocampal network to express the appropriate spatial representation for a particular circumstance are not well understood. Previous studies suggest that the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) may have a role in reproducibly selecting the hippocampal representation of an environment. To examine how ongoing MEC activity is continually integrated by the hippocampus, we performed transient unilateral optogenetic inactivations of the MEC while simultaneously recording place cell activity in CA1. Inactivation of the MEC caused a partial remapping in the CA1 population without diminishing the degree of spatial tuning across the active cell assembly. These changes remained stable irrespective of intermittent disruption of MEC input, indicating that while MEC input is integrated over long time scales to bias the active population, there are mechanisms for stabilizing the population of active neurons independent of the MEC. We find that MEC inputs to the hippocampus shape its ongoing activity by biasing the participation of the neurons in the active network, thereby influencing how the hippocampus selectively represents information. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Modelling Yersinia enterocolitica inactivation in coculture experiments with Lactobacillus sakei as based on pH and lactic acid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, M; Geeraerd, A H; Logist, F; De Visscher, Y; Vereecken, K M; Debevere, J; Devlieghere, F; Van Impe, J F

    2006-08-15

    In food processing and preservation technology, models describing microbial proliferation in food products are a helpful tool to predict the microbial food safety and shelf life. In general, the available models consider microorganisms in pure culture. Thus, microbial interactions are ignored, which may lead to a discrepancy between model predictions and the actual microbial evolution, particularly for fermented and minimally processed food products in which a background flora is often present. In this study, the lactic acid mediated negative microbial interaction between the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus sakei and the psychrotrophic food pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica was examined. A model describing the lactic acid induced inhibition (i.e., early induction of the stationary phase) of the pathogen [Vereecken, K.M., Devlieghere, F., Bockstaele, A., Debevere, J., Van Impe, J.F., 2003. A model for lactic acid induced inhibition of Yersinia enterocolitica in mono- and coculture with Lactobacillus sakei. Food Microbiology 20, 701-713.] was extended to describe the subsequent inactivation (i.e., decrease of the cell concentration to values below the detection limit). In the development of a suitable model structure to describe the inactivation process, critical points in the variation of the specific evolution rate mu [1/h] with the dynamic (time-varying) pH and undissociated lactic acid profiles were taken into account. Thus, biological knowledge, namely, both pH and undissociated lactic acid have an influence on the microbial evolution, was incorporated. The extended model was carefully validated on new data. As a result, the newly developed model is able to accurately predict the growth, inhibition and subsequent inactivation of Y. enterocolitica in coculture as based on the dynamic pH and lactic acid profiles of the medium.

  15. Cytolytic T lymphocyte responses to metabolically inactivated stimulator cells. I. Metabolic inactivation impairs both CD and LD antigen signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelso, A.; Boyle, W.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of metabolic inactivation of spleen cells on antigen presentation to precursors of alloreactive cytolytic T lymphocytes (T/sub c/) were examined. By serological methods, populations inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation, glutaraldehyde fixation or plasma membrane isolation were found to retain normal levels of H-2K/D and Ia antigens. However, comparison of the antigen doses required to stimulate secondary T/sub c/ responses in mixed leukocyte culture showed that the inactivated preparations were approximately 10-fold less immunogenic than X-irradiated spleen cells. Their total inability to stimulate primary cytolytic responses pointed to at least a 100-fold impairment of immunogenicity for unprimed T/sub c/ precursors in the case of uv-irradiated and glutaraldehyde-treated stimulator cells, and at least a 10-fold impairment for membrane fragments. Experiments showing that the capacity of cell monolayers to absorb precursor T/sub c/ from unprimed spleen populations was reduced following uv-irradiation or glutaraldehyde treatment provided direct evidence that this loss of immunogenicity was due in part to suboptimal antigen presentation to precursor T/sub c/. It is concluded that, in addition to the traditional view that these treatments damage the ''LD'' signal to helper T lymphocytes, metabolic inactivation also impairs recognition of ''CD'' determinants by precursor T/sub c/

  16. Underlying mechanism of regulatory actions of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, on neuronal potassium channels and firing: an experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C W; Hung, T Y; Liao, Y K; Hsu, M C; Wu, S N

    2013-06-01

    Diclofenac (DIC), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is known to exert anti-nociceptive and anti-convulsant actions; however, its effects on ion currents, in neurons remain debatable. We aimed to investigate (1) potential effects of diclofenac on membrane potential and potassium currents in differentiated NSC-34 neuronal cells and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with whole-cell patch-clamp technology, and (2) firing of action potentials (APs), using a simulation model from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons based on diclofenac's effects on potassium currents. In the NSC-34 cells, diclofenac exerted an inhibitory effect on delayed-rectifier K⁺ current (I(KDR)) with an IC₅₀ value of 73 μM. Diclofenac not merely inhibited the I(KDR) amplitude in response to membrane depolarization, but also accelerated the process of current inactivation. The inhibition by diclofenac of IK(DR) was not reversed by subsequent application of either naloxone. Importantly, diclofenac (300 μM) increased the amplitude of M-type K⁺ current (I)(KM)), while flupirtine (10 μM) or meclofenamic acid (10 μM) enhanced it effectively. Consistently, diclofenac (100 μM) increased the amplitude of I(KM) and diminished the I(KDR) amplitude, with a shortening of inactivation time constant in DRG neurons. Furthermore, by using the simulation modeling, we demonstrated the potential electrophysiological mechanisms underlying changes in AP firing caused by diclofenac. During the exposure to diclofenac, the actions on both I(KM) and I(KDR) could be potential mechanism through which it influences the excitability of fast-spiking neurons. Caution needs to be made in attributing the effects of diclofenac primarily to those produced by the activation of I(KM).

  17. Quantum chromodynamics as the sequential fragmenting with inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botet, R. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de Physique des Solides; Ploszajczak, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1996-12-31

    We investigate the relation between the modified leading log approximation of the perturbative QCD and the sequential binary fragmentation process. We will show that in the absence of inactivation, this process is equivalent to the QCD gluodynamics. The inactivation term yields a precise prescription of how to include the hadronization in the QCD equations. (authors). 15 refs.

  18. A simple method for generating exactly solvable quantum mechanical potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, B W

    1993-01-01

    A simple transformation method permitting the generation of exactly solvable quantum mechanical potentials from special functions solving second-order differential equations is reviewed. This method is applied to Gegenbauer polynomials to generate an attractive radial potential. The relationship of this method to the determination of supersymmetric quantum mechanical superpotentials is discussed, and the superpotential for the radial potential is also derived. (author)

  19. Free chlorine and monochloramine inactivation kinetics of Aspergillus and Penicillium in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Bibby, Kyle

    2017-09-01

    Fungi are near-ubiquitous in potable water distribution systems, but the disinfection kinetics of commonly identified fungi are poorly studied. In the present study, laboratory scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the inactivation kinetics of Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus versicolor, and Penicillium purpurogenum by free chlorine and monochloramine. The observed inactivation data were then fit to a delayed Chick-Watson model. Based on the model parameter estimation, the Ct values (integrated product of disinfectant concentration C and contact time t over defined time intervals) for 99.9% inactivation of the tested fungal strains ranged from 48.99 mg min/L to 194.7 mg min/L for free chlorine and from 90.33 mg min/L to 531.3 mg min/L for monochloramine. Fungal isolates from a drinking water system (Aspergillus versicolor and Penicillium purpurogenum) were more disinfection resistant than Aspergillus fumigatus type and clinical isolates. The required 99.9% inactivation Ct values for the tested fungal strains are higher than E. coli, a commonly monitored indicator bacteria, and within a similar range for bacteria commonly identified within water distribution systems, such as Mycobacterium spp. and Legionella spp. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The roles of the various plasma agents in the inactivation of bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xinpei; Xiong Qing; Tang Zhiyuan; Xiong Zhilan; Hu Jing; Jiang Zhonghe; Pan Yuan; Ye Tao; Cao Yingguang; Sun Ziyong

    2008-01-01

    The roles of various plasma agents in the inactivation of bacteria have recently been investigated. However, up to now, the effect of the charged particles on the inactivation of bacteria is not well understood. In this paper, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet device, which generates a cold plasma plume carrying a peak current of 300 mA, is used to investigate the role of the charged particles in the inactivation process. It is found that the charged particles play a minor role in the inactivation process when He/N 2 (3%) is used as working gas. On the other hand, when He/O 2 (3%) is used, the charged particles are expected to play an important role in the inactivation of bacteria. Further analysis shows that the negative ions O 2 - might be the charged particles that are playing the role. Besides, it is found that the active species, including O, O 3 , and metastable state O 2 *, can play a crucial role in the inactivation of the bacteria. However, the excited He*, N 2 C 3 Π u , and N 2 + B 2 Σ u + have no significant direct effect on the inactivation of bacteria. It is also concluded that heat and UV play no or minor role in the inactivation process

  1. Quantitative analysis of wet-heat inactivation in bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Yukiko; Bo, Xiao; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi; Somerville, Robert A.; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Mohri, Shirou

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We quantitatively analyzed wet-heat inactivation of the BSE agent. ► Infectivity of the BSE macerate did not survive 155 °C wet-heat treatment. ► Once the sample was dehydrated, infectivity was observed even at 170 °C. ► A quantitative PMCA assay was used to evaluate the degree of BSE inactivation. - Abstract: The bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent is resistant to conventional microbial inactivation procedures and thus threatens the safety of cattle products and by-products. To obtain information necessary to assess BSE inactivation, we performed quantitative analysis of wet-heat inactivation of infectivity in BSE-infected cattle spinal cords. Using a highly sensitive bioassay, we found that infectivity in BSE cattle macerates fell with increase in temperatures from 133 °C to 150 °C and was not detected in the samples subjected to temperatures above 155 °C. In dry cattle tissues, infectivity was detected even at 170 °C. Thus, BSE infectivity reduces with increase in wet-heat temperatures but is less affected when tissues are dehydrated prior to the wet-heat treatment. The results of the quantitative protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay also demonstrated that the level of the protease-resistant prion protein fell below the bioassay detection limit by wet-heat at 155 °C and higher and could help assess BSE inactivation. Our results show that BSE infectivity is strongly resistant to wet-heat inactivation and that it is necessary to pay attention to BSE decontamination in recycled cattle by-products

  2. Quantitative analysis of wet-heat inactivation in bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Yukiko; Bo, Xiao; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi [Prion Disease Research Center, National Institute of Animal Health, 3-1-5 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan); Somerville, Robert A. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Roslin, Midlothian, EH25 9PS (United Kingdom); Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki [Division of CJD Science and Technology, Department of Prion Research, Center for Translational and Advanced Animal Research on Human Diseases, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo, Aoba, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Mohri, Shirou, E-mail: shirou@affrc.go.jp [Prion Disease Research Center, National Institute of Animal Health, 3-1-5 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► We quantitatively analyzed wet-heat inactivation of the BSE agent. ► Infectivity of the BSE macerate did not survive 155 °C wet-heat treatment. ► Once the sample was dehydrated, infectivity was observed even at 170 °C. ► A quantitative PMCA assay was used to evaluate the degree of BSE inactivation. - Abstract: The bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent is resistant to conventional microbial inactivation procedures and thus threatens the safety of cattle products and by-products. To obtain information necessary to assess BSE inactivation, we performed quantitative analysis of wet-heat inactivation of infectivity in BSE-infected cattle spinal cords. Using a highly sensitive bioassay, we found that infectivity in BSE cattle macerates fell with increase in temperatures from 133 °C to 150 °C and was not detected in the samples subjected to temperatures above 155 °C. In dry cattle tissues, infectivity was detected even at 170 °C. Thus, BSE infectivity reduces with increase in wet-heat temperatures but is less affected when tissues are dehydrated prior to the wet-heat treatment. The results of the quantitative protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay also demonstrated that the level of the protease-resistant prion protein fell below the bioassay detection limit by wet-heat at 155 °C and higher and could help assess BSE inactivation. Our results show that BSE infectivity is strongly resistant to wet-heat inactivation and that it is necessary to pay attention to BSE decontamination in recycled cattle by-products.

  3. THE ANTIGENIC POTENCY OF EPIDEMIC INFLUENZA VIRUS FOLLOWING INACTIVATION BY ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Jonas E.; Lavin, G. I.; Francis, Thomas

    1940-01-01

    A study of the antigenic potency of influenza virus inactivated by ultraviolet radiation has been made. Virus so inactivated is still capable of functioning as an immunizing agent when given to mice by the intraperitoneal route. In high concentrations inactivated virus appears to be nearly as effective as active virus but when quantitative comparisons of the immunity induced by different dilutions are made, it is seen that a hundredfold loss in immunizing capacity occurs during inactivation. Virus in suspensions prepared from the lungs of infected mice is inactivated more rapidly than virus in tissue culture medium. A standard for the comparison of vaccines of epidemic influenza virus is proposed. PMID:19871057

  4. Modeling high-intensity pulsed electric field inactivation of a lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliva-Fortuny, R; Bendicho-Porta, S; Martín-Belloso, O

    2006-11-01

    The inactivation kinetics of a lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens (EC 3.1.1.3.) were studied in a simulated skim milk ultrafiltrate treated with high-intensity pulsed electric fields. Samples were subjected to electric field intensities ranging from 16.4 to 27.4 kV/cm for up to 314.5 micros, thus achieving a maximum inactivation of 62.1%. The suitability of describing experimental data using mechanistic first-order kinetics and an empirical model based on the Weibull distribution function is discussed. In addition, different mathematical expressions relating the residual activity values to field strength and treatment time are supplied. A first-order fractional conversion model predicted residual activity with good accuracy (A(f) = 1.018). A mechanistic insight of the model kinetics was that experimental values were the consequence of different structural organizations of the enzyme, with uneven resistance to the pulsed electric field treatments. The Weibull model was also useful in predicting the energy density necessary to achieve lipase inactivation.

  5. Phase 3 Trial of a Sabin Strain-Based Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Guoyang; Li, Rongcheng; Li, Changgui; Sun, Mingbo; Jiang, Shude; Li, Yanping; Mo, Zhaojun; Xia, Jielai; Xie, Zhongping; Che, Yanchun; Yang, Jingsi; Yin, Zhifang; Wang, Jianfeng; Chu, Jiayou; Cai, Wei; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Junzhi; Li, Qihan

    2016-12-01

     The development of a Sabin strain-based inactivated poliovirus vaccine (Sabin-IPV) is imperative to protecting against vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in developing countries.  In this double-blinded, parallel-group, noninferiority trial, eligible infants aged 60-90 days were randomly assigned in a ratio of 1:1 to receive either 3 doses of Sabin-IPV or Salk strain-based IPV (Salk-IPV) at 30-day intervals and a booster at the age of 18 months. Immunogenicity and safety were assessed on the basis of a protocol.  Of 1438 infants, 1200 eligible infants were recruited and received either Sabin-IPV or Salk-IPV. From the Sabin-IPV and Salk-IPV groups, 570 and 564 infants, respectively, completed the primary immunization and formed the per-protocol population. The seroconversion rates of the participants who received Sabin-IPV were 100%, 94.9%, and 99.0% (types I, II, and III, respectively), and those of the participants who received Salk-IPV were 94.7%, 91.3%, and 97.9% 1 month after the completion of primary immunization. An anamnestic response for poliovirus types I, II, and III was elicited by a booster in both groups. Except in the case of fever, other adverse events were similar between the 2 groups.  The immune response induced by Sabin-IPV was not inferior to that established with Salk-IPV. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Antimicrobial blue light: a drug-free approach for inactivating pathogenic microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Dai, Tianhong

    2018-02-01

    Due to the growing global threat of antibiotic resistance, there is a critical need for the development of alternative therapeutics for infectious diseases. Antimicrobial blue light (aBL), as an innovative non-antibiotic approach, has attracted increasing attention. This paper discussed the basic concepts of aBL and recent findings in the studies of aBL. It is commonly hypothesized that the antimicrobial property of aBL is attributed to the presence of endogenous photosensitizing chromophores in microbial cells, which produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species upon light irradiation. A wide range of important microbes are found to be susceptible to aBL inactivation. Studies have also shown there exist therapeutic windows where microbes are selectively inactivated by aBL while host cells are preserved. The combination of aBL with some other agents result in synergistically improved antimicrobial efficacy. Future efforts should be exerted on the standardization of study design for evaluating aBL efficacy, further elucidation of the mechanism of action, optimization of the technical parameters, and translation of this technique to clinic.

  7. The Coulomb potential in quantum mechanics and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeringen, H. van.

    1978-01-01

    This dissertation consists of an analytic study of the Coulomb interaction in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and some related topics. The author investigates in a number of self-contained articles various interesting and important properties of the Coulomb potential. Some of these properties are shared by other potentials which also play a role in quantum mechanics. For such related interactions a comparative study is made. The principal difficulties in the description of proton-deuteron scattering and break-up reactions, due to the Coulomb interaction, are studied by working out a simple model. The bound states are studied for the Coulomb plus Yamaguchi potential, for the symmetric shifted Coulomb potential, and for local potentials with an inverse-distance-squared asymptotic behaviour. (Auth.)

  8. Nitroxides protect horseradish peroxidase from H2O2-induced inactivation and modulate its catalase-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuni, Amram; Maimon, Eric; Goldstein, Sara

    2017-08-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes H 2 O 2 dismutation while undergoing heme inactivation. The mechanism underlying this process has not been fully elucidated. The effects of nitroxides, which protect metmyoglobin and methemoglobin against H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation, have been investigated. HRP reaction with H 2 O 2 was studied by following H 2 O 2 depletion, O 2 evolution and heme spectral changes. Nitroxide concentration was followed by EPR spectroscopy, and its reactions with the oxidized heme species were studied using stopped-flow. Nitroxide protects HRP against H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation. The rate of H 2 O 2 dismutation in the presence of nitroxide obeys zero-order kinetics and increases as [nitroxide] increases. Nitroxide acts catalytically since its oxidized form is readily reduced to the nitroxide mainly by H 2 O 2 . The nitroxide efficacy follows the order 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (TPO)>4-OH-TPO>3-carbamoyl proxyl>4-oxo-TPO, which correlates with the order of the rate constants of nitroxide reactions with compounds I, II, and III. Nitroxide catalytically protects HRP against inactivation induced by H 2 O 2 while modulating its catalase-like activity. The protective role of nitroxide at μM concentrations is attributed to its efficient oxidation by P940, which is the precursor of the inactivated form P670. Modeling the dismutation kinetics in the presence of nitroxide adequately fits the experimental data. In the absence of nitroxide the simulation fits the observed kinetics only if it does not include the formation of a Michaelis-Menten complex. Nitroxides catalytically protect heme proteins against inactivation induced by H 2 O 2 revealing an additional role played by nitroxide antioxidants in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Yogurt and Cardiometabolic Diseases: A Critical Review of Potential Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Melissa Anne; Panahi, Shirin; Daniel, Noémie; Tremblay, Angelo; Marette, André

    2017-11-01

    Associations between yogurt intake and risk of diet-related cardiometabolic diseases (CMDs) have been the subject of recent research in epidemiologic nutrition. A healthy dietary pattern has been identified as a pillar for the prevention of weight gain and CMDs. Epidemiologic studies suggest that yogurt consumption is linked to healthy dietary patterns, lifestyles, and reduced risk of CMDs, particularly type 2 diabetes. However, to our knowledge, few to no randomized controlled trials have investigated yogurt intake in relation to cardiometabolic clinical outcomes. Furthermore, there has been little attempt to clarify the mechanisms that underlie the potential beneficial effects of yogurt consumption on CMDs. Yogurt is a nutrient-dense dairy food and has been suggested to reduce weight gain and prevent CMDs by contributing to intakes of protein, calcium, bioactive lipids, and several other micronutrients. In addition, fermentation with bacterial strains generates bioactive peptides, resulting in a potentially greater beneficial effect of yogurt on metabolic health than nonfermented dairy products such as milk. To date, there is little concrete evidence that the mechanisms proposed in observational studies to explain positive results of yogurt on CMDs or parameters are valid. Many proposed mechanisms are based on assumptions that commercial yogurts contain strain-specific probiotics, that viable yogurt cultures are present in adequate quantities, and that yogurt provides a minimum threshold dose of nutrients or bioactive components capable of exerting a physiologic effect. Therefore, the primary objective of this review is to investigate the plausibility of potential mechanisms commonly cited in the literature in order to shed light on the inverse associations reported between yogurt intake and various cardiometabolic health parameters that are related to its nutrient profile, bacterial constituents, and food matrix. This article reviews current gaps and challenges

  10. Characterization and inactivation of an agmatine deiminase from Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Justin E.; Causey, Corey P.; Lovelace, Leslie; Knuckley, Bryan; Flick, Heather; Lebioda, Lukasz; Thompson, Paul R. (SC)

    2010-11-12

    Helicobacter pylori encodes a potential virulence factor, agmatine deiminase (HpAgD), which catalyzes the conversion of agmatine to N-carbamoyl putrescine (NCP) and ammonia - agmatine is decarboxylated arginine. Agmatine is an endogenous human cell signaling molecule that triggers the innate immune response in humans. Unlike H. pylori, humans do not encode an AgD; it is hypothesized that inhibition of this enzyme would increase the levels of agmatine, and thereby enhance the innate immune response. Taken together, these facts suggest that HpAgD is a potential drug target. Herein we describe the optimized expression, isolation, and purification of HpAgD (10-30 mg/L media). The initial kinetic characterization of this enzyme has also been performed. Additionally, the crystal structure of wild-type HpAgD has been determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. This structure provides a molecular basis for the preferential deimination of agmatine, and identifies Asp198 as a key residue responsible for agmatine recognition, which has been confirmed experimentally. Information gathered from these studies led to the development and characterization of a novel class of haloacetamidine-based HpAgD inactivators. These compounds are the most potent AgD inhibitors ever described.

  11. Power source for inactivation of micro-organisms with partial high voltage discharge in a continuous process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, Y.; Beurskens, R.; Fiala, A.; Haan, S.W.H. de

    2002-01-01

    An electrical discharge technology is investigated as non-thermal method for inactivation of microorganisms. Potential applications include treatment of drinking water (e.g. legionella) and liquid food pasteurization (e.g. fruit juices). A strong interest exists in mild food conservation processes

  12. Two pathogen reduction technologies--methylene blue plus light and shortwave ultraviolet light--effectively inactivate hepatitis C virus in blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Eike; Gravemann, Ute; Friesland, Martina; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Müller, Thomas H; Pietschmann, Thomas; Seltsam, Axel

    2013-05-01

    Contamination of blood products with hepatitis C virus (HCV) can cause infections resulting in acute and chronic liver diseases. Pathogen reduction methods such as photodynamic treatment with methylene blue (MB) plus visible light as well as irradiation with shortwave ultraviolet (UVC) light were developed to inactivate viruses and other pathogens in plasma and platelet concentrates (PCs), respectively. So far, their inactivation capacities for HCV have only been tested in inactivation studies using model viruses for HCV. Recently, a HCV infection system for the propagation of infectious HCV in cell culture was developed. Inactivation studies were performed with cell culture-derived HCV and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a model for HCV. Plasma units or PCs were spiked with high titers of cell culture-grown viruses. After treatment of the blood units with MB plus light (Theraflex MB-Plasma system, MacoPharma) or UVC (Theraflex UV-Platelets system, MacoPharma), residual viral infectivity was assessed using sensitive cell culture systems. HCV was sensitive to inactivation by both pathogen reduction procedures. HCV in plasma was efficiently inactivated by MB plus light below the detection limit already by 1/12 of the full light dose. HCV in PCs was inactivated by UVC irradiation with a reduction factor of more than 5 log. BVDV was less sensitive to the two pathogen reduction methods. Functional assays with human HCV offer an efficient tool to directly assess the inactivation capacity of pathogen reduction procedures. Pathogen reduction technologies such as MB plus light treatment and UVC irradiation have the potential to significantly reduce transfusion-transmitted HCV infections. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  13. Inactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis l,d-Transpeptidase LdtMt1 by Carbapenems and Cephalosporins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubée, Vincent; Triboulet, Sébastien; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Ethève-Quelquejeu, Mélanie; Gutmann, Laurent; Marie, Arul; Dubost, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    The structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptidoglycan is atypical since it contains a majority of 3→3 cross-links synthesized by l,d-transpeptidases that replace 4→3 cross-links formed by the d,d-transpeptidase activity of classical penicillin-binding proteins. Carbapenems inactivate these l,d-transpeptidases, and meropenem combined with clavulanic acid is bactericidal against extensively drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. Here, we used mass spectrometry and stopped-flow fluorimetry to investigate the kinetics and mechanisms of inactivation of the prototypic M. tuberculosis l,d-transpeptidase LdtMt1 by carbapenems (meropenem, doripenem, imipenem, and ertapenem) and cephalosporins (cefotaxime, cephalothin, and ceftriaxone). Inactivation proceeded through noncovalent drug binding and acylation of the catalytic Cys of LdtMt1, which was eventually followed by hydrolysis of the resulting acylenzyme. Meropenem rapidly inhibited LdtMt1, with a binding rate constant of 0.08 μM−1 min−1. The enzyme was unable to recover from this initial binding step since the dissociation rate constant of the noncovalent complex was low (carbapenem side chains affected both the binding and acylation steps, ertapenem being the most efficient LdtMt1 inactivator. Cephalosporins also formed covalent adducts with LdtMt1, although the acylation reaction was 7- to 1,000-fold slower and led to elimination of one of the drug side chains. Comparison of kinetic constants for drug binding, acylation, and acylenzyme hydrolysis indicates that carbapenems and cephems can both be tailored to optimize peptidoglycan synthesis inhibition in M. tuberculosis. PMID:22615283

  14. SMARCB1/INI1 inactivation in renal medullary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Julien; Moroch, Julien; Pierron, Gaelle; Pedeutour, Florence; Grison, Camille; Maillé, Pascale; Soyeux, Pascale; de la Taille, Alexandre; Couturier, Jérome; Vieillefond, Annick; Rousselet, Marie Christine; Delattre, Olivier; Allory, Yves

    2012-09-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC), a rare and highly aggressive tumour which occurs in patients with sickle-cell disease, shares many clinicopathological features with collecting duct carcinoma (CDC). The molecular mechanisms underlying RMC and CDC are mainly unknown, and there is ongoing debate about their status as distinct entities. Loss of expression of SMARCB1/INI1, a chromatin remodelling regulator and repressor of cyclin D1 transcription, has been reported recently in RMC. The aim of our study was to investigate if such loss of expression is specific for RMC. SMARCB1/INI1 genetic alterations and cyclin D1 expression were also studied. Using immunochemistry, neoplastic cells showed complete loss of SMARCB1/INI1 expression in all six cases of RMC but in only one of 22 cases of CDC. In two RMC cases investigated, comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated complete loss of one SMARCB1/INI1 allele, with no other genomic imbalances, and no mutations were found on the remaining allele. Cyclin D1 was expressed in all RMCs, suggesting that SMARCB1/INI1 inactivation may result in increased cyclin D1 transcription. The specific SMARCB1/INI1 inactivation observed in RMCs suggests that RMC and CDC are different entities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Investigation of E. coli bacteria inactivation by photocatalytic activity of TiO2 coated expanded polystyrene foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnagiris, S.; Sakalauskaite, S.; Tuckute, S.; Lelis, M.; Daugelavicius, R.; Milcius, D.

    2017-03-01

    Photocatalytic properties of anatase and other TiO2 polymorphs are widely researched and applied in practical application. In current study TiO2 films on the plasma pre-treated expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam were deposited using magnetron sputtering technique. Main properties of the films were characterised using combination of XRD, XPS and SEM techniques. Photocatalytic properties of the observed crystalline anatase phase were tested by investigating bleaching of the methylene blue (MB) aqueous solution and by testing Escherichia coli (E. coli) viability after incubation under UV-B irradiation. E. coli viability experiments indicated that there are two mechanisms of E. coli bacteria inactivation. UV irradiation alone causes rapid damage to the outer membrane of E. coli bacteria. The second mechanism of E. coli inactivation is invoked only with synergistic combination of TiO2 and UV. Acting as photocatalyst TiO2 generates active radicals who initiate the chain peroxidation of organic molecules and within 45 min reduce E. coli bacteria viability by nearly 90%.

  16. Ebola Virus Inactivation by Detergents Is Annulled in Serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; Tintu, Andrei; Russcher, Henk; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.; Reusken, Chantal B. E. M.; Rijken, Mikel; van Hellemond, Jaap J.; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Koelewijn, Rob; de Jong, Menno D.; Haddock, Elaine; Fischer, Robert J.; Munster, Vincent J.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of blood samples from hemorrhagic fever virus (HFV)-infected patients with 0.1% detergents has been recommended for virus inactivation and subsequent safe laboratory testing. However, data on virus inactivation by this procedure are lacking. Here we show the effect of this procedure on

  17. Leukotriene B4 omega-hydroxylase in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Suicidal inactivation by acetylenic fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, S; Reich, N O; Goldstein, I M; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1985-10-25

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) not only generate and respond to leukotriene B4 (LTB4), but also catabolize this mediator of inflammation rapidly and specifically by omega-oxidation (probably due to the action of a cytochrome P-450 enzyme). To develop pharmacologically useful inhibitors of the LTB4 omega-hydroxylase in human PMN, we devised a general scheme for synthesizing terminal acetylenic fatty acids based on the "acetylenic zipper" reaction. We found that the LTB4 omega-hydroxylase in intact PMN and in PMN sonicates is inactivated in a concentration-dependent fashion by terminal acetylenic analogues of lauric, palmitic, and stearic acids (i.e. 11-dodecynoic, 15-hexadecynoic, and 17-octadecynoic acids). Consistent with a suicidal process, inactivation of the LTB4 omega-hydroxylase requires molecular oxygen and NADPH, is time-dependent, and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Inactivation of the omega-hydroxylase by acetylenic fatty acids also is dependent on the terminal acetylenic moiety and the carbon chain length. Saturated fatty acids lacking a terminal acetylenic moiety do not inactivate the omega-hydroxylase. In addition, the two long-chain (C16, C18) acetylenic fatty acids inactivate the omega-hydroxylase at much lower concentrations (less than 5.0 microM) than those required for inactivation by the short-chain (C12) terminal acetylenic fatty acid (100 microM). Potent suicidal inhibitors of the LTB4 omega-hydroxylase in human PMN will help elucidate the roles played by LTB4 and its omega-oxidation products in regulating PMN function and in mediating inflammation.

  18. Rapid Bedside Inactivation of Ebola Virus for Safe Nucleic Acid Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe; Karlberg, Helen; Bragstad, Karoline

    2016-01-01

    Rapid bedside inactivation of Ebola virus would be a solution for the safety of medical and technical staff, risk containment, sample transport, and high-throughput or rapid diagnostic testing during an outbreak. We show that the commercially available Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer used...... for nucleic acid extraction inactivates Ebola virus. A rapid bedside inactivation method for nucleic acid tests is obtained by simply adding Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer directly into vacuum blood collection EDTA tubes using a thin needle and syringe prior to sampling. The ready-to-use inactivation vacuum...... tubes are stable for more than 4 months, and Ebola virus RNA is preserved in the Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer for at least 5 weeks independent of the storage temperature. We also show that Ebola virus RNA can be manually extracted from Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer-inactivated samples using...

  19. Inactivation of Cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4 but not P450 3A5 by OSI-930, a Thiophene-Containing Anticancer DrugS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsia-lien; Zhang, Haoming; Medower, Christine; Johnson, William W.

    2011-01-01

    An investigational anticancer agent that contains a thiophene moiety, 3-[(quinolin-4-ylmethyl)-amino]-N-[4-trifluoromethox)phenyl] thiophene-2-carboxamide (OSI-930), was tested to investigate its ability to modulate the activities of several cytochrome P450 enzymes. Results showed that OSI-930 inactivated purified, recombinant cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4 in the reconstituted system in a mechanism-based manner. The inactivation was dependent on cytochrome b5 and required NADPH. Catalase did not protect against the inactivation. No inactivation was observed in studies with human 2B6, 2D6, or 3A5 either in the presence or in the absence of b5. The inactivation of 3A4 by OSI-930 was time- and concentration-dependent. The inactivation of the 7-benzyloxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin catalytic activity of 3A4 was characterized by a KI of 24 μM and a kinact of 0.04 min−1. This KI is significantly greater than the clinical OSI-930 Cmax of 1.7 μM at the maximum tolerated dose, indicating that clinical drug interactions of OSI-930 via this pathway are not likely. Spectral analysis of the inactivated protein indicated that the decrease in the reduced CO spectrum at 450 nm was comparable to the amount of inactivation, thereby suggesting that the inactivation was primarily due to modification of the heme. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis with detection at 400 nm showed a loss of heme comparable to the activity loss, but a modified heme was not detected. This result suggests either that the heme must have been modified enough so as not to be observed in a HPLC chromatograph or, possibly, that it was destroyed. The partition ratio for the inactivation of P450 3A4 was approximately 23, suggesting that this P450 3A4-mediated pathway occurs with approximately 4% frequency during the metabolism of OSI-930. Modeling studies on the binding of OSI-930 to the active site of the P450 3A4 indicated that OSI-930 would be oriented properly in the active site for oxidation

  20. Na/K pump inactivation, subsarcolemmal Na measurements, and cytoplasmic ion turnover kinetics contradict restricted Na spaces in murine cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang-Min; Hilgemann, Donald W

    2017-07-03

    Decades ago, it was proposed that Na transport in cardiac myocytes is modulated by large changes in cytoplasmic Na concentration within restricted subsarcolemmal spaces. Here, we probe this hypothesis for Na/K pumps by generating constitutive transsarcolemmal Na flux with the Na channel opener veratridine in whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Using 25 mM Na in the patch pipette, pump currents decay strongly during continuous activation by extracellular K (τ, ∼2 s). In contradiction to depletion hypotheses, the decay becomes stronger when pump currents are decreased by hyperpolarization. Na channel currents are nearly unchanged by pump activity in these conditions, and conversely, continuous Na currents up to 0.5 nA in magnitude have negligible effects on pump currents. These outcomes are even more pronounced using 50 mM Li as a cytoplasmic Na congener. Thus, the Na/K pump current decay reflects mostly an inactivation mechanism that immobilizes Na/K pump charge movements, not cytoplasmic Na depletion. When channel currents are increased beyond 1 nA, models with unrestricted subsarcolemmal diffusion accurately predict current decay (τ ∼15 s) and reversal potential shifts observed for Na, Li, and K currents through Na channels opened by veratridine, as well as for Na, K, Cs, Li, and Cl currents recorded in nystatin-permeabilized myocytes. Ion concentrations in the pipette tip (i.e., access conductance) track without appreciable delay the current changes caused by sarcolemmal ion flux. Importantly, cytoplasmic mixing volumes, calculated from current decay kinetics, increase and decrease as expected with osmolarity changes (τ >30 s). Na/K pump current run-down over 20 min reflects a failure of pumps to recover from inactivation. Simulations reveal that pump inactivation coupled with Na-activated recovery enhances the rapidity and effectivity of Na homeostasis in cardiac myocytes. In conclusion, an autoregulatory mechanism enhances cardiac Na/K pump activity when

  1. Inactivation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase by 5'-(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl))adenosine: protection by the hydrolyzed reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettigrew, D.W.

    1987-03-24

    Incubation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase with 5'-(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl)adenosine (FSO/sub 2/BzAdo) at pH 8.0 and 25/sup 0/C results in the loss of enzyme activity, which is not restored by the addition of ..beta..-mercaptoethanol or dithiothreitol. The FSO/sub 2/BzAdo concentration dependence of the inactivation kinetics is described by a mechanism that includes the equilibrium binding of the reagent to the enzyme prior to a first-order inactivation reaction in addition to effects of reagent hydrolysis. The hydrolysis of the reagent has two effects on the observed kinetics. The first effect is deviation from pseudo-first-order kinetic behavior due to depletion of the reagent. The second effect is the novel protection of the enzyme from inactivation due to binding of the sulfonate hydrolysis product. Determinations of the reaction stoichiometry with /sup 3/H-labeled FSO/sub 2/BzAdo show that the inactivation is associated with the covalent incorporation of 1.08 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme subunit. Ligand protection experiments show that ATP, AMP, dAMP, NADH, 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, and the sulfonate hydrolysis product of FSO/sub 2/BzAdo provide protection from inactivation. The protection obtained with ATMP is not dependent on Mg/sup 2 +/. The results are consistent with modification by FSO/sub 2/BzAdo of a single adenine nucleotide binding site per enzyme subunit.

  2. Promoter hypermethylation of KLF4 inactivates its tumor suppressor function in cervical carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ting Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The KLF4 gene has been shown to be inactivated in cervical carcinogenesis as a tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism of KLF4 silencing in cervical carcinomas has not yet been identified. DNA methylation plays a key role in stable suppression of gene expression. METHODS: The methylation status of the KLF4 promoter CpG islands was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing (BSQ in tissues of normal cervix and cervical cancer. KLF4 gene expression was detected by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot. KLF4 promoter methylation in cervical cancer cell line was determined by BSQ and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR. Cell proliferation ability was detected by cell growth curve and MTT assay. RESULTS: The methylated allele was found in 41.90% of 24 cervical cancer tissues but only in 11.11% of 11 normal cervix tissues (P<0.005. KLF4 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervix tissues (P<0.01 and KLF4 mRNA expression showed a significant negative correlation with the promoter hypermethylation (r = -0.486, P = 0.003. Cervical cancer cell lines also showed a significant negative correlation between KLF4 expression and hypermethylation. After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza, the expression of KLF4 in the cervical cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein levels was drastically increased, the cell proliferation ability was inhibited and the chemosensitivity for cisplatin was significantly increased. CONCLUSION: KLF4 gene is inactivated by methylation-induced silencing mechanisms in a large subset of cervical carcinomas and KLF4 promoter hypermethylation inactivates the gene's function as a tumor suppressor in cervical carcinogenesis.

  3. Induction of uterine cancer with inactivated herpes simplex virus, types 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentz, W.B.; Reagan, J.W.; Heggie, A.D.; Fu, Y.S.; Anthony, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    A series of studies were performed to evaluate the oncogenic potential of inactivated herpes simplex viruses types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) in the mouse cervix. HSV-1 or HSV-2 prepared in HEp-2 cell cultures and inactivated by exposure to formalin or ultraviolet light was applied to the mouse cervix for periods ranging from 20 to 90 weeks. Control mice were exposed for the same period to control fluids. Vaginal cytologic preparations from all animals were examined weekly to detect epithelial abnormalities. Animals were sacrificed and histopathological studies were carried out when cellular changes seen on vaginal smears resembled those indicative of premalignant or malignant changes as previously established in a similar model system using coal tar hydrocarbons. Other animals were exposed for periods up to 90 weeks, or until there was cellular evidence of invasive cancer. Cytologic and histologic materials were coded and evaluated without knowledge of whether they were from virus-exposed or control animals. Premalignant and malignant cervical lesions similar to those that occur in women were encountered in 78 to 90% of the virus-exposed animals. All controls were normal. Invasive cancer was detected in 24 to 60% of the animals and dysplasia was found in 18 to 66%. The yield of invasive cancer was twice as great after exposure to ultraviolet-inactivated HSV-2 as compared with formalin-inactivated virus. Various histologic grades of carcinoma of the cervix and endometrium were found. No primary lesions were found in the vagina or ovaries

  4. Inactivation and injury of total coliform bacteria after primary disinfection of drinking water by TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Luigi, E-mail: l.rizzo@unisa.it [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    In this study the potential application of TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis as primary disinfection system of drinking water was investigated in terms of coliform bacteria inactivation and injury. As model water the effluent of biological denitrification unit for nitrate removal from groundwater, which is characterized by high organic matter and bacteria release, was used. The injury of photocatalysis on coliform bacteria was characterized by means of selective (mEndo) and less selective (mT7) culture media. Different catalyst loadings as well as photolysis and adsorption effects were investigated. Photocatalysis was effective in coliform bacteria inactivation (91-99% after 60 min irradiation time, depending on both catalyst loading and initial density of coliform bacteria detected by mEndo), although no total removal was observed after 60 min irradiation time. The contribution of adsorption mechanism was significant (60-98% after 60 min, depending on catalyst loading) compared to previous investigations probably due to the nature of source water rich in particulate organic matter and biofilm. Photocatalysis process did not result in any irreversible injury (98.8% being the higher injury) under investigated conditions, thus a bacteria regrowth may take place under optimum environment conditions if any final disinfection process (e.g., chlorine or chlorine dioxide) is not used.

  5. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Vaughn, J.M. (Univ. of New England College of Medicine, Biddeford, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  6. A novel CD4-conjugated ultraviolet light-activated photocatalyst inactivates HIV-1 and SIV efficiently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Koushi; Sugiyama, Takahiro; Kato, Shinji; Kondo, Yoichi; Ageyama, Naohide; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Iwata, Misao; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we found that the electric potential derived from the redox reaction of ultraviolet (UV)-illuminated CD4-conjugated titanium dioxide (TiO2) inactivated a wide range of high-titered primary HIV-1 isolates, regardless of virus co-receptor usage or genetic clade. In vitro incubation of HIV-1 isolates with CD4-conjugated TiO2 (CD4-TiO2) followed by UV illumination led to inhibition of viral infectivity in both H9 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells as well as to the complete inactivation of plasma virions from HIV-1-infected individuals. Treatment with a newly established extra-corporeal circulation system with the photocatalyst in rhesus macaques completely inactivated plasma virus in the system and effectively reduced the infectious plasma viral load. Furthermore, plasma viremia and infectious viral loads were controlled following a second therapeutic photocatalyst treatment during primary SIV(mac239) infection of macaques. Our findings suggest that this therapeutic immunophysical strategy may help control human immunodeficiency viral infection in vivo.

  7. Biomarkers and Mechanisms of FANCD2 Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Willers

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic or epigenetic inactivation of the pathway formed by the Fanconi anemia (FA and BRCA1 proteins occurs in several cancer types, making the affected tumors potentially hypersensitive to DNA cross-linkers and other chemotherapeutic agents. It has been proposed that the inability of FA/BRCA-defective cells to form subnuclear foci of effector proteins, such as FANCD2, can be used as a biomarker to aid individualization of chemotherapy. We show that FANCD2 inactivation not only renders cells sensitive to cross-links, but also oxidative stress, a common effect of cancer therapeutics. Oxidative stress sensitivity does not correlate with FANCD2 or RAD51 foci formation, but associates with increased γH2AX foci levels and apoptosis. Therefore, FANCD2 may protect cells against cross-links and oxidative stress through distinct mechanisms, consistent with the growing notion that the pathway is not linear. Our data emphasize the need for multiple biomarkers, such as γH2AX, FANCD2, and RAD51, to capture all pathway activities.

  8. Strategy to inactivate Clostridium perfringens spores in meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saeed; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Torres, J Antonio; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2009-05-01

    The current study aimed to develop an inactivation strategy for Clostridium perfringens spores in meat through a combination of spore activation at low pressure (100-200 MPa, 7 min) and elevated temperature (80 degrees C, 10 min); spore germination at high temperatures (55, 60 or 65 degrees C); and inactivation of germinated spores with elevated temperatures (80 and 90 degrees C, 10 and 20 min) and high pressure (586 MPa, at 23 and 73 degrees C, 10 min). Low pressures (100-200 MPa) were insufficient to efficiently activate C. perfringens spores for germination. However, C. perfringens spores were efficiently activated with elevated temperature (80 degrees C, 10 min), and germinated at temperatures lethal for vegetative cells (>or= 55 degrees C) when incubated for 60 min with a mixture of L-asparagine and KCl (AK) in phosphate buffer (pH 7) and in poultry meat. Inactivation of spores (approximately 4 decimal reduction) in meat by elevated temperatures (80-90 degrees C for 20 min) required a long germination period (55 degrees C for 60 min). However, similar inactivation level was reached with shorter germination period (55 degrees C for 15 min) when spore contaminated-meat was treated with pressure-assisted thermal processing (568 MPa, 73 degrees C, 10 min). Therefore, the most efficient strategy to inactivate C. perfringens spores in poultry meat containing 50 mM AK consisted: (i) a primary heat treatment (80 degrees C, 10 min) to pasteurize and denature the meat proteins and to activate C. perfringens spores for germination; (ii) cooling of the product to 55 degrees C in about 20 min and further incubation at 55 degrees C for about 15 min for spore germination; and (iii) inactivation of germinated spores by pressure-assisted thermal processing (586 MPa at 73 degrees C for 10 min). Collectively, this study demonstrates the feasibility of an alternative and novel strategy to inactivate C. perfringens spores in meat products formulated with germinants specific for C

  9. The radiation inactivation of glutamate and isocitrate dehydrogenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Failat, R.R.A.

    1980-12-01

    The reaction of free radicals produced by ionizing radiation with the enzymes glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and NADP + -specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) have been studied by steady-state and pulse radiolysis techniques. In de-aerated GDH solutions, hydroxyl radicals have been found to be the most efficient of the primary radicals generated from water in causing inactivation. The effect of reaction with the enzyme of selective free radicals (SCN) 2 - , (Br) 2 - and (I) 2 - on its activity has also been studied. In neutral solutions, the order of inactivating effectiveness is (I) 2 - > (Br) 2 - > (SCN) 2 - . In the case of the thiocyanate radical anion (SCN) 2 - , the inactivation efficiency is found to depend on KSCN concentration. The radiation inactivation of GDH at both neutral and alkaline pH is accompanied by the loss of sulphydryl groups. Pulse radiolysis was also used to determine the rate constants and the transient absorption spectra following the reaction of the free radicals with GDH. 60 Co-γ-radiolysis and pulse radiolysis were also used to study the effect of ionizing radiation on the activity of ICDH. The results obtained were similar to those of GDH. (author)

  10. Therapeutic Implications of Black Seed and Its Constituent Thymoquinone in the Prevention of Cancer through Inactivation and Activation of Molecular Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad H. Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer is probably the most dreaded disease in both men and women and also major health problem worldwide. Despite its high prevalence, the exact molecular mechanisms of the development and progression are not fully understood. The current chemotherapy/radiotherapy regime used to treat cancer shows adverse side effect and may alter gene functions. Natural products are generally safe, effective, and less expensive substitutes of anticancer chemotherapeutics. Based on previous studies of their potential therapeutic uses, Nigella sativa and its constituents may be proved as good therapeutic options in the prevention of cancer. Black seeds are used as staple food in the Middle Eastern Countries for thousands of years and also in the treatment of diseases. Earlier studies have shown that N. sativa and its constituent thymoquinone (TQ have important roles in the prevention and treatment of cancer by modulating cell signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the role of N. sativa and its constituents TQ in the prevention of cancer through the activation or inactivation of molecular cell signaling pathways.

  11. Gamma-irradiation to inactivate thioglucosidase of crucifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessman, K.J.; McCaslin, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    The crucifers contain glucosinolates which through enzymatic hydrolysis give rise to toxicants that limit the use of oil-free meal obtainable from this plant family. Seeds from three crucifers were used to test gamma irradiation to inactivate enzyme systems as a step toward detoxification. Seeds of Crambe abyssinica Hochst (crambe), ground seeds of Sinapis alba L. (mustard), and seeds of Brassica napus L. (rape) were subjected to gamma-irradiation (6.25, 12.5, 25.0 and 50.4 Mrad) to inactivate thioglucosidase and/or destroy glucosinolates. Samples of ground seeds, their oil-free meals, previously irradiated ground seeds and their oil-free meals were assayed for glucose, a product of enzymatic hydrolysis of glucosinolates present in the crucifer seeds. The 50.4 Mrad exposure inactivated thioglucosidase but did not destroy glucosinolates. The fatty acid contents of extracted oils were affected. The amino acid profile of defatted crambe protein meal was affected, while that of white mustard was not

  12. Can microbial cells develop resistance to oxidative stress in antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashef, Nasim; Hamblin, Michael R

    2017-03-01

    Infections have been a major cause of disease throughout the history of humans on earth. With the introduction of antibiotics, it was thought that infections had been conquered. However, bacteria have been able to develop resistance to antibiotics at an exponentially increasing rate. The growing threat from multi-drug resistant organisms calls for intensive action to prevent the emergence of totally resistant and untreatable infections. Novel, non-invasive, non-antibiotic strategies are needed that act more efficiently and faster than current antibiotics. One promising alternative is antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI), an approach that produces reactive oxygen species when dyes and light are combined. So far, it has been questionable if bacteria can develop resistance against APDI. This review paper gives an overview of recent studies concerning the susceptibility of bacteria towards oxidative stress, and suggests possible mechanisms of the development of APDI-resistance that should at least be addressed. Some ways to potentiate APDI and also to overcome future resistance are suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Human X chromosome inactivation and reactivation: implications for cell reprogramming and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, Irene; Fisher, Amanda G

    2017-11-05

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an exemplar of epigenetic regulation that is set up as pluripotent cells differentiate. Once established, XCI is stably propagated, but can be reversed in vivo or by pluripotent reprogramming in vitro Although reprogramming provides a useful model for inactive X (Xi) reactivation in mouse, the relative instability and heterogeneity of human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem cells hampers comparable progress in human. Here we review studies aimed at reactivating the human Xi using different reprogramming strategies. We outline our recent results using mouse ES cells to reprogramme female human fibroblasts by cell-cell fusion. We show that pluripotent reprogramming induces widespread and rapid chromatin remodelling in which the human Xi loses XIST and H3K27m3 enrichment and selected Xi genes become reactivated, ahead of mitotic division. Using RNA sequencing to map the extent of human Xi reactivation, and chromatin-modifying drugs to potentiate reactivation, we outline how this approach could be used to better design strategies to re-express human X-linked loci. As cell fusion induces the expression of human pluripotency genes that represent both the 'primed' and 'naive' states, this approach may also offer a fresh opportunity to segregate human pluripotent states with distinct Xi expression profiles, using single-cell-based approaches.This article is part of the themed issue 'X-chromosome inactivation: a tribute to Mary Lyon'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. IL26 gene inactivation in Equidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhsi-Niaei, M; Drögemüller, M; Jagannathan, V; Gerber, V; Leeb, T

    2013-12-01

    Interleukin-26 (IL26) is a member of the IL10 cytokine family. The IL26 gene is located between two other well-known cytokines genes of this family encoding interferon-gamma (IFNG) and IL22 in an evolutionary conserved gene cluster. In contrast to humans and most other mammals, mice lack a functional Il26 gene. We analyzed the genome sequences of other vertebrates for the presence or absence of functional IL26 orthologs and found that the IL26 gene has also become inactivated in several equid species. We detected a one-base pair frameshift deletion in exon 2 of the IL26 gene in the domestic horse (Equus caballus), Przewalski horse (Equus przewalskii) and donkey (Equus asinus). The remnant IL26 gene in the horse is still transcribed and gives rise to at least five alternative transcripts. None of these transcripts share a conserved open reading frame with the human IL26 gene. A comparative analysis across diverse vertebrates revealed that the IL26 gene has also independently been inactivated in a few other mammals, including the African elephant and the European hedgehog. The IL26 gene thus appears to be highly variable, and the conserved open reading frame has been lost several times during mammalian evolution. © 2013 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  15. A key inactivation factor of HeLa cell viability by a plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Mayo [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Johkura, Kohei, E-mail: sato@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Embryology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Recently, a plasma flow has been applied to medical treatment using effects of various kinds of stimuli such as chemical species, charged particles, heat, light, shock wave and electric fields. Among them, the chemical species are known to cause an inactivation of cell viability. However, the mechanisms and key factors of this event are not yet clear. In this study, we focused on the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in plasma-treated culture medium because it is generated in the culture medium and it is also chemically stable compared with free radicals generated by the plasma flow. To elucidate the significance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, we assessed the differences in the effects of plasma-treated medium and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium against inactivation of HeLa cell viability. These two media showed comparable effects on HeLa cells in terms of the survival ratios, morphological features of damage processes, permeations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into the cells, response to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition by catalase and comprehensive gene expression. The results supported that among chemical species generated in a plasma-treated culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is one of the main factors responsible for inactivation of HeLa cell viability. (fast track communication)

  16. Multi-Layered TiO2 Films towards Enhancement of Escherichia coli Inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorachon Yoriya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline TiO2 has shown its great photocatalytic properties in bacterial inactivation. This work presents a design fabrication of low-cost, layered TiO2 films assembled reactors and a study of their performance for a better understanding to elucidate the photocatalytic effect on inactivation of E. coli in water. The ability to reduce the number of bacteria in water samples for the layered TiO2 composing reactors has been investigated as a function of time, while varying the parameters of light sources, initial concentration of bacteria, and ratios of TiO2 film area and volume of water. Herein, the layered TiO2 films have been fabricated on the glass plates by thermal spray coating prior to screen printing, allowing a good adhesion of the films. Surface topology and crystallographic phase of TiO2 for the screen-printed active layer have been characterized, resulting in the ratio of anatase:rutile being 80:20. Under exposure to sunlight and a given condition employed in this study, the optimized film area:water volume of 1:2.62 has shown a significant ability to reduce the E. coli cells in water samples. The ratio of surface area of photocatalytic active base to volume of water medium is believed to play a predominant role facilitating the cells inactivation. The kinetic rate of inactivation and its behavior are also described in terms of adsorption of reaction species at different contact times.

  17. Randomized, double-blinded clinical trial for human norovirus inactivation in oysters by high hydrostatic pressure processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Juan S; Kingsley, David H; Montes, Julia S; Richards, Gary P; Lyon, G Marshall; Abdulhafid, Gwen M; Seitz, Scot R; Fernandez, Marina L; Teunis, Peter F; Flick, George J; Moe, Christine L

    2011-08-01

    Contamination of oysters with human noroviruses (HuNoV) constitutes a human health risk and may lead to severe economic losses in the shellfish industry. There is a need to identify a technology that can inactivate HuNoV in oysters. In this study, we conducted a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial to assess the effect of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HPP) on Norwalk virus (HuNoV genogroup I.1) inactivation in virus-seeded oysters ingested by subjects. Forty-four healthy, positive-secretor adults were divided into three study phases. Subjects in each phase were randomized into control and intervention groups. Subjects received Norwalk virus (8FIIb, 1.0 × 10(4) genomic equivalent copies) in artificially seeded oysters with or without HPP treatment (400 MPa at 25°C, 600 MPa at 6°C, or 400 MPa at 6°C for 5 min). HPP at 600 MPa, but not 400 MPa (at 6° or 25°C), completely inactivated HuNoV in seeded oysters and resulted in no HuNoV infection among these subjects, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR detection of HuNoV RNA in subjects' stool or vomitus samples. Interestingly, a white blood cell (granulocyte) shift was identified in 92% of the infected subjects and was significantly associated with infection (P = 0.0014). In summary, these data suggest that HPP is effective at inactivating HuNoV in contaminated whole oysters and suggest a potential intervention to inactivate infectious HuNoV in oysters for the commercial shellfish industry.

  18. Exactly Solvable Quantum Mechanical Potentials: An Alternative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronchik, Jeremy N.; Williams, Brian W.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an alternative approach to finding exactly solvable, one-dimensional quantum mechanical potentials. Differs from the usual approach in that instead of starting with a particular potential and seeking solutions to the related Schrodinger equations, it begins with known solutions to second-order ordinary differential equations and seeks to…

  19. Lipase inactivation in wheat germ by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Pankaj Kumar; Kudachikar, V.B.; Kumar, Sourav

    2013-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve the shelf life of wheat germ by optimizing processing conditions involving γ-irradiation. Studies were carried out to investigate the effect of γ-irradiation (0–30 kGy doses) on the chemical composition of wheat germ with respect to variation in moisture, total ash, crude fat, free fatty acid, protein and lipase activity. The results demonstrate that shelf stability of wheat germ was achieved by inactivation of lipase at doses of γ-irradiation greater than 12 kGy. - Highlights: Ø γ-irradiation was found to inactivate Lipase present in Wheat Germ. Ø The treatment did not result in significant changes in Total Ash, Moisture and Protein Content of Wheat Germ. Ø The irradiation at 30 kGy resulted in 31.2 % inactivation of Lipase in Wheat Germ

  20. The pulsed light inactivation of veterinary relevant microbial biofilms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results show that both Cryptosporidium and Giardia attach to biofilms in large numbers (100-1000 oo/cysts) in as little as 72 hours. Pulsed light successfully inactivated all test species (Listeria, Salmonella, Bacillus, Escherichia) in planktonic and biofilm form with an increase in inactivation for every increase in UV dose.

  1. Comparative analysis on inactivation kinetics of between piezotolerant and piezosensitive mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under combinations of high hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuki; Kuwabara, Yuki; Kuwabara, Wataru; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Kanako; Hayashi, Mayumi; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru

    2017-12-01

    We previously obtained a pressure-tolerant (piezotolerant) and a pressure sensitive (piezosensitive) mutant strain, under ambient temperature, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain KA31a. The inactivation kinetics of these mutants were analyzed at 150 to 250MPa with 4 to 40°C. By a multiple regression analysis, the pressure and temperature dependency of the inactivation rate constants k values of both mutants, as well as the parent strain KA31a, were well approximated with high correlation coefficients (0.92 to 0.95). For both mutants, as well as strain KA31a, the lowest k value was shown at a low pressure levels with around ambient temperature. The k value approximately increased with increase in pressure level, and with increase and decrease in temperature. The piezosensitive mutant strain a924E1 showed piezosensitivity at all pressure and temperature levels, compared with the parent strain KA31a. In contrast, the piezotolerant mutant strain a2568D8 showed piezotolerance at 4 to 20°C, but did not show significant piezotolerance at 40°C. These results of the variable influence of temperature on pressure inactivation of these strains would be important for better understanding of piezosensitive and piezotolerant mechanisms, as well as the pressure inactivation mechanism of S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inactivation of a solid-state detergent protease by hydrogen peroxide vapor and humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biran, Suzan; Jensen, Anker Degn; Kiil, Søren

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study on solid-state stability of a detergent protease (Savinase®) is reported. The inactivation kinetics of technical grade enzyme powder was determined as a function of gas phase H2O2 concentration and humidity by employing a quick assay running over few hours instead of several...... weeks as typical in industry. The results indicated that enzymes adsorbed significant amounts of moisture and H2O2 during exposure. The amount of adsorbed H2O2 did not depend on humidity in the gas stream, which implied that water and H2O2 were not competing for the same adsorption sites. Inactivation...... of the solid-state enzyme was caused by the mutual effect of increasing hydration and H2O2 (g) concentration. No auto-proteolytic activity or covalently bound aggregate formation was detected. A simple mechanism for solid-state enzyme oxidation was proposed and the kinetic parameters in the resulting rate...

  3. Mechanism-Based Classification of PAH Mixtures to Predict Carcinogenic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, Susan C; Siddens, Lisbeth K; Krueger, Sharon K; Larkin, Andrew J; Löhr, Christiane V; Williams, David E; Baird, William M; Waters, Katrina M

    2015-07-01

    We have previously shown that relative potency factors and DNA adduct measurements are inadequate for predicting carcinogenicity of certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH mixtures, particularly those that function through alternate pathways or exhibit greater promotional activity compared to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Therefore, we developed a pathway-based approach for classification of tumor outcome after dermal exposure to PAH/mixtures. FVB/N mice were exposed to dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), BaP, or environmental PAH mixtures (Mix 1-3) following a 2-stage initiation/promotion skin tumor protocol. Resulting tumor incidence could be categorized by carcinogenic potency as DBC > BaP = Mix2 = Mix3 > Mix1 = Control, based on statistical significance. Gene expression profiles measured in skin of mice collected 12 h post-initiation were compared with tumor outcome for identification of short-term bioactivity profiles. A Bayesian integration model was utilized to identify biological pathways predictive of PAH carcinogenic potential during initiation. Integration of probability matrices from four enriched pathways (P PAH mixtures. These data further provide a 'source-to-outcome' model that could be used to predict PAH interactions during tumorigenesis and provide an example of how mode-of-action-based risk assessment could be employed for environmental PAH mixtures. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The Potential Role of Cache Mechanism for Complicated Design Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriyasu, Hirokawa; Fujita, Kikuo

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential role of cache mechanism for complicated design optimization While design optimization is an application of mathematical programming techniques to engineering design problems over numerical computation, its progress has been coevolutionary. The trend in such progress indicates that more complicated applications become the next target of design optimization beyond growth of computational resources. As the progress in the past two decades had required response surface techniques, decomposition techniques, etc., any new framework must be introduced for the future of design optimization methods. This paper proposes a possibility of what we call cache mechanism for mediating the coming challenge and briefly demonstrates some promises in the idea of Voronoi diagram based cumulative approximation as an example of its implementation, development of strict robust design, extension of design optimization for product variety

  5. Inactivation of E-coli O157 : H7 in apple cider by ozone at various temperatures and concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenstrup, Lotte Dock

    2004-01-01

    of dissolved ozone of about 5-6 mg/L at 20C, before the on-set of E. coli O157:H7 inactivation in the cider. Total processing times, based on lag time plus 5D, ranged from about 4 to 14 min depending on temperature and ozone concentration. Overall, inactivation of E. coli O157:H7by ozone was fast enough...

  6. Casein Kinase 2 Reverses Tail-Independent Inactivation of Kinesin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Kinesin-1 is a plus-end microtubule-based motor, and defects in kinesin-based transport are linked to diseases including neurodegeneration. Kinesin can auto-inhibit via a head-tail interaction, but is believed to be active otherwise. Here we report a tail-independent inactivation of kinesin, reversible by the disease-relevant signalling protein, casein kinase 2 (CK2). The majority of initially active kinesin (native or tail-less) loses its ability to interact with microtubules in vitro, and CK2 reverses this inactivation (approximately fourfold) without altering kinesin's single motor properties. This activation pathway does not require motor phosphorylation, and is independent of head-tail auto-inhibition. In cultured mammalian cells, reducing CK2 expression, but not its kinase activity, decreases the force required to stall lipid droplet transport, consistent with a decreased number of active kinesin motors. Our results (Nat. Commun., 3:754, 2012) provide the first direct evidence of a protein kinase upregulating kinesin-based transport, and suggest a novel pathway for regulating the activity of cargo-bound kinesin. Work supported by NIGMS grants GM64624 to SPG, GM74830-06A1 to LH, GM76516 to LB, NS048501 to SJK, and AHA grant 825278F to JX.

  7. DNA aptamer functionalized gold nanostructures for molecular recognition and photothermal inactivation of methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Yusufbeyoglu, Sadi; Yılmaz, Vedat; McLamore, Eric S; Ildız, Nilay; Ülgen, Ahmet

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we report the development of DNA aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Apt@Au NPs) and gold nanorods (Apt@Au NRs) for inactivation of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with targeted photothermal therapy (PTT). Although both Apt@Au NPs and Apt@Au NRs specifically bind to MRSA cells, Apt@Au NPs and Apt@Au NRs inactivated ∼5% and over 95% of the cells,respectively through PTT. This difference in inactivation was based on the relatively high longitudinal absorption of near-infrared (NIR) radiation and strong photothermal conversion capability for the Apt@Au NRs compared to the Apt@Au NPs. The Au NRs served as a nanoplatform for the loading of thiolated aptamer and also provided multivalent effects for increasing binding strength and affinity to MRSA. Our results indicate that the type of aptamer and the degree of multivalent effect(s) are important factors for MRSA inactivation efficiency in PTT. We show that the Apt@Au NRs are a very effective and promising nanosystem for specific cell recognition and in vitro PTT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors affecting the In Vitro inactivation of adolase by x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintiliani, M.; Boccacci, M.

    1962-08-15

    The influence of urea and of various protective compounds on the in vitro inactivation of aldolase by x rays was studied. Low concentrations of urea protect the enzyme from the inactivation, whereas high concentrations, able to induce an unfolding of the protein molecule, increase the degree inactivation by a given dose of radiation. Cysteamine, cystamine, aminoethyl-isothio-uronium, and glutathione, all protect the aldolase in solution from the inactivation by x rays. Cystamine is as protective as cysteamine, in equimolecular concentrations, when high inactivation levels are reached. No protection can be demonstrated when the aldolase, after incubation with the tested compounds, is precipitated and redissolved in a new medium before irradiation. Nevertheless, with S/sup 35/ labeled cystamine, it can be demonstrated that at least seven residues of cysteamine are bound to each aldolase molecule. The protective power of glutathione is reduced by a factor of about 0.2 in the presence of 4 M urea. The possible implications of these findings are discussed. (auth)

  9. Comparison of glycerolisation with cryopreservation methods on HIV-1 inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Baare, J.; Pagnon, J.; Cameron, P.; Vardaxis, N.; Middlekoop, E.; Crowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    Cryopreservation and glycerolisation are two successful long-term preservation methods for human cadaveric donor skin, which is used in the treatment of bum patients. High concentrations of glycerol has been shown to be antibacterial and virucidal. Because fear of possible transmission of HIV-1 following allograft transplantation, this study was undertaken to investigate whether HIV can be effectively eliminated from skin explants. HIV-1 Ba-L, which has been shown to infect monocytes in skin explants and also dendritic cells, was. For the experiments we used cell-free virus, exogenously HIV infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and exogenously HIV infected cadaver split skin. Different concentrations of glycerol at various temperatures and the glycerolisation procedure as used by the Euro Skin Bank were used to determine the effects on HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity. For the cryopreservation technique we used 10% DMSO and a controlled rate freezer. HIV-1 Ba-L transfer was determined by adding uninfected PBMCs to the infected material and reverse transcriptase was measured. Cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by 50% glycerol but was effectively inactivated within 30 minutes by 70% and 85% glycerol at 4 degree C, room temperature and 37 degree C. In contrast, cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by cryopreservation. Most importantly, we have shown that HIV-1 Ba-L present in split skin is inactivated by incubating skin in 70% glycerol for three hours at 37-C. HIV in exogenously infected skin was not inactivated by cryopreservation. High concentrations of glycerol effectively inactivates free HIV-1 Ba-L and intracellular HIV-1 Ba-L. Also the current glycerolisation procedure carried out by the Euro Skin Bank effectively inactivates infectious virus. However, the cryopreservation technique did not show any reduction in HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity

  10. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijkeren, Engeline; Schink, Anne-Kathrin; Roberts, Marilyn C; Wang, Yang; Schwarz, Stefan

    During the past decades resistance to virtually all antimicrobial agents has been observed in bacteria of animal origin. This chapter describes in detail the mechanisms so far encountered for the various classes of antimicrobial agents. The main mechanisms include enzymatic inactivation by either

  11. Epigenetic inactivation of CHFR in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Minoru; Sasaki, Yasushi; Satoh, Ayumi; Ogi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Jair, Kam-Wing; Schuebel, Kornel E; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2003-06-24

    Cell-cycle checkpoints controlling the orderly progression through mitosis are frequently disrupted in human cancers. One such checkpoint, entry into metaphase, is regulated by the CHFR gene encoding a protein possessing forkhead-associated and RING finger domains as well as ubiquitin-ligase activity. Although defects in this checkpoint have been described, the molecular basis and prevalence of CHFR inactivation in human tumors are still not fully understood. To address this question, we analyzed the pattern of CHFR expression in a number of human cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We found CpG methylation-dependent silencing of CHFR expression in 45% of cancer cell lines, 40% of primary colorectal cancers, 53% of colorectal adenomas, and 30% of primary head and neck cancers. Expression of CHFR was precisely correlated with both CpG methylation and deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the CpG-rich regulatory region. Moreover, CpG methylation and thus silencing of CHFR depended on the activities of two DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3b, as their genetic inactivation restored CHFR expression. Finally, cells with CHFR methylation had an intrinsically high mitotic index when treated with microtubule inhibitor. This means that cells in which CHFR was epigenetically inactivated constitute loss-of-function alleles for mitotic checkpoint control. Taken together, these findings shed light on a pathway by which mitotic checkpoint is bypassed in cancer cells and suggest that inactivation of checkpoint genes is much more widespread than previously suspected.

  12. Role of Temperature and Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter on Inactivation Kinetics of Rotavirus and Bacteriophage MS2 by Solar Irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Romero, Ofelia C.

    2011-12-15

    Although the sunlight-mediated inactivation of viruses has been recognized as an important process that controls surface water quality, the mechanisms of virus inactivation by sunlight are not yet clearly understood. We investigated the synergistic role of temperature and Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM), an exogenous sensitizer, for sunlight-mediated inactivation of porcine rotavirus and MS2 bacteriophage. Upon irradiation by a full spectrum of simulated sunlight in the absence of SRNOM and in the temperature range of 14-42 °C, high inactivation rate constants, kobs, of MS2 (k obs ≤ 3.8 h-1 or 1-log10 over 0.6 h) and rotavirus (kobs ≤ 11.8 h-1 or ∼1-log10 over 0.2 h) were measured. A weak temperature (14-42 °C) dependence of kobs values was observed for both viruses irradiated by the full sunlight spectrum. Under the same irradiation condition, the presence of SRNOM reduced the inactivation of both viruses due to attenuation of lower wavelengths of the simulated sunlight. For rotavirus and MS2 solutions irradiated by only UVA and visible light in the absence of SRNOM, inactivation kinetics were slow (kobs < 0.3 h-1 or <1-log10 unit reduction over 7 h) and temperature-independent for the range considered. Conversely, under UVA and visible light irradiation and in the presence of SRNOM, temperature-dependent inactivation of MS2 was observed. For rotavirus, the SRNOM-mediated exogenous inactivation was only important at temperatures >33 °C, with low rotavirus kobs values (kobs ≈ 0.2 h-1; 1-log10 unit reduction over 12 h) for the temperature range of 14-33 °C. These kobs values increased to 0.5 h-1 at 43 °C and 1.5 h-1 (1-log10 reduction over 1.6 h) at 50 °C. While SRNOM-mediated exogenous inactivation of MS2 was triggered by singlet oxygen, the presence of hydrogen peroxide was important for rotavirus inactivation in the 40-50 °C range. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. UK-18,892: resistance to modification by aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R J; Brammer, K W; Cheeseman, H E; Jevons, S

    1978-12-01

    UK-18,892, a new semisynthetic aminoglycoside, was active against bacteria possessing aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes, with the exception of some known to possess AAC(6') or AAD(4') enzymes. This activity has been rationalized by using cell-free extracts of bacteria containing known inactivating enzymes, where it was shown that UK-18,892 was not a substrate for the APH(3'), AAD(2''), AAC(3), and AAC(2') enzymes. It was also demonstrated that UK-18,892 protected mice against lethal infections caused by organisms possessing aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes.

  14. Novel Fluorescent Microemulsion: Probing Properties, Investigating Mechanism, and Unveiling Potential Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Mengna; Dang, Leping; Liu, Tiankuo; Guo, Yun; Wang, Zhanzhong

    2017-08-09

    Nanoscale microemulsions have been utilized as delivery carriers for nutraceuticals and active biological drugs. Herein, we designed and synthesized a novel oil in water (O/W) fluorescent microemulsion based on isoamyl acetate, polyoxyethylene castor oil EL (CrEL), and water. The microemulsion emitted bright blue fluorescence, thus exhibiting its potential for active drug detection with label-free strategy. The microemulsion exhibited excitation-dependent emission and distinct red shift with longer excitation wavelengths. Lifetime and quantum yield of fluorescent microemulsion were 2.831 ns and 5.0%, respectively. An excellent fluorescent stability of the microemulsion was confirmed by altering pH, ionic strength, temperature, and time. Moreover, we proposed a probable mechanism of fluorochromic phenomenon, in connection with the aromatic ring structure of polyoxyethylene ether substituent in CrEL. Based on our findings, we concluded that this new fluorescent microemulsion is a promising drug carrier that can facilitate active drug detection with a label-free strategy. Although further research is required to understand the exact mechanism behind its fluorescence property, this work provided valuable guidance to develop new biosensors based on fluorescent microemulsion.

  15. Effects of background fluid on the efficiency of inactivating yeast with non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Hyo Ryu

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure has been actively applied to sterilization. However, its efficiency for inactivating microorganisms often varies depending on microbial species and environments surrounding the microorganisms. We investigated the influence of environmental factors (surrounding media on the efficiency of microbial inactivation by plasma using an eukaryotic model microbe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to elucidate the mechanisms for differential efficiency of sterilization by plasma. Yeast cells treated with plasma in water showed the most severe damage in viability and cell morphology as well as damage to membrane lipids, and genomic DNA. Cells in saline were less damaged compared to those in water, and those in YPD (Yeast extract, Peptone, Dextrose were least impaired. HOG1 mitogen activated protein kinase was activated in cells exposed to plasma in water and saline. Inactivation of yeast cells in water and saline was due to the acidification of the solutions by plasma, but higher survival of yeast cells treated in saline may have resulted from the additional effect related to salt strength. Levels of hydroxyl radical (OH· produced by plasma were the highest in water and the lowest in YPD. This may have resulted in differential inactivation of yeast cells in water, saline, and YPD by plasma. Taken together, our data suggest that the surrounding media (environment can crucially affect the outcomes of yeast cell plasma treatment because plasma modulates vital properties of media, and the toxic nature of plasma can also be altered by the surrounding media.

  16. Involvement of Atm and Trp53 in neural cell loss due to Terf2 inactivation during mouse brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jusik; Choi, Inseo; Lee, Youngsoo

    2017-11-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity is one of the critical features for proper neurodevelopment and inhibition of neurological diseases. The signals from both ATM and ATR to TP53 are well-known mechanisms to remove neural cells with DNA damage during neurogenesis. Here we examined the involvement of Atm and Atr in genomic instability due to Terf2 inactivation during mouse brain development. Selective inactivation of Terf2 in neural progenitors induced apoptosis, resulting in a complete loss of the brain structure. This neural loss was rescued partially in both Atm and Trp53 deficiency, but not in an Atr-deficient background in the mouse. Atm inactivation resulted in incomplete brain structures, whereas p53 deficiency led to the formation of multinucleated giant neural cells and the disruption of the brain structure. These giant neural cells disappeared in Lig4 deficiency. These data demonstrate ATM and TP53 are important for the maintenance of telomere homeostasis and the surveillance of telomere dysfunction during neurogenesis.

  17. Inactivation and stability of viral diagnostic reagents treated by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, L.A.; Freeman, C.Y.; Hall, H.E.; Forrester, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply the pertinent findings from gamma inactivation of virus infectivity to the production of high quality diagnostic reagents. A Gammacell 220 was used to subject 38 viruses grown in either susceptible tissue cultures or embryonated chicken eggs to various doses of gamma radiation from a cobalt-60 source. The radiation required to reduce viral infectivity was 0.42 to 3.7 megarads (Mrad). The effect of gamma treatment on the antigenic reactivity of reagents for the complement fixation (CF), hemagglutination (HA) and neuraminadase assays was determined. Influenza antigens inactivated with 1.7 Mrad displayed comparable potency, sensitivity, specificity and stability to those inactivated by standard procedures with beta-propiolactone (BPL). Significant inactivation of influenza N1 and B neuraminidase occurred with >2.4 Mrad radiation at temperatures above 4 0 C. All 38 viruses were inactivated, and CF or HA antigens were prepared successfully. Antigenic potency remained stable with all antigens for 3 years and with 83% after 5 years storage. Influenza HA antigens evaluated after 9 years of storage demonstrated 86% stability. Gamma radiation is safer than chemical inactivation procedures and is a reliable and effective replacement for BPL in preparing diagnostic reagents. (author)

  18. Inactivation and stability of viral diagnostic reagents treated by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, L A; Freeman, C Y; Hall, H E; Forrester, B D [Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA (USA)

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this study was to apply the pertinent findings from gamma inactivation of virus infectivity to the production of high quality diagnostic reagents. A Gammacell 220 was used to subject 38 viruses grown in either susceptible tissue cultures or embryonated chicken eggs to various doses of gamma radiation from a cobalt-60 source. The radiation required to reduce viral infectivity was 0.42 to 3.7 megarads (Mrad). The effect of gamma treatment on the antigenic reactivity of reagents for the complement fixation (CF), hemagglutination (HA) and neuraminadase assays was determined. Influenza antigens inactivated with 1.7 Mrad displayed comparable potency, sensitivity, specificity and stability to those inactivated by standard procedures with beta-propiolactone (BPL). Significant inactivation of influenza N1 and B neuraminidase occurred with >2.4 Mrad radiation at temperatures above 4{sup 0}C. All 38 viruses were inactivated, and CF or HA antigens were prepared successfully. Antigenic potency remained stable with all antigens for 3 years and with 83% after 5 years storage. Influenza HA antigens evaluated after 9 years of storage demonstrated 86% stability. Gamma radiation is safer than chemical inactivation procedures and is a reliable and effective replacement for BPL in preparing diagnostic reagents. (author).

  19. Development of inactivated-local isolate vaccine for infectious bronchitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darminto

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis (IB is an acute highly contagious viral respiratory disease of poultry caused by coronavirus. The disease causes high mortality in young chicks, reduce body weight gain in broilers and remarkable drop in egg production. IB can only be controlled by vaccination, but due to the antigenic variation among serotypes of IB viruses, the effective IB vaccine should be prepared from local isolates. The aim of this research is to develop inactivated IB vaccine derived from local IB isolates. Local isolates of IB viruses designated as I-37, I-269 and PTS-III were propagated respectively in specific pathogen free (SPF chicken eggs, the viruses then were inactivated by formaline at final concentration of 1:1,000. Subsequently, the inactivated viruses were mixed and emulsified in oil emulsion adjuvant with sorbitant mono-oleic as an emulsifier. The vaccine then was tested for its safety, potency and efficacy in broiler chickens. Birds inoculated twice with a two-week interval by inactivated vaccine did not show any adverse reaction, either systemic or local reaction. The inoculated birds developed antibody responses with high titre, while antibody of the control birds remain negative. In addition, efficacy test which was conducted in broilers demonstrated that birds vaccinated by live-commercial vaccine and boosted three weeks later by Balitvet inactivated vaccine showed high level of antibody production which provided high level of protection against challenged virus (76% against I-37, 92% against I-269 and 68% against PTS-III challenge viruses. From this study, it can be concluded that inactivated local IB vaccine is considered to be safe, potent and efficacious. The vaccine stimulates high titre of antibody responses, which provide high level of protection against challenged viruses.

  20. Selective removal and inactivation of bacteria by nanoparticle composites prepared by surface modification of montmorillonite with quaternary ammonium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Rowaida K S

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to prepare new nanocomposites with antibacterial activities by surface modification of montmorillonite using quaternary ammonium compounds that are widely applied as disinfectants and antiseptics in food-processing environments. The intercalation of four quaternary ammonium compounds namely benzalkonium chloride, cetylpyridinium chloride monohydrate, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, tetraethylammonium chloride hydrate into montmorillonite layers was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The antibacterial influences of the modified clay variants against important foodborne pathogens differed based on modifiers quantities, microbial cell densities, and length of contact. Elution experiments through 0.1 g of the studied montmorillonite variants indicated that Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, and Listeria monocytogenes were the most sensitive strains. 1 g of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide intercalated montmorillonites demonstrated maximum inactivation of L. monocytogenes populations, with 4.5 log c.f.u./ml units of reduction. In adsorption experiments, 0.1 g of tetraethylammonium chloride hydrate montmorillonite variants significantly reduced the growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes, and S. aureus populations by 5.77, 6.33, and 7.38 log units respectively. Growth of wide variety of microorganisms was strongly inhibited to undetectable levels (benzalkonium chloride montmorillonite variants. This investigation highlights that reduction in counts of microbial populations adsorbed to the new nanocomposites was substantially different from that in elution experiments, where interactions of nanocomposites with bacteria were specific and more complex than simple ability to inactivate. Treatment columns packed with modified variants maintained their inactivation capacity to the growth of Salmonella Tennessee and S. aureus populations after 48 h of incubation at room temperature with maximum reductions

  1. Modelling fungal solid-state fermentation: The role of inactivation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.P.; Sonsbeek, H.M. van; Knol, W.; Tramper, J.; Geelhoed, W.; Peeters, M.; Rinzema, A.

    1999-01-01

    The theoretical mathematical models described in this paper are used to evaluate the effects of fungal biomass inactivation kinetics on a non- isothermal tray solid-state fermentation (SSF). The inactivation kinetics, derived from previously reported experiments done under isothermal conditions and

  2. A specific inactivator of mammalian C'4 isolated from nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J A

    1969-08-01

    A material which specifically inactivates mammalian C'4 was isolated from low ionic strength precipitates of nurse shark serum. The C'4 inactivator was not detected in whole serum. The conditions of its generation and its immunoelectrophoretic behavior seem to indicate that it is an enzymatically formed cleavage product of a precursor contained in whole shark serum. The inactivator was partially purified and characterized. It had an S-value of 3.3 (sucrose gradient) which was in agreement with its retardation on gel filtration, was stable between pH 5.0 and 10.0, had a half-life of 5 min at 56 degrees C, pH 7.5, was inactivated by trypsin and was nontoxic. Its powerful anticomplementary activity in vitro and in vivo was solely due to the rapid inactivation of C'4; no other complement components were affected. No cofactor requirement was observed for the equally rapid inactivation of highly purified human and guinea pig C'4. The kinetics of C'4 inactivation and TAME hydrolysis, the greater anodic mobility of inactivated human C'4, and the influence of temperature on the rate of inactivation suggest that the inactivator is an enzyme and C'4 its substrate. This conclusion was supported by the more recent detection of a split product of C'4. Intravenous administration of the C'4 inactivator could prevent lethal Forssman shock and suppress the Arthus reaction in guinea pigs; it prolonged significantly the rejection time of renal xenografts but had no detectable effect on passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Anaphylatoxin could be generated in C'4 depleted guinea pig serum with the cobra venom factor, but not with immune precipitates. The possible relationship between C'1 esterase and the C'4 inactivator is discussed on the basis of similarities and dissimilarities.

  3. Inactivation of carbenicillin by some radioresistant mutant strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahiera, T.S.; Mahmoud, M.I.; Bashandy, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Sensitivity test of five bacterial species to carbenicillin was performed microbiologically. The bacterial species were previously isolated from high level radiation environment. All the studied species could either highly decrease the antibiotic activity or even inactivate it completely. Detailed study of the inactivation of carbenicillin by the radioresistant mutant strains B. Laterosporus, B. firmus and M. roseus was performed, in the present study. Using high performace liquid chromatography technique. The gram-positive m. roseus mutant strain seemed to be the most active mutant in degrading the antibiotic. The left over of the antibiotic attained a value of 9% of the original amount after 14 day incubation of the antibiotic with this mutant strain, while the value of the left over reached 36% and 32% after the same period of incubation with the mutants B. laterosporus and B. firmus respectively. In the case of bacillus species, the degradation of the antibiotic started at the same moment when it was added to the bacterial cultures. This fact may indicate that the inactivation of the studied antibiotic by these bacillus species was due to extracellular enzymes extracted rapidly in the surrounding medium. In the case of M. roseus the inactivation process started later. after the addition of the antibiotic to the mutant culture

  4. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) more frequently harbored loss-of-function mutations in males (based on false discovery rate <0.1), compared to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (P<0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence compared to males across a variety of tumor types. PMID:27869828

  5. Tumor-suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E; Cleary, John P; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J; Hess, Julian M; Gimelbrant, Alexander A; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X-chromosome genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative 'escape from X-inactivation tumor-suppressor' (EXITS) genes, we examined somatic alterations from >4,100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) X-chromosome genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) harbored loss-of-function mutations more frequently in males (based on a false discovery rate < 0.1), in comparison to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (Fisher's exact P < 0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence in females as compared to males across a variety of tumor types.

  6. PEF and UV combined system for pathogen microorganisms inactivation in liquid food products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramariuc, R [Competence Center in Electrostatics and Electrotechnologies, Bucharest (Romania); Popa, M; Mitelut, A; Geicu, M [University of Agronomic Science and Veterinary Medicine, Bucharest (Romania); Tudorache, A; Brinduse, E; Kontek, A; Fotescu, L [Research and Development Institute in Viticulture and Vinification Valea Calugareasca (Romania); Cramariuc, B [IT Center for Science and Technology, Bucharest (Romania); Nisiparu, L, E-mail: raducramariuc@yahoo.com [Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-06-23

    Pulsed electrical field (PEF) treatment is a non-thermal food preservation technology based on the use of the electrical field in impulses applied in order to inactivate and control pathogen microorganisms in foods. This technology is highly appreciated for its ability to prolong the shelf life of the treated product without the use of heat and also for its ability to preserve the product's sensory qualities and nutritional value as well as for the microbiological control of the treated products. This paper presents the PEF and UV treatment methods, or a combination between the two, for microbe inactivation in liquid products. The experiments were carried out using yeasts, lactic bacteria and acetic bacteria in the following systems: stand-alone treatments (PEF or UV) or in combination (UV+PEF or PEF+UV). The results of these experiments showed that one can obtain total inactivation of microorganisms using the combined UV+PEF system, thus leading to the possibility of increasing liquid food products quality as compared to the quality obtained using thermal pasteurization.

  7. PEF and UV combined system for pathogen microorganisms inactivation in liquid food products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramariuc, R.; Popa, M.; Tudorache, A.; Brînduşe, E.; Kontek, A.; Mitelut, A.; Fotescu, L.; Cramariuc, B.; Geicu, M.; Nisiparu, L.

    2011-06-01

    Pulsed electrical field (PEF) treatment is a non-thermal food preservation technology based on the use of the electrical field in impulses applied in order to inactivate and control pathogen microorganisms in foods. This technology is highly appreciated for its ability to prolong the shelf life of the treated product without the use of heat and also for its ability to preserve the product's sensory qualities and nutritional value as well as for the microbiological control of the treated products. This paper presents the PEF and UV treatment methods, or a combination between the two, for microbe inactivation in liquid products. The experiments were carried out using yeasts, lactic bacteria and acetic bacteria in the following systems: stand-alone treatments (PEF or UV) or in combination (UV+PEF or PEF+UV). The results of these experiments showed that one can obtain total inactivation of microorganisms using the combined UV+PEF system, thus leading to the possibility of increasing liquid food products quality as compared to the quality obtained using thermal pasteurization.

  8. PEF and UV combined system for pathogen microorganisms inactivation in liquid food products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramariuc, R; Popa, M; Mitelut, A; Geicu, M; Tudorache, A; Brinduse, E; Kontek, A; Fotescu, L; Cramariuc, B; Nisiparu, L

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed electrical field (PEF) treatment is a non-thermal food preservation technology based on the use of the electrical field in impulses applied in order to inactivate and control pathogen microorganisms in foods. This technology is highly appreciated for its ability to prolong the shelf life of the treated product without the use of heat and also for its ability to preserve the product's sensory qualities and nutritional value as well as for the microbiological control of the treated products. This paper presents the PEF and UV treatment methods, or a combination between the two, for microbe inactivation in liquid products. The experiments were carried out using yeasts, lactic bacteria and acetic bacteria in the following systems: stand-alone treatments (PEF or UV) or in combination (UV+PEF or PEF+UV). The results of these experiments showed that one can obtain total inactivation of microorganisms using the combined UV+PEF system, thus leading to the possibility of increasing liquid food products quality as compared to the quality obtained using thermal pasteurization.

  9. Inactivation of microorganisms within collagen gel biomatrices using pulsed electric field treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Sarah; Maclean, Michelle; Anderson, John G; MacGregor, Scott J; Grant, M Helen

    2012-02-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment was examined as a potential decontamination method for tissue engineering biomatrices by determining the susceptibility of a range of microorganisms whilst within a collagen gel. High intensity pulsed electric fields were applied to collagen gel biomatrices containing either Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the spores of Aspergillus niger. The results established varying degrees of microbial PEF susceptibility. When high initial cell densities (10(6)-10(7) CFU ml(-1)) were PEF treated with 100 pulses at 45 kV cm(-1), the greatest log reduction was achieved with S. cerevisiae (~6.5 log(10) CFU ml(-1)) and the lowest reduction achieved with S. epidermidis (~0.5 log(10) CFU ml(-1)). The results demonstrate that inactivation is influenced by the intrinsic properties of the microorganism treated. Further investigations are required to optimise the microbial inactivation kinetics associated with PEF treatment of collagen gel biomatrices.

  10. Thermodynamic coupling between activation and inactivation gating in potassium channels revealed by free energy molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Albert C; Cuello, Luis G; Perozo, Eduardo; Roux, Benoît

    2011-12-01

    The amount of ionic current flowing through K(+) channels is determined by the interplay between two separate time-dependent processes: activation and inactivation gating. Activation is concerned with the stimulus-dependent opening of the main intracellular gate, whereas inactivation is a spontaneous conformational transition of the selectivity filter toward a nonconductive state occurring on a variety of timescales. A recent analysis of multiple x-ray structures of open and partially open KcsA channels revealed the mechanism by which movements of the inner activation gate, formed by the inner helices from the four subunits of the pore domain, bias the conformational changes at the selectivity filter toward a nonconductive inactivated state. This analysis highlighted the important role of Phe103, a residue located along the inner helix, near the hinge position associated with the opening of the intracellular gate. In the present study, we use free energy perturbation molecular dynamics simulations (FEP/MD) to quantitatively elucidate the thermodynamic basis for the coupling between the intracellular gate and the selectivity filter. The results of the FEP/MD calculations are in good agreement with experiments, and further analysis of the repulsive, van der Waals dispersive, and electrostatic free energy contributions reveals that the energetic basis underlying the absence of inactivation in the F103A mutation in KcsA is the absence of the unfavorable steric interaction occurring with the large Ile100 side chain in a neighboring subunit when the intracellular gate is open and the selectivity filter is in a conductive conformation. Macroscopic current analysis shows that the I100A mutant indeed relieves inactivation in KcsA, but to a lesser extent than the F103A mutant.

  11. Inactivation of Clostridium difficile in sewage sludge by anaerobic thermophilic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changyun; Salsali, Hamidreza; Weese, Scott; Warriner, Keith

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in community-associated Clostridium difficile infections with biosolids derived from wastewater treatment being identified as one potential source. The current study evaluated the efficacy of thermophilic digestion in decreasing levels of C. difficile ribotype 078 associated with sewage sludge. Five isolates of C. difficile 078 were introduced (final density of 5 log CFU/g) into digested sludge and subjected to anaerobic digestion at mesophilic (36 or 42 °C) or thermophilic (55 °C) temperatures for up to 60 days. It was found that mesophilic digestion at 36 °C did not result in a significant reduction in C. difficile spore levels. In contrast, thermophilic sludge digestion reduced endospore levels at a rate of 0.19-2.68 log CFU/day, depending on the strain tested. The mechanism of lethality was indirect - by stimulating germination then inactivating the resultant vegetative cells. Acidification of sludge by adding acetic acid (6 g/L) inhibited the germination of spores regardless of the sludge digestion temperature. In conclusion, thermophilic digestion can be applied to reduce C. difficile in biosolids, thereby reducing the environmental burden of the enteric pathogen.

  12. Optimizing supercritical carbon dioxide in the inactivation of bacteria in clinical solid waste by using response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Md. Sohrab; Nik Ab Rahman, Nik Norulaini; Balakrishnan, Venugopal; Alkarkhi, Abbas F.M.; Ahmad Rajion, Zainul; Ab Kadir, Mohd Omar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Supercritical carbon dioxide sterilization of clinical solid waste. • Inactivation of bacteria in clinical solid waste using supercritical carbon dioxide. • Reduction of the hazardous exposure of clinical solid waste. • Optimization of the supercritical carbon dioxide experimental conditions. - Abstract: Clinical solid waste (CSW) poses a challenge to health care facilities because of the presence of pathogenic microorganisms, leading to concerns in the effective sterilization of the CSW for safe handling and elimination of infectious disease transmission. In the present study, supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO 2 ) was applied to inactivate gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, and gram-negative Escherichia coli in CSW. The effects of SC-CO 2 sterilization parameters such as pressure, temperature, and time were investigated and optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). Results showed that the data were adequately fitted into the second-order polynomial model. The linear quadratic terms and interaction between pressure and temperature had significant effects on the inactivation of S. aureus, E. coli, E. faecalis, and B. subtilis in CSW. Optimum conditions for the complete inactivation of bacteria within the experimental range of the studied variables were 20 MPa, 60 °C, and 60 min. The SC-CO 2 -treated bacterial cells, observed under a scanning electron microscope, showed morphological changes, including cell breakage and dislodged cell walls, which could have caused the inactivation. This espouses the inference that SC-CO 2 exerts strong inactivating effects on the bacteria present in CSW, and has the potential to be used in CSW management for the safe handling and recycling-reuse of CSW materials

  13. Optimizing supercritical carbon dioxide in the inactivation of bacteria in clinical solid waste by using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Md. Sohrab [Department of Environmental Technology, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Nik Ab Rahman, Nik Norulaini [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Balakrishnan, Venugopal [Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Alkarkhi, Abbas F.M. [Department of Environmental Technology, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Ahmad Rajion, Zainul [School of Dental Science, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia); Ab Kadir, Mohd Omar, E-mail: akmomar@usm.my [Department of Environmental Technology, School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Supercritical carbon dioxide sterilization of clinical solid waste. • Inactivation of bacteria in clinical solid waste using supercritical carbon dioxide. • Reduction of the hazardous exposure of clinical solid waste. • Optimization of the supercritical carbon dioxide experimental conditions. - Abstract: Clinical solid waste (CSW) poses a challenge to health care facilities because of the presence of pathogenic microorganisms, leading to concerns in the effective sterilization of the CSW for safe handling and elimination of infectious disease transmission. In the present study, supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO{sub 2}) was applied to inactivate gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, and gram-negative Escherichia coli in CSW. The effects of SC-CO{sub 2} sterilization parameters such as pressure, temperature, and time were investigated and optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). Results showed that the data were adequately fitted into the second-order polynomial model. The linear quadratic terms and interaction between pressure and temperature had significant effects on the inactivation of S. aureus, E. coli, E. faecalis, and B. subtilis in CSW. Optimum conditions for the complete inactivation of bacteria within the experimental range of the studied variables were 20 MPa, 60 °C, and 60 min. The SC-CO{sub 2}-treated bacterial cells, observed under a scanning electron microscope, showed morphological changes, including cell breakage and dislodged cell walls, which could have caused the inactivation. This espouses the inference that SC-CO{sub 2} exerts strong inactivating effects on the bacteria present in CSW, and has the potential to be used in CSW management for the safe handling and recycling-reuse of CSW materials.

  14. Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in phosphate buffered saline (PBS and milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng eDong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH opens up new areas for dynamic high pressure assisted thermal sterilization of liquids. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores are resistant to high isostatic pressure and temperature and were suggested as potential surrogate for high pressure thermal sterilization validation. B. amyloliquefaciens spores suspended in PBS buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0, low fat milk (1.5%, pH 6.7 and whole milk (3.5%, pH 6.7 at initial concentration of ~106 CFU/mL were subjected to UHPH treatments at 200, 300 and 350 MPa with an inlet temperature at ~80 °C. Thermal inactivation kinetics of B. amyloliquefaciens spores in PBS and milk were assessed with thin wall glass capillaries and modeled using mechanistic linear first order and Weibull models. The residence time during UHPH treatments was estimated to determine the contribution of temperature to spore inactivation by UHPH. No sublethal injury was detected after UHPH treatments using sodium chloride as selective component in the nutrient agar medium. The inactivation profiles of spores in PBS buffer and milk were compared and fat provided no clear protective effect for spores against treatments. Treatment at 200 MPa with valve temperatures lower than 125 °C caused no reduction of spores. A reduction of 3.5 log10 CFU/mL of B. amyloliquefaciens spores was achieved by treatment at 350 MPa with a valve temperature higher than 150 °C. The modeled thermal inactivation and observed inactivation during UHPH treatments suggest that temperature could be the main lethal effect driving inactivation.

  15. Efficacy of Inactivation of Human Enteroviruses by Multiple ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has been successfully used for treating a broad suite of pathogens without the concomitant formation of carcinogenic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, conventional mercury UV lamps have some practical limitations in water treatment applications, such as the inefficiency of energy consumption and more importantly potential mercury contamination upon disposal of the lamps. The recent invention of a novel light-emitting-diodes (LED) device generating germicidal UV wavelengths could eliminate the aforementioned limitations. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of multiple-wavelength UV LEDs for inactivating USEPA contaminant candidate list (CCL) RNA enteroviruses. Of 12 enterovirus species, serotype representatives of the four human enteric species (enterovirus A-D) such as coxsackievirus A10 (CVA10), echovirus 30 (Echo30), poliovirus 1 (PV1), and enterovirus 70 (EV70) respectively were selected as testing RNA viruses. Bench-scale performance evaluation was conducted using a collimated beam (CB) apparatus with LEDs emitting at 260 nm, 280 nm, and the combination of 260|280 nm together, as well as a monochromatic low-pressure (LP) UV lamp at 254 nm for comparison. The CB tests were performed with mixed stocks of four viruses. Infectious virus concentrations were determined using an integrated cell culture reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (ICC-RTqPCR). The 260 nm LED was most effective at inactivating all enteroviruses teste

  16. Inactivation of Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua in Milk by Combined Treatment with High Hydrostatic Pressure and the Lactoperoxidase System

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Graells, Cristina; Valckx, Caroline; Michiels, Chris W.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied inactivation of four strains each of Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua in milk by the combined use of high hydrostatic pressure and the lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide system as a potential mild food preservation method. The lactoperoxidase system alone exerted a bacteriostatic effect on both species for at least 24 h at room temperature, but none of the strains was inactivated. Upon high-pressure treatment in the presence of the lactoperoxidase system, different results were obtained for E. coli and L. innocua. For none of the E. coli strains did the lactoperoxidase system increase the inactivation compared to a treatment with high pressure alone. However, a strong synergistic interaction of both treatments was observed for L. innocua. Inactivation exceeding 7 decades was achieved for all strains with a mild treatment (400 MPa, 15 min, 20°C), which in the absence of the lactoperoxidase system caused only 2 to 5 decades of inactivation depending on the strain. Milk as a substrate was found to have a considerable effect protecting E. coli and L. innocua against pressure inactivation and reducing the effectiveness of the lactoperoxidase system under pressure on L. innocua. Time course experiments showed that L. innocua counts continued to decrease in the first hours after pressure treatment in the presence of the lactoperoxidase system. E. coli counts remained constant for at least 24 h, except after treatment at the highest pressure level (600 MPa, 15 min, 20°C), in which case, in the presence of the lactoperoxidase system, a transient decrease was observed, indicating sublethal injury rather than true inactivation. PMID:11010856

  17. 37 CFR 11.11 - Administrative suspension, inactivation, resignation, and readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative suspension, inactivation, resignation, and readmission. 11.11 Section 11.11 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED... Other Non-Patent Law § 11.11 Administrative suspension, inactivation, resignation, and readmission. (a...

  18. Immunogenicity of UV-inactivated measles virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahorska, R.; Mazur, N.; Korbecki, M.

    1978-01-01

    By means of the antigen extinction limit test it was shown that a triple dose vaccination of guinea pigs with UV-inactivated measles virus gave better results, than a single dose vaccination which was proved by the very low immunogenicity index. For both vaccination schemes (single and triple) the immune response was only sligthly influenced by a change of dose from 10 5 to 10 6 HadU 50 /ml or by the addition of aluminum adjuvant. In the antigen extinction limit test the antibody levels were determined by two methods (HIT and NT) the results of which were statistically equivalent. The UV-inactivated measles virus was also found to induce hemolysis-inhibiting antibodies. (orig.) [de

  19. Analysis of the dose-sparing effect of adjuvanted Sabin-inactivated poliovirus vaccine (sIPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuofan; Ding, Wenting; Guo, Qi; Liu, Ze; Zhu, Zhe; Song, Shaohui; Li, Weidong; Liao, Guoyang

    2018-03-30

    Sabin-based inactivated poliovirus vaccine(sIPV) is gradually replacing live-attenuated oral polio vaccine(OPV). Sabin-inactivated poliovirus vaccine(sIPV) has played a vital role in reducing economic burden of poliomyelitis and maintaining appropriate antibody levels in the population. However, due to its high cost and limited manufacturing capacity, sIPV cannot reach its full potential for global poliovirus eradication in developing countries. Therefore, to address this situation, we designed this study to evaluate the dose-sparing effects of AS03, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) admixed with sIPV in rats. Our results showed that a combination of 1/4-dose sIPV adjuvanted with AS03 or AS03 with BW006 provides a seroconversion rate similar to that of full-dose sIPV without adjuvant and that, this rate is 5-fold higher than that of 1/4-dose sIPV without adjuvant after the first immunization. The combination of AS03 or AS03 with BW006 as an adjuvant effectively reduced sIPV dose by at least 4-fold and induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Therefore, our study revealed that the combination of AS03 or AS03 with BW006 is a promising adjuvant for sIPV development.

  20. Influenza (flu) vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/flu.html CDC review information for Inactivated Influenza VIS: ...

  1. Quantum mechanical streamlines. I - Square potential barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Christoph, A. C.; Palke, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Exact numerical calculations are made for scattering of quantum mechanical particles hitting a square two-dimensional potential barrier (an exact analog of the Goos-Haenchen optical experiments). Quantum mechanical streamlines are plotted and found to be smooth and continuous, to have continuous first derivatives even through the classical forbidden region, and to form quantized vortices around each of the nodal points. A comparison is made between the present numerical calculations and the stationary wave approximation, and good agreement is found between both the Goos-Haenchen shifts and the reflection coefficients. The time-independent Schroedinger equation for real wavefunctions is reduced to solving a nonlinear first-order partial differential equation, leading to a generalization of the Prager-Hirschfelder perturbation scheme. Implications of the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics are discussed, and cases are cited where quantum and classical mechanical motions are identical.

  2. Inactivation disinfection property of Moringa Oleifera seed extract: optimization and kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, M. A.; Jami, M. S.; Hammed, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the statistical optimization study of disinfection inactivation parameters of defatted Moringa oleifera seed extract on Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial cells. Three level factorial design was used to estimate the optimum range and the kinetics of the inactivation process was also carried. The inactivation process involved comparing different disinfection models of Chicks-Watson, Collins-Selleck and Homs models. The results from analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the statistical optimization process revealed that only contact time was significant. The optimum disinfection range of the seed extract was 125 mg/L, 30 minutes and 120rpm agitation. At the optimum dose, the inactivation kinetics followed the Collin-Selleck model with coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.6320. This study is the first of its kind in determining the inactivation kinetics of pseudomonas aeruginosa using the defatted seed extract.

  3. Inactivation Effect of Antibiotic-Resistant Gene Using Chlorine Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Furukawa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the inactivation effects on the antibiotic-resistance gene (vanA of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE using chlorination, a disinfection method widely used in various water treatment facilities. Suspensions of VRE were prepared by adding VRE to phosphate-buffered saline, or the sterilized secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. The inactivation experiments were carried out at several chlorine concentrations and stirring time. Enterococci concentration and presence of vanA were determined. The enterococci concentration decreased as chlorine concentrations and stirring times increased, with more than 7.0 log reduction occurring under the following conditions: 40 min stirring at 0.5 mg Cl2/L, 20 min stirring at 1.0 mg Cl2/L, and 3 min stirring at 3.0 mg Cl2/L. In the inactivation experiment using VRE suspended in secondary effluent, the culturable enterococci required much higher chlorine concentration and longer treatment time for complete disinfection than the cases of suspension of VRE. However, vanA was detected in all chlorinated suspensions of VRE, even in samples where no enterococcal colonies were present on the medium agar plate. The chlorine disinfection was not able to destroy antibiotic-resistance genes, though it can inactivate and decrease bacterial counts of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB. Therefore, it was suggested that remaining ARB and/or antibiotic-resistance gene in inactivated bacterial cells after chlorine disinfection tank could be discharged into water environments.

  4. Radical inactivation of a biological sulphydryl molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.S.; Lal, M.; Gaucher, G.M.; Armstrong, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reactive species produced from the free radical-induced chain oxidation of low molecular weight sulphydryl-containing molecules in aerated solutions deactivate the sulphydryl-containing enzyme papain, forming both reparable mixed disulphides and non-reparable products. This inactivation is highly efficient for penicillamine and glutathione, but almost negligible with cysteine, which is a protector of papain for [cysteine] / [papain] >= 5 under all conditions used. In the case of glutathione, superoxide dismutase caused only a small reduction in the inactivation and peroxide yields were small, implying that the deactivating species are not .O 2 - but RSOO. radicals or products from them. For penicillamine, however, dimutase was highly effective and the peroxide yields were relatively large, demonstrating that .O 2 - or a radical with similar capabilities for forming H 2 O 2 and being deactivated by dismutase was involved. Although in the presence of dismutase penicillamine is a better protector of non-reparable papain inactivation than glutathione, it suffers from a deficiency in that the papain-penicillamine mixed disulphide, which is always formed, cannot be repaired by spontaneous reaction with RSH molecules. (author)

  5. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  6. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  7. Factors Affecting Bacterial Inactivation during High Hydrostatic Pressure Processing of Foods: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Qamar-Abbas; Buffa, Martin; Guamis, Buenaventura; Saldo, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Although, the High Hydrostatic Pressure (HHP) technology has been gaining gradual popularity in food industry since last two decades, intensive research is needed to explore the missing information. Bacterial inactivation in food by using HHP applications can be enhanced by getting deeper insights of the process. Some of these aspects have been already studied in detail (like pressure, time, and temperature, etc.), while some others still need to be investigated in more details (like pH, rates of compression, and decompression, etc.). Selection of process parameters is mainly dependent on type of matrix and target bacteria. This intensive review provides comprehensive information about the variety of aspects that can determine the bacterial inactivation potential of HHP process indicating the fields of future research on this subject including pH shifts of the pressure treated samples and critical limits of compression and decompression rates to accelerate the process efficacy.

  8. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in fish by-products is inactivated with inorganic acid (pH 1) and base (pH 12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrmel, M; Modahl, I; Nygaard, H; Lie, K M

    2014-04-01

    The aquaculture industry needs a simple, inexpensive and safe method for the treatment of fish waste without heat. Microbial inactivation by inorganic acid (HCl) or base (KOH) was determined using infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) as a model organism for fish pathogens. Salmonella and spores of Clostridium perfringens were general hygiene indicators in supplementary examinations. IPNV, which is considered to be among the most chemical- and heat-resistant fish pathogens, was reduced by more than 3 log in 4 h at pH 1.0 and pH 12.0. Salmonella was rapidly inactivated by the same treatment, whereas spores of C. perfringens were hardly affected. The results indicate that low and high pH treatment could be particularly suitable for fish waste destined for biogas production. pH treatment at aquaculture production sites could reduce the spread of fish pathogens during storage and transportation without disturbing the anaerobic digestion process. The treatment could also be an alternative to the current energy-intensive steam pressure sterilization of fish waste to be used by the bioenergy, fertilizer and soil improver industries. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effect of pre-irradiation on thermal inactivation of B. pumilus E 601 dry spores irradiated with EB and. gamma. -rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yuhei; Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1989-11-01

    The survival fraction of B. pumilus spores irradiated with {gamma} -rays and electron beams in vacuum were increased when the spores were heated or allowed to stand in vacuum for a long time at room temperature. The survival curves of the spores thus treated after irradiation might give apparent radiation sensitivities which were lower than true ones obtained just after irradiation. On the contrary, the radiation sensitivities of the spores irradiated in dry air and then heated or allowed to stand in dry air became high. To elucidate the characteristics of th spores, the effect of heating on the radiation sensitivity of the B. pumilus spores has been studied. By heating the pre-irradiated spores in vacuum, its survival fraction was increased, in other words, the spores inactivated with radiation were recovered. However, the thermal sensitivity of the recovered spores was found to be high compared with that of the original spores. On the other hand, when B. pumilus spores were irradiated in dry air and then heated in dry air, the survival curves of the spores were found to be composed of two exponential curves, suggesting that two kinds of thermal inactivation mechanism existed. From Arrhenius plots of unirradiated B. pumilus spores, the activation energies of the thermal inactivation in the range of 90degC to 120degC in vacuum and in air were found to be about 38 kcal/mol and 29 kcal/mol, respectively. The activation energy of the spores at a temperature of higher than 120degC, however increased to give the same value (about 38 kcal/mol) as found in vacuum. This fact suggests the main mechanism of the thermal inactivation of the spores varies near 120degC. Arrhenius plots of irradiated spores in vacuum was similar to that of unirradiated ones. Thermal inactivation rates of the irradiated spores in the presence of air will also be discussed as compared with those of unirradiated ones. (author).

  10. Inactivation of E. Coli in Water Using Photocatalytic, Nanostructured Films Synthesized by Aerosol Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratim Biswas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 nanostructured films were synthesized by an aerosol chemical vapor deposition (ACVD method with different controlled morphologies: columnar, granular, and branched structures for the photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli in water. Effects of film morphology and external applied voltage on inactivation rate were investigated. As-prepared films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, and UV-VIS. Photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical inactivation of E. coli using as-prepared TiO2 films were performed under irradiation of UVA light (note: UVA has a low efficiency to inactivate E. coli. Inactivation rate constants for each case were obtained from their respective inactivation curve through a 2 h incubation period. Photocatalytic inactivation rate constants of E. coli are 0.02/min (using columnar films, and 0.08/min (using branched films. The inactivation rate constant for the columnar film was enhanced by 330% by applied voltage on the film while that for the branched film was increased only by 30%. Photocatalytic microbial inactivation rate of the columnar and the branched films were also compared taking into account their different surface areas. Since the majority of the UV radiation that reaches the Earth’s surface is UVA, this study provides an opportunity to use sunlight to efficiently decontaminate drinking water.

  11. Stem-Cell Inactivation on Transplantation of Haemopoietic Cell Suspensions from Genetically Different Donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, R. V. [Institute of Biophysics, Ministry of Public Health of the USSR, Moscow, USSR (Russian Federation)

    1969-07-15

    The transplantation of a mixture of haemopoietic or lymphoid cells from two genetically different mice into lethally irradiated F{sub 1} recipients results in marked or total inactivation of the colony-forming units of the graft. This phenomenon is observed following transplantation of mixtures of spleen cells or bone-marrow cells from animals of different genotypes: CBA + C57BL, A + CBA, A + C57BL, C3H + C57BL, CBA + (CBA x C57BL) F{sub 1}. Maximum inactivation is observed when lymph-node cells of one genotype are transplanted with spleen or bone-marrow cells of another genotype. Use of non-syngenic kidney cells or lymphoid cells inactivated by irradiation as one component of the mixture shows that inactivation of genetically heterogeneous stem cells requires the participation of viable lymphoid cells. The inactivation phenomenon is also observed with Jerne's method. This shows that inactivation affects not only colony-forming cells but also the immunologically competent precursors of antibody-producing cells. (author)

  12. Inactivation of influenza A virus H1N1 by disinfection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun Kyo; Bae, Jung Eun; Kim, In Seop

    2010-06-01

    Because any patient, health care worker, or visitor is capable of transmitting influenza to susceptible persons within hospitals, hospital-acquired influenza has been a clinical concern. Disinfection and cleaning of medical equipment, surgical instruments, and hospital environment are important measures to prevent transmission of influenza virus from hospitals to individuals. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of disinfection processes, which can be easily operated at hospitals, in inactivating influenza A virus H1N1 (H1N1). The effects of 0.1 mol/L NaOH, 70% ethanol, 70% 1-propanol, solvent/detergent (S/D) using 0.3% tri (n-butyl)-phosphate and 1.0% Triton X-100, heat, and ethylene oxide (EO) treatments in inactivating H1N1 were determined. Inactivation of H1N1 was kinetically determined by the treatment of disinfectants to virus solution. Also, a surface test method, which involved drying an amount of virus on a surface and then applying the inactivation methods for 1 minute of contact time, was used to determine the virucidal activity. H1N1 was completely inactivated to undetectable levels in 1 minute of 70% ethanol, 70% 1-propanol, and solvent/detergent treatments in the surface tests as well as in the suspension tests. H1N1 was completely inactivated in 1 minute of 0.1 mol/L NaOH treatment in the suspension tests and also effectively inactivated in the surface tests with the log reduction factor of 3.7. H1N1 was inactivated to undetectable levels within 5 minutes, 2.5 minutes, and 1 minute of heat treatment at 70, 80, and 90 degrees C, respectively in the suspension tests. Also, H1N1 was completely inactivated by EO treatment in the surface tests. Common disinfectants, heat, and EO tested in this study were effective at inactivating H1N1. These results would be helpful in implementing effective disinfecting measures to prevent hospital-acquired infections. Copyright 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc

  13. Radionuclides in cigarettes may lead to carcinogenesis via p16INK4a inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prueitt, Robyn L.; Goodman, Julie E.; Valberg, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that tobacco smoke is responsible for the vast majority of lung cancers worldwide. There are many known and suspected carcinogens present in cigarette smoke, including α-emitting radioisotopes. Epidemiologic studies have shown that increased lung cancer risk is associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, and it is estimated that the majority of smoking-induced lung cancers may be at least partly attributable to the inhaled and deposited radiation dose from radioisotopes in the cigarette smoke itself. Recent research shows that silencing of the tumor suppressor gene p16 INK4a (p16) by promoter methylation plays a role in smoking-related lung cancer. Inactivation of p16 has also been associated with lung cancer incidence in radiation-exposed workers, suggesting that radionuclides in cigarette smoke may be acting with other compounds to cause smoking-induced lung cancer. We evaluated the mechanism of ionizing radiation as an accepted cause of lung cancer in terms of its dose from tobacco smoke and silencing of p16. Because both radiation and cigarette smoking are associated with inactivation of p16, and p16 inactivation has been shown to play a major role in carcinogenesis, ionizing radiation from cigarette smoke likely plays a role in lung cancer risk. How large a role it plays, relative to chemical carcinogens and other modes of action, remains to be elucidated

  14. Studies on the inactivation of human parvovirus 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Sally A; Tuke, Philip W; Miyagawa, Eiji; Blümel, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is a novel parvovirus, which like parvovirus B19 (B19V) can be a contaminant of plasma pools used to prepare plasma-derived medicinal products. Inactivation studies of B19V have shown that it is more sensitive to virus inactivation strategies than animal parvoviruses. However, inactivation of PARV4 has not yet been specifically addressed. Treatment of parvoviruses by heat or low-pH conditions causes externalization of the virus genome. Using nuclease treatment combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction, the extent of virus DNA externalization was used as an indirect measure of the inactivation of PARV4, B19V, and minute virus of mice (MVM) by pasteurization of albumin and by low-pH treatment. Infectivity studies were performed in parallel for B19V and MVM. PARV4 showed greater resistance to pasteurization and low-pH treatment than B19V, although PARV4 was not as resistant as MVM. There was a 2- to 3-log reduction of encapsidated PARV4 DNA after pasteurization and low-pH treatment. In contrast, B19V was effectively inactivated while MVM was stable under these conditions. Divalent cations were found to have a stabilizing effect on PARV4 capsids. In the absence of divalent cations, even at neutral pH, there was a reduction of PARV4 titer, an effect not observed for B19V or MVM. In the case of heat treatment and incubation at low pH, PARV4 shows intermediate resistance when compared to B19V and MVM. Divalent cations seem important for stabilizing PARV4 virus particles. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. Relationship between sublethal injury and inactivation of yeast cells by the combination of sorbic acid and pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somolinos, M; García, D; Condón, S; Mañas, P; Pagán, R

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of sublethal injury after the pulsed-electric-field (PEF) treatment of two yeasts, Dekkera bruxellensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the relation of sublethal injury to the inactivating effect of the combination of PEF and sorbic acid. PEF caused sublethal injury in both yeasts: more than 90% of surviving D. bruxellensis cells and 99% of surviving S. cerevisiae cells were sublethally injured after 50 pulses at 12 kV/cm in buffer at pHs of both 7.0 and 4.0. The proportion of sublethally injured cells reached a maximum after 50 pulses at 12.0 kV/cm (S. cerevisiae) or 16.5 kV/cm (D. bruxellensis), and it kept constant or progressively decreased at greater electric field strengths and with longer PEF treatments. Sublethally PEF-injured cells showed sensitivity to the presence of sorbic acid at a concentration of 2,000 ppm. A synergistic inactivating effect of the combination of PEF and sorbic acid was observed. Survivors of the PEF treatment were progressively inactivated in the presence of 2,000 ppm of sorbic acid at pH 3.8, with the combined treatments achieving more than log10 5 cycles of dead cells under the conditions investigated. This study has demonstrated the occurrence of sublethal injury after exposure to PEF, so yeast inactivation by PEF is not an all-or-nothing event. The combination of PEF and sorbic acid has proven to be an effective method to achieve a higher level of yeast inactivation. This work contributes to the knowledge of the mechanism of microbial inactivation by PEF, and it may be useful for improving food preservation by PEF technology.

  16. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection

  17. The Eag domain regulates the voltage-dependent inactivation of rat Eag1 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Eag (Kv10 and Erg (Kv11 belong to two distinct subfamilies of the ether-à-go-go K+ channel family (KCNH. While Erg channels are characterized by an inward-rectifying current-voltage relationship that results from a C-type inactivation, mammalian Eag channels display little or no voltage-dependent inactivation. Although the amino (N-terminal region such as the eag domain is not required for the C-type inactivation of Erg channels, an N-terminal deletion in mouse Eag1 has been shown to produce a voltage-dependent inactivation. To further discern the role of the eag domain in the inactivation of Eag1 channels, we generated N-terminal chimeras between rat Eag (rEag1 and human Erg (hERG1 channels that involved swapping the eag domain alone or the complete cytoplasmic N-terminal region. Functional analyses indicated that introduction of the homologous hERG1 eag domain led to both a fast phase and a slow phase of channel inactivation in the rEag1 chimeras. By contrast, the inactivation features were retained in the reverse hERG1 chimeras. Furthermore, an eag domain-lacking rEag1 deletion mutant also showed the fast phase of inactivation that was notably attenuated upon co-expression with the rEag1 eag domain fragment, but not with the hERG1 eag domain fragment. Additionally, we have identified a point mutation in the S4-S5 linker region of rEag1 that resulted in a similar inactivation phenotype. Biophysical analyses of these mutant constructs suggested that the inactivation gating of rEag1 was distinctly different from that of hERG1. Overall, our findings are consistent with the notion that the eag domain plays a critical role in regulating the inactivation gating of rEag1. We propose that the eag domain may destabilize or mask an inherent voltage-dependent inactivation of rEag1 K+ channels.

  18. Studies on disappearance and inactivation of viruses in sewage, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Kazuyoshi; Yabuuchi, Kiyoshi; Taguchi, Fumiaki.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of inactivating viruses in wastewater were studied. Polio visuses were added to the distilled water until the number of viruses reached 10sup(6.8) TCID 50 /ml, and liquid layer was 2 mm. The inactivation rate of viruses was determined at each time of ultraviolet (U.V.) irradiation (from 0.425 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 to 10.0 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 ). A linear correlation was seen between the inactivation rate of viruses and the time of U.V. irradiation obtained from logarithmic transformation. The irradiation time required for inactivation of 99.9% viruses was 15 sec when U.V. intensity was 10.0 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 and 9.6 min when it was 0.423 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 . When the U.V. intensity was 0.425 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 , the time required for inactivation was dependent on the number of viruses (120 sec in cases of 10sup(3.8) TCID 50 /ml of viruses and 720 sec in cases of 10sup(7.8) TCID 50 /ml of viruses). When viruses were added to the distilled water until the number reached 10sup(5.8) TCID 50 /ml, and the depth of water was designated as 2 mm, 10 cm, and 15 cm, the U.V. permeability was more than 89% at any depth of water, and a sixteen-min U.V. irradiation inactivated more than 99.99% of viruses. When polio viruses were added to triple step-treated water until the number reached 10sup(5.3) TCID 50 /ml, the irradiation time required for inactivation of more than 99.99% was one min when the U.V. intensity was 10.0 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 and 20 min when it was 0.425 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 . (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Improving the gaussian effective potential: quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Thomaz, M.T.; Lemos, N.A.

    1990-08-01

    In order to gain intuition for variational problems in field theory, we analyze variationally the quantum-mechanical anharmonic oscillator [(V(x)sup(k) - sub(2) x sup(2) + sup(λ) - sub(4) λ sup(4)]. Special attention is paid to improvements to the Gaussian effective potential. (author)

  20. Latexin Inactivation Enhances Survival and Long-Term Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Expands the Entire Hematopoietic System in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Natural genetic diversity offers an important yet largely untapped resource to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function. Latexin (Lxn is a negative stem cell regulatory gene identified on the basis of genetic diversity. By using an Lxn knockout mouse model, we found that Lxn inactivation in vivo led to the physiological expansion of the entire hematopoietic hierarchy. Loss of Lxn enhanced the competitive repopulation capacity and survival of HSCs in a cell-intrinsic manner. Gene profiling of Lxn-null HSCs showed altered expression of genes enriched in cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. Thrombospondin 1 (Thbs1 was a potential downstream target with a dramatic downregulation in Lxn-null HSCs. Enforced expression of Thbs1 restored the Lxn inactivation-mediated HSC phenotypes. This study reveals that Lxn plays an important role in the maintenance of homeostatic hematopoiesis, and it may lead to development of safe and effective approaches to manipulate HSCs for clinical benefit. : In this article, Liang and colleagues show that loss of latexin in vivo expands the HSC population and increases their survival and engraftment. Latexin regulates HSC function and hematopoiesis via the Thbs1 signaling pathway. Keywords: latexin, hematopoietic stem cell, repopulating advantage, expansion, survival, thrombospondin 1

  1. Safety, immunogenicity and duration of immunity elicited by an inactivated bovine ephemeral fever vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly Aziz-Boaron

    Full Text Available Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF is an economically important viral vector-borne cattle disease. Several live-attenuated, inactivated and recombinant vaccines have been tested, demonstrating varying efficacy. However, to the best of our knowledge, duration of immunity conferred by an inactivated vaccine has never been reported. In the last decade, Israel has faced an increasing number of BEF outbreaks. The need for an effective vaccine compatible with strains circulating in the Middle East region led to the development of a MONTANIDE™ ISA 206 VG (water-in-oil-in-water, inactivated vaccine based on a local strain. We tested the safety, immunogenicity and duration of immunity conferred by this vaccine. The induced neutralizing antibody (NA response was followed for 493 days in 40 cows vaccinated by different protocols. The vaccine did not cause adverse reactions or a decrease in milk production. All cows [except 2 (6.7% which did not respond to vaccination] showed a significant rise in NA titer of up to 1:256 following the second, third or fourth booster vaccination. Neutralizing antibody levels declined gradually to 1:16 up to 120 days post vaccination. This decline continued in cows vaccinated only twice, whereas cows vaccinated 3 or 4 times showed stable titers of approximately 1:16 for up to 267 days post vaccination. At least three vaccinations with the inactivated BEF vaccine were needed to confer long-lasting immunity. These results may have significant implications for the choice of vaccination protocol with inactivated BEF vaccines. Complementary challenge data should however be added to the above results in order to determine what is the minimal NA response conferring protection from clinical disease.

  2. Inactivation of Escherichia coli in a tropical fruit smoothie by a combination of heat and pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkling-Ribeiro, M; Noci, F; Cronin, D A; Lyng, J G; Morgan, D J

    2008-10-01

    Moderate heat in combination with pulsed electric fields (PEF) was investigated as a potential alternative to thermal pasteurization of a tropical fruit smoothie based on pineapple, banana, and coconut milk, inoculated with Escherichia coli K12. The smoothie was heated from 25 degrees C to either 45 or 55 degrees C over 60 s and subsequently cooled to 10 degrees C. PEF was applied at electric field strengths of 24 and 34 kV/cm with specific energy inputs of 350, 500, and 650 kJ/L. Both processing technologies were combined using heat (45 or 55 degrees C) and the most effective set of PEF conditions. Bacterial inactivation was estimated on standard and NaCl-supplemented tryptone soy agar (TSA) to enumerate sublethally injured cells. By increasing the temperature from 45 to 55 degrees C, a higher reduction in E. coli numbers (1 compared with 1.7 log(10) colony forming units {CFU} per milliliter, P field strength was increased during stand-alone PEF treatment from 24 to 34 kV/cm, a greater number of E. coli cells were inactivated (2.8 compared with 4.2 log(10) CFU/mL, P or = 0.05) achieved by thermal pasteurization (72 degrees C, 15 s). A reversed hurdle processing sequence did not affect bacterial inactivation (P> or = 0.05). No differences were observed (P> or = 0.05) between the bacterial counts estimated on nonselective and selective TSA, suggesting that sublethal cell injury did not occur during single PEF treatments or combined heat/PEF treatments.

  3. Inactivation of bacteria in sewage sludge by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandya, G.A.; Kapila, Smita; Kelkar, V.B.; Negi, Shobha; Modi, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The survival of certain bacterial cultures suspended in sewage sludge and exposed to gamma-radiation was studied. The inactivation patterns of most of the organisms were significantly different when irradiation was performed using sewage samples collected in the summer and monsoon seasons. The summer sample collected from the anaerobic digester afforded significant protection to both Gram negative and Gram positive organisms. This was evident by the increase in dose required to bring about a 6 log cycle reduction in viable count of the bacterial cultures, when suspended in sewage samples instead of phosphate buffer. The observations made using monsoon digester samples were quite different. This sewage sludge greatly enhanced inactivation by gamma-radiation in most cases. The effects of certain chemicals on the inactivation patterns of two organisms - Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexneri - were examined. Arsenate, mercury and lead salts sensitised S. typhi, while barium acetate and sodium sulphide protected this culture against gamma-radiation. In the case of Sh. flexneri, barium acetate and iodacetamide proved to be radioprotectors. The effects of some chemicals on the inactivation pattern of Sh. flexneri cells irradiated in sludge are also discussed. (author)

  4. Advanced Analysis to Distinguish between Physical Decrease and Inactivation of Viable Phages in Aerosol by Quantitating Phage-Specific Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimasaki, Noriko; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Sakakibara, Masaya; Kikuno, Ritsuko; Iizuka, Chiori; Okaue, Akira; Okuda, Shunji; Shinohara, Katsuaki

    2018-01-01

     Recent studies have investigated the efficacy of air-cleaning products against pathogens in the air. A standard method to evaluate the reduction in airborne viruses caused by an air cleaner has been established using a safe bacteriophage instead of pathogenic viruses; the reduction in airborne viruses is determined by counting the number of viable airborne phages by culture, after operating the air cleaner. The reduction in the number of viable airborne phages could be because of "physical decrease" or "inactivation". Therefore, to understand the mechanism of reduction correctly, an analysis is required to distinguish between physical decrease and inactivation. The purpose of this study was to design an analysis to distinguish between the physical decrease and inactivation of viable phi-X174 phages in aerosols. We established a suitable polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system by selecting an appropriate primer-probe set for PCR and validating the sensitivity, linearity, and specificity of the primer-probe set to robustly quantify phi-X174-specific airborne particles. Using this quantitative PCR system and culture assay, we performed a behavior analysis of the phage aerosol in a small chamber (1 m 3 ) at different levels of humidity, as humidity is known to affect the number of viable airborne phages. The results revealed that the reduction in the number of viable airborne phages was caused not only by physical decrease but also by inactivation under particular levels of humidity. Our study could provide an advanced analysis to differentiate between the physical decrease and inactivation of viable airborne phages.

  5. Inactivation of Toluene 2-Monooxygenase in Burkholderia cepacia G4 by Alkynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Chris M.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Arp, Daniel J.; Hyman, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    High concentrations of acetylene (10 to 50% [vol/vol] gas phase) were required to inhibit the growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4 on toluene, while 1% (vol/vol) (gas phase) propyne or 1-butyne completely inhibited growth. Low concentrations of longer-chain alkynes (C5 to C10) were also effective inhibitors of toluene-dependent growth, and 2- and 3-alkynes were more potent inhibitors than their 1-alkyne counterparts. Exposure of toluene-grown B. cepacia G4 to alkynes resulted in the irreversible loss of toluene- and o-cresol-dependent O2 uptake activities, while acetate- and 3-methylcatechol-dependent O2 uptake activities were unaffected. Toluene-dependent O2 uptake decreased upon the addition of 1-butyne in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The loss of activity followed first-order kinetics, with apparent rate constants ranging from 0.25 min−1 to 2.45 min−1. Increasing concentrations of toluene afforded protection from the inhibitory effects of 1-butyne. Furthermore, oxygen, supplied as H2O2, was required for inhibition by 1-butyne. These results suggest that alkynes are specific, mechanism-based inactivators of toluene 2-monooxygenase in B. cepacia G4, although the simplest alkyne, acetylene, was relatively ineffective compared to longer alkynes. Alkene analogs of acetylene and propyne—ethylene and propylene—were not inactivators of toluene 2-monooxygenase activity in B. cepacia G4 but were oxidized to their respective epoxides, with apparent Ks and Vmax values of 39.7 μM and 112.3 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 for ethylene and 32.3 μM and 89.2 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 for propylene. PMID:9925593

  6. A novel method for bacterial inactivation using electrosprayed water nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; McDevitt, James; Yamauchi, Toshiyuki; Demokritou, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This is a study focusing on the potential to deactivate biological agents (bacteria and endospores) using engineered water nanostructures (EWNS). The EWNS were generated using an electrospray device that collects water by condensing atmospheric water vapor on a Peltier-cooled electrode. A high voltage is applied between the collection electrode and a grounded electrode resulting in aerosolization of the condensed water and a constant generation of EWNS. Gram-negative Serratia marcescens, gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillusatrophaeus endospores were placed on stainless steel coupons and exposed to generated EWNS at multiple time intervals. Upon exposures, the bacteria were recovered and placed on nutrient agar to grow, and the colony forming units were counted. Ozone levels as well as air temperature and relative humidity were monitored during the experiments. Qualitative confirmation of bacterial destruction was also obtained by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, important EWNS aerosol properties such as particle number concentration as a function of size as well as the average surface charge of the generated EWNS were measured using real-time instrumentation. It was shown that the novel electrospray method can generate over time a constant flux of EWNS. EWNS have a peak number concentration of ∼8,000 particles per cubic centimeter with a modal peak size around 20 nm. The average surface charge of the generated EWNS was found to be 10 ± 2 electrons per particle. In addition, it was shown that the EWNS have the potential to deactivate both bacteria types from surfaces. At the same administrate dose, however, the endospores were not inactivated. This novel method and the unique properties of the generated EWNS could potentially be used to develop an effective, environmentally friendly, and inexpensive method for bacteria inactivation.

  7. A novel method for bacterial inactivation using electrosprayed water nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios, E-mail: gpyrgiot@hsph.harvard.edu; McDevitt, James [Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology (United States); Yamauchi, Toshiyuki [Panasonic Corporation, Appliances Company (Japan); Demokritou, Philip [Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This is a study focusing on the potential to deactivate biological agents (bacteria and endospores) using engineered water nanostructures (EWNS). The EWNS were generated using an electrospray device that collects water by condensing atmospheric water vapor on a Peltier-cooled electrode. A high voltage is applied between the collection electrode and a grounded electrode resulting in aerosolization of the condensed water and a constant generation of EWNS. Gram-negative Serratia marcescens, gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillusatrophaeus endospores were placed on stainless steel coupons and exposed to generated EWNS at multiple time intervals. Upon exposures, the bacteria were recovered and placed on nutrient agar to grow, and the colony forming units were counted. Ozone levels as well as air temperature and relative humidity were monitored during the experiments. Qualitative confirmation of bacterial destruction was also obtained by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, important EWNS aerosol properties such as particle number concentration as a function of size as well as the average surface charge of the generated EWNS were measured using real-time instrumentation. It was shown that the novel electrospray method can generate over time a constant flux of EWNS. EWNS have a peak number concentration of {approx}8,000 particles per cubic centimeter with a modal peak size around 20 nm. The average surface charge of the generated EWNS was found to be 10 {+-} 2 electrons per particle. In addition, it was shown that the EWNS have the potential to deactivate both bacteria types from surfaces. At the same administrate dose, however, the endospores were not inactivated. This novel method and the unique properties of the generated EWNS could potentially be used to develop an effective, environmentally friendly, and inexpensive method for bacteria inactivation.

  8. Potential mechanisms for cell-based gene therapy to treat HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-02-01

    An estimated 35 million people are infected with HIV worldwide. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has reduced the morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients but efficacy requires strict adherence and the treatment is not curative. Most importantly, the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains and drug toxicity can restrict the long-term therapeutic efficacy in some patients. Therefore, novel treatment strategies that permanently control or eliminate the virus and restore the damaged immune system are required. Gene therapy against HIV infection has been the topic of intense investigations for the last two decades because it can theoretically provide such a durable anti-HIV control. In this review we discuss two major gene therapy strategies to combat HIV. One approach aims to kill HIV-infected cells and the other is based on the protection of cells from HIV infection. We discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms for candidate approaches to permanently block HIV infection, including the latest strategies and future therapeutic applications. Hematopoietic stem cell-based gene therapy for HIV/AIDS may eventually become an alternative for standard ART and should ideally provide a functional cure in which the virus is durably controlled without medication. Recent results from preclinical research and early-stage clinical trials support the feasibility and safety of this novel strategy.

  9. Use of In Situ-Generated Dimethyldioxirane for Inactivation of Biological Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, William H; Bushway, Karen E; Miller, Susan D; Delcomyn, Carrie A; Renard, Jean J; Henley, Michael V

    2005-01-01

    ...) at neutral pH, was investigated for inactivation of biological warfare agent simulants. The DMDO solution inactivated bacterial spores, fungal spores, vegetative bacterial cells, viruses, and protein by 7 orders of magnitude in less than 10 min...

  10. Method of inactivating reproducible forms of mycoplasma in biological preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veber, P.; Jurmanova, K.; Lesko, J.; Hana, L.; Veber, V.

    1978-01-01

    Inactivation of mycoplasms in biological materials was achieved using gamma radiation with a dose rate of 1x10 4 to 5x10 6 rads/h for 1 to 250 hours. The technique is advantageous for allowing the inactivation of the final form of products (tablets, vaccines, etc.). (J.P.)

  11. Dihydroartemisinin Accentuates the Anti-Tumor Effects of Photodynamic Therapy via Inactivation of NF-κB in Eca109 and Ec9706 Esophageal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jing Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a new treatment for esophageal cancer which has been shown to be effective in the elimination of tumor. However, PDT could induce the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB in many photosensitizers based PDT, which plays a negative role in PDT. In addition, our previous results have shown that dihydroartemisinin (DHA, which was the most potent one of artemisinin derivatives, has anticancer activity in esophageal cancer cells. Methods: Cell viability was determined by MTT analysis, and apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Nuclear extract was obtained for determining NF-κB DNA-binding activity, while total protein extract obtained for downstream gene expression by western blot. Results: We demonstrated DHA enhanced PDT-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in both human esophageal cancer cell lines Eca109 and Ec9706 in vitro. The mechanism was at least partially due to DHA deactivated PDT-induced NF-κB activation, so as to decrease tremendously the expression of its target gene Bcl-2. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that DHA augments PDT-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in esophageal cancer cells, and that inactivation of NF-κB activity is a potential mechanism by which DHA sensitizes esophageal cancer cells to PDT-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis.

  12. Antigenic characterization of a formalin-inactivated poliovirus vaccine derived from live-attenuated Sabin strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tano, Yoshio; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Martin, Javier; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Simizu, Bunsiti; Miyamura, Tatsuo

    2007-10-10

    A candidate inactivated poliovirus vaccine derived from live-attenuated Sabin strains (sIPV), which are used in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), was prepared in a large-production scale. The modification of viral antigenic epitopes during the formalin inactivation process was investigated by capture ELISA assays using type-specific and antigenic site-specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). The major antigenic site 1 was modified during the formalin inactivation of Sabin 1. Antigenic sites 1-3 were slightly modified during the formalin inactivation of Sabin 2 strain. Sites 1 and 3 were altered on inactivated Sabin 3 virus. These alterations were different to those shown by wild-type Saukett strain, used in conventional IPV (cIPV). It has been previously reported that type 1 sIPV showed higher immunogenicity to type 1 cIPV whereas types 2 and 3 sIPV induced lower level of immunogenicity than their cIPV counterparts. Our results suggest that the differences in epitope structure after formalin inactivation may account, at least in part, for the observed differences in immunogenicity between Sabin and wild-type inactivated poliovaccines.

  13. Chlorine inactivation of fungal spores on cereal grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S; Pardoel, D; Harun, A; Treloar, T

    1997-04-01

    Although 0.4% chlorine for 2 min has been recommended for surface disinfection of food samples before direct plating for fungal enumeration, this procedure may not be adequate for highly contaminated products. The effectiveness of a range of chlorine solutions was investigated using barley samples artificially contaminated with four different concentrations of Aspergillus flavus. A. niger, A. ochraceus, Eurotium repens, Penicillium brevicompactum P. chrysogenum and Cladosporium cladosporioides. At initial contamination levels greater than 10(4)/g, 0.4% chlorine did not inactivate sufficient spores to produce less than 20% contamination. Of the test fungi, ascospores of E. repens were the most resistant to chlorine inactivation, whereas the conidia of C. cladosporioides were the most sensitive. Rinsing the samples with 70% ethanol improved the effectiveness of the recommended surface disinfection procedure. However, some ethanol appears to permeate into the grains and may inactivate sensitive internal fungi, although a minimal effect only was observed on wheat infected with Alternaria.

  14. Inactivation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) by ferryl derivatives of human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Puchała, Mieczysław; Wesołowska, Katarzyna; Serafin, Eligiusz

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, inactivation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) by products of reactions of H2O2 with metHb has been studied. Inactivation of the enzyme was studied in two systems corresponding to two kinetic stages of the reaction. In the first system H2O2 was added to the mixture of metHb and ADH [the (metHb+ADH)+H2O2] system (ADH was present in the system since the moment of addition of H2O2 i. e. since the very beginning of the reaction of metHb with H2O2). In the second system ADH was added to the system 5 min after the initiation of the reaction of H2O2 with metHb [the (metHb+H2O2)5 min+ADH] system. In the first case all the products of reaction of H2O2 with metHb (non-peroxyl and peroxyl radicals and non-radical products, viz. hydroperoxides and *HbFe(IV)=O) could react with the enzyme causing its inactivation. In the second system, enzyme reacted almost exclusively with non-radical products (though a small contribution of reactions with peroxyl radicals cannot be excluded). ADH inactivation was observed in both system. Hydrogen peroxide alone did not inactivate ADH at the concentrations employed evidencing that enzyme inactivation was due exclusively to products of reaction of H2O2 with metHb. The rate and extent of ADH inactivation were much higher in the first than in the second system. The dependence of ADH activity on the time of incubation with ferryl derivatives of Hb can be described by a sum of three exponentials in the first system and two exponentials in the second system. Reactions of appropriate forms of the ferryl derivatives of hemoglobin have been tentatively ascribed to these exponentials. The extent of the enzyme inactivation in the second system was dependent on the proton concentration, being at the highest at pH 7.4 and negligible at pH 6.0. The reaction of H2O2 with metHb resulted in the formation of cross-links of Hb subunits (dimers and trimers). The amount of the dimers formed was much lower in the first system i. e. when the radical

  15. Inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives. II. Physical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, B.; Wiebe, M.E.; Lippin, A.; Vandersande, J.; Stryker, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives was evaluated by addition of marker viruses (VSV, Sindbis, Sendai, EMC) to anti-hemophilic factor (AHF) concentrates. The rate of virus inactivation at 60 degrees C was decreased by at least 100- to 700-fold by inclusion of 2.75 M glycine and 50 percent sucrose, or 3.0 M potassium citrate, additives which contribute to retention of protein biologic activity. Nonetheless, at least 10(4) infectious units of each virus was inactivated within 10 hours. Increasing the temperature from 60 to 70 or 80 degrees C caused a 90 percent or greater loss in AHF activity. An even greater decline in the rate of virus inactivation was observed on heating AHF in the lyophilized state, although no loss in AHF activity was observed after 72 hours of heating at 60 degrees C. Several of the proteins present in lyophilized AHF concentrates displayed an altered electrophoretic mobility as a result of exposure to 60 degrees C for 24 hours. Exposure of lyophilized AHF to irradiation from a cobalt 60 source resulted in an acceptable yield of AHF at 1.0, but not at 2.0, megarads. At 1 megarad, greater than or equal to 6.0 logs of VSV and 3.3 logs of Sindbis virus were inactivated

  16. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-01-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as · OH and ONOO - . In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  17. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra, E-mail: olakow@biol.uni.lodz.p [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Serafin, Eligiusz, E-mail: serafin@biol.uni.lodz.p [Laboratory of Computer and Analytical Techniques, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Puchala, Mieczyslaw, E-mail: puchala@biol.uni.lodz.p [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as {sup {center_dot}}OH and ONOO{sup -}. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  18. Crystal structure of lactose permease in complex with an affinity inactivator yields unique insight into sugar recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaptal, Vincent; Kwon, Seunghyug; Sawaya, Michael R.; Guan, Lan; Kaback, H. Ronald; Abramson, Jeff (UCLA); (TTU)

    2011-08-29

    Lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY) with a single-Cys residue in place of A122 (helix IV) transports galactopyranosides and is specifically inactivated by methanethiosulfonyl-galactopyranosides (MTS-gal), which behave as unique suicide substrates. In order to study the mechanism of inactivation more precisely, we solved the structure of single-Cys122 LacY in complex with covalently bound MTS-gal. This structure exhibits an inward-facing conformation similar to that observed previously with a slight narrowing of the cytoplasmic cavity. MTS-gal is bound covalently, forming a disulfide bond with C122 and positioned between R144 and W151. E269, a residue essential for binding, coordinates the C-4 hydroxyl of the galactopyranoside moiety. The location of the sugar is in accord with many biochemical studies.

  19. Students' Conceptual Difficulties in Quantum Mechanics: Potential Well Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Ozgur; Didis, Nilufer; Tasar, Mehmet Fatih

    2009-01-01

    In this study, students' conceptual difficulties about some basic concepts in quantum mechanics like one-dimensional potential well problems and probability density of tunneling particles were identified. For this aim, a multiple choice instrument named Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Test has been developed by one of the researchers of this study…

  20. Inactivation of catalase by free radicals derived from oxygen via gamma radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhaire, J.P.; Gardes-Albert, M.; Ferradini, C.; Sabourault, D.; Ribiere, C.

    1991-01-01

    The inactivation of catalase (10 -5 mol/l) by OH· or OH·/O 2 - · free radicals, at pH 7.4, has been investigated using γ radiolysis with doses up to 9000 Gy. Maxima initial G-values of catalase inactivation have been determined. These values are inferior to those of the free radicals OH· and O 2 - · produced by water radiolysis. Nevertheless, the presence of O 2 /O 2 - · enhances the inactivation due to OH· radicals. The general shape of the inactivation curves as a function of the radiation dose is biphasic: an initial rapid phase (from 0 to ∼ 500 Gy) followed by a slow phase (from ∼ 500 to 9000 Gy). The addition of H 2 O 2 at the beginning of irradiation decreases the inactivation yield by OH· radicals. This phenomenon could be due to the formation of compound-I (catalase-H 2 O 2 ) which would be less sensitive towards OH· radicals than catalase. In the presence of 0.1 mol/l ethanol, catalase (5 x 10 -6 mol/l) is not inactived by O 2 - · and RO 2 · (from ethanol) radicals for an irradiation dose of 2000 Gy, implying a complete protecting effect by ethanol [fr

  1. A review of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins removal/inactivation in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Judy A; Szlag, David C; Southwell, Benjamin J; Sinclair, James

    2010-07-01

    This review focuses on the efficiency of different water treatment processes for the removal of cyanotoxins from potable water. Although several investigators have studied full-scale drinking water processes to determine the efficiency of cyanotoxin inactivation, many of the studies were based on ancillary practice. In this context, "ancillary practice" refers to the removal or inactivation of cyanotoxins by standard daily operational procedures and without a contingency operational plan utilizing specific treatment barriers. In this review, "auxiliary practice" refers to the implementation of inactivation/removal treatment barriers or operational changes explicitly designed to minimize risk from toxin-forming algae and their toxins to make potable water. Furthermore, the best drinking water treatment practices are based on extension of the multibarrier approach to remove cyanotoxins from water. Cyanotoxins are considered natural contaminants that occur worldwide and specific classes of cyanotoxins have shown regional prevalence. For example, freshwaters in the Americas often show high concentrations of microcystin, anatoxin-a, and cylindrospermopsin, whereas Australian water sources often show high concentrations of microcystin, cylindrospermopsin, and saxitoxins. Other less frequently reported cyanotoxins include lyngbyatoxin A, debromoaplysiatoxin, and beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine. This review focuses on the commonly used unit processes and treatment trains to reduce the toxicity of four classes of cyanotoxins: the microcystins, cylindrospermopsin, anatoxin-a, and saxitoxins. The goal of this review is to inform the reader of how each unit process participates in a treatment train and how an auxiliary multibarrier approach to water treatment can provide safer water for the consumer.

  2. Bioburden assessment and gamma radiation inactivation patterns in parchment documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, Inês; Mesquita, Nuno; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Carolino, Maria Manuela; Portugal, António; Botelho, Maria Luísa

    2013-01-01

    Parchment documents are part of our cultural heritage and, as historical artifacts that they are, should be preserved. The aim of this study was to validate an appropriate methodology to characterize the bioburden of parchment documents, and to assess the growth and gamma radiation inactivation patterns of the microbiota present in that material. Another goal was to estimate the minimum gamma radiation dose (D min ) to be applied for the decontamination of parchment as an alternative treatment to the current toxic chemical and non-chemical decontamination methods. Two bioburden assessment methodologies were evaluated: the Swab Method (SM) and the Destructive Method (DM). The recovery efficiency of each method was estimated by artificial contamination, using a Cladosporium cladosporioides spore suspension. The parchment samples' microbiota was typified using morphological methods and the fungal isolates were identified by ITS-DNA sequencing. The inactivation pattern was assessed using the DM after exposure to different gamma radiation doses, and using C. cladosporioides as reference. Based on the applied methodology, parchment samples presented bioburden values lower than 5×10 3 CFU/cm 2 for total microbiota, and lower than 10 CFU/cm 2 for fungal propagules. The results suggest no evident inactivation trend for the natural parchment microbiota, especially regarding the fungal community. A minimum gamma radiation dose (D min ) of 5 kGy is proposed for the decontamination treatment of parchment. Determining the minimal decontamination dose in parchment is essential for a correct application of gamma radiation as an alternative decontamination treatment for this type of documents avoiding the toxicity and the degradation promoted by the traditional chemical and non-chemical treatments. - Highlights: • Characterization of the microbial population of parchment documents. • Study the inactivation pattern of parchment microbiota by gamma radiation. • Assessment of

  3. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus in Human Milk Are Inactivated by Holder Pasteurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton Spence, Erin; Huff, Monica; Shattuck, Karen; Vickers, Amy; Yun, Nadezda; Paessler, Slobodan

    2017-05-01

    Potential donors of human milk are screened for Ebola virus (EBOV) using standard questions, but testing for EBOV and Marburg virus (MARV) is not part of routine serological testing performed by milk banks. Research aim: This study tested the hypothesis that EBOV would be inactivated in donor human milk (DHM) by standard pasteurization techniques (Holder) used in all North American nonprofit milk banks. Milk samples were obtained from a nonprofit milk bank. They were inoculated with EBOV (Zaire strain) and MARV (Angola strain) and processed by standard Holder pasteurization technique. Plaque assays for EBOV and MARV were performed to detect the presence of virus after pasteurization. Neither EBOV nor MARV was detectable by viral plaque assay in DHM or culture media samples, which were pasteurized by the Holder process. EBOV and MARV are safely inactivated in human milk by standard Holder pasteurization technique. Screening for EBOV or MARV beyond questionnaire and self-deferral is not needed to ensure safety of DHM for high-risk infants.

  4. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2.) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. PMID:26225731

  5. Experimental induction of chicken amyloid A amyloidosis in white layer chickens by inoculation with inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Wazir Ahmad; Hirai, Takuya; Niazmand, Mohammad Hakim; Okumura, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the amyloidogenic potential of inactivated vaccines and the localized production of serum amyloid A (SAA) at the injection site in white layer chickens. Hens in the treated group were injected intramuscularly three times with high doses of inactivated oil-emulsion Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine and multivalent viral and bacterial inactivated oil-emulsion vaccines at two-week intervals. Chickens in the control group did not receive any inoculum. In the treated group, emaciation and granulomas were present, while several chickens died between 4 and 6 weeks after the first injection. Hepatomegaly was seen at necropsy, and the liver parenchyma showed inconsistent discolouration with patchy green to yellowish-brown areas, or sometimes red-brown areas with haemorrhage. Amyloid deposition in the liver, spleen, duodenum, and at injection sites was demonstrated using haematoxylin and eosin staining, Congo red, and immunohistochemistry. The incidence of chicken amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis was 47% (28 of 60) in the treated group. In addition, RT-PCR was used to identify chicken SAA mRNA expression in the liver and at the injection sites. Furthermore, SAA mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in fibroblasts at the injection sites, and also in hepatocytes. We believe that this is the first report of the experimental induction of systemic AA amyloidosis in white layer chickens following repeated inoculation with inactivated vaccines without the administration of amyloid fibrils or other amyloid-enhancing factors.

  6. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics and higher excited states of a non-polynomial potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drigo Filho, E.; Ricotta, R.M.

    1989-03-01

    Supersymmetric quantum mechanics is used to evaluate new excited states of a non-polynomial potential. This illustrates a method of evaluating higher excited states of quantum mechanical potentials. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  7. Inactivation of bacteria in sewage sludge by ionizing radiation, heat, and thermoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandon, J.R.; Langley, S.L.

    1976-01-01

    For purposes of animal feeding or fertilizer usage on edible crops, sewage sludge must be free of pathogenic organisms. Bacterial inactivation by a combination of heat and irradiation is shown to be effective. These results must be viewed in conjunction with those from studies of parasite egg inactivation, virus inactivation, and physical-chemical benefits in order to make a fair assessment of the value of the thermoradiation treatment compared to other possible sludge treatment processes

  8. Lack of immune potentiation by complexing HBsAg in a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine with antibody in hepatitis B immunoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelie, P. N.; van Amelsfoort, P. J.; Martine de Groot, C. S.; Bakker, E.; Schaasberg, W.; Niessen, J. C.; Reesink, H. W.

    1989-01-01

    In a randomized, dose-response study among 305 health care workers, we examined whether the immunogenicity of a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine could be enhanced when HBsAg was complexed by anti-HBs contained in hepatitis B immunoglobulin either at equivalent proportions or at 10-fold antigen

  9. Cytogenetic and molecular studies on a recombinant human X chromosome: implications for the spreading of X chromosome inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohandas, T.; Geller, R.L.; Yen, P.H.; Rosendorff, J.; Bernstein, R.; Yoshida, A.; Shapiro, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    A pericentric inversion of human X chromosome and a recombinant X chromosome [rec(X)] derived from crossing-over within the inversion was identified in a family. The rec(X) had a duplication of the segment Xq26.3 → Xqter and a deletion of Xp22.3 → Xpter and was interpreted to be Xqter → Xq26.3::Xp22.3 → Xqter. To characterize the rec(X) chromosome, dosage blots were done on genomic DNA from carriers of this rearranged X chromosome using a number of X chromosome probes. Results showed that anonymous sequences from the distal end of the long arm to which probes 4D8, Hx120A, DX13, and St14 bind as well as the locus for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) wee duplicated on the rec(X). Mouse-human cell hybrids were constructed that retained the rec(X) in the active or inactive state. Analyses of these hybrid clones for markers from the distal short arm of the X chromosome showed that the rec(X) retained the loci for steroid sulfatase (STS) and the cell surface antigen 12E7 (MIC2); but not the pseudoautosomal sequence 113D. These molecular studies confirm that the rec(X) is a duplication-deficiency chromosome as expected. In the inactive state in cell hybrids, STS and MIC2 (which usually escape X chromosome inactivation) were expressed from the rec(X), whereas G6PD was not. Therefore, in the rec(X) X chromosome inactivation has spread through STS and MIC2 leaving these loci unaffected and has inactivated G6PD in the absence of an inactivation center in the q26.3 → qter region of the human X chromosome. The mechanism of spreading of inactivation appears to operate in a sequence-specific fashion. Alternatively, STS and MIC2 may have undergone inactivation initially but could not be maintained in an inactive state

  10. Virus inactivation studies using ion beams, electron and gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolko, Eduardo E. [Laboratorio de Polimeros, Grupo Aplicaciones Industriales, Unidad de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Agropecuarias, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Pbro. Juan Gonzalez y Aragon 15, C.P. B1802AYA Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: smolko@cae.cnea.gov.ar; Lombardo, Jorge H. [Biotech S.A., C.P. 1754 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2005-07-01

    Known methods of virus inactivation are based on the chemical action of some substances such as acetylethylenimine, betapropiolactone, glycidalaldehyde, formaldehyde, etc. In such a process, the viral suspension should be kept at room or higher temperatures for 24-48 h. Under these conditions, physical and chemical agents act to degrade the virus antigenic proteins. On the contrary with ionizing radiations at low temperatures, the treatment does not cause such degradation allowing the study of different viral functions. In this work, particle ({alpha}, d and ss) and {gamma} irradiations were used for partial and total inactivation of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV), Rauscher Leukemia Virus (RLV) and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV). Obtention of the D{sub 37} dose from survival curves and the application of the target theory, permitted the determination of molecular weight of the nucleic acid genomes, EBR values and useful information for vaccine preparation. For RLV virus, a two target model of the RNA genome was deduced in accordance with biological information while from data from the literature and our own work on the structure of the scrapie prion, considering the molecular weight obtained by application of the theory, a new model for prion replication is presented, based on a trimer molecule.

  11. Virus inactivation studies using ion beams, electron and gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolko, Eduardo E.; Lombardo, Jorge H.

    2005-01-01

    Known methods of virus inactivation are based on the chemical action of some substances such as acetylethylenimine, betapropiolactone, glycidalaldehyde, formaldehyde, etc. In such a process, the viral suspension should be kept at room or higher temperatures for 24-48 h. Under these conditions, physical and chemical agents act to degrade the virus antigenic proteins. On the contrary with ionizing radiations at low temperatures, the treatment does not cause such degradation allowing the study of different viral functions. In this work, particle (α, d and ss) and γ irradiations were used for partial and total inactivation of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV), Rauscher Leukemia Virus (RLV) and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV). Obtention of the D 37 dose from survival curves and the application of the target theory, permitted the determination of molecular weight of the nucleic acid genomes, EBR values and useful information for vaccine preparation. For RLV virus, a two target model of the RNA genome was deduced in accordance with biological information while from data from the literature and our own work on the structure of the scrapie prion, considering the molecular weight obtained by application of the theory, a new model for prion replication is presented, based on a trimer molecule

  12. Pharmaceutical Approaches to Target Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Domenico; Spanò, Virginia; Parrino, Barbara; Carbone, Anna; Montalbano, Alessandra; Barraja, Paola; Diana, Patrizia; Cirrincione, Girolamo; Cascioferro, Stella

    2017-10-26

    There is urgent need for new therapeutic strategies to fight the global threat of antibiotic resistance. The focus of this Perspective is on chemical agents that target the most common mechanisms of antibiotic resistance such as enzymatic inactivation of antibiotics, changes in cell permeability, and induction/activation of efflux pumps. Here we assess the current landscape and challenges in the treatment of antibiotic resistance mechanisms at both bacterial cell and community levels. We also discuss the potential clinical application of chemical inhibitors of antibiotic resistance mechanisms as add-on treatments for serious drug-resistant infections. Enzymatic inhibitors, such as the derivatives of the β-lactamase inhibitor avibactam, are closer to the clinic than other molecules. For example, MK-7655, in combination with imipenem, is in clinical development for the treatment of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are difficult to treat. In addition, other molecules targeting multidrug-resistance mechanisms, such as efflux pumps, are under development and hold promise for the treatment of multidrug resistant infections.

  13. Towards a mechanism-based approach to pain diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The last few decades have witnessed a huge leap forward in our understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings of pain, both in normal states where it helps protect from injury, and in pathological states where pain evolves from a symptom reflecting tissue injury to become the disease itself. However, despite these scientific advances, chronic pain remains extremely challenging to manage clinically. While the number of potential treatment targets has grown substantially and a strong case has been made for a mechanism-based and individualized approach to pain therapy, arguably clinicians are not much more advanced now than 20 years ago, in their capacity to either diagnose or effectively treat their patients. The gulf between pain research and pain management is as wide as ever. We are still currently unable to apply an evidence-based approach to chronic pain management that reflects mechanistic understanding, and instead, clinical practice remains an empirical and often unsatisfactory journey for patients, whose individual response to treatment cannot be predicted. Here we take a common and difficult to treat pain condition, chronic low back pain, and use its presentation in clinical practice as a framework to highlight what is known about pathophysiological pain mechanisms and how we could potentially detect these to drive rational treatment choice. We discuss how present methods of assessment and management still fall well short, however, of any mechanism-based or precision-medicine approach. Nevertheless, substantial improvements in chronic pain management could be possible if a more strategic and coordinated approach were to evolve, one designed to identify the specific mechanisms driving the presenting pain phenotype. We present an analysis of such an approach, highlighting the major problems in identifying mechanisms in patients, and develop a framework for a pain diagnostic ladder that may prove useful in the future, consisting of successive identification of

  14. Damage mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria in drinking water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at elucidating the inactivation mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria in drinking water during chlorine and solar disinfection using a simple plating method. The well-known bacterial model Escherichia coli was used as pathogenic bacteria for the experiments. The damage mechanisms of E. coli were ...

  15. [Inactivating Effect of Heat-Denatured Lysozyme on Murine Norovirus in Bread Fillings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Michiko; Yasuda, Yuka; Takahashi, Hajime; Takeuchi, Akira; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the viability of murine norovirus strain 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate for human norovirus, in bread fillings used for making stuffed buns and pastries. The inactivating effect of heat-denatured lysozyme, which was recently reported to have an antiviral effect, on MNV-1 contaminating the bread fillings was also examined. MNV-1 was inoculated into two types of fillings (chocolate cream, marmalade jam) at 4.5 log PFU/g, and the bread fillings were stored at 4℃ for 5 days. MNV-1 remained viable in the bread fillings during storage. However, addition of 1% heat-denatured lysozyme to the fillings resulted in a decrease of MNV-1 infectivity immediately after inoculation, in both fillings. On the fifth day of storage, MNV-1 infectivity was decreased by 1.2 log PFU/g in chocolate cream and by 0.9 log PFU/g in marmalade jam. Although the mechanism underlying the anti-norovirus effect of heat-denatured lysozyme has not been clarified, our results suggest that heat-denatured lysozyme can be used as an inactivating agent against norovirus in bread fillings.

  16. Urease from Helicobacter pylori is inactivated by sulforaphane and other isothiocyanates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Jed W.; Stephenson, Katherine K.; Wade, Kristina L.; Talalay, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Infections by Helicobacter pylori are very common, causing gastroduodenal inflammation including peptic ulcers, and increasing the risk of gastric neoplasia. The isothiocyanate (ITC) sulforaphane [SF; 1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)butane] derived from edible crucifers such as broccoli is potently bactericidal against Helicobacter, including antibiotic-resistant strains, suggesting a possible dietary therapy. Gastric H. pylori infections express high urease activity which generates ammonia, neutralizes gastric acidity, and promotes inflammation. The finding that SF inhibits (inactivates) urease (jack bean and Helicobacter) raised the issue of whether these properties might be functionally related. The rates of inactivation of urease activity depend on enzyme and SF concentrations and show first order kinetics. Treatment with SF results in time-dependent increases in the ultraviolet absorption of partially purified Helicobacter urease in the 280–340 nm region. This provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of dithiocarbamates between the ITC group of SF and cysteine thiols of urease. The potencies of inactivation of Helicobacter urease by isothiocyanates structurally related to SF were surprisingly variable. Natural isothiocyanates closely related to SF, previously shown to be bactericidal (berteroin, hirsutin, phenethyl isothiocyanate, alyssin, and erucin), did not inactivate urease activity. Furthermore, SF is bactericidal against both urease positive and negative H. pylori strains. In contrast, some isothiocyanates such as benzoyl-ITC, are very potent urease inactivators, but are not bactericidal. The bactericidal effects of SF and other ITC against Helicobacter are therefore not obligatorily linked to urease inactivation, but may reduce the inflammatory component of Helicobacter infections. PMID:23583386

  17. Thermal inactivation profiles of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in lamb skeletal muscle homogenate fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Richard J; Waldron, Anna; Warne, Darian

    2010-01-31

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease in livestock and there is a debate about its role in humans in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders such as Crohn's disease, but the relationship remains unproven. Nevertheless livestock health authorities in many countries aim to lower the prevalence of this infection to reduce potential contamination of the human food supply. MAP may occur in bovine milk and data on thermal inactivation suggest pasteurisation is an effective process. Recently MAP has been identified in skeletal muscle of cattle and sheep but there are no data on its thermal inactivation in these substrates. In this study the inactivation of MAP was studied in a fluid homogenate of lamb skeletal muscle at temperatures previously identified as being relevant to cooking processes applied by domestic consumers. A PCR thermocycler was used to ensure accurate temperatures and rapid heat exchange, while radiometric culture was used to ensure sensitive detection of viable MAP for determination of D and z values. Among the two predominant strains of MAP, S and C, D(55) ranged from 56 to 89 min, D(60) was 8 to 11 min, D(65) was 26 to 35s while D(70) was 1.5 to 1.8s. Values for z were 4.21C degrees for the S strain and 4.51C degrees for the C strain. At temperatures of 65-70 degrees C, MAP appeared to be less heat tolerant in skeletal muscle fluid than in previous reports using milk as the medium. The total thermal exposure of MAP during baking of a sample of 16 leg-of-lamb roasts in domestic ovens was determined to result in more than 20 log reductions in most cases, that is the product was microbiologically safe. Based on the models used in this study, there is a low probability of survival of MAP provided that red meat is cooked to recommended standards. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Knowledge base mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwa, M; Furukawa, K; Makinouchi, A; Mizoguchi, T; Mizoguchi, F; Yamasaki, H

    1982-01-01

    One of the principal goals of the Fifth Generation Computer System Project for the coming decade is to develop a methodology for building knowledge information processing systems which will provide people with intelligent agents. The key notion of the fifth generation computer system is knowledge used for problem solving. In this paper the authors describe the plan of Randd on knowledge base mechanisms. A knowledge representation system is to be designed to support knowledge acquisition for the knowledge information processing systems. The system will include a knowledge representation language, a knowledge base editor and a debugger. It is also expected to perform as a kind of meta-inference system. In order to develop the large scale knowledge base systems, a knowledge base mechanism based on the relational model is to be studied in the earlier stage of the project. Distributed problem solving is also one of the main issues of the project. 19 references.

  19. Effects of High Pressure on Bacillus licheniformis Spore Germination and Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borch-Pedersen, Kristina; Mellegård, Hilde; Reineke, Kai; Boysen, Preben; Sevenich, Robert; Lindbäck, Toril; Aspholm, Marina

    2017-07-15

    food-processing technology used to eliminate microbes from food. The application of this technology for spore eradication in the food industry requires a better understanding of how HP affects the spores of different bacterial species. The present study provides novel insights into how HP affects Bacillus licheniformis spores, a species associated with food spoilage and occasionally food poisoning. We describe the roles of different g